WorldWideScience

Sample records for extreme ultraviolet explorer

  1. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  2. Telescience - Concepts and contributions to the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Will; Dobson, Carl; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Malina, Roger F.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how the contradictory goals of low-cost and fast data turnaround characterizing the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mission can be achieved via the early use of telescience style transparent tools and simulations. The use of transparent tools reduces the parallel development of capability while ensuring that valuable prelaunch experience is not lost in the operations phase. Efforts made to upgrade the 'EUVE electronics' simulator are described.

  3. Plans for the extreme ultraviolet explorer data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Dobson, Carl A.; Malina, Roger F.; Bowyer, Stuart

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents an approach for storage and fast access to data that will be obtained by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), a satellite payload scheduled for launch in 1991. The EUVE telescopes will be operated remotely from the EUVE Science Operation Center (SOC) located at the University of California, Berkeley. The EUVE science payload consists of three scanning telescope carrying out an all-sky survey in the 80-800 A spectral region and a Deep Survey/Spectrometer telescope performing a deep survey in the 80-250 A spectral region. Guest Observers will remotely access the EUVE spectrometer database at the SOC. The EUVE database will consist of about 2 X 10 to the 10th bytes of information in a very compact form, very similar to the raw telemetry data. A history file will be built concurrently giving telescope parameters, command history, attitude summaries, engineering summaries, anomalous events, and ephemeris summaries.

  4. Preliminary GPS orbit determination results for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Kenn; Bertiger, Willy; Wu, Sien; Yunck, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A single-frequency Motorola Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver was launched with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission in June 1992. The receiver utilizes dual GPS antennas placed on opposite sides of the satellite to obtain full GPS coverage as it rotates during its primary scanning mission. A data set from this GPS experiment has been processed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with the GIPSY-OASIS 2 software package. The single-frequency, dual antenna approach and the low altitude (approximately 500 km) orbit of the satellite create special problems for the GPS orbit determination analysis. The low orbit implies that the dynamics of the spacecraft will be difficult to model, and that atmospheric drag will be an important error source. A reduced-dynamic solution technique was investigated in which ad hoc accelerations were estimated at each time step to absorb dynamic model error. In addition, a single-frequency ionospheric correction was investigated, and a cycle-slip detector was written. Orbit accuracy is currently better than 5 m. Further optimization should improve this to about 1 m.

  5. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in extreme ultra-violet induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Nijdam, S; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    We measured the electron density in an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The measured electron density just after the EUV pulse is 2.6 × 10 16  m −3 . This is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction from photo-ionization, which yields a density of 4.5 × 10 16  m −3 . After the EUV pulse the density slightly increases due to electron impact ionization. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds. (fast track communication)

  6. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y.

    1998-01-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed

  7. Adaptive multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayraktar, Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the development of a new class of optical components to enhance the imaging performance by enabling adaptations of the optics. When used at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths, such ‘adaptive optics’ offers the potential to achieve the highest spatial resolution in

  8. Extreme Ultraviolet Imager –“ Compact

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Just how far can one shrink an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imager??? — Can it shrink it to a CubeSat/Small-Sat form-factor???  Or perhaps more to the point… Can one...

  9. Electrostatic mask protection for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, R.; Heerens, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Electrostatic protection of mask for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) was discussed. Both charged and neutral particles could be prevented from moving towards the mask by choosing a nonuniform electrical field. Benefits of electrostatic protection are that it does not affect the EUV beam and

  10. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    irradiance camera (STI-Cam) and also be used investigating real-time space weather effects and deriving more detailed correction procedures for the evaluation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals. Progress in physics goes with achieving higher accuracy in measurements. This review historically guides the reader on the ways of exploring the impact of the variable solar radiation in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region on our upper atmosphere in the altitude regime from 80 to 1000 km.

  11. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chang [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  12. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10 7 and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet observations of coronal holes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, J.D.; Sheeley, N.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet Skylab and ground-based solar magnetic field data have been combined to study the origin and evolution of coronal holes. It is shown that holes exist only within the large-scale unipolar magnetic cells into which the solar surface is divided at any given time. A well-defined boundary zone usually exists between the edge of a hole and the neutral line which marks the edge of its magnetic cell. This boundary zone is the region across which a cell is connected by magnetic arcades with adjacent cells of opposite polarity. Three pieces of observational evidence are offered to support the hypothesis that the magnetic lines of force from a hole are open. Kitt Peak magnetograms are used to show that, at least on a relative scale, the average field strengths within holes are quite variable, but indistinguishable from the field strengths in other quiet parts of the Sun's surface. Finally it is shown that the large, equatorial holes characteristic of the declining phase of the last solar cycle during Skylab (1973-74) were all formed as a result of the mergence of bipolar magnetic regions (BMR's), confirming an earlier hypothesis by Timothy et al. (1975). Systematic application of this model to the different aspects of the solar cycle correctly predicts the occurrence of both large, equatorial coronal holes (the 'M-regions' which cause recurrent geomagnetic storms) and the polar cap holes. (Auth.)

  14. Extreme ultraviolet-induced photoionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Fok, Tomasz; Jarocki, Roman; Szczurek, Miroslaw

    2014-05-01

    In this work photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of He or Ne gases with a focused extreme ultraviolet (EUV) beam from one of two laser-plasma sources employing Nd:YAG laser systems. The first of them was a 10 Hz laser-plasma EUV source, based on a double-stream gas-puff target, irradiated with a 3 ns per 0.8 J laser pulse. EUV radiation in this case was focused using a gold-plated grazing incidence ellipsoidal collector. The second source was based on a 10 ns per 10 J per 10 Hz laser system. In this case EUV radiation was focused using a gold-plated grazing incidence multifoil collector. Gases were injected into the interaction region, perpendicularly to an optical axis of the irradiation system, using an auxiliary gas puff valve. Spectral measurements in the EUV range were performed. In all cases the most intense emission lines were assigned to singly charged ions. The other emission lines belong to atoms or doubly charged ions.

  15. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 μm wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  16. Tomographic extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs: TESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Stephan, A; Cook, T; Vickers, J; Taylor, V; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-08-01

    We describe the system of Tomographic Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) SpectrographS (TESS) that are the primary instruments for the Tomographic Experiment using Radiative Recombinative Ionospheric EUV and Radio Sources (TERRIERS) satellite. The spectrographs were designed to make high-sensitivity {80 counts/s)/Rayleigh [one Rayleigh is equivalent to 10(6) photons/(4pi str cm(2)s)}, line-of-sight measurements of the oi 135.6- and 91.1-nm emissions suitable for tomographic inversion. The system consists of five spectrographs, four identical nightglow instruments (for redundancy and added sensitivity), and one instrument with a smaller aperture to reduce sensitivity and increase spectral resolution for daytime operation. Each instrument has a bandpass of 80-140 nm with approximately 2- and 1-nm resolution for the night and day instruments, respectively. They utilize microchannel-plate-based two-dimensional imaging detectors with wedge-and-strip anode readouts. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and calibrated at Boston University, and the TERRIERS satellite was launched on 18 May 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  17. Four-wave mixing experiments with extreme ultraviolet transient gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Cucini, R.; Capotondi, F.; Battistoni, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Gessini, A.; Manfredda, M.; Nikolov, I. P.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Svetina, C.; Parisse, P.; Casolari, F.; Danailov, M. B.; Kiskinova, M.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-04-01

    Four-wave mixing (FWM) processes, based on third-order nonlinear light-matter interactions, can combine ultrafast time resolution with energy and wavevector selectivity, and enable the exploration of dynamics inaccessible by linear methods. The coherent and multi-wave nature of the FWM approach has been crucial in the development of advanced technologies, such as silicon photonics, subwavelength imaging and quantum communications. All these technologies operate at optical wavelengths, which limits the spatial resolution and does not allow the probing of excitations with energy in the electronvolt range. Extension to shorter wavelengths--that is, the extreme ultraviolet and soft-X-ray ranges--would allow the spatial resolution to be improved and the excitation energy range to be expanded, as well as enabling elemental selectivity to be achieved by exploiting core resonances. So far, FWM applications at such wavelengths have been prevented by the absence of coherent sources of sufficient brightness and of suitable experimental set-ups. Here we show how transient gratings, generated by the interference of coherent extreme-ultraviolet pulses delivered by the FERMI free-electron laser, can be used to stimulate FWM processes at suboptical wavelengths. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the possibility of observing the time evolution of the FWM signal, which shows the dynamics of coherent excitations as molecular vibrations. This result opens the way to FWM with nanometre spatial resolution and elemental selectivity, which, for example, would enable the investigation of charge-transfer dynamics. The theoretical possibility of realizing these applications has already stimulated ongoing developments of free-electron lasers: our results show that FWM at suboptical wavelengths is feasible, and we hope that they will enable advances in present and future photon sources.

  18. Solid state laser driver for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, L.E.; Honig, J.; Reichert, P.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    We describe the design and initial performance of a Nd:YAG laser master oscillator/phase conjugated power amplifier as a driver for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The design provides 0.5 to 1 joule per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width and excellent beam quality up through 1.5 kHz repetition frequency.

  19. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy

  20. Elastic modulus of Extreme Ultraviolet exposed single-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mund, Baibhav Kumar; Gao, An; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Highly transparent membranes are required for a number of applications, such as protective coatings for components in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, beam splitters (EUV pump-probe experiments), transmission gratings, and reticles. Graphene is an excellent candidate due to its high tensile

  1. Vectorial diffraction of extreme ultraviolet light and ultrashort light pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugrowati, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we present applications in optics involving the diffraction theory of light for two advanced technologies. We have used a rigorous vectorial diffraction method to model: (i) the imaging of mask structures in extreme ultraviolet lithography, and (ii) ultrashort pulse propagation

  2. Reliability analysis of an extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for space research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of reliability analysis of a complex system is reviewed. Key concepts are explained with examples. A reliability analysis of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer flown on February 24, 1979, is carried out using this method. The results of this analysis are presented with their interpretation. (orig.)

  3. Bragg reflectors with IR suppression for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medvedev, Viacheslav; Yakshin, Andrey; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Krivtsun, V.M.; Yakunin, A.M.; Koshelev, K.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The most promi¬sing next generation lithography technology is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). To fulfill the demands of high productivity, EUVL requires high power EUV radiation sources, with a promising technology for such sources being based on the emission of dense plasmas produced by

  4. System performance modeling of extreme ultraviolet lithographic thermal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, P. A.; Gianoulakis, S. E.; Moen, C. D.; Kanouff, M. P.; Fisher, A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithography Engineering Test Stand. Extensive modeling was applied to predict the impact of thermal loads on key lithographic parameters such as image placement error, focal shift, and loss of CD control. We show that thermal issues can be effectively managed to ensure that their impact on lithographic performance is maintained within design error budgets. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  5. A spectroscopic method for calibration of solar extreme ultraviolet instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, W. M.; Kastner, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    A method of calibrating solar extreme ultraviolet spectrographs in space using coronal emission lines of known relative intensity is presented and demonstrated. This approach is useful for recalibrating orbiting instruments that may be subject to degradation during extended periods of operation. The calibration results are insensitive to the physical distribution of emitting plasma in any likely solar coronal source. It is suggested that this technique may be useful for calibration of spectrographs used in the study of laboratory plasmas.

  6. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics. (paper)

  7. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics.

  8. Extreme Ultraviolet Stokesmeter for Pulsed Magneto-Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Ruiz-Lopez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Several applications in material science and magnetic holography using extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation require the measurement of the degree and state of polarization. In this work, an instrument to measure simultaneously both parameters from EUV pulses is presented. The instrument determines the Stokes parameters after a reflection on an array of multilayer mirrors at the Brewster angle. The Stokesmeter was tested at Swiss Light Source at different EUV wavelengths. The experimental Stokes patterns of the source were compared with the simulated pattern.

  9. The Extreme Ultraviolet spectrometer on bard the Hisaki satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kagitani, M.; Kimura, T.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2017-12-01

    The extreme ultraviolet spectroscope EXCEED (EXtrem ultraviolet spetrosCope for ExosphEric Dynamics) on board the Hisaki satellite was launched in September 2013 from the Uchinoura space center, Japan. It is orbiting around the Earth with an orbital altitude of around 950-1150 km. This satellite is dedicated to and optimized for observing the atmosphere and magnetosphere of terrestrial planets such as Mercury, Venus, Mars, as well as Jupiter. The instrument consists of an off axis parabolic entrance mirror, switchable slits with multiple filters and shapes, a toroidal grating, and a photon counting detector, together with a field of view guiding camera. The design goal is to achieve a large effective area but with high spatial and spectral resolution. Based on the after-launch calibration, the spectral resolution of EXCEED is found to be 0.3-0.5 nm FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) over the entire spectral band, and the spatial resolution is around 17". The evaluated effective area is larger than 1cm2. In this presentation, the basic concept of the instrument design and the observation technique are introduced. The current status of the spacecraft and its future observation plan are also shown.

  10. EPE The Extreme Physics Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michael; Elvis, Martin; Bookbinder, Jay; Brenneman, Laura; Bulbul, Esra; Nulsen, Paul; Patnaude, Dan; Smith, Randall; Bandler, Simon; Okajima, Takashi; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Extreme Physics Explorer (EPE) is a mission concept that will address fundamental and timely questions in astrophysics which are primary science objectives of IXO. The reach of EPE to the areas outlined in NASA RFI NNH11ZDA018L is shown as a table. The dark green indicates areas in which EPE can do the basic IXO science, and the light green areas where EPE can contribute but will not reach the full IXO capability. To address these science questions, EPE will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin in active galactic nuclei (AGN), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. EPE gives up the high resolution imaging of IXO in return for lightweight, high TRL foil mirrors which will provide >20 times the effective area of ASTRO-H and similar spatial resolution, with a beam sufficient to study point sources and nearby galaxies and clusters. Advances in micro-calorimeters allow improved performance at high rates with twice the energy resolution of ASTRO-H. A lower TRL option would provide 200 times the area of ASTRO-H using a micro-channel plate optic (MCPO) and a deployable optical bench. Both options are in the middle range of RFI missions at between $600M and $1000M. The EPE foil optic has direct heritage to ASTRO-H, allowing robust cost estimates. The spacecraft is entirely off the shelf and introduces no difficult requirements. The mission could be started and launched in this decade to an L2 orbit, with a three-year lifetime and consumables for 5 years. While ASTRO-H will give us the first taste of high-resolution, non-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it will be limited to small numbers of objects in many categories. EPE will give us the first statistically significant samples in each of these categories.

  11. Method for the protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, Wayne M.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-06-22

    A coating for the protection of optical surfaces exposed to a high energy erosive plasma. A gas that can be decomposed by the high energy plasma, such as the xenon plasma used for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), is injected into the EUVL machine. The decomposition products coat the optical surfaces with a protective coating maintained at less than about 100 .ANG. thick by periodic injections of the gas. Gases that can be used include hydrocarbon gases, particularly methane, PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S. The use of PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S is particularly advantageous since films of the plasma-induced decomposition products S and P cannot grow to greater than 10 .ANG. thick in a vacuum atmosphere such as found in an EUVL machine.

  12. The Extreme-ultraviolet Emission from Sun-grazing Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryans, Paul; Pesnell, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory has observed two Sun-grazing comets as they passed through the solar atmosphere. Both passages resulted in a measurable enhancement of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiance in several of the AIA bandpasses.We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Molecules in the comet rapidly sublimate as it approaches the Sun. They are then photodissociated by the solar radiation field to create atomic species. Subsequent ionization of these atoms produces a higher abundance of ions than normally present in the corona and results in EUV emission in the wavelength ranges of the AIA telescope passbands.

  13. Laser waveform control of extreme ultraviolet high harmonics from solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yong Sing; Wu, Mengxi; Yin, Yanchun; Chew, Andrew; Ren, Xiaoming; Gholam-Mirzaei, Shima; Browne, Dana A; Chini, Michael; Chang, Zenghu; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B; Ghimire, Shambhu

    2017-05-01

    Solid-state high-harmonic sources offer the possibility of compact, high-repetition-rate attosecond light emitters. However, the time structure of high harmonics must be characterized at the sub-cycle level. We use strong two-cycle laser pulses to directly control the time-dependent nonlinear current in single-crystal MgO, leading to the generation of extreme ultraviolet harmonics. We find that harmonics are delayed with respect to each other, yielding an atto-chirp, the value of which depends on the laser field strength. Our results provide the foundation for attosecond pulse metrology based on solid-state harmonics and a new approach to studying sub-cycle dynamics in solids.

  14. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, Artem; Herrwerth, O.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Lezius, M.; Kling, Matthias; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Belkacem, Ali; Ueda, K.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robbert; Ullrich, Joachim

    2011-06-17

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC = CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +} + CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52 {+-} 15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8 < KER < 8 eV, providing clear evidence for the existence of a fast, nonradiative decay channel.

  15. Optical proximity correction for anamorphic extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Chris; Lam, Michael; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Jiang, Fan; Fenger, Germain; Adam, Kostas

    2017-10-01

    The change from isomorphic to anamorphic optics in high numerical aperture (NA) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) scanners necessitates changes to the mask data preparation flow. The required changes for each step in the mask tape out process are discussed, with a focus on optical proximity correction (OPC). When necessary, solutions to new problems are demonstrated, and verified by rigorous simulation. Additions to the OPC model include accounting for anamorphic effects in the optics, mask electromagnetics, and mask manufacturing. The correction algorithm is updated to include awareness of anamorphic mask geometry for mask rule checking (MRC). OPC verification through process window conditions is enhanced to test different wafer scale mask error ranges in the horizontal and vertical directions. This work will show that existing models and methods can be updated to support anamorphic optics without major changes. Also, the larger mask size in the Y direction can result in better model accuracy, easier OPC convergence, and designs which are more tolerant to mask errors.

  16. Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, S C; Cerjarn, C; Kearney, P; Mirkarimi, P; Ray-Chaudhuri, A; Walton, C.

    1999-01-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithgraphy (EUVL) is an emerging technology for fabrication of sub-100 nm feature sizes on silicon, following the SIA road map well into the 21st century. The specific EUVL system described is a scanned, projection lithography system with a 4:1 reduction, using a laser plasma EUV source. The mask and all of the system optics are reflective, multilayer mirrors which function in the extreme ultraviolet at 13.4 nm wavelength. Since the masks are imaged to the wafer exposure plane, mask defects greater than 80% of the exposure plane CD (for 4:1 reduction) will in many cases render the mask useless, whereas intervening optics can have defects which are not a printing problem. For the 100 nm node, we must reduce defects to less than 0.01/cm ampersand sup2; at sign 80nm or larger to obtain acceptable mask production yields. We have succeeded in reducing the defects to less than 0.1/cm ampersand sup2; for defects larger than 130 nm detected by visible light inspection tools, however our program goal is to achieve 0.01/cm ampersand sup2; in the near future. More importantly though, we plan to have a detailed understanding of defect origination and the effect on multilayer growth in order to mitigate defects below the 10 -2 /cm ampersand sup2; level on the next generation of mask blank deposition systems. In this paper we will discuss issues and results from the ion-beam multilayer deposition tool, details of the defect detection and characterization facility, and progress on defect printability modeling

  17. Extreme ultraviolet high-harmonic spectroscopy of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, T. T.; Garg, M.; Kruchinin, S. Yu.; Moulet, A.; Hassan, M. Th.; Goulielmakis, E.

    2015-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high-harmonic radiation emerging from laser-driven atoms, molecules or plasmas underlies powerful attosecond spectroscopy techniques and provides insight into fundamental structural and dynamic properties of matter. The advancement of these spectroscopy techniques to study strong-field electron dynamics in condensed matter calls for the generation and manipulation of EUV radiation in bulk solids, but this capability has remained beyond the reach of optical sciences. Recent experiments and theoretical predictions paved the way to strong-field physics in solids by demonstrating the generation and optical control of deep ultraviolet radiation in bulk semiconductors, driven by femtosecond mid-infrared fields or the coherent up-conversion of terahertz fields to multi-octave spectra in the mid-infrared and optical frequencies. Here we demonstrate that thin films of SiO2 exposed to intense, few-cycle to sub-cycle pulses give rise to wideband coherent EUV radiation extending in energy to about 40 electronvolts. Our study indicates the association of the emitted EUV radiation with intraband currents of multi-petahertz frequency, induced in the lowest conduction band of SiO2. To demonstrate the applicability of high-harmonic spectroscopy to solids, we exploit the EUV spectra to gain access to fine details of the energy dispersion profile of the conduction band that are as yet inaccessible by photoemission spectroscopy in wide-bandgap dielectrics. In addition, we use the EUV spectra to trace the attosecond control of the intraband electron motion induced by synthesized optical transients. Our work advances lightwave electronics in condensed matter into the realm of multi-petahertz frequencies and their attosecond control, and marks the advent of solid-state EUV photonics.

  18. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Simon J; Jeong, Hwan J; Shafer, David R

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of low pressure helium microwave driven discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinho, Susana; Felizardo, Edgar; Tatarova, Elena; Alves, Luis Lemos

    2016-09-01

    Surface wave driven discharges are reliable plasma sources that can produce high levels of vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation (VUV and EUV). The richness of the emission spectrum makes this type of discharge a possible alternative source in EUV/VUV radiation assisted applications. However, due to challenging experimental requirements, publications concerning EUV radiation emitted by microwave plasmas are scarce and a deeper understanding of the main mechanisms governing the emission of radiation in this spectral range is required. To this end, the EUV radiation emitted by helium microwave driven plasmas operating at 2.45 GHz has been studied for low pressure conditions. Spectral lines from excited helium atoms and ions were detected via emission spectroscopy in the EUV/VUV regions. Novel data concerning the spectral lines observed in the 23 - 33 nm wavelength range and their intensity behaviour with variation of the discharge operational conditions are presented. The intensity of all the spectral emissions strongly increases with the microwave power delivered to the plasma up to 400 W. Furthermore, the intensity of all the ion spectral emissions in the EUV range decreases by nearly one order of magnitude as the pressure was raised from 0.2 to 0.5 mbar. Work funded by FCT - Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia, under Project UID/FIS/50010/2013 and grant SFRH/BD/52412/2013 (PD-F APPLAuSE).

  20. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer extreme ultraviolet mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) extreme ultraviolet mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of a pattern inspection the mask structure not only from the standpoint of a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope but also by using a projection electron microscope but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam techniques such as critical dimension metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients of the candidate materials for the conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of the charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair ML, 16-nm-sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in half pitch 44, 40, and 32 nm line-and-space patterns. Reducing 40-pair ML to 20-pair ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16-nm-sized defects and etching residues remained detectable. The 16-nm-sized defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. A double-layer structure with 2.5-nm-thick B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  1. A small-scale extreme ultraviolet wave observed by SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, R.; Jiang, Y.; Hong, J.; Yang, J.; Bi, Y.; Yang, L.; Yang, D.

    2012-06-01

    "Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) waves" are large-scale wavelike transients often associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this Letter, we present a possible detection of a fast-mode EUV wave associated with a mini-CME observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. On 2010 December 1, a small-scale EUV wave erupted near the disk center associated with a mini-CME, which showed all the low corona manifestations of a typical CME. The CME was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament, with a typical length of about 30''. Although the eruption was tiny, the wave had the appearance of an almost semicircular front and propagated at a uniform velocity of 220-250km s-1 with very little angular dependence. The CME lateral expansion was asymmetric with an inclination toward north, and the southern footprints of the CME loops hardly shifted. The lateral expansion resulted in deep long-duration dimmings, showing the CME extent. Our analysis confirms that the small-scale EUV wave is a true wave, interpreted as the fast-mode wave.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for the Shenguang III laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Zhang, Jiyan; Wei, Minxi; Zhao, Yang; Qing, Bo; Lv, Min; Yang, Zhenghua; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shenye; Cai, Houzhi; Liu, Jinyuan

    2015-06-10

    An extreme ultraviolet spectrometer has been developed for high-energy density physics experiments at the Shenguang-III (SG-III) laser facility. Alternative use of two different varied-line-spacing gratings covers a wavelength range of 10-260 Å. A newly developed x-ray framing camera with single wide strip line is designed to record time-gated spectra with ~70 ps temporal resolution and 20 lp/mm spatial resolution. The width of the strip line is up to 20 mm, enhancing the capability of the spatial resolving measurements. All components of the x-ray framing camera are roomed in an aluminum air box. The whole spectrometer is mounted on a diagnostic instrument manipulator at the SG-III laser facility for the first time. A new alignment method for the spectrometer based on the superimposition of two laser focal spots is developed. The approaches of the alignment including offline and online two steps are described. A carbon spectrum and an aluminum spectrum have been successfully recorded by the spectrometer using 2400 l/mm and 1200 l/mm gratings, respectively. The experimental spectral lines show that the spectral resolution of the spectrometer is about 0.2 Å and 1 Å for the 2400 l/mm and 1200 l/mm gratings, respectively. A theoretical calculation was carried out to estimate the maximum resolving power of the spectrometer.

  3. Surface roughness control by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Inam Ul; Obeidi, Muhannad Ahmed; Budner, Bogusław; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Brabazon, Dermot

    2017-10-01

    Surface roughness control of polymeric materials is often desirable in various biomedical engineering applications related to biocompatibility control, separation science and surface wettability control. In this study, Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymer films were irradiated with Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons in nitrogen environment and investigations were performed on surface roughness modification via EUV exposure. The samples were irradiated at 3 mm and 4 mm distance from the focal spot to investigate the effect of EUV fluence on topography. The topography of the EUV treated PET samples were studied by AFM. The detailed scanning was also performed on the sample irradiated at 3 mm. It was observed that the average surface roughness of PET samples was increased from 9 nm (pristine sample) to 280 nm and 253 nm for EUV irradiated samples. Detailed AFM studies confirmed the presence of 1.8 mm wide period U-shaped channels in EUV exposed PET samples. The walls of the channels were having FWHM of about 0.4 mm. The channels were created due to translatory movements of the sample in horizontal and transverse directions during the EUV exposure. The increased surface roughness is useful for many applications. The nanoscale channels fabricated by EUV exposure could be interesting for microfluidic applications based on lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices.

  4. Extreme ultraviolet multilayer defect analysis and geometry reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongbo; Evanschitzky, Peter; Erdmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for the characterization of multilayer defects from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection images at different focus positions. The transport-of-intensity equation is applied to retrieve the phase distribution of the reflected light in the vicinity of the defect. The defect-induced intensity and phase modifications and their dependency from defect geometry parameters are analyzed by several selected optical properties of multilayer defect. To reconstruct the defect geometry parameters from the intensity and phase of a defect, a principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to parameterize the intensity and phase distributions into principal component coefficients. In order to construct the base functions of the PCA, a combination of a reference multilayer defect and appropriate pupil filters is introduced to obtain the designed sets of intensity and phase distributions. Finally, an artificial neural network is applied to correlate the principal component coefficients of the intensity and the phase of the defect with the defect geometry parameters and to reconstruct the unknown defect geometry parameters. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated both for mask blank defects and for defects in the vicinity of an absorber pattern.

  5. Imaging performance improvement of coherent extreme-ultraviolet scatterometry microscope with high-harmonic-generation extreme-ultraviolet source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamezaki, Daiki; Harada, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yutaka; Watanabe, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    In extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, the development of a review apparatus for the EUV mask pattern at an exposure wavelength of 13.5 nm is required. The EUV mask is composed of an absorber pattern and a Mo/Si multilayer on a glass substrate. This mask pattern has a three-dimensional (3D) structure. The 3D structure would modulate the EUV reflection phase, which would cause focus and pattern shifts. Thus, the review of the EUV phase image is also important. We have developed a coherent EUV scatterometry microscope (CSM), which is a simple microscope without objective optics. The EUV phase and intensity images were reconstructed with diffraction images by ptychography. For a standalone mask review, the high-harmonic-generation (HHG) EUV source was employed. In this study, we updated the sample stage, pump-laser reduction system, and gas-pressure control system to reconstruct the image. As a result, an 88 nm line-and-space pattern and a cross-line pattern were reconstructed. In addition, a particle defect of 2 µm diameter was well reconstructed. This demonstrated the high capability of the standalone CSM, which can hence be used in factories, such as mask shops and semiconductor fabrication plants.

  6. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-01-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  7. Advanced materials for multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, S A; Chkhalo, N I; Kuzin, S V; Pariev, D E; Polkovnikov, V N; Salashchenko, N N; Shestov, S V; Zuev, S Y

    2016-03-20

    We provide an analysis of contemporary multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar astronomy in the wavelength ranges: λ=12.9-13.3  nm, λ=17-21  nm, λ=28-33  nm, and λ=58.4  nm. We found new material pairs, which will make new spaceborne experiments possible due to the high reflection efficiencies, spectral resolution, and long-term stabilities of the proposed multilayer coatings. In the spectral range λ=13  nm, Mo/Be multilayer mirrors were shown to demonstrate a better ratio of reflection efficiency and spectral resolution compared with the commonly used Mo/Si. In the spectral range λ=17-21  nm, a new multilayer structure Al/Si was proposed, which had higher spectral resolution along with comparable reflection efficiency compared with the commonly used Al/Zr multilayer structures. In the spectral range λ=30  nm, the Si/B4C/Mg/Cr multilayer structure turned out to best obey reflection efficiency and long-term stability. The B4C and Cr layers prevented mutual diffusion of the Si and Mg layers. For the spectral range λ=58  nm, a new multilayer Mo/Mg-based structure was developed; its reflection efficiency and long-term stability have been analyzed. We also investigated intrinsic stresses inherent for most of the multilayer structures and proposed possibilities for stress elimination.

  8. Extreme ultraviolet lithography: A few more pieces of the puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christopher N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-20

    The work described in this dissertation has improved three essential components of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography: exposure tools, photoresist, and metrology. Exposure tools. A field-averaging illumination stage is presented that enables nonuniform, high-coherence sources to be used in applications where highly uniform illumination is required. In an EUV implementation, it is shown that the illuminator achieves a 6.5% peak-to-valley intensity variation across the entire design field of view. In addition, a design for a stand-alone EUV printing tool capable of delivering 15 nm half-pitch sinusoidal fringes with available sources, gratings and nano-positioning stages is presented. It is shown that the proposed design delivers a near zero line-edge-rougness (LER) aerial image, something extremely attractive for the application of resist testing. Photoresist. Two new methods of quantifying the deprotection blur of EUV photoresists are described and experimentally demonstrated. The deprotection blur, LER, and sensitivity parameters of several EUV photoresists are quantified simultaneously as base weight percent, photoacid generator (PAG) weight percent, and post-exposure bake (PEB) temperature are varied. Two surprising results are found: (1) changing base weight percent does not significantly affect the deprotection blur of EUV photoresist, and (2) increasing PAG weight percent can simultaneously reduce LER and E-size in EUV photoresist. The latter result motivates the development of an EUV exposure statistics model that includes the effects of photon shot noise, the PAG spatial distribution, and the changing of the PAG distribution during the exposure. In addition, a shot noise + deprotection blur model is used to show that as deprotection blur becomes large relative to the size of the printed feature, LER reduction from improved counting statistics becomes dominated by an increase in LER due to reduced deprotection contrast. Metrology. Finally, this

  9. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-01

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer-Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  10. EDITORIAL: Extreme Ultraviolet Light Sources for Semiconductor Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, David

    2004-12-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) [1] provides industry expectations for high volume computer chip fabrication a decade into the future. It provides expectations to anticipated performance and requisite specifications. While the roadmap provides a collective projection of what international industry expects to produce, it does not specify the technology that will be employed. Indeed, there are generally several competing technologies for each two or three year step forward—known as `nodes'. Recent successful technologies have been based on KrF (248 nm), and now ArF (193 nm) lasers, combined with ultraviolet transmissive refractive optics, in what are known as step and scan exposure tools. Less fortunate technologies in the recent past have included soft x-ray proximity printing and, it appears, 157 nm wavelength F2 lasers. In combination with higher numerical aperture liquid emersion optics, 193 nm is expected to be used for the manufacture of leading edge chip performance for the coming five years. Beyond that, starting in about 2009, the technology to be employed is less clear. The leading candidate for the 2009 node is extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, however this requires that several remaining challenges, including sufficient EUV source power, be overcome in a timely manner. This technology is based on multilayer coated reflective optics [2] and an EUV emitting plasma. Following Moore's Law [3] it is expected, for example, that at the 2009 `32 nm node' (printable patterns of 32 nm half-pitch), isolated lines with 18 nm width will be formed in resist (using threshold effects), and that these will be further narrowed to 13 nm in transfer to metalized electronic gates. These narrow features are expected to provide computer chips of 19 GHz clock frequency, with of the order of 1.5 billion transistors per chip [1]. This issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains a cluster of eight papers addressing the critical

  11. A beamline for time-resolved extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Grilj, Jakob; Sistrunk, Emily; Koch, Markus; Gühr, Markus

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation is a convenient way to obtain extreme ultraviolet light from table-top laser systems and the experimental tools to exploit this simple and powerful light source for time-resolved spectroscopy are being developed by several groups. For these applications, brightness and stability of the high harmonic generation is a key feature. This article focuses on practical aspects in the generation of extreme ultraviolet pulses with ultrafast commercial lasers, namely generation ...

  12. Ionic debris measurement of three extreme ultraviolet sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporre, J.; Castaño, C. H.; Raju, R.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2009-08-01

    Generation of debris in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources is an inherent and real threat to the lifetime of collection optics. Debris measurement of these sources is useful to enable source suppliers to estimate collector lifetime. At the Center for Plasma Material Interactions (CPMI) at the University of Illinois, an Illinois calibrated spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer (ICE) was built to measure the ion debris flux in absolute units. In addition to ion flux, the detector is also capable of identifying different ion species present in the plasma utilizing energy-to-charge ratio discrimination. The lifetime of the collector optics is calculated using the measured ion flux. In the current investigation we compare the measurement of ion debris production in three different EUV sources: the Energetiq EQ-10M, the AIXUV-100, and the XTREME XTS 13-35. In the EQ-10M source, three angular measurements are coupled with three variations in operating pressure to measure consequent effects on debris production. These measurements reveal four predominant ion species in the energetic debris analysis: C+, Si+, Xe+, and Xe2+. The amount of debris is reduced as pressure is increased. Various debris mitigation methods are implemented in the AIXUV-100 source and results reveal that four ion species are observed (Ar+, Xe+, Xe2+, and W+), though there does not seem to be a dominant species. The first mitigation technique, backstreaming argon toward the source, reduces the amount of Ar+, Xe2+, and W+, yet increases the amount of Xe+ The increase in Xe+ flux is explained based on charge exchange phenomena. The ICE machine was then attached 1.92 m away from the pinch of XTS 13-35 source, and placed at 25° away from the normal line. The comparison of results reveals that the XTS 13-35 and the EQ-10M sources produced comparable amounts of energetic ion flux per watt of EUV light produced. The AIXUV-100 source generated more ion debris flux per watt of EUV light than the

  13. Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

    2009-01-01

    The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS.

  14. Performance of The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Mirror Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Raymond G.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Conard, Steven J.; Friedman, Scott D.; Hampton, Jeffery; Moos, H. Warren; Nikulla, Paul; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Saha, Timo T.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer is a NASA astrophysics satellite which produces high-resolution spectra in the far-ultraviolet (90.5-118.7 nm bandpass) using a high effective area and low background detectors. The observatory was launched on its three-year mission from Cape Canaveral Air Station on 24 June 1999. The instrument contains four coaligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors which illuminate separate Rowland circle spectrograph channels equipped with holographically ruled diffraction gratings and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The telescope mirrors have a 352 x 387 mm aperture and 2245 mm focal length and are attached to actuator assemblies, which provide on-orbit, tip, tilt, and focus control. Two mirrors are coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and two are coated with lithium fluoride over aluminum (Al:LiF). We describe mirror assembly in-flight optical and mechanical performance. On-orbit measurements of the far-ultraviolet point spread function associated with each mirror are compared to expectations based on pre-flight laboratory measurements and modeling using the Optical Surface Analysis Code and surface metrology data. On-orbit imaging data indicate that the mirrors meet their instrument-level requirement of 50 percent and 95 percent slit transmission for the high- and mid-resolution spectrograph entrance slits, respectively. The degradation of mirror reflectivity during satellite integration and test is also discussed. The far-ultraviolet reflectivity of the SiC- and AlLiF-coated mirrors decreased about six percent and three percent, respectively, between coating and launch. Each mirror is equipped with three actuators, which consist of a stepper motor driving a ball screw via a two-stage planetary gear train. We also discuss the mechanical performance of the mirror assemblies, including actuator performance and thermal effects.

  15. Large-solid-angle illuminators for extreme ultraviolet lithography with laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W.

    1995-06-01

    Laser Plasma Sources (LPSS) of extreme ultraviolet radiation are an attractive alternative to synchrotron radiation sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) due to their modularity, brightness, and modest size and cost. To fully exploit the extreme ultraviolet power emitted by such sources, it is necessary to capture the largest possible fraction of the source emission half-sphere while simultaneously optimizing the illumination stationarity and uniformity on the object mask. In this LDRD project, laser plasma source illumination systems for EUVL have been designed and then theoretically and experimentally characterized. Ellipsoidal condensers have been found to be simple yet extremely efficient condensers for small-field EUVL imaging systems. The effects of aberrations in such condensers on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging have been studied with physical optics modeling. Lastly, the design of an efficient large-solid-angle condenser has been completed. It collects 50% of the available laser plasma source power at 14 nm and delivers it properly to the object mask in a wide-arc-field camera

  16. Comparing vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation for postionization of laser desorbed neutrals from bacterial biofilms and organic fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, Gerald L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor Street (m/c 111), Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Takahashi, Lynelle K. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Room 419 Latimer Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zhou Jia; Ahmed, Musahid [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moore, Jerry F. [MassThink LLC, 500 East Ogden Avenue Suite 200, Naperville, IL 60563 (United States); Hanley, Luke, E-mail: lhanley@uic.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor Street (m/c 111), Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation from 8 to 24 eV generated at a synchrotron was used to postionize laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotic-treated biofilms and a modified fullerene using laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). Results show detection of the parent ion, various fragments, and extracellular material from biofilms using LDPI-MS with both vacuum and extreme ultraviolet photons. Parent ions were observed for both cases, but extreme ultraviolet photons (16-24 eV) induced more fragmentation than vacuum ultraviolet (8-14 eV) photons.

  17. Comparing Vacuum and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation for Postionization of Laser Desorbed Neutrals from Bacterial Biofilms and Organic Fullerene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspera, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moored, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-12-08

    Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation from 8 - 24 eV generated at a synchrotron was used to postionize laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotic-treated biofilms and a modified fullerene using laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). Results show detection of the parent ion, various fragments, and extracellular material from biofilms using LDPI-MS with both vacuum and extreme ultraviolet photons. Parent ions were observed for both cases, but extreme ultraviolet photons (16-24 eV) induced more fragmentation than vacuum ultraviolet (8-14 eV) photons.

  18. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source and ultra-high vacuum chamber for studying EUV-induced processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.; Yakushev, O.; Abrikosov, A.; Snegirev, E.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    An experimental setup that directly reproduces extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography relevant conditions for detailed component exposure tests is described. The EUV setup includes a pulsed plasma radiation source, operating at 13.5 nm; a debris mitigation system; collection and filtering optics; and

  19. Spectral purification and infrared light recycling in extreme ultraviolet lithography sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayraktar, M.; van Goor, F. A.; Boller, K. J.; F. Bijkerk,

    2014-01-01

    We present the design of a novel collector mirror for laser produced plasma (LPP) light sources to be used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The design prevents undesired infrared (IR) drive laser light, reflected from the plasma, from reaching the exit of the light source. This results in a

  20. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 keV. This...

  1. The Sandia laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (XUV) light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Laser produced plasmas have been shown to be extremely bright sources of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (XUV) radiation; however, certain practical difficulties have hindered the development of this source as a routinely usable laboratory device. To explore solutions to these difficulties, Sandia has constructed an XUV laser plasma source (LASPS) with the intention of developing an instrument that can be used for experiments requiring intense XUV radiation from 50-300 eV. The driving laser for this source is a KrF excimer with a wavelength of 248 nm, divergence of 200 μrad, pulse width of 23 ns at 20 Hz and typical pulse energy of 500 mJ which allows for good energy coupling to the plasma at moderate (10/sup 12/ W cm/sup 2/) power densities. This source has been pulsed approximately 2 x 10/sup 5/ times, demonstrating good tolerance to plasma debris. The source radiates from the visible to well above 1000 eV, however, to date attention has been concentrated on the 50-300 eV region. In this paper, spectral data and plasma images for both stainless steel and gold targets are presented with the gold target yielding a 200 μm plasma and reradiating 3.9% of the pump energy into 15-73 eV band, a flux of 1.22 x 10/sup 13/ photons/pulse/eV into 2π sr. Further efforts will expand these measurements to rare earth targets and to higher spectral energies. A special high throughput wide angle XUV (50-300 eV) monochromator and associated optics is being concurrently developed to collect the plasma radiation, perform energy dispersion and focus the radiation onto the experimental area

  2. Capillary discharge extreme ultraviolet lasers. [Colorado State Univ. , Ft. Collins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    The project objective is to explore the generation of soft X-ray laser radiation in a plasma column created by a fast capillary discharge. The proposed capillary lasing scheme offers the potential for compact, simple and efficient soft X-ray laser sources. For this purpose a compact, fast pulse generator which produces 100 kA current pulses with a risetime of 11 ns was constructed. Initial experiments were conducted in evacuated capillaries, in which the plasma is produced by ablation of the capillary walls. The soft X-ray emission from discharges in polyethylene capillary channels was studied to investigate the possibility of amplification in the 3-2 transition of C VI, at {lambda} = 18.2 nm. Time-resolved spectra in which this transition appears anomalously intense with respect to the 4--2 transition of the same ion were obtained. To date, however, this phenomenoa could not be confirmed as gain, as the intensity of the 18.2 nm line has not been observed to increase exponentially as a function of the capillary length. Encouraging results were obtained by fast pulse discharge excitation of capillaries filled with preionized gas. High temperature (Te > 150 eV), small diameter ({approximately}200 {mu}m) plasma columns were efficiently generated. Fast current pulse excitation of a selected low mass density of uniformly preionized material Mag the capillary was observed to detach rapidly the plasma from the capillary walls, and form a plasma channel of a diameter much smaller and significantly hotter than those produced by a similar current pulse in evacuated capillaries of the same size. Discharges in argon-filled capillaries at currents between 20 and 60 kA produced plasmas with ArX-Ar{sub XIV} line emission, and with spectra that are similar to those of plasmas generated by > I MA current implosions in large pulsed power machines. The characteristic of these plasmas approach those necessary for soft X-ray amplification in low Z elements.

  3. Design and performance of capping layers for extreme-ultraviolet multilayer mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajt, Sasa; Chapman, Henry N.; Nguyen, Nhan; Alameda, Jennifer; Robinson, Jeffrey C.; Malinowski, Michael; Gullikson, Eric; Aquila, Andrew; Tarrio, Charles; Grantham, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Multilayer lifetime has emerged as one of the major issues for the commercialization of extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). We describe the performance of an oxidation-resistant capping layer of Ru atop multilayers that results in a reflectivity above 69% at 13.2 nm, which is suitable for EUVL projection optics and has been tested with accelerated electron-beam and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) light in a water-vapor environment. Based on accelerated exposure results, we calculated multilayer lifetimes for all reflective mirrors in a typical commercial EUVL tool and concluded that Ru-capped multilayers have ∼40x longer lifetimes than Si-capped multilayers, which translates to 3 months to many years, depending on the mirror dose

  4. Tabletop single-shot extreme ultraviolet Fourier transform holography of an extended object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Erik B; Monserud, Nils C; Brown, Christopher G; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Xu, Huiwen; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik; Marconi, Mario C

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate single and multi-shot Fourier transform holography with the use of a tabletop extreme ultraviolet laser. The reference wave was produced by a Fresnel zone plate with a central opening that allowed the incident beam to illuminate the sample directly. The high reference wave intensity allows for larger objects to be imaged compared to mask-based lensless Fourier transform holography techniques. We obtain a spatial resolution of 169 nm from a single laser pulse and a resolution of 128 nm from an accumulation of 20 laser pulses for an object ~11x11μm(2) in size. This experiment utilized a tabletop extreme ultraviolet laser that produces a highly coherent ~1.2 ns laser pulse at 46.9 nm wavelength.

  5. Charge Carrier Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxides Studied by Femtosecond Transient Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    With the ability to disentangle electronic transitions that occur on different elements and local electronic structures, time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in condensed phase systems. In this dissertation, a visible-pump/XUV-probe transient absorption apparatus with femtosecond resolution was constructed to investigate the carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductors after photo-excitation. This includes timesca...

  6. Spontaneous and artificial direct nanostructuring of solid surface by extreme ultraviolet laser with nanosecond pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koláček, Karel; Schmidt, Jiří; Štraus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Melich, Radek; Psota, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2016), s. 11-22 ISSN 0263-0346 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) interferometer * Aspheric interferometer mirrors * Multilayer reflection coating for 46.9 nm * Ar8+ laser application * XUV direct nanostructuring Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.420, year: 2016 http://dx. doi . org /10.1017/S0263034615000786

  7. Relativistic frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet regime using self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yun, Hyeok; Yun, Sang Jae; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yoon, Jin Woo; Yu, Tae Jun; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2012-01-01

    Coherent short-wavelength radiation from laser–plasma interactions is of increasing interest in disciplines including ultrafast biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. Using solid targets instead of atomic gases could enable the generation of coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation with higher energy and more energetic photons. Here we present the generation of extreme ultraviolet radiation through coherent high-harmonic generation from self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors—a new-generation mechanism established in a long underdense plasma on a solid target. Using a 30-fs, 100-TW Ti:sapphire laser, we obtain wavelengths as short as 4.9 nm for an optimized level of amplified spontaneous emission. Particle-in-cell simulations show that oscillatory flying electron nanosheets form in a long underdense plasma, and suggest that the high-harmonic generation is caused by reflection of the laser pulse from electron nanosheets. We expect this extreme ultraviolet radiation to be valuable in realizing a compact X-ray instrument for research in biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. PMID:23187631

  8. Design, fabrication, and characterization of high-efficiency extreme ultraviolet diffusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Salmassi, Farhad; Anderson, Erik H.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2004-02-19

    As the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography progresses, interest grows in the extension of traditional optical components to the EUV regime. The strong absorption of EUV by most materials and its extremely short wavelength, however, makes it very difficult to implement many components that are commonplace in the longer wavelength regimes. One such example is the diffuser often implemented with ordinary ground glass in the visible light regime. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of reflective EUV diffusers with high efficiency within a controllable bandwidth. Using these techniques we have fabricated diffusers with efficiencies exceeding 10% within a moderate angular single-sided bandwidth of approximately 0.06 radians.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry of laser plasma material between the criticaland ablation surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gartside, L.M.R.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A.K.; Wagenaars, E.; Whittaker, D.S.; Kozlová, Michaela; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Sawicka, Magdalena; Polan, Jiří; Kalal, M.; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2011), s. 91-97 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1734; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : extreme ultraviolet lasers * interferometry * radiation -hydrodynamics * transmission Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.595, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B7W6W-52C3K95-3&_user=625012&_coverDate=06%2F30%2F2011&_rdoc=9&_fmt=high&_orig=browse&_origin

  10. Final Report: Spectral Analysis of L-shell Data in the Extreme Ultraviolet from Tokamak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jernigan, J. Garrett [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    We performed detailed analyses of extreme ultraviolet spectra taken by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and on the Alcator CKmod tokamak at the M.I.T. Plasma Science and Fusion Center. We focused on the emission of iron, carbon, and other elements in several spectral band pass regions covered by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We documented emission lines of carbon not found in currently used solar databases and demonstrated that this emission was due to charge exchange.

  11. Ablation and transmission of thin solid targets irradiated by intense extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Aslanyan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV laser beam with a parylene foil was studied by experiments and simulation. A single EUV laser pulse of nanosecond duration focused to an intensity of 3 × 1010 W cm−2 perforated micrometer thick targets. The same laser pulse was simultaneously used to diagnose the interaction by a transmission measurement. A combination of 2-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic and diffraction calculations was used to model the ablation, leading to good agreement with experiment. This theoretical approach allows predictive modelling of the interaction with matter of intense EUV beams over a broad range of parameters.

  12. Properites of ultrathin films appropriate for optics capping layers in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajt, S; Edwards, N V; Madey, T E

    2007-06-25

    The contamination of optical surfaces by irradiation shortens optics lifetime and is one of the main concerns for optics used in conjunction with intense light sources, such as high power lasers, 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron sources or plasma sources used in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tools. This paper focuses on properties and surface chemistry of different materials, which as thin layers, could be used as capping layers to protect and extend EUVL optics lifetime. The most promising candidates include single element materials such as ruthenium and rhodium, and oxides such as TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  13. Exploring Mercury's Surface in UltraViolet from Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenberg, N.

    2017-12-01

    The MESSENGER Mission's Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) component of its Mercury Atmosphere and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) instrument obtained approximately 4600 point observations of Mercury's surface in middle ultraviolet (MUV; 210 nm - 300 nm) and far ultraviolet (FUV; 119.1 - 122.5 nm and 129.2 - 131.5 nm) wavelengths over the course of its orbital mission, mostly in Mercury's southern hemisphere. Given the very low (UV surface reflectance and parameters appear to support the presence of varying amounts of carbon in different spectral or geologic units on Mercury. Far-UV reflectance data is currently under-utilized, but analysis of lunar surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) indicate that the data are sensitive to both composition and space weathering. The far-UV reflectance from MASCS may provide similar information for the Mercury surface, complementing results from longer wavelengths. MESSENGER data products for surface reflectance include middle-UV reflectance spectra, ultraviolet far-UV reflectance values, combined middle-UV through near-infrared spectra (210 nm - 1450 nm), a global `spectral cube' of near-UV to near-IR, and an upcoming UV spectral cube.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) degradation of poly(olefin sulfone)s: Towards applications as EUV photoresists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, Kirsten; Blakey, Idriss; Blinco, James; Gronheid, Roel; Jack, Kevin; Pollentier, Ivan; Leeson, Michael J.; Younkin, Todd R.; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2011-01-01

    Poly(olefin sulfone)s, formed by the reaction of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and an olefin, are known to be highly susceptible to degradation by radiation and thus have been identified as candidate materials for chain scission-based extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) resist materials. In order to investigate this further, the synthesis and characterisation of two poly(olefin sulfone)s namely poly(1-pentene sulfone) (PPS) and poly(2-methyl-1-pentene sulfone) (PMPS), was achieved and the two materials were evaluated for possible chain scission EUVL resist applications. It was found that both materials possess high sensitivities to EUV photons; however; the rates of outgassing were extremely high. The only observed degradation products were found to be SO 2 and the respective olefin suggesting that depolymerisation takes place under irradiation in a vacuum environment. In addition to depolymerisation, a concurrent conversion of SO 2 moieties to a sulfide phase was observed using XPS.

  15. Spin-on-glass coatings for the generation of super-polishedsubstrates for extreme ultraviolet optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmassi, Farhad; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Substrates intended for use as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optics have extremely stringent requirements in terms of finish. These requirements can dramatically increase the cost and fabrication time, especially when non-conventional shapes, such as toroids, are required. Here we present a spin-on-glass resist process capable of generating super-polished parts from inexpensive substrates. The method has been used to render diamond-turned substrates compatible for use as EUV optics. Toroidal diamond-turned optics with starting rms roughness in the 3.3 to 3.7 nm range have been smoothed to the 0.4 to 0.6 nm range. EUV reflectometry characterization of these optics has demonstrated reflectivities of approximately 63%.

  16. Operation of a free-electron laser from the extreme ultraviolet to the water window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, W.; Asova, G.; Ayvazyan, V.; Azima, A.; Baboi, N.; Bähr, J.; Balandin, V.; Beutner, B.; Brandt, A.; Bolzmann, A.; Brinkmann, R.; Brovko, O. I.; Castellano, M.; Castro, P.; Catani, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Choroba, S.; Cianchi, A.; Costello, J. T.; Cubaynes, D.; Dardis, J.; Decking, W.; Delsim-Hashemi, H.; Delserieys, A.; di Pirro, G.; Dohlus, M.; Düsterer, S.; Eckhardt, A.; Edwards, H. T.; Faatz, B.; Feldhaus, J.; Flöttmann, K.; Frisch, J.; Fröhlich, L.; Garvey, T.; Gensch, U.; Gerth, Ch.; Görler, M.; Golubeva, N.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Grecki, M.; Grimm, O.; Hacker, K.; Hahn, U.; Han, J. H.; Honkavaara, K.; Hott, T.; Hüning, M.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jaeschke, E.; Jalmuzna, W.; Jezynski, T.; Kammering, R.; Katalev, V.; Kavanagh, K.; Kennedy, E. T.; Khodyachykh, S.; Klose, K.; Kocharyan, V.; Körfer, M.; Kollewe, M.; Koprek, W.; Korepanov, S.; Kostin, D.; Krassilnikov, M.; Kube, G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Lilje, L.; Limberg, T.; Lipka, D.; Löhl, F.; Luna, H.; Luong, M.; Martins, M.; Meyer, M.; Michelato, P.; Miltchev, V.; Möller, W. D.; Monaco, L.; Müller, W. F. O.; Napieralski, O.; Napoly, O.; Nicolosi, P.; Nölle, D.; Nuñez, T.; Oppelt, A.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Pchalek, N.; Pedregosa-Gutierrez, J.; Petersen, B.; Petrosyan, B.; Petrosyan, G.; Petrosyan, L.; Pflüger, J.; Plönjes, E.; Poletto, L.; Pozniak, K.; Prat, E.; Proch, D.; Pucyk, P.; Radcliffe, P.; Redlin, H.; Rehlich, K.; Richter, M.; Roehrs, M.; Roensch, J.; Romaniuk, R.; Ross, M.; Rossbach, J.; Rybnikov, V.; Sachwitz, M.; Saldin, E. L.; Sandner, W.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmitz, M.; Schmüser, P.; Schneider, J. R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Schnepp, S.; Schreiber, S.; Seidel, M.; Sertore, D.; Shabunov, A. V.; Simon, C.; Simrock, S.; Sombrowski, E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Spanknebel, P.; Spesyvtsev, R.; Staykov, L.; Steffen, B.; Stephan, F.; Stulle, F.; Thom, H.; Tiedtke, K.; Tischer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Treusch, R.; Trines, D.; Tsakov, I.; Vogel, E.; Weiland, T.; Weise, H.; Wellhöfer, M.; Wendt, M.; Will, I.; Winter, A.; Wittenburg, K.; Wurth, W.; Yeates, P.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zagorodnov, I.; Zapfe, K.

    2007-06-01

    We report results on the performance of a free-electron laser operating at a wavelength of 13.7 nm where unprecedented peak and average powers for a coherent extreme-ultraviolet radiation source have been measured. In the saturation regime, the peak energy approached 170 µJ for individual pulses, and the average energy per pulse reached 70 µJ. The pulse duration was in the region of 10 fs, and peak powers of 10 GW were achieved. At a pulse repetition frequency of 700 pulses per second, the average extreme-ultraviolet power reached 20 mW. The output beam also contained a significant contribution from odd harmonics of approximately 0.6% and 0.03% for the 3rd (4.6 nm) and the 5th (2.75 nm) harmonics, respectively. At 2.75 nm the 5th harmonic of the radiation reaches deep into the water window, a wavelength range that is crucially important for the investigation of biological samples.

  17. Effect of stray light correction of extreme-ultraviolet solar images in tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloveras, D. G.; Vásquez, A. M.; Shearer, P.; Frazin, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    The Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) telescope on board the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission provides extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) coronal images of the full Sun. Using time series of EUV images, the differential emission measure tomography (DEMT) technique allows the determination of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the coronal electron density and temperature in the inner corona. EUV images are affected by stray light contamination which can be effectively removed if the point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument is well determined, as it is the case for EUVI. We show the results of a detailed analysis of the impact of EUVI stray light removal in DEMT results. To this end we analyze Carrington Rotation (CR)-2081 during the last solar minimum, characterized by a highly axisymmetric coronal structure. We find that stray light decontamination of EUVI images implies a systematic decrease of the derived electron density scale height and a systematic increase of the derived coronal base density, while its effect on the derived temperature is not systematic neither significant. We detail the results of the analysis in quantitative fashion.

  18. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziani, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France); Delmotte, F., E-mail: Franck.Delmotte@InstitutOptique.fr [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Le Paven-Thivet, C. [Institut d' Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes (IETR) UMR-CNRS 6164, Université de Rennes 1, UEB, IUT Saint Brieuc, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22004 Saint Brieuc cedex France (France); Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Roulliay, M. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay UMR 8214, Univ Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay France (France); Bridou, F. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Gasc, K. [Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-03

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B{sub 4}C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source.

  19. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziani, A.; Delmotte, F.; Le Paven-Thivet, C.; Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A.; Roulliay, M.; Bridou, F.; Gasc, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B 4 C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source

  20. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, Viliam; Čuba, Václav; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugars, and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9-nm (26.5 eV) radiation provided by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Doses up to 45 kGy were delivered with a repetition rate of 3 Hz. We studied the dependence of the yield of SSBs and DSBs of a simple model of DNA molecule (pBR322) on the CDL pulse fluence. Agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. The action cross sections of the single- and double-strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA in solid state were determined. We observed an increase in the efficiency of strand-break induction in the supercoiled DNA as a function of laser pulse fluence. Results are compared to those acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities and other sources of extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation.

  1. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, Viliam; Čuba, Václav; Grisham, Michael E; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugars, and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9-nm (26.5 eV) radiation provided by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Doses up to 45 kGy were delivered with a repetition rate of 3 Hz. We studied the dependence of the yield of SSBs and DSBs of a simple model of DNA molecule (pBR322) on the CDL pulse fluence. Agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. The action cross sections of the single- and double-strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA in solid state were determined. We observed an increase in the efficiency of strand-break induction in the supercoiled DNA as a function of laser pulse fluence. Results are compared to those acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities and other sources of extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation.

  2. Exploration of Extreme Terrain Using a Polyhedral Rover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Exploring celestial bodies with extreme terrains in our solar system, like Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and asteroids, are of great importance to NASA because these...

  3. TWO TYPES OF EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHTENINGS IN AR 10926 OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Choe, G. S.; Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Imada, S.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated seven extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightenings in the active region AR 10926 on 2006 December 2 observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft. We have determined their Doppler velocities and non-thermal velocities from 15 EUV spectral lines (log T = 4.7 - 6.4) by fitting each line profile to a Gaussian function. The Doppler velocity maps for different temperatures are presented to show the height dependence of the Doppler shifts. It is found that the active region brightenings show two distinct Doppler shift patterns. The type 1 brightening shows a systematic increase of Doppler velocity from -68 km s -1 (strong blueshift) at log T = 4.7 to -2 km s -1 (weak blueshift) at log T = 6.4, while the type 2 brightenings have Doppler velocities in the range from -20 km s -1 to 20 km s -1 . The type 1 brightening point is considered to sit in an upward reconnection outflow whose speed decreases with height. In both types of brightenings, the non-thermal velocity is found to be significantly enhanced at log T = 5.8 compared to the background region. We have also determined electron densities from line ratios and derived temperatures from emission measure loci using the CHIANTI atomic database. The electron densities of all brightenings are comparable to typical values in active regions (log N e = 9.9-10.4). The emission measure loci plots indicate that these brightenings should be multi-thermal whereas the background is isothermal. The differential emission measure as a function of temperature shows multiple peaks in the EUV brightening regions, while it has only a single peak (log T = 6.0) in the background region. Using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms, we have found that the type 1 brightening is associated with a canceling magnetic feature with a flux canceling rate of 2.4 x 10 18 Mx hr -1 . We also found the canceling magnetic feature and chromospheric brightenings in the type 1 brightening from the Hinode SOT and

  4. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, He [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Xu, Yiming [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Ulonska, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Robinson, Joseph S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Ranitovic, Predrag [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Kaindl, Robert A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    2015-06-11

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. In this article, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s-1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10-5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Finally, spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications.

  5. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s−1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10−5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications. PMID:26067922

  6. Surface modification of polymers for biocompatibility via exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inam Ul Ahad; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Korczyc, Barbara; Ciach, Tomasz; Brabazon, Dermot

    2014-09-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are being widely used for the treatment of various traumata, diseases and defects in human beings due to ease in their synthesis. As biomaterials have direct interaction with the extracellular environment in the biological world, biocompatibility is a topic of great significance. The introduction or enhancement of biocompatibility in certain polymers is still a challenge to overcome. Polymer biocompatibility can be controlled by surface modification. Various physical and chemical methods (e.g., chemical and plasma treatment, ion implantation, and ultraviolet irradiation etc.) are in use or being developed for the modification of polymer surfaces. However an important limitation in their employment is the alteration of bulk material. Different surface and bulk properties of biomaterials are often desirable for biomedical applications. Because extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation penetration is quite limited even in low density mediums, it could be possible to use it for surface modification without influencing the bulk material. This article reviews the degree of biocompatibility of different polymeric biomaterials being currently employed in various biomedical applications, the surface properties required to be modified for biocompatibility control, plasma and laser ablation based surface modification techniques, and research studies indicating possible use of EUV for enhancing biocompatibility. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Efficient extreme ultraviolet emission from one-dimensional spherical plasmas produced by multiple lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kensuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Ugomori, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Nozomi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Ohashi, Hayato; Kawasaki, Masato; Suzuki, Yuhei; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tomita, Kentaro; Hirose, Ryoichi; Ejima, Takeo; Nishikino, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate high conversion efficiency for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission at 6.5–6.7 nm from multiple laser beam-produced one-dimensional spherical plasmas. Multiply charged-state ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) in Gd, Tb, and Mo. At an optimum laser intensity of 1 × 10 12 W/cm 2 , which is estimated to yield an electron temperature of around 100 eV, the maximum in-band EUV conversion efficiency (CE) was observed to be 0.8%, which is one of the highest values ever reported due to the reduction of plasma expansion loss. (author)

  8. Acid Diffusion Length in Line-and-Space Resist Patterns Fabricated by Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2013-07-01

    Acids generated upon exposure to radiation induce the polarity change of the polymer through catalytic chain reactions in chemically amplified resists. With the reduction of feature size, the acid diffusion length increasingly becomes an important issue. In this study, we investigated the acid diffusion length in line-and-space patterns fabricated using a small field exposure tool for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography and the EIDEC standard resist to clarify the acid diffusion length in a state-of-the-art resist. The acid diffusion length depended on the nominal line width and exposure dose. Upon exposure to EUV radiation with an exposure dose of 16 mJ cm-2, the acid diffusion length (three-dimensional) in a line-and-space pattern with 21 nm nominal line width was 9.5 nm.

  9. Dynamics of radical ions of fluorinated polymer for Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Naoya; Okamoto, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2015-07-01

    To realize extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography for mass production of semiconductor devices, enhancements of performance of chemically amplified resist have been still important issue. In EUV resist, radiation chemical reactions occur after irradiations of the EUV light. Dynamics of chemical intermediates of EUV resist after exposure to the ionizing radiations is important for understanding new resist design. Fluorinated resists have been developed for ArF, F2, and EUV lithography. Fluorinated polymers are effective to enhance the sensitivity of the EUV resist because F atom has higher absorptivity of EUV photons. However, the fluorination effect on the radiation chemical reactions in the resist has not been clarified in detail. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of radical ions of fluorinated polymers (FPs) by pulse radiolysis method and quantum chemical calculations to clarify the reaction mechanism for EUV lithography.

  10. Complementary ion and extreme ultra-violet spectrometer for laser-plasma diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S; Ramakrishna, B; Doria, D; Sarri, G; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Ehrentraut, L; Stiel, H; Steinke, S; Priebe, G; Schnürer, M; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W

    2009-10-01

    Simultaneous detection of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) and ion emission along the same line of sight provides comprehensive insight into the evolution of plasmas. This type of combined spectroscopy is applied to diagnose laser interaction with a spray target. The use of a micro-channel-plate detector assures reliable detection of both XUV and ion signals in a single laser shot. The qualitative analysis of the ion emission and XUV spectra allows to gain detailed information about the plasma conditions, and a correlation between the energetic proton emission and the XUV plasma emission can be suggested. The measured XUV emission spectrum from water spray shows efficient deceleration of laser accelerated electrons with energies up to keV in the initially cold background plasma and the collisional heating of the plasma.

  11. Complementary ion and extreme ultra-violet spectrometer for laser-plasma diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Ehrentraut, L.; Stiel, H.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Priebe, G.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous detection of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) and ion emission along the same line of sight provides comprehensive insight into the evolution of plasmas. This type of combined spectroscopy is applied to diagnose laser interaction with a spray target. The use of a micro-channel-plate detector assures reliable detection of both XUV and ion signals in a single laser shot. The qualitative analysis of the ion emission and XUV spectra allows to gain detailed information about the plasma conditions, and a correlation between the energetic proton emission and the XUV plasma emission can be suggested. The measured XUV emission spectrum from water spray shows efficient deceleration of laser accelerated electrons with energies up to keV in the initially cold background plasma and the collisional heating of the plasma.

  12. Relativistic electron mirrors from nanoscale foils for coherent frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, D.; Yeung, M.; Dzelzainis, T.; Foster, P.S.; Rykovanov, S.G.; Lewis, C.LS.; Marjoribanks, R.S.; Ruhl, H.; Habs, D.; Schreiber, J.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting light from a mirror moving close to the speed of light has been envisioned as a route towards producing bright X-ray pulses since Einstein’s seminal work on special relativity. For an ideal relativistic mirror, the peak power of the reflected radiation can substantially exceed that of the incident radiation due to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression. Here we demonstrate for the first time that dense relativistic electron mirrors can be created from the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a freestanding, nanometre-scale thin foil. The mirror structures are shown to shift the frequency of a counter-propagating laser pulse coherently from the infrared to the extreme ultraviolet with an efficiency >104 times higher than in the case of incoherent scattering. Our results elucidate the reflection process of laser-generated electron mirrors and give clear guidance for future developments of a relativistic mirror structure. PMID:23612304

  13. A high efficiency ultrahigh vacuum compatible flat field spectrometer for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Fahy, K.; Aguilar, A.; Makonyi, K.; Takacs, E.; Tan, J.N.; Pomeroy, J.M.; Burnett, J.H.; Gillaspy, J.D.; Roberts, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A custom, flat field, extreme ultraviolet spectrometer built specifically for use with low power light sources that operate under ultrahigh vacuum conditions is reported. The spectral range of the spectrometer extends from 4 nm to 40 nm. The instrument optimizes the light gathering power and signal-to-noise ratio while achieving good resolution. A detailed description of the spectrometer and design considerations are presented, as well as a procedure that could be used to obtain a synthetic wavelength calibration with the aid of only a single known spectral feature. This synthetic wavelength calibration is compared to a standard wavelength calibration obtained from previously reported spectral lines of Xe, Ar, and Ne ions recorded with this spectrometer

  14. Invisible marking system by extreme ultraviolet radiation: the new frontier for anti-counterfeiting tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaro, P. Di; Bollanti, S.; Flora, F.; Mezi, L.; Murra, D.; Torre, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R.M.; Vincenti, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a marking technology which uses extreme ultraviolet radiation to write invisible patterns on tags based on alkali fluoride thin films. The shape of the pattern is pre-determined by a mask (in the case of contact lithography) or by a suitable mirror (projection lithography). Tags marked using this method offer a much better protection against fakes than currently available anti-counterfeiting techniques. The complexity and cost of this technology can be tailored to the value of the good to be protected, leaving, on the other hand, the specific reading technique straightforward. So far, we have exploited our invisible marking to tag artworks, identity cards, electrical components, and containers of radioactive wastes. Advantages and limits of this technology are discussed in comparison with the anti-counterfeiting systems available in the market.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet diagnosis of a neutral-beam-heated mirror machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.P.

    1980-07-01

    Extreme ultraviolet emissions from the LLL 2XIIB fusion research experiment have been studied. (2XIIB was a magnetic-mirror-plasma-confinement device; beams of high-energy (20 keV) neutral deuterium created a high-density, high-temperature plasma.) A normal-incidence concave-grating monochromator, equipped with a windowless photomultiplier tube, was used to measure emissions in the spectral region from 400 Angstrom to 1600 A. Emissions of oxygen, titanium, carbon, nitrogen, and deuterium were identified; the oxygen brightnesses at times exceeded 10/sup 18/ ph-s/sup -1/-cm/sup -2/-sr/sup -1/. A survey of the emission characteristics found the oxygen concentration was 3%, the other impurities had concentrations near 0.4%. The radiated power loss was about 5% of the deposited neutral beam power.

  16. Extending resonant inelastic X-ray scattering to the extreme ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Andrew eWray

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS, core hole resonance modes are used to enhance coupling between photons and low energy electronic degrees of freedom. Resonating with shallow core holes accessed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV can provide greatly improved energy resolution at standard resolving power, but has been found to often yield qualitatively different spectra than similar measurements performed with higher energy X-rays. This paper uses experimental data and multiplet-based numerical simulations for the M-edges of Co-, Ni- and Cu-based Mott insulators to review the properties that distinguish EUV RIXS from more commonly performed higher energy measurements. Key factors such as the origin of the strong EUV elastic line and advantages of EUV spectral functions over soft X-ray RIXS for identifying intrinsic excitation line shapes are discussed.

  17. Extreme Ultraviolet Emission Spectrum of CO_2 Induced by Electron Impact at 200 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.; James, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    We present the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission spectrum of CO_2 induced by electronimpact at 200 eV. There are 36 spectral features which are identified with a resolution of 0.5 nmover the wavelength range of 40 to 125 nm. Absolute emission cross sections were obtained for eachof these features. The EUV emission spectrum induced by electron impact consist of atomicmultiplets of CI,II and OI,II,III as well as CO and CO^+ molecular band systems produced bydissociative excitation. The CI (119.4 nm) multiplet is the strongest feature of CI with a peak crosssection of 3.61 x 10^(-19) cm^2 at 200 eV. The strongest feature of OI in the EUV spectrum is theOI (99.0 nm) multiplet with a peak cross section of 3.59 x 10^(-19) cm^2 at 200 eV.

  18. Mapping the spectral phase of isolated attosecond pulses by extreme-ultraviolet emission spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Candong; Zeng, Zhinan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Nisoli, Mauro

    2015-04-20

    An all-optical method is proposed for the measurement of the spectral phase of isolated attosecond pulses. The technique is based on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in a gas by the combination of an attosecond pulse and a strong infrared (IR) pulse with controlled electric field. By using a full quantum simulation, we demonstrate that, for particular temporal delays between the two pulses, the IR field can drive back to the parent ions the photoelectrons generated by the attosecond pulse, thus leading to the generation of XUV photons. It is found that the generated XUV spectrum is notably sensitive to the chirp of the attosecond pulse, which can then be reliably retrieved. A classical quantum-path analysis is further used to quantitatively explain the main features exhibited in the XUV emission.

  19. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry for actinide trace analysis and nanoscale isotopic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Tyler; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Willingham, David; Naes, Benjamin E.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Zhu, Zihua; Chao, W.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize Extreme Ultraviolet Time-of-Flight (EUV TOF) Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry for high spatial resolution elemental and isotopic analysis. We compare EUV TOF results with Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to orient the EUV TOF method within the overall field of analytical mass spectrometry. Using the well-characterized NIST 61x glasses, we show that the EUV ionization approach produces relatively few molecular ion interferences in comparison to TOF SIMS. We demonstrate that the ratio of element ion to element oxide ion is adjustable with EUV laser pulse energy and that the EUV TOF instrument has a sample utilization efficiency of 0.014%. The EUV TOF system also achieves a lateral resolution of 80 nm and we demonstrate this lateral resolution with isotopic imaging of closely spaced particles or uranium isotopic standard materials.

  20. Methods and apparatus for use with extreme ultraviolet light having contamination protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilese, Francis C.; Torczynski, John R.; Garcia, Rudy; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Delgado, Gildardo R.; Rader, Daniel J.; Geller, Anthony S.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2016-07-12

    An apparatus for use with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light comprising A) a duct having a first end opening, a second end opening and an intermediate opening intermediate the first end opening the second end opening, B) an optical component disposed to receive EUV light from the second end opening or to send light through the second end opening, and C) a source of low pressure gas at a first pressure to flow through the duct, the gas having a high transmission of EUV light, fluidly coupled to the intermediate opening. In addition to or rather than gas flow the apparatus may have A) a low pressure gas with a heat control unit thermally coupled to at least one of the duct and the optical component and/or B) a voltage device to generate voltage between a first portion and a second portion of the duet with a grounded insulative portion therebetween.

  1. Extreme-ultraviolet and electron beam lithography processing using water developable resist material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    In order to achieve the use of pure water in the developable process of extreme-ultraviolet and electron beam lithography, instead of conventionally used tetramethylammonium hydroxide and organic solvents, a water developable resist material was designed and developed. The water-developable resist material was derived from woody biomass with beta-linked disaccharide unit for environmental affair, safety, easiness of handling, and health of the working people. 80 nm dense line patterning images with exposure dose of 22 μC/cm2 and CF4 etching selectivity of 1.8 with hardmask layer were provided by specific process conditions. The approach of our water-developable resist material will be one of the most promising technologies ready to be investigated into production of medical device applications.

  2. Evaluation and testing of image quality of the Space Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jilong; Yi, Zhong; Zhou, Shuhong; Yu, Qian; Hou, Yinlong; Wang, Shanshan

    2018-01-01

    For the space solar extreme ultraviolet telescope, the star point test can not be performed in the x-ray band (19.5nm band) as there is not light source of bright enough. In this paper, the point spread function of the optical system is calculated to evaluate the imaging performance of the telescope system. Combined with the actual processing surface error, such as small grinding head processing and magnetorheological processing, the optical design software Zemax and data analysis software Matlab are used to directly calculate the system point spread function of the space solar extreme ultraviolet telescope. Matlab codes are programmed to generate the required surface error grid data. These surface error data is loaded to the specified surface of the telescope system by using the communication technique of DDE (Dynamic Data Exchange), which is used to connect Zemax and Matlab. As the different processing methods will lead to surface error with different size, distribution and spatial frequency, the impact of imaging is also different. Therefore, the characteristics of the surface error of different machining methods are studied. Combining with its position in the optical system and simulation its influence on the image quality, it is of great significance to reasonably choose the processing technology. Additionally, we have also analyzed the relationship between the surface error and the image quality evaluation. In order to ensure the final processing of the mirror to meet the requirements of the image quality, we should choose one or several methods to evaluate the surface error according to the different spatial frequency characteristics of the surface error.

  3. Extreme ultra-violet emission spectroscopy of highly charged gadolinium ions with an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A

    2013-01-01

    We present extreme ultra-violet emission spectra of highly charged gadolinium ions obtained with an electron beam ion trap at electron energies of 0.53–1.51 keV. The electron energy dependence of the spectra in the 5.7–11.3 nm range is compared with calculation with the flexible atomic code. (paper)

  4. New type of discharge-produced plasma source for extreme ultraviolet based on liquid tin jet electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshelev, K.N.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Ivanov, V.; Yakushev, O.; Chekmarev, A.; Koloshnikov, V.; Snegirev, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for discharge-produced plasma (DPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources based on the usage of two liquid metallic alloy jets as discharge electrodes has been proposed and tested. Discharge was ignited using laser ablation of one of the cathode jets. A system with two jet electrodes was

  5. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.; Lopaev, D.; Lee, Christopher James; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav; Yakushev, O.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that

  6. A giant planet undergoing extreme-ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B Scott; Stassun, Keivan G; Collins, Karen A; Beatty, Thomas G; Zhou, George; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Eastman, Jason D; Siverd, Robert J; Crepp, Justin R; Gonzales, Erica J; Stevens, Daniel J; Buchhave, Lars A; Pepper, Joshua; Johnson, Marshall C; Colon, Knicole D; Jensen, Eric L N; Rodriguez, Joseph E; Bozza, Valerio; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Dumont, Mary T; Ellis, Tyler; Gaillard, Clement; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kasper, David H; Fukui, Akihiko; Gregorio, Joao; Ito, Ayaka; Kielkopf, John F; Manner, Mark; Matt, Kyle; Narita, Norio; Oberst, Thomas E; Reed, Phillip A; Scarpetta, Gaetano; Stephens, Denice C; Yeigh, Rex R; Zambelli, Roberto; Fulton, B J; Howard, Andrew W; James, David J; Penny, Matthew; Bayliss, Daniel; Curtis, Ivan A; DePoy, D L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Gould, Andrew; Joner, Michael D; Kuhn, Rudolf B; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Lund, Michael B; Marshall, Jennifer L; McLeod, Kim K; Pogge, Richard W; Relles, Howard; Stockdale, Christopher; Tan, T G; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2017-06-22

    The amount of ultraviolet irradiation and ablation experienced by a planet depends strongly on the temperature of its host star. Of the thousands of extrasolar planets now known, only six have been found that transit hot, A-type stars (with temperatures of 7,300-10,000 kelvin), and no planets are known to transit the even hotter B-type stars. For example, WASP-33 is an A-type star with a temperature of about 7,430 kelvin, which hosts the hottest known transiting planet, WASP-33b (ref. 1); the planet is itself as hot as a red dwarf star of type M (ref. 2). WASP-33b displays a large heat differential between its dayside and nightside, and is highly inflated-traits that have been linked to high insolation. However, even at the temperature of its dayside, its atmosphere probably resembles the molecule-dominated atmospheres of other planets and, given the level of ultraviolet irradiation it experiences, its atmosphere is unlikely to be substantially ablated over the lifetime of its star. Here we report observations of the bright star HD 195689 (also known as KELT-9), which reveal a close-in (orbital period of about 1.48 days) transiting giant planet, KELT-9b. At approximately 10,170 kelvin, the host star is at the dividing line between stars of type A and B, and we measure the dayside temperature of KELT-9b to be about 4,600 kelvin. This is as hot as stars of stellar type K4 (ref. 5). The molecules in K stars are entirely dissociated, and so the primary sources of opacity in the dayside atmosphere of KELT-9b are probably atomic metals. Furthermore, KELT-9b receives 700 times more extreme-ultraviolet radiation (that is, with wavelengths shorter than 91.2 nanometres) than WASP-33b, leading to a predicted range of mass-loss rates that could leave the planet largely stripped of its envelope during the main-sequence lifetime of the host star.

  7. Electron impact collision strengths and transition rates for extreme ultraviolet emission from Xe10+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yunfeng; Gao Cheng; Zeng Jiaolong

    2009-01-01

    The energy levels, oscillator strengths, and electron impact collision strengths are calculated for the Xe 10+ ion using the configuration interaction scheme implemented by the Flexible Atomic Code. These data pertain to the 3917 levels belonging to the following configurations: 4s 2 4p 6 4d 8 , 4s 2 4p 6 4d 7 4f, 4s 2 4p 6 4d 7 5l (l = s, p, d, or f), 4s 2 4p 5 4d 9 , 4s 2 4p 5 4d 8 4f, 4s 2 4p 5 4d 8 5l, 4s 2 4p 6 4d 6 5s5p, 4s 2 4p 6 4d 6 5p5d. Configuration interactions among these configurations are included in the calculation. Collision strengths are obtained at 10 scattered electron energies (1-1000 eV) and are tabulated here at five representative energies of 10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 eV. Effective collision strengths are obtained by assuming a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution at 10 temperatures ranging from 10 to 100 eV, and are tabulated at five representative temperatures of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 eV in this work. The whole data set should be useful for research involving extreme ultraviolet emission from Xe 10+

  8. Micro- and Nanoprocessing of Polymers Using a Laser Plasma Extreme Ultraviolet Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, A.; Szczurek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser plasma with temperature of the order of tens eV can be an efficient source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The radiation can be focused using different kind of optics, giving sufficient fluence for some applications. In this work we present results of investigations concerning applications of a laser plasma EUV source based on a double stream gas puff target. The source was equipped with two different grazing incidence collectors. One of them was a multifoil collector, the second one was an axisymmetrical ellipsoidal collector. The multifoil mirror was used mainly in experiments concerning micromachining of organic polymers by direct photo-etching. The experiments were performed for different polymers that were irradiated through a fine metal grid as a contact mask. The smallest element of a pattern structure obtained in this way was 5 μm, while the structure height was 50 μm giving an aspect ratio about 10. The laser-plasma EUV source equipped with the axisymmetrical ellipsoidal collector was used for surface modification of organic polymers and inorganic solids. The surface morphology after irradiation was investigated. Different forms of micro- and nanostructures were obtained depending on material and irradiation conditions. (author)

  9. Extreme ultraviolet digital in-line holography using a tabletop source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürch, Michael; Spielmann, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) offers fast, lensless, and aberration-free imaging with diffraction-limited resolution and inherently combines phase- and amplitude-contrast imaging, as well as three-dimensional imaging. Extending this technique to shorter wavelengths allows increasing the achievable spatial and phase-contrast resolution, as well as accessing material parameters not accessible in the optical domain. In this paper, we report on DIH experiments conducted with a coherent tabletop ultrafast high harmonic source operated at 38 nm wavelength. Applying a twin-image-free reconstruction scheme optimized for highly absorbing samples, we were able to demonstrate the phase-contrast imaging of silicon nitride sheets of 15 nm thickness and the use of the strong absorption of extreme ultraviolet in matter for amplitude-contrast imaging of thin films with spatial resolution below 1 μm. High-resolution morphology determination in combination with phase-contrast imaging is of special importance in thin-film characterization and applications arising thereof.

  10. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O'Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  11. Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of Few-Times Ionized Tungsten for Divertor Plasma Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Clementson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The extreme ultraviolet (EUV emission from few-times ionized tungsten atoms has been experimentally studied at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility. The ions were produced and confined during low-energy operations of the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap. By varying the electron-beam energy from around 30–300 eV, tungsten ions in charge states expected to be abundant in tokamak divertor plasmas were excited, and the resulting EUV emission was studied using a survey spectrometer covering 120–320 Å. It is found that the emission strongly depends on the excitation energy; below 150 eV, it is relatively simple, consisting of strong isolated lines from a few charge states, whereas at higher energies, it becomes very complex. For divertor plasmas with tungsten impurity ions, this emission should prove useful for diagnostics of tungsten flux rates and charge balance, as well as for radiative cooling of the divertor volume. Several lines in the 194–223 Å interval belonging to the spectra of five- and seven-times ionized tungsten (Tm-like W VI and Ho-like W VIII were also measured using a high-resolution spectrometer.

  12. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-01-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 μm in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  13. Design, conception, and metrology of Extreme Ultraviolet multilayers mirrors resistant environments of space and EUV sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecquet, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrum (EUV) wavelengths, which range between 13 nm and 40 nm, have many applications in science and technology. These have been developed for example in plasma physics (high order harmonics sources, X ray lasers). The work presented is about the design, the fabrication and the metrology of periodic multilayer mirrors. The main motivation of this study is to establish a cycle of development taking into account both the optical properties of reflective coatings (reflectivity, spectral selectivity, attenuation) and their behaviour under various environments. To improve the spectral selectivity, new multilayer periodic structures have been developed. They are characterized by a bimodal reflectance profile with adjustable attenuation. The effect of environment on the stability of performance is especially critical for the optical collection. The addition of material barriers has stabilized the performance of the peak reflectivity for over 200 h at 400 C deg. and it reduces the influence of other factors of instability on the reflectance. In addition, all structures have been fabricated successfully and evaluated in severe environments. (author)

  14. A Fast Propagating Extreme-Ultraviolet Wave Associated with a Mini-filament Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Dan; Yang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The fast extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves (>1000 km s-1) in the solar corona were very rare in the past. Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, we present a fast EUV wave associated with a mini-filament eruption, a C1.0 flare, and a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2011 September 30. The event took place at the periphery between two active regions (ARs). The mini-filament rapidly erupted as a blowout jet associated with a flare and a CME. The CME front was likely developed from the large-scale overlying loops. The wave onset was nearly simultaneous with the start of the jet and the flare. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the rapid jet. The wave had an initial speed of about 1100 km s-1 and a slight deceleration in the last phase, and the velocity decreased to about 500 km s-1. The wave propagated in a narrow angle extent, likely to avoid the ARs on both sides. All the results provide evidence that the fast EUV wave was a fast-mode MHD wave. The wave resisted being driven by the CME, because it opened up the large-scale loops and its front likely formed later than the wave. The wave was most likely triggered by the jet, due to their close timing and location relations.

  15. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  16. Recycling of laser and plasma radiation energy for enhancement of extreme ultraviolet sources for nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Johnson, K.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed comprehensive integrated models for detailed simulation of laser-produced plasma (LPP) and laser/target interaction, with potential recycling of the escaping laser and out-of-band plasma radiation. Recycling, i.e., returning the escaping laser and plasma radiation to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation region using retroreflective mirrors, has the potential of increasing the EUV conversion efficiency (CE) by up to 60% according to our simulations. This would result in significantly reduced power consumption and/or increased EUV output. Based on our recently developed models, our High Energy Interaction with General Heterogeneous Target Systems (HEIGHTS) computer simulation package was upgraded for LPP devices to include various radiation recycling regimes and to estimate the potential CE enhancement. The upgraded HEIGHTS was used to study recycling of both laser and plasma-generated radiation and to predict possible gains in conversion efficiency compared to no-recycling LPP devices when using droplets of tin target. We considered three versions of the LPP system including a single CO2 laser, a single Nd:YAG laser, and a dual-pulse device combining both laser systems. The gains in generating EUV energy were predicted and compared for these systems. Overall, laser and radiation energy recycling showed the potential for significant enhancement in source efficiency of up to 60% for the dual-pulse system. Significantly higher CE gains might be possible with optimization of the pre-pulse and main pulse parameters and source size.

  17. Charge Carrier Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxides Studied by Femtosecond Transient Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang-Ming

    With the ability to disentangle electronic transitions that occur on different elements and local electronic structures, time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in condensed phase systems. In this dissertation, a visible-pump/XUV-probe transient absorption apparatus with femtosecond resolution was constructed to investigate the carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductors after photo-excitation. This includes timescales for carrier thermalization by carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering. The 30 -- 72 eV photon energy coverage (17 -- 40 nm wavelength) generated by a table-top XUV light source is suitable for probing the 3p-to-3d core level absorptions of various transition metal oxides (TMOs) with specificities to elements and oxidation states. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor-based materials is given. In addition, fundamentals of core-level spectroscopy and the high harmonic generation (HHG) process are also addressed in this introductory chapter. Specifications of the experimental apparatus that was constructed are summarized in Chapter 2, including the design concepts and characterization of performance. Chapter 3 presents the spectral tunability of the XUV pulses generated from a semi-infinite gas cell (SIGC), as well as the data acquisition procedures. Charge carrier relaxation dynamics in Co3O4 following the charge transfer excitation pathway at 400 nm are documented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, various visible pump wavelengths are used to excite Co3O4 and the differences in the carrier dynamics versus excitation wavelength are considered. After selectively photoexciting a Si/TiO2 heterojunction, the resulted electron transfer process is observed and reported in Chapter 6. The concluding remarks of the dissertation are made in Chapter 7, while several ongoing time-resolved experiments are addressed in the Appendix sections.

  18. Geocentric position preliminary detection from the extreme ultraviolet images of Chang'E-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen; Ping, Jinsong; Wang, Mingyuan; Li, Wenxiao

    2015-08-01

    An Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Camera was installed onboard the Chinese lunar surface landing mission, the Chang'E-3 lander, as a useful method to observe the Earth plasmasphere. This EUV optical payload obtained more than 600 moon-based Earth plasmasphere images since December 14, 2013. However, due to errors of unknown size and origin in the platform attitude control of the lander and in the EUV telescope pointing control during the mission operating periods, the geocentric coordinates in these EUV images are not fixed in the same position of CCD pixel. Before adequately calibrating, these positioning offsets will introduce extra errors into the analysis of the plasmaspheric structure. With only a little insufficient telemetry information, an effective calibrating method of circle-based differential algorithm is suggested and demonstrated, for automatically and precisely detecting the geocentric position in each EUV image of Chang'E-3 mission. In each EUV image, the tested method uses the outline of a circle as the basic unit to capture the contour for the bright region based on the spectral characteristic. Then, the center of the extracted circle is adopted as the geocentric position for the image. The preliminary analysis shows that this method can effectively detect the geocentric position being always consistent with the recognition result by the basic hand labor method. It is found that the radius of the circles varies from month to month from December, 2013 to May, 2014. The monthly averages of radius show relative notable positive correlation and negative correlation with the changes of both Zenith angle of the Earth at the landing area of Chang'E-3 lander, and the Earth-moon distance, respectively. This method and results here will benefit the Chang'E-3 EUV study.

  19. On the nature of the extreme-ultraviolet late phase of solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Dai, Y., E-mail: yingli@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-10-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase of solar flares is a second peak of warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI) for many minutes to a few hours after the GOES soft X-ray peak. It was first observed by the EUV Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The late-phase emission originates from a second set of longer loops (late-phase loops) that are higher than the main flaring loops. It is suggested to be caused by either additional heating or long-lasting cooling. In this paper, we study the role of long-lasting cooling and additional heating in producing the EUV late phase using the enthalpy based thermal evolution of loops model. We find that a long cooling process in late-phase loops can well explain the presence of the EUV late-phase emission, but we cannot exclude the possibility of additional heating in the decay phase. Moreover, we provide two preliminary methods based on the UV and EUV emissions from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO to determine whether or not additional heating plays a role in the late-phase emission. Using nonlinear force-free field modeling, we study the magnetic configuration of the EUV late phase. It is found that the late phase can be generated either in hot spine field lines associated with a magnetic null point or in large-scale magnetic loops of multipolar magnetic fields. In this paper, we also discuss why the EUV late phase is usually observed in warm coronal emissions and why the majority of flares do not exhibit an EUV late phase.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  1. OBSERVATION OF A QUASIPERIODIC PULSATION IN HARD X-RAY, RADIO, AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVELENGTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Suk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Nakariakov, Valery M., E-mail: pankaj@kasi.re.kr [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of a quasiperiodic pulsation (QPP) observed in the hard X-ray (HXR), radio, and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels during an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2011 September 23–24. The nonthermal HXR emission in 25–50 keV observed by RHESSI shows five distinct impulsive peaks of decaying amplitude with a period of about 3 minutes. A similar QPP was observed in the microwave emission recorded by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Polarimeter in the 2, 3.75, 9.4, and 17 GHz channels. Interestingly, the 3-minute QPP was also observed in the metric and decimetric radio frequencies (25–180, 245, 610 MHz) as repetitive type III bursts. Multiwavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory /Atmospheric Image Assembly, Hinode /SOT, and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory /SECCHI suggest a fan-spine topology at the eruption site, associated with the formation of a quasi-circular ribbon during the flare. A small filament was observed below the fan loops before the flare onset. The filament rose slowly and interacted with the ambient field. This behavior was followed by an untwisting motion of the filament. Two different structures of the filament showed an approximately 3-minute periodic alternate rotation in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions. The 3-minute QPP was found to highly correlate with 3-minute oscillations in a nearby sunspot. We suggest that the periodic reconnection (modulated either by a sunspot slow-mode wave or by an untwisting filament) at a magnetic null point most likely causes the repetitive particle acceleration, generating the QPP observed in HXR, microwave, and type III radio bursts.

  2. Enhancing extreme ultraviolet photons emission in laser produced plasmas for advanced lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-08-01

    Current challenges in the development of efficient laser produced plasma sources for the next generation extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) are increasing EUV power and maximizing lifetime and therefore, reducing cost of devices. Mass-limited targets such as small tin droplets are considered among the best choices for cleaner operation of the optical system because of lower mass of atomic debris produced by the laser beam. The small diameter of droplets, however, decreases the conversion efficiency (CE) of EUV photons emission, especially in the case of CO2 laser, where laser wavelength has high reflectivity from the tin surface. We investigated ways of improving CE in mass-limited targets. We considered in our modeling various possible target phases and lasers configurations: from solid/liquid droplets subjected to laser beam energy with different intensities and laser wavelength to dual-beam lasers, i.e., a pre-pulse followed by a main pulse with adjusted delay time in between. We studied the dependence of vapor expansion rate, which can be produced as a result of droplet heating by pre-pulse laser energy, on target configuration, size, and laser beam parameters. As a consequence, we studied the influence of these conditions and parameters on the CE and debris mass accumulation. For better understanding and more accurate modeling of all physical processes occurred during various phases of laser beam/target interactions, plasma plume formation and evolution, EUV photons emission and collection, we have implemented in our heights package state-of-the art models and methods, verified, and benchmarked against laboratory experiments in our CMUXE center as well as various worldwide experimental results.

  3. Sensitivity enhancement of chemically amplified resists and performance study using extreme ultraviolet interference lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Elizabeth; Nagahara, Seiji; Yildirim, Oktay; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Meeuwissen, Marieke; Nagai, Tomoki; Naruoka, Takehiko; Verspaget, Coen; Hoefnagels, Rik; Rispens, Gijsbert; Shiraishi, Gosuke; Terashita, Yuichi; Minekawa, Yukie; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Oshima, Akihiro; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-07-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, λ=13.5 nm) is the most promising candidate to manufacture electronic devices for future technology nodes in the semiconductor industry. Nonetheless, EUVL still faces many technological challenges as it moves toward high-volume manufacturing (HVM). A key bottleneck from the tool design and performance point of view has been the development of an efficient, high-power EUV light source for high throughput production. Consequently, there has been extensive research on different methodologies to enhance EUV resist sensitivity. Resist performance is measured in terms of its ultimate printing resolution, line width roughness (LWR), sensitivity [S or best energy (BE)], and exposure latitude (EL). However, there are well-known fundamental trade-off relationships (line width roughness, resolution and sensitivity trade-off) among these parameters for chemically amplified resists (CARs). We present early proof-of-principle results for a multiexposure lithography process that has the potential for high sensitivity enhancement without compromising other important performance characteristics by the use of a "Photosensitized Chemically Amplified Resist™" (PSCAR™). With this method, we seek to increase the sensitivity by combining a first EUV pattern exposure with a second UV-flood exposure (λ=365 nm) and the use of a PSCAR. In addition, we have evaluated over 50 different state-of-the-art EUV CARs. Among these, we have identified several promising candidates that simultaneously meet sensitivity, LWR, and EL high-performance requirements with the aim of resolving line space (L/S) features for the 7- and 5-nm logic node [16- and 13-nm half-pitch (HP), respectively] for HVM. Several CARs were additionally found to be well resolved down to 12- and 11-nm HP with minimal pattern collapse and bridging, a remarkable feat for CARs. Finally, the performance of two negative tone state-of-the-art alternative resist platforms previously investigated

  4. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  5. Studies of extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasmas, as sources for next generation lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Thomas

    The work presented in this thesis is primarily concerned with the optimisation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoemission around 13.5 nm, from laser produced tin (Sn) plasmas. EUV lithography has been identified as the leading next generation technology to take over from the current optical lithography systems, due to its potential of printing smaller feature sizes on integrated circuits. Many of the problems hindering the implementation of EUV lithography for high volume manufacturing have been overcome during the past 20 years of development. However, the lack of source power is a major concern for realising EUV lithography and remains a major roadblock that must be overcome. Therefore in order to optimise and improve the EUV emission from Sn laser plasma sources, many parameters contributing to the make-up of an EUV source are investigated. Chapter 3 presents the results of varying several different experimental parameters on the EUV emission from Sn laser plasmas. Several of the laser parameters including the energy, gas mixture, focusing lens position and angle of incidence are changed, while their effect on the EUV emission is studied. Double laser pulse experiments are also carried out by creating plasma targets for the main laser pulse to interact with. The resulting emission is compared to that of a single laser pulse on solid Sn. Chapter 4 investigates tailoring the CO2 laser pulse duration to improve the efficiency of an EUV source set-up. In doing so a new technique for shortening the time duration of the pulse is described. The direct effects of shortening the CO2 laser pulse duration on the EUV emission from Sn are then studied and shown to improve the efficiency of the source. In Chapter 5 a new plasma target type is studied and compared to the previous dual laser experiments. Laser produced colliding plasma jet targets form a new plasma layer, with densities that can be optimised for re-heating with the main CO2 laser pulse. Chapter 6 will present

  6. Tracing electron-ion recombination in nanoplasmas produced by extreme-ultraviolet irradiation of rare-gas clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, B; Campi, F; Arbeiter, M; Fennel, Th; Vrakking, M J J; Rouzée, A

    2014-06-27

    We investigate electron-ion recombination in nanoplasmas produced by the ionization of rare-gas clusters with intense femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses. The relaxation dynamics following XUV irradiation is studied using time-delayed 790-nm pulses, revealing the generation of a large number of excited atoms resulting from electron-ion recombination. In medium-sized Ar-Xe clusters, these atoms are preferentially created in the Xe core within 10 ps after the cluster ionization. The ionization of excited atoms serves as a sensitive probe for monitoring the cluster expansion dynamics up to the ns time scale.

  7. Rare-gas clusters in intense extreme-ultraviolet pulses from a high-order harmonic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, B; Arbeiter, M; Fennel, Th; Vrakking, M J J; Rouzée, A

    2014-02-21

    We report evidence for two previously unidentified effects in the ionization of rare-gas clusters by intense extreme-ultraviolet pulses. First, electron spectra indicate multistep photoemission with increasing isotropy for larger clusters due to electron-atom collisions. Second, very slow (meV) electrons are interpreted as the first experimental evidence for Rydberg-like atomic state formation in the nanoplasma expansion. Only small fractions of Xe2+ ions were found, in sharp contrast to previous results recorded under comparable conditions [Murphy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 203401 (2008).

  8. Frustration of direct photoionization of Ar clusters in intense extreme ultraviolet pulses from a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwayama, H; Nagaya, K; Yao, M; Fukuzawa, H; Liu, X-J; Pruemper, G; Ueda, K; Motomura, K; Saito, N; Rudenko, A; Okunishi, M; Shimada, K; Harada, T; Toyoda, M; Yanagihara, M; Yamamoto, M; Ullrich, J; Foucar, L; Czasch, A; Doerner, R

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the kinetic energies of fragment ions from Ar clusters (average cluster size (N)∼ 10-600) exposed to intense extreme ultraviolet free electron laser pulses (λ ∼ 61 nm, I∼ 1.3x 10 11 W cm -2 ). For small clusters ((N)∼ 200. Considering how many photoelectrons can escape from the cluster, it was found that the size dependence of the ion kinetic energy exhibited the frustration of direct photoionization, which resulted from the strong Coulomb potential of the highly ionized cluster.

  9. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U., E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Döppner, T.; Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Förster, E. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hartley, N. J. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

    2014-09-08

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  10. International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D

    1980-03-01

    Observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae secured with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite were combined with extensive ground-based data to obtain electron densities, gas kinetic temperatures, and ionic concentrations. We then employed a network of theoretical model nebulae to estimate the factors by which observed ionic concentrations must be multiplied to obtain elemental abundances. Comparison with a large sample of nebulae for which extensive ground-based observations have been obtained shows nitrogen to be markedly enhanced in some of these objects. Possibly most, if not all, high-excitation nebulae evolve from stars that have higher masses than progenitors of nebulae of low-to-moderate excitation.

  11. Development of experimental techniques for the characterization of ultrashort photon pulses of extreme ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Düsterer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging tasks for extreme ultraviolet, soft and hard x-ray free-electron laser photon diagnostics is the precise determination of the photon pulse duration, which is typically in the sub 100 fs range. Nine different methods, able to determine such ultrashort photon pulse durations, were compared experimentally at FLASH, the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg, in order to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods. Radiation pulses at a wavelength of 13.5 and 24.0 nm together with the corresponding electron bunch duration were measured by indirect methods like analyzing spectral correlations, statistical fluctuations, and energy modulations of the electron bunch and also by direct methods like autocorrelation techniques, terahertz streaking, or reflectivity changes of solid state samples. In this paper, we present a comprehensive overview of the various techniques and a comparison of the individual experimental results. The information gained is of utmost importance for the future development of reliable pulse duration monitors indispensable for successful experiments with ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulses.

  12. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) was selected by NASA for flight in 2014 to make a sensitive search for X-ray polarization from a wide set of source classes, including stellar black holes, Seyfert galaxies and quasars, blazars, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Among the primary scientific objectives are determining the effects of the spin of black holes and the geometry of supermassive black hole accretion, determining the configurations of the magnetic fields and the X-ray emission of magnetars, and determining the magnetic structure of the supernova shocks in which cosmic rays are accelerated. GEMS will observe 23 targets during a 16 month prime mission, in observations that will be able to reach predicted levels of polarization. The mission can be extended to provide a guest observer phase. The GEMS instrument has time projection chamber polarimeters with high 2-10 keV efficiency at the focus of thin foil mirrors. The 4.5 m focal length mirrors will be deployed on an extended boom. The spacecraft with the instrument is rotated with a period of about 10 minutes to enable measurement and correction of systematic errors. A small Bragg reflection soft X-ray experiment takes advantage of this rotation to obtain a measurement at 0.5 keV. The design of the GEMS instrument and the mission, the expected performance and the planned science program will be discussed.

  13. The JEM-EUSO Mission to Explore the Extreme Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina-Tanco, G.

    2012-01-01

    The JEM-EUSO mission will explore the origin of the extreme energy comic-rays (EECRs) above 10 20 eV and and can shed new light on some topics of fundamental physics. It is planned to be launched by a H2B rocket on 2017 and transferred to ISS by the H2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV), where it will be attached to the external experiment platform of KIBO. The super-wide-field of view (60 degrees) telescope, with a diameter of about 2.5m looks down the night-side atmosphere of the Earth from ∼400 km of altitude, to detect near UV photons (330–400nm, both fluorescent and Cherenkov) emitted by giant air-showers produced by EECRs. The instrument is design to observe between 500 and 800 events above 55 EeV in its first 3 yr of operation, as well as an exposure larger than 1 million km 2 str yr at 3×10 20 eV 5 yr after launch. At these energies cosmic rays carry directional information and the arrival direction map will allow the identification of point sources of EECR, in case they exist, and of their astronomical counterparts. The comparison among the energy spectra of the spatially resolved individual sources will clarify the acceleration/emission mechanism, and also probe the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin process for the validation of Lorentz invariance up to γ∼10 11 . Neutral components (neutrinos and gamma rays) can also be detected if their fluxes are high enough. In fact, few cosmogenic neutrinos per year can be expected under conservative assumptions.

  14. Modeling and simulation of acid generation in anion-bound chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Hirayama, Taku; Ohomori, Katsumi; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most promising candidate technique for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices with half-pitches of sub-10 nm. An anion-bound polymer, in which the anion part of onium salts is polymerized, has attracted much attention from the viewpoint of the control of acid diffusion. In this study, we modeled the acid generation processes in the anion-bound chemically amplified resists upon exposure to EUV radiation and developed a Monte Carlo simulation code. Using the developed simulation code, the dependence of the quantum efficiency of acid generation on the concentration of acid generator units was calculated. The calculated quantum efficiencies well agreed with the experimental values with a fitting error of less than 10%. The thermalization distance was considered to be approximately 3 nm. The blur of proton distribution intrinsic to the reaction mechanisms of anion-bound chemically amplified resists was roughly estimated to be 4.5-6.5 nm.

  15. Internal frequency conversion extreme ultraviolet interferometer using mutual coherence properties of two high-order-harmonic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobosz, S.; Stabile, H.; Tortora, A.; Monot, P.; Reau, F.; Bougeard, M.; Merdji, H.; Carre, B.; Martin, Ph.; Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.; Delmotte, F.; Gautier, J.; Mercier, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report on an innovative two-dimensional imaging extreme ultraviolet (XUV) interferometer operating at 32 nm based on the mutual coherence of two laser high order harmonics (HOH) sources, separately generated in gas. We give the first evidence that the two mutually coherent HOH sources can be produced in two independent spatially separated gas jets, allowing for probing centimeter-sized objects. A magnification factor of 10 leads to a micron resolution associated with a subpicosecond temporal resolution. Single shot interferograms with a fringe visibility better than 30% are routinely produced. As a test of the XUV interferometer, we measure a maximum electronic density of 3x10 20 cm -3 1.1 ns after the creation of a plasma on aluminum target.

  16. Internal frequency conversion extreme ultraviolet interferometer using mutual coherence properties of two high-order-harmonic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobosz, S.; Stabile, H.; Tortora, A.; Monot, P.; Reau, F.; Bougeard, M.; Merdji, H.; Carre, B.; Martin, Ph. [CEA, IRAMIS, Service des Photons Atomes et Molecules, F-91191 Gif- sur-Yvette (France); Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.; Delmotte, F.; Gautier, J.; Mercier, R. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS et Universite Paris Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    We report on an innovative two-dimensional imaging extreme ultraviolet (XUV) interferometer operating at 32 nm based on the mutual coherence of two laser high order harmonics (HOH) sources, separately generated in gas. We give the first evidence that the two mutually coherent HOH sources can be produced in two independent spatially separated gas jets, allowing for probing centimeter-sized objects. A magnification factor of 10 leads to a micron resolution associated with a subpicosecond temporal resolution. Single shot interferograms with a fringe visibility better than 30% are routinely produced. As a test of the XUV interferometer, we measure a maximum electronic density of 3x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} 1.1 ns after the creation of a plasma on aluminum target.

  17. Effective Carbon Contaminant Cleaning Condition Using Ozone Dissolved Water and Megasonic for Ru-Capped Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-ho; Kang, Bong-kyun; Kim, Min-su; Ahn, Jin-ho; Cho, Han-ku; Lee, Han-shin; Park, Jin-Goo

    2012-09-01

    A possible candidate for carbon contaminant removal in Ru-capped extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask is ozone dissolved water (DIO3). However, the use of DIO3 leaves reflectivity loss and serious surface damages on Ru capping layer caused by its high oxidation potential. In this study, an optimum DIO3 cleaning condition for effective carbon cleaning without surface damage was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The effect of feed gases such as O2, CO2, and N2 of various concentrations were tried during DIO3 generation for oxidation stability on Ru capping layer and N2 added 15 ppm DIO3 was found to be the best condition. However carbon contaminant was ineffectively removed at this condition. Thus megasonic is irradiated during DIO3 process and the results show that carbon is not only completely removed in a shorter time but also lower reflectivity loss was accomplished with minimal increase in the surface roughness.

  18. Multiphoton double ionization of Ar in intense extreme ultraviolet laser fields studied by shot-by-shot photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Y; Fushitani, M; Matsuda, A; Tseng, C-M; Hishikawa, A; Shigemasa, E; Nagasono, M; Tono, K; Togashi, T; Ohashi, H; Kimura, H; Senba, Y; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T

    2010-09-24

    Photoelectron spectroscopy has been performed to study the multiphoton double ionization of Ar in an intense extreme ultraviolet laser field (hν ∼ 21  eV, ∼ 5  TW/cm²), by using a free electron laser (FEL). Three distinct peaks identified in the observed photoelectron spectra clearly show that the double ionization proceeds sequentially via the formation of Ar(+): Ar+hν→Ar (+) + e⁻ and Ar²(+) + 2hν→Ar(+) + e⁻. Shot-by-shot recording of the photoelectron spectra allows simultaneous monitoring of FEL spectrum and the multiphoton process for each FEL pulse, revealing that the two-photon ionization from Ar(+) is significantly enhanced by intermediate resonances in Ar(+).

  19. The Formation of a Power Multi-Pulse Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation in the Pulse Plasma Diode of Low Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgeniia V. Borgun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results are presented on experimental studies of the temporal characteristics of spike extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation in the spectral range of 12.2 ÷ 15.8 nm from the anode region of high-current (I = 40 kA pulsed discharges in tin vapor. It is observed that the intense multi-spike radiation in this range arises at an inductive stage of the discharge. It has been shown that the radiation spikes correlate with the sharp increase of active resistance and of pumped power, due to plasma heating by an electron beam, formed in the double layer of charged particles. It has been observed that for large number of spikes the conversion efficiency of pumped energy into radiationat double layer formation is essentially higher in comparison with collisional heating.

  20. High-space resolution imaging plate analysis of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light from tin laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Christopher S A; Murakami, Takehiro; Ugomori, Teruyuki; Yoshida, Kensuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Atarashi, Hironori; Iyoda, Tomokazu; Nagai, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    With the advent of high volume manufacturing capabilities by extreme ultraviolet lithography, constant improvements in light source design and cost-efficiency are required. Currently, light intensity and conversion efficiency (CE) measurments are obtained by charged couple devices, faraday cups etc, but also phoshpor imaging plates (IPs) (BaFBr:Eu). IPs are sensitive to light and high-energy species, which is ideal for studying extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light from laser produced plasmas (LPPs). In this work, we used IPs to observe a large angular distribution (10°-90°). We ablated a tin target by high-energy lasers (1064 nm Nd:YAG, 10 10 and 10 11 W/cm 2 ) to generate the EUV light. The europium ions in the IP were trapped in a higher energy state from exposure to EUV light and high-energy species. The light intensity was angular dependent; therefore excitation of the IP depends on the angle, and so highly informative about the LPP. We obtained high-space resolution (345 μm, 0.2°) angular distribution and grazing spectrometer (5-20 nm grate) data simultaneously at different target to IP distances (103 mm and 200 mm). Two laser systems and IP types (BAS-TR and BAS-SR) were also compared. The cosine fitting values from the IP data were used to calculate the CE to be 1.6% (SD ± 0.2) at 13.5 nm 2% bandwidth. Finally, a practical assessment of IPs and a damage issue are disclosed.

  1. Deuterium and Oxygen Toward Feige 110: Results from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, S. D.; Howk, J. C.; Chayer, P.; Tripp, T. M.; Hebrard, G.; Andre, M.; Oliveira, C.; Jenkins, E. B.; Moos, H. W.; Oegerle, William R.

    2001-01-01

    We present measurements of the column densities of interstellar D I and O I made with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), and of H I made with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) toward the sdOB star Feige 110 [(l,b) = (74.09 deg., - 59.07 deg.); d = 179(sup +265, sub -67) pc; Z = -154(sup +57, Sub -227 pc). Our determination of the D I column density made use of curve of growth fitting and profile fitting analyses, while our O I column density determination used only curve of growth techniques. The H I column density was estimated by fitting the damping wings of the interstellar Ly(lpha) profile. We find log N(D I) = 15.47 +/- 0.06, log N(O I) = 16.73 +/- 0.10, and log N(H I) = 20.14(sup +0.13, sub -0.20) (all errors 2(sigma)). This implies D/H = (2.14 +/- 0.82) x 10(esp -5), D/O = (5.50(sup + 1.64, sub -133)) x 10(exp -2), and O/H = (3.89 +/- 1.67) x 10(exp -4). Taken with the FUSE results reported in companion papers and previous measurements of the local interstellar medium, this suggests the possibility of spatial variability in D/H for sight lines exceeding approx. 100 pc. This result may constrain models which characterize the mixing time and length scales of material in the local interstellar medium.

  2. Colombia: 40 Million People Exposed to Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation During the Whole Year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solorzano, L.; Hernandez, G.; Jaramillo, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Colombian population is exposed to extreme UVR all year round. Colombia, located at the northwest of South America, between latitudes 12 deg. N and 4 deg. S, has extreme levels of UVR during 365 days a year. The UV levels of the 12 largest cities of Colombia are presented, as well as the experimental measurements taken at the city of Medellin (Altitude: 1,470 m, Latitude: 7 deg. N, Population: 2,000,000). The UV Index normally reaches high about 9 points: the extreme category according to the internationally established UV Index scale, considering that clear sky conditions dominate. Also presented are the statistical records of skin diseases related to UVR exposure, taken at the Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paul in Medellin, during the past 20 years. There is a strong commitment in creating a culture of UV awareness and protection among the Colombian population. These very high levels of continuous UV radiation are a good reason to do so. (author)

  3. A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo study of plasma-induced damage of normal incidence collector optics used in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieggers, R. C.; W. J. Goedheer,; M.R. Akdim,; F. Bijkerk,; Zegeling, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a kinetic simulation of the plasma formed by photoionization in the intense flux of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) light source. The model is based on the particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo approach. The photoelectric effect and ionization by electron collisions are included.

  4. Aromatic structure degradation of single layer graphene on an amorphous silicon substrate in the presence of water, hydrogen and Extreme Ultraviolet light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mund, Baibhav Kumar; Sturm, J.M.; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we study the reaction of water and graphene under Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation and in the presence of hydrogen. In this work, single layer graphene (SLG) on amorphous Si as an underlying substrate was dosed with water (0.75 ML) and exposed to EUV (λ = 13.5 nm, 92 eV) with

  5. An Idealized Meteorological-Hydrodynamic Model for Exploring Extreme Storm Surge Statistics in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Van den Berg, N.J.F.; De Jong, M.S.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.; Den Heijer, C.; Vrijling, J.K.; Jonkman, S.N.; Roos, P.C.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Lansen, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores an alternative method to determine extreme surge levels at the Dutch Coast. For this exploration, specific focus is on the extreme water level at Hoek van Holland, The Netherlands. The alternative method has been based on a joint probability model of the storm characteristics at

  6. Exploring societal solidarity in the context of extreme prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Manya J; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Klein, Sabine D; Streuli, Jürg C; Baumann-Hölzle, Ruth; Fauchère, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-21

    Extreme prematurity can result in long-term disabilities. Its impact on society is often not taken into account and deemed controversial. Our study examined attitudes of the Swiss population regarding extreme prematurity and people's perspectives regarding the question of solidarity with disabled people. We conducted a nationwide representative anonymous telephone survey with 1210 Swiss residents aged 18 years or older. We asked how people estimate their own personal solidarity, the solidarity of their social environment and the solidarity across the country with disabled persons. Spearman's correlation calculations were used to assess if a correlation exists between solidarity and setting financial limits to intensive care and between solidarity and withholding neonatal intensive care. According to 36.0% of the respondents intensive medical care should not be withheld from extremely preterm infants, even if their chances for an acceptable quality of life were poor. For 28.8%, intensive care should be withheld from these infants, and 26.9% held an intermediate position depending on the situation. A total of 31.5% were against setting a financial limit to treatment of extremely preterm newborns with an uncertain future quality of life, 34.2% were in favour and 26.9% were deliberating. A majority (88.8%) considered their solidarity toward disabled people as substantial; the solidarity of their personal environment and of the society at large was estimated as high by 79.1% and 48.6%, respectively. The Swiss population expressed a high level of solidarity which may alleviate some pressure on parents and health care providers in the decision-making process in neonatal intensive care units. In addition, there was no relationship between solidarity and people's willingness to pay for the care or withholding treatment of extremely preterm babies.

  7. Electronic structure, excitation properties, and chemical transformations of extreme ultra-violet resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert A.; Narasimhan, Amrit; Brainard, Robert L.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of extreme ultra violet resist materials and of their individual components, two polymers and two photoacid generators (PAGs), is studied using a combination of x-ray and UV photoemission spectroscopies, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab-initio techniques. It is shown that simple molecular models can be used to understand the electronic structure of each sample and describe the experimental data. Additionally, effects directly relevant to the photochemical processes are observed: low energy loss processes are observed for the phenolic polymer containing samples that should favor thermalization of electrons; PAG segregation is measured at the surface of the resist films that could lead to surface inhomogeneities; both PAGs are found to be stable upon irradiation in the absence of the polymer, contrasting with a high reactivity that can be followed upon x-ray irradiation of the full resist.

  8. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Fuchs, Silvio; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Zastrau, Ulf; Blinne, Alexander; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Förster, Eckhart

    2013-01-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed

  9. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Blinne, Alexander; Fuchs, Silvio; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Paulus, Gerhard G; Förster, Eckhart; Zastrau, Ulf

    2013-09-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  10. Design, conception, and metrology of Extreme Ultraviolet multilayers mirrors resistant environments of space and EUV sources; Conception, realisation et metrologie de miroirs multicouches pour l'extreme ultraviolet resistants aux environnements du spatial et des sources EUV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecquet, Ch.

    2009-03-15

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrum (EUV) wavelengths, which range between 13 nm and 40 nm, have many applications in science and technology. These have been developed for example in plasma physics (high order harmonics sources, X ray lasers). The work presented is about the design, the fabrication and the metrology of periodic multilayer mirrors. The main motivation of this study is to establish a cycle of development taking into account both the optical properties of reflective coatings (reflectivity, spectral selectivity, attenuation) and their behaviour under various environments. To improve the spectral selectivity, new multilayer periodic structures have been developed. They are characterized by a bimodal reflectance profile with adjustable attenuation. The effect of environment on the stability of performance is especially critical for the optical collection. The addition of material barriers has stabilized the performance of the peak reflectivity for over 200 h at 400 C deg. and it reduces the influence of other factors of instability on the reflectance. In addition, all structures have been fabricated successfully and evaluated in severe environments. (author)

  11. THE MUSCLES TREASURY SURVEY. II. INTRINSIC LY α AND EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF K AND M DWARFS WITH EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0123 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Wood, Brian E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Froning, Cynthia [Dept. of Astronomy C1400, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, CNRS, Blvd de l’Observatoire, CS 34229, F-06304 Nice cedex 4 (France); Rugheimer, Sarah [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Irvine Building, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); Walkowicz, Lucianne, E-mail: allison.youngblood@colorado.edu [The Adler Planetarium, 1300 S Lakeshore Dr, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of low-mass (K- and M-type) stars play a critical role in the heating and chemistry of exoplanet atmospheres, but are not observationally well-constrained. Direct observations of the intrinsic flux of the Ly α line (the dominant source of UV photons from low-mass stars) are challenging, as interstellar H i absorbs the entire line core for even the closest stars. To address the existing gap in empirical constraints on the UV flux of K and M dwarfs, the MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey has obtained UV observations of 11 nearby M and K dwarfs hosting exoplanets. This paper presents the Ly α and extreme-UV spectral reconstructions for the MUSCLES targets. Most targets are optically inactive, but all exhibit significant UV activity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to correct the observed Ly α profiles for interstellar absorption, and we employ empirical relations to compute the extreme-UV SED from the intrinsic Ly α flux in ∼100 Å bins from 100–1170 Å. The reconstructed Ly α profiles have 300 km s{sup −1} broad cores, while >1% of the total intrinsic Ly α flux is measured in extended wings between 300 and 1200 km s{sup −1}. The Ly α surface flux positively correlates with the Mg ii surface flux and negatively correlates with the stellar rotation period. Stars with larger Ly α surface flux also tend to have larger surface flux in ions formed at higher temperatures, but these correlations remain statistically insignificant in our sample of 11 stars. We also present H i column density measurements for 10 new sightlines through the local interstellar medium.

  12. Different oxidative stress response in keratinocytes and fibroblasts of reconstructed skin exposed to non extreme daily-ultraviolet radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Marionnet

    Full Text Available Experiments characterizing the biological effects of sun exposure have usually involved solar simulators. However, they addressed the worst case scenario i.e. zenithal sun, rarely found in common outdoor activities. A non-extreme ultraviolet radiation (UV spectrum referred as "daily UV radiation" (DUVR with a higher UVA (320-400 nm to UVB (280-320 nm irradiance ratio has therefore been defined. In this study, the biological impact of an acute exposure to low physiological doses of DUVR (corresponding to 10 and 20% of the dose received per day in Paris mid-April on a 3 dimensional reconstructed skin model, was analysed. In such conditions, epidermal and dermal morphological alterations could only be detected after the highest dose of DUVR. We then focused on oxidative stress response induced by DUVR, by analyzing the modulation of mRNA level of 24 markers in parallel in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. DUVR significantly modulated mRNA levels of these markers in both cell types. A cell type differential response was noticed: it was faster in fibroblasts, with a majority of inductions and high levels of modulation in contrast to keratinocyte response. Our results thus revealed a higher sensitivity in response to oxidative stress of dermal fibroblasts although located deeper in the skin, giving new insights into the skin biological events occurring in everyday UV exposure.

  13. Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) for application in science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Wachulak, Przemysław; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Mirosław; Adjei, Daniel; Ahad, Inam Ul; Ayele, Mesfin G.; Fok, Tomasz; Szczurek, Anna; Torrisi, Alfio; Wegrzyński, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) developed in our laboratory for application in various areas of technology and science are presented. The sources are based on a laser-irradiated gas puff target approach. The targets formed by pulsed injection of gas under high-pressure are irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from Nd:YAG lasers. We use commercial lasers generating pulses with time duration from 1ns to 10ns and energies from 0.5J to 10J at 10Hz repetition rate. The gas puff targets are produced using a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which secures high conversion efficiency without degradation of the nozzle. The use of a gas puff target instead of a solid target makes generation of laser plasmas emitting soft x-rays and EUV possible without target debris production. The sources are equipped with various optical systems, including grazing incidence axisymmetric ellipsoidal mirrors, a "lobster eye" type grazing incidence multi-foil mirror, and an ellipsoidal mirror with Mo/Si multilayer coating, to collect soft x-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beams. In this paper new applications of these sources in various fields, including soft x-ray and EUV imaging in nanoscale, EUV radiography and tomography, EUV materials processing and modification of polymer surfaces, EUV photoionization of gases, radiobiology and soft x-ray contact microscopy are reviewed.

  14. Element-selective investigation of femtosecond spin dynamics in NiPd magnetic alloys using extreme ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Seung-gi; Adam, Roman; Plötzing, Moritz; von Witzleben, Moritz; Weier, Christian; Parlak, Umut; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Schneider, Claus M.; Rusz, Jan; Maldonado, Pablo; Oppeneer, Peter M.

    2018-02-01

    We studied femtosecond spin dynamics in NixPd1 -x magnetic thin films by optically pumping the system with infrared (1.55 eV) laser pulses and subsequently recording the reflectivity of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses synchronized with the pump pulse train. XUV light in the energy range from 20 to 72 eV was produced by laser high-harmonic generation. The reflectivity of XUV radiation at characteristic resonant energies allowed separate detection of the spin dynamics in the elemental subsystems at the M2 ,3 absorption edges of Ni (68.0 and 66.2 eV) and N2 ,3 edges of Pd (55.7 and 50.9 eV). The measurements were performed in transversal magneto-optical Kerr effect geometry. In static measurements, we observed a magnetic signature of the Pd subsystem due to an induced magnetization. Calculated magneto-optical asymmetries based on density functional theory show close agreement with the measured results. Femtosecond spin dynamics measured at the Ni absorption edges indicates that increasing the Pd concentration, which causes a decrease in the Curie temperature TC, results in a drop of the demagnetization time τM, contrary to the τM˜1 /TC scaling expected for single-species materials. This observation is ascribed to the increase of the Pd-mediated spin-orbit coupling in the alloy.

  15. Influence of the electrode wear on the EUV generation of a discharge based extreme ultraviolet light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieker, Jochen; Bergmann, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    Reliability and a long maintenance interval are major requirements for the industrial use of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. In this paper we present results on the influence of the electrode erosion on the EUV generation and its lifetime limiting characteristics. The geometry of the electrodes and their influence on the gas pressure distribution within the electrode system have been found to be the key variables to characterize the regime of operation. This better understanding allows for an optimization of device parameters (e.g. gas flow or pulse energy) to counteract the erosion process, in order to increase the maintenance interval and EUV output. The EUV source under investigation is based on a hollow cathode triggered pinch plasma. A new trigger concept is introduced that enables free adjustment of the gas pressure during operation, thus enabling the operation with a high conversion efficiency of up to  >0.7 %/2πsr at 13.5 nm and 2% bandwidth. The efficiency for the peak brilliance is up to ~2.6 W kW-1 mm-2sr-1 while the maximum electrical input power of the system is 15 kW.

  16. Maximum material thickness for extreme ultra-violet and X-ray backlighter probing of dense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Tallents, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Extreme ultra-violet (EUV) lasers, X-ray lasers and other backlighter sources can be used to probe high-energy density materials if their brightness can overcome self-emission from the material. We investigate the maximum plasma thickness of aluminum, silicon and iron that can be probed with EUV or X-ray photons of energy 89-1243 eV before self-emission from the plasma overwhelms the backlighter output. For a uniform plasma, backlighter transmission decreases exponentially with increasing thickness of the material following Beer's law at a rate dependent on the plasma opacity. We evaluate the plasma opacity with the Los Alamos TOPS opacity data. The self-emission is assumed to be either that of a black body to arise from a plasma in LTE or to only consist of free-free and free-bound emission. It is shown that at higher plasma temperature (≥40 eV), EUV radiation (e.g. photon energy=89 eV) can probe a greater thickness of plasma than X-ray radiation (e.g. photon energy=1243 eV)

  17. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  18. Tuning extreme ultraviolet emission for optimum coupling with multilayer mirrors for future lithography through control of ionic charge states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Hayato, E-mail: ohashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Kawasaki, Masato [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kanehara, Tatsuhiko; Aida, Yuya; Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Torii, Shuichi; Makimura, Tetsuya [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan)

    2014-01-21

    We report on the identification of the optimum plasma conditions for a laser-produced plasma source for efficient coupling with multilayer mirrors at 6.x nm for beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography. A small shift to lower energies of the peak emission for Nd:YAG laser-produced gadolinium plasmas was observed with increasing laser power density. Charge-defined emission spectra were observed in electron beam ion trap (EBIT) studies and the charge states responsible identified by use of the flexible atomic code (FAC). The EBIT spectra displayed a larger systematic shift of the peak wavelength of intense emission at 6.x nm to longer wavelengths with increasing ionic charge. This combination of spectra enabled the key ion stage to be confirmed as Gd{sup 18+}, over a range of laser power densities, with contributions from Gd{sup 17+} and Gd{sup 19+} responsible for the slight shift to longer wavelengths in the laser-plasma spectra. The FAC calculation also identified the origin of observed out-of-band emission and the charge states responsible.

  19. Measurements of density dependent intensity ratios of extreme ultraviolet line emission from Fe X, XI, and XII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Erina; Ali, Safdar; Tsuda, Takashi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-05-01

    We report high-resolution density dependent intensity ratio measurements for middle charge states of iron in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral wavelength range of 160-200 Å. The measurements were performed at the Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer installed on a low energy compact electron beam ion trap. The intensity ratios for several line pairs stemming from Fe X, Fe XI and Fe XII were extracted from spectra collected at the electron beam energies of 340 and 400 eV by varying the beam current between 7.5 and 12 mA at each energy. In addition, the effective electron densities were obtained experimentally by imaging the electron beam profile and ion cloud size with a pinhole camera and visible spectrometer, respectively. In this paper, the experimental results are compared with previous data from the literature and with the present calculations performed using a collisional-radiative model. Our experimental results show a rather good agreement with the calculations and previous reported results.

  20. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet light-emitting plasmas from a laser-excited fluorine containing liquid polymer jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, B.; Assmann, J.; Faubel, M.; Gaebel, K.; Kranzusch, S.; Lugovoj, E.; Mann, K.; Missalla, T.; Peth, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    The operation of a liquid polymer jet laser-plasma target and the characterization of the absolute x-ray emission in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength window from 9-19 nm is reported. The target is a liquid polymer (perfluoro-polyether) that is exposed to pulsed and focused laser light at 532 nm in the form of a thin, liquid microjet (d=40 to 160 μm) in vacuum. The spectral brightness of the source in the 13 nm range is relatively high because a large fraction of radiative energy is emitted in one single line only, which is assigned to be the 2p-3d F VII doublet at 12.8 nm, with a laser energy conversion efficiency of 0.45% (2π sr, 2% bandwidth) in our initial experiment. A further increase of the relative emission has been found in the wavelength range between 7 and 17 nm when the jet diameter was increased from 40 to 160 μm. The two-dimensional spatial profile of the source plasma (d=40 to 50 μm) has been analyzed with a pinhole camera

  1. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  2. Electron-hole pairs generated in ZrO2 nanoparticle resist upon exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2018-02-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticle resists have attracted much attention as the next-generation resist used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices. However, the sensitization mechanism of the metal oxide nanoparticle resists is unknown. Understanding the sensitization mechanism is important for the efficient development of resist materials. In this study, the energy deposition in a zirconium oxide (ZrO2) nanoparticle resist was investigated. The numbers of electron-hole pairs generated in a ZrO2 core and an methacrylic acid (MAA) ligand shell upon exposure to 1 mJ cm-2 (exposure dose) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiations were theoretically estimated to be 0.16 at most and 0.04-0.17 cm2 mJ-1, respectively. By comparing the calculated distribution of electron-hole pairs with the line-and-space patterns of the ZrO2 nanoparticle resist fabricated by an EUV exposure tool, the number of electron-hole pairs required for the solubility change of the resist films was estimated to be 1.3-2.2 per NP. NP denotes a nanoparticle consisting of a metal oxide core with a ligand shell. In the material design of metal oxide nanoparticle resists, it is important to efficiently use the electron-hole pairs generated in the metal oxide core for the chemical change of ligand molecules.

  3. POINT-SPREAD FUNCTIONS FOR THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET CHANNELS OF SDO/AIA TELESCOPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poduval, B.; DeForest, C. E.; Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the stray-light point-spread functions (PSFs) and their inverses we characterized for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) EUV telescopes on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. The inverse kernels are approximate inverses under convolution. Convolving the original Level 1 images with them produces images with improved stray-light characteristics. We demonstrate the usefulness of these PSFs by applying them to two specific cases: photometry and differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The PSFs consist of a narrow Gaussian core, a diffraction component, and a diffuse component represented by the sum of a Gaussian-truncated Lorentzian and a shoulder Gaussian. We determined the diffraction term using the measured geometry of the diffraction pattern identified in flare images and the theoretically computed intensities of the principal maxima of the first few diffraction orders. To determine the diffuse component, we fitted its parameterized model using iterative forward-modeling of the lunar interior in the SDO/AIA images from the 2011 March 4 lunar transit. We find that deconvolution significantly improves the contrast in dark features such as miniature coronal holes, though the effect was marginal in bright features. On a percentage-scattering basis, the PSFs for SDO/AIA are better by a factor of two than that of the EUV telescope on board the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer mission. A preliminary analysis suggests that deconvolution alone does not affect DEM analysis of small coronal loop segments with suitable background subtraction. We include the derived PSFs and their inverses as supplementary digital materials.

  4. POINT-SPREAD FUNCTIONS FOR THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET CHANNELS OF SDO/AIA TELESCOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poduval, B.; DeForest, C. E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S., E-mail: bala@boulder.swri.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present the stray-light point-spread functions (PSFs) and their inverses we characterized for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) EUV telescopes on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. The inverse kernels are approximate inverses under convolution. Convolving the original Level 1 images with them produces images with improved stray-light characteristics. We demonstrate the usefulness of these PSFs by applying them to two specific cases: photometry and differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The PSFs consist of a narrow Gaussian core, a diffraction component, and a diffuse component represented by the sum of a Gaussian-truncated Lorentzian and a shoulder Gaussian. We determined the diffraction term using the measured geometry of the diffraction pattern identified in flare images and the theoretically computed intensities of the principal maxima of the first few diffraction orders. To determine the diffuse component, we fitted its parameterized model using iterative forward-modeling of the lunar interior in the SDO/AIA images from the 2011 March 4 lunar transit. We find that deconvolution significantly improves the contrast in dark features such as miniature coronal holes, though the effect was marginal in bright features. On a percentage-scattering basis, the PSFs for SDO/AIA are better by a factor of two than that of the EUV telescope on board the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer mission. A preliminary analysis suggests that deconvolution alone does not affect DEM analysis of small coronal loop segments with suitable background subtraction. We include the derived PSFs and their inverses as supplementary digital materials.

  5. Lightweight Multifunctional Planetary Probe for Extreme Environment Exploration and Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayandor, Javid (Principal Investigator); Schroeder, Kevin; Samareh, Jamshid

    2017-01-01

    The demand to explore new worlds requires the development of advanced technologies that enable landed science on uncertain terrains or in hard to reach locations. As a result, contemporary Entry, Descent, Landing, (EDL) and additional locomotion (EDLL) profiles are becoming increasingly more complex, with the introduction of lifting/guided entries, hazard avoidance on descent, and a plethora of landing techniques including airbags and the skycrane maneuver. The inclusion of each of these subsystems into a mission profile is associated with a substantial mass penalty. This report explores the new all-in-one entry vehicle concept, TANDEM, a new combined EDLL concept, and compares it to the current state of the art EDL systems. The explored system is lightweight and collapsible and provides the capacity for lifting/guided entry, guided descent, hazard avoidance, omnidirectional impact protection and surface locomotion without the aid of any additional subsystems. This Phase I study explored: 1. The capabilities and feasibility of the TANDEM concept as an EDLL vehicle. 2. Extensive impact analysis to ensure mission success in unfavorable landing conditions, and safe landing in Tessera regions. 3. Development of a detailed design for a conceptual mission to Venus. As a result of our work it was shown that: 1. TANDEM provides additional benefits over the Adaptive, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) including guided descent and surface locomotion, while reducing the mass by 38% compared to the ADEPT-VITaL mission. 2. Demonstrated that the design of tensegrity structures, and TANDEM specifically, grows linearly with an increase in velocity, which was previously unknown. 3. Investigation of surface impact revealed a promising results that suggest a properly configured TANDEM vehicle can safely land and preform science in the Tessera regions, which was previously labeled by the Decadal Survey as, largely inaccessible despite its high scientific interest. This work

  6. Capillary discharge extreme ultraviolet lasers. Progress report, December 15, 1991--December 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    The project objective is to explore the generation of soft X-ray laser radiation in a plasma column created by a fast capillary discharge. The proposed capillary lasing scheme offers the potential for compact, simple and efficient soft X-ray laser sources. For this purpose a compact, fast pulse generator which produces 100 kA current pulses with a risetime of 11 ns was constructed. Initial experiments were conducted in evacuated capillaries, in which the plasma is produced by ablation of the capillary walls. The soft X-ray emission from discharges in polyethylene capillary channels was studied to investigate the possibility of amplification in the 3-2 transition of C VI, at {lambda} = 18.2 nm. Time-resolved spectra in which this transition appears anomalously intense with respect to the 4--2 transition of the same ion were obtained. To date, however, this phenomenoa could not be confirmed as gain, as the intensity of the 18.2 nm line has not been observed to increase exponentially as a function of the capillary length. Encouraging results were obtained by fast pulse discharge excitation of capillaries filled with preionized gas. High temperature (Te > 150 eV), small diameter ({approximately}200 {mu}m) plasma columns were efficiently generated. Fast current pulse excitation of a selected low mass density of uniformly preionized material Mag the capillary was observed to detach rapidly the plasma from the capillary walls, and form a plasma channel of a diameter much smaller and significantly hotter than those produced by a similar current pulse in evacuated capillaries of the same size. Discharges in argon-filled capillaries at currents between 20 and 60 kA produced plasmas with ArX-Ar{sub XIV} line emission, and with spectra that are similar to those of plasmas generated by > I MA current implosions in large pulsed power machines. The characteristic of these plasmas approach those necessary for soft X-ray amplification in low Z elements.

  7. Development of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray multilayer optics for scientific studies with femtosecond/attosecond sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, Andrew Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-21

    The development of multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation has led to advancements in many areas of science and technology, including materials studies, EUV lithography, water window microscopy, plasma imaging, and orbiting solar physics imaging. Recent developments in femtosecond and attosecond EUV pulse generation from sources such as high harmonic generation lasers, combined with the elemental and chemical specificity provided by EUV radiation, are opening new opportunities to study fundamental dynamic processes in materials. Critical to these efforts is the design and fabrication of multilayer optics to transport, focus, shape and image these ultra-fast pulses This thesis describes the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of multilayer optics for EUV femtosecond and attosecond scientific studies. Multilayer mirrors for bandwidth control, pulse shaping and compression, tri-material multilayers, and multilayers for polarization control are described. Characterization of multilayer optics, including measurement of material optical constants, reflectivity of multilayer mirrors, and metrology of reflected phases of the multilayer, which is critical to maintaining pulse size and shape, were performed. Two applications of these multilayer mirrors are detailed in the thesis. In the first application, broad bandwidth multilayers were used to characterize and measure sub-100 attosecond pulses from a high harmonic generation source and was performed in collaboration with the Max-Planck institute for Quantum Optics and Ludwig- Maximilians University in Garching, Germany, with Professors Krausz and Kleineberg. In the second application, multilayer mirrors with polarization control are useful to study femtosecond spin dynamics in an ongoing collaboration with the T-REX group of Professor Parmigiani at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. As new ultrafast x-ray sources become available, for example free electron lasers, the multilayer designs

  8. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Observations of the Galactic Center: Quantifying the Extreme Ultraviolet/Soft X-ray Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    2018-04-01

    It has long been shown that the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of the ionizing stars of H II regions can be estimated by comparing the observed line emission to detailed models. In the Galactic Center (GC), however, previous observations have shown that the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED) of the local photon field is strange, producing both very low excitation ionized gas (indicative of ionization by late O stars) and also widespread diffuse emission from atoms too highly ionized to be found in normal H II regions. This paper describes the analysis of all GC spectra taken by Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph and downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. In it, H II region densities and abundances are described, and serendipitously discovered candidate planetary nebulae, compact shocks, and candidate young stellar objects are tabulated. Models were computed with Cloudy, using SEDs from Starburst99 plus additional X-rays, and compared to the observed mid-infrared forbidden and recombination lines. The ages inferred from the model fits do not agree with recent proposed star formation sequences (star formation in the GC occurring along streams of gas with density enhancements caused by close encounters with the black hole, Sgr A*), with Sgr B1, Sgr C, and the Arches Cluster being all about the same age, around 4.5 Myr old, with similar X-ray requirements. The fits for the Quintuplet Cluster appear to give a younger age, but that could be caused by higher-energy photons from shocks from stellar winds or from a supernova.

  9. Study of CD variation caused by the black border effect and out-of-band radiation in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Niroomand, Ardavan; Lorusso, Gian F.; Boone, Robert; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) remains a promising candidate for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 1× nm half pitch node and beyond, many technological burdens have to be overcome. The "field edge effect" in EUVL is one of them. The image border region of an EUV mask, also known as the "black border" (BB), reflects a few percent of the incident EUV light, resulting in a leakage of light into neighboring exposure fields, especially at the corner of the field where three adjacent exposures take place. This effect significantly impacts on critical dimension (CD) uniformity (CDU) across the exposure field. To avoid this phenomenon, a light-shielding border is introduced by etching away the entire absorber and multilayer at the image border region of the EUV mask. We present a method of modeling the field edge effect (also called the BB effect) by using rigorous lithography simulation with a calibrated resist model. An additional "flare level" at the field edge is introduced on top of the exposure tool flare map to account for the BB effect. The parameters in this model include the reflectivity and the width of the BB, which are mainly determining the leakage of EUV light and its influence range, respectively. Another parameter is the transition width which represents the half shadow effect of the reticle masking blades. By setting the corresponding parameters, the simulation results match well the experimental results obtained at the IMEC's NXE:3100 EUV exposure tool. Moreover, these results indicate that the out-of-band (OoB) radiation also contributes to the CDU. Using simulation, we can also determine the OoB effect rigorously using the methodology of an "effective mask blank." The study demonstrates that the impact of BB and OoB effects on CDU can be well predicted by simulations.

  10. Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions in Solar Flares from Extreme Ultraviolet Lines: A Possible Diagnostic of Ion Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Labrosse, Nicolas [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-10

    In a solar flare, a large fraction of the magnetic energy released is converted rapidly to the kinetic energy of non-thermal particles and bulk plasma motion. This will likely result in non-equilibrium particle distributions and turbulent plasma conditions. We investigate this by analyzing the profiles of high temperature extreme ultraviolet emission lines from a major flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:44) observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode . We find that in many locations the line profiles are non-Gaussian, consistent with a kappa distribution of emitting ions with properties that vary in space and time. At the flare footpoints, close to sites of hard X-ray emission from non-thermal electrons, the κ index for the Fe xvi 262.976 Å line at 3 MK takes values of 3–5. In the corona, close to a low-energy HXR source, the Fe xxiii 263.760 Å line at 15 MK shows κ values of typically 4–7. The observed trends in the κ parameter show that we are most likely detecting the properties of the ion population rather than any instrumental effects. We calculate that a non-thermal ion population could exist if locally accelerated on timescales ≤0.1 s. However, observations of net redshifts in the lines also imply the presence of plasma downflows, which could lead to bulk turbulence, with increased non-Gaussianity in cooler regions. Both interpretations have important implications for theories of solar flare particle acceleration.

  11. Deposition and characterization of B4C/CeO2 multilayers at 6.x nm extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertsu, M. G.; Giglia, A.; Brose, S.; Park, D.; Wang, Z. S.; Mayer, J.; Juschkin, L.; Nicolosi, P.

    2016-03-01

    New multilayers of boron carbide/cerium dioxide (B4C/CeO2) combination on silicon (Si) substrate are manufactured to represent reflective-optics candidates for future lithography at 6.x nm wavelength. This is one of only a few attempts to make multilayers of this kind. Combination of several innovative experiments enables detailed study of optical properties, structural properties, and interface profiles of the multilayers in order to open up a room for further optimization of the manufacturing process. The interface profile is visualized by high-angle annular dark-field imaging which provides highly sensitive contrast to atomic number. Synchrotron based at-wavelength extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflectance measurements near the boron (B) absorption edge allow derivation of optical parameters with high sensitivity to local atom interactions. X-ray reflectivity measurements at Cu-Kalpha (8 keV ) determine the period of multilayers with high in-depth resolution. By combining these measurements and choosing robust nonlinear curve fitting algorithms, accuracy of the results has been significantly improved. It also enables a comprehensive characterization of multilayers. Interface diffusion is determined to be a major cause for the low reflectivity performance. Optical constants of B4C and CeO2 layers are derived in EUV wavelengths. Besides, optical properties and asymmetric thicknesses of inter-diffusion layers (interlayers) in EUV wavelengths near the boron edge are determined. Finally, ideal reflectivity of the B4C/CeO2 combination is calculated by using optical constants derived from the proposed measurements in order to evaluate the potentiality of the design.

  12. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a flare that occurred on 9 March 2012 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit reached almost the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, fortunately EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km/s upflows was observed in several locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20 - 60 km/s upflows in a host of million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XI - Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex. At a point close to strong energy input, the flare ions reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK. At this point there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. The results to be presented are refined from the preliminary data given above and combined with context AIA observations for a comparison with predictions of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources of systematic measurement errors. To overcome a variety of experimental difficulties, several new methods in interferogram analysis and phase-retrieval were developed: the Fourier-Transform Method of Phase-Shift Determination, which uses Fourier-domain analysis to improve the accuracy of phase-shifting interferometry; the Fourier-Transform Guided Unwrap Method, which was developed to overcome difficulties associated with a high density of mid-spatial-frequency blemishes and which uses a low-spatial-frequency approximation to the measured wavefront to guide the phase unwrapping in the presence of noise; and, finally, an expedient method of Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization which facilitates polynomial basis transformations in wave-front surface fitting procedures.

  14. Extreme-ultraviolet and hard X-ray signatures of electron acceleration during the failed eruption of a filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, A.; Mrozek, T.; Kołomański, S.; Gburek, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aims: We search for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightenings in TRACE 171 Å images and hard X-ray (HXR) bursts observed during failed eruptions. We expect that if an eruption is confined by interaction with overlaying magnetic structures, we should observe effects caused by reconnection between magnetic structures and acceleration of particles. Methods: We used TRACE observations of three well-observed failed eruptions. A semi-automated method was used to search for abrupt brightness changes in the TRACE field of view. The EUV images were compared to the HXR spatial distribution reconstructed from YOHKOH/HXT and RHESSI data. The EUV light curves of a selected area were compared to height profiles of eruption, HXR emission, and the HXR photon spectral index of a power-law fit to the HXR data. Results: We have found that EUV brightenings are closely relatedto the eruption velocity decrease, to HXR bursts, and to episodes of hardening of the HXR spectra. The EUV-brightened areas are observed far from the flaring structure, in footpoints of large systems of loops observed 30-60 min after the maximum of a flare. These are not "post-flare" loops, which are also observed, but at significantly lower heights. The high-lying systems of loops are observed at heights equal to the height at which the eruption was observed to stop. We observed only one HXR source that was spatially correlated with EUV brightening. For other EUV-brightened areas we estimated the expected brightness of HXR sources. Conclusions: We find that EUV brightenings are produced by interaction between the erupting structure with overlaying loops. The interaction is strong enough to heat the system of high loops. These loops cool and are visible in the EUV range about 30-60 min later. The estimated brightness of HXR sources associated with EUV brightenings shows that they are too weak to be detected with present instruments. However, next-generation instruments will have sufficient dynamic range and

  15. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s –1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s –1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s –1 . We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive

  16. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s-1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s-1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s-1. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of

  17. Development and Testing of Mechanism Technology for Space Exploration in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Tony R.; Levanas, Greg; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Glenn Research Center (GRC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Aeroflex, Inc. have partnered to develop and test actuator hardware that will survive the stringent environment of the moon, and which can also be leveraged for other challenging space exploration missions. Prototype actuators have been built and tested in a unique low temperature test bed with motor interface temperatures as low as 14 degrees Kelvin. Several years of work have resulted in specialized electro-mechanical hardware to survive extreme space exploration environments, a test program that verifies and finds limitations of the designs at extreme temperatures, and a growing knowledge base that can be leveraged by future space exploration missions.

  18. Amorphous InGaMgO Ultraviolet Photo-TFT with Ultrahigh Photosensitivity and Extremely Large Responsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, amorphous InGaZnO ultraviolet photo thin-film transistors have exhibited great potential for application in future display technologies. Nevertheless, the transmittance of amorphous InGaZnO (~80% is still not high enough, resulting in the relatively large sacrifice of aperture ratio for each sensor pixel. In this work, the ultraviolet photo thin-film transistor based on amorphous InGaMgO, which processes a larger bandgap and higher transmission compared to amorphous InGaZnO, was proposed and investigated. Furthermore, the effects of post-deposition annealing in oxygen on both the material and ultraviolet detection characteristics of amorphous InGaMgO were also comprehensively studied. It was found that oxygen post-deposition annealing can effectively reduce oxygen vacancies, leading to an optimized device performance, including lower dark current, higher sensitivity, and larger responsivity. We attributed it to the combined effect of the reduction in donor states and recombination centers, both of which are related to oxygen vacancies. As a result, the 240-min annealed device exhibited the lowest dark current of 1.7 × 10−10 A, the highest photosensitivity of 3.9 × 106, and the largest responsivity of 1.5 × 104 A/W. Therefore, our findings have revealed that amorphous InGaMgO photo thin-film transistors are a very promising alternative for UV detection, especially for application in touch-free interactive displays.

  19. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Spectroscopy of the Nova-Like Cataclysmic Variable BB Doradus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M; Barrett, Paul E; Szkody, Paula; Schlegel, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    ... (possibly lower than 10 ). Assuming an average white dwarf (WD) mass of 0.8 M leads to a mass accretion rate of 10 9 M yr 1 and a distance on the order of 650 pc, consistent with the extremely low Galactic reddening in the direction of BB Dor...

  20. Surface modification of organic polymer by dual action of extreme ultraviolet/visible-near infrared ultrashort pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří; Homer, Pavel; Jakubczak, Krzysztof; Rus, Bedřich; Kim, I. J.; Kim, C. M.; Lee, G.H.; Nam, C. H.; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Juha, Libor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 2 (2009), 026105/1-026105/3 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA ČR GC202/07/J008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : high-speed optical techniques * polymers * surface structure * ultraviolet radiation effects Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.072, year: 2009

  1. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from mid-infrared laser-produced rare-earth Gd plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Higashiguchi, T.; Li, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Ohashi, H.; Torii, S.; Nakamura, D.; Takahashi, A.; Okada, T.; Jiang, W.; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.; Makimura, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2013), s. 31837-31845 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ultraviolet emission * plasma * conversion efficiency * spectral purity Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.525, year: 2013

  2. Effects of deprotonation efficiency of protected units on line edge roughness and stochastic defect generation in chemically amplified resist processes for 11 nm node of extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2014-11-01

    The deprotonation of polymer radical cations plays an important role in the acid generation in chemically amplified resists upon exposure to ionizing radiation. In this study, the effects of the deprotonation efficiency of protected units of a resist polymer on line edge roughness (LER) and stochastic defect generation were investigated. The suppression of stochastic effects is essential for the realization of high-volume production of semiconductor devices with an 11 nm critical dimension using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. By increasing the deprotonation efficiency, the chemical contrast (latent image quality) was improved; however, the protected unit number fluctuation did not significantly change. Consequently, LER and the probability of stochastic defect generation were reduced. This effect was prominent when the protection ratio was close to 100%.

  3. Study on the resistance of haloferax radiotolerans, an extreme Halophilic archaebacterium from Uromia lake against ultraviolet (UV) light and 60Co gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgarni, E.; Shirzad, M.; Soudi, M. R.; Shahmohammadi, H. R.; Falsafi, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the capacity of an extreme halophilic archaebacterium, isolated from Uromia lake, Haloferax radiotolerans to withstand the lethal effects of ultraviolet light (UV),and 60 Co r-rays has been studied. The resistibility of this organism against the DNA-damaging agents was evaluated by calculating of the survival fractions at different dose rates of W and 60 Co r-rays radiations and compared with those of Escherichia coli B/r (a radioresistant strain of E. coli). D 37 values for Haloferax radiotolerans and E. coli B/r were 23 1, and 9 J/m 2 , respectively, by exposure to the UV light. They were 645, and 99 Gy, respectively, by exposure to 60 Co r-rays. Against these agents, Haloferax radiotolerans shows much more resistance compare to that of E. coli B/r. This is categorized as the first report of resistibility in the member of Archaea

  4. Observation of extreme ultraviolet transitions in highly charged Ba{sup 16+} to Ba{sup 23+} ions with electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S.; Shimizu, E.; Nakamura, N. [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    We have investigated extreme ultraviolet emission from highly charged barium using a compact electron beam ion trap at the Tokyo EBIT laboratory. The spectra were recorded for several beam energies ranging from 440 to 740 eV, while keeping the electron beam current constant at 10 mA. Radiation from charge states Zr-like Ba{sup 16+} to As-like Ba{sup 23+} were recorded and identified by varying the electron beam energy across the ionization thresholds and comparing with calculated results. The calculations were performed with a detailed relativistic configuration interaction approach using the Flexible Atomic Code. Several new lines belonging to electric dipole transitions were observed and identified.

  5. Spectral lines and characteristic of temporal variations in photoionized plasmas induced with laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, I.; Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Jarocki, R.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-11-01

    Spectral lines for Kr/Ne/H2 photoionized plasma in the ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) wavelength ranges have been created using a laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV source. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The laser pulses were focused onto a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulses. Spectral lines from photoionization in neutral Kr/Ne/H2 and up to few charged states were observed. The intense emission lines were associated with the Kr transition lines. Experimental and theoretical investigations on intensity variations for some ionic lines are presented. A decrease in the intensity with the delay time between the laser pulse and the spectrum acquisition was revealed. Electron temperature and electron density in the photoionized plasma have been estimated from the characteristic emission lines. Temperature was obtained using Boltzmann plot method, assuming that the population density of atoms and ions are considered in a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Electron density was calculated from the Stark broadening profile. The temporal evaluation of the plasma and the way of optimizing the radiation intensity of LPP EUV sources is discussed.

  6. Spectral filter for splitting a beam with electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or soft X-Ray (Soft X) and the infrared (IR) wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, F.A.; Bijkerk, Frederik; van den Boogaard, Toine; van den Boogaard, A.J.R.; van der Meer, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral filter for splitting the primary radiation from a generated beam with primary electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation) or soft X-ray (soft X) wavelength range and parasitic radiation having a wavelength in the infrared wavelength range (IR

  7. Reply to “Comment on ‘Ultrafast Demagnetization Measurements Using Extreme Ultraviolet Light: Comparison of Electronic and Magnetic Contributions’ ”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Turgut

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the following, we show that the conclusions of our article titled “Ultrafast Demagnetization Measurements Using Extreme Ultraviolet Light: Comparison of Electronic and Magnetic Contributions” are correct. The Comment of Vodungbo et al. argues that a unique determination of the refractive index variation over time is not possible using the data set presented in our paper. Furthermore, it was suggested that the lack of uniqueness allows for the possibility of a very specific time-dependent trajectory of the refractive index in the complex plane that could give rise to a large nonmagnetic modulation of the measured asymmetry, in spite of a negligible change in the s-polarized reflectivity. In this Reply, we conclusively show that any nonmagnetic contribution to the measured asymmetry is indeed negligible (<2%, below the noise level of the magnetic-asymmetry measurements. First, we use a few additional measurements to unambiguously rule out the presence of any nonmagnetic contributions to the signal. Second, we show that the scenario proposed by Vodungbo et al. would require both exotic time and energy dependences of the refractive index near the M edge that are extremely unlikely (virtually impossible in real materials. Thus, the conclusions of our original article are preserved.

  8. Remote Sensing of the Upper Atmosphere and the Ionosphere in the Extreme and Far Ultraviolet: Results from the LITES Experiment aboard the IS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S. C.; Chakrabarti, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Geddes, G.; Budzien, S. A.; Cook, T.; Aryal, S.; Martel, J.; Galkin, I. A.; Erickson, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Limb-Imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) was launched as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 (STP-H5) payload aboard a commercial resupply flight on February 19, 2017 and was subsequently installed on the International Space Station (ISS). LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans the 60 - 140 nm wavelength range at 1 nm spectral resolution and samples tangent altitudes 150 - 350 km with 0.2° angular resolution. LITES, in combination with the GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry - Colocated (GROUP-C) experiment, which includes a GPS receiver and a nadir viewing 135.6 nm photometer, jointly collect new information on the thermosphere and the ionosphere using simultaneous UV and radio emissions. LITES, which uses standard stars to perform in-flight calibration, observes altitude profiles of day and night airglow emissions that are being used to infer thermospheric and ionospheric density profiles. Furthermore, due to the inclination of the ISS, LITES has also observed auroral spectrum and their altitude and spatial variations. Finally, geomagnetic storm effects on its UV emissions can be used to remotely sense their effects on the upper atmospheric morphology. These ISS observations,which are complement to the upcoming ICON and GOLD NASA missions, are focused on ionosphere-atmosphere coupling and global-scale atmospheric response to space weather observed from higher altitudes . We will present an overview of the LITES instrument, some early results from the first few months of operations. We will also summarize the advantages in calibration and validation activities that are possible through space-based LITES, GROUP-C and stellar measurements and simultaneous ground-based optical and radar observations.

  9. Addiction in Extreme Sports: An Exploration of Withdrawal States in Rock Climbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirene, Robert M.; Shearer, David; Roderique-Davies, Gareth; Mellalieu, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Extreme sports athletes are often labeled “adrenaline junkies” by the media, implying they are addicted to their sport. Research suggests during abstinence these athletes may experience withdrawal states characteristic of individuals with an addiction (Celsi, Rose, & Leigh, 1993; Franken, Zijlstra, & Muris, 2006; Willig, 2008). Despite this notion, no research has directly explored withdrawal experiences of extreme sports athletes. Methods Using semi-structured interviews, we explored withdrawal experiences of high (n = 4) and average-ability (n = 4) male rock climbers during periods of abstinence. We investigated the psychological and behavioral aspects of withdrawal, including craving, anhedonia, and negative affect; and differences in the frequency and intensity of these states between groups. Results Deductive content analysis indicated support for each of the three categories of anhedonia, craving, and negative affect. Consistent with existing substance addiction literature, high-ability climbers recalled more frequent and intense craving states and negative affect during abstinence compared with average-ability climbers. No differences in anhedonic symptoms between high and average-ability participants were found. Conclusions Rock climbing athletes appear to experience withdrawal symptoms when abstinent from their sport comparable to individuals with substance and behavioral addictions. The implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27348554

  10. Hardware and Methods of the Optical End-to-End Test of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Steven J.; Redman, Kevin W.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; McGuffey, Doug B.; Smee, Stephen; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kushner, Gary

    1999-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), currently being tested and scheduled for a 1999 launch, is an astrophysics satellite designed to provide high spectral resolving power (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda = 24,000-30,000) over the interval 90.5-118.7 nm. The FUSE optical path consists of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic, primary mirrors which illuminate separate Rowland circle spectrograph channels equipped with holographic gratings and delay line microchannel plate detectors. We describe the hardware and methods used for the optical end-to-end test of the FUSE instrument during satellite integration and test. Cost and schedule constraints forced us to devise a simplified version of the planned optical test which occurred in parallel with satellite thermal-vacuum testing. The optical test employed a collimator assembly which consisted of four co-aligned, 15" Cassegrain telescopes which were positioned above the FUSE instrument, providing a collimated beam for each optical channel. A windowed UV light source, remotely adjustable in three axes, was mounted at the focal plane of each collimator. Problems with the UV light sources, including high F-number and window failures, were the only major difficulties encountered during the test. The test succeeded in uncovering a significant problem with the secondary structure used for the instrument closeout cavity and, furthermore, showed that the mechanical solution was successful. The hardware was also used extensively for simulations of science observations, providing both UV light for spectra and visible light for the fine error sensor camera.

  11. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): Overview of Science Objectives, Instrument Design, Data Products, and Model Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Hock, R.; Jones, A. R.; Woodraska, D.; Judge, D.; Didkovsky, L.; Lean, J.; Mariska, J.; Warren, H.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The highly variable solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is the major energy input to the Earth's upper atmosphere, strongly impacting the geospace environment, affecting satellite operations, communications, and navigation. The Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) will measure the solar EUV irradiance from 0.1 to 105 nm with unprecedented spectral resolution (0.1 nm), temporal cadence (ten seconds), and accuracy (20%). EVE includes several irradiance instruments: The Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS)-A is a grazingincidence spectrograph that measures the solar EUV irradiance in the 5 to 37 nm range with 0.1-nm resolution, and the MEGS-B is a normal-incidence, dual-pass spectrograph that measures the solar EUV irradiance in the 35 to 105 nm range with 0.1-nm resolution. To provide MEGS in-flight calibration, the EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) measures the solar EUV irradiance in broadbands between 0.1 and 39 nm, and a MEGS-Photometer measures the Sun s bright hydrogen emission at 121.6 nm. The EVE data products include a near real-time space-weather product (Level 0C), which provides the solar EUV irradiance in specific bands and also spectra in 0.1-nm intervals with a cadence of one minute and with a time delay of less than 15 minutes. The EVE higher-level products are Level 2 with the solar EUV irradiance at higher time cadence (0.25 seconds for photometers and ten seconds for spectrographs) and Level 3 with averages of the solar irradiance over a day and over each one-hour period. The EVE team also plans to advance existing models of solar EUV irradiance and to operationally use the EVE measurements in models of Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere. Improved understanding of the evolution of solar flares and extending the various models to incorporate solar flare events are high priorities for the EVE team.

  12. Pulse radiolysis study of polystyrene-based polymers with added photoacid generators: Reaction mechanism of extreme-ultraviolet and electron-beam chemically amplified resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2015-02-01

    The reaction mechanism of chemically amplified resist (CAR) after irradiation with ionizing radiation is important for developing extreme-ultraviolet and electron-beam lithography. The acid generation after the ionization is an essential reaction in CAR. In this study, the intermediate of the proton source of acid (a radical cation of the base polymer) in the presence of a photoacid generator (PAG) was investigated by the pulse radiolysis method. The deprotonation kinetics of the radical cation of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) in solutions with and without PAG shows only a small difference. However, the yield of radical cations of poly(4-methoxystyrene) (PMOS) as a model of the resist with a protecting (releasing) group increases upon adding PAG. The formation of the ion pair between the PMOS radical cation and the dissociated anion with a lifetime of approximately 30 to 40 µs is suggested. The lower acid yield in PMOS than in PHS film is also discussed in terms of the stability of the radical cation.

  13. A Partnership between English Language Learners and a Team of Rocket Scientists: EPO for the NASA SDO Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, S. M.; Eparvier, F.; McCaffrey, M.; Murillo, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent immigrant high school students were successfully engaged in learning about Sun-Earth connections through a partnership with the NASA SDO Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) project. The students were enrolled in a pilot course as part of the Math, Engineering and Science Achievement MESA) program. For many of the students, this was the only science option available to them due to language limitations. The English Language Learner (ELL) students doubled their achievement on a pre- and post-assessment on the content of the course. Students learned scientific content and vocabulary in English with support in Spanish, attended field trips, hosted scientist speakers, built and deployed space weather monitors as part of the Stanford SOLAR project, and gave final presentations in English, showcasing their new computer skills. Teachers who taught the students in other courses noted gains in the students' willingness to use English in class and noted gains in math skills. The MESA-EVE course won recognition as a Colorado MESA Program of Excellence and is being offered again in 2007-08. The course has been broken into modules for use in shorter after-school environments, or for use by EVE scientists who are outside of the Boulder area. Other EVE EPO includes professional development for teachers and content workshops for journalists.

  14. A Partnership between English Language Learners and a Team of Rocket Scientists: EPO for the NASA SDO Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, S. M.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Eparvier, F.; Murillo, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recent immigrant high school students were successfully engaged in learning about Sun-Earth connections through a partnership with the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) project. The students were enrolled in a pilot course as part of the Math, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program. The English Language Learner (ELL) students doubled their achievement on a pre- and post- assessment on the content of the course. Students learned scientific content and vocabulary in English with support in Spanish, attended field trips, hosted scientist speakers, built antenna and deployed space weather monitors as part of the Stanford SOLAR project, and gave final presentations in English, showcasing their new computer skills. Teachers who taught the students in other courses noted gains in the students' willingness to use English in class and noted gains in math skills. The course has been broken into modules for use in shorter after-school environments, or for use by EVE scientists who are outside of the Boulder area. Video footage of "The Making of a Satellite", and "All About EVE" is completed for use in the kits. Other EVE EPO includes upcoming professional development for teachers and content workshops for journalists.

  15. Impact of B4C capping layer for extreme ultraviolet mask on the sensitivity of patterned mask inspection using a projection electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2014-10-01

    The inspection sensitivity of a patterned extreme ultraviolet mask with B4C-capped multilayer (ML) was investigated using a simulated projection electron microscope (PEM) image. Extrusion and intrusion defects with 16-nm size were detected with their intensity of >10 times the standard deviation of the background level on a half-pitch 64-nm line-and-space pattern. The defect detection sensitivity in this case was higher than that of a Ru-capped ML sample and has a potential to meet the requirement for beyond 16-nm node generation from the standpoint of patterned mask inspection using the PEM technique. These results indicate that the B4C capping layer, besides its good durability, has an advantage for high sensitivity of patterned mask inspection. The optimal condition of the incident beam energy was found to be 500 and 1,000 eV for the samples of B4C-capped ML and B4C-buffered Ru-capped ML, respectively. The sensitivity of defect detection was strongly affected by the difference of secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) between the absorber layer and capping layer. However, the small incident beam energy was found to be preferable when the SEEC difference was relatively high.

  16. A portable high-resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer designed for the Shanghai EBIT and the Shanghai low energy EBITs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhan; Zhao, Ruifeng; Li, Wenxian; Tu, Bingsheng; Yang, Yang, E-mail: yangyang@fudan.edu.cn; Xiao, Jun; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming [EBIT Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics (Ministry of Education), Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huldt, Sven [Lund Observatory, Lund University, Lund SE-22100 (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    A portable high resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic research at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) laboratory. A unique way of aligning the grazing incidence spectrometer using the zero order of the grating is introduced. This method is realized by extending the range of the movement of the CCD detector to cover the zero order. The alignment can be done in a few minutes, thus leading to a portable spectrometer. The high vacuum needed to be compatible with the EBITs is reached by mounting most of the translation and rotation stages outside the chamber. Only one high vacuum compatible linear guide is mounted inside the chamber. This is to ensure the convenient interchange of the gratings needed to enable wavelength coverage of the whole range of 10 to 500 Å. Spectra recorded with one of our low energy EBITs shows that a resolving power of above 800 can be achieved. In the slitless configuration used in this work, we found the resolving power to be limited by the width of the EBIT plasma. When mounted on the Shanghai EBIT which is a high energy EBIT and has a narrower EBIT plasma width, the estimated resolving power will be around 1400 at 221.15 Å.

  17. Contrasting behavior of covalent and molecular carbon allotropes exposed to extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufarová, M.; Hájková, V.; Chalupský, J.; Burian, T.; Vacík, J.; Vorlíček, V.; Vyšín, L.; Gaudin, J.; Medvedev, N.; Ziaja, B.; Nagasono, M.; Yabashi, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Sinn, H.; Störmer, M.; Koláček, K.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Juha, L.

    2017-12-01

    All carbon materials, e.g., amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings and C60 fullerene thin films, play an important role in short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) research motivated by FEL optics development and prospective nanotechnology applications. Responses of a-C and C60 layers to the extreme ultraviolet (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source in Japan) and soft x-ray (free-electron laser in Hamburg) free-electron laser radiation are investigated by Raman spectroscopy, differential interference contrast, and atomic force microscopy. A remarkable difference in the behavior of covalent (a-C) and molecular (C60) carbonaceous solids is demonstrated under these irradiation conditions. Low thresholds for ablation of a fullerene crystal (estimated to be around 0.15 eV/atom for C60 vs 0.9 eV/atom for a-C in terms of the absorbed dose) are caused by a low cohesive energy of fullerene crystals. An efficient mechanism of the removal of intact C60 molecules from the irradiated crystal due to Coulomb repulsion of fullerene-cage cation radicals formed by the ionizing radiation is revealed by a detailed modeling.

  18. A Possible Detection of a Fast-mode Extreme Ultraviolet Wave Associated with a Mini Coronal Mass Ejection Observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Yang, Liheng; Yang, Dan

    2011-10-01

    "Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves" are large-scale wavelike transients often associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this Letter, we present a possible detection of a fast-mode EUV wave associated with a mini-CME observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. On 2010 December 1, a small-scale EUV wave erupted near the disk center associated with a mini-CME, which showed all the low corona manifestations of a typical CME. The CME was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament, with a typical length of about 30''. Although the eruption was tiny, the wave had the appearance of an almost semicircular front and propagated at a uniform velocity of 220-250 km s-1 with very little angular dependence. The CME lateral expansion was asymmetric with an inclination toward north, and the southern footprints of the CME loops hardly shifted. The lateral expansion resulted in deep long-duration dimmings, showing the CME extent. Comparing the onset and the initial speed of the CME, the wave was likely triggered by the rapid expansion of the CME loops. Our analysis confirms that the small-scale EUV wave is a true wave, interpreted as a fast-mode wave.

  19. Wavefront measurement of single-mode quantum cascade laser beam for seed application in laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Yokotsuka, Toshio; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2012-12-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a very attractive seed source for a multikilowatt pulsed CO2 lasers applied for driving extreme ultraviolet emitting plasmas. In this Letter, we investigate output beam properties of a QCL designed to address P18 and P20 lines of 10.6 micron band of CO2 molecule. In particular, output beam quality and stability are investigated for the first time. A well-defined linear polarization and a single-mode operation enabled a use of phase retrieval method for full description of QCL output beam. A direct, multi-image numerical phase retrieval technique was developed and successfully applied to the measured intensity patterns of a QCL beam. Very good agreement between the measured and reconstructed beam profiles was observed at distances ranging from QCL aperture to infinity, proving a good understanding of the beam propagation. The results also confirm a high spatial coherence and high stability of the beam parameters, the features expected from an excellent seed source.

  20. Photoionization of resonantly driven atomic states by an extreme ultraviolet-free-electron laser: intensity dependence and renormalization of Rabi frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, B; Brand, A; Glässl, M; Vagov, A; Axt, V M; Pietsch, U

    2013-01-01

    We analyze theoretically the high intensity photoionization dynamics of a system with two atomic states resonantly coupled by coherent extreme ultraviolet laser radiation that also gives rise to the ionization. The ground state occupation of such a system is shown to exhibit damped Rabi oscillations. The corresponding ionization, which is responsible for the damping, scales almost linearly with the field intensity when the pulse length exceeds the Rabi period. For shorter pulses a quadratic scaling is found. The Rabi frequency is shifted compared to its value for an isolated two-level system. The shift increases with excitation intensity and can acquire a high percentage of the unrenormalized frequency at high intensities. Analytical results obtained within a simplified solvable model demonstrate that the damping and the shift both result from the coupling of the discrete states to the ionization continuum and are therefore closely related. Numerical simulations for a two-electron system reveal at high intensities the importance of off-resonant ionization channels. (paper)

  1. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis, E-mail: d.rudolf@fz-juelich.de; Juschkin, Larissa [RWTH Aachen University, Experimental Physics of EUV, Steinbachstraße 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Danylyuk, Serhiy [RWTH Aachen University, Chair for Technology of Optical Systems, JARA-FIT, Steinbachstraße 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergmann, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Grützmacher, Detlev [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV–250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

  2. A portable high-resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer designed for the Shanghai EBIT and the Shanghai low energy EBITs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhan; Zhao, Ruifeng; Li, Wenxian; Tu, Bingsheng; Yang, Yang; Xiao, Jun; Huldt, Sven; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2014-06-01

    A portable high resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic research at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) laboratory. A unique way of aligning the grazing incidence spectrometer using the zero order of the grating is introduced. This method is realized by extending the range of the movement of the CCD detector to cover the zero order. The alignment can be done in a few minutes, thus leading to a portable spectrometer. The high vacuum needed to be compatible with the EBITs is reached by mounting most of the translation and rotation stages outside the chamber. Only one high vacuum compatible linear guide is mounted inside the chamber. This is to ensure the convenient interchange of the gratings needed to enable wavelength coverage of the whole range of 10 to 500 Å. Spectra recorded with one of our low energy EBITs shows that a resolving power of above 800 can be achieved. In the slitless configuration used in this work, we found the resolving power to be limited by the width of the EBIT plasma. When mounted on the Shanghai EBIT which is a high energy EBIT and has a narrower EBIT plasma width, the estimated resolving power will be around 1400 at 221.15 Å.

  3. Application of Laser Plasma Sources of Soft X-rays and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) in Imaging, Processing Materials and Photoionization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P. W.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Ahad, I. U.; Fok, T.; Szczurek, A.; Wȩgrzyński, Ł.

    In the paper we present new applications of laser plasma sources of soft X-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) in various areas of plasma physics, nanotechnology and biomedical engineering. The sources are based on a gas puff target irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from commercial Nd: YAG lasers, generating pulses with time duration from 1 to 10 ns and energies from 0.5 to 10 J at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The targets are produced with the use of a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which allows for high conversion efficiency of laser energy into soft X-rays and EUV without degradation of the nozzle. The sources are equipped with various optical systems to collect soft X-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beam. New applications of these sources in imaging, including EUV tomography and soft X-ray microscopy, processing of materials and photoionization studies are presented.

  4. Bright Linearly and Circularly Polarized Extreme Ultraviolet and Soft X-ray High Harmonics for Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an extreme nonlinear optical process. When implemented in a phase-matched geometry, HHG coherent upconverts femtosecond laser light into coherent "X-ray laser" beams, while retaining excellent spatial and temporal coherence, as well as the polarization state of the driving laser. HHG has a tabletop footprint, with femtosecond to attosecond time resolution, combined with nanometer spatial resolution. As a consequence of these unique capabilities, HHG is now being widely adopted for use in molecular spectroscopy and imaging, materials science, as well as nanoimaging in general. In the first half of this thesis, I demonstrate high flux linearly polarized soft X-ray HHG, driven by a single-stage 10-mJ Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. I first down-converted the laser to 1.3 mum using an optical parametric amplifier, before up-converting it into the soft X-ray region using HHG in a high-pressure, phase-matched, hollow waveguide geometry. The resulting optimally phase-matched broadband spectrum extends to 200 eV, with a soft X-ray photon flux of > 106 photons/pulse/1% bandwidth at 1 kHz, corresponding to > 109 photons/s/1% bandwidth, or approximately a three orders-of-magnitude increase compared with past work. Using this broad bandwidth X-ray source, I demonstrated X-ray absorption spectroscopy of multiple elements and transitions in molecules in a single spectrum, with a spectral resolution of 0.25 eV, and with the ability to resolve the near edge fine structure. In the second half of this thesis, I discuss how to generate the first bright circularly polarized (CP) soft X-ray HHG and also use them to implement the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements. Using counter-rotating CP lasers at 1.3 mum and 0.79 mum, I generated CPHHG with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right CP peaks, with energies

  5. NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations: Science Operations Development for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission 16 in 2012 was to evaluate and compare the performance of a defined series of representative near-Earth asteroid (NEA) extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks under different conditions and combinations of work systems, constraints, and assumptions considered for future human NEA exploration missions. NEEMO 16 followed NASA's 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS), the primary focus of which was understanding the implications of communication latency, crew size, and work system combinations with respect to scientific data quality, data management, crew workload, and crew/mission control interactions. The 1-g environment precluded meaningful evaluation of NEA EVA translation, worksite stabilization, sampling, or instrument deployment techniques. Thus, NEEMO missions were designed to provide an opportunity to perform a preliminary evaluation of these important factors for each of the conditions being considered. NEEMO 15 also took place in 2011 and provided a first look at many of the factors, but the mission was cut short due to a hurricane threat before all objectives were completed. ARES Directorate (KX) personnel consulted with JSC engineers to ensure that high-fidelity planetary science protocols were incorporated into NEEMO mission architectures. ARES has been collaborating with NEEMO mission planners since NEEMO 9 in 2006, successively building upon previous developments to refine science operations concepts within engineering constraints; it is expected to continue the collaboration as NASA's human exploration mission plans evolve.

  6. Extremes of the jet-accretion power relation of blazars, as explored by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sbarrato, T.; Ghisellini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations are crucial to study the non-thermal jet emission from high-redshift, powerful blazars. We observed two bright z > 2 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in hard X-rays to explore the details of their relativistic jets and their possible variability. S5 0014+81 (at z = 3.......366) and B0222+185 (at z = 2.690) have been observed twice by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) simultaneously with Swift/X-ray Telescope, showing different variability behaviours. We found that NuSTAR is instrumental to explore the variability of powerful high-redshift blazars, even when...... no γ -ray emission is detected. The two sources have proven to have respectively the most luminous accretion disc and the most powerful jet among known blazars. Thanks to these properties, they are located at the extreme end of the jet-accretion disc relation previously found for γ -ray detected...

  7. Probing the Production of Extreme-ultraviolet Late-phase Solar Flares Using the Model Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Ding, Mingde

    2018-04-01

    Recent observations in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths reveal an EUV late phase in some solar flares that is characterized by a second peak in warm coronal emissions (∼3 MK) several tens of minutes to a few hours after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak. Using the model enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), we numerically probe the production of EUV late-phase solar flares. Starting from two main mechanisms of producing the EUV late phase, i.e., long-lasting cooling and secondary heating, we carry out two groups of numerical experiments to study the effects of these two processes on the emission characteristics in late-phase loops. In either of the two processes an EUV late-phase solar flare that conforms to the observational criteria can be numerically synthesized. However, the underlying hydrodynamic and thermodynamic evolutions in late-phase loops are different between the two synthetic flare cases. The late-phase peak due to a long-lasting cooling process always occurs during the radiative cooling phase, while that powered by a secondary heating is more likely to take place in the conductive cooling phase. We then propose a new method for diagnosing the two mechanisms based on the shape of EUV late-phase light curves. Moreover, from the partition of energy input, we discuss why most solar flares are not EUV late flares. Finally, by addressing some other factors that may potentially affect the loop emissions, we also discuss why the EUV late phase is mainly observed in warm coronal emissions.

  8. Initiation and Early Evolution of the Coronal Mass Ejection on 2009 May 13 from Extreme-ultraviolet and White-light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ⊙). Below 2 R ⊙, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ⊙, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ⊙ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ⊙. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  9. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V., E-mail: reva.antoine@gmail.com [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 53 Leninskij Prospekt, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R {sub ☉}). Below 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R {sub ☉} from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R {sub ☉}. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  10. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ☉ ). Below 2 R ☉ , we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ☉ , we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ☉ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ☉ . The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  11. Performance Verification of the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer GEMS X-Ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Black, J. Kevin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Tamagawa, Toru; Kanako, Kenta; Takeuchi, Yoko; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; hide

    2014-01-01

    olarimetry is a powerful tool for astrophysical observations that has yet to be exploited in the X-ray band. For satellite-borne and sounding rocket experiments, we have developed a photoelectric gas polarimeter to measure X-ray polarization in the 2-10 keV range utilizing a time projection chamber (TPC) and advanced micro-pattern gas electron multiplier (GEM) techniques. We carried out performance verification of a flight equivalent unit (1/4 model) which was planned to be launched on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) satellite. The test was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facility in April 2013. The polarimeter was irradiated with linearly-polarized monochromatic X-rays between 2.3 and 10.0 keV and scanned with a collimated beam at 5 different detector positions. After a systematic investigation of the detector response, a modulation factor greater than or equal to 35% above 4 keV was obtained with the expected polarization angle. At energies below 4 keV where the photoelectron track becomes short, diffusion in the region between the GEM and readout strips leaves an asymmetric photoelectron image. A correction method retrieves an expected modulation angle, and the expected modulation factor, approximately 20% at 2.7 keV. Folding the measured values of modulation through an instrument model gives sensitivity, parameterized by minimum detectable polarization (MDP), nearly identical to that assumed at the preliminary design review (PDR).

  12. A Compact Extreme Ultraviolet Imager

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Just how far can one shrink a solar/heliospheric image??? — Can you shrink it small enough to fit on a cube-sat? What can we image — successfully — from a cube-sat?...

  13. Exploring local perceptions and attributions of 'extreme' wildfire impacts in Rural Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, M.; Paveglio, T.; Kallman, D.

    2013-12-01

    To date there have been few systematic efforts to uncover the criteria that local stakeholders use to perceive of and make judgments about the severity of wildfire impacts to the social-ecological systems they are a part of. The study presented here sought to uncover expanded understandings of perceived social and ecological impacts from a wildfire in rural Montana and the underlying causes for those perceived impacts. Such efforts could lead to more comprehensive social impact assessment concerning wildfires or other hazards and help better understand how local perceptions might influence residents' ongoing attitudes toward fire risk or mitigation efforts. The study presented here explored local perceptions of impact from the 2012 Dahl fire near Roundup, MT. The Dahl Fire burned 73 permanent structures, 150 outbuilding and 22,000 acres of predominantly private lands in the rural Bull Mountains. Members of the project team interviewed approximately 50 stakeholders impacted by or involved in the management for the Dahl Fire. Interviews took place in the summer of 2013 and included a variety of residents, emergency personnel, firefighters, local community officials and land management professionals. Results suggest that residents considered the Dahl fire especially impactful given the number of private residences and structures that were burned and the number of people displaced or disrupted by the event (either directly, through efforts to help those affected, or through indirect impacts to community function). The extremity of the firefighting conditions (e.g. wind, relative humidity, terrain), the rapidity of fire spread through populated areas and the damages sustained given previous fires in the area all surprised stakeholders and contributed to their perceptions of impact severity. Conflicts over access to properties during and immediately following the fire, and the variable perception that personal wildfire mitigations did little to reduce damages from the

  14. Exploring Extreme Retro-reflection by Asteroids Using Las Cumbres Observatory Robotic Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Bauer, James M.

    2017-10-01

    The reflectivity of solar system surfaces ‘spikes’ sharply when the Sun is less than 1 degree from directly behind the observer. The Galileo spacecraft measured the reflectivity of part of Europa’s surface to increase by as much as a factor of 8 as the observer moves from 5 degrees to the exact backscattering direction! One mechanism explains this spike as coherent light scattering that occurs only close to this unique retro-reflection geometry. Due to the tight linear alignment of the target, observer and Sun required to measure the peak brightness of the spike, accurate and complete measurements of the amplitude and decay of the spike exist for only a few targets. We used the unique capabilities of the automated Las Cumbres Observatory global telescope network (LCO) to systematically measure this extreme opposition surge for 60+ asteroids sampling a variety of taxonomic classes in the Bus/DeMeo taxonomy.Each asteroid was observed in the SDSS r’ and g’ filters during the ~8 hour interval when it passes within ~0.1 deg of the point opposite the Sun on the sky. Supporting observations of each asteroid with LCO collected over ~50 days measure asteroid rotation and phase angle brightness changes to enable accurate characterization of the retro-reflection spike. This data set vastly increases the number and variety of the surfaces characterized at such small phase angles compared to existing asteroid data. We examine how the spike characteristics vary with surface composition, albedo, and wavelength providing new constraints on physical models of this ubiquitous yet poorly understood phenomenon.Analysis and modeling of these measurements will advance our understanding of the physical mechanism responsible for this enhanced retro-reflection thereby improving our ability to characterize these surfaces from remote observations. The ability to infer surface physical properties from remote sensing data is a key capability for future asteroid missions, manned

  15. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C +5 n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I p = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z eff and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n e , compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I p and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I p and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Maritime Military Decision Making in Environments of Extreme Information Ambiguity: An Initial Exploration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reeves, Andrew T

    2005-01-01

    ... to make effective decisions. An environment of extreme information ambiguity, a dependent variable, is one of the most difficult components of a battle where the decision maker may reach a confusing and debilitating point...

  17. Very short-term reactive forecasting of the solar ultraviolet index using an extreme learning machine integrated with the solar zenith angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravinesh C; Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio V; Adamowski, Jan F; Quilty, John M

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to erythemally-effective solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that contributes to malignant keratinocyte cancers and associated health-risk is best mitigated through innovative decision-support systems, with global solar UV index (UVI) forecast necessary to inform real-time sun-protection behaviour recommendations. It follows that the UVI forecasting models are useful tools for such decision-making. In this study, a model for computationally-efficient data-driven forecasting of diffuse and global very short-term reactive (VSTR) (10-min lead-time) UVI, enhanced by drawing on the solar zenith angle (θ s ) data, was developed using an extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm. An ELM algorithm typically serves to address complex and ill-defined forecasting problems. UV spectroradiometer situated in Toowoomba, Australia measured daily cycles (0500-1700h) of UVI over the austral summer period. After trialling activations functions based on sine, hard limit, logarithmic and tangent sigmoid and triangular and radial basis networks for best results, an optimal ELM architecture utilising logarithmic sigmoid equation in hidden layer, with lagged combinations of θ s as the predictor data was developed. ELM's performance was evaluated using statistical metrics: correlation coefficient (r), Willmott's Index (WI), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (E NS ), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute error (MAE) between observed and forecasted UVI. Using these metrics, the ELM model's performance was compared to that of existing methods: multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), M5 Model Tree, and a semi-empirical (Pro6UV) clear sky model. Based on RMSE and MAE values, the ELM model (0.255, 0.346, respectively) outperformed the MARS (0.310, 0.438) and M5 Model Tree (0.346, 0.466) models. Concurring with these metrics, the Willmott's Index for the ELM, MARS and M5 Model Tree models were 0.966, 0.942 and 0.934, respectively. About 57% of the ELM model

  18. Maritime military decision making in environments of extreme information ambiguity an initial exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Andrew T.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis examines the following hypothesis: Through the combined use of common training and collaborative planning, a decision maker may sufficiently alleviate the harmful effects of an environment of information so that he/she can continue to make effective decisions. An environment of extreme information ambiguity, a dependent variable, is one of the most difficult components of a battle where the decision maker may reach a confusing and debilitating point where surviving seems less and ...

  19. Enabling Structured Exploration of Workflow Performance Variability in Extreme-Scale Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Stephan, Eric G.; Raju, Bibi; Altintas, Ilkay; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram

    2015-11-15

    Workflows are taking an Workflows are taking an increasingly important role in orchestrating complex scientific processes in extreme scale and highly heterogeneous environments. However, to date we cannot reliably predict, understand, and optimize workflow performance. Sources of performance variability and in particular the interdependencies of workflow design, execution environment and system architecture are not well understood. While there is a rich portfolio of tools for performance analysis, modeling and prediction for single applications in homogenous computing environments, these are not applicable to workflows, due to the number and heterogeneity of the involved workflow and system components and their strong interdependencies. In this paper, we investigate workflow performance goals and identify factors that could have a relevant impact. Based on our analysis, we propose a new workflow performance provenance ontology, the Open Provenance Model-based WorkFlow Performance Provenance, or OPM-WFPP, that will enable the empirical study of workflow performance characteristics and variability including complex source attribution.

  20. Future extreme events in European climate: An exploration of regional climate model projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniston, M.; Stephenson, D.B.; Christensen, O.B.

    2007-01-01

    -90) and future (2071-2 100) climate on the basis of regional climate model simulations produced by the PRUDENCE project. A summary of the main results follows. Heat waves - Regional surface warming causes the frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves to increase over Europe. By the end of the twenty first...... variability. Precipitation - Heavy winter precipitation increases in central and northern Europe and decreases in the south; heavy summer precipitation increases in north-eastern Europe and decreases in the south. Mediterranean droughts start earlier in the year and last longer. Winter storms - Extreme wind...... regions of Holland, Germany and Denmark, in particular. These results are found to depend to different degrees on model formulation. While the responses of heat waves are robust to model formulation, the magnitudes of changes in precipitation and wind speed are sensitive to the choice of regional model...

  1. Exploring People’s Perceptions of Precursors to the Development of Radicalisation and Extremism.

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Hussain

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the research was to explore perceptions of factors that may influence individuals to become radicalised. A semi-structured interview was carried out with 30 participants (15 = males, 15 = females) recruited in equal numbers from a U.K. and a U.S. university. Transcripts of the interviews were then analysed using thematic analysis. There was a high degree of agreement on likely precursors to radicalisation across the two groups with lack of identity, lack of social integration an...

  2. Exploring the role of ionospheric drivers during the extreme solar minimum of 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Klenzing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the recent solar minimum, solar activity reached the lowest levels observed during the space age, resulting in a contracted atmosphere. This extremely low solar activity provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand the variability of the Earth's ambient ionosphere. The average E × B drifts measured by the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI on the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS satellite during this period are found to have several differences from the expected climatology based on previous solar minima, including downward drifts in the early afternoon and a weak to non-existent pre-reversal enhancement. Using SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere as a computational engine, we investigate the effects of these electrodynamical changes as well as the contraction of the thermosphere and reduced EUV ionization on the ionosphere. The sensitivity of the simulations to wind models is also discussed. These modeled ionospheres are compared to the C/NOFS average topside ion density and composition and Formosa Satellite-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate average NmF2 and hmF2. In all cases, incorporating the VEFI drift data significantly improves the model results when compared to both the C/NOFS density data and the F3/C GOX data. Changing the MSIS and EUVAC models produced changes in magnitude, but not morphology with respect to local time. The choice of wind model modulates the resulting topside density and composition, but only the use of the VEFI E × B drifts produces the observed post-sunset drop in the F peak.

  3. Ultraviolet sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenck, G.O.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial ultraviolet radiation sources can supply bactericidal energy in such a high dosage that in less than a second a higher degree of disinfection is accomplished than by sun irradiation in hours. Bacteria, viruses, phages, and organic micropollutants can be degraded by photochemical wet combustion down to and below detection limits of organic carbon. There are no known ultraviolet-resistant microorganisms. There are limitations to ultraviolet treatment which can often be overcome by adequate technical measures. Unlike other water purification processes, ultraviolet irradiation only exterminates living organisms. The radiation must be able to penetrate to the objects of the kill; in a dose large enough to kill, and long enough to kill and prevent new growth. Contrary to filters, ultraviolet flow-through reactors do not restrict free flow significantly. In contrast to distillation, ultraviolet irradiation imposes no phase changes to the water. Used as a sequence in ultrapure water systems, maintenance requirements are virtually nonexistent; because of the absence of dissolved and particulate matter in purified water, mechanical cleaning of the photoreactor chambers is not essential. The process is highly economical; energy consumption is low and supervision minimal. 103 refs., 45 figs., 15 tabs

  4. Using Discrete Event Simulation for Programming Model Exploration at Extreme-Scale: Macroscale Components for the Structural Simulation Toolkit (SST).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Jeremiah J [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kenny, Joseph P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Discrete event simulation provides a powerful mechanism for designing and testing new extreme- scale programming models for high-performance computing. Rather than debug, run, and wait for results on an actual system, design can first iterate through a simulator. This is particularly useful when test beds cannot be used, i.e. to explore hardware or scales that do not yet exist or are inaccessible. Here we detail the macroscale components of the structural simulation toolkit (SST). Instead of depending on trace replay or state machines, the simulator is architected to execute real code on real software stacks. Our particular user-space threading framework allows massive scales to be simulated even on small clusters. The link between the discrete event core and the threading framework allows interesting performance metrics like call graphs to be collected from a simulated run. Performance analysis via simulation can thus become an important phase in extreme-scale programming model and runtime system design via the SST macroscale components.

  5. Are extreme hydro-meteorological events a prerequisite for extreme water quality impacts? Exploring climate impacts on inland and coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, A. M.; Balaji, V.; Del Giudice, D.; Sinha, E.; Zhou, Y.; Ho, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Questions surrounding water sustainability, climate change, and extreme events are often framed around water quantity - whether too much or too little. The massive impacts of extreme water quality impairments are equally compelling, however. Recent years have provided a host of compelling examples, with unprecedented harmful algal blooms developing along the West coast, in Utah Lake, in Lake Erie, and off the Florida coast, and huge hypoxic dead zones continuing to form in regions such as Lake Erie, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico. Linkages between climate change, extreme events, and water quality impacts are not well understood, however. Several factors explain this lack of understanding, including the relative complexity of underlying processes, the spatial and temporal scale mismatch between hydrologists and climatologists, and observational uncertainty leading to ambiguities in the historical record. Here, we draw on a number of recent studies that aim to quantitatively link meteorological variability and water quality impacts to test the hypothesis that extreme water quality impairments are the result of extreme hydro-meteorological events. We find that extreme hydro-meteorological events are neither always a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the occurrence of extreme water quality impacts. Rather, extreme water quality impairments often occur in situations where multiple contributing factors compound, which complicates both attribution of historical events and the ability to predict the future incidence of such events. Given the critical societal importance of water quality projections, a concerted program of uncertainty reduction encompassing observational and modeling components will be needed to examine situations where extreme weather plays an important, but not solitary, role in the chain of cause and effect.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray diagnostics of high-temperature plasmas. Annual progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moos, H.W.; Armstrong, L. Jr.; Fastie, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the research program at this laboratory from mid February 1976 until January 31, 1977, are described. The four major research areas of the program: diagnostic studies of magnetically confined high temperature plasmas, supporting laboratory studies, theoretical studies of highly ionized atoms, and instrument development are discussed. Spatially resolved ultraviolet measurements on Elmo Bumpy Torus have determined impurity confinement times. The measured oxygen densities and fluxes are being determined at Alcator; the spectroscopic studies show that hydrogen discharges in this tokamak have an effective Z close to one. A laboratory study of the Penning discharge between 100 and 300 A shows that it is a bright source for evaluation of EUV diagnostic instrumentation. Design of a multispatial element spectrometer system is complete and construction has begun. A spectrophotometer compatible with both types of facilities is available for absolute intensity calibration transfer from the NBS SURF II facility to ERDA plasma facilities. Computer programs needed for relativistic calculation of transition probabilities and wavelengths have been completed and applied to calculations in the Li, Be, Ar, and K isoelectronic sequences

  7. A new observational approach to investigate the heliospheric interstellar wind interface - The study of extreme and far ultraviolet resonantly scattered solar radiation from neon, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Fahr, Hans J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the outstanding uncertainties in the understanding of the heliosphere concerns the character of the interaction between the outflowing solar wind and the interstellar medium. A new possibility for obtaining information on this topic is suggested. The cosmically abundant elements neon, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen will be affected differently at their interface passage depending upon the character of this region. Consequently, the distribution of these atoms and their ions will vary within the inner heliosphere. The study of resonantly scattered solar radiation from these species will then provide information on the nature of the interface. A preliminary evaluation of this approach has been carried out, and the results are encouraging. The relevant lines to be studied are in the extreme and far ulraviolet. The existing data in these bands are reviewed; unfortunately, past instrumentation has had insufficient resolution and sensitivity to provide useful information. The capabilities of future approved missions with capabilities in this area are evaluated.

  8. Exploring Fingerprints of the Extreme Thermoacidophile Metallosphaera sedula Grown on Synthetic Martian Regolith Materials as the Sole Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Kölbl

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The biology of metal transforming microorganisms is of a fundamental and applied importance for our understanding of past and present biogeochemical processes on Earth and in the Universe. The extreme thermoacidophile Metallosphaera sedula is a metal mobilizing archaeon, which thrives in hot acid environments (optimal growth at 74°C and pH 2.0 and utilizes energy from the oxidation of reduced metal inorganic sources. These characteristics of M. sedula make it an ideal organism to further our knowledge of the biogeochemical processes of possible life on extraterrestrial planetary bodies. Exploring the viability and metal extraction capacity of M. sedula living on and interacting with synthetic extraterrestrial minerals, we show that M. sedula utilizes metals trapped in the Martian regolith simulants (JSC Mars 1A; P-MRS; S-MRS; MRS07/52 as the sole energy sources. The obtained set of microbiological and mineralogical data suggests that M. sedula actively colonizes synthetic Martian regolith materials and releases free soluble metals. The surface of bioprocessed Martian regolith simulants is analyzed for specific mineralogical fingerprints left upon M. sedula growth. The obtained results provide insights of biomining of extraterrestrial material as well as of the detection of biosignatures implementing in life search missions.

  9. Normalization Strategies for Enhancing Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Social Media Responses during Extreme Events: A Case Study based on Analysis of Four Extreme Events using Socio-Environmental Data Explorer (SEDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayakumar, J.; Shook, E.; Turner, V. K.

    2017-10-01

    With social media becoming increasingly location-based, there has been a greater push from researchers across various domains including social science, public health, and disaster management, to tap in the spatial, temporal, and textual data available from these sources to analyze public response during extreme events such as an epidemic outbreak or a natural disaster. Studies based on demographics and other socio-economic factors suggests that social media data could be highly skewed based on the variations of population density with respect to place. To capture the spatio-temporal variations in public response during extreme events we have developed the Socio-Environmental Data Explorer (SEDE). SEDE collects and integrates social media, news and environmental data to support exploration and assessment of public response to extreme events. For this study, using SEDE, we conduct spatio-temporal social media response analysis on four major extreme events in the United States including the "North American storm complex" in December 2015, the "snowstorm Jonas" in January 2016, the "West Virginia floods" in June 2016, and the "Hurricane Matthew" in October 2016. Analysis is conducted on geo-tagged social media data from Twitter and warnings from the storm events database provided by National Centers For Environmental Information (NCEI) for analysis. Results demonstrate that, to support complex social media analyses, spatial and population-based normalization and filtering is necessary. The implications of these results suggests that, while developing software solutions to support analysis of non-conventional data sources such as social media, it is quintessential to identify the inherent biases associated with the data sources, and adapt techniques and enhance capabilities to mitigate the bias. The normalization strategies that we have developed and incorporated to SEDE will be helpful in reducing the population bias associated with social media data and will be useful

  10. Extreme ultraviolet induced oxidation of Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Feng; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    13.5 nm EUV photons generate a significant amount of secondary electrons at the surface of the multilayer mirrors (MLM) in the lithography tool, inducing photochemical reactions between residual gas molecules and the mirror surfaces [1]. An understanding of the catalytic role of the mirror surface

  11. Life in extreme environments: single molecule force spectroscopy as a tool to explore proteins from extremophilic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Hoffmann, Toni; Batchelor, Matthew; Hughes, Megan L; Kendrick, Katherine E; Walsh, Danielle L; Wilson, Michael; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2015-04-01

    Extremophiles are organisms which survive and thrive in extreme environments. The proteins from extremophilic single-celled organisms have received considerable attention as they are structurally stable and functionally active under extreme physical and chemical conditions. In this short article, we provide an introduction to extremophiles, the structural adaptations of proteins from extremophilic organisms and the exploitation of these proteins in industrial applications. We provide a review of recent developments which have utilized single molecule force spectroscopy to mechanically manipulate proteins from extremophilic organisms and the information which has been gained about their stability, flexibility and underlying energy landscapes.

  12. Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Editor); Moos, Warren; VanSteenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The 'Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy' conference was inspired by the accomplishments of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission. The FUSE mission was launched in June 1999 and spent over eight years exploring the far-ultraviolet universe, gathering over 64 million seconds of high-resolution spectral data on nearly 3000 astronomical targets. The goal of this conference was not only to celebrate the accomplishments of FUSE, but to look toward the future and understand the major scientific drivers for the ultraviolet capabilities of the next generation fo space observatories. Invited speakers presented discussions based on measurements made by FUSE and other ultraviolet instruments, assessed their connection with measurements made with other techniques and, where appropriate, discussed the implications of low-z measurements for high-z phenomena. In addition to the oral presentations, many participants presented poster papers. The breadth of these presentation made it clear that much good science is still in progress with FUSE data and that these result will continue to have relevance in many scientific areas.

  13. Ultraviolet photochemistry of 2-bromothiophene explored using universal ionization detection and multi-mass velocity-map imaging with a PImMS2 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, R. A.; Hansen, C. S.; Elsdon, E.; Bain, M.; King, S. J.; Lee, J. W. L.; Brouard, M.; Vallance, C.; Turchetta, R.; Ashfold, M. N. R.

    2017-07-01

    The ultraviolet photochemistry of 2-bromothiophene (C4H3SBr) has been studied across the wavelength range 265-245 nm using a velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus recently modified for multi-mass imaging and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 118.2 nm) universal ionization. At all wavelengths, molecular products arising from the loss of atomic bromine were found to exhibit recoil velocities and anisotropies consistent with those reported elsewhere for the Br fragment [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 224303 (2015)]. Comparison between the momentum distributions of the Br and C4H3S fragments suggests that bromine is formed primarily in its ground (2P3/2) spin-orbit state. These distributions match well at high momentum, but relatively fewer slow moving molecular fragments were detected. This is explained by the observation of a second substantial ionic product, C3H3+. Analysis of ion images recorded simultaneously for several ion masses and the results of high-level ab initio calculations suggest that this fragment ion arises from dissociative ionization (by the VUV probe laser) of the most internally excited C4H3S fragments. This study provides an excellent benchmark for the recently modified VMI instrumentation and offers a powerful demonstration of the emerging field of multi-mass VMI using event-triggered, high frame-rate sensors, and universal ionization.

  14. Normalization Strategies for Enhancing Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Social Media Responses during Extreme Events: A Case Study based on Analysis of Four Extreme Events using Socio-Environmental Data Explorer (SEDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ajayakumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With social media becoming increasingly location-based, there has been a greater push from researchers across various domains including social science, public health, and disaster management, to tap in the spatial, temporal, and textual data available from these sources to analyze public response during extreme events such as an epidemic outbreak or a natural disaster. Studies based on demographics and other socio-economic factors suggests that social media data could be highly skewed based on the variations of population density with respect to place. To capture the spatio-temporal variations in public response during extreme events we have developed the Socio-Environmental Data Explorer (SEDE. SEDE collects and integrates social media, news and environmental data to support exploration and assessment of public response to extreme events. For this study, using SEDE, we conduct spatio-temporal social media response analysis on four major extreme events in the United States including the “North American storm complex” in December 2015, the “snowstorm Jonas” in January 2016, the “West Virginia floods” in June 2016, and the “Hurricane Matthew” in October 2016. Analysis is conducted on geo-tagged social media data from Twitter and warnings from the storm events database provided by National Centers For Environmental Information (NCEI for analysis. Results demonstrate that, to support complex social media analyses, spatial and population-based normalization and filtering is necessary. The implications of these results suggests that, while developing software solutions to support analysis of non-conventional data sources such as social media, it is quintessential to identify the inherent biases associated with the data sources, and adapt techniques and enhance capabilities to mitigate the bias. The normalization strategies that we have developed and incorporated to SEDE will be helpful in reducing the population bias associated with

  15. Exploring the influence of precipitation extremes and human water use on total water storage (TWS) changes in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandu; Forootan, Ehsan; Schumacher, Maike; Awange, Joseph L.; Müller Schmied, Hannes

    2016-03-01

    Climate extremes such as droughts and intense rainfall events are expected to strongly influence global/regional water resources in addition to the growing demands for freshwater. This study examines the impacts of precipitation extremes and human water usage on total water storage (TWS) over the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) River Basin in South Asia. Monthly TWS changes derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) (2002-2014) and soil moisture from three reanalyses (1979-2014) are used to estimate new extreme indices. These indices are applied in conjunction with standardized precipitation indices (SPI) to explore the impacts of precipitation extremes on TWS in the region. The results indicate that although long-term precipitation do not indicate any significant trends over the two subbasins (Ganges and Brahmaputra-Meghna), there is significant decline in rainfall (9.0 ± 4.0 mm/decade) over the Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin from 1998 to 2014. Both river basins exhibit a rapid decline of TWS from 2002 to 2014 (Ganges: 12.2 ± 3.4 km3/yr and Brahmaputra-Meghna: 9.1 ± 2.7 km3/yr). While the Ganges River Basin has been regaining TWS (5.4 ± 2.2 km3/yr) from 2010 onward, the Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin exhibits a further decline (13.0 ± 3.2 km3/yr) in TWS from 2011 onward. The impact of human water consumption on TWS appears to be considerably higher in Ganges compared to Brahmaputra-Meghna, where it is mainly concentrated over Bangladesh. The interannual water storage dynamics are found to be strongly associated with meteorological forcing data such as precipitation. In particular, extreme drought conditions, such as those of 2006 and 2009, had profound negative impacts on the TWS, where groundwater resources are already being unsustainably exploited.

  16. Exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrenz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Oil and gas exploration is a unique kind of business. Businesses providing a vast and ever-changing panoply of products to markets are a focus of several disciplines' energetic study and analysis. The product inventory problem is robust, pertinent, and meaningful, and it merits the voluminous and protracted attention received from keen business practitioners. Prototypical business practitioners, be they trained by years of business hurly-burly, or sophisticated MBAs with arrays of mathematical algorithms and computers, are not normally prepared, however, to recognize the unique nature of exploration's inventories. Put together such a business practitioner with an explorationist and misunderstandings, hidden and open, are inevitable and predictably rife. The first purpose of this paper is to articulate the inherited inventory handling paradigms of business practitioners in relation to exploration's inventories. To do so, standard pedagogy in business administration is used and a case study of an exploration venture is presented. A second purpose is to show the burdens that the misunderstandings create. The result is not just business plans that go awry, but public policies that have effects opposite from those intended

  17. A new daily observational record from Grytviken, South Georgia: exploring 20th century extremes in the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Z.; Turney, C. S.; Allan, R.; Colwell, S.; Kelly, G.; Lister, D.; Jones, P. D.; Beswick, M.; Alexander, L. V.; Lippmann, T.; Herold, N.; Jones, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    Although recent work has highlighted a host of significant late 20th century environmental changes across the mid to high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, the sparse nature of observational records limits our ability to place these changes in the context of long-term (multi-decadal and centennial) variability. As a result, investigating the impact of anthropogenic forcing on climate modes of variability and ecosystems is particularly challenging. Sub-Antarctic islands are particularly important in this regard, straddling major ocean and atmospheric boundaries and offering the potential to develop highly resolved records of change. In 1905, a whaling and meteorological station was established at Grytviken on Sub-Antarctic South Georgia in the South Atlantic (54°S) providing near-continuous observations through to present day. Although South Georgia lies in a strategic location for understanding Southern Ocean atmosphere-ocean dynamics, only a monthly resolved dataset has until now been available. Here we report a near continuous daily observational record from Grytviken for temperature and precipitation, which we compare to different datasets (including Twentieth Century Reanalysis; 20CR version 2c). A warming trend over the 20th century is observed in mean daily temperature at Grytviken with an average rate of temperature rise of 0.14°C per decade over the period 1907-2016 (p<0.0001). We find a significant trend towards increasingly warmer daytime extremes commencing from the mid-20th century accompanied by warmer night-time temperatures. Analysis of these data, and reanalysis products, suggest a realignment of synoptic conditions across the mid to high-latitudes, with a link between increasing temperature trends and atmospheric circulation dominated by stronger westerly airflow, resulting in significant foehn-related warming.

  18. Ultraviolet extensions of particle physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthier, Laure Gaëlle

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider completed the Standard Model field content. Many questions though remain unanswered by the Standard Model triggering a search for new physics. New physics could manifest itself at the Large Hadron Collider by the discovery of new...... particles. However, the lack of new resonances might suggest that these new particles are still out of reach which leaves us with few options. Two possibilities are explored in this thesis. The first is to study precision measurements which might indicate new physics as small deviations from the Standard...... are expressed as power series with missing higher order terms. We also show how to connect ultraviolet models of new physics to the Standard Model effective field theory and calculate bounds on them using the Standard Model effective field theory fit results. Finally, we study a nonrelativistic ultraviolet...

  19. Ultraviolet Protection by Fabric Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The increasing emission of greenhouse gases has evoked the human being to save the ozone layer and minimize the risk of ultraviolet radiation (UVR. Various fabric structures have been explored to achieve desired ultraviolet protection factor (UPF in various situations. Objective. In this study, the effect of various filament configurations like twisted, flat, intermingled, and textured in multifilament yarns on fabric in different combinations is assessed in order to engineer a fabric of better ultraviolet protection factor (UPF. Methods. In order to engineer a fabric having optimum UV protection with sufficient comfort level in multifilament woven fabrics, four different yarn configurations, intermingled, textured, twisted, and flat, were used to develop twelve different fabric samples. The most UV absorbing and most demanding fibre polyethylene terephthalate (PET was considered in different filament configuration. Results. The combinations of intermingled warp with flat, intermingled, and textured weft provided excellent UVR protection comparatively at about 22.5 mg/cm2 fabric areal density. The presence of twisted yarn reduced the UV protection due to enhanced openness in fabric structure. Conclusion. The appropriate combination of warp and weft threads of different configuration should be selected judiciously in order to extract maximum UV protection and wear comfort attributes in multifilament woven PET fabrics.

  20. Impurity study of TMX using ultraviolet spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Strand, O.T.; Moos, H.W.; Fortner, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) study of the emissions from intrinsic and injected impurities in TMX is presented. Two survey spectrographs were used to determine that the major impurities present were oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and titanium. Three absolutely-calibrated monochromators were used to measure the time histories and radial profiles of these impurity emissions in the central cell and each plug. Two of these instruments were capable of obtaining radial profiles as a function of time in a single shot

  1. Research studies with the International Ultraviolet Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The IUE research studies comprises 118 separate research programs involving observations, data analysis, and research conducted of the IUE satellite and the NASA Astrophysics Data Program. Herein are presented 92 programs. For each program there is a title, program ID, name of the investigator, statement of work, summary of results, and list of publications.

  2. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Asteroid(4) Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Bodewits, Dennis; Feaga, Lori M.; Landsman, Wayne; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mutchler, Max J.; Russell, Christopher T.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comprehensive review of the UV-visible spectrum and rotational lightcurve of Vesta combining new observations by Hubble Space Telescope and Swift with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer observations. The geometric albedos of Vesta from 220 nm to 953 nm arc derived by carefully comparing these observations from various instruments at different times and observing geometries. Vesta has a rotationally averaged geometric albedo of 0.09 at 250 nm, 0.14 at 300 nm, 0.26 at 373 nm, 0.38 at 673 nm, and 0.30 at 950 nm. The linear spectral slope in the ultraviolet displays a sharp minimum ncar sub-Earth longitude of 20deg, and maximum in the eastern hemisphere. This is completely consistent with the distribution of the spectral slope in the visible wavelength. The uncertainty of the measurement in the ultraviolet is approx.20%, and in the visible wavelengths better than 10%. The amplitude of Vesta's rotational lightcurves is approx.10% throughout the range of wavelengths we observed, but is smaller at 950 nm (approx.6%) ncar the 1-micron mafic band center. Contrary to earlier reports, we found no evidence for any difference between the phasing of the ultraviolet and visible/ncar-infrared lightcurves with respect to sub-Earth longitude. Vesta's average spectrum between 220 and 950 nm can well be described by measured reflectance spectra of fine particle howardite-like materials of basaltic achondrite meteorites. Combining this with the in-phase behavior of the ultraviolet, visible. and ncar-infrared lightcurves, and the spectral slopes with respect to the rotational phase, we conclude that there is no global ultraviolet/visible reversal on Vesta. Consequently, this implies lack of global space weathering on Vesta. Keyword,: Asteroid Vesta; Spectrophotometry; Spectroscopy; Ultraviolet observations; Hubble Space Telescope observations

  3. Exploring the influence of precipitation extremes and human water use on total water storage (TWS) changes in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Khandu, E.; Forootan, Ehsan; Schumacher, Maike; Awange, Joseph L.; Müller Schmied, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Climate extremes such as droughts and intense rainfall events are expected to strongly influence global/regional water resources in addition to the growing demands for freshwater. This study examines the impacts of precipitation extremes and human water usage on total water storage (TWS) over the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) River Basin in South Asia. Monthly TWS changes derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) (2002–2014) and soil moisture from three reanalyses (19...

  4. Ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G M

    2009-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen. The effects of UV radiation are mediated via direct damage to cellular DNA in the skin and suppression of image surveillance mechanisms. In the context of organ transplantation, addiction of drugs which suppress the immune system add greatly to the carcinogenicity of UV radiation. This review considers the mechanisms of such effects.

  5. Ultraviolet phase conjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatkine, M.; Bigio, I.J.; Fisher, R.A.; Maloney, M.L.; Busse, J.R.; Tercovich, R.G.; Feldman, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Diffraction-limited phase conjugate reflection of an injection-locked high-power (approx. 1 MW) ultraviolet excimer laser beam has been demonstrated via stimulated Brillouin scattering. Reflectivities higher than 70% were attained. Limitations as well as coherence and power requirements for image retention are discussed

  6. Ultraviolet fire detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    System is capable of detecting ultraviolet light emitted by match size flame at distance of 10 ft. System is not affected by high energy or particulate radiation and is therefore particularly suited for applications around nuclear plants and X-ray equipment.

  7. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L.

    1993-01-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs

  8. Russia and Countering Violent Extremism in the Internet and Social Media: Exploring Prospects for U.S.-Russia Cooperation Beyond the "Reset"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyl N. Cross Dr.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Russia has been targeted with a series of terrorist attacks over the past several years, and there are a growing number of extremist groups operating throughout Russia’s society utilizing the Internet/social media to promote their narratives and objectives. Russia’s policy community has created institutional mechanisms and laws to address the challenge of violent extremism in the Internet/social media, and recognizes the importance of international cooperation toward these ends. This study, based on primary research conducted in Moscow in 2012, defines Russia’s assessment of domestic and international sources violent extremist threats; explains Moscow’s perspective on balancing democratic principles with the challenge of countering violent extremism in the Internet/social media; assesses existing capacities and impediments to further international collaboration with Russia in countering violent extremism in the Internet/social media spheres; defines specific initiatives that Russia, the United States, and other nations of the world community could advance to enhance international cooperation in countering violent extremism throughout the world cyber community.

  9. Extremely Re-Rich Molybdenite from Porphyry Cu-Mo-Au Prospects in Northeastern Greece: Mode of Occurrence, Causes of Enrichment, and Implications for Gold Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kartal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extremely Re-rich molybdenite occurs with pyrite in sodic–calcic, sodic–sericitic and sericitic-altered porphyritic stocks of granodioritic–tonalitic and granitic composition in the Sapes–Kirki–Esymi, Melitena and Maronia areas, northeastern Greece. Molybdenite in the Pagoni Rachi and Sapes deposits is spatially associated with rheniite, as well as with intermediate (Mo,ReS2 and (Re,MoS2 phases, with up to 46 wt % Re. Nanodomains and/or microinclusions of rheniite may produce the observed Re enrichment in the intermediate molybdenite–rheniite phases. The extreme Re content in molybdenite and the unique presence of rheniite in porphyry-type mineralization, combined with preliminary geochemical data (Cu/Mo ratio, Au grades may indicate that these deposits have affinities with Cu–Au deposits, and should be considered potential targets for gold mineralization in the porphyry environment. In the post-subduction tectonic regime of northern Greece, the extreme Re and Te enrichments in the magmatic-hydrothermal systems over a large areal extent are attributed to an anomalous source (e.g., chemical inhomogenities in the mantle-wedge triggered magmatism, although local scale processes cannot be underestimated.

  10. Vacuum-Ultraviolet Photovoltaic Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Richeng; Ran, Junxue; Zhang, Zhaojun; Ji, Xu; Huang, Feng

    2018-01-23

    Over the past two decades, solar- and astrophysicists and material scientists have been researching and developing new-generation semiconductor-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detectors with low power consumption and small size for replacing traditional heavy and high-energy-consuming microchannel-detection systems, to study the formation and evolution of stars. However, the most desirable semiconductor-based VUV photovoltaic detector capable of achieving zero power consumption has not yet been achieved. With high-crystallinity multistep epitaxial grown AlN as a VUV-absorbing layer for photogenerated carriers and p-type graphene (with unexpected VUV transmittance >96%) as a transparent electrode to collect excited holes, we constructed a heterojunction device with photovoltaic detection for VUV light. The device exhibits an encouraging VUV photoresponse, high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and extremely fast tempera response (80 ns, 10 4 -10 6 times faster than that of the currently reported VUV photoconductive devices). This work has provided an idea for developing zero power consumption and integrated VUV photovoltaic detectors with ultrafast and high-sensitivity VUV detection capability, which not only allows future spacecraft to operate with longer service time and lower launching cost but also ensures an ultrafast evolution of interstellar objects.

  11. Preparing for Extreme Heat in India: Using High-Resolution Climate Models to Explore the Impact of Rising Temperatures on Human Health and Labor Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C.

    2016-12-01

    Globally, higher daily peak temperatures and longer, more intense heat waves are becoming increasingly frequent due to climate change. India, with relatively low GDP per capita, high population density, and tropical climate, is particularly vulnerable to these trends. In May 2015, one of the worst heat waves in world history hit the country, culminating in at least 2,300 officially-reported deaths as temperatures in some regions reached 48°C. As a result of climate change, heat waves in this region will last longer, be more extreme, and occur with greater frequency in the coming years. Impacts will be felt most acutely by vulnerable populations, which include not only those with frail health, but also populations otherwise considered healthy whose livelihood involves working under exposure to high temperatures. The problem is exacerbated by low levels of economic development, particularly in the under-provision of medical services, a higher proportion of weather-reliant income sources, and the inability to recover quickly from shocks. Responding to these challenges requires collaboration among the disciplines of climate science, public health, economics, and public policy. This project, presented as an online web application using Esri's ArcGIS Story Map, covers 1) the impact of extreme heat on human mortality, 2) the impact of combined heat and humidity (as measured by wet bulb globe temperature) on labor productivity, and 3) emerging best practices in adaptation planning by local municipalities and NGOs. The work is presented in a format that is designed to allow policymakers to take a deeper dive into the literature linking extreme temperature to human health and labor productivity, combined with interactive mapping tools that allow planners to drill down to data at the district level across the country of India. Further, the work presents a case study of heat adaptation planning efforts that have already been implemented in the city of Ahmedabad, allowing

  12. Extreme cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The universe is all about extremes. Space has a temperature 270°C below freezing. Stars die in catastrophic supernova explosions a billion times brighter than the Sun. A black hole can generate 10 million trillion volts of electricity. And hypergiants are stars 2 billion kilometres across, larger than the orbit of Jupiter. Extreme Cosmos provides a stunning new view of the way the Universe works, seen through the lens of extremes: the fastest, hottest, heaviest, brightest, oldest, densest and even the loudest. This is an astronomy book that not only offers amazing facts and figures but also re

  13. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry from Gemini 11 of stars in Orion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.H.; Spear, G.G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrophotometry in the wavelength region 2600--3600 A is reported for the bright early-type stars β, eta, γ, delta, iota, epsilon, sigma, xi, and kappa Ori. The results are in good agreement with other observations, and with the possible exception of the supergiants, are in good agreement with recent line-blanketed model atmospheres. There is evidence that the supergiants possess a small ultraviolet deficiency shortward of 3000 A relative to main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The most extreme example of this phenomenon is the star kappa Ori

  14. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  15. Emerging Sensor Technologies for Future Extreme Ultraviolet Astronomy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2002-05-01

    Many advances in photocathodes (GaN, Diamond, etc), microchannel plates (Si MCPs), cryogenic detectors (superconducting tunnel junctions, STJs), intensified active pixel sensors, and readouts (cross strip) are poised to make a significant impact on the capabilities of future instruments. GaN photocathodes have been produced with > 30 percent DQE in the UV, with cutoffs around 400nm, and diamond photocathodes have been made with 40 percent DQE and cutoff > 200nm. Si MCP samples of 25mm format with ~ 7 micron pores, have been evaluated. Gain of nearly 10,000 for a single Si MCP has been achieved. The quantum detection efficiency for Si MCPs is the same as glass MCPs. The background is as low as ~ 0.02 events sec/cm2, the best for any MCP. Flat fields are free of any modulation, and the gain uniformity is relatively good. Along with low stopping power for x, gamma and cosmic rays, and stability to high temperatures (> 800 C), Si MCPs are chemically compatible with many photocathodes. The cross strip anode is a multi-layer metal and ceramic cross strip pattern. Event positions are encoded by direct sensing of the charge on each strip and determination of the charge cloud centroid for each event. The spatial resolution (5 microns) achieved is sufficient to resolve 7 micron microchannel plate pores while using low MCP gain. Image linearity is good enough to see distortions in the microchannel plate pore alignment, and the low MCP gain will enhance the overall lifetime of MCP detector systems. STJs show very high detection efficiencies and can detect radiation from the X ray through to the infrared. Their low effective band gap allows reasonable non-dispersive energy resolution at the higher photon energies. In addition small arrays of STJs have been successfully made.

  16. Analysis of extreme-ultraviolet spectroheliograms of solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, M.; Withbroe, G. L.; Noyes, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The optical depth at the head of the Lyman continuum, tau sub H, was determined at several positions in three hedgerow prominences using spectroheliograms of C III 977 A, LC 896 A, and O IV 554 A, observed with the Harvard experiment on Skylab. It is found that tau sub H varies over a wide range at positions even in a single prominence. At the central part of the prominences where the opacity is largest, tau sub H reaches a maximum value of 30 to 50 for the three prominences. In general, tau sub H decreases with height in the prominences. Most positions near the outer boundary of the prominences are optically thin in the LC (tau sub H less than 1). The determination of tau sub H for P23 is consistent with the data of the Mg X spectroheliograms

  17. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  18. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer - BEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D. M.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV airglow rocket spectrometer (BEARS) instrument is described. The instrument was designed in particular to measure the dominant lines of atomic oxygen in the FUV and EUV dayglow at 1356, 1304, 1027, and 989 A, which is the ultimate source of airglow emissions. The optical and mechanical design of the instrument, the detector, electronics, calibration, flight operations, and results are examined.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet resist materials for sub-7 nm patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2017-06-26

    Continuous ongoing development of dense integrated circuits requires significant advancements in nanoscale patterning technology. As a key process in semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM), high resolution lithography is crucial in keeping with Moore\\'s law. Currently, lithography technology for the sub-7 nm node and beyond has been actively investigated approaching atomic level patterning. EUV technology is now considered to be a potential alternative to HVM for replacing in some cases ArF immersion technology combined with multi-patterning. Development of innovative resist materials will be required to improve advanced fabrication strategies. In this article, advancements in novel resist materials are reviewed to identify design criteria for establishment of a next generation resist platform. Development strategies and the challenges in next generation resist materials are summarized and discussed.

  20. X-ray and extreme ultraviolet emission from comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; Cravens, T. E.; Dennerl, K.

    The discovery of high energy X-ray emission in 1996 from C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) has created a surprising new class of X-ray emitting objects. The original discovery (Lisse et al., 1996) and subsequent detection of X-rays from 17 other comets (Table 1) have shown that the very soft (E < 1 keV) emission is due to an interaction between the solar wind and the comet's atmosphere, and that X-ray emission is a fundamental property of comets. Theoretical and observational work has demonstrated that charge exchange collisions of highly charged solar wind ions with cometary neutral species is the best explanation for the emission. Now a rapidly changing and expanding field, the study of cometary X-ray emission appears to be able to lead us to a better understanding of a number of physical phenomena: the nature of the cometary coma, other sources of X-ray emission in the solar system, the structure of the solar wind in the heliosphere, and the source of the local soft X-ray background.

  1. Extreme-ultraviolet observations of global coronal wave rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attrill, G. D. R. [Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Dstl Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ (United Kingdom); Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.; Harra, L. K.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L., E-mail: gdrattrill@dstl.gov.uk [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    We present evidence of global coronal wave rotation in EUV data from SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The sense of rotation is found to be consistent with the helicity of the source region (clockwise for positive helicity, anticlockwise for negative helicity), with the source regions hosting sigmoidal structures. We also study two coronal wave events observed by SDO/AIA where no clear rotation (or sigmoid) is observed. The selected events show supporting evidence that they all originate with flux rope eruptions. We make comparisons across this set of observations (both with and without clear sigmoidal structures). On examining the magnetic configuration of the source regions, we find that the nonrotation events possess a quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The coronal waves that do show a rotation originate from bipolar source regions.

  2. X-rays and extreme ultraviolet radiation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Attwood, David

    2016-01-01

    With this fully updated second edition, readers will gain a detailed understanding of the physics and applications of modern X-ray and EUV radiation sources. Taking into account the most recent improvements in capabilities, coverage is expanded to include new chapters on free electron lasers (FELs), laser high harmonic generation (HHG), X-ray and EUV optics, and nanoscale imaging; a completely revised chapter on spatial and temporal coherence; and extensive discussion of the generation and applications of femtosecond and attosecond techniques. Readers will be guided step by step through the mathematics of each topic, with over 300 figures, 50 reference tables and 600 equations enabling easy understanding of key concepts. Homework problems, a solutions manual for instructors, and links to YouTube lectures accompany the book online. This is the 'go-to' guide for graduate students, researchers and industry practitioners interested in X-ray and EUV interaction with matter.

  3. Ciliates in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaozhong

    2014-01-01

    As eukaryotic microbial life, ciliated protozoan may be found actively growing in some extreme condition where there is a sufficient energy source to sustain it because they are exceedingly adaptable and not notably less adaptable than the prokaryotes. However, a crucial problem in the study of ciliates in extreme environments is the lack of reliable cultivation techniques. To our knowledge, only a tiny fraction of ciliates can be cultured in the laboratory, even for a very limited period, which can partly explain the paucity of our understanding about ciliates diversity in various extremes although the interest in the biodiversity of extremophiles increased significantly during the past three decades. This mini-review aims to compile the knowledge of several groups of free-living ciliates that can be microscopically observed in extreme environmental samples, although most habitats have not been sufficiently well explored for sound generalizations. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  5. The infrared-ultraviolet connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Physics below 300 GeV is termed infrared, and physics above 1 TeV is called ultraviolet. Some aspects of the relation between these two regions are discussed. It is argued that the symmetries of the infrared must be symmetries in the ultraviolet. Furthermore, naturalness within the context of the

  6. Probing of Hermean exosphere by ultraviolet spectroscopy: preliminary calibration results of an ultraviolet spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouanet, Nicolas; Mariscal, Jean Francois; Maria, Jean-Luc; Mine, Pierre-Olivier; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Murakami, Go; Gnedykh, Victor; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Gallet, Sébastien; Rigal, Jean-Baptiste; Quemerais, Eric; Leblanc, François; Chassefiere, Eric; Goutail, Jean-Pierre

    2017-11-01

    PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) is a double ultraviolet spectrometer for the MPO (Mercury Planetary Orbiter) of the ESA BepiColombo cornerstone mission, which is dedicated to the study of Mercury. The goal of this instrument is to detect emission lines of Mercury exosphere in the bandwidth between 55 to 315 nm by recording full spectra. The instrument is basically composed of two ultraviolet spectrophotometers and one scanning mirror with a single axis of rotation. This movable mirror will collect the light coming from the exosphere above the limb onto the entrance slit of the spectrometers. The mirror is protected from straylight by an entrance baffle characterized by a good rejection capability. Each detector has a specific range of wavelengths: the EUV (Extreme UV) channel spreads from 55 to 155 nm, and the FUV (Far UV) channel from 145 to 315 nm. A couple of photomultipliers receive two additional wavelengths in the Near UV range (NUV) at 404 and 422 nm.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  8. Ultraviolet photovoltaics: Share the spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Delia J.

    2017-08-01

    Electrically controlled windows require power to switch between transparent and tinted states. Now, an ultraviolet light-harvesting solar cell can power smart windows without compromising their control over heat and light.

  9. Effects of antibiotics and ultraviolet radiation on the halophilic blue-green alga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yopp, J.H.; Albright, G.; Miller, D.M.; Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale

    1979-01-01

    The effects of a variety of antibiotics, ultraviolet radiation and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) on the survival and mutability of the halophilic blue-green alga, Aphanothece halophytica, were determined. The halophile was found extremely sensitive to penicillin G and bacitracin; moderately sensitive to novobiocin, amino acid analogs, chloramphenicol and streptomycin; and tolerant to actidione and hydroxyurea. Ultraviolet and NTG killing curves and photoreactivation capabilities were seimilar to those reported for other members of the Chroococcales. Three stable morphological mutants were obtained by ultraviolet and NTG treatment, the latter being much more efficient in the production of mutants. (orig.)

  10. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taalas, P.; Koskela, T.; Damski, J.; Supperi, A. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research; Kyroe, E. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1996-12-31

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project

  11. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme

  14. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  15. Phototherapy cabinet for ultraviolet radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, S.N.; Frost, P.

    1981-01-01

    A newly designed cabinet can be used for the treatment of psoriasis with fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) lamps. the new design provides more uniform distribution of UV radiation in both the horizontal and vertical axes, and several safety features have been added. The distribution and uniformity of UV output in this and in a previously described cabinet are compared. The UV output at the vertical center of the older UV light cabinet was six times greater than that at either the top or bottom, while the design of the present cabinet provides uniform UV radiation except for a slight increase at head height and at the level of the lower legs compared with the middle third of the cabinet. The variation in output of the older cabinet may, in part, explain the commonly encountered difficulty in the phototherapy of psoriasis of the scalp and lower extremities

  16. The EUV spectrophotometer on Atmosphere Explorer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinteregger, H. E.; Bedo, D. E.; Manson, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrophotometer for measurements of solar radiation at wavelengths ranging from 140 to 1850 A will be included in the payload of each of the three Atmosphere-Explorer (AE) missions, AE-C, -D, and -E. The instrument consists of 24 grating monochromators, 12 of which can be telecommanded either to execute 128-step scans each covering a relatively small section of the total spectrophotometer wavelength range or to maintain fixed (command-selected) wavelength positions. The remaining 12 nonscan monochromators operate at permanently fixed wavelengths and view only a small fraction of the solar disk except for one viewing the whole sun in H Lyman alpha. Ten of the 12 scan-capable monochromators also view the entire solar disk since their primary function is to measure the total fluxes independent of the distribution of sources across the solar disk.

  17. Instrument Design for the CubeSat Ultraviolet Transient/Imaging Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing a mission concept for a CubeSat-based synoptic imaging survey to explore the ultraviolet sky for several key discoveries in time-domain...

  18. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David, E-mail: jegpeek@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is {approx}10% and {approx}35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R{sub V} parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  19. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is ∼10% and ∼35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R V parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  20. Beyond Einstein: Exploring the Extreme Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will give an overview of the NASA Universe Division Beyond Einstein program. The Beyond Einstein program consists of a series of exploratory missions to investigate some of the most important and pressing problems in modern-day astrophysics - including searches for Dark Energy and studies of the earliest times in the universe, during the inflationary period after the Big Bang. A variety of new technologies are being developed both in the science instrumentation these missions will carry and in the spacecraft that will carry those instruments.

  1. Exploring the impact of visual and movement based priming on a motor intervention in the acute phase post-stroke in persons with severe hemiparesis of the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jigna; Qiu, Qinyin; Yarossi, Mathew; Merians, Alma; Massood, Supriya; Tunik, Eugene; Adamovich, Sergei; Fluet, Gerard

    2017-07-01

    Explore the potential benefits of using priming methods prior to an active hand task in the acute phase post-stroke in persons with severe upper extremity hemiparesis. Five individuals were trained using priming techniques including virtual reality (VR) based visual mirror feedback and contralaterally controlled passive movement strategies prior to training with an active pinch force modulation task. Clinical, kinetic, and neurophysiological measurements were taken pre and post the training period. Clinical measures were taken at six months post training. The two priming simulations and active training were well tolerated early after stroke. Priming effects were suggested by increased maximal pinch force immediately after visual and movement based priming. Despite having no clinically observable movement distally, the subjects were able to volitionally coordinate isometric force and muscle activity (EMG) in a pinch tracing task. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of force during the pinch trace task gradually decreased over the training period suggesting learning may have occurred. Changes in motor cortical neurophysiology were seen in the unaffected hemisphere using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) mapping. Significant improvements in motor recovery as measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and the Upper Extremity Fugl Meyer Assessment (UEFMA) were demonstrated at six months post training by three of the five subjects. This study suggests that an early hand-based intervention using visual and movement based priming activities and a scaled motor task allows participation by persons without the motor control required for traditionally presented rehabilitation and testing. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of individuals with severely paretic upper extremities after stroke is challenging due to limited movement capacity and few options for therapeutic training. Long-term functional recovery of the arm after stroke depends on early return

  2. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-04-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Δλ = 3 Å) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original data-reduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quick-look plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  3. Deep Extreme Cut: From Extreme Points to Object Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Maninis, Kevis-Kokitsi; Caelles, Sergi; Pont-Tuset, Jordi; Van Gool, Luc

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the use of extreme points in an object (left-most, right-most, top, bottom pixels) as input to obtain precise object segmentation for images and videos. We do so by adding an extra channel to the image in the input of a convolutional neural network (CNN), which contains a Gaussian centered in each of the extreme points. The CNN learns to transform this information into a segmentation of an object that matches those extreme points. We demonstrate the usefulness of this appr...

  4. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  5. Photomorphogenic responses to ultraviolet-B light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gareth I

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UV-B) light regulates numerous aspects of plant metabolism, morphology and physiology through the differential expression of hundreds of genes. Photomorphogenic responses to UV-B are mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8). Considerable progress has been made in understanding UVR8 action: the structural basis of photoreceptor function, how interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 initiates signaling and how REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS proteins negatively regulate UVR8 action. In addition, recent research shows that UVR8 mediates several responses through interaction with other signaling pathways, in particular auxin signaling. Nevertheless, many aspects of UVR8 action remain poorly understood. Most research to date has been undertaken with Arabidopsis, and it is important to explore the functions and regulation of UVR8 in diverse plant species. Furthermore, it is essential to understand how UVR8, and UV-B signaling in general, regulates processes under natural growth conditions. Ultraviolet B regulates the expression of many genes through UVR8-independent pathways, but the activity and importance of these pathways in plants growing in sunlight are poorly understood. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Ultraviolet and Infrared Correlation Studies in Orion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Lakshmi S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the variation of diffuse ultraviolet (UV radiation in the northern part of the Orion constellation using a set of eight areas of the GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey in the far and near UV. Different components of diffuse UV radiation, like dust scattered emission and H2 fluorescence, were quantified and separated after removing the point sources and the foreground emission in each of the fields. Then the dependence of the individual UV components on the infrared 100 μm dust emission was studied. We did not find any positive correlation between the diffuse-UV and IR-100 micron intensities, probably due to the high optical depth of the region or the entire dust column not contributing to the diffuse UV radiation. However, in the far UV we noticed the presence of an excess emission in addition to the dust scattered radiation, which is clearly absent in the near UV. This excess emission, identified as the H2 fluorescence, is produced by the Trapezium stars in the surrounding molecular clouds. We also compare our results with those of previous studies in the region, based on Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE observations.

  7. Ultraviolet spectrographs for thermospheric and ionospheric remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymond, K.F.; McCoy, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been developing far- and extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs for remote sensing the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The first of these sensors, called the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI), will be flying on the Air Force's Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) block 5D3 satellites as an operational sensor in the 1997-2010 time frame. A second sensor, called the High-resolution ionospheric and Thermospheric Spectrograph (HITS), will fly in late 1995 on the Air Force Space Test Program's Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS, also known as P91-1) as part of NRL's High Resolution Airglow and Auroral Spectroscopy (HIRAAS) experiment. Both of these instruments are compact and do not draw much power and would be good candidates for small satellite applications. The instruments and their capabilities are discussed. Possible uses of these instruments in small satellite applications are also presented

  8. Protection from solar ultraviolet radiation by clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailthorpe, M.

    1996-01-01

    The recently published Australia/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4399: l996 'Sun Protective Clothing - Evaluation and Classification' specifies an in vitro spectrophotometric method for the measurement of the ultraviolet (WR) transmission of textiles. Ultraviolet Protection Factors (UPF) are then calculated by convolving the UVR transmission data with standard CIE erythemal response data and ARL solar irradiance data. At the present time the scope of the standard is limited to loose fitting dry clothing. Virtually every textile parameter has an influence on the UPF of the finished garment and hence on the protection afforded to skin from the harmful effects of solar UVR radiation. Textile parameters such as fibre type, the method of spinning the yarn, fabric structure, cover factor, colorant, UVR absorbers and finishing methods determine the UPF of the fabric and hence must be controlled from batch to batch. Since garments generally shrink when washed, multiple wearing and washing cycles usually cause an increase in fabric UPF. Adventitious soiling of fabrics and the absorption of certain components of domestic laundry formulations, e g fluorescent whitening agents, increase fabric UPF ratings. Garments with a high degree of elasticity, e g nylon/lycra sportswear, that are stretched on to fit, will obviously have lower UPFs when stretched than when relaxed. In general fabrics worn in a wet state provide lower protection than when worn dry. On Australia's most extreme summer day it has been estimated that there are 30 MEDs (minimal erythemal doses) in a dawn to dusk exposure. Thus outdoor workers should be provided with UPF 30 clothing, or better. Results from recent experiments using SK-II hairless mice dressed in UPF 50 'sunsuits' have shown that the mice developed no sun induced skin cancers on the skin areas protected by the UPF 50 fabric whereas multiple tumours developed on the unprotected skin

  9. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  10. Aluminum nanostructures for ultraviolet plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jérôme; Khlopin, Dmitry; Zhang, Feifei; Schuermans, Silvère; Proust, Julien; Maurer, Thomas; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2017-08-01

    An electromagnetic field is able to produce a collective oscillation of free electrons at a metal surface. This allows light to be concentrated in volumes smaller than its wavelength. The resulting waves, called surface plasmons can be applied in various technological applications such as ultra-sensitive sensing, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, or metal-enhanced fluorescence, to name a few. For several decades plasmonics has been almost exclusively studied in the visible region by using nanoparticles made of gold or silver as these noble metals support plasmonic resonances in the visible and near-infrared range. Nevertheless, emerging applications will require the extension of nano-plasmonics toward higher energies, in the ultraviolet range. Aluminum is one of the most appealing metal for pushing plasmonics up to ultraviolet energies. The subsequent applications in the field of nano-optics are various. This metal is therefore a highly promising material for commercial applications in the field of ultraviolet nano-optics. As a consequence, aluminum (or ultraviolet, UV) plasmonics has emerged quite recently. Aluminium plasmonics has been demonstrated efficient for numerous potential applications including non-linear optics, enhanced fluorescence, UV-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, optoelectronics, plasmonic assisted solid-state lasing, photocatalysis, structural colors and data storage. In this article, different preparation methods developed in the laboratory to obtain aluminum nanostructures with different geometries are presented. Their optical and morphological characterizations of the nanostructures are given and some proof of principle applications such as fluorescence enhancement are discussed.

  11. Daytime Ionosphere Retrieval Algorithm for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Korpela, Eric J.; Sirk, Martin M.; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer Extreme Ultraviolet spectrograph, ICON EUV, will measure altitude profiles of the daytime extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) OII emission near 83.4 and 61.7 nm that are used to determine density profiles and state parameters of the ionosphere. This paper describes the algorithm concept and approach to inverting these measured OII emission profiles to derive the associated O+ density profile from 150-450 km as a proxy for the electron content in the F-region of the ionosphere. The algorithm incorporates a bias evaluation and feedback step, developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory using data from the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) and the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) missions, that is able to effectively mitigate the effects of systematic instrument calibration errors and inaccuracies in the original photon source within the forward model. Results are presented from end-to-end simulations that convolved simulated airglow profiles with the expected instrument measurement response to produce profiles that were inverted with the algorithm to return data products for comparison to truth. Simulations of measurements over a representative ICON orbit show the algorithm is able to reproduce hmF2 values to better than 5 km accuracy, and NmF2 to better than 12% accuracy over a 12-second integration, and demonstrate that the ICON EUV instrument and daytime ionosphere algorithm can meet the ICON science objectives which require 20 km vertical resolution in hmF2 and 18% precision in NmF2.

  12. Observations of ultraviolet spectra of H II regions and galaxies with IUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1982-08-01

    The ultraviolet spectra, obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer, of a sample of H II regions and the nuclear regions of spiral and elliptical galaxies are described. The star formation rates in the nuclei of spiral galaxies are similar to the star formation rate in the solar neighbourhood. The data indicate that the current thinking on the synthesis of carbon and nitrogen in galaxies has to be revised and the K-corrections determined from the ultraviolet spectra of galaxies when compared with the photometry of distant galaxies suggests colour evolution of galaxies at z > 0.3. (author)

  13. Effect of ultraviolet light on creatinine measurement in jaundiced specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, J.A.; D'Souza, R.

    1986-01-01

    During initial evaluation of a creatinine method using the RA-1000 analyser, experiments with addition of bilirubin indicated negligible interference. However the finding of a 'zero' creatinine value in an extremely jaundiced specimen prompted to re-examine the method. In contrast to earlier findings with normal plasma containing added bilirubin, the authors found that plasma from moderately or severely jaundiced patients gave creatinine values lower than those obtained with a reference method. Since bilirubin has been implicated in the interference, the authors studied the effect of destroying bilirubin with ultraviolet light to see if this provided a practical solution to the problem. (Auth.)

  14. Ultraviolet photodetectors and imaging arrays based on III-V nitride heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey David

    2000-10-01

    The III-V nitride class of compound semiconductors has received much attention in the last decade. These materials have a wide, direct bandgap, making them a prime candidate for optoelectronic devices in the blue, green, and ultraviolet spectral regions. These materials exhibit impressive optical, electrical, and thermal properties, even though there are fundamental materials issues that are thus far unresolved. This work explores the application of III-V nitride semiconductors to optical detectors in the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy was used to synthesize thin film p-i-n photodiode structures on double side polished sapphire substrates; these films were characterized for optical, electrical and structural properties. The grown structures were designed to respond to a predetermined region of the UV spectrum when illuminated from the substrate side. These structures were fabricated into devices using generally accepted techniques for dry etching and p and n-contact metallizations. Test devices were characterized using tools developed by the author. These devices demonstrated as high as 80% quantum efficiency and extremely low dark currents; resulting in spectral detectivities as large as 6 * 1013 cmHz1/2W-1. Devices were designed and demonstrated for a series of detection regions ranging from 365 nm to 250 nm. Photolithography masks were designed to allow the fabrication of photodiode arrays that would hybridize to commercially available CMOS based readout integrated circuits (ROICs), used routinely for infrared photodiode imaging. Photodiode arrays were fabricated and indium bumps were deposited onto the diode contacts and the ROICs to provide electrical connection. The hybrid detector arrays were placed in leadless chip carriers, wirebonded, and connected to commercially available drive and readout circuitry. Images of UV scenes were focused onto the arrays using fused quartz lenses. These images and movies

  15. Ultraviolet-Resistant Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newcombe, David; LaDuc, Myron T.; Osman, Shariff R.

    2007-01-01

    A document summarizes a study in which it was found that spores of the SAFR-032 strain of Bacillus pumilus can survive doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, radiation, and hydrogen peroxide in proportions much greater than those of other bacteria. The study was part of a continuing effort to understand the survivability of bacteria under harsh conditions and develop means of sterilizing spacecraft to prevent biocontamination of Mars that could interfere with the search for life there.

  16. Ultraviolet induced lysosome activity in corneal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A 5.000 W Xe-Hg high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce a 3.3 nm half-bandpass ultraviolet radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated with radiant exposures from 140 Jm -2 to 10.000 Jm -2 and evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, light and electron microscopy. Corneal threshold (Hsub(c) was 200 Jm -2 and lens threshold (Hsub(L)) was 7.500 Jm -2 . The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of UV was the development of corneal epithelial granules. Histological changes included a loss of superficial epithelial cells and selective UV induced autolysis of the wing cells. It is suggested that the biomicroscopically observed granules are the clinical manifestation of the secondary lysosomes revealed by light and electron microscopy. It is proposed that UV breaks down the primary lysosome membranes to release hydrolytic enzymes which in turn form the secondary lysosomes during autolysis. Extreme levels of radiant exposure at 295 nm result in indiscriminate destruction of all layers of the corneal epithelium, but the posterior cornea was spared. (orig.) [de

  17. Analysis of extreme events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khuluse, S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available the stability of the parameter estimates. 9 / 27 Background Overview of the Theory of Extremes Case Studies Concluding Remarks Analysis of Extreme Rainfall Events Analysis of Extreme Wave Heights Figure: Map of South Africa with the study areas... highlighted 10 / 27 Background Overview of the Theory of Extremes Case Studies Concluding Remarks Analysis of Extreme Rainfall Events Analysis of Extreme Wave Heights Western Cape Climatologically diverse: Influence of the varied topography and it’s...

  18. Surprise Ultraviolet Party in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Galaxies aren't the only objects filling up the view of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Since its launch in 2003, the space telescope -- originally designed to observe galaxies across the universe in ultraviolet light -- has discovered a festive sky blinking with flaring and erupting stars, as well as streaking asteroids, satellites and space debris. A group of six streaking objects -- the identities of which remain unknown -- can be seen here flying across the telescope's sight in this sped-up movie. The two brightest objects appear to perform a sharp turn then travel in the reverse direction. This illusion is most likely the result of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer overtaking the objects as it orbits around Earth. Careful inspection reveals four additional faint objects with the same timing and behavior. These faint objects are easiest to see during the retrograde portion of their paths. Three appear between the two bright sources, and one is above them, near the edge of the field of view. These bonus objects are being collected in to public catalogues for other astronomers to study.

  19. Dual Axis Controller for Extreme Environments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Dual Axis Controller for Extreme Environments (DACEE) addresses a critical need of NASA's future exploration plans to investigate extreme environments within our...

  20. Automation Rover for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan; Hilgemann, Evan; Johnson, Michael; Parness, Aaron; Hall, Jeffrey; Kawata, Jessie; Stack, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Almost 2,300 years ago the ancient Greeks built the Antikythera automaton. This purely mechanical computer accurately predicted past and future astronomical events long before electronics existed1. Automata have been credibly used for hundreds of years as computers, art pieces, and clocks. However, in the past several decades automata have become less popular as the capabilities of electronics increased, leaving them an unexplored solution for robotic spacecraft. The Automaton Rover for Extreme Environments (AREE) proposes an exciting paradigm shift from electronics to a fully mechanical system, enabling longitudinal exploration of the most extreme environments within the solar system.

  1. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection

  2. Ultraviolet laser technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, David L

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet Laser Technology and Applications is a hands-on reference text that identifies the main areas of UV laser technology; describes how each is applied; offers clearly illustrated examples of UV opticalsystems applications; and includes technical data on optics, lasers, materials, and systems. This book is unique for its comprehensive, in-depth coverage. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the subject, beginning with UV light itself; moving through the optics, sources, and systems; and concluding with detailed descriptions of applications in various fields.The text enables pr

  3. Ultraviolet divergences and supersymmetric theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagnotti, A.

    1984-09-01

    This article is closely related to the one by Ferrara in these same Proceedings. It deals with what is perhaps the most fascinating property of supersymmetric theories, their improved ultraviolet behavior. My aim here is to present a survey of the state of the art as of August, 1984, and a somewhat more detailed discussion of the breakdown of the superspace power-counting beyond N = 2 superfields. A method is also described for simplifying divergence calculations that uses the locality of subtracted Feynman integrals. 74 references.

  4. The ultraviolet extinction properties of the 30 Dor Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2018-01-01

    Recent investigation of the extinction law in 30 Dor and the Tarantula Nebula, at optical and near infrared wavelengths, has revealed a ratio of total to selective extinction RV=AV/E(B-V) of about 4.5. This indicates a larger proportion of large grains than in the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. Possible origins include coalescence of small grains, grain growth, selective destruction of small grains, and fresh injection of large grains. From a study of the ultraviolet extinction properties of three Wolf-Rayet stars in 30 Dor (R 139, R 140, R 145), observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer, we show that the excess of large grains does not come at the expense of small grains, which are still present. Fresh injection of large grains by supernova explosions appears to be the dominant mechanism.

  5. A far-ultraviolet photometer for planetary surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.C.; Fastie, W.G.; Lucke, R.L.; Hapke, B.W.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement of local variations in the far-ultraviolet albedo is explored as a means of detecting changes in the refractive index of rocks and dust on the surface of atmosphereless planets and satellites. Far-ultraviolet spectrophotometric measurements of the lunar surface which were obtained on the Apollo 17 orbital mission are presented to demonstrate that significant albedo variations occur in the spectral range 120 to 170 nm. These data also confirm the hypothesis that the albedo variations represent refractive index differences in the surface materials. A three-band photometer is described which, when put in orbit around a solar system object, is capable of providing refractive index maps with a sensitivity of 1 part in the second decimal place and with kilometer resolution. Comparative surface composition and surface history analyses based on such maps are discussed

  6. The Ultraviolet Spectral Morphology of a Sample of B Supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, R. C.; Borchers, A. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Fahey, R. P.

    1995-05-01

    A study of the ultraviolet spectra of a sample of B supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud is being undertaken as a means of addressing some questions about the nature and evolution of massive stars. All spectra are new or archival low-dispersion SWP spectra (1200International Ultraviolet Explorer. As a first step in this study, the ultraviolet spectral morphology of approximately 50 program stars is being examined for consistency with their published spectral classifications. Analysis includes a tabulation of ultraviolet spectral features, evaluation of their variation with spectral type and luminosity class, and comparison with IUE spectral sequences of standard stars. The data analysis was performed at the IUE Data Analysis Center at Goddard Space Flight Center. Partial support of this work by NASA and Northern Kentucky University through the Joint Ventures (JOVE) program, and support of the Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics at GSFC, is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Ultraviolet light and ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Jason C S; Kwok, Alvin K H

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to review the association between ultraviolet (UV) light and ocular diseases. The data are sourced from the literature search of Medline up to Nov 2012, and the extracted data from original articles, review papers, and book chapters were reviewed. There is a strong evidence that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is associated with the formation of eyelid malignancies [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)], photokeratitis, climatic droplet keratopathy (CDK), pterygium, and cortical cataract. However, the evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is related to UV exposure. It is now suggested that AMD is probably related to visible radiation especially blue light, rather than UV exposure. From the results, it was concluded that eyelid malignancies (BCC and SCC), photokeratitis, CDK, pterygium, and cortical cataract are strongly associated with UVR exposure. Evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, OSSN, and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether AMD is related to UV exposure. Simple behaviural changes, appropriate clothing, wearing hats, and UV blocking spectacles, sunglasses or contact lens are effective measures for UV protection.

  8. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  9. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, sho...

  10. Herbal Cosmeceuticals for Photoprotection from Ultraviolet B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herbal Cosmeceuticals for Photoprotection from Ultraviolet B Radiation: A Review. AK Mishra, A Mishra, P Chattopadhyay. Abstract. Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays vary with time and season and are the major cause of sunburns. Sunburned skin is a leading risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Protection ...

  11. Development of Ultraviolet Spectrophotometric Method for Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: An ultraviolet spectrophotometric system was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of lornoxicam in solid dosage forms. Methods: Lornoxicam was dissolved in 0.01M NaOH and analysed using ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry. Various analytical parameters such as linearity, precision, ...

  12. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK)

  13. Probing of Hermean Exosphere by ultraviolet spectroscopy: Instrument presentation, calibration philosophy and first lights results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, J. F.; Rouanet, N.; Maria, J. L.; Quémerais, E.; Mine, P. O.; Zuppella, P.; Suman, M.; Nicolosi, P.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.

    2017-11-01

    PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) is a double spectrometer for the Extreme Ultraviolet range (55-155 nm) and the Far Ultraviolet range (145-315 nm) dedicated to the characterization of Mercury's exosphere composition and dynamics, and surface-exosphere connections. PHEBUS is part of the ESA BepiColombo cornerstone mission payload devoted to the study of Mercury. The BepiColombo mission consists of two spacecrafts: the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) and the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) on which PHEBUS will be mounted. PHEBUS is a French-led instrument implemented in a cooperative scheme involving Japan (detectors), Russia (scanner) and Italy (ground calibration). Before launch, PHEBUS team want to perform a full absolute calibration on ground, in addition to calibrations which will be made in-flight, in order to know the instrument's response as precisely as possible. Instrument overview and calibration philosophy are introduced along with the first lights results observed by a first prototype.

  14. Ultraviolet Keratitis: From the Pathophysiological Basis to Prevention and Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Ultraviolet keratitis is caused by the toxic effects of acute high-dose ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reflecting the sensitivity of the ocular surface to photochemical injury. The clinical syndrome presents with ocular pain, tearing, conjunctival chemosis, blepharospasm, and deterioration of vision typically several hours after exposure, lasting up to 3 days. Mountaineers, skiers, and beach recreationalists are particularly at risk to suffer from ultraviolet (UV) keratitis as the reflectivity of UVR in these environments is extremely high. The aim of this review is to raise awareness about the potential of UV damage on the eye with an emphasis on UV keratitis, to highlight the pathophysiological basis of corneal phototoxicity, and to provide practical guidance for the prevention and clinical management of UV keratitis commonly known as snow blindness.

  15. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H; Gilbert, David W; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315-400 nm), "black-light," electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV "Black-light" ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products.

  16. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazova, M.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of ∼ 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  17. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  18. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator for...

  19. Advanced, Compact, Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for Planetary Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced, Compact, Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for Planetary Systems will advance the capabilities of ultraviolet imaging spectrometers by improving the...

  20. CUTIE: Cubesat Ultraviolet Transient Imaging Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenko, Stephen B.; Bellm, Eric Christopher; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gezari, Suvi; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jewell, April; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Mushotzky, Richard; Nikzad, Shouleh; Piro, Anthony; Waxman, Eli; Ofek, Eran Oded

    2017-01-01

    We describe a mission concept for the Cubesat Ultraviolet Transient Imaging Experiment (CUTIE). CUTIE will image an area on the sky of ~ 1700 square degrees every ~ 95 min at near-UV wavelengths (260-320 nm) to a depth of 19.0 mag (AB). These capabilities represent orders of magnitude improvement over past UV imagers, allowing CUTIE to conduct the first true synoptic survey of the transient and variable sky in the UV bandpass. CUTIE will uniquely address key Decadal Survey science questions such as how massive stars end their lives, how super-massive black holes accrete material and influence their surroundings, and how suitable habitable-zone planets around low-mass stars are for hosting life. By partnering with upcoming ground-based time-domain surveys, CUTIE will further leverage its low-Earth orbit to provide a multi-wavelength view of the dynamic universe that can only be achieved from space. The remarkable sensitivity for such a small payload is achieved via the use of large format delta-doped CCDs; space qualifying this technology will serve as a key milestone towards the development of future large missions (Explorers and Surveyors). Finally, our innovative design in a 6U cubesat form factor will enable significant cost savings, accelerating the timeline from conception to on-sky operation (5 years; well matched for graduate student participation).

  1. Galactic Astronomy in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorguev, A. S.; Sachkov, M. E.; Zabolotskikh, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a number of prospective observational programs for the ultraviolet space observatory WSO-UV, which seem to be of great importance to modern galactic astronomy. The programs include the search for binary Cepheids; the search and detailed photometric study and the analysis of radial distribution of UV-bright stars in globular clusters ("blue stragglers", blue horizontal-branch stars, RR Lyrae variables, white dwarfs, and stars with UV excesses); the investigation of stellar content and kinematics of young open clusters and associations; the study of spectral energy distribution in hot stars, including calculation of the extinction curves in the UV, optical and NIR; and accurate definition of the relations between the UV-colors and effective temperature. The high angular resolution of the observatory allows accurate astrometric measurements of stellar proper motions and their kinematic analysis.

  2. Stomatal closure by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negash, L.; Björn, L.O.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation (UV) (255–325 nm) on stomatal closure was investigated on tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc) Trotter] in the presence of white light (ca 50 ·mol m −2 s −1 ). The action spectrum showed that UV (ca 2 ·mol m −2 s −1 , half band width about 10 nm) of 285 nm or shorter wavelengths was very efficient in causing stomatal closure. The effectiveness decreased sharply towards longer wavelengths. Radiation of 313 nm or longer wavelengths was practically without effect. Increasing UV intensity increased stomatal resistance. When stronger white light (5 to 9 times stronger than the one used during irradiation) was administered, stomates re-opened rapidly irrespective of whether the UV was on or off, although a subsequent gradual closing tendency was observed when the UV was on. (author)

  3. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  4. Recent advances and applications of gas chromatography vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Inês C; Schug, Kevin A

    2017-01-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometer was developed recently as an alternative to existing gas chromatography detectors. This detector measures the absorption of gas-phase chemical species in the range of 120-240 nm, where all chemical compounds present unique absorption spectra. Therefore, qualitative analysis can be performed and quantification follows standard Beer-Lambert law principles. Different fields of application, such as petrochemical, food, and environmental analysis have been explored. Commonly demonstrated is the capability for facile deconvolution of co-eluting analytes. The concept of additive absorption for co-eluting analytes has also been advanced for classification and speciation of complex mixtures using a data treatment procedure termed time interval deconvolution. Furthermore, pseudo-absolute quantitation can be performed for system diagnosis, as well as potentially calibrationless quantitation. In this manuscript an overview of these features, the vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometer instrumentation, and performance capabilities are given. A discussion of the applications of the vacuum ultraviolet detector is provided by describing and discussing the papers published thus far since 2014. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The SAURON project - XIII. SAURON-GALEX study of early-type galaxies : the ultraviolet colour-magnitude relations and Fundamental Planes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; van de Ven, Glenn; Peletier, Reynier F.; Bacon, Roland; Cappellari, Michele; de Zeeuw, Tim; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Sarzi, Marc; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.

    2009-01-01

    We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) imaging of 34 nearby early-type galaxies from the SAURON representative sample of 48 E/S0 galaxies, all of which have ground-based optical imaging from the MDM Observatory. The surface brightness profiles of nine

  6. ASASSN-15LH: A SUPERLUMINOUS ULTRAVIOLET REBRIGHTENING OBSERVED BY SWIFT AND HUBBLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Peter J.; Yang, Yi; Wang, Lifan [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cooke, Jeff; Mould, Jeremy [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Olaes, Melanie; Quimby, Robert M. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Baade, Dietrich [European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Gehrels, Neil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hoeflich, Peter [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Maund, Justyn [Department of Physics and Astronomy F39 Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Wheeler, J. Craig [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We present and discuss ultraviolet and optical photometry from the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope, X-ray limits from the X-Ray Telescope on Swift, and imaging polarimetry and ultraviolet/optical spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope , all from observations of ASASSN-15lh. It has been classified as a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN I), making it more luminous than any other supernova observed. ASASSN-15lh is not detected in the X-rays in individual or co-added observations. From the polarimetry we determine that the explosion was only mildly asymmetric. We find the flux of ASASSN-15lh to increase strongly into the ultraviolet, with an ultraviolet luminosity 100 times greater than the hydrogen-rich, ultraviolet-bright SLSN II SN 2008es. We find that objects as bright as ASASSN-15lh are easily detectable beyond redshifts of ∼4 with the single-visit depths planned for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Deep near-infrared surveys could detect such objects past a redshift of ∼20, enabling a probe of the earliest star formation. A late rebrightening—most prominent at shorter wavelengths—is seen about two months after the peak brightness, which is itself as bright as an SLSN. The ultraviolet spectra during the rebrightening are dominated by the continuum without the broad absorption or emission lines seen in SLSNe or tidal disruption events (TDEs) and the early optical spectra of ASASSN-15lh. Our spectra show no strong hydrogen emission, showing only Ly α absorption near the redshift previously found by optical absorption lines of the presumed host. The properties of ASASSN-15lh are extreme when compared to either SLSNe or TDEs.

  7. Weather and Climate Extremes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krause, Paul

    1997-01-01

    .... All extremes are presented in terms of their location and date and, where supportive information is available in the professional literature, detailed discussions of the extreme event are provided...

  8. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  9. Ultraviolet Extinction and Visible Transparency by Ivy Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Quanshui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Though much research has been conducted for nanoparticles, naturally occurring nanoparticles have not yet been well explored for their diverse properties and potential applications. This paper reports the optical absorption and scattering properties of nanoparticles secreted by English ivy. Both experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted. Strong ultraviolet extinction and excellent visible transparency are observed, compared to the inorganic TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles at similar concentrations. The contributions of absorption and scattering to the total extinction are quantified by simulation of the Mie scattering theory.

  10. The 1982 ultraviolet eclipse of the symbiotic binary AR Pav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Ake, T. B.; Imhoff, C. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) of the symbiotic binary AR Pav through its 1982 eclipse show that the hot star is not eclipsed. The hot star is associated with an extended region of continuum emission which is partially eclipsed. The eclipsed radiation is hotter near to its center, with a maximum temperature of about 9000 K. The uneclipsed flux is hotter than this. UV emission lines are not measurably eclipsed and presumably arise in a much larger region than the continuum. These data provide new constraints on models of the system but also are apparently in contradiction to those based on ground-based data.

  11. Oxidation of graphene in ozone under ultraviolet light

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2012-08-17

    Based on first-principles calculations, the process of grapheneoxidation in ozone under ultraviolet light is explored by studying the effects of O(3P) on the structural and electronic properties of a graphene sheet. On initial absorption of O(3P), an epoxy group is formed on the graphene sheet and the Dirac cone is shifted away from the Brillouin zone corners without carrier doping. When the oxidation progresses, an adjacent C-C bond is broken, a vacancy is formed, and CO and/or CO2 molecules are released.

  12. Some aspects of vacuum ultraviolet radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Damany, Nicole; Vodar, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Some Aspects of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics presents some data on the state of research in vacuum ultraviolet radiation in association with areas of physics. Organized into four parts, this book begins by elucidating the optical properties of solids in the vacuum ultraviolet region (v.u.v.), particularly the specific methods of determination of optical constants in v.u.v., the properties of metals, and those of ionic insulators. Part II deals with molecular spectroscopy, with emphasis on the spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules, paraffins, and condensed phases. Part III

  13. Gene adaptation to extreme environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlaire, P.; Rodriguez, V.; Kerner, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This work is oriented to the study of gene adaptation to extreme conditions, such as the hydrothermal system located in Copahue, Neuquen, Argentina. The organisms living there develop under two pressure selection conditions: the high temperature of thermal water and the strong impact of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Several microorganisms found in this region were isolated and different colonies resistant to UV radiation were selected, a Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain identified through 16S RNA sequence, being the most remarkable. A gene library was prepared out of this strain with UV sensitive bacteria BH200 (uvrA::Tn10). A number of clones were isolated by means of UV selection, the most outstanding being a gene carrier able to codify for the guanosine monophosphate synthetase enzyme (GMPs). The suitability of said enzyme was proved by means of additional assays performed on ght 1 bacteria (guaA26::Tn 10) which lacked the enzyme. A transcript of 1100 pb was detected through Northern Blot. The result was consistent with that obtained for the mapping of the starting transcription site. The cloned GMPs produces an increase in growth speed and a greater biomass in BH200 bacteria. (author)

  14. Development of a Large-Format Science-Grade CMOS Active Pixel Sensor, for Extreme Ultra Violet Spectroscopy and Imaging in Space Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltham, N. R; Prydderch, M; Mapson-Menard, H; Morrissey, Q; Turchetta, R; Pool, P; Harris, A

    2005-01-01

    We describe our programme to develop a large-format science-grade CMOS active pixel sensor for future space science missions, and in particular an extreme ultra-violet spectrograph for solar physics...

  15. Extreme value distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ahsanullah, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the book is to give a through account of the basic theory of extreme value distributions. The book cover a wide range of materials available to date. The central ideas and results of extreme value distributions are presented. The book rwill be useful o applied statisticians as well statisticians interrested to work in the area of extreme value distributions.vmonograph presents the central ideas and results of extreme value distributions.The monograph gives self-contained of theory and applications of extreme value distributions.

  16. Production and analysis of some atomic emission spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, F.G.

    1979-01-01

    The development of technical facilities for spectra analysis are described including the design, construction and adjustment of a grazing incidence spectrograph for the extreme ultraviolet and the improvements in light sources. The investigations of the fifth and fourth spectra of tantalum, the analysis of the sixth spectrum of tungsten, the extension of the analysis of the fourth spectrum of hafnium and a start of the analysis of the seventh spectrum of rhenium are presented. (C.F.)

  17. DNA Repair and Photoprotection: Mechanisms of Overcoming Environmental Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Halophilic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L. Jones; Bonnie K. Baxter

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic archaea push the limits of life at several extremes. In particular, they are noted for their biochemical strategies in dealing with osmotic stress, low water activity and cycles of desiccation in their hypersaline environments. Another feature common to their habitats is intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is a challenge that microorganisms must overcome. The consequences of high UV exposure include DNA lesions arising directly from bond rearrangement of adjacent bipyrimidine...

  18. The ultraviolet, optical, and infrared properties of Sloan Digital Sky Survey sources detected by GALEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agueros, MA; Ivezic, Z; Covey, KR; Obric, M; Hao, L; Walkowicz, LM; West, AA; Vanden Berk, DE; Lupton, RH; Knapp, GR; Gunn, JE; Richards, GT; Bochanski, J; Brooks, A; Claire, M; Haggard, D; Kaib, N; Kimball, A; Gogarten, SM; Seth, A; Solontoi, M

    We discuss the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared properties of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) sources detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ( GALEX) as part of its All-sky Imaging Survey Early Release Observations. Virtually all (> 99%) the GALEX sources in the overlap region are detected

  19. Thin film optical coatings for the ultraviolet spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchio, P.; Albrand, G.; Alvisi, M.; Amra, C.; Rauf, H.; Cousin, B.; Otrio, G.

    2017-11-01

    The applications and innovations related to the ultraviolet field are today in strong growth. To satisfy these developments which go from biomedical to the large equipment like the Storage Ring Free Electron Laser, it is crucial to control with an extreme precision the optical performances, in using the substrates and the thin film materials impossible to circumvent in this spectral range. In particular, the reduction of the losses by electromagnetic diffusion, Joule effect absorption, or the behavior under UV luminous flows of power, resistance to surrounding particulate flows... become top priority which concerns a broad European and international community. Our laboratory has the theoretical, experimental and technological tools to design and fabricate numerous multilayer coatings with desirable optical properties in the visible and infrared spectral ranges. We have extended our expertise to the ultraviolet. We present here some results on high reflectivity multidielectric mirrors towards 250 nm in wavelength, produced by Ion Plating Deposition. The latter technique allows us to obtain surface treatments with low absorption and high resistance. We give in this study the UV transparent materials and the manufacturing technology which have been the best suited to meet requirements. Single UV layers were deposited and characterized. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors with a reflectance higher than 99% at 300 nm were obtained. Optical and non-optical characterizations such as UV spectrophotometric measurements, X-Ray Diffraction spectra, Scanning Electron Microscope and Atomic Force Microscope images were performed

  20. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation

  1. Solar ultraviolet radiation : personal exposure and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.; Gies, H.P.; Elliott, G.

    1988-01-01

    Overexposure to solar ultraviolet radiation ( [1TUVR) can result in serious health effects including skin cancer. Good skin and eye protection against solar UVR is available and the outdoor worker should be educated to use such protection at all times

  2. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of transient species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw, D.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    Transient species are studied in the isolation of the gas phase using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). A description of the equipment used and a discussion of some theoretical topics, which play a role in the interpretation of PE spectra, are given. Koopmans' theorem, Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) calculations and the sum rule are discussed. A versatile ultraviolet PE spectrometer, designed specifically for this purpose, has been built and the construction and performance of this instrument are described. (Auth.)

  3. Ultraviolet Light and Skin Cancer in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Shannon C.; Bergfeld, Wilma F.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide. Ultraviolet light exposure is the most important risk factor for cutaneous melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Constitutive skin color and genetic factors, as well as immunological factors, play a role in the development of skin cancer. Ultraviolet light also causes sunburn and photoaging damage to the skin.

  4. Ocular ultraviolet radiation exposure of welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkate, Thomas D

    2017-05-01

    reference made to the average solar UVR exposure of a Danish outdoor worker being 22 400 J/m 2 per year (min-max 5400 - 66 900 J/m 2 per year) (10). For comparison, taking the mean 8-hour UVR dose within the welding helmets as 15 mJ/cm2 (3), this would equate to an annual ocular/facial UVR dose for welders of 37 500 J/m 2 (at 5 days/week, 50 weeks/year). Even though this value is weighted for the ACGIH action spectrum, and the value for the Danish outdoor workers is weighted for the erythema spectrum, it provides a reasonable comparison and indicates that welders are likely to receive comparable facial/ocular UVR doses to outdoor workers. Slagor et al also state that "it is inferred that welders are not exposed to large amounts of UVR during their work life, in spite of the photokeratoconjunctivitis incidents" (1, p451). I would propose that the UVR dosimetry studies described above (2, 3), taken together with studies on UVR emissions of welding arcs which show that the MPE for many welding arcs can be exceeded in a matter of seconds (11-13), indicate that welders do work in an extreme UVR environment. These studies also suggest that welders are regularly exposed to levels of UVR that exceed the occupational exposure limits at body sites which are thought to be protected (eg, face and eyes) (2, 3). When these exposures are further considered in light of the range of eye conditions reported to occur in welders (14-17), the importance of implementing a comprehensive eye safety strategy for welders and all workers in a welding environment is imperative. References 1. Slagor RM, La Cour M, Bonde JP. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding. Scan J Work Environ Health. 2016;42(5):447-53. https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3572.  2. Shehade SA, Roberts PJ, Diffey BF, Foulds IS. Photodermatitis due to spot welding. Br J Dermatol. 1987;117:117-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.1987.tb04100.x.  3. Tenkate TD, Collins MJ. Personal ultraviolet radiation exposure of

  5. Interstellar Silicon Depletion and the Ultraviolet Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen

    2018-01-01

    Spinning small silicate grains were recently invoked to account for the Galactic foreground anomalous microwave emission. These grains, if present, will absorb starlight in the far ultraviolet (UV). There is also renewed interest in attributing the enigmatic 2175 Å interstellar extinction bump to small silicates. To probe the role of silicon in the UV extinction, we explore the relations between the amount of silicon required to be locked up in silicates [Si/H]dust and the 2175 Å bump or the far-UV extinction rise, based on an analysis of the extinction curves along 46 Galactic sightlines for which the gas-phase silicon abundance [Si/H]gas is known. We derive [Si/H]dust either from [Si/H]ISM - [Si/H]gas or from the Kramers- Kronig relation which relates the wavelength-integrated extinction to the total dust volume, where [Si/H]ISM is the interstellar silicon reference abundance and taken to be that of proto-Sun or B stars. We also derive [Si/H]dust from fi�tting the observed extinction curves with a mixture of amorphous silicates and graphitic grains. We fi�nd that in all three cases [Si/H]dust shows no correlation with the 2175 Å bump, while the carbon depletion [C/H]dust tends to correlate with the 2175 Å bump. This supports carbon grains instead of silicates as the possible carrier of the 2175 Å bump. We also �find that neither [Si/H]dust nor [C/H]dust alone correlates with the far-UV extinction, suggesting that the far-UV extinction is a combined effect of small carbon grains and silicates.

  6. International Conference “Ultraviolet Properties of Evolved Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez Dagostino, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    This book presents an up-to-date collection of reviews and contributed articles in the field of ultraviolet astronomy. Its content has been mainly motivated by the recent access to the rest frame UV light of distant red galaxies, gained through large optical facilities. This driveway has derived in a renewed interest on the stars that presumably dominate or have important effects on the integrated UV properties of evolved systems of the nearby and faraway Universe. The topics included in this volume extend from the fresh spectroscopic analyses of high redshift early-type galaxies observed with the 8-10m class telescopes to the fundamental outcomes from various satellites, from the long-lived International Ultraviolet Explorer to current facilities, such as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. This is one of the few volumes published in recent years devoted to UV astronomical research and the only one dedicated to the properties of evolved stellar populations at these wavelengths. This contemporary panorama will be ...

  7. A Fourier transform spectrometer for visible and near ultra-violet measurements of atmospheric absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C. L.; Gerlach, J. C.; Whitehurst, M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a prototype, ground-based, Sun-pointed Michelson interferometric spectrometer is described. Its intended use is to measure the atmospheric amount of various gases which absorb in the near-infrared, visible, and near-ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Preliminary spectra which contain the alpha, 0.8 micrometer, and rho sigma tau water vapor absorption bands in the near-infrared are presented to indicate the present capability of the system. Ultimately, the spectrometer can be used to explore the feasible applications of Fourier transform spectroscopy in the ultraviolet where grating spectrometers were used exclusively.

  8. Exploring Science Through Polar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Bell, R. E.; Zadoff, L.; Kelsey, R.

    2003-12-01

    Exploring the Poles is a First Year Seminar course taught at Barnard College, Columbia University. First Year Seminars are required of incoming students and are designed to encourage critical analysis in a small class setting with focused discussion. The class links historical polar exploration with current research in order to: introduce non-scientists to the value of environmental science through polar literature; discuss issues related to venturing into the unknown that are of relevance to any discipline: self-reliance, leadership, preparation, decisions under uncertainty; show students the human face of science; change attitudes about science and scientists; use data to engage students in exploring/understanding the environment and help them learn to draw conclusions from data; integrate research and education. These goals are met by bringing analysis of early exploration efforts together with a modern understanding of the polar environment. To date to class has followed the efforts of Nansen in the Fram, Scott and Amundsen in their race to the pole, and Shackleton's Endurance. As students read turn-of-the-century expedition journals, expedition progress is progressively revealed on an interactive map showing the environmental context. To bring the exploration process to life, students are assigned to expedition teams for specific years and the fates of the student "expeditions" are based on their own decisions. For example, in the Arctic, they navigate coastal sea ice and become frozen into the ice north of Siberia, re-creating Nansen's polar drift. Fates of the teams varied tremendously: some safely emerged at Fram Strait in 4 years, while others nearly became hopelessly lost in the Beaufort Gyre. Students thus learn about variability in the current polar environment through first hand experience, enabling them to appreciate the experiences, decisions, and, in some cases, the luck, of polar explorers. Evaluation by the Columbia Center for New Media, Teaching

  9. Classifying Returns as Extreme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I consider extreme returns for the stock and bond markets of 14 EU countries using two classification schemes: One, the univariate classification scheme from the previous literature that classifies extreme returns for each market separately, and two, a novel multivariate classification scheme...... that classifies extreme returns for several markets jointly. The new classification scheme holds about the same information as the old one, while demanding a shorter sample period. The new classification scheme is useful....

  10. Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure Criteria (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliney, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    During the past 25 years occupational health and safety guidelines, regulations and standards have evolved to protect workers and the general public from potentially hazardous exposure to ultraviolet radiation. A further goal has been to promote the safe design and use of suntanning devices, optical instruments, lamps, and laser products. From the gradually expanding knowledge of the biological effects of UVR exposure of the eye and skin, exposure limits have been slightly revised over the past two decades - by both national and international organisations. The general trend has been a convergence of differing limits. The greatest divergence in guidelines and standards has occurred where the biological effects are least understood or are simply controversial. Philosophical differences in the level of protection have played a role, since there are those who argue that UVR exposure offers more benefit than is accepted by all. The earliest guidelines were limited to UVR from low-pressure mercury lamps used in germicidal applications in the 1940s. By 1972 a North-American guideline based upon an envelope action spectrum had appeared. The International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee (INIRC) of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) proposed similar guidelines in 1985 and these were revised based upon newer data a few years later. After an extensive review of the IRPA/INIRC guidelines, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection revalidated and endorsed those limits. Although these guidelines were based firstly on preventing any acute effects, they have also been analysed to show that the risk is extremely small, or undetectable, for delayed effects for persons exposed below these recommended limits. The limits are approximately one-third of an MED (for fair skin) in any eight-hour period. At this level, detectable molecular damage appears to be fully repaired. Further refinement is still called for. For example, the maximal

  11. The Normal-incidence Vacuum-ultraviolet Spectrometer for the TJ-II and First Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2002-01-01

    A normal-incidence spectrometer, operating in the extreme-ultraviolet and ultraviolet wavelength regions, has been commissioned for the TJ-II stellarator. The instrument has been custom built by McPherson, Chelmsford, MA, and has several unique features and accessories that are described here. The instrument and CCD detector has been tested and calibrated, and its performance evaluated, using spectral lines from glow discharges and a RF excited flow lamp. Finally, the first spectra collected with the instrument of TJ-II plasmas are presented and a preliminary estimation of an oxygen ion temperature is made. (Author) 23 refs

  12. The Normal-incidence Vacuum-ultraviolet Spectrometer for the TJ-II and First Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K.J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2002-07-01

    A normal-incidence spectrometer, operating in the extreme-ultraviolet and ultraviolet wavelength regions, has been commissioned for the TJ-II stellarator. The instrument has been custom built by McPherson, Chelmsford, MA, and has several unique features and accessories that are described here. The instrument and CCD detector has been tested and calibrated, and its performance evaluated, using spectral lines from glow discharges and a RF excited flow lamp. Finally, the first spectra collected with the instrument of TJ-II plasmas are presented and a preliminary estimation of an oxygen ion temperature is made. (Author) 23 refs.

  13. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    often defined as a sudden loss of perfusion to the lower extremity/extremities of less than 14 days' duration, ... Femoral arteries palpated Soft, tender. Hard, calcified. Dystrophic limb features Absent. Present. Cardiac abnormalities Present. Generally absent. Iliac/femoral bruits Absent. May be present. History of claudication ...

  14. ULTRAVIOLET-SELECTED FIELD AND PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS TOWARD TAURUS AND UPPER SCORPIUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findeisen, K.; Hillenbrand, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out a Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Cycle 1 guest investigator program covering 56 deg 2 near the Taurus T association and 12 deg 2 along the northern edge of the Upper Scorpius OB association. We combined photometry in the GALEX far-ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet bands with data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey to identify candidate young (∼<100 Myr old) stars as those with an ultraviolet excess relative to older main-sequence stars. Follow-up spectroscopy of a partial sample of these candidates suggests five new members of Taurus, with 8-20 expected from additional observations, and five new members of Upper Scorpius, with three to six expected from additional observations. These candidate new members appear to represent a distributed, non-clustered population in either region, although our sample statistics are as of yet too poor to constrain the nature or extent of this population. Rather, our study demonstrates the ability of GALEX observations to identify young stellar populations distributed over a wide area of the sky. We also highlight the necessity of a better understanding of the Galactic ultraviolet source population to support similar investigations. In particular, we report a large population of stars with an ultraviolet excess but no optical indicators of stellar activity or accretion, and briefly argue against several interpretations of these sources.

  15. Direct ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy of betelgeuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Stefanik, R. P.

    2013-05-01

    Direct images of Betelgeuse were obtained over a span of 4 years with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. These images reveal the extended ultraviolet continuum emission (~2 times the optical diameter), the varying overall ultraviolet flux levels and a pattern of bright surface continuum features that change in position and appearance over several months or less. Concurrent photometry and radial velocity measures support the model of a pulsating star, first discovered in the ultraviolet from IUE. Spatially resolved HST spectroscopy reveals a larger extention in chromospheric emissions of Mg II as well as the rotation of the supergiant. Changing localized subsonic flows occur in the low chromosphere that can cover a substantial fraction of the stellar disk and may initiate the mass outflow.

  16. Are healthcare middle management jobs extreme jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David A; Parry, Emma; Gascoigne, Charlotte; Moore, Cíara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the incidence of "extreme jobs" among middle managers in acute hospitals, and to identify individual and organizational implications. The paper is based on interviews and focus groups with managers at six hospitals, a "proof of concept" pilot with an operations management team, and a survey administered at five hospitals. Six of the original dimensions of extreme jobs, identified in commercial settings, apply to hospital management: long hours, unpredictable work patterns, tight deadlines with fast pace, broad responsibility, "24/7 availability", mentoring and coaching. Six healthcare-specific dimensions were identified: making life or death decisions, conflicting priorities, being required to do more with fewer resources, responding to regulatory bodies, the need to involve many people before introducing improvements, fighting a negative climate. Around 75 per cent of hospital middle managers have extreme jobs. This extreme healthcare management job model was derived inductively from a qualitative study involving a small number of respondents. While the evidence suggests that extreme jobs are common, further research is required to assess the antecedents, incidence, and implications of these working practices. A varied, intense, fast-paced role with responsibility and long hours can be rewarding, for some. However, multi-tasking across complex roles can lead to fatigue, burnout, and mistakes, patient care may be compromised, and family life may be adversely affected. As far as the authors can ascertain, there are no other studies exploring acute sector management roles through an extreme jobs lens.

  17. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses human capacity for movement in the context of extreme loading and with it the combined effects of metabolic, biomechanical and gravitational stress on the human body. This topic encompasses extreme duration, as occurs in ultra-endurance competitions (e.g. adventure racing...... and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may...

  18. Upper-extremity venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, J.S.T.; Neiman, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    Symptomatically, patients often present with pain, swelling, and occasionally discoloration of the hand. In the presence of chronic swelling, it may be difficult to differentiate thrombosis from lymphedema, especially in patients who have undergone mastectomy. Noninvasive testing is helpful in differentiating between these two conditions, but venography offers definitive diagnosis. More importantly, venography demonstrates the site as well as the extent of the thrombotic process. Venography of the upper extremity was first introduced in 1931. Unlike the lower extremity, the use of this simple radiographic technique to evaluate venous problems of the upper extremity has received little attention

  19. [Preservation of crushed extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, A; Tácsik, I; Juhász, J; Hepp, F

    1976-01-01

    For the conservation of crushed extremities all achievements of up-to-date traumatology are to be used. The impairement of the seriously crushed extremity displays a certain similarity to the polytraumatism involving the whole organism. This is to be taken into consideration in the surgical treatment. Conserving the vitality of the extremity deferred treatment and reconstructive operations at a later date become possible. As absolute rule must be in view that all cases are to be examined with the greatest care and individually, as regards the surgical treatment.

  20. Nanoscale freestanding gratings for ultraviolet blocking filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Beek, J.T.; Fleming, R.C.; Hindle, P.S.; Prentiss, J.D.; Schattenburg, M.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ritzau, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) blocking filters are needed for atomic flux imaging in environments where high levels of ultraviolet radiation are present. Freestanding gratings are a promising candidate for UV filtering. They have a high aspect ratio ({approximately}13), narrow ({approximately}40 nm) slots, and effectively block UV radiation. The grating fabrication process makes use of several etching, electroplating, and lithographic steps and includes an optional step to plug pinholes induced by particles during processing. Gratings were successfully manufactured and tested. Measured UV transmissions of {approximately}10{sup {minus}5} and particle transmissions of {approximately}10{percent} are in agreement with theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  1. Ultraviolet Emission from Rocket Motor Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    blind ultraviolet, SBUV. Ultraviolet environmental effects on biological or physical systems are of:en considered for the ranges LVA, 400 to 315 nm, UVB...and surface destruction of ozore. Ir. remote unpolluted environments there is a lower surface level, about __ -2 aý Gx-op’ 13 ppb for the Amazonian...Climatic Bawline Observatories’ J. Geophys Res 91(D4). 522.-5236 (14󈨤) 14. Hough, A. M. and Denvent, R G. "Changes in the globil concentration of

  2. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2011-01-01

    Denne afhandling, "Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy”, består i hovedsagen af to dele. Deep Ultraviolet – også kaldt DUV – står for bølgelængdeområdet 200 til 300 nm. Første del, kapitlerne 1 til 4, handler om den instrumentelle teknologi i DUV Raman-systemet. Anden del, kapitlerne 5 og 6 fokuserer på nogle få anvendelser af DUV Ramanspektroskopien. Kapitel 1 giver en kort introduktion til Ramanspektroskopi i almindelighed og DUVs relation hertil. DUV Ramanspektrometrien h...

  3. Molecular geometry in the ultraviolet absorption spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, S.F. de; Monteiro, L.S.; Adamis, L.M.B.; Baltar, M.C.P.; Silva, R.M. da

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectra may be sensibly affected by steric effects. These effects can cause a lot of difficulties and unexpected changes in spectrum. The most general source of such difficulties is steric inhibition of resonance. In addition to this, ultraviolet epectra may be markedly changed by steric factors which change the positions of dipoles in the molecule with respect to each other and by the interaction of nonconjugated chromophores suitably located in space. We have studied in detail each of these effects presenting a lot of usual and importants examples in Organic Chemistry. Others relevants subjects were not considerated in this present work [pt

  4. Starbursts at space ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2006-06-01

    Starbursts are systems with very high star formation rate per unit area. They are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. The similarities between the physical properties of local starbursts and high-z star-forming galaxies, highlight the cosmological relevance of starbursts. On the other hand, nearby starbursts are laboratories where to study violent star formation processes and their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic media, in detail and deeply. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, as they are in the far-infrared, due to the ‘picket-fence’ interstellar dust distribution. After the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. Super-stellar clusters have properties similar to globular clusters. The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s-1 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. These metal-rich outflows and the ionizing radiation can travel to the halo of galaxies

  5. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maran, S.P.; Aller, L.H.; Gull, T.R.; Stecher, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of three high excitation planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds (LMC P40, SMC N2, SMC N5) were obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. The results are analyzed together with new visual wavelength spectrophotometry of LMC P40 and published data on SMC N2 and SMC N5 to investigate chemical composition and in particular to make the first reliable estimates of the carbon abundance in extragalactic planetary nebulae. Although carbon is at most only slightly less abundant in the LMC and SMC planetary nebulae than in galactic planetaries, it is almost 40 times more abundant in the SMC planetaries than in the SMC interstellar medium, and is about 6 times more abundant in the LMC planetary than in the LMC interstellar medium. According to our limited sample, the net result of carbon synthesis and convective dredgeup in the progenitors of planetary nebulae, as reflected in the nebular carbon abundance, is roughly the same in the Galaxy, the LMC, and the SMC

  6. Stratospheric ozone, ultraviolet radiation and climate change; Ozone stratospherique, rayonnement ultraviolet et changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, O. [Met Office Hadley Centre (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    It is well known that an overexposure to ultraviolet radiation is associated with a number of health risks such as an increased risk of cataracts and skin cancers. At a time when climate change is often blamed for all our environmental problems, what is the latest news about the stratospheric ozone layer and other factors controlling ultraviolet radiation at the surface of the Earth? Will the expected changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere and changes in our climate increase or decrease the risk for skin cancer? This article investigates the role of the various factors influencing ultraviolet radiation and presents the latest knowledge on the subject. (author)

  7. Far-ultraviolet spectral changes of titanium dioxide with gold nanoparticles by ultraviolet and visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Kurawaki, Yuji

    2018-05-01

    Attenuated total reflectance spectra including the far-ultraviolet (FUV, ≤ 200 nm) region of titanium dioxide (TiO2) with and without gold (Au) nanoparticles were measured. A newly developed external light-irradiation system enabled to observe spectral changes of TiO2 with Au nanoparticles upon light irradiations. Absorption in the FUV region decreased and increased by the irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light, respectively. These spectral changes may reflect photo-induced electron transfer from TiO2 to Au nanoparticles under ultraviolet light and from Au nanoparticles to TiO2 under visible light, respectively.

  8. Statistics of extremes theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beirlant, Jan; Segers, Johan; Teugels, Jozef; De Waal, Daniel; Ferro, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Research in the statistical analysis of extreme values has flourished over the past decade: new probability models, inference and data analysis techniques have been introduced; and new application areas have been explored. Statistics of Extremes comprehensively covers a wide range of models and application areas, including risk and insurance: a major area of interest and relevance to extreme value theory. Case studies are introduced providing a good balance of theory and application of each model discussed, incorporating many illustrated examples and plots of data. The last part of the book covers some interesting advanced topics, including  time series, regression, multivariate and Bayesian modelling of extremes, the use of which has huge potential.  

  9. Far-UV Spectroscopy of Two Extremely Hot, Helium-Rich White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kruk, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of hot post-asymptotic giant branch stars and white dwarfs (WDs) are hydrogen-deficient. Two distinct evolutionary sequences have been identified. One of them comprises stars of spectral type [WC] and PG1159, and it originates from a late helium-shell flash, creating helium-rich stellar atmospheres with significant admixtures of carbon (up to about 50, mass fraction). The other sequence comprises stars of spectral type O(He) and luminous subdwarf O stars which possibly are descendants of RCrB stars and extreme helium stars. Their carbon abundances are significantly lower (of the order of 1 or less) and it is thought that they originate from binary-star evolution (through merger or common-envelope evolution). Here we investigate two of the three hottest known helium-rich (DO) WDs (PG 1034+001 and PG 0038+199). They are the only ones for which spectra were recorded with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope, allowing a comprehensive ultraviolet spectral analysis. We find effective temperatures of T(eff) =115000 +/- 5000 K and 125000 +/- 5000 K, respectively, and a surface gravity of log g = 7 +/-0.5. In both stars, nitrogen is strongly oversolar while C and O are significantly subsolar. For all other assessed metals (Ne, Si, P, S, Ar, Fe, and Ni) we find abundances close to solar. We conclude that these WDs are immediate descendants of O(He) stars and, hence, result from close-binary evolution.

  10. Infrared Constraint on Ultraviolet Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yuhsin [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM–SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  11. Germ killing by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawrik, O.

    1975-01-01

    Short-wave UV radiation, in particular the range about 250 nm, has a high germ reducing effect. Corresponding UV burners which above all emit radiation at the line of 254 nm can therefore be used effectively in all cases where the least possible content of germs in the air is aimed at. Apart from this it is also possible to reduce by this process the germs on surfaces and liquids. Especially in the most various ranges of pharmaceutical production one is steadily striving for efficient and last not least economic procedures by which it is possible to reduce the germs present in the air of a room. Numerous scientific investigations have sufficiently proved that short-wave UV radiation is extremely well appropriate for such purposes. Absolutely germ-free air in a room can only be obtained under laboratory conditions. In practice, however, the aim is not to achieve a 100 per cent killing of the germs present in a room but to make sure that the germ rate in certain rooms is constantly reduced to the lowest possible level. If in this connection it is referred to a germ reduction of 100 or 99 per cent this is but theory. (orig.) [de

  12. Coping with extreme climate events: Institutional flocking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, van C.S.A.; Mol, A.P.J.; Tatenhove, van J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The article explores the governance structures that would be needed to cope with extreme and unpredictable climate change. The impacts on the Netherlands of a Gulf Stream collapse in the Northern Atlantic are taken as a case. This hypothetical situation of serious risks and high uncertainties

  13. Wide-Field Ultraviolet Spectrometer for Planetary Exospheres and Thermospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Wishnow, E. H.; Miller, T.; Edelstein, J.; Lillis, R. J.; Korpela, E.; England, S.; Shourt, W. V.; Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J.; Courtade, S.; Curtis, D. W.; Deighan, J.; Chaffin, M.; Harmoul, A.; Almatroushi, H. R.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the composition, structure, and variability of a planet's upper atmosphere - the exosphere and thermosphere - is essential for understanding how the upper atmosphere is coupled to the lower atmosphere, magnetosphere and near-space environment, and the Sun. Ultraviolet spectroscopy can directly observe emissions from constituents in the exosphere and thermosphere. From such observations, the structure, composition, and variability can be determined.We will present the preliminary design for a wide field ultraviolet imaging spectrometer for remote sensing of planetary atmospheres. The imaging spectrometer achieves an extremely large instantaneous 110 degree field of view with no moving scanning mirror. The imaging resolution is very appropriate for extended atmospheric emission studies, with a resolution of better than 0.3 degrees at the center to 0.4 degrees at the edges of the field. The spectral range covers 120 - 170 nm, encompassing emissions from H, O, C, N, CO, and N2, with an average spectral resolution of 1.5 nm. The instrument is composed of a 2-element wide-field telescope, a 3-element Offner spectrometer, and a sealed MCP detector system contained within a compact volume of about 40 x 25 x 20 cm. We will present the optical and mechanical design as well as the predicted optical performance.The wide instantaneous FOV simplifies instrument and spacecraft operations by removing the need for multiple scans (either from a scan mirror or spacecraft slews) to cover the regions of interest. This instrumentation can allow for two-dimensional spectral information to be built up with simple spacecraft operation or just using spacecraft motion. Applications to the terrestrial geocorona and thermosphere will be addressed as well as applications to the upper atmospheres of other planetary objects.

  14. Ultraviolet radiation, sun and tanning salons

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    The pamphlet gives some information about ultraviolet radiation (UV), UV-sources and health effects, tanning in artificial and natural sun. It also includes some sun protection advice. It is intended mainly for persons inspecting artificial tanning units and for the owners of tanning salons. (Author)

  15. Ultraviolet spectroscopic evaluation of bioactive saponin fraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultraviolet spectroscopic evaluation of bioactive saponin fraction from the aqueous extract of Vernonia amygdalina [Esteraeceae] leaf. Paul Chukwuemeka ADIUKWU 1*, Martina BONSU 1, Inemesit OKON-BEN 1,. Paul PEPRAH 1, Paapa MENSAH-KANE 1, Jonathan JATO 1 and Grace NAMBATYA 2. 1School of Pharmacy ...

  16. Characterization of ethanol concentrations at ultraviolet wavelength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the measurement of optical absorption spectrum for different concentrations of ethanol at ultraviolet wavelength. Ethanol absorption spectrum was measured using portable spectroscopy setup from Avantes. It consists of Balanced Deuterium Halogen light source and spectrometer. The light source can ...

  17. Influence of ultraviolet on polylactide degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzorova, M. V.; Tertyshnaya, Yu. V.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Popov, A. A.; Nikolaeva, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of physical factors on the destruction of biodegradable polymers is also important to evaluate, predicting the period of their full degradation in the environment. One of the most significant environmental factors is the ultraviolet radiation. The influence of UV radiation time on polylactide destruction was proved by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  18. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex inte...

  19. Ultraviolet Spectrophotometric Determination of Simvastain in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is aimed at describing an accurate, robust and reproducible ultraviolet spectrophotometric technique for the determination of simvastain in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage formulations. Samples from three different brands of simvastatin 10mg were selected for the study. Different aliquots were taken from the ...

  20. Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopic Evaluation of Complexation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some complexes of crude methanol extract of Loranthus micranthus Linn parasitic on Kola acuminata were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrophotometry. The crude methanol extract was complexed with ferric chloride solution, borate mixture, methanolic aluminum nitrate and aluminum chloride solutions ...

  1. Habitat impact on ultraviolet reflectance in moths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletalová, Lenka; Zapletal, Michal; Konvička, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2016), s. 1300-1305 ISSN 0046-225X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-33733S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * ultraviolet reflectance * mimicry Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.601, year: 2016

  2. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Dupree, A. K.; Elvis, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Kenyon, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: Cygnus Loop; P Cygni profiles in dwarf novae; YY Gem; nova shells; HZ Herculis; activity cycles in cluster giants; Alpha Ori; metal deficient giant stars; ultraviolet spectra of symbiotic stars detected by the Very Large Array; time variability in symbiotic stars; blue galaxies; and quasistellar objects with X-ray spectra.

  3. Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes Employing Nanoscale Compositional Inhomogeneities: A New Approach for Transforming Army Ultraviolet Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sampath, A. V; Garrett, G. A; Reed, M. L; Readinger, E. D; Wraback, M; Chua, C; Johnson, N. M

    2006-01-01

    Nitride semiconductor ultraviolet optical sources offer the possibility of compact, light-weight, low-cost, low-power-consumption optoelectronic sensors that would enable a new generation of fieldable...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic...

  5. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Bahn, M.; Ciais, P.; Mahecha, M. D.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Zscheischler, J.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a key component of the global carbon cycle and its carbon balance is strongly influenced by climate. Ongoing environmental changes are thought to increase global terrestrial carbon uptake. But evidence is mounting that rare climate extremes can lead to a decrease in ecosystem carbon stocks and therefore have the potential to negate the expected increase in terrestrial carbon uptake. Here we explore the mechanisms and impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle, and propose a pathway to improve our understanding of present and future impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon budget. In addition to direct impact on the carbon fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration via extreme temperature and (or) drought, effects of extreme events may also lead to lagged responses, such as wildfires triggered by heat waves and droughts, or pest and pathogen outbreaks following wind-throw caused by heavy storms, reduced plant health due to drought stress or due to less frequent cold extremes in presently cold regions. One extreme event can potentially override accumulated previous carbon sinks, as shown by the Western European 2003 heat wave.. Extreme events have the potential to affect the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance through a single factor, or as a combination of factors. Climate extremes can cause carbon losses from accumulated stocks, as well as long-lasting impacts on (e.g. lagged effects) on plant growth and mortality, extending beyond the duration of the extreme event itself. The sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystems and their carbon balance to climate change and extreme events varies according to the type of extreme, the climatic region, the land cover, and the land management. Extreme event impacts are very relevant in forests due to the importance of lagged and memory effects on tree growth and mortality, the longevity of tree species, the large forest carbon stocks and their vulnerability, as well as the

  6. Classical ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaneck, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of polymers was well established by Clark and coworkers in the 1970s, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of polymer films, was developed later. Previous to the 1970s, the first attempts to use ultraviolet light on polymer films took the form of appearance potential (valence band edge) measurements. Only some years later could the full valence band region of thin polymer films, including insulating polymers, semiconducting polymers and electrically conducting polymers. The development of what might be termed 'classical ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy' of polymer films may be loosely based upon a variety of issues, including adapting thin polymer film technology to ultra high vacuum studies, the widespread use of helium resonance lamps for studies of solid surfaces, the combined advent of practical and sufficient theoretical-computational methods. The advent of, and the use of, easily available synchrotron radiation for multi-photon spectroscopies, nominally in the area of the near UV, is not included in the term 'classical'. At the same time, electrically conducting polymers were discovered, leading to applications of the corresponding semiconducting polymers, which added technologically driven emphasis to this development of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy for polymer materials. This paper traces a limited number of highlights in the evolution of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of polymers, from the 1970s through to 2008. Also, since this issue is dedicated to Prof. Kazuhiko Seki, who has been a friend and competitor for over two decades, the author relies on some of Prof. Seki's earlier research, unpublished, on who-did-what-first. Prof. Seki's own contributions to the field, however, are discussed in other articles in this issue.

  7. Ultraviolet Signatures of Stars and Gas in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitherer, Claus

    2001-01-01

    We extracted about 500 short wavelength prime (SWP) (high-dispersion) International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of B0 to B8 stars of all luminosity classes for the purpose of creating a stellar library. Several hundred scientifically useful high-dispersion B-star spectra are in the IUE Archive. The data were taken either with the purpose of performing stellar-wind studies or investigations of interstellar absorption lines. Due to the nature of these projects, the S/N of the data is the maximum achievable with the IUE satellite. Rountree and Sonneborn and Walborn, Parker, and Nichols extracted a subset of B spectral classification standards from the IUE Archive to construct atlases of IUE high-dispersion spectra. Their work served as our guideline for the data extraction.

  8. Ultraviolet laser-induced voltage in anisotropic shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinyang; Zhu, Jing; Li, Yizhang; Zhao, Kun; Zhan, Honglei; Yue, Wenzheng

    2018-01-01

    The anisotropy of shales plays a significant role in oil and gas exploration and engineering. Owing to various problems and limitations, anisotropic properties were seldom investigated by direct current resistivity methods. Here in this work, a 248 nm ultraviolet laser was employed to assess the anisotropic electrical response of a dielectric shale. Angular dependence of laser-induced voltages (V p) were obtained, with a data symmetry at the location of 180° and a ~62.2% V p anisotropy of the sample. The double-exponential functions have provided an explanation for the electrical field controlled carrier transportation process in horizontal and vertical directions. The results demonstrate that the combination of optics and electrical logging analysis (Opti-electrical Logging) is a promising technology for the investigation of unconventional reservoirs.

  9. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on skin of guinea pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenwen; Chen Qiang; Li Peng; Ling Ling; Lin Xiaochen; Ren Shuping; Liu Yajuan; Li Yun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the adverse effects of ultraviolet B (UV-B) on the skin of guinea pig. Methods: Guinea pig skin was irradiated with UV-B, the skin changes in external appearance, pathology, and the contents of OH and O 2 - produced in the skin were determined to study the adverse effects of UV-B on the guinea pig skin. Results: UV-B caused red swelling and desquamation of skin, with the increasing of the UV-B irradiation, the cells in stratum spinosum began to proliferate vigorously, the MDA and ROS contents in UVB radiation group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: UV-B can cause injury to guinea pig skin and has the potential to produce skin cancer. (authors)

  10. Geomicrobiological exploration and characterization of novel deep-sea hydrothermal activities accompanying with extremely acidic white smokers and elemental sulfur chimneys at the TOTO caldera in the Mariana Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Hirayama, H.; Kosaka, A.; Tsunogai, U.; Gamo, T.; Nealson, K. H.; Horikoshi, K.

    2004-12-01

    Novel hydrothermal activities accompanying effluent white smokers and elemental sulfur chimney structures at the northeast lava dome of the TOTO caldera depression in the Mariana Volcanic Arc were explored by the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. The white smoker hydrothermal fluids were observed in the potential hydrothermal activity center of the field and represented a maximal temperature of 172 degree C and a lowest pH of 1.59, that was the lowest pH of the hydrothermal fluid ever recorded. The chimney structures consisting all of elemental sulfur (sulfur chimney) were also peculiar to the TOTO caldera hydrothermal field in the world. The geochemical characterization strongly suggested that the TOTO caldera hydrothermal field was a novel system driven by subseafloor mixing between the oxygenated seawater and the superheated volcanic gasses. Microbial community structures in a sulfur chimney structure and its formation hydrothermal fluid with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide (15 mM) were investigated by culture-dependent and _|independent analyses. Ribosomal rRNA gene clone analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that epsilon-Proteobacteria, specifically classified into Group G and Group B, dominated the microbial communities in the sulfur chimney structure and formed a dense microbial mat covering the sulfur chimney surface. Archaeal phylotypes were consistently minor components in the communities and related to the genera Thermococcus, Pyrodictium, Aeropyrum, and the uncultivated archaeal group of Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeotal Group. Cultivation analysis suggested that the microbial components inhabiting in the sulfur chimney structure might be entrained by hydrothermal fluids from the potential subsurface habitats

  11. Moving in extreme environments: extreme loading; carriage versus distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W; Goldman, Ralph F; Cotter, James D

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses human capacity for movement in the context of extreme loading and with it the combined effects of metabolic, biomechanical and gravitational stress on the human body. This topic encompasses extreme duration, as occurs in ultra-endurance competitions (e.g. adventure racing and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may be at least as problematic, and are therefore included as a reference, e.g. when considering exposure, dangers and (mal)adaptations. As per the other reviews in this series, we describe the nature of the stress and the associated consequences; illustrate relevant regulations, including why and how they are set; present the pros and cons for self versus prescribed acute and chronic exposure; describe humans' (mal)adaptations; and finally suggest future directions for practice and research. In summary, we describe adaptation patterns that are often U or J shaped and that over time minimal or no load carriage decreases the global load carrying capacity and eventually leads to severe adverse effects and manifest disease under minimal absolute but high relative loads. We advocate that further understanding of load carrying capacity and the inherent mechanisms leading to adverse effects may advantageously be studied in this perspective. With improved access to insightful and portable technologies, there are some exciting possibilities to explore these questions in this context.

  12. Extreme meteorological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinger de Schwarzkopf, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Different meteorological variables which may reach significant extreme values, such as the windspeed and, in particular, its occurrence through tornadoes and hurricanes that necesarily incide and wich must be taken into account at the time of nuclear power plants' installation, are analyzed. For this kind of study, it is necessary to determine the basic phenomenum of design. Two criteria are applied to define the basic values of design for extreme meteorological variables. The first one determines the expected extreme value: it is obtained from analyzing the recurence of the phenomenum in a convened period of time, wich may be generally of 50 years. The second one determines the extreme value of low probability, taking into account the nuclear power plant's operating life -f.ex. 25 years- and considering, during said lapse, the occurrence probabilities of extreme meteorological phenomena. The values may be determined either by the deterministic method, which is based on the acknowledgement of the fundamental physical characteristics of the phenomena or by the probabilistic method, that aims to the analysis of historical statistical data. Brief comments are made on the subject in relation to the Argentine Republic area. (R.J.S.) [es

  13. Statistics of Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Davison, Anthony C.

    2015-04-10

    Statistics of extremes concerns inference for rare events. Often the events have never yet been observed, and their probabilities must therefore be estimated by extrapolation of tail models fitted to available data. Because data concerning the event of interest may be very limited, efficient methods of inference play an important role. This article reviews this domain, emphasizing current research topics. We first sketch the classical theory of extremes for maxima and threshold exceedances of stationary series. We then review multivariate theory, distinguishing asymptotic independence and dependence models, followed by a description of models for spatial and spatiotemporal extreme events. Finally, we discuss inference and describe two applications. Animations illustrate some of the main ideas. © 2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  14. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  15. Acclimatization to extreme heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, M. E.; Ganguly, A. R.; Bhatia, U.

    2017-12-01

    Heat extremes throughout the globe, as well as in the United States, are expected to increase. These heat extremes have been shown to impact human health, resulting in some of the highest levels of lives lost as compared with similar natural disasters. But in order to inform decision makers and best understand future mortality and morbidity, adaptation and mitigation must be considered. Defined as the ability for individuals or society to change behavior and/or adapt physiologically, acclimatization encompasses the gradual adaptation that occurs over time. Therefore, this research aims to account for acclimatization to extreme heat by using a hybrid methodology that incorporates future air conditioning use and installation patterns with future temperature-related time series data. While previous studies have not accounted for energy usage patterns and market saturation scenarios, we integrate such factors to compare the impact of air conditioning as a tool for acclimatization, with a particular emphasis on mortality within vulnerable communities.

  16. Extremal graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The ever-expanding field of extremal graph theory encompasses a diverse array of problem-solving methods, including applications to economics, computer science, and optimization theory. This volume, based on a series of lectures delivered to graduate students at the University of Cambridge, presents a concise yet comprehensive treatment of extremal graph theory.Unlike most graph theory treatises, this text features complete proofs for almost all of its results. Further insights into theory are provided by the numerous exercises of varying degrees of difficulty that accompany each chapter. A

  17. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Extreme waves in New Zealand waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Victor A.; Bryan, Karin R.; Stephens, Scott A.; Gorman, Richard M.

    2017-09-01

    A detailed climatology of extreme wave events for New Zealand waters is presented, in addition to estimates of significant wave height (Hs) for up to a 100-year return period. Extreme events were explored using 44 years (1958-2001) of wave hindcast data. Comparisons to buoy data at three locations around New Zealand showed negative biases in the model, which nevertheless provided a suitable basis for trends, spatial distribution, and frequency analyses. Results indicate some similarities to patterns previously shown in the mean wave climate, with the largest waves found in southern New Zealand, and the smallest ones observed in areas sheltered from southwesterly swells. The number of extreme events varies substantially throughout the year, while the differences in intensity are more consistent. Events occur more/less frequently in winter/summer months. The greatest mean annual variability of extreme Hs is found on the north coasts of both the North and South Islands, where more locally-generated storms drive the extremes. The interannual variability is largest along the north coast of the country and on the east coast of the South Island, suggesting relationships with La Niña-like effects and the Southern Annular Mode, respectively, which past work showed to be important drivers in these regions. Moreover, the known trend for a more positive Southern Annular Mode may explain the increasing number of extreme events shown in our study.

  19. Projection of extreme precipitation in the context of climate change ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to explore the impact of ENSO on extreme pre- cipitation; Deshpande and ... the far inland to the west and the Pacific Ocean to the east and so, diverse ..... 2011 Human con- tribution to more-intense precipitation extremes; Nature. 470(7334) 378–381. National Meteorological Information Center 2012 Assess- ment Report of ...

  20. Extreme Science (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajo-Franklin, Caroline; Klein, Spencer; Minor, Andrew; Torok, Tamas

    2012-02-27

    On Feb. 27, 2012 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, four Berkeley Lab scientists presented talks related to extreme science - and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel.

  1. Extreme Environment Electronics based on Silicon Carbide, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation tolerant, extreme temperature capable electronics are needed for a variety of planned NASA missions. For example, in-situ exploration of Venus and long...

  2. Extreme Environment Electronics based on Silicon Carbide, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation tolerant, extreme temperature capable electronics are needed for a variety of planned NASA missions. For example, in-situ exploration of Venus and long...

  3. Influence of extreme ultraviolet radiation on the P v ionization fraction in hot star winds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 427, č. 1 (2012), s. 84-90 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0003 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : hydrodynamics * early-type stars * mass-loss Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.521, year: 2012

  4. Modelling of capillary Z-pinch recombination pumping of boron extreme ultraviolet laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Vrbová, M.; Hübner, Jakub

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2009), 073105 1-073105 11 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/07/0275 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Boron * capillary * discharges (electric * laser ablation * optical pumping * plasma heating by laser * plasma kinetic theory * plasma magnetohydrodynamics * Z pinch Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.475, year: 2009 http://link.aip.org/link/? PHP /16/073105

  5. Development of novel protecting derivatives for chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyasu; Tanagi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Shoichi; Furukawa, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    EUV lithography is the most favorable process for high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices below 1X nm half-pitch. Many efforts have revealed that the effective proton generation and the control of the generated acid diffusion are required to improve the breakthrough of the RLS trade-off. For the development of EUV resists, the novel protecting derivatives were designed. To clarify the lithographic performance of these derivatives, we synthesized the acrylic polymers containing these derivatives as model photopolymers and exposed the resist samples based on these polymers to EUV/EB radiation. On the basis of the lithographic performances of these resist sample, we evaluated the characteristics of novel protecting derivatives upon exposure to EUV/EB radiation. We discuss the relationship between the chemical structures of these derivatives and lithographic performance.

  6. Generation of Bright Phase-matched Circularly-polarized Extreme Ultraviolet High Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-08

    the first experiment, the HHG beam was spectrally dispersed using a spectrometer com- posed of a toroidal mirror, a laminar Au grating with a groove...field of the foil. The alternating polarity of the CCD Grating Toroid Magnetic foil Electro- magnet Al filter λ = 790 nm, 40 fs, 4 kHz, 10 W λ/2 λ/2 λ/4...our spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a toroid mirror (glass substrate coated by 100 nm of B4C and tilted at a grazing angle of 8°), a

  7. Counter-streaming flows in a giant quiet-Sun filament observed in the extreme ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercke, A.; Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. The giant solar filament was visible on the solar surface from 2011 November 8-23. Multiwavelength data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to examine counter-streaming flows within the spine of the filament. Methods: We use data from two SDO instruments, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), covering the whole filament, which stretched over more than half a solar diameter. Hα images from the Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (KSO) provide context information of where the spine of the filament is defined and the barbs are located. We apply local correlation tracking (LCT) to a two-hour time series on 2011 November 16 of the AIA images to derive horizontal flow velocities of the filament. To enhance the contrast of the AIA images, noise adaptive fuzzy equalization (NAFE) is employed, which allows us to identify and quantify counter-streaming flows in the filament. We observe the same cool filament plasma in absorption in both Hα and EUV images. Hence, the counter-streaming flows are directly related to this filament material in the spine. In addition, we use directional flow maps to highlight the counter-streaming flows. Results: We detect counter-streaming flows in the filament, which are visible in the time-lapse movies in all four examined AIA wavelength bands (λ171 Å, λ193 Å, λ304 Å, and λ211 Å). In the time-lapse movies we see that these persistent flows lasted for at least two hours, although they became less prominent towards the end of the time series. Furthermore, by applying LCT to the images we clearly determine counter-streaming flows in time series of λ171 Å and λ193 Å images. In the λ304 Å wavelength band, we only see minor indications for counter-streaming flows with LCT, while in the λ211 Å wavelength band the counter-streaming flows are not detectable with this method. The diverse morphology of the filament in Hα and EUV images is caused by different absorption processes, i.e., spectral line absorption and absorption by hydrogen and helium continua, respectively. The horizontal flows reach mean flow speeds of about 0.5 km s-1 for all wavelength bands. The highest horizontal flow speeds are identified in the λ171 Å band with flow speeds of up to 2.5 km s-1. The results are averaged over a time series of 90 minutes. Because the LCT sampling window has finite width, a spatial degradation cannot be avoided leading to lower estimates of the flow velocities as compared to feature tracking or Doppler measurements. The counter-streaming flows cover about 15-20% of the whole area of the EUV filament channel and are located in the central part of the spine. Conclusions: Compared to the ground-based observations, the absence of seeing effects in AIA observations reveal counter-streaming flows in the filament even with a moderate image scale of 0. ''6 pixel-1. Using a contrast enhancement technique, these flows can be detected and quantified with LCT in different wavelengths. We confirm the omnipresence of counter-streaming flows also in giant quiet-Sun filaments. A movie associated to Fig. 6 is available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  8. Photoionized argon plasmas induced with intense soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, L.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Dudžák, Roman; Dostál, Jan; Krouský, Eduard; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Hřebíček, Jan; Medřík, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 014009. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-plasma * plasma radiation * photoionization * Argon plasma * Nd:YAG laser * PALS iodine laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics); Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0741-3335/58/1/014009

  9. Dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Leth, Henriette Astrup

    2011-01-01

    of the system to propagations of the nuclear wave packet in one specific electronic charge state at a time. Suggested ionization channels can be examined, and kinetic energy release spectra for the nuclei can be calculated and compared with experiments. Double ionization of O2 is studied as an example, and good...

  10. Cataloguing Emission Line Spectra from Fe VII-Fe XXIV in the Extreme Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kahn, D. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Mauche, C. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed laboratory astrophysics measurements are, in progress to produce spectral tables for the Fe VII Fe XXIV line emission in the EUV wavelength band. Results for Fe XIII are presented that update line lists used in the Chandra Emission Line Project.

  11. Photoionized argon plasmas induced with intense soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, L.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Dudžák, Roman; Dostál, Jan; Krouský, Eduard; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Hřebíček, Jan; Medřík, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2016), s. 014009 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-plasma * plasma radiation * photoionization * Argon plasma * Nd:YAG laser * PALS iodine laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0741-3335/58/1/014009

  12. Optical technologies for extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray coherent sources

    CERN Document Server

    Poletto, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The book reviews the most recent achievements in optical technologies for XUV and X-ray coherent sources. Particular attention is given to free-electron-laser facilities, but also to other sources available at present, such as synchrotrons, high-order laser harmonics and X-ray lasers. The optical technologies relevant to each type of source are discussed. In addition, the main technologies used for photon handling and conditioning, namely multilayer mirrors, adaptive optics, crystals and gratings are explained. Experiments using coherent light received during the last decades a lot of attention for the X-ray regime. Strong efforts were taken for the realization of almost fully coherent sources, e.g. the free-electron lasers, both as independent sources in the femtosecond and attosecond regimes and as seeding sources for free-electron-lasers and X-ray gas lasers. In parallel to the development of sources, optical technologies for photon handling and conditioning of such coherent and intense X-ray beams advance...

  13. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Régnier, S.; Alexander, C. E.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; Korreck, K. E.; Weber, M.; Mitchell, N.; Platt, S.; De Pontieu, B.; Title, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Kuzin, S.; DeForest, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Observing the Sun at high time and spatial scales is a step toward understanding the finest and fundamental scales of heating events in the solar corona. The high-resolution coronal (Hi-C) instrument has provided the highest spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in the EUV wavelength range to date. Hi-C observed an active region on 2012 July 11 that exhibits several interesting features in the EUV line at 193 Å. One of them is the existence of short, small brightenings 'sparkling' at the edge of the active region; we call these EUV bright dots (EBDs). Individual EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength; however, they can be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA, which suggests a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on their frequency in the Hi-C time series, we define four different categories of EBDs: single peak, double peak, long duration, and bursty. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale, trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV heating events at the base of these coronal loops, which have a free magnetic energy of the order of 10 26 erg.

  14. Desorption/ablation of lithium fluoride induced by extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blejchař, T.; Nevrlý, V.; Vašinek, M.; Dostál, M.; Kozubková, M.; Dlabka, J.; Stachoň, M.; Juha, Libor; Bitala, P.; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Pira, Peter; Wild, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2016), s. 131-138 ISSN 0029-5922. [PLASMA 2015 : International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas. Warsaw, 07.09.2015-11.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : desorption * fluid dynamics * lithium fluoride * numerical simulation * plume expansion * pulsed laser ablation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 0.760, year: 2016

  15. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized Ge, Kr and Mo emitted by imploding plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Feldman, U.; Cohen, L.; Behring, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra of highly ionized Ge, Kr and Mo in the spectral region of 10 to 80A were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was obtained by focusing the energy of the 24 laser beams of the University of Rochester Omega system on 0.4 mm diameter microballoon targets. The laser pulse duration was in the range of 0.87 to 1.09 ns, with total energy in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 kJ. The observed spectral lines include n = 2-2 transitions in the oxygen and fluorine isoelectronic sequences and n = 3 to 4 transitions in the sodium, magnesium and aluminum isoelectronic sequences. The present observations are compared with previous experimental and theoretical studies

  16. Slowly varying component of extreme ultraviolet solar radiation and its relation to solar radio radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. D.; Neupert, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the correlations between solar EUV line fluxes and solar radio fluxes has been carried out. A calibration for the Goddard Space Flight Center EUV spectrum is suggested. The results are used to obtain an equation for the absolute EUV flux for several lines in the 150- to 400-A region and the total flux of 81 intense lines in the region, the 2800-MHz radio flux being used as independent variable.

  17. Nano-structuring of solid surface by extreme ultraviolet Ar8+ laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koláček, Karel; Štraus, Jaroslav; Schmidt, Jiří; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Shukurov, A.; Holý, V.; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-63 ISSN 0263-0346. [International Conference on the Frontiers of Plasma Physics and Technology/5./. Singapore, 18.04.2011-22.04.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08024; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR KAN300100702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ablation by EUV radiation * application of Ar8+ laser * nano-patterning by EUV radiation * , nano-structuring by EUV radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UPT-D) Impact factor: 2.016, year: 2012

  18. Responsivity calibration of the extreme ultraviolet spectrometer in the range of 175-435 Å

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We reported the relative responsivity calibration of the grazing-incidence flat-field EUV spectrometer between 175 and 435 Å by means of two methods. The first method is implemented by measuring the diffraction efficiency of the grating with synchrotron radiation light source. Considering the transmission efficiency and quantum efficiency of the other optical components in the spectrometer, the total responsivity was then obtained. The second one was carried out by measuring line emissions from C3+, N4+ and O3+ ions at Shanghai high temperature super conductor electron beam ion trap (SH-HtscEBIT. The EUV spectra were also simulated theoretically via a collisional radiative model. In the calculation, the second-order relativistic many-body perturbation theory approach based on the flexible atomic code was used to calculate the energy levels and transition rates; the close-coupling R-matrix approach and relativistic distorted wave method were utilized to calculate the collision strength of electron impact excitation. In comparison with the spectroscopic measurements at EBIT device, the differences between the measured and simulated relative line intensities were obtained. The responsivity calibration for the spectrometer was then achieved by a 3rd degree polynomial function fitting. Our measurement shows that the responsivity between 175 and 435 Å varies by factor of ∼ 46. The two results of calibration demonstrated a consistency within an average deviation of 24%. In addition, an evaluation of our calculations on C iv, N v and O iv line emissions in this wavelength region was given.

  19. Numerical evaluation of a 13.5-nm high-brightness microplasma extreme ultraviolet source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hara, H.; Arai, G.; Dinh, T.H.; Jiang, W.; Miura, T.; Endo, Akira; Ejima, T.; Li, B.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.; Sunahara, A.; Higashiguchi, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 19 (2015), s. 1-7, č. článku 193301. ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasmas * 4D-4F emissions resonances * collisions * dynamics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.101, year: 2015

  20. An Upper Limit on the Ratio Between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gen, oxygen gas and water molecules that support a habitable environment. Various thermal and ... greenhouse, water vapor would reach the stratosphere where it would get photolyzed and subsequently should ..... I use the bolometric and EUV luminosities of planet-hosting stars of spectral type ranging from A to M, given ...

  1. Responsivity calibration of the extreme ultraviolet spectrometer in the range of 175-435 à

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, B.; Li, M. C.; Lu, Q. F.; Zhao, Z. Z.; Shen, Y.; Yang, Y.; Lu, D.; Yao, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Zhou, H. J.; Huo, T. L.; Xiao, J.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2017-04-01

    We reported the relative responsivity calibration of the grazing-incidence flat-field EUV spectrometer between 175 and 435 Å by means of two methods. The first method is implemented by measuring the diffraction efficiency of the grating with synchrotron radiation light source. Considering the transmission efficiency and quantum efficiency of the other optical components in the spectrometer, the total responsivity was then obtained. The second one was carried out by measuring line emissions from C3+, N4+ and O3+ ions at Shanghai high temperature super conductor electron beam ion trap (SH-HtscEBIT). The EUV spectra were also simulated theoretically via a collisional radiative model. In the calculation, the second-order relativistic many-body perturbation theory approach based on the flexible atomic code was used to calculate the energy levels and transition rates; the close-coupling R-matrix approach and relativistic distorted wave method were utilized to calculate the collision strength of electron impact excitation. In comparison with the spectroscopic measurements at EBIT device, the differences between the measured and simulated relative line intensities were obtained. The responsivity calibration for the spectrometer was then achieved by a 3rd degree polynomial function fitting. Our measurement shows that the responsivity between 175 and 435 Å varies by factor of ˜ 46. The two results of calibration demonstrated a consistency within an average deviation of 24%. In addition, an evaluation of our calculations on C iv, N v and O iv line emissions in this wavelength region was given.

  2. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-10-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated ˜125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography (EUVL) as a viable manufacturing technology. However, for extension to the 3-nm technology node and beyond, existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multipatterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes). Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should FELs become the preferred next-generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) self-amplified spontaneous emission, (2) regenerative amplifier, or (3) self-seeding. Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provides a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUVL applications.

  3. A Micro Coronal Mass Ejection Associated Blowout Extreme-ultraviolet Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Yang, Bo

    2011-09-01

    The so-called mini coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were recently identified as small-scale eruptive events showing the same on-disk characteristics as large-scale CMEs, and Moore et al. further found that one-third of polar X-ray jets are the so-called blowout jets, in which the jet-base magnetic arch, often carrying a filament, undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. By means of the two viewpoint observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Ahead of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO A), in this Letter, we present the first observations that a blowout jet from the eruption of an EUV mini-filament channel in the quiet Sun was indeed associated with a real micro-CME. Captured by the on-disk SDO observations, the whole life of the mini-filament channel, from the formation to eruption, was associated with convergences and cancellations of opposite-polarity magnetic flux in the photosphere, and its eruption was accompanied by a small flare-like brightening, a small corona dimming, and posteruptive loops. The near-limb counterpart of the eruption observed by STEREO A, however, showed up as a small EUV jet followed by a white-light jet. These observations not only confirm the previous results that mini-filaments have characteristics common to large-scale ones, but also give clear evidences that blowout jets can result from the eruptions of mini-filaments and are associated with mini-CME.

  4. Silver nanoparticles on nanopatterned LiF(110) surface studied by extreme ultraviolet light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giglia, Angelo, E-mail: giglia@iom.cnr.it; Nannarone, Stefano [Istituto Officina dei Materiali - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate e NanoSCienza, Area Science Park Basovizza, S.S. 14 Km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Miotti, Paolo [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Parisse, Pietro [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    A LiF(110) surface featuring a ridge-and-valley nanopatterned structure periodic along the [−1,1,0] direction (period and height of the order of 30 nm and 10 nm, respectively) formed by [001] macrosteps exposing (100) and (010) facets was functionalized by rows of Ag nanoparticles and studied by elastic light scattering in the energy range 50–100 eV. Families of diffraction efficiencies curves were taken at grazing incidence angle and fixed photon energy as a function of scattering angle, and elastic scattering curves were taken at fixed scattering angle as a function of energy. The scattering curves presented well-defined features ascribable to the periodicities of the surface, or equivalently to the reciprocal q{sub X} vectors correlated with the power spectral density features of topological images of atomic force microscopy. Other characteristics of the functionalized surface, including the height of ridge-valley profile, the Ag nanoparticle dimensions, and the material distribution in the scattering plane, were obtained by fitting the experimental zero and first order efficiency curves to simulation results of a parameterized model. The simulations were carried out adapting an in-house code based on the electromagnetic differential method, and the different material properties were taken into account by a space dependent complex dielectric constant. Information along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane was not accessible but morphological insights were obtained combining light diffraction with atomic force microscopy. The results indicate nanoparticles with a quasi-ellipsoidal shape prolate along the ridge direction with minor and major axes of ∼12 nm and ∼21 nm, respectively.

  5. An Upper Limit on the Ratio Between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Owing to our poor knowledge on the actual environment of exoplanets, the habitability of rocky planets around the habitable zone remains ambiguous and incomplete. However, we must impose as many conditions as can be determined directly and easily in order to narrow down our search for planets that may possibly.

  6. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Carmen S [Fort Collins, CO; Rocca, Jorge J [Fort Collins, CO; Vaschenko, Georgiy [San Diego, CA; Bloom, Scott [Encinitas, CA; Anderson, Erik H [El Cerrito, CA; Chao, Weilun [El Cerrito, CA; Hemberg, Oscar [Stockholm, SE

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  7. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the resenceof a magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roy, Amitava; Hassan, S.M.; Harilal, S.S.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš; Hassanein, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2014), "053106-1"-"053106-11" ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * debris mitigation * dynamics * targets Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2014

  8. Extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light in the fungal pathogen causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Kevin P. Drees; Jeffrey T. Foster; Daniel L. Lindner

    2018-01-01

    Bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has decimated North American hibernating bats since its emergence in 2006. Here, we utilize comparative genomics to examine the evolutionary history of this pathogen in comparison to six closely related nonpathogenic species....

  9. EPO for the NASA SDO Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Learning Suite for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellagher, Emily; Scherrer, D. K.

    2013-07-01

    EVE Education and Public Outreach (EPO) promotes an understanding of the process of science and concepts within solar science and sun-earth connections. EVE EPO also features working scientists, current research and career awareness. One of the highlights for of this years projects is the digitization of solar lessons and the collaboration with the other instrument teams to develop new resources for students and educators. Digital lesson suite: EVE EPO has taken the best solar lessons and reworked then to make then more engaging, to reflect SDO data and made them SMARTboard compatible. We are creating a website that Students and teachers can access these lesson and use them online or download them. Project team collaboration: The SDO instruments (EVE, AIA and HMI) teams have created a comic book series for upper elementary and middle school students with the SDO mascot Camilla. These comics may be printed or read on mobile devices. Many teachers are looking for resources to use with their students via the Ipad so our collaboration helps supply teachers with a great resource that teachers about solar concepts and helps dispel solar misconceptions.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): EVE Education and Public Outreach (EPO) promotes an understanding of the process of science and concepts within solar science and sun-earth connections. EVE EPO also features working scientists, current research and career awareness. One of the highlights for of this years projects is the digitization of solar lessons and the collaboration with the other instrument teams to develop new resources for students and educators. Digital lesson suite: EVE EPO has taken the best solar lessons and reworked then to make then more engaging, to reflect SDO data and made them SMARTboard compatible. We are creating a website that Students and teachers can access these lesson and use them online or download them. Project team collaboration: The SDO instruments (EVE, AIA and HMI) teams have created a comic book series for upper elementary and middle school students with the SDO mascot Camilla. These comics may be printed or read on mobile devices. Many teachers are looking for resources to use with their students via the Ipad so our collaboration helps supply teachers with a great resource that teachers about solar concepts and helps dispel solar misconceptions.

  10. The extreme ultraviolet albedos of the planet Mercury and of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. H.; Broadfoot, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The albedo of the moon in the far UV was measured by Mariner 10 at a solar phase angle of 74 deg, and the geometric albedo of Mercury was measured in same wavelength range (584-1657 A) at solar phase angles ranging from 50 to 120 deg. For both the moon and Mercury there is a general increase in albedo for wavelengths decreasing from 1657 to 584 A. The ratio of the albedos of Mercury and the moon increases from about 0.6 to 0.8 in the range 600-1600 A. This merely points to a difference in the surfaces of the moon and Mercury, there being insufficient data to make any conclusions regarding the nature of the difference.

  11. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, V.; Čuba, V.; Grisham, M. E.; Heinbuch, S.; Rocca, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 4 (2015), "042718-1"-"042718-8" ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GA13-28721S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : XUV * DNA damages * single- strand breaks (SSBs) * double- strand breaks (DSBs) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2014

  12. Chirped pulse amplification in an extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gauthier, D.; Allaria, E.; Coreno, M.; Cudin, I.; Dacasa, H.; Danailov, M.B.; Demidovich, A.; Di Mitri, S.; Diviacco, B.; Ferrari, E.; Finetti, P.; Frassetto, F.; Garzella, D.; Künzel, S.; Leroux, Vincent; Mahieu, B.; Mahne, N.; Meyer, M.; Mazza, T.; Miotti, P.; Penco, G.; Raimondi, L.; Ribič, P.R.; Richter, R.; Roussel, E.; Schulz, S.; Sturari, L.; Svetina, C.; Trovo, M.; Walker, P.A.; Zangrando, M.; Callegari, C.; Fajardo, M.; Poletto, L.; Zeitoun, P.; Giannessi, L.; De Ninno, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, Dec (2016), s. 1-5, č. článku 13688. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : FEL * compression * radiation * coherent * proposal Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  13. Optical constants of silica glass from extreme ultraviolet to far infrared at near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent; Jonasz, Miroslaw

    2007-11-01

    We thoroughly and critically review studies reporting the real (refractive index) and imaginary (absorption index) parts of the complex refractive index of silica glass over the spectral range from 30 nm to 1000 μm. The general features of the optical constants over the electromagnetic spectrum are relatively consistent throughout the literature. In particular, silica glass is effectively opaque for wavelengths shorter than 200 nm and larger than 3.5-4.0 μm. Strong absorption bands are observed (i) below 160 nm due to the interaction with electrons, absorption by impurities, and the presence of OH groups and point defects; (ii) at ~2.73-2.85, 3.5, and 4.3 μm also caused by OH groups; and (iii) at ~9-9.5, 12.5, and 21-23 μm due to SiOSi resonance modes of vibration. However, the actual values of the refractive and absorption indices can vary significantly due to the glass manufacturing process, crystallinity, wavelength, and temperature and to the presence of impurities, point defects, inclusions, and bubbles, as well as to the experimental uncertainties and approximations in the retrieval methods. Moreover, new formulas providing comprehensive approximations of the optical properties of silica glass are proposed between 7 and 50 μm. These formulas are consistent with experimental data and substantially extend the spectral range of 0.21-7 μm covered by existing formulas and can be used in various engineering applications.

  14. An Upper Limit on the Ratio Between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types have already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in the near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets ...

  15. Counter-facing plasma guns for efficient extreme ultra-violet plasma light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kuwabara, Hajime; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial guns was proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. We applied Li as the source of plasma for improvement of the conversion efficiency, the spectral purity, and the repetition capability. For operation of the system with ideal counter-facing plasma focus mode, we changed the system from simple coaxial geometry to a multi-channel configuration. We applied a laser trigger to make synchronous multi-channel discharges with low jitter. The results indicated that the configuration is promising to make a high energy density plasma with high spectral efficiency.

  16. Langmuir probe measurement of the bismuth plasma plume formed by an extreme-ultraviolet pulsed laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pira, P.; Burian, T.; Kolpaková, A.; Tichý, M.; Kudrna, P.; Daniš, S.; Juha, Libor; Lančok, Ján; Vyšín, Luděk; Civiš, Svatopluk; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Wild, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 40 (2014), 1-6 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : XUV laser * pulsed laser deposition * Langmuir probe * plasma plume Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2014

  17. Surface modification of polymers for biocompatibility via exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahad, Inam Ul; Bartnik, Andrejz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Korkzyc, Barbara; Ciach, Tomasz; Brabazon, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are being widely used for the treatment of various traumata, diseases and defects in human beings due to ease in their synthesis. As biomaterials have direct interaction with the extracellular environment in the biological world, biocompatibility is a topic of great significance. The introduction or enhancement of biocompatibility in certain polymers is still a challenge to overcome. Polymer biocompatibility can be controlled by surface modification. Various physical an...

  18. Statistics of Local Extremes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Bierbooms, W.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2003-01-01

    . A theoretical expression for the probability density function associated with local extremes of a stochasticprocess is presented. The expression is basically based on the lower four statistical moments and a bandwidth parameter. The theoretical expression is subsequently verified by comparison with simulated...

  19. Lower Extremity Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, D Luke; Subramaniam, Pramilla N; Rodriguez, Juan F

    2016-11-15

    Severe hypokalemia in the absence of other electrolyte abnormalities, the result of diarrhea, caused striking electrocardiographic changes, generalized weakness, flaccid paralysis of the lower extremities, and biochemical evidence of mild skeletal and cardiac rhabdomyolysis in a 33-year-old man. Repletion of potassium reversed all abnormalities in 24 hours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrological extremes and security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. W. Kundzewicz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes – floods and droughts – have been on the rise. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and impact on societal livelihood and welfare. Security can be generally understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. The traditional interpretation of security, focused on the state military capabilities, has been replaced by a wider understanding, including economic, societal and environmental aspects that get increasing attention. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state that is responsible for sustaining economic development, and societal and environmental security. The latter can be regarded as the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. An important part of it is water security, which can be defined as the availability of an adequate quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods, ecosystems and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks to people, environments and economies. Security concerns arise because, over large areas, hydrological extremes − floods and droughts − are becoming more frequent and more severe. In terms of dealing with water-related risks, climate change can increase uncertainties, which makes the state’s task to deliver security more difficult and more expensive. However, changes in population size and development, and level of protection, drive exposure to hydrological hazards.

  1. Extremely Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Extremely Preterm Birth Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ173, June 2016 ... Labor and Birth (FAQ087) Tobacco, Alcohol, Drugs, and Pregnancy (FAQ170) Patient Education ... Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient ...

  2. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003461.htm Extremity x-ray To use the sharing features on this page, ... in the body Risks There is low-level radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the ...

  3. Injuries in extreme sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Lior; Pengas, Ioannis P; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2017-04-18

    Extreme sports (ES) are usually pursued in remote locations with little or no access to medical care with the athlete competing against oneself or the forces of nature. They involve high speed, height, real or perceived danger, a high level of physical exertion, spectacular stunts, and heightened risk element or death.Popularity for such sports has increased exponentially over the past two decades with dedicated TV channels, Internet sites, high-rating competitions, and high-profile sponsors drawing more participants.Recent data suggest that the risk and severity of injury in some ES is unexpectedly high. Medical personnel treating the ES athlete need to be aware there are numerous differences which must be appreciated between the common traditional sports and this newly developing area. These relate to the temperament of the athletes themselves, the particular epidemiology of injury, the initial management following injury, treatment decisions, and rehabilitation.The management of the injured extreme sports athlete is a challenge to surgeons and sports physicians. Appropriate safety gear is essential for protection from severe or fatal injuries as the margins for error in these sports are small.The purpose of this review is to provide an epidemiologic overview of common injuries affecting the extreme athletes through a focus on a few of the most popular and exciting extreme sports.

  4. Extremism and Disability Chic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, James M.; Badar, Jeanmarie

    2018-01-01

    The word chic refers to something fashionable or stylish. Chic varies for individuals and groups and with time and place. Something chic may have desirable or undesirable long-term consequences. Disability and extremism are also changeable concepts, depending on comparison to social norms. People with disabilities should have the option of being…

  5. World Weather Extremes. Revision,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    very high latitudes where there is less moisture. 174J.p. Verdou, Extremes climatiques mondiales" [World Climatic- - E~tremes], France. Meteorologie...air pressure less than 92 kilopascals (27.17 inches) and winds over 249 kilometers per hour (155 miles per hour), and they cause " catastrophic " damage

  6. Effective polycrystalline sensor of ultraviolet radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Yu. Pavelets

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of special thin layers with high and low resistance in space charge region of surface barrier photoconverters based on the p-Cu1.8S/n-CdS structure leads to a sufficient increase in photosensitivity and decrease in dark tunneling-recombination current. Highly efficient and stable polycrystalline photoconverters of ultraviolet radiation based on polycrystalline CdS have been obtained. Electrical and photoelectric properties have been investigated, and the main operational parameters of ultraviolet sensors have been adduced. The reasons for high stability of the parameters inherent to the p-Cu1.8S/n-CdS sensors are as follows: the absence of impurity components additionally doped to the barrier structure and stability of the photocurrent photoemission component.

  7. ULTRAVIOLET HALOS AROUND SPIRAL GALAXIES. I. MORPHOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Cafmeyer, Julian; Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: hodgeskl@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    We examine ultraviolet halos around a sample of highly inclined galaxies within 25 Mpc to measure their morphology and luminosity. Despite contamination from galactic light scattered into the wings of the point-spread function, we find that ultraviolet (UV) halos occur around each galaxy in our sample. Around most galaxies the halos form a thick, diffuse disk-like structure, but starburst galaxies with galactic superwinds have qualitatively different halos that are more extensive and have filamentary structure. The spatial coincidence of the UV halos above star-forming regions, the lack of consistent association with outflows or extraplanar ionized gas, and the strong correlation between the halo and galaxy UV luminosity suggest that the UV light is an extragalactic reflection nebula. UV halos may thus represent 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙} of dust within 2–10 kpc of the disk, whose properties may change with height in starburst galaxies.

  8. Contact lens disinfection by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolman, P.J.; Dobrogowski, M.J. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1989-12-15

    A 253.7-nm ultraviolet light with an intensity of 1,100 microW/cm2 was tested for its germicidal activity against contact lenses and storage solutions contaminated with various corneal pathogens. The exposure time necessary to reduce a concentration of organisms from 10(6)/ml to less than 10/ml was 30 seconds for Staphylococcus aureus, 60 seconds for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 84 seconds for Candida albicans. The time necessary to sterilize a suspension of 10(4)/ml Acanthamoeba polyphaga was less than three minutes with this technique. Four brands of soft contact lenses were exposed to ultraviolet light for over eight hours without changing their appearance, comfort, or refraction.

  9. Contact lens disinfection by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolman, P.J.; Dobrogowski, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    A 253.7-nm ultraviolet light with an intensity of 1,100 microW/cm2 was tested for its germicidal activity against contact lenses and storage solutions contaminated with various corneal pathogens. The exposure time necessary to reduce a concentration of organisms from 10(6)/ml to less than 10/ml was 30 seconds for Staphylococcus aureus, 60 seconds for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 84 seconds for Candida albicans. The time necessary to sterilize a suspension of 10(4)/ml Acanthamoeba polyphaga was less than three minutes with this technique. Four brands of soft contact lenses were exposed to ultraviolet light for over eight hours without changing their appearance, comfort, or refraction

  10. Diagnosis of Dentin Caries – Ultraviolet Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Uzunov Ts.; Uzunov T.; Grozdanova R.; Kosturkov D.

    2014-01-01

    The technology advance in recent years determines the need of construction of modern appliances for early diagnosis of dental caries, which are categorized by great precision, non-invasiveness, easy usage and wide availability. Such non-invasive and accurate tool for diagnostics of caries is Caries Detector (LED), Bulgarian product by “Optica Laser”. The detector emits a specific wavelength of near ultraviolet light, which causes fluorescence to porphyrins - metabolic products of the life cyc...

  11. Monitoring of phenol photodegradation by ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, B.; Gonzalez, C.; Thomas, O.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been developed as an emerging technology for hazardous organic treatment in industrial wastewater. In this paper, the contribution of ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy to follow phenol photodegradation was studied in a laboratory photochemical reactor equipped with a low pressure mercury lamp. It has been observed that a multicomponent approach is efficient for the evolution estimation of the initial product or intermediate compounds formed during the photodegradation.

  12. Preoperative ultraviolet B inflammation in skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Dawes, J M; Denk, F

    2018-01-01

    , we wanted to test whether this effort could be enhanced and complemented by the use of a model system which takes into account the function of not just circulating, but also tissue-resident immune cells: ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of the skin. METHODS: We conducted psychophysical...... in the skin might predict the degree of a patient's neuro-immune response and the extent of their postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty....

  13. The next generation of ultraviolet light technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    According to this article, the next generation of ultraviolet (UV) light technologies into the environmental spotlight. Researchers have long recognized the potential of UV light, nestled between the longer radiation wavelengths of the visible spectrum and the shorter ones in the x-ray region, to effect chemical change. Environmentally, UV light made its debut as a water purification tool. As the technology improved, researchers incorporated UV light in wastewater treatment systems and, later, in remediation techniques

  14. Polarization Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the VUV polarization testing of the NSSTC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being developed for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  15. The Ultraviolet Index: a useful tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, J P; Long, C S

    2000-09-01

    The Ultraviolet Index was developed in the United States in 1994 following successful use of ultraviolet (UV) alerts in other countries. This daily National Weather Service prediction is a calculation which integrates five data elements to yield the amount of UV radiation impacting the surface (1m2) at solar noon in 58 of the largest US population centers. This simple numeric prediction is then categorized by the Environmental Protection Agency into five "exposure levels" with protective actions recommended for each level. This information is disseminated through the media. Daily reminders seem to affect awareness and behavior in Canada, but US surveys indicate the need for better understanding through educational graphics. Comparing the UV Index to a precipitation prediction has merit in that it links a familiar daily prediction with implied appropriate protective measures. Graphics link the ideas that "when it rains it pours and when it shines it radiates." Beginning in schools, camps, and dermatology meetings, using the rain/shine analogy, a wider exposure to the Ultraviolet Index is proposed.

  16. The First Ultraviolet Linear Spectropolarimetry of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, M. J.; Fox, G. K.; Code, A. D.; Anderson, C. M.; Babler, B. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Edgar, R. J.; Johnson, J. J.; Lupie, O. L.; Meade, M. R.; Sanders, W. T.; Weitenbeck, A. J.; Zellner, N. E.; Harold, J.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Clayton, G. C.

    1995-05-01

    We have obtained the first ultraviolet linear spectropolarimetry of Mars using the Wisconsin Ultraviolet PhotoPolarimetry Experiment (WUPPE), which flew on the Astro-2 shuttle mission. Mars was observed on March 12, 1995 at a phase angle of 21 degrees. A ground-based support observation was taken within 24 hours at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO), providing a total spectral coverage of 2000 - 10,000 Angstroms. The ultraviolet polarization increases almost linearly with decreasing wavelength. The polarization reaches a maximicrons of 5% at 2000 Angstroms. An empirical fit to the UV data predict zero polarization at about 4600 Angstroms. This is clearly seen in the PBO data, as is a position angle rotation of 90 degrees -- as would be expected at this phase angle if the dominant polarization source were switching from atmospheric to surface-based. We will present an analysis of the WUPPE+PBO polarimetry, examining several possible mechanisms. Our efforts will involve the characterizing the state of the Martian atmosphere at the time of the WUPPE observations using recent WFPC2 and FOS data (courtesy of Phil James, University of Toledo). WUPPE is supported by NASA contract NAS5-26777

  17. Pushing the Envelope of Extreme Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme Space Weather events are large solar flares or geomagnetic storms, which can cost billions of dollars to recover from. We have few examples of such events; the Carrington Event (the solar superstorm) is one of the few that had superlatives in three categories: size of solar flare, drop in Dst, and amplitude of aa. Kepler observations show that stars similar to the Sun can have flares releasing millions of times more energy than an X-class flare. These flares and the accompanying coronal mass ejections could strongly affect the atmosphere surrounding a planet. What level of solar activity would be necessary to strongly affect the atmosphere of the Earth? Can we map out the envelope of space weather along the evolution of the Sun? What would space weather look like if the Sun stopped producing a magnetic field? To what extreme should Space Weather go? These are the extremes of Space Weather explored in this talk.

  18. The Influence of the Environment and Clothing on Human Exposure to Ultraviolet Light

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objection The aim of this study is to determine the effect of clothing and the environment on human exposure to ultraviolet light. Methods The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China. Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin. The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensi...

  19. Far-Ultraviolet Spectra of B Stars near the Ecliptic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Carmen; Orozco, Verónica; Gómez, José F.; Trapero, Joaquín; Talavera, Antonio; Bowyer, Stuart; Edelstein, Jerry; Korpela, Eric; Lampton, Michael; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2001-05-01

    Spectra of B stars in the wavelength range of 911-1100 Å have been obtained with the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta de Radiación Difusa (EURD) spectrograph on board the Spanish satellite MINISAT-01 with ~5 Å spectral resolution. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of the same stars have been used to normalize Kurucz models to the distance, reddening, and spectral type of the corresponding star. The comparison of eight main-sequence stars studied in detail (α Vir, ɛ Tau, λ Tau, τ Tau, α Leo, ζ Lib, θ Oph, and σ Sgr) shows agreement with Kurucz models, but observed fluxes are 10%-40% higher than the models in most cases. The difference in flux between observations and models is higher in the wavelength range between Lyα and Lyβ. We suggest that Kurucz models underestimate the far-ultraviolet (FUV) flux of main-sequence B stars between these two Lyman lines. Computation of flux distributions of line-blanketed model atmospheres including non-LTE effects suggests that this flux underestimate could be due to departures from LTE, although other causes cannot be ruled out. We found that the common assumption of solar metallicity for young disk stars should be made with care, since small deviations can have a significant impact on FUV model fluxes. Two peculiar stars (ρ Leo and ɛ Aqr) and two emission-line stars (ɛ Cap and π Aqr) were also studied. Of these, only ɛ Aqr has a flux in agreement with the models. The rest have strong variability in the IUE range and/or uncertain reddening, which makes the comparison with models difficult. Based on the development and utilization of the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta de Radiación Difusa, a collaboration of the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial and the Center for EUV Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley.

  20. Deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, R/I is a Cohen–. Macaulay algebra of Type 1, and hence R/I is Gorenstein. In view of Theorem 2.1, R/I is a nearly (or 1-deficient) extremal Gorenstein algebra. We now shall describe a result of Bruns and Hibi [1] which characterizes the Stanley–. Reisner rings having 2-pure but not 2-linear resolutions. Theorem 2.3.

  1. Religious Extremism in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    boarding and lodging in madrasas (religious schools).9 Some ROs also organize weddings and arrange for burials for the poor.10 Moreover, a few ROs...this will explain why 28 Sandler, “New Frontiers of Terrorism.” 29 Stephen Sharot, “Beyond Christianity : A Critique of the Rational Choice Theory...Religion and Terrorism: Christian Fundamentalism and Extremism,” Terrorism and Political Violence 22, no.3 (2010): 438‒456, http://dx.doi.org

  2. Imaging Under Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-28

    have successfully reported, using direct imaging, the atomic-scale of molecular nanocrystals , the phase transition in metal-insulator transitions...the embryonic crystallization following extreme melting, the discovery of nanogating in quasi-1D materials, and the nature of interface electric ...are numerous, and we have successfully reported, using direct imaging, the atomic-scale of molecular nanocrystals , the phase transition in metal

  3. Extremes in nature

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, Gianfausto; Kottegoda, Nathabandu T

    2007-01-01

    This book is about the theoretical and practical aspects of the statistics of Extreme Events in Nature. Most importantly, this is the first text in which Copulas are introduced and used in Geophysics. Several topics are fully original, and show how standard models and calculations can be improved by exploiting the opportunities offered by Copulas. In addition, new quantities useful for design and risk assessment are introduced.

  4. USACE Extreme Sea levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Pattiaratchi, C., Jensen, J., 2013. Estimating extreme water level probabilities: a comparison of the direct methods and recommendations for best practise ...will discuss with Jason Engle and determine the best way to proceed. • Kate will provide a copy of the storm climate analysis report that Andy Garcia...Gouldby, HR Wallingford) 12:50 to 2:00: Lunch 2:00 to 2:25: Best Practices and Analysis Methodologies (Jeff Melby, USACE) 2:25 to 3:10

  5. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cid Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  6. Exploring extreme plasma physics in the laboratory and in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L. O.; Grismayer, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Cruz, F.; Gaudio, F. D.; Martins, J. L.; Vieira, J.; Vranic, M.

    2017-10-01

    The interaction of ultra intense fields with plasmas is at the confluence of several sub-fields ranging from QED, and nuclear physics to high energy astrophysics, and fundamental plasma processes. It requires novel theoretical tools, highly optimised numerical codes and algorithms tailored to these complex scenarios, where physical mechanisms at very disparate temporal and spatial scales are self-consistently coupled in multidimensional geometries. The key developments implemented in Osiris will be presented along with some examples of problems, relevant for laboratory or astrophysical scenarios, that are being addressed resorting to the combination of massively parallel simulations with theoretical models. The relevance for near future experimental facilities such as ELI will also be presented. Work supported by the European Research Council (ERC-AdG-2015 InPairs Grant No. 695088).

  7. High Performance Multivariate Visual Data Exploration for Extremely Large Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebel, Oliver; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes; Prabhat

    2008-01-01

    One of the central challenges in modern science is the need to quickly derive knowledge and understanding from large, complex collections of data. We present a new approach that deals with this challenge by combining and extending techniques from high performance visual data analysis and scientific data management. This approach is demonstrated within the context of gaining insight from complex, time-varying datasets produced by a laser wakefield accelerator simulation. Our approach leverages histogram-based parallel coordinates for both visual information display as well as a vehicle for guiding a data mining operation. Data extraction and subsetting are implemented with state-of-the-art index/query technology. This approach, while applied here to accelerator science, is generally applicable to a broad set of science applications, and is implemented in a production-quality visual data analysis infrastructure. We conduct a detailed performance analysis and demonstrate good scalability on a distributed memory Cray XT4 system

  8. Extreme Arthropods: Exploring Evolutionary Adaptations to Polar and Temperate Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandro, Luke; Constible, Juanita M.; Lee, Richard E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    In this activity, Namib and Antarctic arthropods are used to illustrate several important biological principles. Among these are the key ideas that form follows function and that the environment drives evolution. In addition, students will discover that the climates of the Namib Desert and the Antarctic Peninsula are similar in several ways, and…

  9. High Performance Multivariate Visual Data Exploration for Extremely Large Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes; Prabhat,

    2008-08-22

    One of the central challenges in modern science is the need to quickly derive knowledge and understanding from large, complex collections of data. We present a new approach that deals with this challenge by combining and extending techniques from high performance visual data analysis and scientific data management. This approach is demonstrated within the context of gaining insight from complex, time-varying datasets produced by a laser wakefield accelerator simulation. Our approach leverages histogram-based parallel coordinates for both visual information display as well as a vehicle for guiding a data mining operation. Data extraction and subsetting are implemented with state-of-the-art index/query technology. This approach, while applied here to accelerator science, is generally applicable to a broad set of science applications, and is implemented in a production-quality visual data analysis infrastructure. We conduct a detailed performance analysis and demonstrate good scalability on a distributed memory Cray XT4 system.

  10. Extreme sports are good for your health: a phenomenological understanding of fear and anxiety in extreme sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brymer, Eric; Schweitzer, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Extreme sports are traditionally explored from a risk-taking perspective which often assumes that participants do not experience fear. In this article we explore participants' experience of fear associated with participation in extreme sports. An interpretive phenomenological method was used with 15 participants. Four themes emerged: experience of fear, relationship to fear, management of fear, and fear and self-transformation. Participants' experience of extreme sports was revealed in terms of intense fear but this fear was integrated and experienced as a potentially meaningful and constructive event in their lives. The findings have implications for understanding fear as a potentially transformative process.

  11. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Gaia16apd in Superluminous Supernova Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Zhiglo, Andrey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Blinnikov, Sergei [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sorokina, Elena [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kozyreva, Alexandra, E-mail: alexey.tolstov@ipmu.jp [The Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2017-08-10

    Observations of Gaia16apd revealed extremely luminous ultraviolet emission among superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we perform a comparison of UV light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities between the most popular SLSN models: pair-instability supernova, magnetar, and interaction with circumstellar medium. We find that the interaction model is the most promising to explain the extreme UV luminosity of Gaia16apd. The differences in late-time UV emission and in color evolution found between the models can be used to link an observed SLSN event to the most appropriate model. Observations at UV wavelengths can be used to clarify the nature of SLSNe and more attention should be paid to them in future follow-up observations.

  12. Planckian charged black holes in ultraviolet self-complete quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Nicolini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the role of the charge within the self-complete quantum gravity paradigm. By studying the classicalization of generic ultraviolet improved charged black hole solutions around the Planck scale, we showed that the charge introduces important differences with respect to the neutral case. First, there exists a family of black hole parameters fulfilling the particle-black hole condition. Second, there is no extremal particle-black hole solution but quasi extremal charged particle-black holes at the best. We showed that the Hawking emission disrupts the condition of particle-black hole. By analyzing the Schwinger pair production mechanism, the charge is quickly shed and the particle-black hole condition can ultimately be restored in a cooling down phase towards a zero temperature configuration, provided non-classical effects are taken into account.

  13. Planckian charged black holes in ultraviolet self-complete quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Piero

    2018-03-01

    We present an analysis of the role of the charge within the self-complete quantum gravity paradigm. By studying the classicalization of generic ultraviolet improved charged black hole solutions around the Planck scale, we showed that the charge introduces important differences with respect to the neutral case. First, there exists a family of black hole parameters fulfilling the particle-black hole condition. Second, there is no extremal particle-black hole solution but quasi extremal charged particle-black holes at the best. We showed that the Hawking emission disrupts the condition of particle-black hole. By analyzing the Schwinger pair production mechanism, the charge is quickly shed and the particle-black hole condition can ultimately be restored in a cooling down phase towards a zero temperature configuration, provided non-classical effects are taken into account.

  14. Solar Power Generation in Extreme Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Frederick W.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of space requires power for guidance, navigation, and control; instrumentation; thermal control; communications and data handling; and many subsystems and activities. Generating sufficient and reliable power in deep space through the use of solar arrays becomes even more challenging as solar intensity decreases and high radiation levels begin to degrade the performance of photovoltaic devices. The Extreme Environments Solar Power (EESP) project goal is to develop advanced photovoltaic technology to address these challenges.

  15. Disinfection Effect of Film Cassettes by Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    A bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department. Studies have demonstrated a bactericidal effect of ultraviolet irradiation, and to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic and pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection practices suitable for bacteria. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In conclusion, ultraviolet irradiate on film cassette over the surface more than 2 minutes. Ultraviolet dose of 1565 {mu}W {center_dot} s/cm{sup 2}Win in 30 second relative to ultraviolet dose in time.

  16. Disinfection Effect of Film Cassettes by Ultraviolet Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom

    2001-01-01

    A bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department. Studies have demonstrated a bactericidal effect of ultraviolet irradiation, and to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic and pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection practices suitable for bacteria. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In conclusion, ultraviolet irradiate on film cassette over the surface more than 2 minutes. Ultraviolet dose of 1565 μW · s/cm 2 Win in 30 second relative to ultraviolet dose in time

  17. Exploration Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, D.R.; Stanley, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2012 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry. Three sources of information are reported and analyzed in this annual review of international exploration for 2012: 1) budgetary statistics expressed in U.S. nominal dollars provided by SNL Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia; 2) regional and site-specific exploration activities that took place in 2012 as compiled by the USGS and 3) regional events including economic, social and political conditions that affected exploration activities, which were derived from published sources and unpublished discussions with USGS and industry specialists.

  18. Exploration Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  19. Exploration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennevik, H.C. [Saga Petroleum A/S, Forus (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    The paper evaluates exploration technology. Topics discussed are: Visions; the subsurface challenge; the creative tension; the exploration process; seismic; geology; organic geochemistry; seismic resolution; integration; drilling; value creation. 4 refs., 22 figs.

  20. Transformers For Extreme Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Imagine a revolutionary way to remotely control the environment surrounding one or more roving vehicles exploring remote and unexplored areas of the Solar System,...

  1. Femtosecond Amplifiers and Microlasers in the Deep Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    the ultraviolet (UV) and visible regions of the spectrum, as well as their applications in photochemistry and medical therapeutics. We believe that...FEMTOSECOND AMPLIFIERS AND MICROLASERS IN DEEP ULTRAVIOLET J GARY EDEN UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 11/19/2013 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution...Performance Report 15/08/2010 - 14/08/2013 Femtosecond Amplifiers and Microlasers in the Deep Ultraviolet FA9550-10-1-0456 Eden, James Gary Professor

  2. Regional warming of hot extremes accelerated by surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat, M. G.; Pitman, A. J.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    Strong regional differences exist in how hot temperature extremes increase under global warming. Using an ensemble of coupled climate models, we examine the regional warming rates of hot extremes relative to annual average warming rates in the same regions. We identify hot spots of accelerated warming of model-simulated hot extremes in Europe, North America, South America, and Southeast China. These hot spots indicate where the warm tail of a distribution of temperatures increases faster than the average and are robust across most Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models. Exploring the conditions on the specific day when the hot extreme occurs demonstrates that the hot spots are explained by changes in the surface energy fluxes consistent with drying soils. However, the model-simulated accelerated warming of hot extremes appears inconsistent with observations, except over Europe. The simulated acceleration of hot extremes may therefore be unreliable, a result that necessitates a reevaluation of how climate models resolve the relevant terrestrial processes.

  3. Repository exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentz, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses exploration objectives and requirements for a nuclear repository in the U.S.A. The importance of designing the exploration program to meet the system performance objectives is emphasized and some examples of the extent of exploration required before the License Application for Construction Authorization is granted are also discussed

  4. In-orbit Calibrations of the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, S. N. [Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Sriram, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Mondal, C.; Sahu, S.; Joseph, P.; Barve, I. V.; George, K.; Kamath, P. U.; Kathiravan, S.; Kumar, A.; Lancelot, J. P.; Mahesh, P. K. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala II Block, Bangalore-560034 (India); Girish, V. [ISRO Satellite Centre, HAL Airport Road, Bangalore 560017 (India); Postma, J.; Leahy, D. [University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta Canada (Canada); Hutchings, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Ghosh, S. K., E-mail: purni@iiap.res.in [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Pune (India); and others

    2017-09-01

    The Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the payloads in ASTROSAT, the first Indian Space Observatory. The UVIT instrument has two 375 mm telescopes: one for the far-ultraviolet (FUV) channel (1300–1800 Å), and the other for the near-ultraviolet (NUV) channel (2000–3000 Å) and the visible (VIS) channel (3200–5500 Å). UVIT is primarily designed for simultaneous imaging in the two ultraviolet channels with spatial resolution better than 1.″8, along with provisions for slit-less spectroscopy in the NUV and FUV channels. The results of in-orbit calibrations of UVIT are presented in this paper.

  5. In-orbit Calibrations of the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, S. N.; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Girish, V.; Postma, J.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Sriram, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Mondal, C.; Sahu, S.; Joseph, P.; Hutchings, J.; Ghosh, S. K.; Barve, I. V.; George, K.; Kamath, P. U.; Kathiravan, S.; Kumar, A.; Lancelot, J. P.; Leahy, D.; Mahesh, P. K.; Mohan, R.; Nagabhushana, S.; Pati, A. K.; Kameswara Rao, N.; Sreedhar, Y. H.; Sreekumar, P.

    2017-09-01

    The Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the payloads in ASTROSAT, the first Indian Space Observatory. The UVIT instrument has two 375 mm telescopes: one for the far-ultraviolet (FUV) channel (1300-1800 Å), and the other for the near-ultraviolet (NUV) channel (2000-3000 Å) and the visible (VIS) channel (3200-5500 Å). UVIT is primarily designed for simultaneous imaging in the two ultraviolet channels with spatial resolution better than 1.″8, along with provisions for slit-less spectroscopy in the NUV and FUV channels. The results of in-orbit calibrations of UVIT are presented in this paper.

  6. Ultraviolet spectrophotometer for measuring columnar atmospheric ozone from aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, F. A.; Sellers, B.; Briehl, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UVS) to measure downward solar fluxes from an aircraft or other high altitude platform is described. The UVS uses an ultraviolet diffuser to obtain large angular response with no aiming requirement, a twelve-position filter wheel with narrow (2-nm) and broad (20-nm) bandpass filters, and an ultraviolet photodiode. The columnar atmospheric ozone above the UVS (aircraft) is calculated from the ratios of the measured ultraviolet fluxes. Comparison with some Dobson station measurements gives agreement to 2%. Some UVS measured ozone profiles over the Pacific Ocean for November 1976 are shown to illustrate the instrument's performance.

  7. Ultraviolet air disinfection for protection against influenza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Three converging lines of evidence support the belief that it may be possible, under appropriate circumstances, to interrupt the airborne transmission of influenza by ultraviolet (UV) air disinfection. These lines of evidence are: (a) that influenza is airborne; (b) that UV irradiation of the upper air of a room can provide safe and effective disinfection of air in the lower part of the room; and (c) that epidemic spread of airborne viral infections in humans can be prevented if the population under consideration remains in the UV-protected environment

  8. Probing nanoscale ferroelectricity by ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, D A; Bruchhausen, A; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Fainstein, A; Katiyar, R S; Cantarero, A; Soukiassian, A; Vaithyanathan, V; Haeni, J H; Tian, W; Schlom, D G; Choi, K J; Kim, D M; Eom, C B; Sun, H P; Pan, X Q; Li, Y L; Chen, L Q; Jia, Q X; Nakhmanson, S M; Rabe, K M; Xi, X X

    2006-09-15

    We demonstrated that ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to measure the transition temperature (Tc) in ferroelectric ultrathin films and superlattices. We showed that one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO3 layers in BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices are not only ferroelectric (with Tc as high as 250 kelvin) but also polarize the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 layers adjacent to them. Tc was tuned by approximately 500 kelvin by varying the thicknesses of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers, revealing the essential roles of electrical and mechanical boundary conditions for nanoscale ferroelectricity.

  9. Far ultraviolet spectrophotometry of BD +28 4211

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Timothy A.; Cash, Webster; Green, James C.

    1991-01-01

    The results are reported of a November 1989 rocket flight which recorded a flux-calibrated spectrum of BD +28 4211 from 912 to 1150 A with 1A resolution. BD +28 4211, an SdO-type star, is commonly used as an ultraviolet calibration source in the IUE wavelength band. The present work extends the useful range of this standard shortward of Lyman-alpha. Since previous experiments show marked disparity, this study can be useful in determining a standard in the 912 to 1216 A band.

  10. Ultraviolet Flux Variation of Epsilon Aurigae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woon Kang

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available The eighteen ultraviolet light curves of Epsilon Aurigae have been plotted using the integrated fluxes reduced from the 233 IUE low dispersion spectra taken between 1978 and 1986. The times of contacts and depth of eclipse have been determined from the light curves at the wavelength from 2550 Å to 3050 Å. The UV light curves show two brightenings during the totality, the downward slope of the variation from the second to the third contacts, and asymmetry of the eclipse light curve. The two selected spectra note that the energy density distribution is not changed between the totality of the eclipse and out-of-eclipse.

  11. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE PIGMENTS AND DNA DIMER INDUCTION AS RESPONSES TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The most basic effect of UV radiation on biological systems is damage to DNA. In response to UV radiation organisms have ad...

  12. Development of lasers in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet for photochemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goujon, Paul.

    1975-06-01

    Intense light sources in the ultraviolet (lambda>200 nm) and in the vacuum ultraviolet (lambda 2 , CO and H 2 , as well as in Ar+H 2 and Ar+N 2 mixtures, have been observed in the near ultraviolet and in vacuum ultraviolet. The pulses last 1.5 to 2 ns and the power varies from 1 to 3 MW. These emissions are produced by a transversely excited laser using a travelling wave discharge, the construction of which is described. The performance of such pulsed lasers is discussed as a function of the various parameters involved. The pulse energy was measured either with a photodiode having a known photocathode yield, or by actinometry, measuring the hydrogen formation by photolysis of ethylene (C 2 H 4 ). This laser can work recurrently with an excellent pulse reproductibility, thus enabling sampling techniques to be employed. The properties sought after in designing this laser are brevity, and reproducibility of the pulse high power and short wavelengths. It is intended as a fundamental research tool for time-resolved molecular spectroscopy studies [fr

  13. Extreme Programming Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chromatic

    2003-01-01

    Extreme Programming (XP) is a radical new approach to software development that has been accepted quickly because its core practices--the need for constant testing, programming in pairs, inviting customer input, and the communal ownership of code--resonate with developers everywhere. Although many developers feel that XP is rooted in commonsense, its vastly different approach can bring challenges, frustrations, and constant demands on your patience. Unless you've got unlimited time (and who does these days?), you can't always stop to thumb through hundreds of pages to find the piece of info

  14. Metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, D A; Ramond, J-B; Makhalanyane, T P; De Maayer, P

    2015-06-01

    Whether they are exposed to extremes of heat or cold, or buried deep beneath the Earth's surface, microorganisms have an uncanny ability to survive under these conditions. This ability to survive has fascinated scientists for nearly a century, but the recent development of metagenomics and 'omics' tools has allowed us to make huge leaps in understanding the remarkable complexity and versatility of extremophile communities. Here, in the context of the recently developed metagenomic tools, we discuss recent research on the community composition, adaptive strategies and biological functions of extremophiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Training Simulator for Extreme Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, Salman; Manca, Davide; Komulainen, Tiina M.; Øvergård, Kjell Ivar

    2015-01-01

    - Current technological advancements have enabled the achievement of excellence in design of training simulators. This work highlights the challenges faced by operators in extreme environments and harsh conditions in an attempt to underpin the necessary features of extreme training simulators.

  16. Training Simulator for Extreme Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, Salman; Manca, Davide; Komulainen, Tiina M.; Øvergård, Kjell Ivar

    2015-01-01

    Current technological advancements have enabled the achievement of excellence in design of training simulators. This work highlights the challenges faced by operators in extreme environments and harsh conditions in an attempt to underpin the necessary features of extreme training simulators.

  17. Solar extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of “extreme events,” defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than S-2, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial 14C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observational results have impacted our use of the relatively limited historical record in new ways: the detection of actual events in the 14C tree-ring records, and the systematic observations of flares and “superflares” by the Kepler spacecraft. I discuss how these new findings may affect our understanding of the distribution function expected for extreme solar events.

  18. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mahmoud R

    2005-03-01

    Every living organism on the surface of the earth is exposed to the ultraviolet (UV) fraction of the sunlight. This electromagnetic energy has both life-giving and life-endangering effects. UV radiation can damage DNA and thus mutagenize several genes involved in the development of the skin cancer. The presence of typical signature of UV-induced mutations on these genes indicates that the ultraviolet-B part of sunlight is responsible for the evolution of cutaneous carcinogenesis. During this process, variable alterations of the oncogenic, tumor-suppressive, and cell-cycle control signaling pathways occur. These pathways include (a) mutated PTCH (in the mitogenic Sonic Hedgehog pathway) and mutated p53 tumor-suppressor gene in basal cell carcinomas, (b) an activated mitogenic ras pathway and mutated p53 in squamous cell carcinomas, and (c) an activated ras pathway, inactive p16, and p53 tumor suppressors in melanomas. This review presents background information about the skin optics, UV radiation, and molecular events involved in photocarcinogenesis.

  19. Two ultraviolet radiation datasets that cover China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Hu, Bo; Wang, Yuesi; Liu, Guangren; Tang, Liqin; Ji, Dongsheng; Bai, Yongfei; Bao, Weikai; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yunming; Ding, Weixin; Han, Xiaozeng; He, Fei; Huang, Hui; Huang, Zhenying; Li, Xinrong; Li, Yan; Liu, Wenzhao; Lin, Luxiang; Ouyang, Zhu; Qin, Boqiang; Shen, Weijun; Shen, Yanjun; Su, Hongxin; Song, Changchun; Sun, Bo; Sun, Song; Wang, Anzhi; Wang, Genxu; Wang, Huimin; Wang, Silong; Wang, Youshao; Wei, Wenxue; Xie, Ping; Xie, Zongqiang; Yan, Xiaoyuan; Zeng, Fanjiang; Zhang, Fawei; Zhang, Yangjian; Zhang, Yiping; Zhao, Chengyi; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhu, Bo

    2017-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has significant effects on ecosystems, environments, and human health, as well as atmospheric processes and climate change. Two ultraviolet radiation datasets are described in this paper. One contains hourly observations of UV radiation measured at 40 Chinese Ecosystem Research Network stations from 2005 to 2015. CUV3 broadband radiometers were used to observe the UV radiation, with an accuracy of 5%, which meets the World Meteorology Organization's measurement standards. The extremum method was used to control the quality of the measured datasets. The other dataset contains daily cumulative UV radiation estimates that were calculated using an all-sky estimation model combined with a hybrid model. The reconstructed daily UV radiation data span from 1961 to 2014. The mean absolute bias error and root-mean-square error are smaller than 30% at most stations, and most of the mean bias error values are negative, which indicates underestimation of the UV radiation intensity. These datasets can improve our basic knowledge of the spatial and temporal variations in UV radiation. Additionally, these datasets can be used in studies of potential ozone formation and atmospheric oxidation, as well as simulations of ecological processes.

  20. Orientation of migratory birds under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    In view of the finding that cryptochrome 1a, the putative receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, is restricted to the ultraviolet single cones in European Robins, we studied the orientation behaviour of robins and Australian Silvereyes under monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) light. At low intensity UV light of 0.3 mW/m(2), birds showed normal migratory orientation by their inclination compass, with the directional information originating in radical pair processes in the eye. At 2.8 mW/m(2), robins showed an axial preference in the east-west axis, whereas silvereyes preferred an easterly direction. At 5.7 mW/m(2), robins changed direction to a north-south axis. When UV light was combined with yellow light, robins showed easterly 'fixed direction' responses, which changed to disorientation when their upper beak was locally anaesthetised with xylocaine, indicating that they were controlled by the magnetite-based receptors in the beak. Orientation under UV light thus appears to be similar to that observed under blue, turquoise and green light, albeit the UV responses occur at lower light levels, probably because of the greater light sensitivity of the UV cones. The orientation under UV light and green light suggests that at least at the level of the retina, magnetoreception and vision are largely independent of each other.