WorldWideScience

Sample records for extreme temperature fluctuations

  1. Trends in Temperature Extremes in Association with Weather-Intraseasonal Fluctuations in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Cheng; YAN Zhongwei; Zhaohua WU; FU Congbin; TU Kai

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the frequencies of four temperature extremes (the occurrence of warm days, cold days, warm nights and cold nights) with respect to a modulated annual cycle (MAC), and those associated exclusively with weather-intraseasonal fluctuations (WIF) in eastern China were investigated based on an updated homogenized daily maximum and minimum temperature dataset for 1960-2008. The Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method was used to isolate the WIF, MAC, and longer-term components from the temperature series. The annual, winter and summer occurrences of warm (cold) nights were found to have increased (decreased) significantly almost everywhere, while those of warm (cold) days have increased (decreased) in northern China (north of 40°N). However, the four temperature extremes associated exclusively with WIF for winter have decreased almost everywhere, while those for summer have decreased in the north but increased in the south. These characteristics agree with changes in the amplitude of WIF. In particular, winter WIF of maximum temperature tended to weaken almost everywhere, especially in eastern coastal areas (by 10%-20%); summer WIF tended to intensify in southern China by 10%-20%. It is notable that in northern China, the occurrence of warm days has increased, even where that associated with WIF has decreased significantly. This suggests that the recent increasing frequency of warm extremes is due to a considerable rise in the mean temperature level, which surpasses the effect of the weakening weather fluctuations in northern China.

  2. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  3. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-12-02

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  4. Effects of fluctuating daily temperatures at critical thermal extremes on Aedes aegypti life-history traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B Carrington

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of temperature on insect biology is well understood under constant temperature conditions, but less so under more natural, fluctuating conditions. A fluctuating temperature profile around a mean of 26°C can alter Aedes aegypti vector competence for dengue viruses as well as numerous life-history traits, however, the effect of fluctuations on mosquitoes at critical thermal limits is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of large and small daily temperature fluctuations at low (16°C and high (35-37°C mean temperatures, after we identified these temperatures as being thresholds for immature development and/or adult reproduction under constant temperature conditions. We found that temperature effects on larval development time, larval survival and adult reproduction depend on the combination of mean temperature and magnitude of fluctuations. Importantly, observed degree-day estimates for mosquito development under fluctuating temperature profiles depart significantly (around 10-20% from that predicted by constant temperatures of the same mean. At low mean temperatures, fluctuations reduce the thermal energy required to reach pupation relative to constant temperature, whereas at high mean temperatures additional thermal energy is required to complete development. A stage-structured model based on these empirical data predicts that fluctuations can significantly affect the intrinsic growth rate of mosquito populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that by using constant temperatures, one could under- or over-estimate values for numerous life-history traits compared to more natural field conditions dependent upon the mean temperature. This complexity may in turn reduce the accuracy of population dynamics modeling and downstream applications for mosquito surveillance and disease prevention.

  5. Effects of fluctuating daily temperatures at critical thermal extremes on Aedes aegypti life-history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Lauren B; Armijos, M Veronica; Lambrechts, Louis; Barker, Christopher M; Scott, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature on insect biology is well understood under constant temperature conditions, but less so under more natural, fluctuating conditions. A fluctuating temperature profile around a mean of 26°C can alter Aedes aegypti vector competence for dengue viruses as well as numerous life-history traits, however, the effect of fluctuations on mosquitoes at critical thermal limits is unknown. We investigated the effects of large and small daily temperature fluctuations at low (16°C) and high (35-37°C) mean temperatures, after we identified these temperatures as being thresholds for immature development and/or adult reproduction under constant temperature conditions. We found that temperature effects on larval development time, larval survival and adult reproduction depend on the combination of mean temperature and magnitude of fluctuations. Importantly, observed degree-day estimates for mosquito development under fluctuating temperature profiles depart significantly (around 10-20%) from that predicted by constant temperatures of the same mean. At low mean temperatures, fluctuations reduce the thermal energy required to reach pupation relative to constant temperature, whereas at high mean temperatures additional thermal energy is required to complete development. A stage-structured model based on these empirical data predicts that fluctuations can significantly affect the intrinsic growth rate of mosquito populations. Our results indicate that by using constant temperatures, one could under- or over-estimate values for numerous life-history traits compared to more natural field conditions dependent upon the mean temperature. This complexity may in turn reduce the accuracy of population dynamics modeling and downstream applications for mosquito surveillance and disease prevention.

  6. Effects of fluctuating daily temperatures at critical thermal extremes on Aedes aegypti life-history traits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrington, Lauren B; Armijos, M Veronica; Lambrechts, Louis; Barker, Christopher M; Scott, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    .... A fluctuating temperature profile around a mean of 26°C can alter Aedes aegypti vector competence for dengue viruses as well as numerous life-history traits, however, the effect of fluctuations on mosquitoes at critical thermal limits is unknown...

  7. Bacterial responses to fluctuations and extremes in temperature and brine salinity at the surface of Arctic winter sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Wintertime measurements near Barrow, Alaska, showed that bacteria near the surface of first-year sea ice and in overlying saline snow experience more extreme temperatures and salinities, and wider fluctuations in both parameters, than bacteria deeper in the ice. To examine impacts of such conditions on bacterial survival, two Arctic isolates with different environmental tolerances were subjected to winter-freezing conditions, with and without the presence of organic solutes involved in osmoprotection: proline, choline, or glycine betaine. Obligate psychrophile Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H suffered cell losses under all treatments, with maximal loss after 15-day exposure to temperatures fluctuating between -7 and -25 °C. Osmoprotectants significantly reduced the losses, implying that salinity rather than temperature extremes presents the greater stress for this organism. In contrast, psychrotolerant Psychrobacter sp. strain 7E underwent miniaturization and fragmentation under both fluctuating and stable-freezing conditions, with cell numbers increasing in most cases, implying a different survival strategy that may include enhanced dispersal. Thus, the composition and abundance of the bacterial community that survives in winter sea ice may depend on the extent to which overlying snow buffers against extreme temperature and salinity conditions and on the availability of solutes that mitigate osmotic shock, especially during melting.

  8. Effects of Fluctuating Daily Temperatures at Critical Thermal Extremes on Aedes aegypti Life-History Traits: e58824

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauren B Carrington; M Veronica Armijos; Louis Lambrechts; Christopher M Barker; Thomas W Scott

    2013-01-01

    .... A fluctuating temperature profile around a mean of 26°C can alter Aedes aegypti vector competence for dengue viruses as well as numerous life-history traits, however, the effect of fluctuations on mosquitoes at critical thermal limits is unknown...

  9. How to observe fluctuating temperature?

    CERN Document Server

    Utyuzh, O V; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2001-01-01

    We provide arguments that event-by-event (EBE) analysis of multiparticle production data are ideal place to search for the possible fluctuation of temperature characterizing hadronizing source in thermodynamical approach.

  10. Fluctuations of the unruh temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Demers, J G

    1994-01-01

    Using the influence functional formalism, the problem of an accelerating detector in the presence of a scalar field in its ground state is considered in Minkowski space. As is known since the work of Unruh, to a quantum mechanical detector following a definite, classical acceleration, the field appears to be thermally excited. We relax the requirement of perfect classicality for the trajectory and substitute it with one of {\\it derived} classicality through the criteria of decoherence. The ensuing fluctuations in temperature are then related with the time and the amplitude of excitation in the detector's internal degree of freedom.

  11. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Kedem, Yaron [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics,B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thorlacius, Lárus [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Science Institute,Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics,Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Zarembo, Konstantin [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics,B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University,SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-01-07

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS spacetime. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at high temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordström black hole in global AdS.

  12. Temperature fluctuations in an inhomogeneous diffusive fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Z

    2014-01-01

    We discuss metric perturbations of the relativistic diffusion equation around the homogeneous Juttner equilibrium of massless particles in a homogeneous expanding universe. The metric perturbation describes matter distribution and the gravitational wave background in an inhomogeneous universe. We show that the lowest order perturbation can be treated as a variation of temperature. We derive a formula expressing temperature fluctuations in terms of the diffusion and tensor power spectrum. We discuss the multipole expansion of the fluctuations in the presence of diffusion.

  13. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander V. [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Zarembo, Konstantin [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kedem, Yaron [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  14. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  15. Quantifying the effect of trend, fluctuation, and extreme event of climate change on ecosystem productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupeng; Yu, Deyong; Su, Yun; Hao, Ruifang

    2014-12-01

    Climate change comprises three fractions of trend, fluctuation, and extreme event. Assessing the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystem requires an understanding of the action mechanism of these fractions, respectively. This study examined 11 years of remotely sensed-derived net primary productivity (NPP) to identify the impacts of the trend and fluctuation of climate change as well as extremely low temperatures caused by a freezing disaster on ecosystem productivity in Hunan province, China. The partial least squares regression model was used to evaluate the contributions of temperature, precipitation, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) to NPP variation. A climatic signal decomposition and contribution assessment model was proposed to decompose climate factors into trend and fluctuation components. Then, we quantitatively evaluated the contributions of each component of climatic factors to NPP variation. The results indicated that the total contribution of the temperature, precipitation, and PAR to NPP variation from 2001 to 2011 in Hunan province is 85 %, and individual contributions of the temperature, precipitation, and PAR to NPP variation are 44 % (including 34 % trend contribution and 10 % fluctuation contribution), 5 % (including 4 % trend contribution and 1 % fluctuation contribution), and 36 % (including 30 % trend contribution and 6 % fluctuation contribution), respectively. The contributions of temperature fluctuation-driven NPP were higher in the north and lower in the south, and the contributions of precipitation trend-driven NPP and PAR fluctuation-driven NPP are higher in the west and lower in the east. As an instance of occasionally triggered disturbance in 2008, extremely low temperatures and a freezing disaster produced an abrupt decrease of NPP in forest and grass ecosystems. These results prove that the climatic trend change brought about great impacts on ecosystem productivity and that climatic fluctuations and

  16. Electron temperature fluctuations in NGC 346

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, V A; Krabbe, A C

    2008-01-01

    The existence and origin of large spatial temperature fluctuations in HII regions and planetary nebulae are assumed to explain the differences between the heavy element abundances inferred from collisionally excited and recombination lines, although this interpretation remains significantly controversial. We investigate the spatial variation in electron temperature inside NGC 346, the brightest HII region in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Long slit spectrophotometric data of high signal-to-noise were employed to derive the electron temperature from measurements derived from localized observations of the [OIII]($\\lambda4959 + \\lambda5007)/\\lambda4363$ ratio in three directions across the nebula. The electron temperature was estimated in 179 areas of 5$^{\\prime\\prime}\\times1.5^{\\prime\\prime}$ of size distributed along three different declinations. A largely homogeneous temperature distribution was found with a mean temperature of 12 269 K and a dispersion of 6.1%. After correcting for pure measurements errors, a t...

  17. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Domier, C.W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Brower, D.L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI sy

  18. Temperature fluctuations of interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Kobi; Biham, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The temperatures of interstellar dust grains are analyzed using stochastic simulations, taking into account the grain composition and size and the discreteness of the photon flux. [...] The distribution of grain temperatures is calculated for a broad range of grain sizes and for different intensities of the interstellar radiation field, relevant to diffuse clouds and to PDRs. The dependence of the average grain temperature on its size is shown for different irradiation intensities. It is found that the average temperatures of grains with radii smaller than about 0.02 $\\mu$m are reduced due to the fluctuations. The average temperatures of grains of radii larger than about 0.35 $\\mu$m are also slightly reduced due to their more efficient emission of infrared radiation, particularly when exposed to high irradiation intensities. The average temperatures of silicate and carbonaceous grains are found to depend on the radiation field intensity X_MMP according to ~X_MMP^gamma, where the exponent gamma depends on the...

  19. New algorithm for extreme temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damean, N.

    2000-01-01

    A new algorithm for measurement of extreme temperature is presented. This algorithm reduces the measurement of the unknown temperature to the solving of an optimal control problem, using a numerical computer. Based on this method, a new device for extreme temperature measurements is projected. It co

  20. Temperature Fluctuation Characteristics Analysis for Steam Generator of Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Li-na; WU; Zhi-guang

    2015-01-01

    In the case of boiling heat transfer deterioration,temperature fluctuating may accelerate the corrosion of heat transfer tubes and can also lead to thermal stress on the tubes.In this paper,dryout-induced temperature fluctuation for the fast reactor steam generator is investigated.The impacts of water flow rate,sodium inlet temperature and the outlet steam

  1. Daily extreme temperature multifractals in Catalonia (NE Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgueño, A. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Lana, X., E-mail: francisco.javier.lana@upc.edu [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Serra, C. [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, M.D. [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-02-01

    The multifractal character of the daily extreme temperatures in Catalonia (NE Spain) is analyzed by means of the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) applied to 65 thermometric records covering years 1950–2004. Although no clear spatial patterns of the multifractal spectrum parameters appear, factor scores deduced from Principal Component analysis indicate some signs of spatial gradients. Additionally, the daily extreme temperature series are classified depending on their complex time behavior, through four multifractal parameters (Hurst exponent, Hölder exponent with maximum spectrum, spectrum asymmetry and spectrum width). As a synthesis of the three last parameters, a basic measure of complexity is proposed through a normalized Complexity Index. Its regional behavior is found to be free of geographical dependences. This index represents a new step towards the description of the daily extreme temperatures complexity.

  2. Fluctuation of Mesoscopic RLC Circuit at Finite Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Yan; WANG Ji-Suo; FAN Hong-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We consider the fluctuation of mesoscopic RLC circuit at finite temperature since a resistance always produces Joule heat when the circuit is working. By virtue of the thermo field dynamics and the coherent thermo state representation we show that the quantum mechanical zero-point fluctuations of both charge and current increase with the rising temperature and the resistance value.

  3. Betavoltaic performance under extreme temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Tom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Longevity of sensors and portable devices is severely limited by temperature, chemical instability, and electrolyte leakage issues associated with conventional electrochemical batteries. Betavoltaics, which operate similar to photo voltaics, can operate in a wide temperature range safely without permanent degradation. Though not a new concept, which began in the 1950's and peaked in the mid 1970's, research has been minimal and sporadic until recent advancements in ultra-low power electronics and materialization of low power applications. The technology is rapidly maturing, generating research, and development in increasing the beta emitting source and semiconductor efficiencies. This study presents an update on betavoltaic technology, results from temperature evaluation on commercially available General Licensed betavoltaic cells, development of a hybrid system for latent and burst power, modeling and simulation techniques and results, and current and proposed research and development. Betavoltaic performance was successfully demonstrated for a wide temperature range (-30°C to 70°C. Short circuit current and open circuit voltage were used to compare electrical performance. Results indicate that the open-circuit voltage and maximum power decreased as temperature increased due to increases in the semiconductor's intrinsic carrier concentration.

  4. Extreme Environment High Temperature Communication Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a communications system capable of operation at extreme temperatures and pressures in hostile and corrosive...

  5. Flexible diaphragm-extreme temperature usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Guillermo (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A diaphragm suitable for extreme temperature usage, such as encountered in critical aerospace applications, is fabricated by a unique method, and of a unique combination of materials. The materials include multilayered lay-ups of diaphragm materials sandwiched between layers of bleeder fabrics. After being formed in the desired shape on a mold, they are vacuum sealed and then cured under pressure, in a heated autoclave. A bond capable of withstanding extreme temperatures are produced.

  6. Fluctuational shift of nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss a macroscopic counterpart to the microscopic mechanism of the straightening dimer mesogens conformations, proposed recently by S.M. Saliti, M.G.Tamba, S.N. Sprunt, C.Welch, G.H.Mehl, A. Jakli, J.T. Gleeson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217801 (2016)) to explain their experimental observation of the unprecedentedly large shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our interpretation is based on singular longitudinal fluctuations of the nematic order parameter. Since these fluctuations are governed by the Goldstone director fluctuations they exist only in the nematic state. External magnetic field suppresses the singular longitudinal fluctuations of the order parameter (similarly as it is the case for the transverse director fluctuations, although with a different scaling over the magnetic field). The reduction of the fluctuations changes the equilibrium value of the modulus of the order parameter in the nematic state. Therefore it leads to additional (with respect to the mean field contribution) fluctuational shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our mechanism works for any nematic liquid crystals, however the magnitude of the fluctuational shift increases with decrease of the Frank elastic moduli. Since some of these moduli supposed to be anomalously small for so-called bent-core or dimer nematic liquid crystals, just these liquid crystals are promising candidates for the observation of the predicted fluctuational shift of the phase transition temperature.

  7. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    periods around 20 minutes. These periods are longer than those of the Sun, as expected for a star that is larger and heavier than the Sun. The figure accompanying this Press Release shows these oscillations in the form of a "power spectrum", i.e., the amount of temperature change at different values of the period. Most of the highest peaks correspond to the real oscillations in the star. The changes (fluctuations) of the temperature of Eta Bootis vary with the oscillation mode and, at the time of these observations, were mostly between 0.03 and 0.08 degrees. This diagramme provides the first strong evidence ever for solar-type oscillations in a star other than the Sun. An article with the detailed results will soon appear in the "Astronomical Journal". Agreement with Stellar Theory The measured periods of the main oscillation modes give important information about the interior of Eta Bootis. Theoretical models of the star have now been compared with these observations and the astronomers were pleased to find that the agreement is excellent, implying that current stellar theory is remarkably good. This shows that we apparently understand stars quite well, but there is of course still much to be learned. Future observations of this kind, with ground-based telescopes and possibly in a more distant future also from space, promise to open up a new and exciting way of studying stars. From now on, we will be able "to look inside" stars in great detail. Appendix: Spectral Analysis Dark spectral lines were first seen in the solar spectrum by the German physicist Johann Fraunhofer in 1814. Later, in the mid-nineteenth century, such lines were also seen in the spectra of other stars. It is now known that they are due to the upper, cooler layers in the solar and stellar atmospheres, whose atoms and molecules absorb the radiation from the hotter, deeper layers at specific wavelengths. These wavelengths serve as "footprints" of these atoms and molecules and allow astronomers to

  8. Extreme fluctuations and the finite lifetime of the turbulent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Gioia, Gustavo

    2010-03-01

    We argue that the transition to turbulence is controlled by large amplitude events that follow extreme distribution theory. The theory suggests an explanation for recent observations of the turbulent state lifetime which exhibit superexponential scaling behavior with Reynolds number.

  9. Analysis of heat exchanger network for temperature fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zunlong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject to temperature disturbance, exchangers in heat exchanger network will interact. It is necessary to evaluate the degree of temperature fluctuation in the network. There is inherently linear relationship between output and inlet temperatures of heat exchanger network. Based on this, the concept of temperature-change sensitivity coefficient was put forward. Quantitative influence of temperature fluctuation in the network was carried out in order to examine transmission character of temperature fluctuation in the system. And the information was obtained for improving the design quality of heat exchanger network. Favorable results were obtained by the introduced method compared with the experimental results. These results will assist engineers to distinguish primary and secondary influencing factors, which can be used in observing and controlling influencing factors accurately.

  10. Fast temperature spectrometer for samples under extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E Ercan; Toellner, Thomas S; Hu, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multi-wavelength Fast Temperature Readout (FasTeR) spectrometer to capture a sample's transient temperature fluctuations, and reduce uncertainties in melting temperature determination. Without sacrificing accuracy, FasTeR features a fast readout rate (about 100 Hz), high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and a well-constrained focus. Complimenting a charge-coupled device spectrometer, FasTeR consists of an array of photomultiplier tubes and optical dichroic filters. The temperatures determined by FasTeR outside of the vicinity of melting are, generally, in good agreement with results from the charge-coupled device spectrometer. Near melting, FasTeR is capable of capturing transient temperature fluctuations, at least on the order of 300 K/s. A software tool, SIMFaster, is described and has been developed to simulate FasTeR and assess design configurations. FasTeR is especially suitable for temperature determinations that utilize ultra-fast techniques under extreme conditions. Working in parallel with the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, we have applied the FasTeR spectrometer to measure the melting temperature of (57)Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressure.

  11. Fluctuations and correlations in high temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Pasztor, A; Ratti, C; Szabo, K K

    2015-01-01

    We calculate second- and fourth-order cumulants of conserved charges in a temperature range stretching from the QCD transition region towards the realm of (resummed) perturbation theory. We perform lattice simulations with staggered quarks; the continuum extrapolation is based on $N_t=10\\dots24$ in the crossover-region and $N_t=8\\dots16$ at higher temperatures. We find that the Hadron Resonance Gas model predictions describe the lattice data rather well in the confined phase. At high temperatures (above $\\sim$250 MeV) we find agreement with the three-loop Hard Thermal Loop results.

  12. Relativistic QED Plasma at Extremely High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2016-01-01

    Renormalization scheme of QED (Quantum Electrodynamics) at high temperatures is used to calculate the effective parameters of relativistic plasma in the early universe. Renormalization constants of QED play role of effective parameters of the theory and can be used to determine the collective behavior of the medium. We explicitly show that the dielectric constant, magnetic reluctivity, Debye length and the plasma frequency depend on temperature in the early universe. Propagation speed, refractive index, plasma frequency and Debye shielding length of a QED plasma are computed at extremely high temperatures in the early universe. We also found the favorable conditions for the relativistic plasma from this calculations.

  13. Extreme low temperature tolerance in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Richard Strimbeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Woody plants in boreal to arctic environments and high mountains survive prolonged exposure to temperatures below -40˚C and minimum temperatures below -60˚C, and laboratory tests show that many of these species can also survive immersion in liquid nitrogen at -196˚C. Studies of biochemical changes that occur during acclimation, including recent proteomic and metabolomic studies, have identified changes in carbohydrate and compatible solute concentrations, membrane lipid composition, and proteins, notably dehydrins, that may have important roles in survival at extreme low temperature. Consideration of the biophysical mechanisms of membrane stress and strain lead to the following hypotheses for cellular and molecular mechanisms of survival at extreme low temperature: 1. Changes in lipid composition stabilize membranes at temperatures above the lipid phase transition temperature (-20 to 30˚C, preventing phase changes that result in irreversible injury. 2. High concentrations of oligosaccharides promote vitrification or high viscosity in the cytoplasm in freeze-dehydrated cells, which would prevent deleterious interactions between membranes. 3. Dehydrins bind membranes and further promote vitrification or act stearically to prevent membrane-membrane interactions.

  14. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wei-jie; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward in [1,2]. In the present work we aim at improving the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and density, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results and recent experimental data from STAR.

  15. Forecasting extreme temperature health hazards in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pappenberger, Florian; Cloke, Hannah L.

    2017-04-01

    Extreme hot temperatures, such as those experienced during a heat wave, represent a dangerous meteorological hazard to human health. Heat disorders such as sunstroke are harmful to people of all ages and responsible for excess mortality in the affected areas. In 2003 more than 50,000 people died in western and southern Europe because of a severe and sustained episode of summer heat [1]. Furthermore, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change heat waves are expected to get more frequent in the future thus posing an increasing threat to human lives. Developing appropriate tools for extreme hot temperatures prediction is therefore mandatory to increase public preparedness and mitigate heat-induced impacts. A recent study has shown that forecasts of the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) provide a valid overview of extreme temperature health hazards on a global scale [2]. UTCI is a parameter related to the temperature of the human body and its regulatory responses to the surrounding atmospheric environment. UTCI is calculated using an advanced thermo-physiological model that includes the human heat budget, physiology and clothing. To forecast UTCI the model uses meteorological inputs, such as 2m air temperature, 2m water vapour pressure and wind velocity at body height derived from 10m wind speed, from NWP models. Here we examine the potential of UTCI as an extreme hot temperature prediction tool for the European area. UTCI forecasts calculated using above-mentioned parameters from ECMWF models are presented. The skill in predicting UTCI for medium lead times is also analysed and discussed for implementation to international health-hazard warning systems. This research is supported by the ANYWHERE project (EnhANcing emergencY management and response to extreme WeatHER and climate Events) which is funded by the European Commission's HORIZON2020 programme. [1] Koppe C. et al., Heat waves: risks and responses. World Health Organization. Health and

  16. Data Converters Performance at Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeshuni, Rarnesham; Kumar, Nikil; Mao, James; Keymeulen, Didier; Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Stoica, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Space missions often require radiation and extreme-temperature hardened electronics to survive the harsh environments beyond earth's atmosphere. Traditional approaches to preserve electronics incorporate shielding, insulation and redundancy at the expense of power and weight. However, a novel way of bypassing these problems is the concept of evolutionary hardware. A reconfgurable device, consisting of several switches interconnected with analog/digital parts, is controlled by an evolutionary processor (EP). When the EP detects degradation in the circuit it sends signals to reconfgure the switches, thus forming a new circuit with the desired output. This concept has been developed since the mid-90s, but one problem remains - the EP cannot degrade substantially. For this reason, extensive testing at extreme temperatures (-180' to 120(deg)C) has been done on devices found on FPGA boards (taking the role of the EP) such as the Analog to Digital and the Digital to Analog Converter. Analysis of the results has shown that FPGA boards implementing EP with some compensation may be a practical solution to evolving circuits. This paper describes results on the tests of data converters at extreme temperatures.

  17. Influence of extreme fluctuations of impurity relief on the evolution of kink solitons in doped materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, B. V.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of kink solitons is very sensitive to random irregularities of the potential relief. The evolution of kinks after their generation is essentially modified by strong fluctuations of the potential. The stochastic nature of such modification is taken into account by the theory of extreme deviations on a random walk.

  18. Extreme temperatures in summer time. Health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Díaz Jiménez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The increment that has been detected in summer temperatures in the last years joined to the trends expected to climate for the next century provide an increase in frequency and intensity of the extreme climate events, basically in heat waves. The undoubted relationship between temperature and mortality makes necessary a quantifying in order to characterize the expected effects of temperature over mortality particularly in heat waves.This study show a state-of-the-art review this problem, with a special emphasis in the heat wave that Europe suffered in summer of 2003 and how the heat waves has been characterized until now. Lastly, which are the characteristics that should have the preventive measures designed to minimized the effects of heat waves over population ́s health.

  19. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo;

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s...

  20. Using scaling fluctuation analysis to quantify anthropogenic changes in regional and global precipitation, including extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Isabel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    Anthropic precipitation changes affect the mean and the magnitude and frequency of extreme events, and therefore potentially have severe consequences in all aspects of human life. Unfortunately, - unlike the anthropic temperature changes - precipitation changes of anthropic origin have been proven difficult to establish with high statistical significance. For example, when changes have been established for individual precipitation products, the serious divergences found between products reflect our limited ability to estimate areal precipitation even at global scales. In addition to data issues, the usual approaches to assessing changes in precipitation also have methodological issues that hamper their identification. Here we discuss how the situation can be clarified by the systematic application of scaling fluctuation analysis - for example, to determine the scales at which the anthropogenic signal exceeds the natural variability noise (we find that it is roughly 20 years). Following a recent approach for estimating anthropogenic temperature changes we directly determine the effective sensitivity of the precipitation rate to a doubling of CO2. The novelty in this approach is that it takes CO2 as a surrogate for all anthropogenic forcings and estimates the trend based on the forcing rather than time - the usual approach. This leads both to an improved signal to noise ratio and, when compared to the usual estimates of trends, it augments their statistical significance; we further improve the signal to noise ratio by considering precipitation over the ocean where anthropogenic increases are strongest, finding that there are statistically significant trends at the 3 to 4 standard deviation level. This approach also permits the first direct estimate of the increases in global precipitation with temperature: we find 1.71±0.62 %/K which is close to that found by GCM's (2 - 3%/K) and is well below the value of ≈ 6 - 7%/K predicted on the basis of increases in humidity

  1. Effect of Fluctuating Temperatures on Forest Soil Nitrogen Minerealization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAOLIPING; P.INESON

    1997-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization in forest soil wa studied in laboratory by incubating undisturbed soil cores enclosed within PVC columns at different temperatures to compare the effect of flucttuating temperature with that of constant temperaature,and to find out whether soil nitrification shows linearity over time .The results showed that there was no significant difference between soil nitrification at fluctuating temperature and that at constant temperature,and suggested that it must be careful to make the conclusion that soil nitrification has linearity over time.

  2. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditions experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover may insulate terrestrial habitats from extreme air temperature fluctuations. Further, climate projections suggest large changes in precipitation will occur in the polar regions, with the greatest changes expected during the winter period and, hence, implications for the insulation of overwintering microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow, Shallow Snow (30 cm) and Deep Snow (120 cm). Air temperatures during the winter period fluctuated frequently between +3 and -24 °C, and the No Snow soil temperatures reflected this variation closely, with the extreme minimum being slightly lower. Under 30 cm of snow, soil temperatures varied less and did not decrease below -12 °C. Those under deep snow were even more stable and did not decline below -2 °C. Despite these striking differences in winter thermal regimes, there were no clear differences in survival of the invertebrate fauna between treatments, including oribatid, prostigmatid and mesostigmatid mites, Araneae, Collembola, Nematocera larvae or Coleoptera. This indicates widespread tolerance, previously undocumented for the Araneae, Nematocera or Coleoptera, of

  3. Daily temperature extremes play an important role in predicting thermal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gang; Hoffmann, Ary A; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-07-01

    Organisms in natural environments experience diel temperature fluctuations, including sporadic extreme conditions, rather than constant temperatures. Studies based mainly on model organisms have tended to focus on responses to average temperatures or short-term heat stress, which overlooks the potential impact of daily fluctuations, including stressful daytime periods and milder night-time periods. Here, we focus on daily maximum temperatures, while holding night-time temperatures constant, to specifically investigate the effects of high temperature on demographic parameters and fitness in the English grain aphid Sitobion avenae. We then compared the observed effects of different daily maximum temperatures with predictions from constant temperature-performance expectations. Moderate daily maximum temperatures depressed aphid performance while extreme conditions had dramatic effects, even when mean temperatures were below the critical maximum. Predictions based on daily average temperature underestimated negative effects of temperature on performance by ignoring daily maximum temperature, while predictions based on daytime maximum temperatures overestimated detrimental impacts by ignoring recovery under mild night-time temperatures. Our findings suggest that daily maximum temperature will play an important role in regulating natural population dynamics and should be considered in predictions. These findings have implications for natural population dynamics, particularly when considering the expected increase in extreme temperature events under climate change.

  4. Spatiotemporal variability of extreme temperature frequency and amplitude in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanjie; Gao, Zhiqiu; Pan, Zaitao; Li, Dan; Huang, Xinhui

    2017-03-01

    Temperature extremes in China are examined based on daily maximum and minimum temperatures from station observations and multiple global climate models. The magnitude and frequency of extremes are expressed in terms of return values and periods, respectively, estimated by the fitted Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution of annual extreme temperatures. The observations suggest that changes in temperature extremes considerably exceed changes in the respective climatological means during the past five decades, with greater amplitude of increases in cold extremes than in warm extremes. The frequency of warm (cold) extremes increases (decreases) over most areas, with an increasingly faster rate as the extremity level rises. Changes in warm extremes are more dependent on the varying shape of GEV distribution than the location shift, whereas changes in cold extremes are more closely associated with the location shift. The models simulate the overall pattern of temperature extremes during 1961-1981 reasonably well in China, but they show a smaller asymmetry between changes in warm and cold extremes primarily due to their underestimation of increases in cold extremes especially over southern China. Projections from a high emission scenario show the multi-model median change in warm and cold extremes by 2040 relative to 1971 will be 2.6 °C and 2.8 °C, respectively, with the strongest changes in cold extremes shifting southward. By 2040, warm extremes at the 1971 20-year return values would occur about every three years, while the 1971 cold extremes would occur once in > 500 years.

  5. OH* imager response to turbulence-induced temperature fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Vargas, Fabio A.

    2016-12-01

    The layer of the excited state hydroxyl radical (OH*) is formed in the mesopause region by the reaction of ozone (O3) and atomic hydrogen (H). We derive the theoretical expressions for the OH* brightness and rotational temperature (T*) responses to high-frequency atmospheric temperature perturbations. The theory is used to calculate the 1-D and 2-D horizontal wave number spectra of the OH* and T* image fluctuations induced by atmospheric turbulence. By applying the theory to images of a breaking gravity wave packet, acquired by the Utah State University Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper, we show that existing infrared OH* imager technology can observe the evolution of gravity wave breakdown and characterize the resulting turbulent eddies in the source region and in the inertial subrange of the turbulence spectrum. For the example presented here, the RMS OH* brightness fluctuations induced by the gravity wave packet was 2.90% and by the associated turbulence was 1.07%. Unfortunately, the T* fluctuations induced by turbulence are usually too small to be observed in the OH* rotational temperature maps.

  6. The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Guy; Bonada, Núria; Brown, Lee E; Death, Russell G; Durance, Isabelle; Gray, Clare; Hladyz, Sally; Ledger, Mark E; Milner, Alexander M; Ormerod, Steve J; Thompson, Ross M; Pawar, Samraat

    2016-05-19

    Most research on the effects of environmental change in freshwaters has focused on incremental changes in average conditions, rather than fluctuations or extreme events such as heatwaves, cold snaps, droughts, floods or wildfires, which may have even more profound consequences. Such events are commonly predicted to increase in frequency, intensity and duration with global climate change, with many systems being exposed to conditions with no recent historical precedent. We propose a mechanistic framework for predicting potential impacts of environmental fluctuations on running-water ecosystems by scaling up effects of fluctuations from individuals to entire ecosystems. This framework requires integration of four key components: effects of the environment on individual metabolism, metabolic and biomechanical constraints on fluctuating species interactions, assembly dynamics of local food webs, and mapping the dynamics of the meta-community onto ecosystem function. We illustrate the framework by developing a mathematical model of environmental fluctuations on dynamically assembling food webs. We highlight (currently limited) empirical evidence for emerging insights and theoretical predictions. For example, widely supported predictions about the effects of environmental fluctuations are: high vulnerability of species with high per capita metabolic demands such as large-bodied ones at the top of food webs; simplification of food web network structure and impaired energetic transfer efficiency; and reduced resilience and top-down relative to bottom-up regulation of food web and ecosystem processes. We conclude by identifying key questions and challenges that need to be addressed to develop more accurate and predictive bio-assessments of the effects of fluctuations, and implications of fluctuations for management practices in an increasingly uncertain world.

  7. Advanced Flip Chips in Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2010-01-01

    The use of underfill materials is necessary with flip-chip interconnect technology to redistribute stresses due to mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) between dissimilar materials in the overall assembly. Underfills are formulated using organic polymers and possibly inorganic filler materials. There are a few ways to apply the underfills with flip-chip technology. Traditional capillary-flow underfill materials now possess high flow speed and reduced time to cure, but they still require additional processing steps beyond the typical surface-mount technology (SMT) assembly process. Studies were conducted using underfills in a temperature range of -190 to 85 C, which resulted in an increase of reliability by one to two orders of magnitude. Thermal shock of the flip-chip test articles was designed to induce failures at the interconnect sites (-40 to 100 C). The study on the reliability of flip chips using underfills in the extreme temperature region is of significant value for space applications. This technology is considered as an enabling technology for future space missions. Flip-chip interconnect technology is an advanced electrical interconnection approach where the silicon die or chip is electrically connected, face down, to the substrate by reflowing solder bumps on area-array metallized terminals on the die to matching footprints of solder-wettable pads on the chosen substrate. This advanced flip-chip interconnect technology will significantly improve the performance of high-speed systems, productivity enhancement over manual wire bonding, self-alignment during die joining, low lead inductances, and reduced need for attachment of precious metals. The use of commercially developed no-flow fluxing underfills provides a means of reducing the processing steps employed in the traditional capillary flow methods to enhance SMT compatibility. Reliability of flip chips may be significantly increased by matching/tailoring the CTEs of the substrate

  8. Patterns and singular features of extreme fluctuational paths of a periodically driven system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhen, E-mail: czkillua@icloud.com; Liu, Xianbin, E-mail: xbliu@nuaa.edu.cn

    2016-05-20

    Large fluctuations of an overdamped periodically driven oscillating system are investigated theoretically and numerically in the limit of weak noise. Optimal paths fluctuating to certain point are given by statistical analysis using the concept of prehistory probability distribution. The validity of statistical results is verified by solutions of boundary value problem. Optimal paths are found to change topologically when terminating points lie at opposite side of a switching line. Patterns of extreme paths are plotted through a proper parameterization of Lagrangian manifold having complicated structures. Several extreme paths to the same point are obtained by multiple solutions of boundary value solutions. Actions along various extreme paths are calculated and associated analysis is performed in relation to the singular features of the patterns. - Highlights: • Both extreme and optimal paths are obtained by various methods. • Boundary value problems are solved to ensure the validity of statistical results. • Topological structure of Lagrangian manifold is considered. • Singularities of the pattern of extreme paths are studied.

  9. Quantum-gravity fluctuations and the black-hole temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-05-15

    Bekenstein has put forward the idea that, in a quantum theory of gravity, a black hole should have a discrete energy spectrum with concomitant discrete line emission. The quantized black-hole radiation spectrum is expected to be very different from Hawking's semi-classical prediction of a thermal black-hole radiation spectrum. One naturally wonders: Is it possible to reconcile the discrete quantum spectrum suggested by Bekenstein with the continuous semi-classical spectrum suggested by Hawking? In order to address this fundamental question, in this essay we shall consider the zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime. In a quantum theory of gravity, these spacetime fluctuations are closely related to the characteristic gravitational resonances of the corresponding black-hole spacetime. Assuming that the energy of the black-hole radiation stems from these zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime, we derive the effective temperature of the quantized black-hole radiation spectrum. Remarkably, it is shown that this characteristic temperature of the discrete (quantized) black-hole radiation agrees with the well-known Hawking temperature of the continuous (semi-classical) black-hole spectrum. (orig.)

  10. The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, Guy; Bonada, Nuria; Brown, Lee E; Death, Russell G.; Durance, Isabelle; Gray, Clare; Hladyz, Sally; Mark E. Ledger; Milner, Alexander; Ormerod, Stephen; Thomson, Ross M.; Pawar, Samraat

    2016-01-01

    Most research on the effects of environmental change in freshwaters has focused on incremental changes in average conditions, rather than fluctuations or extreme events such as heatwaves, cold snaps, droughts, floods, or wildfires, which may have even more profound consequences. Such events are commonly predicted to increase in frequency, intensity, and duration with global climate change, with many systems being exposed to conditions with no recent historical precedent. We propose a mechanis...

  11. Brain temperature homeostasis: physiological fluctuations and pathological shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2010-01-01

    Brain temperature is a physiological parameter, reflecting the balance between metabolism-related intra-brain heat production and heat loss by cerebral circulation to the rest of the body and then to the external environment. First, we present data on brain temperature fluctuations occurring under physiological and behavioral conditions and discuss their mechanisms. Since most processes governing neural activity are temperature-dependent, we consider how naturally occurring temperature fluctuations could affect neural activity and neural functions. We also consider psychomotor stimulants and show that their hyperthermic effects are state-dependent and modulated by environmental conditions. Since high temperature could irreversibly damage neural cells and worsen various pathological processes, we consider the situations associated with pathological brain hyperthermia and evaluate its role in acute perturbations of brain functions, neurotoxicity, and neurodegeneration. We also discuss the limitations in consideration of brain temperature within the frameworks of physiological regulation and homeostasis. While different adaptive mechanisms could, within some limits, compensate for altered intra-brain heat balance, these mechanisms could fail in real-life situations, resulting in life-threatening health complications.

  12. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  13. Separating out the influence of climatic trend, fluctuations, and extreme events on crop yield: a case study in Hunan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Shi, Peijun; Zhang, Zhao; Meng, Yongchang; Luan, Yibo; Wang, Jiwei

    2017-09-01

    Separating out the influence of climatic trend, fluctuations and extreme events on crop yield is of paramount importance to climate change adaptation, resilience, and mitigation. Previous studies lack systematic and explicit assessment of these three fundamental aspects of climate change on crop yield. This research attempts to separate out the impacts on rice yields of climatic trend (linear trend change related to mean value), fluctuations (variability surpassing the "fluctuation threshold" which defined as one standard deviation (1 SD) of the residual between the original data series and the linear trend value for each climatic variable), and extreme events (identified by absolute criterion for each kind of extreme events related to crop yield). The main idea of the research method was to construct climate scenarios combined with crop system simulation model. Comparable climate scenarios were designed to express the impact of each climate change component and, were input to the crop system model (CERES-Rice), which calculated the related simulated yield gap to quantify the percentage impacts of climatic trend, fluctuations, and extreme events. Six Agro-Meteorological Stations (AMS) in Hunan province were selected to study the quantitatively impact of climatic trend, fluctuations and extreme events involving climatic variables (air temperature, precipitation, and sunshine duration) on early rice yield during 1981-2012. The results showed that extreme events were found to have the greatest impact on early rice yield (-2.59 to -15.89%). Followed by climatic fluctuations with a range of -2.60 to -4.46%, and then the climatic trend (4.91-2.12%). Furthermore, the influence of climatic trend on early rice yield presented "trade-offs" among various climate variables and AMS. Climatic trend and extreme events associated with air temperature showed larger effects on early rice yield than other climatic variables, particularly for high-temperature events (-2.11 to -12

  14. Finite Temperature Field Theory of "Extreme Black Holes"

    OpenAIRE

    Degura, Yoshitaka; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    We treat the model which describes "extreme black holes" moving slowly. We derive an effective lagrangian in the low energy for this model and then investigate a statistical behavior of "extreme black holes" in the finite temperature.

  15. Coaxial Cables for Martian Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Harvey, Wayne L.; Valas, Sam; Tsai, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Work was conducted to validate the use of the rover external flexible coaxial cabling for space under the extreme environments to be encountered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The antennas must survive all ground operations plus the nominal 670-Martian-day mission that includes summer and winter seasons of the Mars environment. Successful development of processes established coaxial cable hardware fatigue limits, which were well beyond the expected in-flight exposures. In keeping with traditional qualification philosophy, this was accomplished by subjecting flight-representative coaxial cables to temperature cycling of the same depth as expected in-flight, but for three times the expected number of in-flight thermal cycles. Insertion loss and return loss tests were performed on the coaxial cables during the thermal chamber breaks. A vector network analyzer was calibrated and operated over the operational frequency range 7.145 to 8.450 GHz. Even though some of the exposed cables function only at UHF frequencies (approximately 400 MHz), the testing was more sensitive, and extending the test range down to 400 MHz would have cost frequency resolution. The Gore flexible coaxial cables, which were the subject of these tests, proved to be robust and displayed no sign of degradation due to the 3X exposure to the punishing Mars surface operations cycles.

  16. Reduction of temperature fluctuation within low temperature region using a cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Daiki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Murata, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Fumiaki; Komine, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    Modeling and experiments are performed to decrease temperature fluctuation generated by the periodic motion of the displacer in a Gifford-McMahon (GM) type cryocooler within the low-temperature region. The one-dimensional heat equation allows us to show that thermal diffusivity is an essential factor to achieve much smaller temperature fluctuation, and fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) with low thermal diffusivity makes it possible to reduce the temperature fluctuation dramatically. Based on the model, experiments are performed to vary the thickness of two FRP dampers, on the cryohead of the cryocooler and on the sample stage. As a result, the FRP dampers enable us to achieve the temperature fluctuations of only 0.7 mK, corresponding to a standard deviation of 0.25 mK, when the sample stage is maintained at 4.2000 K, even if a GM cryocooler is utilized for cooling the temperature, which introduces an initial temperature fluctuation of 282 mK at the cryohead.

  17. Response of the ice sheets to fluctuating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgeholm Mikkelsen, Troels; Grinsted, Aslak; Ditlevsen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting the future sea level relies on accurate modeling of the response of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to changing tempera- tures. Using coupled climate and ice sheet models long time forecasting is often made computationally feasible by running the ice sheet model in off-line mode, such that the temperature and precipitation fields govern- ing the mass balance of the ice sheets are taken to be constant over time. As the temperature and precipitation fluctuates, the asymmetry in the typical time scales for accumulation and ablation would result in a bias in the resulting mass balance of the ice sheet. We show that the steady state of the ice sheet is biased toward larger size of the ice sheet, if the short time scale fluctuations in temperature are not taken into account. This could potentially imply that the critical global temperature increase for ice sheet collapse is overestimated, thus the risk of collapse in a given climate change scenario underestimated. Our results highlight the need to consider the variability and not only the mean of the forcing of the mass balance of the ice sheet. We estimate that the effect of temperature variability on surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet in recent ensemble forecasting should be adjusted downward by as much as 10 percent of the present day observed value, if assuming a 2 degree warming. We are thus closer to a potential tipping point, than previously anticipated. Many predicted scenarios of the future climate show an increased variability in temperature over much of the Earth. In light of the findings presented here, it is important to gauge the extent to which this increased variability will further influence climate change.

  18. Simulation of Temperature Fluctuations in Stirling Engine Regenerator Matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegaard; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2003-01-01

    , and momentum and the ideal gas equation of state. ODEs that govern the dynamic behaviour of the regenerator matrix temperatures are included in the model. Known loss mechanisms are coupled directly into the governing equations instead of applying the losses as corrections to simulation results from...... and accurately calculated. Simulation results have been compared to experimental data for a 9 kW Stirling engine and reasonable agreement has been found over a wide range of operating conditions using Helium or Nitrogen as working gas. Simulation results indicate that fluctuations in the regenerator matrix...

  19. Producing small scale temperature fluctuations in an airstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacher, G E; Fairall, C W

    1978-10-01

    A 4.5-microm ''hot'' wire is used to heat a low-speed airstream at frequencies from dc to 400 Hz. For dc excitation the thermal noise spectrum produced was white to a frequency of 2 kHz. ac heating of the wire up to a frequency of 400 Hz (800 Hz thermal fluctuation of the airstream) yielded a good thermal signal as far as 2 cm from the hot wire. Calculation shows excellent heat transfer between the wire and airstream. The technique is very useful for calibrating the frequency response of temperature sensors and for investigating turbulent heat transfer for various flow configurations.

  20. Effect of temperature fluctuation on hydrate-based CO2 separation from fuel gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosen Li; Chungang Xu; Zhaoyang Chen; Huijie Wu; Jing Cai

    2011-01-01

    A new method of temperature fluctuation is proposed to promote the process of hydrate-based CO2 separation from fuel gas in this work according to the dual nature of CO2 solubility in hydrate forming and non-hydrate forming regions [1].The temperature fluctuation operated in the process of hydrate formation improves the formation of gas hydrate observably.The amount of the gas consumed with temperature fluctuation is approximately 35% more than that without temperature fluctuation.It is found that only the temperature fluctuation operated in the period of forming hydrate leads to a good effect on CO2 separation.Meanwhile,with the proceeding of hydrate formation,the effect of temperature fluctuation on the gas hydrate gradually reduces,and little effect is left in the completion term.The CO2 separation efficiencies in the separation processes with the effective temperature fluctuations are improved remarkably.

  1. Temperature Evolution of Spin Fluctuations in FeAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnyak, A.; Ehlers, G.; Tóth, S.; Gofryk, K.; Sefat, A. S.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of superconductivity (SC) in iron pnictides has opened a new stage in SC research. The superconducting state appears in iron pnictides with doping in metallic parent compounds. This is an important difference to the cuprates, which exhibit SC near a correlated insulating state. Therefore, the nature of the magnetism in the simplest iron pnictide - binary FeAs - is of fundamental importance for understanding the interplay between localized and itinerant magnetism and superconductivity in these materials. We use inelastic neutron scattering to map spin wave excitations in the monoarsenide FeAs at temperatures above and below the antiferromagnetic transition TN ~ 70 K. We find magnetic excitation spectrum near the Néel temperature to be strongly different from the spectrum in the ground state. Near the transition temperature, magnetic fluctuations clearly indicate two-dimensional character in an intrinsically three-dimensional (3D) system. On the other hand, at low temperature, spin waves in FeAs are anisotropic 3D, suggesting a crossover from two-dimensional to three-dimensional character. Work at ORNL was sponsored by the US DOE Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (AP, GE) and Materials Science and Engineering Division (KG, AS).

  2. Representing Extreme Temperature Events and Resolving Their Implications for Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, P. J.; Mueller, N. D.; Butler, E. E.; Tingley, M.; McKinnon, K. A.; Rhines, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Although it is well recognized that extreme temperatures occurring at particular growth stages are destructive to yield, there appears substantial scope for improved empirical assessment and simulation of the relationship between temperature and yield. Several anecdotes are discussed. First, a statistical analysis of historical U.S. extreme temperatures is provided. It is demonstrated that both reanalysis and model simulations significantly differ from near-surface temperature observations in the frequency and magnitude of extremes. This finding supports empirical assessment using near-surface instrumental records and underscores present difficulties in simulating past and predicting future changes. Second, an analysis of the implications of extreme temperatures on U.S. maize yield is provided where the response is resolved regionally and according to growth stage. Sensitivity to extreme temperatures during silking is found to be uniformly high across the U.S., but the response during grain filling varies spatially, with higher sensitivity in the North. This regional and growth-stage dependent sensitivity implies the importance of representing cultivar, planting times, and development rates, and is also indicative of the potential for future changes according to the combined effects of climate and technology. Finally, interaction between extreme temperatures and agriculture is indicated by analysis showing that historical extreme temperatures in the U.S. Midwest have cooled in relation to changes in regional productivity, possibly because of greater potential for cooling through evapotranspiration. This interpretation is consistent with changes in crop physiology and management, though also noteworthy is that the moderating influence of increased evapotranspiration on extreme temperatures appears to be lost during severe drought. Together, these findings indicate that a more accurate assessment of the historical relationship between extreme temperatures and yield

  3. Rapid fluctuations of the air and surface temperature in the city of Bucharest (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Hustiu, Mihaita-Cristinel

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas derive significant changes of the ambient temperature generating specific challenges for society and infrastructure. Extreme temperature events, heat and cold waves affect the human comfort, increase the health risk, and require specific building regulations and emergency preparedness, strongly related to the magnitude and frequency of the thermal hazards. Rapid changes of the temperature put a particular stress for the urban settlements, and the topic has been approached constantly in the scientific literature. Due to its geographical position in a plain area with a temperate climate and noticeable continental influence, the city of Bucharest (Romania) deals with high seasonal and daily temperature variations. However, rapid fluctuations also occur at sub-daily scale caused by cold or warm air advections or by very local effects (e.g. radiative heat exchange, local precipitation). For example, in the area of Bucharest, the cold fronts of the warm season may trigger temperature decreasing up to 10-15 centigrades / hour, while warm advections lead to increasing of 1-2 centigrades / hour. This study focuses on the hourly and sub-hourly temperature variations over the period November 2014 - February 2016, using air temperature data collected from urban sensors and meteorological stations of the national network, and land surface temperature data obtained from satellite remote sensing. The analysis returns different statistics, such as magnitude, intensity, frequency, simultaneous occurrence and areal coverage of the rapid temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, the generating factors for each case study are assessed, and the results are used to define some preliminary patterns and enhance the urban temperature forecast at fine scale. The study was funded by the Romanian Programme Partnership in Priority Domains, PN - II - PCCA - 2013 - 4 - 0509 - Reducing UHI effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (REDBHI).

  4. Temperature Fluctuations driven by Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    McNally, Colin P; Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2014-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are requ...

  5. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and thermodynamic fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Heine, G

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the in-plane and out-of-plane resistivity and the transverse and longitudinal in-plane and out-of-plane magnetoresistance above T, are reported in the high-temperature superconductors Bi2Sr2CaCu208+' and YBa2CU307 sub b. The carrier concentration of the Bi2Sr2CaCu208+' single crystals covers a broad range of the phase diagram from the slightly under doped to the moderately over doped region. The doping concentration of the thin films ranges from strongly under doped to optimally doped. The in-plane resistivities obey a metallic-like temperature dependence with a positive magnetoresistance in the transverse and the longitudinal orientation of the magnetic field. The out-of-plane resistivities show an activated behavior above T, with a metallic region at higher temperatures and negative magnetoresistance. The data were analyzed in the framework of a model for superconducting order parameter fluctuations. The positive in-plane magnetoresistance of the highly anisotropic Bi2Sr2CaCu208+x single cry...

  6. Assessing the characteristics of extreme precipitation over northeast China using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haibo; Wu, Zhengfang; Zong, Shengwei; Meng, Xiangjun; Wang, Lei

    2013-06-01

    Extreme climate events have inflicted severe and adverse effects on human life, social economy, and natural ecosystems. In this study, the precipitation time series from a network of 90 weather stations in Northeast China (NEC) and for the period of 1961-2009 are used. An objective method, the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis method, is applied to determine the thresholds of extreme events. Notable occurrence frequency and strong intensity of extreme precipitation (EP) mainly occur in Liaoning Province and the piedmont regions in Changbai Mountains and Xiao Hinggan Mountains. Generally, EP frequency shows a nonsignificant negative trend, whereas EP intensity has a weak and nonsignificant positive trend for the entire NEC in the period of 1961-2009. To assess EP severity, we propose an EP severity index (EPSI) combining both EP frequency and intensity, rather than separately analyze the EP frequency or intensity. Spatial gradients of EPSI are observed in northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast directions over NEC. The EPSI in northwestern and southeastern NEC are low (0.02-0.3), whereas high EPSI (0.34-0.83) occurs in the southwestern and northeastern portions of the region. Higher EPSI (0.4-0.83) occurs in southern Liaoning Province, which decreases along the southwest-northeast direction. The spatial patterns of EPSI are associated with the circulation over East Asia. Areas that have a short distance from sea and that locate in the windward slope of mountain will probably accompany high EP severity over NEC.

  7. Extreme Technicolor & The Walking Critical Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Järvinen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    We map the phase diagram of gauge theories of fundamental interactions in the flavor- temperature plane using chiral perturbation theory to estimate the relation between the pion decaying constant and the critical temperature above which chiral symmetry is restored. We then investigate the impact...

  8. Extreme Technicolor & The Walking Critical Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Järvinen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    We map the phase diagram of gauge theories of fundamental interactions in the flavor- temperature plane using chiral perturbation theory to estimate the relation between the pion decaying constant and the critical temperature above which chiral symmetry is restored. We then investigate the impact...

  9. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Colin P. [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Yang, Chao-Chin, E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk, E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  10. Reduced quantum fluctuation in mesoscopic Josephson junction with nonclassical radiation field at finite temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan You-Bang

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the reduced fluctuation properties in a mesoscopic Josephson junction with the squeezed state at a finite temperature. It is shown that the fluctuations increase with increasing temperature and the mesoscopic Josephson junction subsystem can exhibit squeezing behaviour at an appropriately low temperature.

  11. Extreme temperature packaging: challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Consumer electronics account for the majority of electronics manufactured today. Given the temperature limits of humans, consumer electronics are typically rated for operation from -40°C to +85°C. Military applications extend the range to -65°C to +125°C while underhood automotive electronics may see +150°C. With the proliferation of the Internet of Things (IoT), the goal of instrumenting (sensing, computation, transmission) to improve safety and performance in high temperature environments such as geothermal wells, nuclear reactors, combustion chambers, industrial processes, etc. requires sensors, electronics and packaging compatible with these environments. Advances in wide bandgap semiconductors (SiC and GaN) allow the fabrication of high temperature compatible sensors and electronics. Integration and packaging of these devices is required for implementation into actual applications. The basic elements of packaging are die attach, electrical interconnection and the package or housing. Consumer electronics typically use conductive adhesives or low melting point solders for die attach, wire bonds or low melting solder for electrical interconnection and epoxy for the package. These materials melt or decompose in high temperature environments. This paper examines materials and processes for high temperature packaging including liquid transient phase and sintered nanoparticle die attach, high melting point wires for wire bonding and metal and ceramic packages. The limitations of currently available solutions will also be discussed.

  12. Discrete self-similiarity and critical point behavior in fluctuations about extremal black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Traschen, J

    1994-01-01

    The issues of scaling symmetry and critical point behavior are studied for fluctuations about extremal charged black holes. We consider the scattering and capture of the spherically symmetric mode of a charged, massive test field on the background spacetime of a black hole with charge Q and mass M. The spacetime geometry near the horizon of a |Q|=M black hole has a scaling symmetry, which is absent if |Q|extremal background, compared to a correlation length sc...

  13. Discrete self-similarity and critical point behavior in fluctuations about extremal black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traschen, Jennie

    1994-12-01

    The issues of scaling symmetry and critical point behavior are studied for fluctuations about extremal charged black holes. We consider the scattering and capture of the spherically symmetric mode of a charged, massive test field on the background spacetime of a black hole with charge Q and mass M. The spacetime geometry near the horizon of a ||Q||=M black hole has a scaling symmetry, which is absent if ||Q||scale being introduced by the surface gravity. We show that this symmetry leads to the existence of a self-similar solution for the charged field near the horizon, and further, that there is a one parameter family of discretely self-similar solutions. The scaling symmetry, or lack thereof, also shows up in correlation length scales, defined in terms of the rate at which the influence of an external source coupled to the field dies off. It is shown by constructing the Green's functions that an external source has a long range influence on the extremal background, compared to a correlation length scale which falls off exponentially fast in the ||Q||0 in the background spacetime, infinitesimal changes in the black hole area vary like Δ1/2.

  14. Edge Particle Flux with Temperature Fluctuation in the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jun; YAN Long-Wen; HONG Wen-Yu; QIAN Jun; ZHAO Kai-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Electron temperature, density, plasma potential and their fluctuation profiles at edge plasmas are measured simultaneously with a reciprocating probe system in HL-2A. The analysis results of four-tip data indicate that the temperature fluctuation has relative amplitude of 10-15%, gives more contribution to particle flux in lower (0- 25 kHz) and higher frequency (50-250 kHz) ranges. The coherence between temperature fluctuation's and density or potential fluctuations implies that their coupling will impact anomalous transport. The measured diffusion coefficient is about three times of the Bohm diffusion coefficient when considering the temperature fluctuation. The particle flux with temperature fluctuation is discussed in HL-2A for the first time.

  15. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing CAD tools, models and methodologies for electronics design for circuit operation in extreme environments with focus on very low temperatures...

  16. Temperature extremes in Western Europe and associated atmospheric anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, V. A.; Santos, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    This worḱs focal point is the analysis of temperature extremes over Western Europe in the period 1957-2007 and their relationship to large-scale anomalies in the atmospheric circulation patterns. The study is based on temperature daily time series recorded at a set of meteorological stations covering the target area. The large-scale anomalies are analyzed using data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis project. Firstly, a preliminary statistical analysis was undertaken in order to identify data gaps and erroneous values and to check the homogeneity of the time series, using not only elementary statistical approaches (e.g., chronograms, box-plots, scatter-plots), but also a set of non-parametric statistical tests particularly suitable for the analysis of monthly and seasonal mean temperature time series (e.g., Wald-Wolfowitz serial correlation test, Spearman and Mann-Kendall trend tests). Secondly, based on previous results, a selection of the highest quality time series was carried out. Aiming at identifying temperature extremes, we then proceed to the isolation of months with temperature values above or below pre-selected thresholds based on the empirical distribution of each time series. In particular, thresholds are based on percentiles specifically computed for each individual temperature record (data adaptive) and not on fixed values. As a result, a calendar of extremely high and extremely low monthly mean temperatures is obtained and the large-scale atmospheric conditions during each extreme are analyzed. Several atmospheric fields are considered in this study (e.g., 2-m maximum and minimum air temperature, sea level pressure, geopotential height, zonal and meridional wind components, vorticity, relative humidity) at different isobaric levels. Results show remarkably different synoptic conditions for temperature extremes in different parts of Western Europe, highlighting the different dynamical mechanisms underlying their

  17. Trends in mean and extreme temperatures over Ibadan, Southwest Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatan, Abayomi A.; Osayomi, Tolulope; Akande, Samuel O.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.; Gutowski, William J.

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, Ibadan has been experiencing an increase in mean temperature which appears to be linked to anthropogenic global warming. Previous studies have indicated that the warming may be accompanied by changes in extreme events. This study examined trends in mean and extreme temperatures over Ibadan during 1971-2012 at annual and seasonal scales using the high-resolution atmospheric reanalysis from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) twentieth-century dataset (ERA-20C) at 15 grid points. Magnitudes of linear trends in mean and extreme temperatures and their statistical significance were calculated using ordinary least squares and Mann-Kendall rank statistic tests. The results show that Ibadan has witnessed an increase in annual and seasonal mean minimum temperatures. The annual mean maximum temperature exhibited a non-significant decline in most parts of Ibadan. While trends in cold extremes at annual scale show warming, trends in coldest night show greater warming than in coldest day. At the seasonal scale, we found that Ibadan experienced a mix of positive and negative trends in absolute extreme temperature indices. However, cold extremes show the largest trend magnitudes, with trends in coldest night showing the greatest warming. The results compare well with those obtained from a limited number of stations. This study should inform decision-makers and urban planners about the ongoing warming in Ibadan.

  18. Mechanisms underlying temperature extremes in Iberia: a Lagrangian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A. Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the occurrence of temperature extremes in Iberia are analysed considering a Lagrangian perspective of the atmospheric flow, using 6-hourly ERA-Interim reanalysis data for the years 1979–2012. Daily 2-m minimum temperatures below the 1st percentile and 2-m maximum temperatures above the 99th percentile at each grid point over Iberia are selected separately for winter and summer. Four categories of extremes are analysed using 10-d backward trajectories initialized at the extreme temperature grid points close to the surface: winter cold (WCE and warm extremes (WWE, and summer cold (SCE and warm extremes (SWE. Air masses leading to temperature extremes are first transported from the North Atlantic towards Europe for all categories. While there is a clear relation to large-scale circulation patterns in winter, the Iberian thermal low is important in summer. Along the trajectories, air mass characteristics are significantly modified through adiabatic warming (air parcel descent, upper-air radiative cooling and near-surface warming (surface heat fluxes and radiation. High residence times over continental areas, such as over northern-central Europe for WCE and, to a lesser extent, over Iberia for SWE, significantly enhance these air mass modifications. Near-surface diabatic warming is particularly striking for SWE. WCE and SWE are responsible for the most extreme conditions in a given year. For WWE and SCE, strong temperature advection associated with important meridional air mass transports are the main driving mechanisms, accompanied by comparatively minor changes in the air mass properties. These results permit a better understanding of mechanisms leading to temperature extremes in Iberia.

  19. Return Levels of Temperature Extremes in Southern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Maida; Lucarini, Valerio; Blender, Richard; Caterina Bramati, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Southern Pakistan (Sindh) is one of the hottest regions in the world and is highly vulnerable to temperature extremes. In order to improve rural and urban planning, information about the recurrence of temperature extremes is required. In this work, return levels of the daily maximum temperature Tmax are estimated, as well as the daily maximum wet-bulb temperature TWmax extremes. The method used is the Peak Over Threshold (POT) and it represents a novelty among the approaches previously used for similar studies in this region. Two main datasets are analyzed: temperatures observed in nine meteorological stations in southern Pakistan from 1980 to 2013, and the ERA Interim data for the nearest corresponding locations. The analysis provides the 2, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100-year Return Levels (RLs) of temperature extremes. The 90% quantile is found to be a suitable threshold for all stations. We find that the RLs of the observed Tmax are above 50°C in northern stations, and above 45°C in the southern stations. The RLs of the observed TWmax exceed 35°C in the region, which is considered as a limit of survivability. The RLs estimated from the ERA Interim data are lower by 3°C to 5°C than the RLs assessed for the nine meteorological stations. A simple bias correction applied to ERA Interim data improves the RLs remarkably, yet discrepancies are still present. The results have potential implications for the risk assessment of extreme temperatures in Sindh.

  20. Time Evolution of Temperature Fluctuation in a Non-Equilibrated System

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Sahoo, Raghunath; Samantray, Prasant

    2015-01-01

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation for a hot gas of massless particles. Specializing to a situation created after heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation for the medium. Further, the effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored.

  1. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  2. Towards constraining extreme temperature projections of the CMIP5 ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Martha-Marie; Orth, René; Isabelle Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    The frequency and intensity of heat waves is expected to change in future in response to global warming. Given the severe impacts of heat waves on ecosystems and society it is important to understand how and where they will intensify. Projections of extreme hot temperatures in the IPCC AR5 model ensemble show large uncertainties for projected changes of extreme temperatures in particular in Central Europe. In this region land-atmosphere coupling can contribute substantially to the development of heat waves. This coupling is also subject to change in future, while model projections display considerable spread. In this work we link projections of changes in extreme temperatures and of changes in land-atmosphere interactions with a particular focus on Central Europe. Uncertainties in projected extreme temperatures can be partly explained by different projected changes of the interplay between latent heat and temperature as well as soil moisture. Given the considerable uncertainty in land-atmosphere coupling representation already in the current climate, we furthermore employ observational data sets to constrain the model ensemble, and consequently the extreme temperature projections.

  3. Influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale experiment was carried out to assess the influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste (MOSW). Heating failure was simulated by decreasing temperature suddenly from 55 ℃ to 20 ℃ suddenly; 2 h time is needed for temperature decrease and recovery. Under the conditions ofS.0 g/(L·d) and 15 d respectively for MOSW load and retention time, following results were noted: (1) biogas production almost stopped and VFA (volatile fatty acid) accumulated rapidly, accompanied by pH decrease; (2) with low temperature (20 ℃) duration of 1, 5, 12 and 24 h, it took 3, 11, 56 and 72 h for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion system to reproduce methane after temperature fluctuation;(3) the longer the low temperature interval lasted, the more the methanogenic bacteria would decay; hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis were all influenced by temperature fluctuation; (4) the thermophilic microorganisms were highly resilient to temperature fluctuation.

  4. Recent trends in pre-monsoon daily temperature extremes over India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D R Kothawale; J V Revadekar; K Rupa Kumar

    2010-02-01

    Extreme climate and weather events are increasingly being recognized as key aspects of climate change. Pre-monsoon season (March–May) is the hottest part of the year over almost the entire South Asian region, in which hot weather extremes including heat waves are recurring natural hazards having serious societal impacts, particularly on human health. In the present paper, recent trends in extreme temperature events for the pre-monsoon season have been studied using daily data on maximum and minimum temperatures over a well-distributed network of 121 stations for the period 1970–2005. For this purpose, time series of extreme temperature events have been constructed for India as a whole and seven homogeneous regions, viz., Western Himalaya (WH), Northwest (NW), Northeast (NE), North Central (NC), East coast (EC), West coast (WC) and Interior Peninsula (IP). In general, the frequency of occurrence of hot days and hot nights showed widespread increasing trend, while that of cold days and cold nights has shown widespread decreasing trend. The frequency of the occurrence of hot days is found to have significantly increased over EC, WC and IP, while that of cold days showed significant decreasing trend over WH and WC. The three regions EC, WC and NW showed significant increasing trend in the frequency of hot nights. For India as whole, the frequency of hot days and nights showed increasing trend while cold days and nights showed decreasing trends. Day-to-day fluctuations of pre-monsoon daily maximum and minimum temperatures have also been studied for the above regions. The results show that there is no significant change in day-to-day magnitude of fluctuations of pre-monsoon maximum and minimum temperatures. However, the results generally indicate that the daily maximum and minimum temperatures are becoming less variable within the season.

  5. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiao-Yuan; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Wen Yi-Zhi; Yu Chang-Xuan; Liu Wan-Dong; Wan Bao-Nian; Gao Xiang; N. C. Luhmann; C. W. Domier; Jian Wang; Z. G. Xia; Zuowei Shen

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number kg is calculated to be about 1.58 cm-1, or keps ≈0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation.

  6. Mangrove species' responses to winter air temperature extremes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhen; Wang, Wenqing; Li, Qingshun Q.; Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Shengchang; Osland, Michael J.; Huang, Jinliang; Peng, Congjiao

    2017-01-01

    The global distribution and diversity of mangrove forests is greatly influenced by the frequency and intensity of winter air temperature extremes. However, our understanding of how different mangrove species respond to winter temperature extremes has been lacking because extreme freezing and chilling events are, by definition, relatively uncommon and also difficult to replicate experimentally. In this study, we investigated species-specific variation in mangrove responses to winter temperature extremes in China. In 10 sites that span a latitudinal gradient, we quantified species-specific damage and recovery following a chilling event, for mangrove species within and outside of their natural range (i.e., native and non-native species, respectively). To characterize plant stress, we measured tree defoliation and chlorophyll fluorescence approximately one month following the chilling event. To quantify recovery, we measured chlorophyll fluorescence approximately nine months after the chilling event. Our results show high variation in the geographic- and species-specific responses of mangroves to winter temperature extremes. While many species were sensitive to the chilling temperatures (e.g., Bruguiera sexangula and species in the Sonneratia and Rhizophora genera), the temperatures during this event were not cold enough to affect certain species (e.g., Kandelia obovata, Aegiceras corniculatum, Avicennia marina, and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza). As expected, non-native species were less tolerant of winter temperature extremes than native species. Interestingly, tidal inundation modulated the effects of chilling. In comparison with other temperature-controlled mangrove range limits across the world, the mangrove range limit in China is unique due to the combination of the following three factors: (1) Mangrove species diversity is comparatively high; (2) winter air temperature extremes, rather than means, are particularly intense and play an important ecological

  7. Can a regional climate model reproduce observed extreme temperatures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Craigmile

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using output from a regional Swedish climate model and observations from the Swedish synoptic observational network, we compare seasonal minimum temperatures from model output and observations using marginal extreme value modeling techniques. We make seasonal comparisons using generalized extreme value models and empirically estimate the shift in the distribution as a function of the regional climate model values, using the Doksum shift function. Spatial and temporal comparisons over south central Sweden are made by building hierarchical Bayesian generalized extreme value models for the observed minima and regional climate model output. Generally speaking the regional model is surprisingly well calibrated for minimum temperatures. We do detect a problem in the regional model to produce minimum temperatures close to 0◦C. The seasonal spatial effects are quite similar between data and regional model. The observations indicate relatively strong warming, especially in the northern region. This signal is present in the regional model, but is not as strong.

  8. Extreme temperature days and potential impacts in Southern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cardil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Extreme temperature events have consequences for human health and mortality, forest disturbance patterns, agricultural productivity, and the economic repercussions of these consequences combined. To gain insight into whether extreme temperature events are changing in light of global climate dynamics, the annual numbers of high temperature days (those with temperatures higher than 20, 22.5 and 25 °C at 850 hPa were analyzed across Southern Europe from years 1978–2012. A significant increase in the frequency of these days was found in many areas over the time period analyzed, and patterns in the spatial distribution of these changes were identified. We discuss the potential consequences of the increases in high temperature days with regards to forest fire risk, human health, agriculture, energy demands, and some potential economic repercussions.

  9. Projected Changes in Temperature Extremes in China Using PRECIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature extremes can cause disastrous impacts on ecological and social economic systems. China is very sensitive to climate change, as its warming rate exceeds that of the global mean level. This paper focused on the spatial and temporal changes of the temperature extremes characterized by the 95th percentile of maximum temperature (TX95, the 5th percentile of the minimum temperature (TN5, high-temperature days (HTD and low-temperature days (LTD. The daily maximum and minimum temperatures generated by PRECIS under different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs are used in the research. The results show that: (1 Model simulation data can reproduce the spatial distribution features of the maximum temperature (Tmax and minimum temperature (Tmin as well as that of the extreme temperature indices; (2 By the end of the 21st century (2070–2099, both the Tmax and Tmin are warmer than the baseline level (1961–1990 in China and the eight sub-regions. However, there are regional differences in the asymmetrical warming features, as the Tmin warms more than the Tmax in the northern part of China and the Tibetan Plateau, while the Tmax warms more than the Tmin in the southern part of China; (3 The frequency of the warm extremes would become more usual, as the HTD characterized by the present-day threshold would increase by 106%, 196% and 346%, under RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively, while the cold extremes characterized by the LTD would become less frequent by the end of the 21st century, decreasing by 75%, 90% and 98% under RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively. The southern and eastern parts of the Tibetan Plateau respond sensitively to changes in both the hot and cold extremes, suggesting its higher likelihood to suffer from climate warming; (4 The intensity of the warm (cold extremes would increase (decrease significantly, characterized by the changes in the TX95 (TN5 by the end of the 21st century, and the magnitude of the

  10. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/339579951

    2012-01-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to

  11. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  12. Application of cross recurrence plot for identification of temperature fluctuations synchronization in parallel minichannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, H.; Mosdorf, R.

    2016-09-01

    The temperature fluctuations occurring in flow boiling in parallel minichannels with diameter of 1 mm have been experimentally investigated and analysed. The wall temperature was recorded at each minichannel outlet by thermocouple with 0.08 mm diameter probe. The time series where recorded during dynamic two-phase flow instabilities which are accompanied by chaotic temperature fluctuations. Time series were denoised using wavelet decomposition and were analysed using cross recurrence plots (CRP) which enables the study of two time series synchronization.

  13. Evaluation of dynamically downscaled extreme temperature using a spatially-aggregated generalized extreme value (GEV) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Han, Yuefeng; Stein, Michael L.; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Huang, Whitney K.

    2016-11-01

    The weather research and forecast (WRF) model downscaling skill in extreme maximum daily temperature is evaluated by using the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution. While the GEV distribution has been used extensively in climatology and meteorology for estimating probabilities of extreme events, accurately estimating GEV parameters based on data from a single pixel can be difficult, even with fairly long data records. This work proposes a simple method assuming that the shape parameter, the most difficult of the three parameters to estimate, does not vary over a relatively large region. This approach is applied to evaluate 31-year WRF-downscaled extreme maximum temperature through comparison with North American regional reanalysis (NARR) data. Uncertainty in GEV parameter estimates and the statistical significance in the differences of estimates between WRF and NARR are accounted for by conducting a novel bootstrap procedure that makes no assumption of temporal or spatial independence within a year, which is especially important for climate data. Despite certain biases over parts of the United States, overall, WRF shows good agreement with NARR in the spatial pattern and magnitudes of GEV parameter estimates. Both WRF and NARR show a significant increase in extreme maximum temperature over the southern Great Plains and southeastern United States in January and over the western United States in July. The GEV model shows clear benefits from the regionally constant shape parameter assumption, for example, leading to estimates of the location and scale parameters of the model that show coherent spatial patterns.

  14. Extreme temperatures and precipitation in Poland. An evaluation attempt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustrnul, Zbigniew [Institute of Meteorology and Water Management, Krakow (Poland); Wypych, Agnieszka; Kosowski, Marek [Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    Summer (JJA) and winter (DJF) temperature extremes and summer (JJA) precipitation extremes in Poland that occurred in the years 1951-2006 are analyzed in this paper. Diurnal extreme values of air temperature (Tmax, Tmin) and diurnal precipitation totals (P) are considered. The data was obtained from 54 meteorological stations. Extreme values were identified based on different methodological approaches. Advantages and disadvantages of selected methods are shown with respect to both temporal and spatial variability of the data. The differences obtained as a result of the applied criteria confirm that the method of percentiles seems to be the most suitable one to be used in spatial analysis. This is especially relevant in areas with a relatively high variability of absolute values. When it comes to analyses of multi-annual trends, the criterion used plays a less significant role. Regardless of the method, there is a certain direction of changes that is maintained, although their magnitudes may be different. It may be concluded from the conducted analyses that for the full evaluation of both spatial variability and temporal variability of weather extremes, a variety of methods and criteria for identifying extreme values, should be considered. They may significantly influence the final results. (orig.)

  15. Statistical Downscaling of Summer Temperature Extremes in Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Lijun; Deliang CHEN; FU Congbin; YAN Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Two approaches of statistical downscaling were applied to indices of temperature extremes based on percentiles of daily maximum and minimum temperature observations at Beijing station in summer during 1960-2008.One was to downscale daily maximum and minimum temperatures by using EOF analysis and stepwise linear regression at first,then to calculate the indices of extremes; the other was to directly downscale the percentile-based indices by using seasonal large-scale temperature and geo-potential height records.The cross-validation results showed that the latter approach has a better performance than the former.Then,the latter approach was applied to 48 meteorological stations in northern China.The crossvalidation results for all 48 stations showed close correlation between the percentile-based indices and the seasonal large-scale variables.Finally,future scenarios of indices of temperature extremes in northern China were projected by applying the statistical downscaling to Hadley Centre Coupled Model Version 3 (HadCM3) simulations under the Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 (RCP 4.5) scenario of the Fifth Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5).The results showed that the 90th percentile of daily maximum temperatures will increase by about 1.5℃,and the 10th of daily minimum temperatures will increase by about 2℃ during the period 2011-35 relative to 1980-99.

  16. Influence of temperature fluctuations on plasma turbulence investigations with Langmuir probes

    CERN Document Server

    Nold, B; Ramisch, M; Huang, Z; Müller, H W; Scott, B D; Stroth, U

    2011-01-01

    The reliability of Langmuir probe measurements for plasma-turbulence investigations is studied on GEMR gyro-fluid simulations and compared with results from conditionally sampled I-V characteristics as well as self-emitting probe measurements in the near scrape-off layer of the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. In this region, simulation and experiment consistently show coherent in-phase fluctuations in density, plasma potential and also in electron temperature. Ion-saturation current measurements turn out to reproduce density fluctuations quite well. Fluctuations in the floating potential, however, are strongly influenced by temperature fluctuations and, hence, are strongly distorted compared to the actual plasma potential. These results suggest that interpreting floating as plasma-potential fluctuations while disregarding temperature effects is not justified near the separatrix of hot fusion plasmas. Here, floating potential measurements lead to corrupted results on the ExB dynamics of turbulent structures in the cont...

  17. Time evolution of temperature fluctuation in a non-equilibrated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Samantray, Prasant [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Centre of Astronomy, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India)

    2016-09-15

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for a hot gas of massless particles. Also, specializing to a situation created after a heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation of the medium using its temperature profile. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations in the latter case is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored. (orig.)

  18. Effect of Contraction on Turbulence and Temperature Fluctuations Generated by a Warm Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robert R., Jr.; Corrsin, Stanley

    1959-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements were made of several statistical properties of approximately homogeneous and isotropic fields of turbulence and temperature fluctuations generated by a warm grid in a uniform airstream sent through a 4-to-1 contraction. These measurements were made both in the contraction and in the axisymmetric domain farther downstream. In addition to confirming the well-known turbulence anisotropy induced by strain, the data show effects on the skewnesses of both longitudinal velocity fluctuation (which has zero skewness in isotropic turbulence) and its derivative. The concomitant anisotropy in the temperature field accelerates the decay of temperature fluctuations.

  19. The Signatures of Large-scale Temperature Fluctuations in the Lyman-alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Matthew; Lidz, Adam; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2010-01-01

    It appears inevitable that reionization processes would have produced large-scale temperature fluctuations in the intergalactic medium. Using toy temperature models and detailed heating histories in cosmological simulations of HeII reionization, we study the consequences of inhomogeneous heating for the Ly-alpha forest. The impact of temperature fluctuations in physically well-motivated models can be surprisingly subtle. In fact, we show that temperature fluctuations at the level predicted by our reionization simulations do not give rise to detectable signatures in the types of statistics that have been employed previously. However, because of the aliasing of small-scale density power to larger scale modes in the line-of-sight Ly-alpha forest power spectrum, earlier analyses were not sensitive to 3D modes with >~ 30 comoving Mpc wavelengths -- scales where temperature fluctuations are likely to be relatively largest. The ongoing Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) aims to measure the 3D power spect...

  20. Trends in rainfall and temperature extremes in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khomsi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In Morocco, socioeconomic fields are vulnerable to weather extreme events. This work aims to analyze the frequency and the trends of temperature and rainfall extreme events in two contrasted Moroccan regions (the Tensift in the semi-arid South, and the Bouregreg in the sub-humid North, during the second half of the 20th century. This study considers long time series of daily extreme temperatures and rainfall, recorded in the stations of Marrakech and Safi for the Tensift region, and Kasba-Tadla and Rabat-Sale for the Bouregreg region, data from four other stations (Tanger, Fes, Agadir and Ouarzazate from outside the regions were added. Extremes are defined by using as thresholds the 1st, 5th, 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles. Results show upward trends in maximum and minimum temperatures of both regions and no generalized trends in rainfall amounts. Changes in cold events are larger than those for warm events, and the number of very cold events decrease significantly in the whole studied area. The southern region is the most affected with the changes of the temperature regime. Most of the trends found in rainfall heavy events are positive with weak magnitudes even though no statistically significant generalized trends could be identified during both seasons.

  1. How to apply the dependence structure analysis to extreme temperature and precipitation for disaster risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jieling; Li, Ning; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xi

    2017-06-01

    IPCC reports that a changing climate can affect the frequency and the intensity of extreme events. However, the extremes appear in the tail of the probability distribution. In order to know the relationship between extreme events in the tail of temperature and precipitation, an important but previously unobserved dependence structure is analyzed in this paper. Here, we examine the dependence structure by building a bivariate joint of Gumbel copula model for temperature and precipitation using monthly average temperature (T) and monthly precipitation (P) data from Beijing station in China covering a period of 1951-2015 and find the dependence structure can be divided into two sections, they are the middle part and the upper tail. We show that T and P have a strong positive correlation in the high tail section (T > 25.85 °C and P > 171.1 mm) (=0.66, p < 0.01) while they do not demonstrate the same relation in the other section, which suggests that the identification of a strong influence of T on extreme P needs help from the dependence structure analysis. We also find that in the high tail section, every 1 °C increase in T is associated with 73.45 mm increase in P. Our results suggested that extreme precipitation fluctuations by changes in temperature will allow the data dependence structure to be included in extreme affect for the disaster risk assessment under future climate change scenarios. Copula bivariate jointed probability distribution is useful to the dependence structure analysis.

  2. Nerve conduction studies in upper extremities: skin temperature corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halar, E M; DeLisa, J A; Soine, T L

    1983-09-01

    The relationship of skin to near nerve (NN) temperature and to nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and distal latency (DL) was studied in 34 normal adult subjects before and after cooling both upper extremities. Median and ulnar motor and sensory NCV, DL, and NN temperature were determined at ambient temperature (mean X skin temp = 33 C) and after cooling, at approximately 26, 28, and 30 C of forearm skin temperature. Skin temperatures on the volar side of the forearm, wrist, palm, and fingers and NN temperature at the forearm, midpalm, and thenar or hypothenar eminence were compared with respective NCV and DL. Results showed a significant linear correlation between skin temperature and NN temperature at corresponding sites (r2 range, 0.4-0.84; p less than 0.005). Furthermore, both skin and NN temperatures correlated significantly with respective NCV and DL. Midline wrist skin temperature showed the best correlation to NCV and DL. Median motor and sensory NCV were altered 1.5 and 1.4m/sec/C degree and their DL 0.2 msec/C degree of wrist skin temperature change, respectively. Ulnar motor and sensory NCV were changed 2.1 and 1.6m/sec/C degree respectively, and 0.2 msec/C degree wrist temperature for motor and sensory DL. Average ambient skin temperature at the wrist (33 C) was used as a standard skin temperature in the temperature correction formula: NCV or DL(temp corrected) = CF(Tst degree - Tm degree) + obtained NCV or DL, where Tst = 33 C for wrist, Tm = the measured skin temperature, and CF = correction factor of tested nerve. Use of temperature correction formula for NCV and DL is suggested in patients with changed wrist skin temperature outside 29.6-36.4C temperature range.

  3. Trend of monthly temperature and daily extreme temperature during 1951-2012 in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloiero, Tommaso

    2017-07-01

    Among several variables affecting climate change and climate variability, temperature plays a crucial role in the process because its variations in monthly and extreme values can impact on the global hydrologic cycle and energy balance through thermal forcing. In this study, an analysis of temperature data has been performed over 22 series observed in New Zealand. In particular, to detect possible trends in the time series, the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test was first applied at monthly scale and then to several indices of extreme daily temperatures computed since 1951. The results showed a positive trend in both the maximum and the minimum temperatures, in particular, in the autumn-winter period. This increase has been evaluated faster in maximum temperature than in minimum one. The trend analysis of the temperature indices suggests that there has been an increase in the frequency and intensity of hot extremes, while most of the cold extremes showed a downward tendency.

  4. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  5. Quantum Fluctuation of a Mesoscopic Inductance Coupling Circuit at Finite Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Tong-Qiang; ZHU Yue-Jin

    2003-01-01

    We study the quantization of mesoscopic inductance coupling circuit and discuss its time evolution. Bymeans of the thermal field dynamics theory we study the quantum fluctuation of the system at finite temperature.

  6. QUANTUM FLUCTUATIONS IN MESOSCOPIC RESISTANCE INDUCTANCE-CAPACITANCE ELECTRIC CIRCUITS AT FINITE TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG XIAN-TING; FAN HONG-YI

    2001-01-01

    By using the charge and current in a quantization resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) electric circuit, we construct a pair of canonical variables. Using this pair of variables and the thermal field dynamics, we obtain the fluctuations of charge and current in the RLC electric circuit at finite temperatures. It is shown that the fluctuations increase with increasing temperature and decrease with prolonging of time.

  7. Implications of primordial power spectra with statistical anisotropy on CMB temperature fluctuation and polarizations

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Both the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck observations reported the hemispherical asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuation. The hemispherical asymmetry might be stemmed from the primordial statistical anisotropy during the inflationary era of the universe. In this paper, we study possible implications of the primordial power spectra with dipolar anisotropy on the CMB temperature fluctuation and polarizations. We explicitly show that the statistical dipolar anisotropy may induce the off-diagonal (\\(\\ell'\

  8. Impact of soil moisture on extreme maximum temperatures in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirien Whan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Land-atmosphere interactions play an important role for hot temperature extremes in Europe. Dry soils may amplify such extremes through feedbacks with evapotranspiration. While previous observational studies generally focused on the relationship between precipitation deficits and the number of hot days, we investigate here the influence of soil moisture (SM on summer monthly maximum temperatures (TXx using water balance model-based SM estimates (driven with observations and temperature observations. Generalized extreme value distributions are fitted to TXx using SM as a covariate. We identify a negative relationship between SM and TXx, whereby a 100 mm decrease in model-based SM is associated with a 1.6 °C increase in TXx in Southern-Central and Southeastern Europe. Dry SM conditions result in a 2–4 °C increase in the 20-year return value of TXx compared to wet conditions in these two regions. In contrast with SM impacts on the number of hot days (NHD, where low and high surface-moisture conditions lead to different variability, we find a mostly linear dependency of the 20-year return value on surface-moisture conditions. We attribute this difference to the non-linear relationship between TXx and NHD that stems from the threshold-based calculation of NHD. Furthermore the employed SM data and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI are only weakly correlated in the investigated regions, highlighting the importance of evapotranspiration and runoff for resulting SM. Finally, in a case study for the hot 2003 summer we illustrate that if 2003 spring conditions in Southern-Central Europe had been as dry as in the more recent 2011 event, temperature extremes in summer would have been higher by about 1 °C, further enhancing the already extreme conditions which prevailed in that year.

  9. Projected changes in precipitation extremes linked to temperature over Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S.; Dairaku, K.; Takayabu, I.; Suzuki-Parker, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have argued that the extreme precipitation intensities are increasing in many regions across the globe due to atmospheric warming. This argument is based on the principle of Clausius-Clapeyron relationship which states that the atmosphere can hold more moisture in warmer air temperature (~7%/°C). In our study, we have investigated the precipitation extremes linked to temperature in current climate (1981-2000) and their projected changes in late 21st century (2081-2100, RCP4.5) over Japan from multi-model ensemble downscaling experiments by three RCMs (NHRCM, NRAMS, WRF) forced by JRA25 as well as three GCMs (CCSM4, MIROC5, MRI-GCM3). To do this, the precipitation intensities of wet days (defined as ≥ 0.05 mm/d) are stratified to different bins with 1°C temperature interval. We have also identified the occurrences of precipitation extremes in different spell durations and associated peak intensities exceeding various thresholds in two climate periods. We found that extreme precipitation intensities are increased by 5 mm/d in future climate for temperatures above 21°C (Fig. 1). Precipitation extremes of higher percentiles are projected to have larger increase rates in future climate scenarios (3-5%/°C in the current climate and 4-6%/°C in the future climate scenarios). The joint probability distribution of wet hours (≥1mm/h) with various peak intensities under future climate scenarios (RCP4.5) of the late 21st century suggests an increase of long-lived (>10hr) and short-lived (1-2hr) events. On the other hand, a relatively decrease of medium-lived events (3-10hr) are noticed in future climate scenario. The increase of extreme precipitation intensities in future climate is due to the increase in temperature under RCP4.5 (~2°C). Increase in temperature causes more evapotranspiration and subsequently increases the water vapor in the atmosphere.

  10. Spin fluctuations and high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the cuprate superconductors, models of strongly correlated electronic systems, such as the Hubbard or t - J models, are commonly employed. To study these models, projected (Hubbard) operators have to be used. Due to the unconventional commutation relations for the Hubbard operators, a specific kinematical interaction of electrons with spin and charge fluctuations emerges. The interaction is induced by the intraband hopping with a coupling parameter of the order of the kinetic energy of electrons W which is much larger than the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J induced by the interband hopping. This review presents a consistent microscopic theory of spin excitations and superconductivity for cuprates where these interactions are taken into account within the Hubbard operator technique. The low-energy spin excitations are considered for the t-J model, while the electronic properties are studied using the two-subband extended Hubbard model where the intersite Coulomb repulsion V and electron-phonon interaction are taken into account.

  11. Fast temperature fluctuation measurements in SOL of tokamak TCV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Pitts, R.A.

    coupling both across the plasma sheath and in the probe circuit itself. Comparisons are also made between the results from higher frequency sweeping and the standard values derived from a slower sweep to show that the fast measurement is reliable. Considerable effort has been expended in recent years...... to compare the statistical character of turbulence in the SOL particle flux on TCV with results from the 2D fluid electrostatic model ESEL [2][4]. Using results from the fast sweeping, similar comparisons can now be made with the fluctuating Te and will be described in this contribution. We also present...... distribution function, introduced for SOL turbulence in [5]. The fast Te capability also allows the SOL response to Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) to be studied and new results will be presented for the far SOL Te response during Type III ELMs....

  12. NAO influence on extreme winter temperatures in Madrid (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, L.; Garcia, R.; Hernandez, E.; Teso, T. del [Dept. Fisica de la Tierra II, Fac. CC. Fisicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Diaz, J. [Centro Universitario de Salud Publica, Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    Extremely cold days (ECDs), with minimum temperatures lower than -4.6 C, have been analysed for Madrid. This threshold corresponds to the 5th percentile of the period 1963-1999. Adopting a case analysis approach, five synoptic patterns have been identified that produce these extremely low temperatures. Three of them are associated with cold air flows over the Iberian Peninsula, and the other two with a lack of significant circulation over the region. A non-linear association with the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) has been identified using log-linear models. The NAO positive phase leads to an increase in the winter frequency of those synoptic patterns associated with stagnant air flow over Iberia, while those characterised by cold, northern flows do not appear to be similarly influenced. (orig.)

  13. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sifat Sharmin

    Full Text Available Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation, population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control.

  14. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control. PMID:26161895

  15. Survival of Apache Trout eggs and alevins under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased stream temperatures due to global climate change, livestock grazing, removal of riparian cover, reduction of stream flow, and urbanization will have important implications for fishes worldwide. Information exists that describes the effects of elevated water temperatures on fish eggs, but less information is available on the effects of fluctuating water temperatures on egg survival, especially those of threatened and endangered species. We tested the posthatch survival of eyed eggs and alevins of Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a threatened salmonid, in static temperatures of 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27°C, and also in treatments with diel fluctuations of ±3°C around those temperatures. The LT50 for posthatch survival of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins was 17.1°C for static temperatures treatments and 17.9°C for the midpoints of ±3°C fluctuating temperature treatments. There was no significant difference in survival between static temperatures and fluctuating temperatures that shared the same mean temperature, yet there was a slight difference in LT50s. Upper thermal tolerance of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins is much lower than that of fry to adult life stages (22–23°C). Information on thermal tolerance of early life stages (eyed egg and alevin) will be valuable to those restoring streams or investigating thermal tolerances of imperiled fishes.

  16. Poorest countries experience earlier anthropogenic emergence of daily temperature extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Luke J.; Frame, David J.; Fischer, Erich M.; Hawkins, Ed; Joshi, Manoj; Jones, Chris D.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the emergence of the anthropogenic warming signal from the noise of internal variability translates to changes in extreme event occurrence is of crucial societal importance. By utilising simulations of cumulative carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and temperature changes from eleven earth system models, we demonstrate that the inherently lower internal variability found at tropical latitudes results in large increases in the frequency of extreme daily temperatures (exceedances of the 99.9th percentile derived from pre-industrial climate simulations) occurring much earlier than for mid-to-high latitude regions. Most of the world’s poorest people live at low latitudes, when considering 2010 GDP-PPP per capita; conversely the wealthiest population quintile disproportionately inhabit more variable mid-latitude climates. Consequently, the fraction of the global population in the lowest socio-economic quintile is exposed to substantially more frequent daily temperature extremes after much lower increases in both mean global warming and cumulative CO2 emissions.

  17. Spectrophotometry of extreme helium stars - Ultraviolet fluxes and effective temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, U.; Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.; Lynas-Gray, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet flux distributions are presented for the extremely helium rich stars BD +10 deg 2179, HD 124448, LSS 3378, BD -9 deg 4395, LSE 78, HD 160641, LSIV -1 deg 2, BD 1 deg 3438, HD 168476, MV Sgr, LS IV-14 deg 109 (CD -35 deg 11760), LSII +33 deg 5 and BD +1 deg 4381 (LSIV +2 deg 13) obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Broadband photometry and a newly computed grid of line blanketed model atmospheres were used to determine accurate angular diameters and total stellar fluxes. The resultant effective temperatures are in most cases in satisfactory agreement with those based on broadband photometry and/or high resolution spectroscopy in the visible. For two objects, LSII +33 deg 5 and LSE 78, disagreement was found between the IUE observations and broadband photometry: the colors predict temperatures around 20,000 K, whereas the UV spectra indicate much lower photospheric temperatures of 14,000 to 15,000 K. The new temperature scale for extreme helium stars extends to lower effective temperatures than that of Heber and Schoenberner (1981) and covers the range from 8,500 K to 32,000 K. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24433

  18. Inverse heat conduction estimation of inner wall temperature fluctuations under turbulent penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhouchao; Lu, Tao; Liu, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Turbulent penetration can occur when hot and cold fluids mix in a horizontal T-junction pipe at nuclear plants. Caused by the unstable turbulent penetration, temperature fluctuations with large amplitude and high frequency can lead to time-varying wall thermal stress and even thermal fatigue on the inner wall. Numerous cases, however, exist where inner wall temperatures cannot be measured and only outer wall temperature measurements are feasible. Therefore, it is one of the popular research areas in nuclear science and engineering to estimate temperature fluctuations on the inner wall from measurements of outer wall temperatures without damaging the structure of the pipe. In this study, both the one-dimensional (1D) and the two-dimensional (2D) inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) were solved to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. First, numerical models of both the 1D and the 2D direct heat conduction problem (DHCP) were structured in MATLAB, based on the finite difference method with an implicit scheme. Second, both the 1D IHCP and the 2D IHCP were solved by the steepest descent method (SDM), and the DHCP results of temperatures on the outer wall were used to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. Third, we compared the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall estimated by the 1D IHCP with those estimated by the 2D IHCP in four cases: (1) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 3°C, (2) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 30°C, (3) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 160°C, and (4) when the fluid temperatures inside the pipe were random from 50°C to 210°C.

  19. Reanalysis Data Evaluation to Study Temperature Extremes in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordov, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes are strongly pronounced in Siberia by significant warming in the 2nd half of 20th century and recent extreme events such as 2010 heat wave and 2013 flood in Russia's Far East. To improve our understanding of observed climate extremes and to provide to regional decision makers the reliable scientifically based information with high special and temporal resolution on climate state, we need to operate with accurate meteorological data in our study. However, from available 231 stations across Siberia only 130 of them present the homogeneous daily temperature time series. Sparse, station network, especially in high latitudes, force us to use simulated reanalysis data. However those might differ from observations. To obtain reliable information on temperature extreme "hot spots" in Siberia we have compared daily temperatures form ERA-40, ERA Interim, JRA-25, JRA-55, NCEP/DOE, MERRA Reanalysis, HadEX2 and GHCNDEX gridded datasets with observations from RIHMI-WDC/CDIAC dataset for overlap period 1981-2000. Data agreement was estimated at station coordinates to which reanalysis data were interpolated using modified Shepard method. Comparison of averaged over 20 year annual mean temperatures shows general agreement for Siberia excepting Baikal region, where reanalyses significantly underestimate observed temperature behavior. The annual temperatures closest to observed one were obtained from ERA-40 and ERA Interim. Furthermore, t-test results show homogeneity of these datasets, which allows one to combine them for long term time series analysis. In particular, we compared the combined data with observations for percentile-based extreme indices. In Western Siberia reanalysis and gridded data accurately reproduce observed daily max/min temperatures. For East Siberia, Lake Baikal area, ERA Interim data slightly underestimates TN90p and TX90p values. Results obtained allows regional decision-makers to get required high spatial resolution (0,25°×0

  20. Increased Stream Temperature in Response to Extreme Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. E.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2016-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystem temperature regulation is essential to the survival of riverine fish species restricted to limited water temperature ranges. Dissolved oxygen levels, similarly necessary to fish health, are decreased by rising temperatures, as warmer waters can hold less oxygen than colder waters. Climate change projections forecast increased precipitation intensities, a trend that has already been observed in the past decade. Though extreme events are becoming more common, the stream temperature response to high-intensity rainfall is not yet completely understood. Precipitation and stream temperature records from gages in the Upper Midwestern United States were analyzed to determine whether there exists a positive relationship between high-intensity rainfall and stream temperature response. This region was chosen for its already observed trends in increasing precipitation intensity, and rural gages were used in order to minimize the effect of impervious surfaces on runoff amounts and temperature. Days with recorded precipitation were divided by an intensity threshold and classified as either high-intensity or low-intensity days. While the effects of rain events on temperature are variable, increases in stream temperature in response to high-intensity rainfall were observed. For some basins, daily maximum rates of stream temperature increase were, on average, greater for higher intensity events. Similarly, the average daily stream temperature range was higher in streams on days of high-intensity precipitation, compared to days of low-intensity events. Understanding the effect of increasing precipitation intensity in conjunction with rising air temperatures will provide insight into the future of aquatic ecosystems and their adaptation to climate change.

  1. Dynamical transition, hydrophobic interface, and the temperature dependence of electrostatic fluctuations in proteins

    CERN Document Server

    LeBard, David N

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have revealed a dramatic increase, with increasing temperature, of the amplitude of electrostatic fluctuations caused by water at the active site of metalloprotein plastocyanin. The increased breadth of electrostatic fluctuations, expressed in terms of the reorganization energy of changing the redox state of the protein, is related to the formation of the hydrophobic protein/water interface allowing large-amplitude collective fluctuations of the water density in the protein's first solvation shell. On the top of the monotonic increase of the reorganization energy with increasing temperature, we have observed a spike at 220 K also accompanied by a significant slowing of the exponential collective Stokes shift dynamics. In contrast to the local density fluctuations of the hydration-shell waters, these spikes might be related to the global property of the water solvent crossing the Widom line.

  2. Dynamical transition, hydrophobic interface, and the temperature dependence of electrostatic fluctuations in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebard, David N.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have revealed a dramatic increase, with increasing temperature, of the amplitude of electrostatic fluctuations caused by water at the active site of metalloprotein plastocyanin. The increased breadth of electrostatic fluctuations, expressed in terms of the reorganization energy of changing the redox state of the protein, is related to the formation of the hydrophobic protein-water interface, allowing large-amplitude collective fluctuations of the water density in the protein’s first solvation shell. On top of the monotonic increase of the reorganization energy with increasing temperature, we have observed a spike at ≃220K also accompanied by a significant slowing of the exponential collective Stokes shift dynamics. In contrast to the local density fluctuations of the hydration-shell waters, these spikes might be related to the global property of the water solvent crossing the Widom line or undergoing a weak first-order transition.

  3. Experimental study of temperature fluctuations in forced stably stratified turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Eidelman, A; Gluzman, Y; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2013-01-01

    We study experimentally temperature fluctuations in stably stratified forced turbulence in air flow. In the experiments with an imposed vertical temperature gradient, the turbulence is produced by two oscillating grids located nearby the side walls of the chamber. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to determine the turbulent and mean velocity fields, and a specially designed temperature probe with sensitive thermocouples is employed to measure the temperature field. We found that the ratio [(\\ell_x \

  4. Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a normally stagnant pipe connected downward to a high velocity and high temperature main pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira, E-mail: a-naka@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Miyoshi, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Oumaya, Toru [Mechanical Engineering Group, Nuclear Power Division, Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., 8 Yokota, 13 Goichi, Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1141 (Japan); Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Shigeo; Hamatani, Daisuke; Hase, Masatsugu; Onojima, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Saito, Atsushi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Higashinada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Flow patterns in a branch pipe with a closed end were observed by visualization. • The penetration length was investigated using experiments and numerical simulations. • The temperature fluctuation mechanism related to spiral flow was discussed. - Abstract: Numerous pipes branch off from the main pipes in power plant facilities. Main pipe flow initiates a cavity flow in a downward branch pipe with a closed end and a thermally stratified layer may form in the branch pipe if there is significant temperature difference in the main and branch pipe fluids. Fluctuation of a thermally stratified layer may initiate thermal fatigue crack in the branch pipe. In the present study, flow structures and temperature fluctuations in a branch pipe are investigated by experiments and numerical simulations to understand detailed behavior of the layer in a straight pipe and in a bent pipe. The penetration length of the main flow is measured for various main pipe flow velocities. The flow patterns in a straight pipe are divided into three regions by visualization with a tracer method, i.e., cavity flow in region 1, disturbed flow in the transition region, and spiral flow in region 2. The fluid temperature fluctuation in a straight pipe after the increase of main pipe flow velocity is attenuated in several hundred seconds since the thermal stratified layer goes down under the area into which the spiral vortex reaches. The fluid temperature in a bent pipe fluctuates when the spiral vortex reaches its lowest point after a long time period. Periodical velocity fluctuations during several tens second period are observed in the spiral flow. The mechanism of temperature fluctuation near the thermal stratified layer is considered with respect to the interference by the spiral flow and the fixed thermal stratified layer at the bent section by the cold water provided from the horizontal section.

  5. Melt nucleating and the three-dimension steady model of the temperature fluctuation with convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingwen Chen; Renji Sun; Zidong Wang; Fengying Wang

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional steady model of temperature fluctuation with melt convection is studied. It is proved that there exists a unique and stable solution in the model and the solution is expressed in a Fourier series form. It theoretically conf1rms the mechanism of melt nucleating: as long as the convection with transverse directions exists, the melt temperature on the front of the solidliquid interface would be not only periodical along the direction which is perpendicular to the direction of crystal growth, but also oscillatory and exponential decay along the direction of crystal growth; this oscillatory property, i.e. temperature fluctuation, leads to local supercooling, accelerates local temperature fluctuation and then results in a large number of nuclei.

  6. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  7. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    a generalized Arrhenius law. We discuss the hypothesis that, upon cooling to a measuring temperature within the spin glass state, there is a range of dynamically in-equivalent configurations in which the system can be trapped, and check within a numerical barrier model simulation, that this  leads to sub...

  8. Metabolic Responses of Chick Embryos to Short-Term Temperature Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, A.; Brand, van den H.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Meijerhof, R.; Kemp, B.

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study embryonic metabolic responses to short-term temperature fluctuations in order to explore the possibilities of using embryonic metabolic responses as a tool to control the incubation process. In the first experiment, eggshell temperature (ET) in the control g

  9. Fluctuations of the cosmic background temperature in unstable-particle cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Khlopov, M.Y.

    1985-07-01

    Introduction of unstable elementary particles of finite mass into the standard cosmological model will weaken the predicted temperature fluctuations of the microwave background on all angular scales, except perhaps for the quadrupole mode. The small-scale anisotropy is estimated. Analysis of large-scale temperature anisotropies might test the unstable-particle model.

  10. Transport Coefficients at Zero Temperature from Extremal Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Edalati, Mohammad; Leigh, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we study transport coefficients of a strongly-coupled (2 +1)-dimensional boundary field theory at zero temperature and finite charge density. The boundary field theory under consideration is dual to the extremal Reissner-Nordstrom AdS(4) black hole in the bulk. We show that, like the cases of scalar and spinor operators studied in arXiv:0907.2694 [hep-th], the correlators of charge (vector) current and energy-momentum (tensor) operators exhibit scaling behavior at low frequency. The existence of such low frequency behavior is related to the fact that the near-horizon geometry of the extremal black hole background has an AdS(2) factor. We carefully calculate the shear viscosity (at zero temperature) and show that the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density takes the value of 1/4\\pi. Because of the AdS(2) factor, we argue that this result stays the same for all d-dimensional boundary field theories dual to the extremal Reissner-Nordstrom AdS(d+1) black holes. Also, w...

  11. Synthesis and microdiffraction at extreme pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Meng, Yue

    2013-10-07

    High pressure compounds and polymorphs are investigated for a broad range of purposes such as determine structures and processes of deep planetary interiors, design materials with novel properties, understand the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to very high stresses as in explosions or impacts. Synthesis and structural analysis of materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature entails remarkable technical challenges. In the laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), very high pressure is generated between the tips of two opposing diamond anvils forced against each other; focused infrared laser beams, shined through the diamonds, allow to reach very high temperatures on samples absorbing the laser radiation. When the LH-DAC is installed in a synchrotron beamline that provides extremely brilliant x-ray radiation, the structure of materials under extreme conditions can be probed in situ. LH-DAC samples, although very small, can show highly variable grain size, phase and chemical composition. In order to obtain the high resolution structural analysis and the most comprehensive characterization of a sample, we collect diffraction data in 2D grids and combine powder, single crystal and multigrain diffraction techniques. Representative results obtained in the synthesis of a new iron oxide, Fe4O5 (1) will be shown.

  12. Risky Adaptation: The Effect of Temperature Extremes on HIV Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R.

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has linked rainfall shock to an increase in HIV prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa. In this paper we take advantage of repeated waves of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and a new high resolution climate dataset for the African continent to test the non-linear relationship between temperature and HIV. We find a strong and significant relationship between recent high temperatures and increases in HIV prevalence in a region. We then test the effect of temperature on risk factors that may contribute to this increase. High temperatures are linked to an increase in sexual violence, number of partners and a decrease in condom usage - all of which may contribute to the uptake in HIV rate. This paper contributes to the literature on adaptation from two standpoints. First, we suggest that some behavioral changes that are classed as adaptations, in the sense that they allow for consumption smoothing in the face of extreme temperatures, may carry unexpected risks to the individuals involved. Second, we find preliminary evidence that the relationship between temperature and these risky behaviors is diminished in regions prone to higher temperatures, suggesting some adaptation is possible in the long run.

  13. Baryon Number, Strangeness and Electric Charge Fluctuations in QCD at High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, M; Jung, C; Karsch, F; Kaczmarek, O; Laermann, E; Mawhinney, R D; Miao, C; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Söldner, W

    2008-01-01

    We analyze baryon number, strangeness and electric charge fluctuations as well as their correlations in QCD at high temperature. We present results obtained from lattice calculations performed with an improved staggered fermion action (p4-action) at two values of the lattice cut-off with almost physical up and down quark masses and a physical value for the strange quark mass. We compare these results, with an ideal quark gas at high temperature and a hadron resonance gas model at low temperature. We find that fluctuations and correlations are well described by the former already for temperatures about 1.5 times the transition temperature. At low temperature qualitative features of the lattice results are well described by a hadron resonance gas model. Higher order cumulants, which become increasingly sensitive to the light pions, however show deviations from a resonance gas in the vicinity of the transition temperature.

  14. Experimental study of turbulence induced wall temperature fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Anirban; Kleissl, Jan; Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent heat transport is critical in engineering applications and atmospheric flows. The relative strength of background shear and buoyancy near the wall influences coherent structures responsible for much of the heat transport. Previous studies show that shear dominated flow causes streaky-like structures; whereas buoyancy dominated flow causes cell-like structures. In this work, we investigated the influence of flow structures on the wall temperature and heat flux in a convective atmospheric boundary layer. Turbulence data at different heights and high frequency wall temperature were obtained during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field campaign at Lannemezan, France from 7 June - 8 July, 2011. Conditional averaging confirms that the warm wall causes warm ejection events, and cold sweep events cause cooling of the wall. The wall temperature structures move along the wind and their advection speed is close to the wind speed of the upper logarithmic layer and mixed layer, have a size of about 0.2 times the boundary layer depth, become streakier with stability and its standard deviation follows a -1/3 power law with stability parameter, Obukhov length. We are thankful to all Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field campaign participants for data sharing and funding from a NASA New Investigator Program award.

  15. Recent trends of extreme temperature indices for the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, D.; Carvalho, M. J.; Marta-Almeida, M.; Melo-Gonçalves, P.; Rocha, A.

    2016-08-01

    Climate change and extreme climate events have a significant impact on societies and ecosystems. As a result, climate change projections, especially related with extreme temperature events, have gained increasing importance due to their impacts on the well-being of the population and ecosystems. However, most studies in the field are based on coarse global climate models (GCMs). In this study, we perform a high resolution downscaling simulation to evaluate recent trends of extreme temperature indices. The model used was Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) forced by MPI-ESM-LR, which has been shown to be one of the more robust models to simulate European climate. The domain used in the simulations includes the Iberian Peninsula and the simulation covers the 1986-2005 period (i.e. recent past). In order to study extreme temperature events, trends were computed using the Theil-Sen method for a set of temperature indexes defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). For this, daily values of minimum and maximum temperatures were used. The trends of the indexes were computed for annual and seasonal values and the Mann-Kendall Trend test was used to evaluate their statistical significance. In order to validate the results, a second simulation, in which WRF was forced by ERA-Interim, was performed. The results suggest an increase in the number of warm days and warm nights, especially during summer and negative trends for cold nights and cold days for the summer and spring. For the winter, contrary to the expected, the results suggest an increase in cold days and cold nights (warming hiatus). This behavior is supported by the WRF simulation forced by ERA-Interim for the autumn days, pointing to an extension of the warming hiatus phenomenon to the remaining seasons. These results should be used with caution since the period used to calculate the trends may not be long enough for this purpose. However, the general sign of trends are similar for

  16. Simulation of extreme temperature over Odisha during May 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Gouda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An extreme temperature event (heat wave over the state of Odisha was unique as it lasted for about 2 weeks in the 3rd and 4th weeks of May 2015. There was a similar severe heat wave in western and central Odisha in the month of April 1998. The interesting feature of the recent episodic heat wave is that it prevailed in the late pre-monsoon season with wider spread in the state of Odisha. Around 12–15 cities experienced a daily maximum temperature of over 45 °C during the strong heat wave period, and 25th −27th May was declared as the red box zone. In this study, we first analysed the intense summer temperature of 2015 May using India Meteorological Department observations of daily maximum temperature. The observed heat wave phenomenon was then simulated using the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRFV3 at 2-km horizontal resolution to assess its ability to forecast such a rare event. The observational analysis clearly indicated that this episodic event was unique both in terms of intensity, geographical spread and duration. An optimized configuration of the WRF model is proposed and implemented for the simulation of the episodic heat wave phenomenon (daily maximum temperature over the state of Odisha. The time-ensemble simulation of the temperature is shown to be in close agreement with the station-scale observations.

  17. [Sports and extreme conditions. Cardiovascular incidence in long term exertion and extreme temperatures (heat, cold)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, B; Savourey, G

    2001-06-30

    During ultra-endurance exercise, both increase in body temperature and dehydration due to sweat losses, lead to a decrease in central blood volume. The heart rate drift allows maintaining appropriate cardiac output, in order to satisfy both muscle perfusion and heat transfer requirements by increasing skin blood flow. The resulting dehydration can impair thermal regulation and increase the risks of serious accidents as heat stroke. Endurance events, lasting more than 8 hours, result in large sweat sodium chloride losses. Thus, ingestion of large amounts of water with poor salt intake can induce symptomatic hyponatremia (plasma sodium extreme condition.

  18. Magnetic fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, S D; Howes, G G; Quataert, E; Salem, C; Sundkvist, D

    2009-01-01

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here we use approximately 1 million independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta ($\\beta_\\parallel \\gtrsim 1$) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. The power in this frequency (the 'dissipation') range is often considered to be driven by the solar wind turbulent cascade, an interpretation which should be qualified in light of the present results. In particular, we show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature aniso...

  19. The impact of temperature fluctuations on the large scale clustering of the Ly$\\alpha$ forest

    CERN Document Server

    Greig, Bradley; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    We develop a semi-analytic method for assessing the impact of the large scale IGM temperature fluctuations expected following He${\\rm\\,{\\scriptstyle II}}$ reionization on three dimensional clustering measurements of the Ly$\\alpha$ forest. Our methodology builds upon the existing large volume, mock Ly$\\alpha$ forest survey simulations presented by Greig et al. (2011) by including a prescription for a spatially inhomogeneous ionising background, temperature fluctuations induced by patchy He${\\rm\\,{\\scriptstyle II}}$ photo-heating and the clustering of quasars. This approach enables us to achieve a dynamic range within our semi-analytic model substantially larger than currently feasible with computationally expensive, fully numerical simulations. The results agree well with existing numerical simulations, with large scale temperature fluctuations introducing a scale dependent increase in the spherically averaged 3D Ly$\\alpha$ forest power spectrum of up to 20-30 per cent at wavenumbers $k\\sim0.02$ Mpc$^{-1}$. Al...

  20. The importance of temperature fluctuations in understanding mosquito population dynamics and malaria risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Thomas, Matthew B.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is a key environmental driver of Anopheles mosquito population dynamics; understanding its central role is important for these malaria vectors. Mosquito population responses to temperature fluctuations, though important across the life history, are poorly understood at a population level. We used stage-structured, temperature-dependent delay-differential equations to conduct a detailed exploration of the impacts of diurnal and annual temperature fluctuations on mosquito population dynamics. The model allows exploration of temperature-driven temporal changes in adult age structure, giving insights into the population’s capacity to vector malaria parasites. Because of temperature-dependent shifts in age structure, the abundance of potentially infectious mosquitoes varies temporally, and does not necessarily mirror the dynamics of the total adult population. In addition to conducting the first comprehensive theoretical exploration of fluctuating temperatures on mosquito population dynamics, we analysed observed temperatures at four locations in Africa covering a range of environmental conditions. We found both temperature and precipitation are needed to explain the observed malaria season in these locations, enhancing our understanding of the drivers of malaria seasonality and how temporal disease risk may shift in response to temperature changes. This approach, tracking both mosquito abundance and age structure, may be a powerful tool for understanding current and future malaria risk.

  1. Biodegradation of Toluene Under Seasonal and Diurnal Fluctuations of Soil-Water Temperature.

    KAUST Repository

    Yadav, Brijesh K

    2012-05-12

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of varying soil-water temperature on biodegradation of toluene under aerobic conditions. To see the seasonal impact of temperature, three sets of batch experiments were conducted at three different constant temperatures: 10°C, 21°C, and 30°C. These conditions were considered to represent (1) winter, (2) spring and/or autumn, and (3) summer seasons, respectively, at many polluted sites. Three additional sets of batch experiments were performed under fluctuating soil-water temperature cases (21<>10°C, 30<>21°C, and 10<>30°C) to mimic the day-night temperature patterns expected during the year. The batches were put at two different temperatures alternatively to represent the day (high-temperature) and night (low-temperature) times. The results of constant- and fluctuating-temperature experiments show that toluene degradation is strongly dependent on soil-water temperature level. An almost two-fold increase in toluene degradation time was observed for every 10°C decrease in temperature for constant-temperature cases. Under fluctuating-temperature conditions, toluene degraders were able to overcome the temperature stress and continued thriving during all considered weather scenarios. However, a slightly longer time was taken compared to the corresponding time at daily mean temperature conditions. The findings of this study are directly useful for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted sites having significant diurnal and seasonal variations of soil-water temperature.

  2. Biodegradation of Toluene Under Seasonal and Diurnal Fluctuations of Soil-Water Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Brijesh K; Shrestha, Shristi R; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2012-09-01

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of varying soil-water temperature on biodegradation of toluene under aerobic conditions. To see the seasonal impact of temperature, three sets of batch experiments were conducted at three different constant temperatures: 10°C, 21°C, and 30°C. These conditions were considered to represent (1) winter, (2) spring and/or autumn, and (3) summer seasons, respectively, at many polluted sites. Three additional sets of batch experiments were performed under fluctuating soil-water temperature cases (2110°C, 3021°C, and 1030°C) to mimic the day-night temperature patterns expected during the year. The batches were put at two different temperatures alternatively to represent the day (high-temperature) and night (low-temperature) times. The results of constant- and fluctuating-temperature experiments show that toluene degradation is strongly dependent on soil-water temperature level. An almost two-fold increase in toluene degradation time was observed for every 10°C decrease in temperature for constant-temperature cases. Under fluctuating-temperature conditions, toluene degraders were able to overcome the temperature stress and continued thriving during all considered weather scenarios. However, a slightly longer time was taken compared to the corresponding time at daily mean temperature conditions. The findings of this study are directly useful for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted sites having significant diurnal and seasonal variations of soil-water temperature.

  3. Geographic variation in the flood-induced fluctuating temperature requirement for germination in Setaria parviflora seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, F P O; Insausti, P

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to search for specific seed germinative strategies related to flooding escape in Setaria parviflora, a common species across the Americas. For this purpose, we investigated induction after floods, in relation to fluctuating temperature requirements for germination in seeds from mountain, floodplain and successional grasslands. A laboratory experiment was conducted in which seeds were imbibed or immersed in water at 5°C. Seeds were also buried in flood-prone and upland grasslands and exhumed during the flooding season. Additionally, seeds were buried in flooded or drained grassland mesocosms. Germination of exhumed seeds was assayed at 25°C or at 20°C/30°C in the dark or in the presence of red light pulses. After submergence or soil flooding, a high fraction (>32%) of seeds from the floodplain required fluctuating temperatures to germinate. In contrast, seeds from the mountains showed maximum differences in germination between fluctuating and constant temperature treatment only after imbibition (35%) or in non-flooded soil conditions (40%). The fluctuating temperature requirement was not clearly related to the foregoing conditions in the successional grassland seeds. Maximum germination could also be attained with red light pulses to seeds from mountain and successional grasslands. Results show that the fluctuating temperature requirement might help floodplain seeds to germinate after floods, indicating a unique feature of the dormancy of S. parviflora seeds from floodplains, which suggests an adaptive advantage aimed at postponing emergence during inundation periods. In contrast, the fluctuating temperature required for germination among seeds from mountain and successional grasslands show its importance for gap detection. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. Measurement System of Reducing Temperature Fluctuation of Thermostat Bath for Calibrating Thermocouple

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Min; Liang, Feixia; Xie, Yue; Huang, Ruguo; Yuan, Haitao; Lu, Jiahua

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Based on the periodic unsteady state heat conduction theory, a new measurement system of reducing temperature fluctuation of thermostat bath was developed in order to obtain a liquid environment with uniform and constant temperature controlled for the measurement requirements of calibrating thermocouple. The experimental results show that the temperature stability in this measurement system is superior to that in traditional system. The measurement system had the advan...

  5. Temperature fluctuations and the thermodynamic determination of the cooperativity length in glass forming liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Y. Z.; Zorn, R.; Holderer, O.; Schmelzer, J. W. P.; Schick, C.; Donth, E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to decide which of the two possible thermodynamic expressions for the cooperativity length in glass forming liquids is the correct one. In the derivation of these two expressions, the occurrence of temperature fluctuations in the considered nanoscale subsystems is either included or neglected. Consequently, our analysis gives also an answer to the widely discussed problem whether temperature fluctuations have to be generally accounted for in thermodynamics or not. To this end, the characteristic length-scales at equal times and temperatures for propylene glycol were determined independently from AC calorimetry in both the above specified ways and from quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS), and compared. The result shows that the cooperative length determined from QENS coincides most consistently with the cooperativity length determined from AC calorimetry measurements for the case that the effect of temperature fluctuations is incorporated in the description. This conclusion indicates that—accounting for temperature fluctuations—the characteristic length can be derived by thermodynamic considerations from the specific parameters of the liquid at glass transition and that temperature does fluctuate in small systems.

  6. Detection of orbital fluctuations above the structural transition temperature in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arham, H.Z.; Hunt, C.R.; Park, W.K.; Gillett, J.; Das, S.D.; Sebastian, S.E.; Xu, Z.J.; Lin, Z.W.; Li, Q.; Gu, G.; Thaler, Alexander; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Chung, D.Y.; Kanatzidis, M.G.; Greene, L.H.

    2012-06-18

    We use point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) to probe AEFe2As2 (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba) and Fe1+yTe. For AE=Sr,Ba we detect orbital fluctuations above TS while for AE=Ca these fluctuations start below TS. Co doping preserves the orbital fluctuations while K doping suppresses it. The fluctuations are only seen at those dopings and temperatures where an in-plane resistive anisotropy is known to exist. We predict an in-plane resistive anisotropy of Fe1+yTe above TS. Our data are examined in light of the recent work by Lee and Phillips (arXiv:1110.5917v2). We also study how joule heating in the PCS junctions impacts the spectra. Spectroscopic information is only obtained from those PCS junctions that are free of heating effects while those PCS junctions that are in the thermal regime display bulk resistivity phenomena.

  7. Pressure, density, temperature and entropy fluctuations in compressible turbulent plane channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of thermodynamic state-variables in compressible aerodynamic wall-turbulence, using results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent plane channel flow. The basic transport equations governing the behaviour of thermodynamic variables (density, pressure, temperature and entropy) are reviewed and used to derive the exact transport equations for the variances and fluxes (transport by the fluctuating velocity field) of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The scaling with Reynolds and Mach number of compressible turbulent plane channel flow is discussed. Correlation coefficients and higher-order statistics of the thermodynamic fluctuations are examined. Finally, detailed budgets of the transport equations for the variances and fluxes of the thermodynamic variables from a well-resolved DNS are analysed. Implications of these results both to the understanding of the thermodynamic interactions in compressible wall-turbulence and to possible improvements in statistical...

  8. Study of cross correlation coefficients of temperature fluctuations in a longitudinal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, L.G.; Manchkha, S.P.; Sviridov, V.G.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the effect that a longitudinal magnetic field has on correlation coefficients of temperature fluctuations in a transverse direction. This effect on those fluctuations was shown to be small in comparison to its effect on the coefficients of longitudinal correlation. This indicates that the structure of the temperature field becomes more anisotropic so that there is an increase in the scale of turbulent disturbances in the direction of the magnetic field's force lines. 1 figure, 2 references.

  9. Fine-scale temperature fluctuation and modulation of Dirofilaria immitis larval development in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Nicholas; Harrington, Laura

    2015-04-15

    We evaluated degree-day predictions of Dirofilaria immitis development (HDU) under constant and fluctuating temperature treatments of equal average daily temperature. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were infected with D. immitis microfilariae and parasite development was recorded at set time points in dissected mosquitoes. Time to L3 development in Malpighian tubules and detection in mosquito heads was shorter for larvae experiencing a daily regime of 19±9°C than larvae at constant 19°C; larval development rate in Malpighian tubules was slower in fluctuating regimes maintained above the 14°C developmental threshold than larvae under constant temperatures. We showed that hourly temperature modeling more accurately predicted D. immitis development to infective L3 stage. Development time differed between fluctuating and constant temperature treatments spanning the 14°C development threshold, implicating a physiological basis for these discrepancies. We conclude that average daily temperature models underestimate L3 development-and consequently dog heartworm transmission risk-at colder temperatures, and spatiotemporal models of D. immitis transmission risk should use hourly temperature data when analyzing high daily temperature ranges spanning 14°C. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fine-scale temperature fluctuation and modulation of Dirofilaria immitis larval development in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Nicholas; Harrington, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated degree-day predictions of Dirofilaria immitis development (HDU) under constant and fluctuating temperature treatments of equal average daily temperature. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were infected with D. immitis microfilariae and parasite development was recorded at set time points in dissected mosquitoes. Time to L3 development in Malpighian tubules and detection in mosquito heads was shorter for larvae experiencing a daily regime of 19±9°C than larvae at constant 19°C; larval development rate in Malpighian tubules was slower in fluctuating regimes maintained above the 14°C developmental threshold than larvae under constant temperatures. We showed that hourly temperature modeling more accurately predicted D. immitis development to infective L3 stage. Development time differed between fluctuating and constant temperature treatments spanning the 14°C development threshold, implicating a physiological basis for these discrepancies. We conclude that average daily temperature models underestimate L3 development—and consequently dog heartworm transmission risk—at colder temperatures, and spatio-temporal models of D. immitis transmission risk should use hourly temperature data when analyzing high daily temperature ranges spanning 14°C. PMID:25747489

  11. Climate change and the impact of extreme temperatures on aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffel, E.; Horton, R.

    2014-12-01

    Weather is the most significant factor affecting aircraft operations, accounting for 70-80% of passenger delays and costing airlines hundreds of millions of dollars per year in lost revenue. Temperature and airport elevation significantly influence the maximum allowable takeoff weight of an aircraft by changing the surface air density and thus the lift produced at a given speed. For a given runway length, airport elevation, and aircraft type there is a temperature threshold above which the airplane cannot take off at its maximum weight and thus must be weight restricted. The number of summer days necessitating weight restriction has increased since 1980 along with the observed increase in surface temperature. Climate change is projected to increase mean temperatures at all airports and significantly increase the frequency and severity of extreme heat events at some. These changes will negatively affect aircraft performance, leading to increased weight restrictions especially at airports with short runways and little room to expand. For a Boeing 737-800 aircraft, we find that the number of weight restriction days between May and September will increase by 50-100% at four major airports in the United States by 2050-2070 under the RCP8.5 high emissions scenario. These performance reductions may have a significant economic effect on the airline industry, leading to lower profits and higher passenger fares. Increased weight restrictions have previously been identified as potential impacts of climate change, but this study is the first to quantify the effect of higher temperatures on commercial aviation.

  12. On extreme rainfall intensity increases with air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Gaal, Ladislav; Szolgay, Jan; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The water vapour holding capacity of air increases at about 7% per degree C according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. This is one of the arguments why a warmer future atmosphere, being able to hold more moisture, will generate higher extreme precipitation intensities. However, several empirical studies have recently demonstrated an increase in extreme rain intensities with air temperature above CC rates, in the range 7-14% per degree C worldwide (called super-CC rates). This was observed especially for shorter duration rainfall, i.e. in hourly and finer resolution data (e.g. review in Westra et al., 2014). The super-CC rate was attributed to positive feedbacks between water vapour and the updraft dynamics in convective clouds and lateral supply (convergence) of moisture. In addition, mixing of storm types was shown to be potentially responsible for super-CC rates in empirical studies. Assuming that convective events are accompanied by lightning, we will show on a large rainfall dataset in Switzerland (30 year records of 10-min and 1-hr data from 59 stations) that while the average rate of increase in extreme rainfall intensity (95th percentile) is 6-7% in no-lightning events and 8-9% in lightning events, it is 11-13% per degree C when all events are combined (Molnar et al., 2015). These results are relevant for climate change studies which predict shifts in storm types in a warmer climate in some parts of the world. The observation that extreme rain intensity and air temperature are positively correlated has consequences for the stochastic modelling of rainfall. Most current stochastic models do not explicitly include a direct rain intensity-air temperature dependency beyond applying factors of change predicted by climate models to basic statistics of precipitation. Including this dependency explicitly in stochastic models will allow, for example in the nested modelling approach of Paschalis et al. (2014), the random cascade disaggregation routine to be

  13. Effect of extreme data loss on long-range correlated and anticorrelated signals quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2010-03-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is an improved method of classical fluctuation analysis for nonstationary signals where embedded polynomial trends mask the intrinsic correlation properties of the fluctuations. To better identify the intrinsic correlation properties of real-world signals where a large amount of data is missing or removed due to artifacts, we investigate how extreme data loss affects the scaling behavior of long-range power-law correlated and anticorrelated signals. We introduce a segmentation approach to generate surrogate signals by randomly removing data segments from stationary signals with different types of long-range correlations. The surrogate signals we generate are characterized by four parameters: (i) the DFA scaling exponent α of the original correlated signal u(i) , (ii) the percentage p of the data removed from u(i) , (iii) the average length μ of the removed (or remaining) data segments, and (iv) the functional form P(l) of the distribution of the length l of the removed (or remaining) data segments. We find that the global scaling exponent of positively correlated signals remains practically unchanged even for extreme data loss of up to 90%. In contrast, the global scaling of anticorrelated signals changes to uncorrelated behavior even when a very small fraction of the data is lost. These observations are confirmed on two examples of real-world signals: human gait and commodity price fluctuations. We further systematically study the local scaling behavior of surrogate signals with missing data to reveal subtle deviations across scales. We find that for anticorrelated signals even 10% of data loss leads to significant monotonic deviations in the local scaling at large scales from the original anticorrelated to uncorrelated behavior. In contrast, positively correlated signals show no observable changes in the local scaling for up to 65% of data loss, while for larger percentage of data loss, the local scaling shows overestimated

  14. Fluctuations at a low mean temperature accelerate dengue virus transmission by Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B Carrington

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental factors such as temperature can alter mosquito vector competence for arboviruses. Results from recent studies indicate that daily fluctuations around an intermediate mean temperature (26°C reduce vector competence of Aedes aeygpti for dengue viruses (DENV. Theoretical predictions suggest that the mean temperature in combination with the magnitude of the diurnal temperature range (DTR mediate the direction of these effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the effect of temperature fluctuations on Ae. aegypti vector competence for DENV serotype-1 at high and low mean temperatures, and confirmed this theoretical prediction. A small DTR had no effect on vector competence around a high (30°C mean, but a large DTR at low temperature (20°C increased the proportion of infected mosquitoes with a disseminated infection by 60% at 21 and 28 days post-exposure compared to a constant 20°C. This effect resulted from a marked shortening of DENV extrinsic incubation period (EIP in its mosquito vector; i.e., a decrease from 29.6 to 18.9 days under the fluctuating vs. constant temperature treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Ae. aegypti exposed to large fluctuations at low temperatures have a significantly shorter virus EIP than under constant temperature conditions at the same mean, leading to a considerably greater potential for DENV transmission. These results emphasize the value of accounting for daily temperature variation in an effort to more accurately understand and predict the risk of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission, provide a mechanism for sustained DENV transmission in endemic areas during cooler times of the year, and indicate that DENV transmission could be more efficient in temperate regions than previously anticipated.

  15. Extreme warm temperatures alter forest phenology and productivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, Richard A; Dash, Jadu; Rodriguez-Galiano, Victor F; Janous, Dalibor; Pavelka, Marian; Marek, Michal V

    2016-09-01

    Recent climate warming has shifted the timing of spring and autumn vegetation phenological events in the temperate and boreal forest ecosystems of Europe. In many areas spring phenological events start earlier and autumn events switch between earlier and later onset. Consequently, the length of growing season in mid and high latitudes of European forest is extended. However, the lagged effects (i.e. the impact of a warm spring or autumn on the subsequent phenological events) on vegetation phenology and productivity are less explored. In this study, we have (1) characterised extreme warm spring and extreme warm autumn events in Europe during 2003-2011, and (2) investigated if direct impact on forest phenology and productivity due to a specific warm event translated to a lagged effect in subsequent phenological events. We found that warmer events in spring occurred extensively in high latitude Europe producing a significant earlier onset of greening (OG) in broadleaf deciduous forest (BLDF) and mixed forest (MF). However, this earlier OG did not show any significant lagged effects on autumnal senescence. Needleleaf evergreen forest (NLEF), BLDF and MF showed a significantly delayed end of senescence (EOS) as a result of extreme warm autumn events; and in the following year's spring phenological events, OG started significantly earlier. Extreme warm spring events directly led to significant (p=0.0189) increases in the productivity of BLDF. In order to have a complete understanding of ecosystems response to warm temperature during key phenological events, particularly autumn events, the lagged effect on the next growing season should be considered.

  16. The Motion of Chondrules and Other Particles in a Protoplanetary Disk with Temperature Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Loesche, Christoph; Kelling, Thorben; Teiser, Jens; Ebel, Denton S

    2016-01-01

    We consider the mechanism of photophoretic transport in protoplanetary disks that are optically thick to radiation. Here, photophoresis is not caused by the central star but by temperature fluctuations that subject suspended solid particles, including chondrules, to non-isotropic thermal radiation within the disk. These short-lived temperature fluctuations can explain time-of-flight size sorting and general number density enhancements. The same mechanism will also lead to velocity fluctuations of dust aggregates beyond $100\\,\\mathrm{m\\,s^{-1}}$ for mm-sized particles in protoplanetary disks. Applying this in future research will change our understanding of the early phases of collisional dust evolution and aggregate growth as particles cross the bouncing barrier and as mass transfer rates are altered.

  17. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes.

  18. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem and quantum tunneling with dissipation at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Fujikawa, K; Fujikawa, Kazuo; Terashima, Hiroaki

    1998-01-01

    A reformulation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of Callen and Welton is presented in such a manner that the basic idea of Feynman-Vernon and Caldeira -Leggett of using an infinite number of oscillators to simulate the dissipative medium is realized manifestly without actually introducing oscillators. If one assumes the existence of a well defined dissipative coefficient $R(\\omega)$ which little depends on the temperature in the energy region we are interested in, the spontanous and induced emissions as well as induced absorption of these effective oscillators with correct Bose distribution automatically appears. Combined with a dispersion relation, we reproduce the tunneling formula in the presence of dissipation at finite temperature without referring to an explicit model Lagrangian. The fluctuation-dissipation theorem of Callen-Welton is also generalized to the fermionic dissipation (or fluctuation) which allows a transparent physical interpretation in terms of second quantized fermionic oscillators....

  19. Linear metric and temperature fluctuations of a charged plasma in a primordial magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Z

    2015-01-01

    We discuss tensor metric perturbations in a magnetic field around the homogeneous Juttner equilibrium of massless particles in an expanding universe. We solve the Liouville equation and derive the energy-momentum tensor up to linear terms in the metric and in the magnetic field.The term linear in the magnetic field is different from zero if the total charge of the primordial plasma is non-zero. We obtain an analytic formula for temperature fluctuations treating the tensor metric perturbations and the magnetic field as independent random variables. Assuming a cutoff on large momenta of the magnetic spectral function we show that the presence of the magnetic field can discriminate only low multipoles in the multipole expansion of temperature fluctuations. In such a case the term linear in the magnetic field can be more important than the quadratic one (corresponding to the fluctuations of the pure magnetic field).

  20. Large diurnal temperature fluctuations negatively influence Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) life-history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Lauren B; Seifert, Stephanie N; Willits, Neil H; Lambrechts, Louis; Scott, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variation in dengue virus transmission in northwestern Thailand is inversely related to the magnitude of diurnal temperature fluctuations, although mean temperature does not vary significantly across seasons. We tested the hypothesis that diurnal temperature fluctuations negatively influence epidemiologically important life-history traits of the primary dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (L.), compared with a constant 26 degrees C temperature. A large diurnal temperature range (DTR) (approximately equals 18 degrees C daily swing) extended immature development time (>1 d), lowered larval survival (approximately equals 6%), and reduced adult female reproductive output by 25% 14 d after blood feeding, relative to the constant 26 degreesC temperature. A small DTR (approximately equal 8 degrees C daily swing) led to a negligible or slightly positive effect on the life history traits tested. Our results indicate that there is a negative impact of large DTR on mosquito biology and are consistent with the hypothesis that, in at least some locations, large temperature fluctuations contribute to seasonal reduction in dengue virus transmission.

  1. Quantum Fluctuation in Mesoscopic Coupled LC Electric Circuits at FiniteTemperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xian-Ting; FAN Hong-Yi

    2001-01-01

    We consider the quantization of two coupled LC circuits with mutual inductance at a finite temperature T. It is shown that the quantum mechanical zero-point fluctuations of currents in the two circuits both increase with upgoing T. Thermal field dynamics and Weyl-Wigner theorern are used in our calculation of ensemble average of the observables.

  2. The height dependence of quiet-sun photospheric temperature fluctuations in observations and simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koza, J.; Kucera, A.; Rybák, J.; Wöhl, H.

    2006-01-01

    We derive rms temperature fluctuations as a function of height throughout the solar photosphere for the non-magnetic photosphere and a small area of enhanced magnetic activity, through semi-empirical inversion based on response functions of a 15-minute time sequence of 118″-long slit spectrograms ta

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF THE DAILY FLUCTUATIONS OF OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE ON THE INDOOR CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Zakharevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone (habitable zone induced by the periodic changes of outdoor air temperature was carried out with the use of numerical simulation of heat transfer processes in the heated room. The developed and programme-implemented two-dimensional physical and mathematical model takes into account unsteady nature of the complex conjugate heat transfer in building envelopes and indoor air spaces when using different types of heating devices. The design features of building structures and windows are considered. The model includes the equations of radiative heat transfer between indoor surfaces, window panes and outdoor environment. In the study, the harmonic changes of outside temperature are specified by the cosine law with the twenty-four-hour period. Two types of heaters are examined: radiator and underfloor heating. Heating output of the devices is specified time-invariable according to the thermal balance defined by the traditional method. Simulations are performed for the three combinations of heat-transfer properties of building structures. The quantitative characteristics of the induced indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone depending on the building envelope thermal inertia and the type of used heater were found out. The analysis of results yielded the following conclusions. Reducing inertia of glazing leads to more rapid penetration of outdoor temperature wave into the room. While the amplitude of the indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone remains constant by reason of the unchanged thermal inertia of the main building structures. The significant increase in the amplitude of harmonic changes of indoor air temperature within the occupied zone is observed when reducing inertia of walls and floors whereas the delay with respect to outside air temperature fluctuations remains almost invariable.

  4. Qualification of Fiber Optic Cables for Martian Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Lindensmith, Christian A.; Roberts, William T.; Rainen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Means have been developed for enabling fiber optic cables of the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometer instrument to survive ground operations plus the nominal 670 Martian conditions that include Martian summer and winter seasons. The purpose of this development was to validate the use of the rover external fiber optic cabling of ChemCam for space applications under the extreme thermal environments to be encountered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Flight-representative fiber optic cables were subjected to extreme temperature thermal cycling of the same diurnal depth (or delta T) as expected in flight, but for three times the expected number of in-flight thermal cycles. The survivability of fiber optic cables was tested for 600 cumulative thermal cycles from -130 to +15 C to cover the winter season, and another 1,410 cumulative cycles from -105 to +40 C to cover the summer season. This test satisfies the required 3 times the design margin that is a total of 2,010 thermal cycles (670 x 3). This development test included functional optical transmission tests during the course of the test. Transmission of the fiber optic cables was performed prior to and after 1,288 thermal cycles and 2,010 thermal cycles. No significant changes in transmission were observed on either of the two representative fiber cables subject through the 3X MSL mission life that is 2,010 thermal cycles.

  5. Temporal Fluctuations in Weather and Climate Extremes That Cause Economic and Human Health Impacts: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Kenneth E.; Pielke, Roger A., Jr.; Changnon, Stanley A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper reviews recent work on trends during this century in societal impacts (direct economic losses and fatalities) in the United States from extreme weather conditions and compares those with trends of associated atmospheric phenomena. Most measures of the economic impacts of weather and climate extremes over the past several decades reveal increasing losses. But trends in most related weather and climate extremes do not show comparable increases with time. This suggests that increasing losses are primarily due to increasing vulnerability arising from a variety of societal changes, including a growing population in higher risk coastal areas and large cities, more property subject to damage, and lifestyle and demographic changes subjecting lives and property to greater exposure.Flood damages and fatalities have generally increased in the last 25 years. While some have speculated that this may be due in part to a corresponding increase in the frequency of heavy rain events, the climate contribution to the observed impacts trends remains to be quantified. There has been a steady increase in hurricane losses. However, when changes in population, inflation, and wealth are considered, there is instead a downward trend. This is consistent with observations of trends in hurricane frequency and intensity. Increasing property losses due to thunderstorm-related phenomena (winds, hail, tornadoes) are explained entirely by changes in societal factors, consistent with the observed trends in the thunderstorm phenomena. Winter storm damages have increased in the last 10-15 years and this appears to be partially due to increases in the frequency of intense nor'easters. There is no evidence of changes in drought-related losses (although data are poor) and no apparent trend in climatic drought frequency. There is also no evidence of changes in the frequency of intense heat or cold waves.

  6. Long-range correlations in rectal temperature fluctuations of healthy infants during maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette Stern

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature are interdependent in infants, where instabilities in thermoregulation can contribute to apneas or even life-threatening events. Identifying abnormalities in thermoregulation is particularly important in the first 6 months of life, where autonomic regulation undergoes critical development. Fluctuations in body temperature have been shown to be sensitive to maturational stage as well as system failure in critically ill patients. We thus aimed to investigate the existence of fractal-like long-range correlations, indicative of temperature control, in night time rectal temperature (T(rec patterns in maturing infants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured T(rec fluctuations in infants every 4 weeks from 4 to 20 weeks of age and before and after immunization. Long-range correlations in the temperature series were quantified by the correlation exponent, alpha using detrended fluctuation analysis. The effects of maturation, room temperature, and immunization on the strength of correlation were investigated. We found that T(rec fluctuations exhibit fractal long-range correlations with a mean (SD alpha of 1.51 (0.11, indicating that T(rec is regulated in a highly correlated and hence deterministic manner. A significant increase in alpha with age from 1.42 (0.07 at 4 weeks to 1.58 (0.04 at 20 weeks reflects a change in long-range correlation behavior with maturation towards a smoother and more deterministic temperature regulation, potentially due to the decrease in surface area to body weight ratio in the maturing infant. alpha was not associated with mean room temperature or influenced by immunization CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the quantification of long-range correlations using alpha derived from detrended fluctuation analysis is an observer-independent tool which can distinguish developmental stages of night time T(rec pattern in young infants, reflective of maturation of

  7. A large temperature fluctuation may trigger an epidemic erythromelalgia outbreak in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Hualiang; Lv, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Gu, Yuzhou; Rutherford, Shannon; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun

    2015-03-01

    Although erythromelalgia (EM) has been documented in the literature for almost 150 years, it is still poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we examined the spatial distribution of epidemic EM, and explored the association between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks in China. We searched all peer-reviewed literature on primary epidemic EM outbreaks in China. A two-stage model was used to characterize the relationship between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks. We observed that epidemic EM outbreaks were reported from 13 provinces during 1960-2014 and they mainly occurred between February and March in southern China. The majority of EM cases were middle school students, with a higher incidence rate in female and resident students. The major clinical characteristics of EM cases included burning, sharp, tingling and/or stinging pain in toes, soles and/or dorsum of feet, fever, erythema and swelling. A large ``V''-shaped fluctuation of daily average temperature (TM) observed during the epidemic EM outbreaks was significantly associated with the number of daily EM cases (β = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.66 ~ 1.79), which indicated that this ``V''-shaped fluctuation of TM probably triggered the epidemic EM outbreaks.

  8. Numerical simulation of long-period fluid temperature fluctuation at a mixing tee for the thermal fatigue problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utanohara, Yoichi, E-mail: utanohara@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Nakamura, Akira, E-mail: a-naka@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koji@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto, E-mail: kasahara@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A large eddy simulation of a mixing tee was carried out. • Fluid temperature fluctuation could be predicted qualitatively. • Grid convergence was almost attained and the simulation continued until 100 s. • A longer-period temperature fluctuation than the well-known St = 0.2 appeared. • Prediction of long-period temperature fluctuations improves the thermal fatigue assessment. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue cracks may be initiated at mixing tees where high and low temperature fluids flow in and mix. According to a previous study, damage by thermal fatigue depends on the frequency of the fluid temperature fluctuation near the wall surface. Structures have the time constant of structural response that depends on physical properties of the structure and the gain of the frequency response tends to become maximum at the frequency lower than the typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation. Hence the effect of the lower frequency, that is, long-period temperature fluctuation is important for the thermal fatigue assessment. The typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation is about St = 0.2 (nearly 6 Hz), where St is Strouhal number and means non-dimensional frequency. In the experimental study by Miyoshi et al. (2014), a longer-period fluctuation than St = 0.2 was also observed. Results of a fluid–structure coupled analysis by Kamaya et al. (2011) showed this long-period temperature fluctuation causes severer damage to piping. In the present study, a large eddy simulation was carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the long-period fluid temperature fluctuation more quantitatively. Numerical simulation was conducted for the WATLON experiment which was the water experiment of a mixing tee performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Four computational grids were used to confirm grid convergence. In the short time (9 s) simulations, tendencies of time-averaged and fluctuated velocities could be followed. Time

  9. Coupled Nosé-Hoover equations of motion to implement a fluctuating heat-bath temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Moritsugu, Kei

    2016-03-01

    The Nosé-Hoover (NH) equation provides a universal and powerful computer simulation protocol to realize an equilibrium canonical temperature for a target physical system. Here we demonstrate a general formalism to couple such NH equations. We provide a coupled NH equation that is constructed by coupling the NH equation of a target physical system and the NH equation of a temperature system. Thus, in contrast to the conventional single NH equation, the heat-bath temperature is a dynamical variable. The temperature fluctuations are not ad hoc, but instead are generated by the newly defined temperature system, and the statistical distribution of the temperature is completely described with an arbitrarily given probability function. The current equations of motion thus describe the physical system that develops with a predistributed fluctuating temperature, which allows enhanced sampling of the physical system. Since the total system is governed by a prescribed distribution, the equilibrium of the physical system is also reconstructed by reweighting. We have formulated a scheme for specifically setting the distribution of the dynamical inverse temperature and demonstrate the statistical relationship between the dynamical and physical temperatures. The statistical features, dynamical properties, and sampling abilities of the current method are demonstrated via the distributions, trajectories, dynamical correlations, and free energy landscapes for both a model system and a biomolecular system. These results indicated that the current coupled NH scheme works well.

  10. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  11. Effective temperatures from the fluctuation-dissipation measurements in soft glassy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari-Farouji, S.; Mizuno, D.; Derks, D.; Wegdam, G. H.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Bonn, D.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the validity of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) and the applicability of the concept of effective temperature in a number of non-equilibrium soft glassy materials. Using a combination of passive and active microrheology to measure displacement fluctuations and the mechanical response function of probe particles embedded in the materials, we have directly tested the validity of the FDT. Our results show no violation of the FDT over several decades in frequency (1-104 Hz) for hard-sphere colloidal glasses and colloidal glasses and gels of Laponite. We further extended the bandwidth of our measurements to lower frequencies (down to 0.1 Hz) using video microscopy to measure the displacement fluctuations, again without finding any deviations from the FDT.

  12. Detrended fluctuation analysis of daily temperature records: Geographic dependence over Australia

    CERN Document Server

    Kir'aly, A; Kir\\'aly, Andrea; J\\'anosi, Imre M.

    2004-01-01

    Daily temperature anomaly records are analyzed (61 for Australia, 18 for Hungary) by means of detrended fluctuation analysis. Positive long range asymptotic correlations extending up to 5-10 years are detected for each case. Contrary to earlier claims, the correlation exponent is not universal for continental stations. Interestingly, the dominant factor is geographic latitude over Australia: the general tendency is a decrease of correlation exponent with increasing distance from the equator. This tendency is in a complete agreement with the results found by Tsonis et al. (1999) for 500-hPa height anomalies in the northern hemisphere. The variance of fluctuations exhibits an opposite trend, the larger is the distance from the equator, the larger the amplitude of intrinsic fluctuations. The presence of Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation is clearly identified for three stations at the north-eastern edge of the Australian continent.

  13. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  14. Generalized fluctuation-dissipation relation and effective temperature in off-equilibrium colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Claudio; di Leonardo, Roberto; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Ruocco, Giancarlo

    2010-03-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT), a fundamental result of equilibrium statistical physics, can be violated when a system is taken out of equilibrium. A generalization of FDT has been theoretically proposed for out-of-equilibrium systems; the kinetic temperature entering the fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) is substituted by a time-scale-dependent effective temperature. We combine the measurements of the correlation function of the rotational dynamics of colloidal particles obtained via dynamic light scattering with those of the birefringence response to study the generalized FDR in an off-equilibrium Laponite suspension undergoing aging. (i) We find that the FDT is strongly violated in the early stage of the aging process and is gradually recovered as the aging time increases and (ii) we determine the aging-time evolution of the effective temperature, comparing our results with those of previous experiments.

  15. Evolution of Temperature Fluctuation in a Thermal bath and, its implications in Hadronic and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Trambak; Sahoo, Raghunath; Samantray, Prasant

    2016-01-01

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuations inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation. Also, taking some existing realistic inputs we have analyzed the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation for the medium created after heavy-ion collisions. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations is investigated. Further, possible implications in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions are explored.

  16. Regional amplification of projected changes in extreme temperatures strongly controlled by soil moisture-temperature feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M. M.; Orth, R.; Cheruy, F.; Hagemann, S.; Lorenz, R.; Hurk, B. J. J. M.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2017-02-01

    Regional hot extremes are projected to increase more strongly than global mean temperature, with substantially larger changes than 2°C even if global warming is limited to this level. We investigate the role of soil moisture-temperature feedbacks for this response based on multimodel experiments for the 21st century with either interactive or fixed (late 20th century mean seasonal cycle) soil moisture. We analyze changes in the hottest days in each year in both sets of experiments, relate them to the global mean temperature increase, and investigate processes leading to these changes. We find that soil moisture-temperature feedbacks significantly contribute to the amplified warming of the hottest days compared to that of global mean temperature. This contribution reaches more than 70% in Central Europe and Central North America. Soil moisture trends are more important for this response than short-term soil moisture variability. These results are relevant for reducing uncertainties in regional temperature projections.

  17. Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2010-09-01

    This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

  18. Evaluation of extreme temperature events in northern Spain based on process control charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeta, M.; Valencia, J. L.; Saá, A.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Extreme climate events have recently attracted the attention of a growing number of researchers because these events impose a large cost on agriculture and associated insurance planning. This study focuses on extreme temperature events and proposes a new method for their evaluation based on statistical process control tools, which are unusual in climate studies. A series of minimum and maximum daily temperatures for 12 geographical areas of a Spanish region between 1931 and 2009 were evaluated by applying statistical process control charts to statistically test whether evidence existed for an increase or a decrease of extreme temperature events. Specification limits were determined for each geographical area and used to define four types of extreme anomalies: lower and upper extremes for the minimum and maximum anomalies. A new binomial Markov extended process that considers the autocorrelation between extreme temperature events was generated for each geographical area and extreme anomaly type to establish the attribute control charts for the annual fraction of extreme days and to monitor the occurrence of annual extreme days. This method was used to assess the significance of changes and trends of extreme temperature events in the analysed region. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of an attribute control chart for evaluating extreme temperature events. For example, the evaluation of extreme maximum temperature events using the proposed statistical process control charts was consistent with the evidence of an increase in maximum temperatures during the last decades of the last century.

  19. Need for Caution in Interpreting Daily Temperature Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardeshmukh, P. D.; Compo, G. P.; Penland, C.

    2014-12-01

    Given the substantial anthropogenic contribution to global warming, it is tempting to seek an anthropogenic component in any unusual recent weather event, or more generally in any recent change in extreme weather statistics. We caution that such detection and attribution efforts may, however, lead to wrong conclusions if the distinctively skewed and heavy-tailed features of the probability distributions of daily weather variations are not properly accounted for. Large deviations from the mean are far more common in such a non-Gaussian world than they are in a Gaussian world. In such a world, a mean climate shift is also generally accompanied by changes in the width and shape of the probability distribution. Consequently, even the sign of the changes in tail probabilities cannot be inferred unequivocally from the mean shift. These realities further complicate the establishment of significant changes in tail probabilities from historical records of limited length and accuracy. A possible solution is to exploit the fact that the salient non-Gaussian features of the observed distributions are captured in a general class of probability distributions introduced in the meteorological literature by Sardeshmukh and Sura (2009). These distributions, called Stochastically Generated Skewed (SGS) distributions (of which Gaussian distributions are special cases), are associated with modified forms of stochastically perturbed damped linear processes, and as such represent perhaps the simplest physically based non-Gaussian prototypes of the observed distributions. Importantly, the distribution of an SGS variable remains an SGS distribution under a mean climate shift. We show further that fitting SGS distributions to all daily values in limited climate records yields extreme value distributions of block maxima with smaller sampling uncertainties than GEV distributions fitted to only the block maxima. Extreme value analysis based on SGS distributions thus provides an attractive

  20. Cold wire constant voltage anemometry to measure temperature fluctuations and its application in a thermoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleve, Sarah; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of temperature fluctuations is essential for most thermoacoustic systems. In the present paper, cold wire constant-voltage anemometry (CVA) to measure temperature fluctuations is presented. Corrections for the thermal inertia and for the end losses of the wire are applied during the post-processing. The correction for the thermal inertia of the cold wire is achieved by applying a time dependent thermal lag as proposed originally for a constant-current anemometry (CCA) system. This thermal lag is measured in parallel by a hot wire. The thermal end losses of the wires to their supports are also considered and approximate corrections are proposed. The procedure for the cold wire CVA is validated in the acoustic field of an acoustic resonator with wires of different lengths. A comparison between a CVA and a CCA measurement also confirms the CVA measurement. Furthermore, the proposed measurement procedure is applied close to the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Supposing a two-dimensional flow, the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature fluctuations is possible. This allows a detailed examination of the acoustic field close to the stack, including the study of the correlation between temperature and velocity.

  1. Estimating changes in temperature extremes from millennial-scale climate simulations using generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Whitney K.; Stein, Michael L.; McInerney, David J.; Sun, Shanshan; Moyer, Elisabeth J.

    2016-07-01

    Changes in extreme weather may produce some of the largest societal impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, it is intrinsically difficult to estimate changes in extreme events from the short observational record. In this work we use millennial runs from the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) in equilibrated pre-industrial and possible future (700 and 1400 ppm CO2) conditions to examine both how extremes change in this model and how well these changes can be estimated as a function of run length. We estimate changes to distributions of future temperature extremes (annual minima and annual maxima) in the contiguous United States by fitting generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions. Using 1000-year pre-industrial and future time series, we show that warm extremes largely change in accordance with mean shifts in the distribution of summertime temperatures. Cold extremes warm more than mean shifts in the distribution of wintertime temperatures, but changes in GEV location parameters are generally well explained by the combination of mean shifts and reduced wintertime temperature variability. For cold extremes at inland locations, return levels at long recurrence intervals show additional effects related to changes in the spread and shape of GEV distributions. We then examine uncertainties that result from using shorter model runs. In theory, the GEV distribution can allow prediction of infrequent events using time series shorter than the recurrence interval of those events. To investigate how well this approach works in practice, we estimate 20-, 50-, and 100-year extreme events using segments of varying lengths. We find that even using GEV distributions, time series of comparable or shorter length than the return period of interest can lead to very poor estimates. These results suggest caution when attempting to use short observational time series or model runs to infer infrequent extremes.

  2. Temperature reconstruction from the length fluctuations of small glaciers in the eastern Alps (northeastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchetto, Stefano; Serandrei-Barbero, Rossana; Donnici, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a linear model computing the air temperature fluctuations from the measured glacier snout fluctuations has been applied, for the first time, to three small glaciers in the western Tauern Alps (eastern Alps) in the period 1929-2011. The considered glaciers, with areas between 0.2 and 1.3 km^2 , are characterized by relevant time variations of their morphology, length and slope. The model requires the knowledge of two parameters: the glacier climate sensitivity C_s and the glacier response time τ both depending on the glacier morphological characteristics and on the precipitation. Applied to the glaciers assuming C_s and τ as in the original formulation, it underestimates the temperature increase of {≈ } 1.8° C derived over the whole period from the in situ data. Given the characteristics of these small glaciers, these parameters have been recalibrated by means of a non-linear least-square regression using an independent set of glaciers. Their mean value is of about 210 m/K and 3.8 years respectively. With the recalibrated values of the new glacier climate sensitivity C^*_s and response time τ ^* , the temperature fluctuations derived by the model reproduce well those obtained from the observed temperatures computed over the hydrological year, with linear correlations between 0.8 and 0.9. The increase of the modeled mean temperature over the whole period fits in with that derived from observed temperature. Considering that the length fluctuations of these small glaciers affect significantly their slope and length, we tested the impact in the model of a time dependent formulation of C_s and τ : the results indicate slight improvements both in the values of the correlation between the reconstructed and the observed temperature fluctuations and in the global temperature increase. Given the above value of climate sensitivity, the large retreat of the small alpine glaciers threatens their survival within a few decades, but the morphological changes

  3. Performance of High Temperature Operational Amplifier, Type LM2904WH, under Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Operation of electronic parts and circuits under extreme temperatures is anticipated in NASA space exploration missions as well as terrestrial applications. Exposure of electronics to extreme temperatures and wide-range thermal swings greatly affects their performance via induced changes in the semiconductor material properties, packaging and interconnects, or due to incompatibility issues between interfaces that result from thermal expansion/contraction mismatch. Electronics that are designed to withstand operation and perform efficiently in extreme temperatures would mitigate risks for failure due to thermal stresses and, therefore, improve system reliability. In addition, they contribute to reducing system size and weight, simplifying its design, and reducing development cost through the elimination of otherwise required thermal control elements for proper ambient operation. A large DC voltage gain (100 dB) operational amplifier with a maximum junction temperature of 150 C was recently introduced by STMicroelectronics [1]. This LM2904WH chip comes in a plastic package and is designed specifically for automotive and industrial control systems. It operates from a single power supply over a wide range of voltages, and it consists of two independent, high gain, internally frequency compensated operational amplifiers. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specifications.

  4. Gas Temperature Measurements of Fluctuating Coal - MHD Plasmas Using Modified Line Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleman, Bradley Carl

    The technique of modified line reversal is investigated and developed to allow accurate measurements on fluctuating coal fired magnetohydrodynamic plasmas and flows. Generalized modified line reversal equations applicable to any geometry and optical system are developed and presented. The generalized equations are specialized to the two most common optical systems, focussed and collimated, employed for modified line reversal measurements. Approximations introduced by specializing to the specific optical systems are investigated. Vignetting of the optical system images is shown to introduce large biases in the temperature measurement for certain optical configurations commonly applied. It is shown that symmetric optical systems are unacceptable for line reversal measurements. The errors introduced by non-simultaneous measurement of the required line reversal parameters due to rapidly fluctuating plasma characteristics are characterized. Line reversal signal and temperature measurements made on a coal fired MHD plasma are used to quantify the error in the temperature measurement due to non-simultaneous sampling of the measured line reversal parameters. A simple modified line reversal system based on interference filters and photodiodes that employs spatial separation to obtain the required line reversal parameters is described. Gas temperatures measured with devices using both the spatial and temporal separation techniques are compared. Modified line reversal temperature measurements are compared to theoretically predicted temperatures as well as CARS and high velocity thermocouple temperature measurements.

  5. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  6. A materials perspective on Li-ion batteries at extreme temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F.; Babu, Ganguli; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Kalaga, Kaushik; Sayed, Farheen N.; Kato, Keiko; Joyner, Jarin; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2017-08-01

    With the continuous upsurge in demand for energy storage, batteries are increasingly required to operate under extreme environmental conditions. Although they are at the technological forefront, Li-ion batteries have long been limited to room temperature, as internal phenomena during their operation cause thermal fluctuations. This has been the reason for many battery explosions in recent consumer products. While traditional efforts to address these issues focused on thermal management strategies, the performance and safety of Li-ion batteries at both low (60 °C) temperatures are inherently related to their respective components, such as electrode and electrolyte materials and the so-called solid-electrolyte interphases. This Review examines recent research that considers thermal tolerance of Li-ion batteries from a materials perspective, spanning a wide temperature spectrum (‑60 °C to 150 °C). The structural stability of promising cathodes, issues with anode passivation, and the competency of various electrolyte, binder and current collectors are compared for their thermal workability. The possibilities offered by each of these cell components could extend the environmental frontiers of commercial Li-ion batteries.

  7. Extreme operative temperatures are better descriptors of the thermal environment than mean temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Agustín; Trefaut Rodrigues, Miguel; Navas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In ecological studies of thermal biology the thermal environment is most frequently described using the mean or other measures of central tendency in environmental temperatures. However, this procedure may hide biologically relevant thermal variation for ectotherms, potentially misleading interpretations. Extremes of operative temperatures (EOT) can help with this problem by bracketing the thermal environment of focal animals. Within this paper, we quantify how mean operative temperatures relate to the range of simultaneously available operative temperatures (a measure of error). We also show how EOT: 1) detect more thermal differences among microsites than measures of central tendency, like the mean OT, 2) allow inferring on microsite use by ectothermic animals, and 3) clarify the relationships between field operative temperatures and temperatures measured at weather stations (WS). To do that, we explored operative temperatures measured at four sites of the Brazilian Caatingas and their correspondent nearest weather stations. We found that the daily mean OT can hide temperature ranges of 41 °C simultaneously available at our study sites. In addition, EOT detected more thermal differences among microsites than central quantiles. We also show how EOT allow inferring about microsite use of ectothermic animals in a given site. Finally, the daily maximum temperature and the daily temperature range measured at WSs predicted well the minimum available field OT at localities many kilometers away. Based on our results, we recommend the use of EOT, instead of mean OT, in thermal ecology studies.

  8. Finding new superconductors: the spin-fluctuation gateway to high Tc and possible room temperature superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, David

    2013-10-24

    We propose an experiment-based strategy for finding new high transition temperature superconductors that is based on the well-established spin fluctuation magnetic gateway to superconductivity in which the attractive quasiparticle interaction needed for superconductivity comes from their coupling to dynamical spin fluctuations originating in the proximity of the material to an antiferromagnetic state. We show how lessons learned by combining the results of almost three decades of intensive experimental and theoretical study of the cuprates with those found in the decade-long study of a strikingly similar family of unconventional heavy electron superconductors, the 115 materials, can prove helpful in carrying out that search. We conclude that, since Tc in these materials scales approximately with the strength of the interaction, J, between the nearest neighbor local moments in their parent antiferromagnetic state, there may not be a magnetic ceiling that would prevent one from discovering a room temperature superconductor.

  9. Factors affecting the thermal environment of Agassiz’s Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) cover sites in the Central Mojave Desert during periods of temperature extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jeremy S.; Berry, Kristin H.; Miller, David; Carlson, Andrea S.

    2015-01-01

    Agassiz's Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) spend >95% of their lives underground in cover sites that serve as thermal buffers from temperatures, which can fluctuate >40°C on a daily and seasonal basis. We monitored temperatures at 30 active tortoise cover sites within the Soda Mountains, San Bernardino County, California, from February 2004 to September 2006. Cover sites varied in type and structural characteristics, including opening height and width, soil cover depth over the opening, aspect, tunnel length, and surficial geology. We focused our analyses on periods of extreme temperature: in summer, between July 1 and September 1, and winter, between November 1 and February 15. With the use of multivariate regression tree analyses, we found cover-site temperatures were influenced largely by tunnel length and subsequently opening width and soil cover. Linear regression models further showed that increasing tunnel length increased temperature stability and dampened seasonal temperature extremes. Climate change models predict increased warming for southwestern North America. Cover sites that buffer temperature extremes and fluctuations will become increasingly important for survival of tortoises. In planning future translocation projects and conservation efforts, decision makers should consider habitats with terrain and underlying substrate that sustain cover sites with long tunnels and expanded openings for tortoises living under temperature extremes similar to those described here or as projected in the future.

  10. Synoptic conditions leading to extremely high temperatures in Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. García

    Full Text Available Extremely hot days (EHD in Madrid have been analysed to determine the synoptic patterns that produce EHDs during the period of 1955–1998. An EHD is defined as a day with maximum temperature higher than 36.5°C, a value which is the threshold for the intense effects on mortatility and it coincides with the 95 percentile of the series. Two different situations have been detected as being responsible for an EHD occurrence, one more dynamical, produced by southern fluxes, and another associated with a stagnation situation over Iberia of a longer duration. Both account for 92% of the total number of days, thus providing an efficient classification framework. A circulation index has been derived to characterise and forecast an EHD occurrence. This paper shows that EHD occur in Madrid during short duration events, and no long heat waves, like those recorded in other cities, are present. Additionally, no clear pattern can be detected in the EHD frequency; the occurrence is tied to changes in the summer location of the Azores high.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Climatology; synoptic-scale meteorology; general or miscellaneous

  11. Synoptic conditions leading to extremely high temperatures in Madrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, R.; Prieto, L.; Hernandez, E.; Teso, T. del [Dept. Fisica de la Tierra II, Fac. CC. Fisicas, Univ. Camplutense de Madrid (Spain); Diaz, J. [Centro Universitario de Salud Publica, Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-02-01

    Extremely hot days (EHD) in Madrid have been analysed to determine the synoptic patterns that produce EHDs during the period of 1955-1998. An EHD is defined as a day with maximum temperature higher than 36.5 C, a value which is the threshold for the intense effects on mortatility and it coincides with the 95 percentile of the series. Two different situations have been detected as being responsible for an EHD occurrence, one more dynamical, produced by southern fluxes, and another associated with a stagnation situation over Iberia of a longer duration. Both account for 92% of the total number of days, thus providing an efficient classification framework. A circulation index has been derived to characterise and forecast an EHD occurrence. This paper shows that EHD occur in Madrid during short duration events, and no long heat waves, like those recorded in other cities, are present. Additionally, no clear pattern can be detected in the EHD frequency; the occurrence is tied to changes in the summer location of the Azores high. (orig.)

  12. The Impact of Fluctuations in Precipitation and Temperature on the Seasonal Snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Ross

    2016-04-01

    The development and melting of the seasonal snowpack depends on complex interactions among climate elements. Previous work (Woods 2009, Adv. Wat. Res.) showed how the typical seasonal variation of temperature and precipitation rate influence snowpack development. Results were expressed in terms of three dimensionless variables for: seasonal temperature regime; seasonality of precipitation; and depth of the snowpack relative to the energy available for melting. However, that theory does not take account of sub-seasonal fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, and as a consequence, makes poor predictions of snow storage in some climates. Here we write a stochastic differential equation for point-scale snow water equivalent (SWE), and then derive an equation for time variation of the probability distribution (pdf) of SWE. This provides a detailed but compact understanding of how temperature and precipitation interact to influence the seasonal accumulation and melt of snow. From this equation, we can estimate statistics such as the mean and standard deviation of SWE on any day of the year, and the mean residence time of snow, and see how they are related to climate characteristics. To develop the equation, we first describe temperature and precipitation with 4 parameters each, defining the mean, seasonal amplitude, seasonal timing, and sub-seasonal fluctuations. To simulate the response of the snowpack to climate, we use a temperature index model with two parameters: a degree-day melt factor and a threshold temperature. By writing the equation for snow storage in dimensionless form, we reduce the problem to five dimensionless parameters, three of them the same as found by Woods (2009), plus one each for the sub-seasonal fluctuations in precipitation and temperature. In the special case of no fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, the new equation reduces to the deterministic case of Woods (2009). We verify by Monte Carlo simulation that that the

  13. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  14. Detection of orbital fluctuations above the structural transition temperature in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arham, H. Z.; Hunt, C. R.; Park, W. K.; Gillett, J.; Das, S. D.; Sebastian, S. E.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Lin, Z. W.; Li, Q.; Gu, G.; Thaler, A.; Ran, S.; Bud' ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Chung, D. Y.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Greene, L. H.

    2012-06-01

    We use point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) to probe AEFe2As2 (AE=Ca,Sr,Ba) and Fe1+yTe. For AE=Sr,Ba we detect orbital fluctuations above TS while for AE=Ca these fluctuations start below TS. Co doping preserves the orbital fluctuations while K doping suppresses it. The fluctuations are only seen at those dopings and temperatures where an in-plane resistive anisotropy is known to exist. We predict an in-plane resistive anisotropy of Fe1+yTe above TS. Our data are examined in light of the recent work by Lee and Phillips (arXiv:1110.5917v2). We also study how joule heating in the PCS junctions impacts the spectra. Spectroscopic information is only obtained from those PCS junctions that are free of heating effects while those PCS junctions that are in the thermal regime display bulk resistivity phenomena.

  15. Quantitative risk assessment of the effects of drought on extreme temperature in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zengchao; Hao, Fanghua; Singh, Vijay P.; Ouyang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Hot extremes may lead to disastrous impacts on human health and agricultural production. Previous studies have revealed the feedback between drought and hot extremes in large regions of eastern China, while quantifying the impact of antecedent drought on hot extremes has been limited. This study aims at quantitatively assessing the risk of extreme temperature conditioned on the antecedent drought condition represented by Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) during summer time in eastern China. A copula-based model is proposed to construct the joint probability distribution of extreme temperature and drought based on 6 month SPI (SPI6). Accordingly, the conditional probability distribution is employed to quantify impacts of antecedent dry (and wet) conditions on the exceedance probability of extreme temperature. Results show that the likelihood of extreme temperature exceeding high quantiles is higher given antecedent dry conditions than that given antecedent wet conditions in large regions from southwestern to northeastern China. Specifically, the conditional probability difference of temperature exceeding 80th percentile given SPI6 lower than or equal to -0.5 and SPI6 higher than 0.5 is around 0.2-0.3. The case study of the 2006 summer hot extremes and drought in Sichuan and Chongqing region shows that the conditional return period of extreme temperature conditioned on antecedent drought is around 5-50 years shorter than univariate return period. These results quantify the impact of antecedent drought on subsequent extreme temperature and highlight the important role of antecedent drought in intensifying hot extremes in these regions.

  16. Temperature dependence of universal fluctuations in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, G

    2006-04-01

    We compute exact analytical expressions for the skewness and kurtosis in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model. These quantities correspond to the third and fourth normalized moments of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnetization of the model. From their behavior, we conclude that they depend explicitly on the system temperature even in the thermodynamic limit, and hence the PDF itself must depend on it. Our results correct the hypothesis called universal fluctuations, they confirm and extend previous results which showed a T dependence of the PDF, including perturbative expansions within the XY model up to first order in temperature.

  17. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours.

  18. The spoilage of air-packaged broiler meat during storage at normal and fluctuating storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q Q; Han, Y Q; Cao, J X; Xu, X L; Zhou, G H; Zhang, W Y

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial diversity and the major flora present on air-packaged broiler meat during storage at normal (4°C) and fluctuating storage temperatures (0-4°C and 4-10°C) were investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. Culture-dependent analysis revealed that the growth of microflora was retarded when broiler meat was stored at lower temperatures (0-4°C). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles showed that Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., Carnobacterium spp., Aeromonas spp., and Weissella spp. were the dominant bacteria throughout all storage conditions. Enterobacteriaceae only appeared in samples subjected to storage with high temperature abuse, whereas Shewanella spp. and Psychrobacter spp. were only detected in samples stored below 4°C. Our results provide evidence that, compared with storage at a standard fixed temperature (4°C), fluctuations in temperatures induce a more complex bacterial diversity in the air-packaged broiler.

  19. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  20. Can reanalysis datasets describe the persistent temperature and precipitation extremes over China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Huang, Dan-Qing; Yan, Pei-Wen; Huang, Ying; Kuang, Xue-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    The persistent temperature and precipitation extremes may bring damage to the economy and human due to their intensity, duration and areal coverage. Understanding the quality of reanalysis datasets in descripting these extreme events is important for detection, attribution and model evaluation. In this study, the performances of two reanalysis datasets [the twentieth century reanalysis (20CR) and Interim ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-Interim)] in reproducing the persistent temperature and precipitation extremes in China are evaluated. For the persistent temperature extremes, the two datasets can better capture the intensity indices than the frequency indices. The increasing/decreasing trend of persistent warm/cold extremes has been reasonably detected by the two datasets, particularly in the northern part of China. The ERA-Interim better reproduces the climatology and tendency of persistent warm extremes, while the 20CR has better skill to depict the persistent cold extremes. For the persistent precipitation extremes, the two datasets have the ability to reproduce the maximum consecutive 5-day precipitation. The two datasets largely underestimate the maximum consecutive dry days over the northern part of China, while overestimate the maximum consecutive wet days over the southern part of China. For the response of the precipitation extremes against the temperature variations, the ERA-Interim has good ability to depict the relationship among persistent precipitation extremes, local persistent temperature extremes, and global temperature variations over specific regions.

  1. Soil temperature regime and vulnerability due to extreme soil temperatures in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviličić, Petra; Vučetić, Višnja; Filić, Suzana; Smolić, Ante

    2016-10-01

    Soil temperature is an important factor within the climate system. Changes of trends in soil temperature and analysis of vulnerability due to heat stress can provide useful information on climate change. In this paper, the soil temperature regime was analyzed on seasonal and annual scales at depths of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 cm at 26 sites in Croatia. Trends of maximal, mean, and minimal soil temperatures were analyzed in the periods 1961-2010 and 1981-2010. Duration of extreme soil temperatures and vulnerability due to high or low soil temperatures in the recent standard period 1981-2010 was compared with the reference climate period 1961-1990. The results show a general warming in all seasons and depths for maximal and mean temperatures in both observed periods, while only at some locations for minimal soil temperature. Warming is more pronounced in the eastern and coastal parts of Croatia in the surface layers, especially in the spring and summer season in the second period. Significant trends of maximal, minimal, and mean soil temperature in both observed periods range from 2.3 to 6.6 °C/decade, from -1.0 to 1.3 °C/decade, and from 0.1 to 2.5 °C/decade, respectively. The highest vulnerability due to heat stress at 35 °C is noted in the upper soil layers of the coastal area in both observed periods. The mountainous and northwestern parts of Croatia at surface soil layers are the most vulnerable due to low soil temperature below 0 °C. Vulnerability due to high or low soil temperature decreases with depth.

  2. Spatio-statistical analysis of temperature fluctuation using Mann-Kendall and Sen's slope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta-ur-Rahman; Dawood, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    This article deals with the spatio-statistical analysis of temperature trend using Mann-Kendall trend model (MKTM) and Sen's slope estimator (SSE) in the eastern Hindu Kush, north Pakistan. The climate change has a strong relationship with the trend in temperature and resultant changes in rainfall pattern and river discharge. In the present study, temperature is selected as a meteorological parameter for trend analysis and slope magnitude. In order to achieve objectives of the study, temperature data was collected from Pakistan Meteorological Department for all the seven meteorological stations that falls in the eastern Hindu Kush region. The temperature data were analysed and simulated using MKTM, whereas for the determination of temperature trend and slope magnitude SSE method have been applied to exhibit the type of fluctuations. The analysis reveals that a positive (increasing) trend in mean maximum temperature has been detected for Chitral, Dir and Saidu Sharif met stations, whereas, negative (decreasing) trend in mean minimum temperature has been recorded for met station Saidu Sharif and Timergara. The analysis further reveals that the concern variation in temperature trend and slope magnitude is attributed to climate change phenomenon in the region.

  3. Coupling Between Periodic Fluctuations in Stream Water Temperature and Groundwater Elevation, Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, R. T.; Bowman, R. S.

    2005-12-01

    Diurnal (24-hour) fluctuations in groundwater levels are often observed in riparian areas. They are generally attributed to periodic changes in barometric pressure, evapotranspirative demand, and recharge events. For losing streams located along semi-arid riparian corridors infiltration of surface water and advection of heat can strongly influence the subsurface hydrogeology. In fact, hourly head and temperature measurements in wells adjacent to the Rio Grande, New Mexico, have revealed diurnal groundwater fluctuations that correlate with diurnal changes in river temperature. We hypothesize that a periodic change in the streambed hydraulic conductivity modulated by variations in temperature may produce a transient flux (pressure wave) into the underlying shallow aquifer. The presence of a streambed restricting layer, diurnal changes in river temperature, limited riparian vegetation, and patterns in head during no-flow conditions in the Rio Grande support a scenario in which variable groundwater recharge from the river contributes to the diurnal head change in the aquifer. We model coupled heat and mass transport to evaluate the potential significance of the hypothesized hydrodynamic interactions.

  4. Extreme precipitation and temperature responses to circulation patterns in current climate: statistical approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Photiadou, C.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is likely to influence the frequency of extreme extremes - temperature, precipitation and hydrological extremes, which implies increasing risks for flood and drought events in Europe. In current climate, European countries were often not sufficiently prepared to deal with the great so

  5. Effect of temperature and temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashad, El H.; Zeeman, G.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Bot, G.P.A.; Lettinga, G.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of temperature, 50 and 60 °C, at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 and 10 days, on the performance of anaerobic digestion of cow manure has been investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Furthermore, the effect of both daily downward and daily upward temperature fl

  6. Effect of temperature and temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashad, El H.; Zeeman, G.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Bot, G.P.A.; Lettinga, G.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of temperature, 50 and 60 °C, at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 and 10 days, on the performance of anaerobic digestion of cow manure has been investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Furthermore, the effect of both daily downward and daily upward temperature

  7. Phenotypic responses of hatchlings to constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures in the multi-banded krait, Bungarus multicintus (Elapidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Gao, Jian-Fang; Han, Jun

    2007-04-01

    Most studies on egg incubation in reptiles have relied on constant temperature incubation in the laboratory rather than on simulations of thermal regimes in natural nests. The thermal effects on embryos in constant-temperature studies often do not realistically reflect what occurs in nature. Recent studies have increasingly recognized the importance of simulating natural nest temperatures rather than applying constant-temperature regimes. We incubated Bungarus multicintus eggs under three constant and one fluctuating-temperature regimes to evaluate the effects of constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures on hatching success and hatchling phenotypes. Hatching success did not differ among the four treatments, and incubation temperature did not affect the sexual phenotype of hatchlings. Incubation length decreased as incubation temperature increased, but eggs incubated at fluctuating temperatures did not differ from eggs incubated at constant temperatures with approximately the same mean in incubation length. Of the hatchling phenotypes examined, residual yolk, fat bodies and locomotor performance were more likely affected by incubation temperature. The maximal locomotor speed was fastest in the fluctuating-temperature and 30 degrees C treatments and slowest in the 24 degrees C treatment, with the 27 degrees C treatment in between. The maximal locomotor length was longest in the fluctuating-temperature treatment and shortest in the 24 degrees C and 27 degrees C treatments, with the 30 degrees C treatment in between. Our results show that fluctuating incubation temperatures do not influence hatching success and hatchling size and morphology any differently than constant temperatures with approximately the same mean, but have a positive effect on locomotor performance of hatchlings.

  8. Experimental measurements of large-scale temperature fluctuation structures in a heated incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.

    1993-03-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements over a heated flat plate are made for three different temperature difference cases of 10, 15, and 20 C. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime are determined from which mean convection velocities, mean inclination angles, extent in space, and coherence characteristics of T-prime large-scale structure are calculated. The T-prime mean convection velocity is found as a function of y(+). The T-prime structure inclination angle is 30 deg. The T-prime structure is limited to the viscous defect length in the normal and spanwise directions. However, in the streamwise direction, the structure is mildly dependent on the temperature difference.

  9. Changes of temperature and precipitation extremes in China: past and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Fang, Guohua; Qi, Heshuai; Zhou, Lei; Gao, Yuqin

    2016-10-01

    Historical temperature and precipitation extremes and their potential future changes are quantified and evaluated throughout the landmass of China. A statistical model of climate extremes based on generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is applied to both historical climate data and bias correction and spatial disaggregation (BCSD) downscaled Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) projections. The results indicate relatively moderate historical warm extreme conditions in China with regional means of maximum temperature 28.9, 29.4, and 29.8 °C for 10-, 20-, and 50-year return periods, respectively, whereas the corresponding regional means of minimum temperature are -20.1, -20.8, and -21.5 °C, manifesting a downward trend northwardly with relative larger regional variations in cold extremes. The historical precipitation extremes also decline gradually from south-southeast toward northwest with significant regional differences. As for the future, the warm extremes are expected to aggravate by roughly 1.66-4.92 °C projected by CMIP5, indicating larger increasing rate and spatial differences compared to cold extremes. The extreme precipitation is projected to increase 7.9-13.4 %, the dry regions would see a larger increasing rate compared to wet regions. The increasing radiative forcing concentration would trigger upward variations in both temperature and precipitation extreme magnitudes. Also, the warm extreme changes are more sensitive to the radiative forcing concentration than the cold extremes. The CMIP5 projections basically maintain a favorable inter-model consistency in temperature and rainfall extreme simulation for the future, but the inter-model difference of warm extremes is larger than cold extremes.

  10. Surface chemistry in the Interstellar Medium II. $\\mathrm{H}_2$ formation on dust with random temperature fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bron, Emeric; Petit, Franck Le

    2014-01-01

    The $\\mathrm{H}_2$ formation on grains is known to be sensitive to dust temperature, which is also known to fluctuate for small grain sizes due to photon absorption. We aim at exploring the consequences of simultaneous fluctuations of the dust temperature and the adsorbed H-atom population on the $\\mathrm{H}_2$ formation rate under the full range of astrophysically relevant UV intensities and gas conditions. The master equation approach is generalized to coupled fluctuations in both the grain's temperature and its surface population and solved numerically. The resolution can be simplified in the case of the Eley-Rideal mechanism, allowing a fast computation. For the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, it remains computationally expensive, and accurate approximations are constructed. We find the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism to become an efficient formation mechanism in unshielded photon dominated region (PDR) edge conditions when taking those fluctuations into account, despite hot average dust temperatures. It r...

  11. Mathematical model of the growth of a mollusk affected by a toxicant and by temperature fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurchenko, T.S.; Burtnaya, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to model the effect of a gamma isomer of hexachloran (lindane) and of temperature fluctuations on the growth of bivalves. The model is based on an experimental study of the effect of the toxicant on Radix ovata and Viviparus viviparus, and also on the Putter-Bertalanffy-Vinberg models and the model of Zotin. Quite good agreements has been obtained between calculated and experimental data, and growth curves have been constructed for the weight increase of the animals when exposed to lindane concentrations not tested in the experiment.

  12. Temperature fluctuation and heat capacity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Guo Liang; Chen Jin Gen; He Ze-Jun; Long Jia-Li; Lu Zhao-Hui; Ma Yu-Gang; Sá Ben-Hao; Shen Wen-Qing; Wang Kun; Wei Yi-Bin; Zhang Hu-Yong; Zhong Chen

    2004-01-01

    We used LUCIAE3.0 model to simulate the Pb+Pb and C+C in SPS energy. The heat capacity was then extracted from event-by-event temperature fluctuation. It is found that the heat capacity per hadron multiplicity decreases with the increasing of beam energy and impact parameter for a given reaction system. While the hadron mass increases, the heat capacity per hadron multiplicity rises. In addition, we found that, for a given hadron, the heat capacity per hadron multiplicity is almost the same regardless of the reaction system. Some discussions were also given.

  13. High-accuracy CFD prediction methods for fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Shaoxiang, E-mail: qian.shaoxiang@jgc.com [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kanamaru, Shinichiro [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto [Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Numerical methods for accurate prediction of thermal loading were proposed. • Predicted fluid temperature fluctuation (FTF) intensity is close to the experiment. • Predicted structure temperature fluctuation (STF) range is close to the experiment. • Predicted peak frequencies of FTF and STF also agree well with the experiment. • CFD results show the proposed numerical methods are of sufficiently high accuracy. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations generated by the mixing of hot and cold fluids at a T-junction, which is widely used in nuclear power and process plants, can cause thermal fatigue failure. The conventional methods for evaluating thermal fatigue tend to provide insufficient accuracy, because they were developed based on limited experimental data and a simplified one-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). CFD/FEA coupling analysis is expected as a useful tool for the more accurate evaluation of thermal fatigue. The present paper aims to verify the accuracy of proposed numerical methods of simulating fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at a T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation. The dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) is used for large eddy simulation (LES) sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulence model, and a hybrid scheme (HS) is adopted for the calculation of convective terms in the governing equations. Also, heat transfer between fluid and structure is calculated directly through thermal conduction by creating a mesh with near wall resolution (NWR) by allocating grid points within the thermal boundary sub-layer. The simulation results show that the distribution of fluid temperature fluctuation intensity and the range of structure temperature fluctuation are remarkably close to the experimental results. Moreover, the peak frequencies of power spectrum density (PSD) of both fluid and structure temperature fluctuations also agree well with the experimental results. Therefore, the numerical methods used in the present paper are

  14. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  15. Toxin production and growth of pathogens subjected to temperature fluctuations simulating consumer handling of cold cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røssvoll, Elin; Rønning, Helene Thorsen; Granum, Per Einar; Møretrø, Trond; Hjerpekjøn, Marianne Røine; Langsrud, Solveig

    2014-08-18

    It is crucial for the quality and safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods to maintain the cold chain from production to consumption. The effect of temperature abuse related to daily meals and elevated refrigerator temperatures on the growth and toxin production of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus weihenstephanensis and Staphylococcus aureus and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica was studied. A case study with temperature loggings in the domestic environment during Easter and Christmas holidays was performed to select relevant time and temperature courses. A model for bacterial surface growth on food using nutrient agar plates exposed to variations in temperatures was used to simulate food stored at different temperatures and exposed to room temperature for short periods of time. The results were compared with predicted growth using the modeling tool ComBase Predictor. The consumers exposed their cold cuts to room temperatures as high as 26.5°C with an average duration of meals was 47 min daily for breakfast/brunch during the vacations. Short (≤ 2 h) daily intervals at 25°C nearly halved the time the different pathogens needed to reach levels corresponding to the levels associated with human infection or intoxication, compared with the controls continuously stored at refrigerator temperature. Although the temperature fluctuations affected growth of both B. weihenstephanensis and S. aureus, toxin production was only detected at much higher cell concentrations than what has been associated with human intoxications. Therefore, growth of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica was found to be the limiting factor for safety. In combination with data on temperature abuse in the domestic environment, modeling programs such as ComBase Predictor can be efficient tools to predict growth of some pathogens but will not predict toxin production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of myostatin genotype on body temperature during extreme temperature events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J T; Kachman, S D; Nielsen, M K; Mader, T L; Spangler, M L

    2013-07-01

    Extreme heat and cold events can create deleterious physiological changes in cattle as they attempt to cope. The genetic background of animals can influence their response to these events. The objective of the current study was to determine the impact of myostatin genotype (MG) on body temperature during periods of heat and cold stress. Two groups of crossbred steers and heifers of unknown pedigree and breed fraction with varying percentages of Angus, Simmental, and Piedmontese were placed in a feedlot over 2 summers and 2 winters. Before arrival, animals were genotyped for the Piedmontese-derived myostatin mutation (C313Y) to determine their MG as either homozygous normal (0 copy; n = 84), heterozygous (1 copy; n = 96), or homozygous for inactive myostatin (2 copy; n = 59). Hourly tympanic and vaginal temperature measurements were collected for steers and heifers, respectively, for 5 d during times of anticipated heat and cold stress. Mean (±SD) ambient temperature for summer and winter stress events were 24.4 (±4.64) and -1.80 (±11.71), respectively. A trigonometric function (sine + cosine) with periods of 12 and 24 h was used to describe the diurnal cyclical pattern. Hourly body temperature was analyzed within a season, and fixed effects included MG, group, trigonometric functions nested within group, and interaction of MG with trigonometric functions nested within group; random effects were animal and residual (Model [I]). A combined analysis of season and group was also investigated with the inclusion of season as a main effect and the nesting of effects within both group and season (Model [C]). In both models, the residual was fitted using an autoregressive covariance structure. A 3-way interaction of MG, season, and trigonometric function periodicities of 24 h (P 0.05). The current study illustrated that a genotype × environment interaction exists for MG and 1-copy animals were more robust to environmental extremes in comparison with 0- or 2-copy animals.

  17. Temporal and spatial characteristics of extreme precipitation events in the Midwest of Jilin Province based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis method and copula functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Enliang; Zhang, Jiquan; Si, Ha; Dong, Zhenhua; Cao, Tiehua; Lan, Wu

    2016-08-01

    Environmental changes have brought about significant changes and challenges to water resources and management in the world; these include increasing climate variability, land use change, intensive agriculture, and rapid urbanization and industrial development, especially much more frequency extreme precipitation events. All of which greatly affect water resource and the development of social economy. In this study, we take extreme precipitation events in the Midwest of Jilin Province as an example; daily precipitation data during 1960-2014 are used. The threshold of extreme precipitation events is defined by multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) method. Extreme precipitation (EP), extreme precipitation ratio (EPR), and intensity of extreme precipitation (EPI) are selected as the extreme precipitation indicators, and then the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test is employed to determine the optimal probability distribution function of extreme precipitation indicators. On this basis, copulas connect nonparametric estimation method and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) method is adopted to determine the bivariate copula function. Finally, we analyze the characteristics of single variable extremum and bivariate joint probability distribution of the extreme precipitation events. The results show that the threshold of extreme precipitation events in semi-arid areas is far less than that in subhumid areas. The extreme precipitation frequency shows a significant decline while the extreme precipitation intensity shows a trend of growth; there are significant differences in spatiotemporal of extreme precipitation events. The spatial variation trend of the joint return period gets shorter from the west to the east. The spatial distribution of co-occurrence return period takes on contrary changes and it is longer than the joint return period.

  18. The Peak Structure and Future Changes of the Relationships Between Extreme Precipitation and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiling; Wang, Dagang; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Erfanian, Amir; Yu, Miao; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Parr, Dana T.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that, in the absence of moisture limitation, extreme precipitation intensity could exponentially increase with temperatures at a rate determined by the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relationship. Climate models project a continuous increase of precipitation extremes for the twenty-first century over most of the globe. However, some station observations suggest a negative scaling of extreme precipitation with very high temperatures, raising doubts about future increase of precipitation extremes. Here we show for the present-day climate over most of the globe,the curve relating daily precipitation extremes with local temperatures has a peak structure, increasing as expected at the low medium range of temperature variations but decreasing at high temperatures. However, this peak-shaped relationship does not imply a potential upper limit for future precipitation extremes. Climate models project both the peak of extreme precipitation and the temperature at which it peaks (T(sub peak)) will increase with warming; the two increases generally conform to the C-C scaling rate in mid- and high-latitudes,and to a super C-C scaling in most of the tropics. Because projected increases of local mean temperature (T(sub mean)) far exceed projected increases of T(sub peak) over land, the conventional approach of relating extreme precipitation to T(sub mean) produces a misleading sub-C-C scaling rate.

  19. A stage structured mosquito model incorporating effects of precipitation and daily temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A

    2016-12-21

    An outbreak of dengue fever in Guangdong province in 2014 was the most serious outbreak ever recorded in China. Given the known positive correlation between the abundance of mosquitoes and the number of dengue fever cases, a stage structured mosquito model was developed to investigate the cause of the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 and its implications for outbreaks of the disease. Data on the Breteau index (number of containers positive for larvae per 100 premises investigated), temperature and precipitation were used for model fitting. The egg laying rate, the development rate and the mortality rates of immatures and adults were obtained from the estimated parameters. Moreover, effects of daily fluctuations of temperature on these parameters were obtained and the effects of temperature and precipitation were analyzed by simulations. Our results indicated that the abundance of mosquitoes depended not only on the total annual precipitation but also on the distribution of the precipitation. The daily mean temperature had a nonlinear relationship with the abundance of mosquitoes, and large diurnal temperature differences can reduce the abundance of mosquitoes. In addition, effects of increasing precipitation and temperature were interdependent. Our findings suggest that the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 was mainly caused by the distribution of the precipitation. In the perspective of mosquito control, our results reveal that it is better to clear water early and spray insecticide between April and August in case of limited resources.

  20. Statistics of velocity and temperature fluctuations in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Huang, Yong-Xiang; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Yu-Lu; Lu, Zhi-Ming; Qiu, Xiang; Zhou, Quan

    2017-08-01

    We investigate fluctuations of the velocity and temperature fields in two-dimensional (2D) Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) over the Rayleigh number range 106≤Ra≤1010 and for a fixed Prandtl number Pr=5.3 and aspect ratio Γ =1 . Our results show that there exists a counter-gradient turbulent transport of energy from fluctuations to the mean flow both locally and globally, implying that the Reynolds stress is one of the driving mechanisms of the large-scale circulation in 2D turbulent RB convection besides the buoyancy of thermal plumes. We also find that the viscous boundary layer (BL) thicknesses near the horizontal conducting plates and near the vertical sidewalls, δu and δv, are almost the same for a given Ra, and they scale with the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers as ˜Ra-0.26±0.03 and ˜Re-0.43±0.04 . Furthermore, the thermal BL thickness δθ defined based on the root-mean-square (rms) temperature profiles is found to agree with Prandtl-Blasius predictions from the scaling point of view. In addition, the probability density functions of turbulent energy ɛu' and thermal ɛθ' dissipation rates, calculated, respectively, within the viscous and thermal BLs, are found to be always non-log-normal and obey approximately a Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution first introduced to characterize rare fluctuations in a confined turbulent flow and critical phenomena.

  1. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnemore, Douglas K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4-δ, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H $\\parallel$ c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below Tc, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the Tc0 vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La2-xSrxCuO4 (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to Tc. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance ξc becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near Hc2.

  2. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas K. Finnemore

    2001-06-25

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H {parallel} c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {xi}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near H{sub c2}.

  3. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung Moo Huh

    2001-05-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H{parallel}c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {zeta}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H{sub c2}.

  4. How to detect fluctuating stripes in the high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Bindloss, I. P.; Fradkin, E.; Oganesyan, V.; Tranquada, J. M.; Kapitulnik, A.; Howald, C.

    2003-10-01

    This article discusses fluctuating order in a quantum disordered phase proximate to a quantum critical point, with particular emphasis on fluctuating stripe order. Optimal strategies are derived for extracting information concerning such local order from experiments, with emphasis on neutron scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy. These ideas are tested by application to two model systems—an exactly solvable one-dimensional (1D) electron gas with an impurity, and a weakly interacting 2D electron gas. Experiments on the cuprate high-temperature superconductors which can be analyzed using these strategies are extensively reviewed. The authors adduce evidence that stripe correlations are widespread in the cuprates. They compare and contrast the advantages of two limiting perspectives on the high-temperature superconductor: weak coupling, in which correlation effects are treated as a perturbation on an underlying metallic (although renormalized) Fermi-liquid state, and strong coupling, in which the magnetism is associated with well-defined localized spins, and stripes are viewed as a form of micro phase separation. The authors present quantitative indicators that the latter view better accounts for the observed stripe phenomena in the cuprates.

  5. Extreme temperature and oil contamination shape the relative abundance of copepod species in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khuong Van; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    is of north Atlantic origin. Pyrene is one of the most toxic components of crude oil to marine copepods. The temperatures of 2, 6 and 10°C represent the mean sea water temperature, the 4°C increase in mean temperature by 2100 as predicted by IPCC scenario RCP8.5 (2013) and the extreme sea water temperature...

  6. Note: Demonstration of an external-cavity diode laser system immune to current and temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinyu; Yin, Longfei; Zhuang, Wei; Luo, Bin; Dang, Anhong; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate an external-cavity laser system using an anti-reflection coated laser diode as gain medium with about 60 nm fluorescence spectrum, and a Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as frequency-selecting element with a transmission bandwidth of 1.3 GHz. With 6.4% optical feedback, a single stable longitudinal mode is obtained with a linewidth of 69 kHz. The wavelength of this laser is operating within the center of the highest transmission peak of FADOF over a diode current range from 55 mA to 142 mA and a diode temperature range from 15 °C to 35 °C, thus it is immune to the fluctuations of current and temperature.

  7. Temperature and precipitation extremes in century-long gridded observations, reanalyses, and atmospheric model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat, Markus G.; Alexander, Lisa V.; Herold, Nicholas; Dittus, Andrea J.

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge about long-term changes in climate extremes is vital to better understand multidecadal climate variability and long-term changes and to place today's extreme events in a historical context. While global changes in temperature and precipitation extremes since the midtwentieth century are well studied, knowledge about century-scale changes is limited. This paper analyses a range of largely independent observations-based data sets covering 1901-2010 for long-term changes and interannual variability in daily scale temperature and precipitation extremes. We compare across data sets for consistency to ascertain our confidence in century-scale changes in extremes. We find consistent warming trends in temperature extremes globally and in most land areas over the past century. For precipitation extremes we find global tendencies toward more intense rainfall throughout much of the twentieth century; however, local changes are spatially more variable. While global time series of the different data sets agree well after about 1950, they often show different changes during the first half of the twentieth century. In regions with good observational coverage, gridded observations and reanalyses agree well throughout the entire past century. Simulations with an atmospheric model suggest that ocean temperatures and sea ice may explain up to about 50% of interannual variability in the global average of temperature extremes, and about 15% in the global average of moderate precipitation extremes, but local correlations are mostly significant only in low latitudes.

  8. Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feller, Georges, E-mail: gfeller@ulg.ac.b [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Centre for Protein Engineering, Institute of Chemistry B6a, University of Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2010-08-18

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 {sup 0}C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins. (topical review)

  9. Probabilistic models for assessment of extreme temperatures and relative humidity in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzbutas, Robertas; Šeputytė, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    Extreme temperatures are fairly common natural phenomenon in Lithuania. They have mainly negative effects both on the environment and humans. Thus there are important to perform probabilistic and statistical analyzes of possibly extreme temperature values and their time-dependant changes. This is especially important in areas where technical objects (sensitive to the extreme temperatures) are foreseen to be constructed. In order to estimate the frequencies and consequences of possible extreme temperatures, the probabilistic analysis of the event occurrence and its uncertainty has been performed: statistical data have been collected and analyzed. The probabilistic analysis of extreme temperatures in Lithuanian territory is based on historical data taken from Lithuanian Hydrometeorology Service, Dūkštas Meteorological Station, Lithuanian Energy Institute and Ignalina NNP Environmental Protection Department of Environmental Monitoring Service. The main objective of performed work was the probabilistic assessment of occurrence and impact of extreme temperature and relative humidity occurring in whole Lithuania and specifically in Dūkštas region where Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant is closed for decommissioning. In addition, the other purpose of this work was to analyze the changes of extreme temperatures. The probabilistic analysis of extreme temperatures increase in Lithuanian territory was based on more than 50 years historical data. The probabilistic assessment was focused on the application and comparison of Gumbel, Weibull and Generalized Value (GEV) distributions, enabling to select a distribution, which has the best fit for data of extreme temperatures. In order to assess the likelihood of extreme temperatures different probabilistic models were applied to evaluate the probability of exeedance of different extreme temperatures. According to the statistics and the relationship between return period and probabilities of temperatures the return period for 30

  10. Scaling precipitation extremes with temperature in the Mediterranean: past climate assessment and projection in anthropogenic scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobinski, Philippe; Silva, Nicolas Da; Panthou, Gérémy; Bastin, Sophie; Muller, Caroline; Ahrens, Bodo; Borga, Marco; Conte, Dario; Fosser, Giorgia; Giorgi, Filippo; Güttler, Ivan; Kotroni, Vassiliki; Li, Laurent; Morin, Efrat; Önol, Bariş; Quintana-Segui, Pere; Romera, Raquel; Torma, Csaba Zsolt

    2016-03-01

    In this study we investigate the scaling of precipitation extremes with temperature in the Mediterranean region by assessing against observations the present day and future regional climate simulations performed in the frame of the HyMeX and MED-CORDEX programs. Over the 1979-2008 period, despite differences in quantitative precipitation simulation across the various models, the change in precipitation extremes with respect to temperature is robust and consistent. The spatial variability of the temperature-precipitation extremes relationship displays a hook shape across the Mediterranean, with negative slope at high temperatures and a slope following Clausius-Clapeyron (CC)-scaling at low temperatures. The temperature at which the slope of the temperature-precipitation extreme relation sharply changes (or temperature break), ranges from about 20 °C in the western Mediterranean to relationship is close to CC-scaling at temperatures below the temperature break, while at high temperatures, the negative slope is close, but somewhat flatter or steeper, than in the current climate depending on the model. Overall, models predict more intense precipitation extremes in the future. Adjusting the temperature-precipitation extremes relationship in the present climate using the CC law and the temperature shift in the future allows the recovery of the temperature-precipitation extremes relationship in the future climate. This implies negligible regional changes of relative humidity in the future despite the large warming and drying over the Mediterranean. This suggests that the Mediterranean Sea is the primary source of moisture which counteracts the drying and warming impacts on relative humidity in parts of the Mediterranean region.

  11. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  12. The association of extreme temperatures and the incidence of tuberculosis in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-08-01

    Seasonal variation in the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) has been widely assumed. However, few studies have investigated the association between extreme temperatures and the incidence of TB. We collected data on cases of TB and mean temperature in Fukuoka, Japan for 2008-2012 and used time-series analyses to assess the possible relationship of extreme temperatures with TB incident cases, adjusting for seasonal and interannual variation. Our analysis revealed that the occurrence of extreme heat temperature events resulted in a significant increase in the number of TB cases (relative risk (RR) 1.20, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.43). We also found that the occurrence of extreme cold temperature events resulted in a significant increase in the number of TB cases (RR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.05-1.45). Sex and age did not modify the effect of either heat or cold extremes. Our study provides quantitative evidence that the number of TB cases increased significantly with extreme heat and cold temperatures. The results may help public health officials predict extreme temperature-related TB incidence and prepare for the implementation of preventive public health interventions.

  13. Effects of Urbanization on Extreme Warmest Night Temperatures During Summer near Bohai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆祥; 黄嘉佑

    2013-01-01

    Many previous studies have focused on the impacts of urbanization on regional mean temperatures. Relatively few have analyzed changes in extreme temperatures. Here, we examine the impact of urbanization on extreme warmest night temperatures from 33 stations in the Bohai area between 1958 and 2009. We compute the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution of extreme warmest night temperatures and analyze long-term variations in its characteristic parameters. A new classification method based on the factor analysis of changes in extreme night temperatures is developed to detect the effects of urbanization in different cities. Of the three parameters that characterize the GEV distribution, the position parameter is the most representative of long-term changes in extreme warmest night temperatures. During the period of rapid urbanization (i.e., after 1978), all three parameters of the GEV distribution are larger for the urban station group than for the reference station group, so are the magnitudes of their variations, and the urban areas have been experiencing higher extreme warmest night temperatures with larger variability. Different types of cities in the Bohai area have all experienced an urban heat island effect, with an average urbanization effect of approximately 0.3℃per decade.

  14. The GOCF/AWAP system - forecasting temperature extremes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawcett, Robert [National Climate Centre, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Docklands, Victoria 3008 (Australia); Hume, Timothy, E-mail: r.fawcett@bom.gov.a, E-mail: t.hume@bom.gov.a [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Docklands, Victoria 3008 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Gridded hourly temperature forecasts from the Bureau of Meteorology's Gridded Operational Consensus Forecasting (GOCF) system are combined in real time with the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP) gridded daily temperature analyses to produce gridded daily maximum and minimum temperature forecasts with lead times from one to five days. These forecasts are compared against the historical record of AWAP daily temperature analyses (1911 to present), to identify regions where record or near-record temperatures are predicted to occur. This paper describes the GOCF/AWAP system, showing how the daily maximum and minimum temperature forecasts are prepared from the hourly forecasts, and how they are bias-corrected in real time using the AWAP analyses, against which they are subsequently verified. Using monthly climatologies of long-term daily mean, standard deviation and all-time highest and lowest on record, derived forecast products (for both maximum and minimum temperature) include ordinary and standardised anomalies, 'forecast - highest on record' and 'forecast - lowest on record'. Compensation for the climatological variation across the country is achieved in these last two products, which provide the necessary guidance as to whether or not record-breaking temperatures are expected, by expressing the forecast departure from the previous record in both {sup 0}C and standard deviations.

  15. The GOCF/AWAP system - forecasting temperature extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Robert; Hume, Timothy

    2010-08-01

    Gridded hourly temperature forecasts from the Bureau of Meteorology's Gridded Operational Consensus Forecasting (GOCF) system are combined in real time with the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP) gridded daily temperature analyses to produce gridded daily maximum and minimum temperature forecasts with lead times from one to five days. These forecasts are compared against the historical record of AWAP daily temperature analyses (1911 to present), to identify regions where record or near-record temperatures are predicted to occur. This paper describes the GOCF/AWAP system, showing how the daily maximum and minimum temperature forecasts are prepared from the hourly forecasts, and how they are bias-corrected in real time using the AWAP analyses, against which they are subsequently verified. Using monthly climatologies of long-term daily mean, standard deviation and all-time highest and lowest on record, derived forecast products (for both maximum and minimum temperature) include ordinary and standardised anomalies, "forecast - highest on record" and "forecast - lowest on record". Compensation for the climatological variation across the country is achieved in these last two products, which provide the necessary guidance as to whether or not record-breaking temperatures are expected, by expressing the forecast departure from the previous record in both °C and standard deviations.

  16. The role of land use change in the recent warming of daily extreme temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Stott, Peter A.; Hegerl, Gabriele C.; Betts, Richard A.

    2013-02-01

    Abstract Understanding how temperature extremes respond in a climate forced by human activity is of great importance, as extreme temperatures are detrimental to health and often responsible for mortality increases. While previous detection and attribution studies demonstrated a significant human influence on the recent warming of daily extremes, contributions of individual anthropogenic forcings like changes in land use have not yet been investigated in such studies. Here we apply an optimal fingerprinting technique to data from observations and experiments with a new earth system model to examine whether changing land use has led to detectable changes in daily extreme temperatures on a quasi-global scale. We find that loss of trees and increase of grassland since preindustrial times has caused an overall cooling trend in both mean and extreme temperatures which is detectable in the observed changes of warm but not cold extremes. The warming in both mean and extreme temperatures due to anthropogenic forcings other than land use is detected in all cases, whereas the weaker effect of natural climatic forcings is not detected in any. This is the first formal attribution of observed climatic changes to changing land use, suggesting further investigations are justified, particularly in studies of warm extremes.

  17. Rising sea levels will reduce extreme temperature variations in tide-dominated reef habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Ryan Joseph; Pivan, Xavier; Falter, James; Symonds, Graham; Gruber, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Temperatures within shallow reefs often differ substantially from those in the surrounding ocean; therefore, predicting future patterns of thermal stresses and bleaching at the scale of reefs depends on accurately predicting reef heat budgets. We present a new framework for quantifying how tidal and solar heating cycles interact with reef morphology to control diurnal temperature extremes within shallow, tidally forced reefs. Using data from northwestern Australia, we construct a heat budget model to investigate how frequency differences between the dominant lunar semidiurnal tide and diurnal solar cycle drive ~15-day modulations in diurnal temperature extremes. The model is extended to show how reefs with tidal amplitudes comparable to their depth, relative to mean sea level, tend to experience the largest temperature extremes globally. As a consequence, we reveal how even a modest sea level rise can substantially reduce temperature extremes within tide-dominated reefs, thereby partially offsetting the local effects of future ocean warming. PMID:27540589

  18. Modelling spoilage of fresh turbot and evaluation of a time-temperature integrator (TTI) label under fluctuating temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuin, Maider; Alfaro, Begoña; Cruz, Ziortza; Argarate, Nerea; George, Susie; Le Marc, Yvan; Olley, June; Pin, Carmen

    2008-10-31

    Kinetic models were developed to predict the microbial spoilage and the sensory quality of fresh fish and to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial time-temperature integrator (TTI) label, Fresh Check(R), to monitor shelf life. Farmed turbot (Psetta maxima) samples were packaged in PVC film and stored at 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees C. Microbial growth and sensory attributes were monitored at regular time intervals. The response of the Fresh Check device was measured at the same temperatures during the storage period. The sensory perception was quantified according to a global sensory indicator obtained by principal component analysis as well as to the Quality Index Method, QIM, as described by Rahman and Olley [Rahman, H.A., Olley, J., 1984. Assessment of sensory techniques for quality assessment of Australian fish. CSIRO Tasmanian Regional Laboratory. Occasional paper n. 8. Available from the Australian Maritime College library. Newnham. Tasmania]. Both methods were found equally valid to monitor the loss of sensory quality. The maximum specific growth rate of spoilage bacteria, the rate of change of the sensory indicators and the rate of change of the colour measurements of the TTI label were modelled as a function of temperature. The temperature had a similar effect on the bacteria, sensory and Fresh Check kinetics. At the time of sensory rejection, the bacterial load was ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g. The end of shelf life indicated by the Fresh Check label was close to the sensory rejection time. The performance of the models was validated under fluctuating temperature conditions by comparing the predicted and measured values for all microbial, sensory and TTI responses. The models have been implemented in a Visual Basic add-in for Excel called "Fish Shelf Life Prediction (FSLP)". This program predicts sensory acceptability and growth of spoilage bacteria in fish and the response of the TTI at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. The program is freely

  19. Contrasting responses of terrestrial ecosystem production to hot temperature extreme regimes between grassland and forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Observational data during the past several decades show faster increase of hot temperature extremes over land than changes in mean temperature. Towards more extreme temperature is expected to affect terrestrial ecosystem function. However, the ecological impacts of hot extremes on vegetation production remain uncertain across biomes in natural climatic conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of hot temperature extremes on aboveground net primary production (ANPP by combining MODIS EVI dataset and in situ climatic records during 2000 to 2009 from 12 long-term experimental sites across biomes and climates. Our results showed that higher mean annual maximum temperatures (Tmax greatly reduced grassland production, and yet enhanced forest production after removing the effects of precipitation. Relative decreases in ANPP were 16% for arid grassland and 7% for mesic grassland, and the increase were 5% for forest. We also observed a significant positive relationship between interannual ANPP and Tmax for forest biome (R2 = 0.79, P < 0.001. This line of evidence suggests that hot temperature extreme leads to contrasting ecosystem-level response of vegetation production to warming climate between grassland and forest. Given that many terrestrial ecosystem models use average daily temperature as input, predictions of ecosystem production should consider these contrasting responses to more hot temperature extreme regimes associated with climate change.

  20. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a simulating pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koj@inss.co.jp; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Taisuke; Sugimoto, Katsumi

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulics phenomena were discussed in a spray pipe of pressurizer. • Temperature fluctuation was investigated in a stratified steam-water two-phase. • Remarkable liquid temperature fluctuations were observed in the liquid layer. • The observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave. • The temperature fluctuations decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a horizontal rectangular duct, which simulate a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor, were studied experimentally. Vertical distributions of the temperature and the liquid velocity were measured with water of various dissolved oxygen concentrations. Large liquid temperature fluctuations were observed when the water was deaerated well and dissolved oxygen concentration was around 10 ppb. The large temperature fluctuations were not observed when the oxygen concentration was higher. It was shown that the observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave since the Richardson numbers were larger than 0.25 and the temperature fluctuation frequencies were around the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies in the present experimental conditions. The temperature fluctuations decreased by the non-condensable gas since the non-condensable gas suppressed the condensation and the temperature difference in the liquid layer was small.

  1. Extreme temperature sensing using brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Fellay, Alexandre

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in silica-based optical fibers may be considered from two different and complementary standpoints. For a physicist, this interaction of light and pressure wave in a material, or equivalently in quantum theory terms between photons and phonons, gives some glimpses of the atomic structure of the solid and of its vibration modes. For an applied engineer, the same phenomenon may be put to good use as a sensing mechanism for distributed measurements, thanks to the dependence of the scattered light on external parameters such as the temperature, the pressure or the strain applied to the fiber. As far as temperature measurements are concerned, Brillouin-based distributed sensors have progressively gained wide recognition as efficient systems, even if their rather high cost still restricts the number of their applications. Yet they are generally used in a relatively narrow temperature range around the usual ambient temperature; in this domain, the frequency of the scattered light incre...

  2. Extreme Temperature, Rad-Hard Power Management ASIC Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop Group will design a rad-hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for spacecraft power management that is functional over a temperature range of...

  3. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop electronics for operation at temperatures that range from -230oC to +130oC. This new technology will minimize the requirements for external...

  4. Growth of group II Clostridium botulinum strains at extreme temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Lindström, Miia; Selby, Katja; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-11-01

    The minimum and maximum growth temperatures and the maximum growth rates at 10, 30, 37, and 40°C were determined for 24 group II Clostridium botulinum strains. Genetic diversity of the strains was revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The minimum growth temperatures ranged from 6.2 to 8.6°C, and the maximum growth temperatures ranged from 34.7 to 39.9°C. The mean maximum growth temperatures and mean maximum growth rates of type E strains at 37°C were significantly higher than those of type B and type F strains. A significant correlation between maximum growth rates at 37°C and maximum growth temperatures was found for all strains. Some type E strains with a high minimum growth temperature also had a higher maximum growth rate at 37°C than at 30°C, which suggests that some group II C. botulinum strains are more mesophilic in their growth properties than others. We found relatively small differences between AFLP clusters, indicating that diverse genetic background among the strains was not reflected in the growth properties. The growth characteristics of group II C. botulinum and some type E strains with mesophilic growth properties may have an impact on inoculation studies and predictive modeling for assessing the safety of foods.

  5. Measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations in oscillating flows using thermal anemometry – application to thermoacoustic refrigerators

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaelle; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper summarizes our recent work on the development of thermal anemometry to measure velocity and temperature fluctuations in oscillating flows. First, we demonstrate that velocity cannot be measured accurately by hot-wire anemometry in oscillating flows when the flow reverses its direction. Indeed, there is no unique and well-defined correlation between the flow velocity and heat transfer near flow reversal, which prevents the recovery of velocity fluctuations fr...

  6. Trends in daily temperature and precipitation extremes over Georgia, 1971–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Keggenhoff

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Annual changes to climate extreme indices in Georgia (Southern Caucasus from 1971 to 2010 are studied using homogenized daily minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation series. Fourteen extreme temperature and 11 extreme precipitation indices are selected from the list of core climate extreme indices recommended by the World Meteorological Organization – Commission for Climatology (WMO-CCL and the research project on Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP. Trends in the extreme indices are studied for 10 minimum and 11 maximum temperature and 24 precipitation series for the period 1971–2010. Between 1971 and 2010 most of the temperature extremes show significant warming trends. In 2010 there are 13.3 fewer frost days than in 1971. Within the same time frame there are 13.6 more summer days and 7.0 more tropical nights. A large number of stations show significant warming trends for monthly minimum and maximum temperature as well as for cold and warm days and nights throughout the study area, whereas warm extremes and night-time based temperature indices show greater trends than cold extremes and daytime indices. Additionally, the warm spell duration indicator indicates a significant increase in the frequency of warm spells between 1971 and 2010. Cold spells show an insignificant increase with low spatial coherence. Maximum 1-day and 5-day precipitation, the number of very heavy precipitation days, very wet and extremely wet days as well as the simple daily intensity index all show an increase in Georgia, although all trends manifest a low spatial coherence. The contribution of very heavy and extremely heavy precipitation to total precipitation increased between 1971 and 2010, whereas the number of wet days decreases.

  7. Damage Evolution in Al Wire Bonds Subjected to a Junction Temperature Fluctuation of 30 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyakwa, Pearl A.; Yang, Li; Arjmand, Elaheh; Evans, Paul; Corfield, Martin R.; Johnson, C. Mark

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonically bonded heavy Al wires subjected to a small junction temperature fluctuation under power cycling from 40°C to 70°C were investigated using a non-destructive three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray tomography evaluation approach. The occurrence of irreversible deformation of the microstructure and wear-out under such conditions were demonstrated. The observed microstructures consist of interfacial and inter-granular cracks concentrated in zones of stress intensity, i.e., near heels and emanating from interface precracks. Interfacial voids were also observed within the bond interior. Degradation rates of `first' and `stitch' bonds are compared and contrasted. A correlative microscopy study combining perspectives from optical microscopy with the x-ray tomography results clarifies the damage observed. An estimation of lifetime is made from the results and discussed in the light of existing predictions.

  8. A Regime Diagram for Autoignition of Homogeneous Reactant Mixtures with Turbulent Velocity and Temperature Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2015-04-02

    A theoretical scaling analysis is conducted to propose a diagram to predict weak and strong ignition regimes for a compositionally homogeneous reactant mixture with turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations. The diagram provides guidance on expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the mixture and the flow/scalar field conditions. The analysis is an extension of the original Zeldovich’s analysis by combining the turbulent flow and scalar characteristics in terms of the characteristic Damköhler and Reynolds numbers of the system, thereby providing unified and comprehensive understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling ignition characteristics. Estimated parameters for existing experimental measurements in a rapid compression facility show that the regime diagram predicts the observed ignition characteristics with good fidelity.

  9. Preliminary Results from Simulations of Temperature Fluctuations in Stirling Engine Regenerator Matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to create a model for studying effects of temperature fluctuations in regenerator matrices on Stirling engine performance. A one-dimensional model with axial discretisation of engine components has been formulated using a fixed Eulerian grid. The model contains...... a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the mass and energy balances for the working gas in all control volumes and energy balances for the matrix material in the control volumes of the regenerator. Interpolation methods with filtering properties are used for state variables...... that adjusts solutions so that they satisfy the necessary cyclic boundary conditions as well as integral conditions for cyclic heat transfer for walls in the engine and for the mean cycle pressure. It has been found that it is possible to accurately solve the stiff ODE system that describes the coupled...

  10. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  11. Variability and long-term change in Australian temperature and precipitation extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Jakob

    2016-12-01

    We conclude that in assessing the likelihood of climate hazards, one needs to consider the modulation of climate extremes due to both long-term change and climate variability. Our findings imply that when planning for adaptation, different emphasis needs to be given to changing temperature and precipitation extremes.

  12. Changing Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in Europe's Climate of the 20th Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Tank, Albertus Maria Gerardus

    2004-01-01

    This thesis aims at increasing the knowledge on past changes in extremes through the analysis of historical records of observations at meteorological stations. The key question addressed is: How did the extremes of daily surface air temperature and precipitation change in Europe's climate of the

  13. Adaptation potential of naturally ventilated barns to high temperature extremes: The OptiBarn project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Climate change interferes with various aspects of the socio-economic system. One important aspect is its influence on animal husbandry, especially dairy faming. Dairy cows are usually kept in naturally ventilated barns (NVBs) which are particular vulnerable to extreme events due to their low adaptation capabilities. An effective adaptation to high outdoor temperatures for example, is only possible under certain wind and humidity conditions. High temperature extremes are expected to increase in number and strength under climate change. To assess the impact of this change on NVBs and dairy cows also the changes in wind and humidity needs to be considered. Hence we need to consider the multivariate structure of future temperature extremes. The OptiBarn project aims to develop sustainable adaptation strategies for dairy housings under climate change for Europe, by considering the multivariate structure of high temperature extremes. In a first step we identify various multivariate high temperature extremes for three core regions in Europe. With respect to dairy cows in NVBs we will focus on the wind and humidity field during high temperature events. In a second step we will use the CORDEX-EUR-11 ensemble to evaluate the capability of the RCMs to model such events and assess their future change potential. By transferring the outdoor conditions to indoor climate and animal wellbeing the results of this assessment can be used to develop technical, architectural and animal specific adaptation strategies for high temperature extremes.

  14. Computational characterization of ignition regimes in a syngas/air mixture with temperature fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2016-07-27

    Auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations were computationally investigated. The main objectives were to quantify the observed ignition characteristics and numerically validate the theory of the turbulent ignition regime diagram recently proposed by Im et al. 2015 [29] that provides a framework to predict ignition behavior . a priori based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and initial flow and scalar field conditions. Ignition regimes were classified into three categories: . weak (where deflagration is the dominant mode of fuel consumption), . reaction-dominant strong, and . mixing-dominant strong (where volumetric ignition is the dominant mode of fuel consumption). Two-dimensional (2D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean syngas/air mixture with uniform mixture composition at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions were performed in a fixed volume. The initial conditions considered two-dimensional isotropic velocity spectrums, temperature fluctuations and localized thermal hot spots. A number of parametric test cases, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers, were investigated. The evolution of the auto-ignition phenomena, pressure rise, and heat release rate were analyzed. In addition, combustion mode analysis based on front propagation speed and computational singular perturbation (CSP) was applied to characterize the auto-ignition phenomena. All results supported that the observed ignition behaviors were consistent with the expected ignition regimes predicted by the theory of the regime diagram. This work provides new high-fidelity data on syngas ignition characteristics over a broad range of conditions and demonstrates that the regime diagram serves as a predictive guidance in the understanding of various physical and chemical mechanisms controlling auto

  15. Extreme Temperatures May Increase Risk for Low Birth Weight at Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at term, NIH study suggests Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Monday, February 27, 201 7 -Stock photo Extreme hot or cold temperatures during pregnancy may increase the risk that infants born at ...

  16. Binary homogeneous nucleation: Temperature and relative humidity fluctuations and non-linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easter, R.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Peters, L.K. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses binary homogeneous nucleation involving H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and water vapor is thought to be the primary mechanism for new particle formation in the marine boundary layer. Temperature, relative humidity, and partial pressure of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] vapor are the most important parameters in fixing the binary homogeneous nucleation rate in the H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]/H[sub 2]O system. The combination of thermodynamic calculations and laboratory experiments indicates that this rate varies roughly as the tenth power of the saturation ratio of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] vapor. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] is a function of temperature, and similar dependencies of the binary homogeneous nucleation rate on relative humidity can be noted as well. These factors thus introduce strong non-linearities into the system, and fluctuations of temperature, relative humidity, and H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] vapor concentrations about mean values may strongly influence the nucleation rate measured in the atmosphere.

  17. Binary homogeneous nucleation: Temperature and relative humidity fluctuations and non-linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easter, R.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Peters, L.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses binary homogeneous nucleation involving H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and water vapor is thought to be the primary mechanism for new particle formation in the marine boundary layer. Temperature, relative humidity, and partial pressure of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor are the most important parameters in fixing the binary homogeneous nucleation rate in the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O system. The combination of thermodynamic calculations and laboratory experiments indicates that this rate varies roughly as the tenth power of the saturation ratio of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is a function of temperature, and similar dependencies of the binary homogeneous nucleation rate on relative humidity can be noted as well. These factors thus introduce strong non-linearities into the system, and fluctuations of temperature, relative humidity, and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor concentrations about mean values may strongly influence the nucleation rate measured in the atmosphere.

  18. Life distribution of thermal fatigue crack propagation under random temperature fluctuation with wide-band spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Michiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    Thermal fatigue crack propagation under random temperature fluctuation is theoretically investigated from a probabilistic view point by the use of a Markov approximation method, under the condition that the temporary variation of the inner surface temperature of plate is modeled as a wide-band stationary Gaussian process. First, a crack growth equation is formulated on the basis of the Paris law under the assumption that the stress intensity factor range {Delta}K can be approximated by the local expectation of a relative maximum of the stress intensity factor K. Next it is extended to a random differential equation, where the randomness in crack propagation resistance is taken into account. The Markov approximation method is then applied to derive a residual life distribution function as well as a probability distribution function of the crack length. Finally, numerical examples are shown to examine the quantitative behavior of the residual life distribution, whose results indicate that the present model is applicable even if the spectrum of temperature is of narrow-band type. (author).

  19. The nonstationary impact of local temperature changes and ENSO on extreme precipitation at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiaohong; Miao, Chiyuan; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Duan, Qingyun

    2017-02-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and local temperature are important drivers of extreme precipitation. Understanding the impact of ENSO and temperature on the risk of extreme precipitation over global land will provide a foundation for risk assessment and climate-adaptive design of infrastructure in a changing climate. In this study, nonstationary generalized extreme value distributions were used to model extreme precipitation over global land for the period 1979-2015, with ENSO indicator and temperature as covariates. Risk factors were estimated to quantify the contrast between the influence of different ENSO phases and temperature. The results show that extreme precipitation is dominated by ENSO over 22% of global land and by temperature over 26% of global land. With a warming climate, the risk of high-intensity daily extreme precipitation increases at high latitudes but decreases in tropical regions. For ENSO, large parts of North America, southern South America, and southeastern and northeastern China are shown to suffer greater risk in El Niño years, with more than double the chance of intense extreme precipitation in El Niño years compared with La Niña years. Moreover, regions with more intense precipitation are more sensitive to ENSO. Global climate models were used to investigate the changing relationship between extreme precipitation and the covariates. The risk of extreme, high-intensity precipitation increases across high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but decreases in middle and lower latitudes under a warming climate scenario, and will likely trigger increases in severe flooding and droughts across the globe. However, there is some uncertainties associated with the influence of ENSO on predictions of future extreme precipitation, with the spatial extent and risk varying among the different models.

  20. Solid Nitrogen at Extreme Conditions of High Pressure and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A; Gregoryanz, E

    2004-04-05

    We review the phase diagram of nitrogen in a wide pressure and temperature range. Recent optical and x-ray diffraction studies at pressures up to 300 GPa and temperatures in excess of 1000 K have provided a wealth of information on the transformation of molecular nitrogen to a nonmolecular (polymeric) semiconducting and two new molecular phases. These newly found phases have very large stability (metastability) range. Moreover, two new molecular phases have considerably different orientational order from the previously known phases. In the iota phase (unlike most of other known molecular phases), N{sub 2} molecules are orientationally equivalent. The nitrogen molecules in the theta phase might be associated into larger aggregates, which is in line with theoretical predictions on polyatomic nitrogen.

  1. Telemetry pill versus rectal and esophageal temperature during extreme rates of exercise-induced core temperature change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Haan, A. de; Koning, J.J. de; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Core temperature measurement with an ingestible telemetry pill has been scarcely investigated during extreme rates of temperature change, induced by short high-intensity exercise in the heat. Therefore, nine participants performed a protocol of rest, (sub)maximal cycling and recovery at 30 °C. The p

  2. Circulation anomalies associated with winter temperature extremes in Athens during the period 1900-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Founda, D. [National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development; Loon, H. van [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We use the long series of temperature observed at the National Observatory of Athens, Greece, to examine the extremes of this element together with associated anomalies in the general circulation of the atmosphere. The 13 extreme-cold and 20 extreme-warm winters during the period 1900-2004 (equal to or below minus one standard deviation, and equal to or above plus one standard deviation respectively) had opposite pressure anomalies, mainly over the North Atlantic and Eurasia. The temperature extremes at Athens were representative of most of the Mediterranean and the Balkans, and their associated pressure anomalies were robust. The extremes of the Index of the North Atlantic Oscillation (the pressure difference between Gibraltar and Iceland) were not a good indicator of the temperature extremes in the Mediterranean. Rather the extreme temperature anomalies over the Mediterranean region are to a large extent controlled by a bipolar pattern of SLP (see level pressure) anomalies with centers over the British Isles and the Arctic. (orig.)

  3. Corresponding Relation between Warm Season Precipitation Extremes and Surface Air Temperature in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Wei; LI; Jian; YU; Ru-Cong

    2013-01-01

    Hourly data of 42 rain gauges over South China during 1966–2005 were used to analyze the corresponding relation between precipitation extremes and surface air temperature in the warm season(May to October).The results show that below 25℃,both daily and hourly precipitation extremes in South China increase with rising temperature.More extreme events transit to the two-time Clausius-Clapeyron(CC)relationship at lower temperatures.Daily as well as hourly precipitation extremes have a decreasing tendency nearly above 25℃,among which the decrease of hourly extremes is much more significant.In order to investigate the efects of rainfall durations,hourly precipitation extremes are presented by short duration and long duration precipitation,respectively.Results show that the dramatic decrease of hourly rainfall intensities above 25℃ is mainly caused by short duration precipitation,and long duration precipitation extremes rarely occur in South China when surface air temperature surpasses 28℃.

  4. Mangrove expansion and contraction at a poleward range limit: Climate extremes and land-ocean temperature gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Hall, Courtney T.; Brumfield, Marisa D; Dugas, Jason; Jones, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand the ecological implications of changes in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Along subtropical coasts, less frequent and warmer freeze events are expected to permit freeze-sensitive mangrove forests to expand poleward and displace freeze-tolerant salt marshes. Here, our aim was to better understand the drivers of poleward mangrove migration by quantifying spatiotemporal patterns in mangrove range expansion and contraction across land-ocean temperature gradients. Our work was conducted in a freeze-sensitive mangrove-marsh transition zone that spans a land-ocean temperature gradient in one of the world's most wetland-rich regions (Mississippi River Deltaic Plain; Louisiana, USA). We used historical air temperature data (1893-2014), alternative future climate scenarios, and coastal wetland coverage data (1978-2011) to investigate spatiotemporal fluctuations and climate-wetland linkages. Our analyses indicate that changes in mangrove coverage have been controlled primarily by extreme freeze events (i.e., air temperatures below a threshold zone of -6.3 to -7.6 °C). We expect that in the past 121 years, mangrove range expansion and contraction has occurred across land-ocean temperature gradients. Mangrove resistance, resilience, and dominance were all highest in areas closer to the ocean where temperature extremes were buffered by large expanses of water and saturated soil. Under climate change, these areas will likely serve as local hotspots for mangrove dispersal, growth, range expansion, and displacement of salt marsh. Collectively, our results show that the frequency and intensity of freeze events across land-ocean temperature gradients greatly influences spatiotemporal patterns of range expansion and contraction of freeze-sensitive mangroves. We expect that, along subtropical coasts, similar processes govern the distribution and abundance of other freeze

  5. Changes of the Temperature and Precipitation Extremes on Homogenized Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAKATOS, Mónika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate indices to detect changes have been defined in several international projects onclimate change. Climate index calculations require at least daily resolution of time series withoutinhomogeneities, such as transfer of stations, changes in observation practice. In many cases thecharacteristics of the estimated linear trends, calculated from the original and from the homogenizedtime series are significantly different. The ECA&D (European Climate Assessment & Dataset indicesand some other special temperature and precipitation indices of own development were applied to theClimate Database of the Hungarian Meteorological Service. Long term daily maximum, minimum anddaily mean temperature data series and daily precipitation sums were examined. The climate indexcalculation processes were tested on original observations and on homogenized daily data fortemperature; in the case of precipitation a complementation process was performed to fill in the gapsof missing data. Experiences of comparing the climate index calculation results, based on original andcomplemented-homogenized data, are reported in this paper. We present the preliminary result ofclimate index calculations also on gridded (interpolated daily data.

  6. Long-Term Trends in Extreme Temperatures in Hong Kong and Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. C. LEE; H. S. CHAN; E. W. L. GINN; M. C. WONG

    2011-01-01

    The observed long-term trends in extreme temperatures in Hong Kong were studied based on the meteorological data recorded at the Hong Kong Observatory Headquarters from 1885-2008. Results show that, over the past 124 years, the extreme daily minimum and maximum temperatures, as well as the length of the warm spell in Hong Kong, exhibit statistically significant long-term rising trends, while the length of the cold spell shows a statistically significant decreasing trend. The time-dependent return period analysis also indicated that the return period for daily minimum temperature at 4℃ or lower lengthened considerably from 6 years in 1900 to over 150 years in 2000, while the return periods for daily maximum temperature reaching 35℃ or above shortened drastically from 32 years in 1900 to 4.5 years in 2000. Past trends in extreme temperatures from selected weather stations in southern China from 1951-2004 were also assessed. Over 70% of the stations studied yielded a statistically significant rising trend in extreme daily minimum temperature, while the trend for extreme maximum temperatures was found to vary, with no significant trend established for the majority of stations.

  7. Climate extremes in the Pacific: improving seasonal prediction of tropical cyclones and extreme ocean temperatures to improve resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, Y.; Jones, D.; Spillman, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change and climate extremes have a major impact on Australia and Pacific Island countries. Of particular concern are tropical cyclones and extreme ocean temperatures, the first being the most destructive events for terrestrial systems, while the latter has the potential to devastate ocean ecosystems through coral bleaching. As a practical response to climate change, under the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning program (PACCSAP), we are developing enhanced web-based information tools for providing seasonal forecasts for climatic extremes in the Western Pacific. Tropical cyclones are the most destructive weather systems that impact on coastal areas. Interannual variability in the intensity and distribution of tropical cyclones is large, and presently greater than any trends that are ascribable to climate change. In the warming environment, predicting tropical cyclone occurrence based on historical relationships, with predictors such as sea surface temperatures (SSTs) now frequently lying outside of the range of past variability meaning that it is not possible to find historical analogues for the seasonal conditions often faced by Pacific countries. Elevated SSTs are the primary trigger for mass coral bleaching events, which can lead to widespread damage and mortality on reef systems. Degraded coral reefs present many problems, including long-term loss of tourism and potential loss or degradation of fisheries. The monitoring and prediction of thermal stress events enables the support of a range of adaptive and management activities that could improve reef resilience to extreme conditions. Using the climate model POAMA (Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia), we aim to improve accuracy of seasonal forecasts of tropical cyclone activity and extreme SSTs for the regions of Western Pacific. Improved knowledge of extreme climatic events, with the assistance of tailored forecast tools, will help enhance the resilience and

  8. Qualification of Bonding Process of Temperature Sensors to Extreme Temperature Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Kitiyakara, Amarit; Redick, Richard; Sunada, Eric T.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been explored based on the state-of-the-art technology to bond the platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) on to potential aerospace material such as a flat aluminum surface and a flexible copper tube to simulate coaxial cable for the flight applications. Primarily, PRTs were inserted into a metal plated copper braid to avoid stresses on the sensor while attaching the sensor with braid to the base material for long duration deep space missions. Appropriate pretreatment has been implemented in this study to enhance the adhesion of the PRTs to the base material. NuSil product has been chosen in this research to attach PRT to the base materials. The resistance (approx.1.1 k(Omega)) of PRTs has been electrically monitored continuously during the qualification thermal cycling testing from -150 C to +120 C and -100 C to -35 C. The test hardware has been thermal cycled three times the mission life per JPL design principles for JUNO project. No PRT failures were observed during and after the PRT thermal cycling qualification test for extreme temperature environments. However, there were some failures associated with staking of the PRT pig tails as a result of thermal cycling qualification test.

  9. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ˜30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of 1/f behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy {E}{{a}}˜ 35 meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  10. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2016-11-11

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ∼30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of [Formula: see text] behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy [Formula: see text] meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  11. Effects of land cover change on temperature and rainfall extremes in multi-model ensemble simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pitman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of historical land use induced land cover change (LULCC on regional-scale climate extremes is examined using four climate models within the Land Use and Climate, IDentification of robust impacts project. To assess those impacts, multiple indices based on daily maximum and minimum temperatures and daily precipitation were used. We contrast the impact of LULCC on extremes with the impact of an increase in atmospheric CO2 from 280 ppmv to 375 ppmv. In general, consistent changes in both high and low temperature extremes are similar to the simulated change in mean temperature caused by LULCC and are restricted to regions of intense modification. The impact of LULCC on both means and on most temperature extremes is statistically significant. While the magnitude of the LULCC-induced change in the extremes can be of similar magnitude to the response to the change in CO2, the impacts of LULCC are much more geographically isolated. For most models, the impacts of LULCC oppose the impact of the increase in CO2 except for one model where the CO2-caused changes in the extremes are amplified. While we find some evidence that individual models respond consistently to LULCC in the simulation of changes in rainfall and rainfall extremes, LULCC's role in affecting rainfall is much less clear and less commonly statistically significant, with the exception of a consistent impact over South East Asia. Since the simulated response of mean and extreme temperatures to LULCC is relatively large, we conclude that unless this forcing is included, we risk erroneous conclusions regarding the drivers of temperature changes over regions of intense LULCC.

  12. Technical Note: Bias correcting climate model simulated daily temperature extremes with quantile mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thrasher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available When applying a quantile mapping-based bias correction to daily temperature extremes simulated by a global climate model (GCM, the transformed values of maximum and minimum temperatures are changed, and the diurnal temperature range (DTR can become physically unrealistic. While causes are not thoroughly explored, there is a strong relationship between GCM biases in snow albedo feedback during snowmelt and bias correction resulting in unrealistic DTR values. We propose a technique to bias correct DTR, based on comparing observations and GCM historic simulations, and combine that with either bias correcting daily maximum temperatures and calculating daily minimum temperatures or vice versa. By basing the bias correction on a base period of 1961–1980 and validating it during a test period of 1981–1999, we show that bias correcting DTR and maximum daily temperature can produce more accurate estimations of daily temperature extremes while avoiding the pathological cases of unrealistic DTR values.

  13. Assessment of indices of temperature extremes simulated by multiple CMIP5 models over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Siyan; Xu, Ying; Zhou, Botao; Shi, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Given that climate extremes in China might have serious regional and global consequences, an increasing number of studies are examining temperature extremes in China using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models. This paper investigates recent changes in temperature extremes in China using 25 state-of-the-art global climate models participating in CMIP5. Thirteen indices that represent extreme temperature events were chosen and derived by daily maximum and minimum temperatures, including those representing the intensity (absolute indices and threshold indices), duration (duration indices), and frequency (percentile indices) of extreme temperature. The overall performance of each model is summarized by a "portrait" diagram based on relative root-mean-square error, which is the RMSE relative to the median RMSE of all models, revealing the multi-model ensemble simulation to be better than individual model for most indices. Compared with observations, the models are able to capture the main features of the spatial distribution of extreme temperature during 1986-2005. Overall, the CMIP5 models are able to depict the observed indices well, and the spatial structure of the ensemble result is better for threshold indices than frequency indices. The spread amongst the CMIP5 models in different subregions for intensity indices is small and the median CMIP5 is close to observations; however, for the duration and frequency indices there can be wide disagreement regarding the change between models and observations in some regions. The model ensemble also performs well in reproducing the observational trend of temperature extremes. All absolute indices increase over China during 1961-2005.

  14. Creep strength of iridium at extremely high temperatures; Zeitstandfestigkeit von Iridium bei extrem hohen Temperaturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, B. [Fachhochschule Jena (Germany). Fachbereich Werkstofftechnik; Lupton, D. [Heraeus (W.C.) GmbH, Hanau (Germany). Produktbereich Materialtechnik; Braun, F. [Heraeus (W.C.) GmbH, Hanau (Germany). Produktbereich Materialtechnik; Merker, J. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Technisches Inst.; Helmich, R. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Technisches Inst.

    1994-12-31

    On iridium in the initial state and after carrying out creep tests, apart from metallographic and fractographic work, investigations on the distribution of trace impurities were done by means of secondary ion mass spectroscopy and investigations of the crystal structure were carried out with the aid of Kossel technique, a special field of X-ray bending. Although iridium of high purity was used for the investigations, enrichment of hydrogen, carbon, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, iron, nickel and chromium was proved by means of secondary ion mass spectroscopy at the grain boundaries, where the average contents in iridium were only about 1 {mu}g/g. In the creep test, creep fracture lines were found in the range of 1800 to 2300 C and about 0.5 to 12 hours on iridium samples with a square cross section of 1 mm. It follows from the results that this noble metal has a considerable resistance to heat at these temperatures, which makes its use up to 2300 C possible. (orig./RHM) [Deutsch] Es erfolgten am Iridium im Ausgangszustand und nach Durchfuehrung der Zeitstandversuche neben metallographischen und fraktographischen Arbeiten Untersuchungen zur Verteilung der Spurenverunreinigungen mittels Sekundaerionen-Massenspektroskopie sowie Untersuchungen der Kristallstruktur mit Hilfe der Kossel-Technik, einem Spezialgebiet der Roentgenbeugung. Obwohl fuer die Untersuchungen hochreines Iridium verwendet wurde, konnten mittels Sekundaerionen-Massenspektroskopie in den Korngrenzen Anreicherungen von Wasserstoff, Kohlenstoff, Natrium, Kalium, Calcium, Magnesium, Silizium, Eisen, Nickel und Chrom nachgewiesen werden, wobei die durchschnittlichen Gehalte in Iridium nur um 1 {mu}g/g lagen. Im Zeitstandversuch wurden an Iridiumproben mit 1 mm Vierkantquerschnitt Zeitbruchlinien im Bereich von 1800 bis 2300 C und etwa 0,5 bis 12 Stunden aufgenommen. Aus den Ergebnissen folgt, dass das Edelmetall bei diesen Temperaturen noch eine beachtliche Warmfestigkeit besitzt, die

  15. Lack of Dependence of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Extremes on Temperature: An Observational Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittal, H.; Ghosh, Subimal; Karmakar, Subhankar; Pathak, Amey; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-08-01

    The intensification of precipitation extremes in a warming world has been reported on a global scale and is traditionally explained with the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation. The relationship is observed to be valid in mid-latitudes; however, the debate persists in tropical monsoon regions, with the extremes of the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) being a prime example. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the dependence of ISMR extremes on both the 2 m surface air temperature over India and on the sea surface temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean. Remarkably, the ISMR extremes exhibit no significant association with temperature at either spatial scale: neither aggregated over the entire India/Tropical Indian Ocean area nor at the grid levels. We find that the theoretical C-C relation overestimates the positive changes in precipitation extremes, which is also reflected in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations. We emphasize that the changing patterns of extremes over the Indian subcontinent need a scientific re-evaluation, which is possible due to availability of the unique long-term in-situ data. This can aid bias correction of model projections of extremes whose value for climate adaptation can hardly be overemphasized, especially for the developing tropical countries.

  16. Effects of strong magnetic fields on pairing fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Eschrig, Matthias; Rainer, D.; Sauls, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    We present the theory for the effects of superconducting pairing fluctuations on the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and the NMR Knight shift for layered superconductors in high magnetic fields. These results can be used to clarify the origin of the pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates, which has been attributed to spin fluctuations as well as pairing fluctuations. We present theoretical results for s-wave and d-wave pairing fluctuations and show that recent experiments in optimally doped ...

  17. Assessment of climate variations in temperature and precipitation extreme events over Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Laux, P.; Kunstmann, H.; Stan, K.; Sohrabi, M. M.; Molanejad, M.; Sabziparvar, A. A.; Ranjbar SaadatAbadi, A.; Ranjbar, F.; Rousta, I.; Zawar-Reza, P.; Khoshakhlagh, F.; Soltanzadeh, I.; Babu, C. A.; Azizi, G. H.; Martin, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, changes in the spatial and temporal patterns of climate extreme indices were analyzed. Daily maximum and minimum air temperature, precipitation, and their association with climate change were used as the basis for tracking changes at 50 meteorological stations in Iran over the period 1975-2010. Sixteen indices of extreme temperature and 11 indices of extreme precipitation, which have been quality controlled and tested for homogeneity and missing data, are examined. Temperature extremes show a warming trend, with a large proportion of stations having statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over the last 15 years (1995-2010), the annual frequency of warm days and nights has increased by 12 and 14 days/decade, respectively. The number of cold days and nights has decreased by 4 and 3 days/decade, respectively. The annual mean maximum and minimum temperatures averaged across Iran both increased by 0.031 and 0.059 °C/decade. The probability of cold nights has gradually decreased from more than 20 % in 1975-1986 to less than 15 % in 1999-2010, whereas the mean frequency of warm days has increased abruptly between the first 12-year period (1975-1986) and the recent 12-year period (1999-2010) from 18 to 40 %, respectively. There are no systematic regional trends over the study period in total precipitation or in the frequency and duration of extreme precipitation events. Statistically significant trends in extreme precipitation events are observed at less than 15 % of all weather stations, with no spatially coherent pattern of change, whereas statistically significant changes in extreme temperature events have occurred at more than 85 % of all weather stations, forming strongly coherent spatial patterns.

  18. Precipitation and temperatures extremes in East Africa in past and future climate

    OpenAIRE

    Kuya, Elinah Khasandi

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has increased extreme weather events over the planet. The most robust changes in East Africa (EA) are for daily temperature and precipitation, where high-impact extreme values have become more common. The overall magnitude, seasonal distribution of precipitation and its inter-annual variability have been altered. East Africa experiences some of the most severe convective storms in the world. They can come without warning and are becoming more frequent. These changes present sig...

  19. Trends in Mediterranean gridded temperature extremes and large-scale circulation influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Efthymiadis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Two recently-available daily gridded datasets are used to investigate trends in Mediterranean temperature extremes since the mid-20th century. The underlying trends are found to be generally consistent with global trends of temperature and their extremes: cold extremes decrease and warm/hot extremes increase. This consistency is better manifested in the western part of the Mediterranean where changes are most pronounced since the mid-1970s. In the eastern part, a cooling is observed, with a near reversal in the last two decades. This inter-basin discrepancy is clearer in winter, while in summer changes are more uniform and the west-east difference is restricted to the rate of increase of warm/hot extremes, which is higher in central and eastern parts of the Mediterranean over recent decades. Linear regression and correlation analysis reveals some influence of major large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns on the occurrence of these extremes – both in terms of trend and interannual variability. These relationships are not, however, able to account for the most striking features of the observations – in particular the intensification of the increasing trend in warm/hot extremes, which is most evident over the last 15–20 yr in the Central and Eastern Mediterranean.

  20. Coldest Temperature Extreme Monotonically Increased and Hottest Extreme Oscillated over Northern Hemisphere Land during Last 114 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-05-01

    Most studies on global warming rely on global mean surface temperature, whose change is jointly determined by anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) and natural variability. This introduces a heated debate on whether there is a recent warming hiatus and what caused the hiatus. Here, we presented a novel method and applied it to a 5° × 5° grid of Northern Hemisphere land for the period 1900 to 2013. Our results show that the coldest 5% of minimum temperature anomalies (the coldest deviation) have increased monotonically by 0.22 °C/decade, which reflects well the elevated anthropogenic GHG effect. The warmest 5% of maximum temperature anomalies (the warmest deviation), however, display a significant oscillation following the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), with a warming rate of 0.07 °C/decade from 1900 to 2013. The warmest (0.34 °C/decade) and coldest deviations (0.25 °C/decade) increased at much higher rates over the most recent decade than last century mean values, indicating the hiatus should not be interpreted as a general slowing of climate change. The significant oscillation of the warmest deviation provides an extension of previous study reporting no pause in the hottest temperature extremes since 1979, and first uncovers its increase from 1900 to 1939 and decrease from 1940 to 1969.

  1. Observed changes in seasonal heat waves and warm temperature extremes in the Romanian Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Dana; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Cheval, Sorin

    2015-04-01

    Extreme high temperature have a large impact on environment and human activities, especially in high elevation areas particularly sensitive to the recent climate warming. The climate of the Romanian Carpathians became warmer particularly in winter, spring and summer, exibiting a significant increasing frequency of warm extremes. The paper investigates the seasonal changes in the frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves in relation to the shifts in the daily distribution of maximum temperatures over a 50-year period of meteorological observations (1961-2010). The paper uses the heat wave definition recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) and exploits the gridded daily dataset of maximum temperature at 0.1° resolution (~10 km) developed in the framework of the CarpatClim project (www.carpatclim.eu). The seasonal changes in heat waves behavior were identified using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric trend test. The results suggest an increase in heat wave frequency and a lengthening of intervals affected by warm temperature extremes all over the study region, which are explained by the shifts in the upper (extreme) tail of the daily maximum temperature distribution in most seasons. The trends are consistent across the region and are well correlated to the positive phases of the East Atlantic Oscillation. Our results are in good agreement with the previous temperature-related studies concerning the Carpathian region. This study was realized within the framework of the project GENCLIM, financed by UEFISCDI, code PN-II 151/2014.

  2. Impact of temperature and precipitation extremes on the flowering dates of four German wildlife shrub species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Jonatan F.; Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing climate change is known to cause an increase in the frequency and amplitude of local temperature and precipitation extremes in many regions of the Earth. While gradual changes in the climatological conditions have already been shown to strongly influence plant flowering dates, the question arises if and how extremes specifically impact the timing of this important phenological phase. Studying this question calls for the application of statistical methods that are tailored to the specific properties of event time series. Here, we employ event coincidence analysis, a novel statistical tool that allows assessing whether or not two types of events exhibit similar sequences of occurrences in order to systematically quantify simultaneities between meteorological extremes and the timing of the flowering of four shrub species across Germany. Our study confirms previous findings of experimental studies by highlighting the impact of early spring temperatures on the flowering of the investigated plants. However, previous studies solely based on correlation analysis do not allow deriving explicit estimates of the strength of such interdependencies without further assumptions, a gap that is closed by our analysis. In addition to direct impacts of extremely warm and cold spring temperatures, our analysis reveals statistically significant indications of an influence of temperature extremes in the autumn preceding the flowering.

  3. Scaling of precipitation extremes with temperature in the French Mediterranean region: What explains the hook shape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobinski, P.; Alonzo, B.; Bastin, S.; Silva, N. Da; Muller, C.

    2016-04-01

    Expected changes to future extreme precipitation remain a key uncertainty associated with anthropogenic climate change. Extreme precipitation has been proposed to scale with the precipitable water content in the atmosphere. Assuming constant relative humidity, this implies an increase of precipitation extremes at a rate of about 7% °C-1 globally as indicated by the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Increases faster and slower than Clausius-Clapeyron have also been reported. In this work, we examine the scaling between precipitation extremes and temperature in the present climate using simulations and measurements from surface weather stations collected in the frame of the HyMeX and MED-CORDEX programs in Southern France. Of particular interest are departures from the Clausius-Clapeyron thermodynamic expectation, their spatial and temporal distribution, and their origin. Looking at the scaling of precipitation extreme with temperature, two regimes emerge which form a hook shape: one at low temperatures (cooler than around 15°C) with rates of increase close to the Clausius-Clapeyron rate and one at high temperatures (warmer than about 15°C) with sub-Clausius-Clapeyron rates and most often negative rates. On average, the region of focus does not seem to exhibit super Clausius-Clapeyron behavior except at some stations, in contrast to earlier studies. Many factors can contribute to departure from Clausius-Clapeyron scaling: time and spatial averaging, choice of scaling temperature (surface versus condensation level), and precipitation efficiency and vertical velocity in updrafts that are not necessarily constant with temperature. But most importantly, the dynamical contribution of orography to precipitation in the fall over this area during the so-called "Cevenoles" events, explains the hook shape of the scaling of precipitation extremes.

  4. Attribution analyses of temperature extremes using a set of 16 indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Christidis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection and attribution studies have demonstrated that anthropogenic forcings have been driving significant changes in temperature extremes since the middle of the 20th century. Moreover, new methodologies have been developed for the attribution of extreme events that assess how human influence may have changed their characteristics. Here we combine formal statistical analyses based on optimal fingerprinting to attribute observed long term changes in temperature extremes with an ensemble-based approach for event attribution. Our analyses are applied to 16 indices constructed with daily temperature data that focus on different characteristics of extremes and together build up a more complete representation of historical changes in warm and cold extremes than previous studies. For each index we compute an annual value for all years of the post-1960 period using data from observations and experiments with a coupled Earth System model for the analysis of multi-decadal changes and a high-resolution atmospheric model for event attribution. The models indicate that anthropogenic forcings have influenced almost all indices in recent decades and led to more prominent changes in the frequency of extremes. The optimal fingerprinting analyses show that for most indices the anthropogenic signal is detectable in changes during 1961–2010 both in Europe and on a quasi-global scale. The weaker natural effect, resulting mainly from volcanic eruptions, is in most cases not detectable, with the exception of large scale changes in indices linked to the frequency of cold night-time extremes. Our event analyses estimate how anthropogenic forcings alter the chances of getting new record index values in Europe and find that such extremes would be markedly rare if human influence were not accounted for, whereas in the current climate their return times range from a few years to a few decades.

  5. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  6. Thermal fluctuations in the high-temperature superconductor CaLaBaCu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landinez Tellez, D.A. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Fisica; Roa-Rojas, J. [Escuela Colombiana de Ingenieria, Bogota (Colombia); Albino Aguiar, J. [Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Calero, J.M. [Escuela de Fisica, Univ. Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2000-07-01

    Magnetization measurements on a polycrystal of CaLaBaCu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} in high magnetic fields (20 to 50 kOe) are reported. The sample has a zero-field transition temperature T{sub c0} = 77 K and a transition width of 2.0 K. The results show large fluctuation effects, which can be explained by Ginzburg-Landau fluctuation theory for a two-dimensional system. The magnetization displays good scaling behavior as a function of [T - T{sub c}(H)]/(TH){sup 1/2}. The experimental data were fitted by using a theoretical model based in the lowest Landau levels approximation, showing good agreement. We also analyze fluctuation effects in conductivity measurements at zero magnetic field. (orig.)

  7. Clarifying the role of fire heat and daily temperature fluctuations as germination cues for Mediterranean Basin obligate seeders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M.; Baeza, M. Jaime; Blanes, M. Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims This study aims to determine the role that both direct effects of fire and subsequent daily temperature fluctuations play in the seed bank dynamics of obligate seeders from the Mediterranean Basin. The short yet high soil temperatures experienced due to passage of fire are conflated with the lower, but longer, temperatures experienced by daily fluctuations which occur after removing vegetation. These germination cues are able to break seed dormancy, but it is difficult to assess their specific level of influence because they occur consecutively after summer fires, just before the flush of germination in the wet season (autumn). Methods By applying experimental fires, seed treatments were imposed that combined fire exposure/non-fire exposure with exposure to microhabitats under a gradient of disturbance (i.e. gaps opened by fire, mechanical brushing and intact vegetation). The seeds used were representative of the main families of obligate seeders (Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus and Rosmarinus officinalis). Specifically, an assessment was made of (1) the proportion of seeds killed by fire, (2) seedling emergence under field conditions and (3) seeds which remained ungerminated in soil. Key Results For the three species studied, the factors that most influenced seedling emergence and seeds remaining ungerminated were microhabitats with higher temperature fluctuations after fire (gaps opened by fire and brushing treatments). The direct effect of fire decreased the seedling emergence of U. parviflorus and reduced the proportion of seeds of R. officinalis remaining ungerminated. Conclusions The relevance of depleting vegetation (and subsequent daily temperature fluctuation in summer) suggests that studies focusing on lower temperature thresholds for breaking seed dormancy are required. This fact also supports the hypothesis that the seeding capacity in Mediterranean Basin obligate seeders may have evolved as a response to a wide range of

  8. Climate change and the effects of temperature extremes on Australian flying-foxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbergen, Justin A; Klose, Stefan M; Markus, Nicola; Eby, Peggy

    2008-02-22

    Little is known about the effects of temperature extremes on natural systems. This is of increasing concern now that climate models predict dramatic increases in the intensity, duration and frequency of such extremes. Here we examine the effects of temperature extremes on behaviour and demography of vulnerable wild flying-foxes (Pteropus spp.). On 12 January 2002 in New South Wales, Australia, temperatures exceeding 42 degrees C killed over 3500 individuals in nine mixed-species colonies. In one colony, we recorded a predictable sequence of thermoregulatory behaviours (wing-fanning, shade-seeking, panting and saliva-spreading, respectively) and witnessed how 5-6% of bats died from hyperthermia. Mortality was greater among the tropical black flying-fox, Pteropus alecto (10-13%) than the temperate grey-headed flying-fox, Pteropus poliocephalus (less than 1%), and young and adult females were more affected than adult males (young, 23-49%; females, 10-15%; males, less than 3%). Since 1994, over 30000 flying-foxes (including at least 24500 P. poliocephalus) were killed during 19 similar events. Although P. alecto was relatively less affected, it is currently expanding its range into the more variable temperature envelope of P. poliocephalus, which increases the likelihood of die-offs occurring in this species. Temperature extremes are important additional threats to Australian flying-foxes and the ecosystem services they provide, and we recommend close monitoring of colonies where temperatures exceeding 42.0 degrees C are predicted. The effects of temperature extremes on flying-foxes highlight the complex implications of climate change for behaviour, demography and species survival.

  9. Estrous cycle fluctuations in sex and ingestive behavior are accentuated by exercise or cold ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhay, Amir; Benton, Noah A; Klingerman, Candice M; Krishnamoorthy, Kaila; Brozek, Jeremy M; Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". In female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), low circulating levels of ovarian steroids are associated with increased food hoarding and decreased sexual motivation, but these effects are exaggerated in food-restricted females. To determine whether cold ambient temperature has the same effects as food restriction, groups of hamsters were fed ad libitum while they were housed at either 5 °C or 22 °C, and then tested for behavior for 90 min on each day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 22 °C, high levels of sexual motivation and low levels of food hoarding were seen every day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 5 °C, high levels of sexual motivation were restricted to the periovulatory day. On the three nonestrous days, these females showed high levels of food hoarding, but not food intake. A separate cohort of females were provided with access to running wheels and housed at 22 °C. They showed high levels of sexual motivation restricted to the periovulatory day, similar to the pattern of sexual motivation seen in cold-housed females. Unlike cold-housed females, those with running wheels showed low levels of food hoarding and high levels of food intake. Food restriction, cold housing, and access to wheels had no significant effect on plasma estradiol or progesterone concentrations, but significantly decreased plasma leptin concentrations. All three energetic challenges unmask estrous cycle fluctuations in sexual motivation that are obscured in laboratory conditions, i.e., isolation in a small cage with an overabundance of food.

  10. Moments of charge fluctuations, pseudo-critical temperatures and freeze-out in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2011-01-01

    We discuss universal properties of higher order cumulants of net baryon number fluctuations and point out their relevance for the analysis of freeze-out and critical conditions in heavy ion collisions at LHC and RHIC.

  11. The effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation in lower extremity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ayse B; Tosun, Fadime; Demirel, Ismail; Unlu, Serap; Bayar, Mustafa K; Erhan, Omer L

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation for patients undergoing lower extremity surgery. Our study included 90 male patients aged 18-60 years in American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status groups I or II who were scheduled for lower extremity surgery. Patients were randomly divided into three groups according to anesthetic technique: general anesthesia (GA), epidural anesthesia (EA), and femoral-sciatic block (FS). These groups were divided into subgroups according to room temperature: the temperature for group I was 20-22 °C and that for group II was 23-25 °C. Therefore, we labeled the groups as follows: GA I, GA II, EA I, EA II, FS I, and FS II. Probes for measuring tympanic membrane and peripheral temperature were placed in and on the patients, and mean skin temperature (MST) and mean body temperature (MBT) were assessed. Postoperative shivering scores were recorded. During anesthesia, tympanic temperature and MBT decreased whereas MST increased for all patients. There was no significant difference between tympanic temperatures in either the room temperature or anesthetic method groups. MST was lower in group GA I than in group GA II after 5, 10, 15, 20, 60 and 90 min whereas MBT was significantly lower at the basal level (p thermoregulation among anesthetic techniques. Room temperature affected thermoregulation in Group GA.

  12. The non-Gaussianity and spatial asymmetry of temperature extremes relative to the jet: the role of horizontal advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnik, Nili; Garfinkel, Chaim

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected raise the number of warm spells and lower the number of cold spells, by simply shifting of the near-surface temperature probability distribution to warmer temperatures. However, changes in the shape of distribution strongly affect how the occurrence of temperature extremes will change. Hence, understanding the processes shaping the spatial and statistical distribution of temperature variations and extremes in the present climate is central to understanding how temperature extremes might vary in the future. Using meteorological reanalyses data we show that the distribution of near-surface temperature variability is non-Gaussian, and consistent with this, extreme warm anomalies occur preferentially poleward of the location of extreme cold anomalies. The non-Guassianity evident in reanalysis data is also found in a set of dry General Circulation Model runs in which the jet is forced at different latitudes, and the location of extremes is influenced by the location of the jet stream. Using a simple model of Lagrangian temperature advection, we investigate the role of synoptic dynamics in causing this non Gaussianity. The meridional shifting between cold and warm extremes, and the related non-Gaussianity are traced back to the synoptic evolution leading up to cold and warm extreme events. We find that the meridional movement of synotpic systems, as well as nonlinear temperature advection are both of crucial importance for the warm/cold asymmetry in the latitudinal distribution of the temperature extremes. The possible implications for future changes in extremes will be briefly discussed.

  13. Temperature Fluctuation Synthesis/Simultaneous Densification and Microstructure Control of Titanium Silicon Carbide (Ti3SiC2) Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@A novel temperature fluctuation synthesis/simultaneous densification process was developed for the preparation of Ti3SiC2 bulk ceramics. In this process, Si is used as an in-situ liquid forming phase and it is favorable for both the solid-liquid synthesis and the densification of Ti3SiC2 ceramics. The present work demonstrated that the temperature fluctuation synthesis/simultaneous densification process is one of the most effective and simple methods for the preparation of Ti3SiC2 bulk materials providing relatively low synthesis temperature, short reaction time, and simultaneous synthesis and densification. This work also showed the capability to control the microstructure, e.g., the preferred orientation, of the bulk Ti3SiC2 materials simply by applying the hot pressing pressure at different stages of the temperature fluctuation process. And textured Ti3SiC2 bulk materials with {002} faces of laminated Ti3SiC2 grains normal to the hot pressing axis were prepared.

  14. Trends in temperature extremes over nine integrated agricultural regions in China, 1961-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xushu; Wang, Zhaoli; Zhou, Xiaowen; Lai, Chengguang; Chen, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    By characterizing the patterns of temperature extremes over nine integrated agricultural regions (IARs) in China from 1961 to 2011, this study performed trend analyses on 16 extreme temperature indices using a high-resolution (0.5° × 0.5°) daily gridded dataset and the Mann-Kendall method. The results show that annually, at both daytime and nighttime, cold extremes significantly decreased but warm extremes significantly increased across all IARs. Overall, nighttimes tended to warm faster than daytimes. Diurnal temperature ranges (DTR) diminished, apart from the mid-northern Southwest China Region and the mid-Loess Plateau Region. Seasonally, DTR widely diminished across all IARs during the four seasons except for spring. Higher minimum daily minimum temperature (TNn) and maximum daily maximum temperature (TXx), in both summer and winter, were recorded for most IARs except for the Huang-Huai-Hai Region; in autumn, all IARs generally encountered higher TNn and TXx. In all seasons, warming was observed at daytime and nighttime but, again, nighttimes warmed faster than daytimes. The results also indicate a more rapid warming trend in Northern and Western China than in Southern and Eastern China, with accelerated warming at high elevations. The increases in TNn and TXx might cause a reduction in agriculture yield in spring over Northern China, while such negative impact might occur in Southern China during summer. In autumn and winter, however, the negative impact possibly occurred in most of the IARs. Moreover, increased TXx in the Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta is possibly related to rapid local urbanization. Climatically, the general increase in temperature extremes across Chinese IARs may be induced by strengthened Northern Hemisphere Subtropical High or weakened Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex.

  15. Impacts of temperature extremes on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.; Plavcová, E.; Urban, A.; Kriz, B.; Kyncl, J.

    2012-04-01

    Elevated mortality associated with high ambient temperatures in summer represents one of the main impacts of weather extremes on human society. Increases in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves have been reported in many European countries; much less is known about which particular cardiovascular disorders are most affected during heat waves, and whether similar patterns are found for morbidity (hospital admissions). Relatively less understood is also cold-related mortality and morbidity in winter, when the relationships between weather and human health are more complex, less direct, and confounded by other factors such as epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. The present study analyses relationships between temperature extremes and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We make use of the datasets on hospital admissions and daily mortality in the population of the Czech Republic (about 10.3 million) over 1994-2009. The data have been standardized to remove the effects of the long-term trend and the seasonal and weekly cycles. Periods when the morbidity/mortality data were affected by epidemics of influenza and other acute respiratory infections have been removed from the analysis. We use analogous definitions for hot and cold spells based on quantiles of daily average temperature anomalies, which allows for a comparison of the findings for summer hot spells and winter cold spells. The main aims of the study are (i) to identify deviations of mortality and morbidity from the baseline associated with hot and cold spells, (ii) to compare the hot- and cold-spell effects for individual cardiovascular diseases (e.g. ischaemic heart disease I20-I25, cerebrovascular disease I60-I69, hypertension I10, aterosclerosis I70) and to identify those diagnoses that are most closely linked to temperature extremes, (iii) to identify population groups most vulnerable to temperature extremes, and (iv) to compare the links to temperature extremes for morbidity and

  16. Oxygen isotope fluctuations in a modern North Sea oyster (Crassostrea gigas) compared with annual variations in seawater temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Wiechert, Uwe; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A total of 181 oxygen isotope values from sequential samples of the left shell of a modern Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) that lived on a sub-tidal oyster bank in the List Basin (North Sea, Germany) shows periodically varying values between + 1.3‰ and -2.5‰. In order to test whether these d18O...... fluctuations reflect seawater temperature changes, the isotope values of the shell were compared to actual seawater temperature variations from the region. C. gigas serves as an excellent proxy for temperature of palaeoseawater and the results show that the examined oyster precipitated its shell in d18O...... equilibrium with the ambient seawater. A cessation of the oyster shell calcification starts at water temperatures below 6 °C, at lower temperatures than previously thought for Crassostrea. For palaeoclimate investigations the termination of shell production is important because the lowest temperatures might...

  17. Characteristics of the spatiotemporal distribution of daily extreme temperature events in China: Minimum temperature records in different climate states against the background of the most probable temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Zhong-Hua; Hu Jing-Guo; Feng Guo-Lin; Cao Yong-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Based on the skewed function,the most probable temperature is defined and the spatiotemporal distributions of the frequencies and strengths of extreme temperature events in different climate states over China are investigated,where the climate states are referred to as State Ⅰ,State Ⅱ and State Ⅲ,i.e.,the daily minimum temperature records of 1961-1990,1971-2000,and 1981-2009.The results show that in space the frequency of high temperature events in summer decreases clearly in the lower and middle reaches of the Yellow River in State Ⅰ and that low temperature events decrease in northern China in State Ⅱ.In the present state,the frequency of high temperature events increases significantly in most areas over China except the north east,while the frequency of low temperature events decreases mainly in north China and the regions between the Yangtze River and the Yellow River.The distributions of frequencies and strengths of extreme temperature events are consistent in space.The analysis of time evolution of extreme events shows that the occurrence of high temperature events become higher with the change in state,while that of low temperature events decreases.High temperature events are becoming stronger as well and deserve to be paid special attention.

  18. Extreme Sensitivity of Room-Temperature Photoelectric Effect for Terahertz Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Tong, Jinchao; Huang, Jingguo; Ouyang, Cheng; Qu, Yue; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    Extreme sensitivity of room-temperature photoelectric effect for terahertz (THz) detection is demonstrated by generating extra carriers in an electromagnetic induced well located at the semiconductor, using a wrapped metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The excellent performance achieved with THz detectors shows great potential to open avenues for THz detection.

  19. Performance of the Micropower Voltage Reference ADR3430 Under Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Electronic systems designed for use in space exploration systems are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures. For example, operation at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated in space missions such as polar craters of the moon (-223 C), James Webb Space Telescope (-236 C), Mars (-140 C), Europa (-223 C), Titan (-178 C), and other deep space probes away from the sun. Similarly, rovers and landers on the lunar surface, and deep space probes intended for the exploration of Venus are expected to encounter high temperature extremes. Electronics capable of operation under extreme temperatures would not only meet the requirements of future spacebased systems, but would also contribute to enhancing efficiency and improving reliability of these systems through the elimination of the thermal control elements that present electronics need for proper operation under the harsh environment of space. In this work, the performance of a micropower, high accuracy voltage reference was evaluated over a wide temperature range. The Analog Devices ADR3430 chip uses a patented voltage reference architecture to achieve high accuracy, low temperature coefficient, and low noise in a CMOS process [1]. The device combines two voltages of opposite temperature coefficients to create an output voltage that is almost independent of ambient temperature. It is rated for the industrial temperature range of -40 C to +125 C, and is ideal for use in low power precision data acquisition systems and in battery-powered devices. Table 1 shows some of the manufacturer s device specifications.

  20. Variations in morphological and life-history traits under extreme temperatures in Drosophila ananassae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seema Sisodia; B N Singh

    2009-06-01

    Using half-sib analysis, we analysed the consequences of extreme rearing temperatures on genetic and phenotypic variations in the morphological and life-history traits of Drosophila ananassae. Paternal half-sib covariance contains a relatively small proportion of the epistatic variance and lacks the dominance variance and variance due to maternal effect, which provides more reliable estimates of additive genetic variance. Experiments were performed on a mass culture population of D. ananassae collected from Kanniyakumari (India). Two extremely stressful temperatures (18°C and 32°C) and one standard temperature (25°C) were used to examine the effect of stressful and non-stressful environments on the morphological and life-history traits in males and females. Mean values of various morphological traits differed significantly among different temperature regimens in both males and females. Rearing at 18°C and 32°C resulted in decreased thorax length, wing-to-thorax (w/t) ratio, sternopleural bristle number, ovariole number, sex comb-tooth number and testis length. Phenotypic variances increased under stressful temperatures in comparison with non-stressful temperatures. Heritability and evolvability based on among-sires (males), among-dams (females), and the sum of the two components (sire + dam) showed higher values at both the stressful temperatures than at the non-stressful temperature. These differences reflect changes in additive genetic variance. Viability was greater at the high than the low extreme temperature. As viability is an indicator of stress, we can assume that stress was greater at 18°C than at 32°C in D. ananassae. The genetic variations for all the quantitative and life-history traits were higher at low temperature. Variation in sexual traits was more pronounced as compared with other morphometric traits, which shows that sexual traits are more prone to thermal stress. Our results agree with the hypothesis that genetic variation is increased in

  1. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  2. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Howard, N. T.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.

    2016-04-01

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (kyρs 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (kyρs ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ˜ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the "Transport Shortfall" [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  3. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, C., E-mail: csung@physics.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mikkelsen, D. R.; Churchill, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Theiler, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SPC, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} < 0.3) are measured in the outer core region (r/a > 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ∼ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the “Transport Shortfall” [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  4. Bunched black (and grouped grey) swans: Dissipative and non-dissipative models of correlated extreme fluctuations in complex geosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, N. W.

    2013-01-01

    I review the hierarchy of approaches to complex systems, focusing particularly on stochastic equations. I discuss how the main models advocated by the late Benoit Mandelbrot fit into this classification, and how they continue to contribute to cross-disciplinary approaches to the increasingly important problems of correlated extreme events and unresolved scales. The ideas have broad importance, with applications ranging across science areas as diverse as the heavy tailed distributions of intense rainfall in hydrology, after which Mandelbrot named the "Noah effect"; the problem of correlated runs of dry summers in climate, after which the "Joseph effect" was named; and the intermittent, bursty, volatility seen in finance and fluid turbulence.

  5. Trends in atmospheric patterns conducive to seasonal precipitation and temperature extremes in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Daniel L; Horton, Daniel E; Singh, Deepti; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that changes in atmospheric circulation have altered the probability of extreme climate events in the Northern Hemisphere. We investigate northeastern Pacific atmospheric circulation patterns that have historically (1949-2015) been associated with cool-season (October-May) precipitation and temperature extremes in California. We identify changes in occurrence of atmospheric circulation patterns by measuring the similarity of the cool-season atmospheric configuration that occurred in each year of the 1949-2015 period with the configuration that occurred during each of the five driest, wettest, warmest, and coolest years. Our analysis detects statistically significant changes in the occurrence of atmospheric patterns associated with seasonal precipitation and temperature extremes. We also find a robust increase in the magnitude and subseasonal persistence of the cool-season West Coast ridge, resulting in an amplification of the background state. Changes in both seasonal mean and extreme event configurations appear to be caused by a combination of spatially nonuniform thermal expansion of the atmosphere and reinforcing trends in the pattern of sea level pressure. In particular, both thermal expansion and sea level pressure trends contribute to a notable increase in anomalous northeastern Pacific ridging patterns similar to that observed during the 2012-2015 California drought. Collectively, our empirical findings suggest that the frequency of atmospheric conditions like those during California's most severely dry and hot years has increased in recent decades, but not necessarily at the expense of patterns associated with extremely wet years.

  6. Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

    2012-01-17

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

  7. Mosselbay environmental conditions and sea-surface temperature fluctuations during the Late Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Annette; Andò, Sergio; Frenzel, Peter; Kugel, Martin; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Schefuß, Enno; Zabel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    our current stage of research, we attribute this to a southward shift of the SHW and a strengthening in Aghulas current speed during this period. Cohen, A.L. and Tyson, P.D., 1995. Sea-surface temperature fluctuations during the Holocene off the south coast of Africa: implications for terrestrial climate and rainfall. The Holocene 5 (3), 304-312.

  8. Effect of extreme data loss on long-range correlated and anti-correlated signals quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Qianli D Y; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how extreme loss of data affects the scaling behavior of long-range power-law correlated and anti-correlated signals applying the DFA method. We introduce a segmentation approach to generate surrogate signals by randomly removing data segments from stationary signals with different types of correlations. These surrogate signals are characterized by: (i) the DFA scaling exponent $\\alpha$ of the original correlated signal, (ii) the percentage $p$ of the data removed, (iii) the average length $\\mu$ of the removed (or remaining) data segments, and (iv) the functional form of the distribution of the length of the removed (or remaining) data segments. We find that the {\\it global} scaling exponent of positively correlated signals remains practically unchanged even for extreme data loss of up to 90%. In contrast, the global scaling of anti-correlated signals changes to uncorrelated behavior even when a very small fraction of the data is lost. These observations are confirmed on the examples of human g...

  9. Effects of extreme spring temperatures on phenology: a case study from Munich and Ingolstadt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochner, Susanne; Menzel, Annette

    2010-05-01

    Extreme events - e.g. warm spells or heavy precipitation events - are likely to increase in the future both in frequency and intensity. Therefore, research on extreme events gains new importance; also in terms of plant development which is mostly triggered by temperatures. An arising question is how plants respond to an extreme warm spell when following an extreme cold winter season. This situation could be studied in spring 2009 in the greater area of Munich and Ingolstadt by phenological observations of flowering and leaf unfolding of birch (Betula pendula L.) and flowering of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.). The long chilling period of winter 2008 and spring 2009 was followed by an immediate strong forcing of flowering and leaf unfolding, especially for birch. This extreme weather situation diminished the difference between urban and rural dates of onset. Another important fact that could be observed in the proceeding period of December 2008 to April 2009 was the reduced temperature difference among urban and rural sites (urban heat island effect). Long-term observations (1951-2008) of the phenological network of the German Meteorological Service (DWD) were used to identify years with reduced urban-rural differences between onset times in the greater area of Munich in the past. Statistical analyses were conducted in order to answer the question whether the sequence of extreme warm and cold events leads to a decreased difference in phenological onset times or if this behaviour can be attributed to extreme warm springs themselves or to the decreased urban heat island effect which is mostly affected by general atmospheric circulation patterns.

  10. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-08-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970-1999 and 2000-2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000-2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970-1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes.

  11. Expected changes in future temperature extremes and their elevation dependency over the Yellow River source region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the Statistical DownScaling Model (SDSM and the outputs from two global climate models, we investigate possible changes in mean and extreme temperature indices and their elevation dependency over the Yellow River source region for the two future periods 2046–2065 and 2081–2100 under the IPCC SRES A2, A1B and B1 emission scenarios. Changes in interannual variability of mean and extreme temperature indices are also analyzed. The validation results show that SDSM performs better in reproducing the maximum temperature-related indices than the minimum temperature-related indices. The projections show that by the middle and end of the 21st century all parts of the study region may experience increases in both mean and extreme temperature in all seasons, along with an increase in the frequency of hot days and warm nights and with a decrease in frost days. By the end of the 21st century, interannual variability increases in all seasons for the frequency of hot days and warm nights and in spring for frost days while it decreases for frost days in summer. Autumn demonstrates pronounced elevation-dependent changes in which around six out of eight indices show significant increasing changes with elevation.

  12. Climate Change and Fetal Health: The Impacts of Exposure to Extreme Temperatures in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Nicole S.; Horton, Radley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Climate change is projected to increase the frequency, intensity, and duration of heat waves while reducing cold extremes, yet few studies have examined the relationship between temperature and fetal health. Objectives: We estimate the impacts of extreme temperatures on birth weight and gestational age in Manhattan, a borough in New York City, and explore differences by socioeconomic status (SES). Methods: We combine average daily temperature from 1985 to 2010 with birth certificate data in Manhattan for the same time period. We then generate 33 downscaled climate model time series to project impacts on fetal health. Results: We find exposure to an extra day where average temperature 25 F and 85 F during pregnancy is associated with a 1.8 and 1.7 g (respectively) reduction in birth weight, but the impact varies by SES, particularly for extreme heat, where teen mothers seem most vulnerable. We find no meaningful, significant effect on gestational age. Using projections of temperature from these climate models, we project average net reductions in birth weight in the 2070- 2099 period of 4.6 g in the business-as-usual scenario. Conclusions: Results suggest that increasing heat events from climate change could adversely impact birth weight and vary by SES.

  13. Climate Change and Fetal Health: The Impacts of Exposure to Extreme Temperatures in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Nicole S.; Horton, Radley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Climate change is projected to increase the frequency, intensity, and duration of heat waves while reducing cold extremes, yet few studies have examined the relationship between temperature and fetal health. Objectives: We estimate the impacts of extreme temperatures on birth weight and gestational age in Manhattan, a borough in New York City, and explore differences by socioeconomic status (SES). Methods: We combine average daily temperature from 1985 to 2010 with birth certificate data in Manhattan for the same time period. We then generate 33 downscaled climate model time series to project impacts on fetal health. Results: We find exposure to an extra day where average temperature 25 F and 85 F during pregnancy is associated with a 1.8 and 1.7 g (respectively) reduction in birth weight, but the impact varies by SES, particularly for extreme heat, where teen mothers seem most vulnerable. We find no meaningful, significant effect on gestational age. Using projections of temperature from these climate models, we project average net reductions in birth weight in the 2070- 2099 period of 4.6 g in the business-as-usual scenario. Conclusions: Results suggest that increasing heat events from climate change could adversely impact birth weight and vary by SES.

  14. Significant influences of global mean temperature and ENSO on extreme rainfall over Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Marcelino, II; Matsumoto, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing concerns on the consequences of global warming, and the accumulating records of disaster related to heavy rainfall events in Southeast Asia, this study investigates whether a direct link can be detected between the rising global mean temperature, as well as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and extreme rainfall over the region. The maximum likelihood modeling that allows incorporating covariates on the location parameter of the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is employed. The GEV model is fitted to annual and seasonal rainfall extremes, which were taken from a high-resolution gauge-based gridded daily precipitation data covering a span of 57 years (1951-2007). Nonstationarities in extreme rainfall are detected over the central parts of Indochina Peninsula, eastern coasts of central Vietnam, northwest of the Sumatra Island, inland portions of Borneo Island, and on the northeastern and southwestern coasts of the Philippines. These nonstationarities in extreme rainfall are directly linked to near-surface global mean temperature and ENSO. In particular, the study reveals that a kelvin increase in global mean temperature anomaly can lead to an increase of 30% to even greater than 45% in annual maximum 1-day rainfall, which were observed pronouncedly over central Vietnam, southern coast of Myanmar, northwestern sections of Thailand, northwestern tip of Sumatra, central portions of Malaysia, and the Visayas island in central Philippines. Furthermore, a pronounced ENSO influence manifested on the seasonal maximum 1-day rainfall; a northward progression of 10%-15% drier condition over Southeast Asia as the El Niño develops from summer to winter is revealed. It is important therefore, to consider the results obtained here for water resources management as well as for adaptation planning to minimize the potential adverse impact of global warming, particularly on extreme rainfall and its associated flood risk over the region

  15. Can tree-ring density data reflect summer temperature extremes and associated circulation patterns over Fennoscandia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ionita, Monica; Lohmann, Gerrit; Chen, Deliang; Linderholm, Hans W.

    2016-12-01

    Tree-ring maximum latewood density (MXD) records from Fennoscandia have been widely used to infer regional- and hemispheric-scale mean temperature variability. Here, we explore if MXD records can also be used to infer past variability of summer temperature extremes across Fennoscandia. The first principal component (PC1) based on 34 MXD chronologies in Fennoscandia explains 50% of the total variance in the observed warm-day extremes over the period 1901-1978. Variations in both observed summer warm-day extremes and PC1 are influenced by the frequency of anomalous anticyclonic pattern over the region, summer sea surface temperatures over the Baltic, North and Norwegian Seas, and the strength of the westerly zonal wind at 200 hPa across Fennoscandia. Both time series are associated with nearly identical atmospheric circulation and SST patterns according to composite map analysis. In a longer context, the first PC based on 3 millennium-long MXD chronologies in central and northern Fennoscandia explains 83% of the total variance of PC1 from the 34 MXD chronologies over the period 1901-1978, 48% of the total variance of the summer warm-day extreme variability over the period 1901-2006, and 36% of the total variance in the frequency of a summer anticyclonic pattern centered over eastern-central Fennoscandia in the period 1948-2006. The frequency of summer warm-day extremes in Fennoscandia is likely linked to a meridional shift of the northern mid-latitude jet stream. This study shows that the MXD network can be used to infer the variability of past summer warm-day extremes and the frequency of the associated summer anticyclonic circulation pattern over Fennoscandia.

  16. Greater increases in temperature extremes in low versus high income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Nicholas; Alexander, Lisa; Green, Donna; Donat, Markus

    2017-03-01

    It is commonly expected that the world’s lowest income countries will face some of the worst impacts of global warming, despite contributing the least to greenhouse gas emissions. Using global atmospheric reanalyses we show that the world’s lowest income countries are already experiencing greater increases in the occurrence of temperature extremes compared to the highest income countries, and have been for over two decades. Not only are low income countries less able to support mitigation and adaptation efforts, but their typically equatorial location predisposes them to lower natural temperature variability and thus greater changes in the occurrence of temperature extremes with global warming. This aspect of global warming is well known but overlooked in current international climate policy agreements and we argue that it is an important factor in reducing inequity due to climate impacts.

  17. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  18. Characterization of Future Caribbean Rainfall and Temperature Extremes across Rainfall Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Melissa McLean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available End-of-century changes in Caribbean climate extremes are derived from the Providing Regional Climate for Impact Studies (PRECIS regional climate model (RCM under the A2 and B2 emission scenarios across five rainfall zones. Trends in rainfall, maximum temperature, and minimum temperature extremes from the RCM are validated against meteorological stations over 1979–1989. The model displays greater skill at representing trends in consecutive wet days (CWD and extreme rainfall (R95P than consecutive dry days (CDD, wet days (R10, and maximum 5-day precipitation (RX5. Trends in warm nights, cool days, and warm days were generally well reproduced. Projections for 2071–2099 relative to 1961–1989 are obtained from the ECHAM5 driven RCM. Northern and eastern zones are projected to experience more intense rainfall under A2 and B2. There is less consensus across scenarios with respect to changes in the dry and wet spell lengths. However, there is indication that a drying trend may be manifest over zone 5 (Trinidad and northern Guyana. Changes in the extreme temperature indices generally suggest a warmer Caribbean towards the end of century across both scenarios with the strongest changes over zone 4 (eastern Caribbean.

  19. Trends in Extremes of Surface Humidity, Temperature, and Summertime Heat Stress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the past half century, the mean summertime temperature in China has increased, with nights warm ing more than days. Using surface station observations, we show that the frequency of extreme heat-stress events in China, caused by extremely hot and humid days as well as by heatwaves lasting for a few days, has increased over the period from 1951 to 1994. When humidity is high, hot weather can cause heat stress in humans. The increased heat-stress trend may pose a public health problem.

  20. Dynamically-downscaled projections of changes in temperature extremes over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junhong; Huang, Guohe; Wang, Xiuquan; Li, Yongping; Lin, Qianguo

    2017-06-01

    In this study, likely changes in extreme temperatures (including 16 indices) over China in response to global warming throughout the twenty-first century are investigated through the PRECIS regional climate modeling system. The PRECIS experiment is conducted at a spatial resolution of 25 km and is driven by a perturbed-physics ensemble to reflect spatial variations and model uncertainties. Simulations of present climate (1961-1990) are compared with observations to validate the model performance in reproducing historical climate over China. Results indicate that the PRECIS demonstrates reasonable skills in reproducing the spatial patterns of observed extreme temperatures over the most regions of China, especially in the east. Nevertheless, the PRECIS shows a relatively poor performance in simulating the spatial patterns of extreme temperatures in the western mountainous regions, where its driving GCM exhibits more uncertainties due to lack of insufficient observations and results in more errors in climate downscaling. Future spatio-temporal changes of extreme temperature indices are then analyzed for three successive periods (i.e., 2020s, 2050s and 2080s). The projected changes in extreme temperatures by PRECIS are well consistent with the results of the major global climate models in both spatial and temporal patterns. Furthermore, the PRECIS demonstrates a distinct superiority in providing more detailed spatial information of extreme indices. In general, all extreme indices show similar changes in spatial pattern: large changes are projected in the north while small changes are projected in the south. In contrast, the temporal patterns for all indices vary differently over future periods: the warm indices, such as SU, TR, WSDI, TX90p, TN90p and GSL are likely to increase, while the cold indices, such as ID, FD, CSDI, TX10p and TN10p, are likely to decrease with time in response to global warming. Nevertheless, the magnitudes of changes in all indices tend to

  1. Climate Change: A New Metric to Measure Changes in the Frequency of Extreme Temperatures using Record Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, L.; Jun, T.; Rind, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    Consensus on global warming is the result of multiple and varying lines of evidence, and one key ramification is the increase in frequency of extreme climate events including record high temperatures. Here we develop a metric- called "record equivalent draws" (RED)-based on record high (low) temperature observations, and show that changes in RED approximate changes in the likelihood of extreme high (low) temperatures. Since we also show that this metric is independent of the specifics of the underlying temperature distributions, RED estimates can be aggregated across different climates to provide a genuinely global assessment of climate change. Using data on monthly average temperatures across the global landmass we find that the frequency of extreme high temperatures increased 10-fold between the first three decades of the last century (1900-1929) and the most recent decade (1999-2008). A more disaggregated analysis shows that the increase in frequency of extreme high temperatures is greater in the tropics than in higher latitudes, a pattern that is not indicated by changes in mean temperature. Our RED estimates also suggest concurrent increases in the frequency of both extreme high and extreme low temperatures during 2002-2008, a period when we observe a plateauing of global mean temperature. Using daily extreme temperature observations, we find that the frequency of extreme high temperatures is greater in the daily minimum temperature time-series compared to the daily maximum temperature time-series. There is no such observable difference in the frequency of extreme low temperatures between the daily minimum and daily maximum.

  2. The evolution of temperature extremes in the Gaspé Peninsula, Quebec, Canada (1974-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Guillaume; Acquaotta, Fiorella; Fratianni, Simona

    2016-07-01

    The majority of natural hazards that affect Canadian territory are the result of extreme climate and weather conditions. Among these weather hazards, some can be calculated from the application of thresholds for minimum and maximum temperatures at a daily or monthly timescale. These thermal indices allowed the prediction of extreme conditions that may have an impact on the human population by affecting, for example, health, agriculture, and water resources. In this article, we discuss the methods used (RHtestsV4, SPLIDHOM, ClimPACT) then describe the steps followed to calculate the indices, including how we dealt with the problem of missing data and the necessity to identify a common methodology to analyze the time series. We also present possible solutions for ensuring the quality of meteorological data. We then present an overview of the results, namely the main trends and variability of extreme temperature for seven stations located in the Gaspé Peninsula from 1974 to 2013. Our results indicate some break points in time series and positive trends for most indices related to the rise of the temperatures but indicate a negative trend for the indices related to low temperatures for most stations during the study period.

  3. Spatiotemporal variations of extreme low temperature for emergency transport: a nationwide observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2016-12-01

    Although recent studies have investigated the effect of extreme heat on emergency transport, few have investigated the spatiotemporal variations of extreme low temperature for emergency transport on a national scale. Data pertaining to emergency ambulance transport and weather variation in the 47 prefectures of Japan between 2007 and 2010 were obtained. Nonlinear and delayed relationships between temperature and morbidity were assessed using a two-stage analysis. First, a Poisson regression analysis allowing for overdispersion in a distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the prefecture-specific effects of temperature on morbidity. Second, a multivariate meta-analysis was applied to pool estimates on a national level. Of 15,868,086 emergency transports over the study period, 5,375,621 emergency transports were reported during the winter months (November through February). The overall cumulative relative risk (RR) at the first percentile vs. the minimum morbidity percentile was 1.24 (95 % CI = 1.15-1.34) for all causes, 1.50 (95 % CI = 1.30-1.74) for cardiovascular diseases, and 1.59 (95 % CI = 1.33-1.89) for respiratory diseases. There were differences in the temporal variations between extreme low temperature and respiratory disease morbidity. Spatial variation between prefectures was observed for all causes (Cochran Q test, p social and environmental factors, which can be responsible for spatial heterogeneity between prefectures.

  4. Time series requirements and trends of temperature and precipitation extremes over Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Guido; Desiato, Franco; Fraschetti, Piero; Perconti, Walter; Piervitali, Emanuela

    2013-04-01

    Extreme climate events have strong impacts on society and economy; accordingly,the knowledge of their trends on long period is crucial for the definition and implementation of a national adaptation strategy to climate change. The Research Programme on Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) identified a set of temperature and precipitation indices suited to investigate variability and trends of climate extremes. It is well known that extreme indices calculation is more demanding than first and second order statistics are: daily temperature and precipitation data are required and strict constrains in terms of continuity and completeness must be met. In addition, possible dishomogeneities affecting time series must be identified and adjusted before indices calculation. When metadata are not available, statistical methods can provide scientist a relevant support for homogeneity check; however, ad-hoc decision criteria (sometimes subjective) must be applied whenever contradictory results characterize different statistical homogeneity tests. In this work, a set of daily (minimum and maximum) temperature and precipitation time series for the period 1961-2011 were selected in order to guarantee a quite uniform spatial distribution of the stations over the Italian territory and according to the afore-said continuity and completeness criteria. Following the method described by Vincent, the homogeneity check of temperature time series was run at annual level. Two well-documented tests were employed (F-test and T-test), both implemented in the free R-package RHtestV3. The Vincent method was also used for a further investigation of time series homogeneity. Temperature dishomogeneous series were discarded. For precipitation series, no homogeneity check was run. The selected series were employed at daily level to calculate a reliable set of extreme indices. For each station, a linear model was employed for indices trend estimation. Finally, single station results were

  5. Seasonal trends in precipitation and surface air temperature extremes in mainland Portugal, 1941-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. I. P.; Santo, F. E.; Ramos, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Several climate models predict, on a global scale, modifications in climate variables that are expected to have impact on society and the environment. The concern is on changes in the variability of processes, the mean and extreme events (maximum and minimum). To explore recent changes in precipitation and near surface air temperature extremes in mainland Portugal, we have inspected trends in time series of specific indices defined for daily data. These indices were recommended by the Commission for Climatology/Climate Variability and Predictability (CCl/CLIVAR) Working Group on Climate Change Detection, and include threshold indices, probability indices, duration indices and other indices. The precipitation and air temperature data used in this study are from, respectively, 57 and 23 measuring stations scattered across mainland Portugal, and cover the periods 1941-2007, for precipitation, and 1941-2006, for temperature. The study focuses on changes at the seasonal scale. Strong seasonality is one of the main features of climate in mainland Portugal. Intensification of the seasonality signal across the territory, particularly in the more sensitive regions, might contribute to endanger already fragile soil and water resources and ecosystems, and the local environmental and economic sustainability. Thus, the understanding of variations in the intensity, frequency and duration of extreme precipitation and air temperature events at the intra-annual scale is particularly important in this geographical area. Trend analyses were conducted over the full period of the records and for sub-periods, exploring patterns of change. Results show, on the one hand, regional differences in the tendency observed in the time series analysed; and, on the other hand, that although trends in annual indices are in general not statistically significant, there are sometimes significant changes over time in the data at the seasonal scale that point out to an increase in the already existing

  6. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  7. Some traits of low temperature germplasm wheat under extremely unfavorable weather conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张嵩午; 王长发; 冯佰利; 苗芳; 周春菊; 张荣萍

    2001-01-01

    Through a long-term observation on the canopy temperature and some traits of wheat the temperature germplasm of wheat was found to result in the wheats having either a high or a low plant temperature. Under normal weather conditions, the wheat having a low temperature germplasm (LTG) demonstrated several advantageous physiologi-cal and agronomic traits than those having a high temperature germplasm (HTG). Under the extremely unfavorableweather conditions, such as rainy weather or severe drought, LTG wheat still could maintain its superiority to HTG wheat in physiological and agronomic traits including leaf functional duration, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, transpiration rate, net photosynthesis rate, root vitality and kernel plumpness. The wide adaptability of LTG wheat to awide range of meteoro-ecological conditions could provide a valuable germplasm in breeding of good strains with broad-spectrum stress resistance.

  8. Solar Orbiter- Solar Array- Thermal Design for an Extreme Temperature Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jens; Paarmann, Carola; Lindner, Anton; Kreutz, Martin; Oberhuttinger, Carola; Costello, Ian; Icardi, Lidia

    2014-08-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission is an interdisciplinary mission to the sun, carried out by ESA in collaboration with NASA. The spacecraft will approach the sun close to 0.28 AU. At this distance, the solar array has to be operated under high solar array inclination angles to limit the temperatures to a maximum qualification temperature of 200°C for the photo voltaic assembly (PVA). Nevertheless, extreme temperatures appear at specific locations of the solar array which require purpose-built temperature protection measures. A very specific thermal protection is needed to keep the PVA and its supporting structures within the qualified temperature range and simultaneously minimize the thermal flux into the spacecraft.This paper describes the Solar Orbiter solar array design in general and its specific thermal design in particular. It describes the interdisciplinary steps between thermal- and mechanical analysis as well as design engineering necessary to result to the different shielding methods.

  9. Climate changes in temperature and precipitation extremes in an alpine grassland of Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zengyun; Li, Qingxiang; Chen, Xi; Teng, Zhidong; Chen, Changchun; Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yuqing

    2016-11-01

    The natural ecosystem in Central Asia is sensitive and vulnerable to the arid and semiarid climate variations, especially the climate extreme events. However, the climate extreme events in this area are still unclear. Therefore, this study analyzed the climate variability in the temperature and precipitation extreme events in an alpine grassland (Bayanbuluk) of Central Asia based on the daily minimum temperature, daily maximum temperature, and daily precipitation from 1958 to 2012. Statistically significant ( p < 0.01) increasing trends were found in the minimum temperature, maximum temperature at annual, and seasonal time scales except the winter maximum temperature. In the seasonal changes, the winter temperature had the largest contribution to the annual warming. Further, there appeared increasing trends for the warm nights and the warm days and decreasing trends for the cool nights and the cool days at a 99 % confidence level. These trends directly resulted in an increasing trend for the growing season length (GSL) which could have positively influence on the vegetation productivity. For the precipitation, it displayed an increasing trend for the annual precipitation although it was not significant. And the summer precipitation had the same variations as the annual precipitation which indicated that the precipitation in summer made the biggest contribution to the annual precipitation than the other three seasons. The winter precipitation had a significant increasing trend (1.49 mm/10a) and a decreasing trend was found in spring. We also found that the precipitation of the very wet days mainly contributes to the annual precipitation with the trend of 4.5 mm/10a. The maximum 1-day precipitation and the heavy precipitation days only had slight increasing trend. A sharp decreasing trend was found before the early 1980s, and then becoming increase for the above three precipitation indexes. The climate experienced a warm-wet abrupt climate change in the 1980s

  10. Spatial distribution of temperature extremes changes in Poland in 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędruszkiewicz, Joanna

    2013-04-01

    There is a general agreement that changes in the frequency or intensity of extreme weather and climate events have profound impacts on both human society and the economy. In the recent years a numerous weather events have affected human health and caused enormous economic losses. A long-lasting heat waves influence society far more than rare occurred extreme high temperature. On the other hand a winter warming and frequent exceedance of 0°C during winter will be disruptive i.e. for the wheel transport and roads condition in Poland. This work is focused on the study of the spatial diversity of minimum and maximum temperature in 21st century in Poland. Firstly the shift in distribution (PDF) and cumulative distribution (CDF) of the daily maximum temperature in summer and minimum temperature in winter between control and scenario periods was compared among different part of the country. Secondly the changes in the characteristic percentiles of the temperature extremes were analyzed. Furthermore the spatial changes in the duration and frequency of the heat waves in Poland were studied. Moreover the future prediction of changes in characteristic days as hot days (Tmax≥30°C), summer days (Tmax≥25°C), tropical nights (Tmin≥20°C), frost days (Tmin<0°C), etc. were spatially compared. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) is expected to change remarkably in 21st century depending on the area of Poland. The daily minimum and maximum 2-meter temperature date have been obtained from seven different regional climate models and corrected by quintile mapping method afterwards. The Polish station data for the control period have been gained from the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management, National Research Institute.

  11. Effect of fluctuations on time-averaged multi-line NO-LIF thermometry measurements of the gas-phase temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroughi, Omid M.; Kronemayer, Helmut; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-09-01

    Multi-line NO laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry enables accurate gas-phase temperature imaging in combustion systems through least-squares fitting of excitation spectra. The required excitation wavelength scan takes several minutes which systematic biases the results in case of temperature fluctuations. In this work, the effect of various types (linear, Gaussian and bimodal) and amplitudes of temperature fluctuations is quantified based on simulated NO-LIF excitation spectra. Temperature fluctuations of less than ±5 % result in a negligible error of less than ±1 % in temperature for all cases. Bimodal temperature distributions have the largest effect on the determined temperature. Symmetric temperature fluctuations around 900 K have a negligible effect. At lower mean temperatures, fluctuations cause a positive bias leading to over-predicted mean temperatures, while at higher temperatures the bias is negative. The results of the theoretical analysis were applied as a guide for interpreting experimental multi-line NO-LIF temperature measurements in a mildly turbulent pilot-plant scale flame reactor dedicated for nanoparticle synthesis.

  12. Dendroclimatic Reconstruction of April-May Temperature Fluctuations in the Western Himalaya of India Since A.D. 1698

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ram R.; Park, Won-Kyu; Bhattacharyya, Amalava

    1997-09-01

    Ring-width chronologies of Himalayan cedar ( Cedrus deodara(D. Don.) G. Don.), Himalayan pine ( Pinus wallichianaA. B. Jackson), and Himalayan spruce ( Picea smithiana(Wall.) Boiss.) from the western Himalayan region, India, have been used to reconstruct mean April-May temperature back to A.D. 1698. The reconstruction correlates significantly with the average April-May instrumental temperature record ( r= +0.62, 1876-1988) and is characterized by annual to multiyear fluctuations. The most striking feature of the present reconstruction is the absence of any warming trend in the 20th century. Relationships between the mean April-May temperature for the western Himalayan region, Indian summer monsoon rainfall, and Southern Oscillation Index indicate that the tree-ring chronologies, as surrogate temperature records, will provide valuable data for climate change studies with regional and global perspectives.

  13. Multi-decadal Surface Temperature Trends and Extremes at Arctic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttal, T.; Makshtas, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic region is considered to be one where global temperatures are changing the most quickly; a number of factors make it the region where an accurate determination of surface temperature is the most difficult to measure or estimate. In developing a pan-Arctic perspective on Arctic in-situ temperature variability, several issues must be addressed including accounting for the different lengths of temperature records at different locations when comparing trends, accounting for the steep latitudinal controls on 'seasonal' trends, considering the often significant variability between different (sometimes a multitude) of temperature measurements made in the vicinity of a single station, and loss of detail information when data is ingested in a global archives or interpolated into gridded data sets. The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (www.iasoa.org) is an internationally networked consortium of facilities that measure a wide range of meteorological and climate relevant parameters; temperature is the most fundamental of these parameters. Many of the observatories have the longest temperature records in the Arctic region including Barrow, Alaska (114 years), Tiksi, Russia (83 years), and Eureka, Canada (67 years). Using the IASOA data sets a detailed analysis is presented of temperature trends presented as a function of the beginning date from which the trend is calculated, seasonal trends considered in the context of the extreme Arctic solar ephemeris, and the variability in occurrence of annual extreme temperature events. At the Tiksi observatory, a complete record is available of 3-hourly temperatures 1932 to present that was constructed through digitization of decades of written records. This data set is used to investigate if calculated trends and variabilities are consistent with those calculated from daily minimum and maximum values archived by the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information Global Historical Climatology

  14. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  15. Minimum extreme temperature in the gulf of mexico: is there a connection with solar activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravilla, D.; Mendoza, B.; Jauregui, E.

    Minimum extreme temperature ( MET) series from several meteorological stations of the Gulf of Mexico are spectrally analyzed using the Maximum Entrophy Method. We obtained periodicities similar to those found in the sunspot number, the magnetic solar cycle, comic ray fluxes and geomagnetic activity which are modulated by solar activity. We suggested that the solar signal is perhaps present in the MET record of this region of Mexico.

  16. Perception, Action, and Cognition of Football Referees in Extreme Temperatures: Impact on Decision Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Gaoua

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Different professional domains require high levels of physical performance alongside fast and accurate decision-making. Construction workers, police officers, firefighters, elite sports men and women, the military and emergency medical professionals are often exposed to hostile environments with limited options for behavioral coping strategies. In this (mini review we use football refereeing as an example to discuss the combined effect of intense physical activity and extreme temperatures on decision-making and suggest an explicative model. In professional football competitions can be played in temperatures ranging from -5°C in Norway to 30°C in Spain for example. Despite these conditions, the referee’s responsibility is to consistently apply the laws fairly and uniformly, and to ensure the rules are followed without waning or adversely influencing the competitiveness of the play. However, strenuous exercise in extreme environments imposes increased physiological and psychological stress that can affect decision-making. Therefore, the physical exertion required to follow the game and the thermal strain from the extreme temperatures may hinder the ability of referees to make fast and accurate decisions. Here, we review literature on the physical and cognitive requirements of football refereeing and how extreme temperatures may affect referees’ decisions. Research suggests that both hot and cold environments have a negative impact on decision-making but data specific to decision-making is still lacking. A theoretical model of decision-making under the constraint of intense physical activity and thermal stress is suggested. Future naturalistic studies are needed to validate this model and provide clear recommendations for mitigating strategies.

  17. Perception, Action, and Cognition of Football Referees in Extreme Temperatures: Impact on Decision Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaoua, Nadia; de Oliveira, Rita F; Hunter, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Different professional domains require high levels of physical performance alongside fast and accurate decision-making. Construction workers, police officers, firefighters, elite sports men and women, the military and emergency medical professionals are often exposed to hostile environments with limited options for behavioral coping strategies. In this (mini) review we use football refereeing as an example to discuss the combined effect of intense physical activity and extreme temperatures on decision-making and suggest an explicative model. In professional football competitions can be played in temperatures ranging from -5°C in Norway to 30°C in Spain for example. Despite these conditions, the referee's responsibility is to consistently apply the laws fairly and uniformly, and to ensure the rules are followed without waning or adversely influencing the competitiveness of the play. However, strenuous exercise in extreme environments imposes increased physiological and psychological stress that can affect decision-making. Therefore, the physical exertion required to follow the game and the thermal strain from the extreme temperatures may hinder the ability of referees to make fast and accurate decisions. Here, we review literature on the physical and cognitive requirements of football refereeing and how extreme temperatures may affect referees' decisions. Research suggests that both hot and cold environments have a negative impact on decision-making but data specific to decision-making is still lacking. A theoretical model of decision-making under the constraint of intense physical activity and thermal stress is suggested. Future naturalistic studies are needed to validate this model and provide clear recommendations for mitigating strategies.

  18. Trends and periodicity of daily temperature and precipitation extremes during 1960-2013 in Hunan Province, central south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ajiao; He, Xinguang; Guan, Huade; Cai, Yi

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the trends and periodicity in climate extremes are examined in Hunan Province over the period 1960-2013 on the basis of 27 extreme climate indices calculated from daily temperature and precipitation records at 89 meteorological stations. The results show that in the whole province, temperature extremes exhibit a warming trend with more than 50% stations being statistically significant for 7 out of 16 temperature indices, and the nighttime temperature increases faster than the daytime temperature at the annual scale. The changes in most extreme temperature indices show strongly coherent spatial patterns. Moreover, the change rates of almost all temperature indices in north Hunan are greater than those of other regions. However, the statistically significant changes in indices of extreme precipitation are observed at fewer stations than in extreme temperature indices, forming less spatially coherent patterns. Positive trends in indices of extreme precipitation show that the amount and intensity of extreme precipitation events are generally increasing in both annual and seasonal scales, whereas the significant downward trend in consecutive wet days indicates that the precipitation becomes more even over the study period. Analysis of changes in probability distributions of extreme indices for 1960-1986 and 1987-2013 also demonstrates a remarkable shift toward warmer condition and increasing tendency in the amount and intensity of extreme precipitation during the past decades. The variations in extreme climate indices exhibit inconstant frequencies in the wavelet power spectrum. Among the 16 temperature indices, 2 of them show significant 1-year periodic oscillation and 7 of them exhibit significant 4-year cycle during some certain periods. However, significant periodic oscillations can be found in all of the precipitation indices. Wet-day precipitation and three absolute precipitation indices show significant 1-year cycle and other seven provide

  19. Refining multi-model projections of temperature extremes by evaluation against land-atmosphere coupling diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Sebastian; Zscheischler, Jakob; Mahecha, Miguel D.; Orth, Rene; Reichstein, Markus; Vogel, Martha; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-05-01

    The Earth's land surface and the atmosphere are strongly interlinked through the exchange of energy and matter. This coupled behaviour causes various land-atmosphere feedbacks, and an insufficient understanding of these feedbacks contributes to uncertain global climate model projections. For example, a crucial role of the land surface in exacerbating summer heat waves in midlatitude regions has been identified empirically for high-impact heat waves, but individual climate models differ widely in their respective representation of land-atmosphere coupling. Here, we compile an ensemble of 54 combinations of observations-based temperature (T) and evapotranspiration (ET) benchmarking datasets and investigate coincidences of T anomalies with ET anomalies as a proxy for land-atmosphere interactions during periods of anomalously warm temperatures. First, we demonstrate that a large fraction of state-of-the-art climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archive produces systematically too frequent coincidences of high T anomalies with negative ET anomalies in midlatitude regions during the warm season and in several tropical regions year-round. These coincidences (high T, low ET) are closely related to the representation of temperature variability and extremes across the multi-model ensemble. Second, we derive a land-coupling constraint based on the spread of the T-ET datasets and consequently retain only a subset of CMIP5 models that produce a land-coupling behaviour that is compatible with these benchmark estimates. The constrained multi-model simulations exhibit more realistic temperature extremes of reduced magnitude in present climate in regions where models show substantial spread in T-ET coupling, i.e. biases in the model ensemble are consistently reduced. Also the multi-model simulations for the coming decades display decreased absolute temperature extremes in the constrained ensemble. On the other hand, the differences between projected

  20. Refining multi-model projections of temperature extremes by evaluation against land–atmosphere coupling diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sippel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's land surface and the atmosphere are strongly interlinked through the exchange of energy and matter. This coupled behaviour causes various land–atmosphere feedbacks, and an insufficient understanding of these feedbacks contributes to uncertain global climate model projections. For example, a crucial role of the land surface in exacerbating summer heat waves in midlatitude regions has been identified empirically for high-impact heat waves, but individual climate models differ widely in their respective representation of land–atmosphere coupling. Here, we compile an ensemble of 54 combinations of observations-based temperature (T and evapotranspiration (ET benchmarking datasets and investigate coincidences of T anomalies with ET anomalies as a proxy for land–atmosphere interactions during periods of anomalously warm temperatures. First, we demonstrate that a large fraction of state-of-the-art climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 archive produces systematically too frequent coincidences of high T anomalies with negative ET anomalies in midlatitude regions during the warm season and in several tropical regions year-round. These coincidences (high T, low ET are closely related to the representation of temperature variability and extremes across the multi-model ensemble. Second, we derive a land-coupling constraint based on the spread of the T–ET datasets and consequently retain only a subset of CMIP5 models that produce a land-coupling behaviour that is compatible with these benchmark estimates. The constrained multi-model simulations exhibit more realistic temperature extremes of reduced magnitude in present climate in regions where models show substantial spread in T–ET coupling, i.e. biases in the model ensemble are consistently reduced. Also the multi-model simulations for the coming decades display decreased absolute temperature extremes in the constrained ensemble. On the other hand

  1. Using Annual Data to Estimate the Public Health Impact of Extreme Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggins, William B; Yang, Chunyuh; Hokama, Tomiko; Law, Lewis S K; Chan, Emily Y Y

    2015-07-01

    Short-term associations between both hot and cold ambient temperatures and higher mortality have been found worldwide. Few studies have examined these associations on longer time scales. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were calculated for 1976-2012 for Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China, defining "annual" time periods in 2 ways: from May through April of the following year and from November through October. Annual frequency and severity of extreme temperatures were summarized by using a degree-days approach with extreme heat expressed as annual degree-days >29.3°C and cold as annual degree-days ASMR, with adjustment for long-term trends. Increases of 10 hot or 200 cold degree-days in an annual period, the approximate interquartile ranges for these variables, were significantly (all P's ≤ 0.011) associated with 1.9% or 3.1% increases, respectively, in the annual ASMR for the May-April analyses and with 2.2% or 2.8% increases, respectively, in the November-October analyses. Associations were stronger for noncancer and elderly mortality. Mortality increases associated with extreme temperature are not simply due to short-term forward displacement of deaths that would have occurred anyway within a few weeks.

  2. Tendencies of extreme values on rainfall and temperature and its relationship with teleconnection patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, J. J.; Cabrejo, A.; Guarin, D.; Ramos, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    It is now very well established that yearly averaged temperatures are increasing due to anthropogenic climate change. In the area of Galicia (NW Spain) this trend has also been determined. Rainfall does not show a clear tendency in its yearly accumulated values. The aim of this work is to study different extreme indices of rainfall and temperatures analysing variability and possible trends associated to climate change. Station data for the study was provided by the CLIMA database of the regional government of Galicia (NW Spain). The definition of the extreme indices was taken from the joint CCl/CLIVAR/JCOMM Expert Team (ET) on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) This group has defined a set of standard extreme values to simplify intercomparison of data from different regions of the world. For the temperatures in the period 1960-2006, results show a significant increase of the number of days with maximum temperatures above the 90th percentile. Furthermore, a significant decrease of the days with maximum temperatures below the 10th percentile has been found. The tendencies of minimum temperatures are reverse: fewer nights with minimum temperatures below 10th percentile, and more with minimum temperatures above 90th percentile. Those tendencies can be observed all over the year, but are more pronounced in summer. This trend is expected to continue in the next decades because of anthropogenic climate change. We have also calculated the relationship between the above mentioned extreme values and different teleconnection patterns appearing in the North Atlantic area. Results show that local tendencies are associated with trends of EA (Eastern Atlantic) and SCA (Scandinavian) patterns. NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) has also some relationship with these tendencies, but only related with cold days and nights in winter. Rainfall index do not show any clear tendency on the annual scale. Nevertheless, the count of days when precipitation is greater than 20mm (R20

  3. Extremes temperatures and enthalpy in Finland and Sweden in a changing climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venaelaeinen, A.; Saku, S.; Jylhae, K. (Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland)); Nikulin, G.; Kjellstroem, E.; Baerring, L. (Swedish Meteorological Institute (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    Though risks caused by harsh weather conditions are taken into account in the planning of nuclear power plants, some exceptional weather events or combination of different events may prevent normal power operation and simultaneously endanger safe shutdown of the plant. Extreme weather events could influence, for example, the external power grid connection, emergency diesel generators (blockage of air intakes), ventilation and cooling of electric and electronics equipment rooms and the seawater intake. Due to the influence of an intensified greenhouse effect the climate is changing rapidly during the coming decades and this change is expected to have an influence also on the occurrence of extreme weather events. In this report we have examined extreme temperatures. Enthalpy is a parameter that combines air temperature and air humidity and it is used in the design of air conditioning systems. Therefore, we have included also return levels of enthalpy in our analysis. The influence of climate change on extreme temperatures is analysed based on regional climate model simulations. The reoccurrence times of high temperatures combined with high air humidity was analysed based on measurements made at five Finnish and three Swedish meteorological stations. Based on the observational records we find the 10 year return level of daily maximum temperature to be around 32 deg. C and the 100 year return level around 35 deg. C. If we look the return levels of warm and humid conditions then for example in Helsinki the 10 year return level of one week mean temperature in case mean air humidity is above 80% is 20.1 deg. C. The 10 year return level of daily maximum enthalpy is around 60 kJ/kg and the 100 year return level almost 70 kJ/kg. According to the climate model simulations the largest increase of 50-year return level of daily maximum temperature is found in southern Sweden and south-western Finland. By the end of this century the increase can be 3-5 deg. C. The largest change

  4. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy......-dispersive XAS technique available on the ID24 beamline at the ESRF synchrotron. The examples chosen concern the melting and the liquid structure of 3d metals and alloys under high pressures (HPs) and the observation of temperature-induced spin crossover in FeCO3 at HP....

  5. Changes in annual temperature and precipitation extremes in the Carpathians since AD 1961

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Magdalena Micu, Dana; Cheval, Sorin

    2014-05-01

    The Carpathians are the largest, longest, most twisted and fragmented segment of the Alpine system, stretching between latitudes 44°N and 50°N, and longitudes 17°E and 27°E. This European mountain range is a climatically transitional region between major atmospheric circulation source areas of the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and continental Europe. The region is a European biodiversity hotspot, containing over one third of all European plant species. It is acknowledged that the mountain regions are particularly sensitive and vulnerable to climate change than any other regions located at the same latitudes. Observational studies on the variability and trends of extreme events suggest an overall consensus towards a significant increase in the frequency, duration and intensity of warm extremes in most of these regions, including the Carpathians. 15 core indices, defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI), were computed in order to investigate the changes in annual temperature and precipitation extremes, based on their known relevance for the infrastructure, human health and tourism activities in these mountains. The indices were computed from gridded daily datasets of minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation at 0.1° resolution (~10 km), available online within the framework of the project CarpatClim (www.carpatclim-eu.org) for the period 1961-2010. Changes in the annual temperature and precipitation extremes in the last five decades have been identified with the Mann-Kendall non-parametric trend test, at the 90% significance level (two-tail test). The results show decreasing trends in cold-related thermal indices, especially in the number of frost days, and increasing trends in warm-related ones. No consistent trend in precipitation extremes has been found. There is a generally uniform signal of significant increasing trends in the frequency of summer days across the Carpathians, with no obvious differences between

  6. Spatiotemporal distribution characteristics and attribution of extreme regional low temperature event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封泰晨; 张珂铨; 苏海晶; 王晓娟; 龚志强; 张文煜

    2015-01-01

    Based on an objective identification technique for regional low temperature event (OITRLTE), the daily minimum temperature in China has been detected from 1960 to 2013. During this period, there were 60 regional extreme low temperature events (ERLTEs), which are included in the 690 regional low temperature events (RLTEs). The 60 ERLTEs are analyzed in this paper. The results show that in the last 50 years, the intensity of the ERLTEs has become weak;the number of lasted days has decreased;and, the affected area has become small. However, that situation has changed in this century. In terms of spatial distribution, the high intensity regions are mainly in Northern China while the high frequency regions concentrate in Central and Eastern China. According to the affected area of each event, the 60 ERLTEs are classified into six types. The atmospheric circulation background fields which correspond to these types are also analyzed. The results show that, influenced by stronger blocking highs of Ural and Lake Baikal, as well as stronger southward polar vortex and East Asia major trough at 500-hPa geopotential height, cold air from high latitudes is guided to move southward and abnormal northerly winds at 850 hPa makes the cold air blow into China along diverse paths, thereby forming different types of regional extreme low temperatures in winter.

  7. Operation of a Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Digital Isolator, Type IL510, Under Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Panko, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new type of signal isolation based on Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) technology was investigated for potential use in harsh temperature environments. Operational characteristics of the 2Mbps single channel, IL510-Series commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) digital isolator chip was obtained under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling in the range of -190 C to +120 C. The isolator was evaluated in terms of its output signal delivery and stability, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (t(sub f)), and propagation delays at 50% level between input and output during low to high (t(sub PLH)) and high to low (t(sub PHL)) transitions. The device performed very well throughout the entire test temperature range as no significant changes occurred either in its function or in its output signal timing characteristics. The limited thermal cycling, which comprised of 12 cycles between -190 C and +120 C, also had no influence on its performance. In addition, the device packaging underwent no structural damage due to the extreme temperature exposure. These preliminary results indicate that this semiconductor chip has the potential for use in a temperature range that extends beyond its specified regime. Additional and more comprehensive testing, however, is required to establish its operation and reliability and to determine its suitability for long-term use in space exploration missions.

  8. Spectral photometry of extreme helium stars: Ultraviolet fluxes and effective temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.; Heber, U.; Lynas-Gray, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet flux distributions are presented for the extremely helium rich stars BD +10 deg 2179, HD 124448, LSS 3378, BD -9 deg 4395, LSE 78, HD 160641, LSIV -1 deg 2, BD 1 deg 3438, HD 168476, MV Sgr, LS IV-14 deg 109 (CD -35 deg 11760), LSII +33 deg 5 and BD +1 deg 4381 (LSIV +2 deg 13) obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Broad band photometry and a newly computed grid of line blanketed model atmospheres were used to determine accurate angular diameters and total stellar fluxes. The resultant effective temperatures are in most cases in satisfactory agreement with those based on broad band photometry and/or high resolution spectroscopy in the visible. For two objects, LSII +33 deg 5 and LSE 78, disagreement was found between the IUE observations and broadband photometry: the colors predict temperatures around 20,000 K, whereas the UV spectra indicate much lower photospheric temperatures of 14,000 to 15,000 K. The new temperature scale for extreme helium stars extends to lower effective temperatures than that of Heber and Schoenberner (1981) and covers the range from 8,500 K to 32,000 K.

  9. Detection of Spatio-temporal variations of rainfall and temperature extremes over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, V.; Karmakar, S.; Ghosh, S.

    2012-12-01

    implemented. The results from this study exhibit the observable changes in the rainfall extreme events that occurred over India in past century. The country experienced large spatial heterogeneity of all the four rainfall variables, even in the meteorologically homogeneous regions. The correlation analyses show that the maximum grids are having positive correlation, however for the duration-frequency, a significant correlation is observed in few grids, with most of the grids showing no correlation. The spatial variation of RL shows spatial heterogeneity and trend analyses exhibit lack of uniformity throughout India. The change in RL shows significant positive change in mainly during past 50 years. The possible reason could be urbanization and change in climate variables. Hence for further investigation, this analysis will be associated with the temperature extremes data throughout India.

  10. Variability of temperature sensitivity of extreme precipitation from a regional-to-local impact scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-12-01

    Relating precipitation intensity to temperature is a popular approach to assess potential changes of extreme events in a warming climate. Potential increases in extreme rainfall induced hazards, such as flash flooding, serve as motivation. It has not been addressed whether the temperature-precipitation scaling approach is meaningful on a regional to local level, where the risk of climate and weather impact is dealt with. Substantial variability of temperature sensitivity of extreme precipitation has been found that results from differing methodological assumptions as well as from varying climatological settings of the study domains. Two aspects are consistently found: First, temperature sensitivities beyond the expected consistency with the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) equation are a feature of short-duration, convective, sub-daily to sub-hourly high-percentile rainfall intensities at mid-latitudes. Second, exponential growth ceases or reverts at threshold temperatures that vary from region to region, as moisture supply becomes limited. Analyses of pooled data, or of single or dispersed stations over large areas make it difficult to estimate the consequences in terms of local climate risk. In this study we test the meaningfulness of the scaling approach from an impact scale perspective. Temperature sensitivities are assessed using quantile regression on hourly and sub-hourly precipitation data from 189 stations in the Austrian south-eastern Alpine region. The observed scaling rates vary substantially, but distinct regional and seasonal patterns emerge. High sensitivity exceeding CC-scaling is seen on the 10-minute scale more than on the hourly scale, in storms shorter than 2 hours duration, and in shoulder seasons, but it is not necessarily a significant feature of the extremes. To be impact relevant, change rates need to be linked to absolute rainfall amounts. We show that high scaling rates occur in lower temperature conditions and thus have smaller effect on absolute

  11. Effects of temperature and copper pollution on soil community--extreme temperature events can lead to community extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Oliveira, Vanessa B; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Amorim, Monica J B

    2013-12-01

    Global warming affects ecosystems and species' diversity. The physiology of individual species is highly influenced by changes in temperature. The effects on species communities are less studied; they are virtually unknown when combining effects of pollution and temperature. To assess the effects of temperature and pollution in the soil community, a 2-factorial soil mesocosms multispecies experiment was performed. Three exposure periods (28 d, 61 d, and 84 d) and 4 temperatures (19 °C, 23 °C, 26 °C, and 29 °C) were tested, resembling the mean annual values for southern Europe countries and extreme events. The soil used was from a field site, clean, or spiked with Cu (100 mg Cu/kg). Results showed clear differences between 29 °C treatment and all other temperature treatments, with a decrease in overall abundance of organisms, further potentiated by the increase in exposure time. Folsomia candida was the most abundant species and Enchytraeus crypticus was the most sensitive to Cu toxicity. Differences in species optimum temperatures were adequately covered: 19 °C for Hypoaspis aculeifer or 26 °C for E. crypticus. The temperature effects were more pronounced the longer the exposure time. Feeding activity decreased with higher temperature and exposure time, following the decrease in invertebrate abundance, whereas for the same conditions the organic matter turnover increased. Hence, negative impacts on ecosystem services because of temperature increase can be expected by changes on soil function and as consequence of biodiversity loss. © 2013 SETAC.

  12. Towards a unified characterization of phenological phases: fluctuations and correlations with temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rybski, Diego; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2010-01-01

    Phenological timing -- i.e. the course of annually recurring development stages in nature -- is of particular interest since it can be understood as a proxy for the climate at a specific region; moreover changes in the so called phenological phases can be a direct consequence of climate change. We analyze records of botanical phenology and study their fluctuations which we find to depend on the seasons. In contrast to previous studies, where typically trends in the phenology of individual species are estimated, we consider the ensemble of all available phases and propose a phenological index that characterizes the influence of climate on the multitude of botanical species.

  13. Ignition and combustion of pyrotechnics at low pressures and at temperature extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Woodley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and effective ignition of pyrotechnic countermeasure decoy flares is vitally important to the safety of expensive military platforms such as aircraft. QinetiQ is conducting experimental and theoretical research into pyrotechnic countermeasure decoy flares. A key part of this work is the development and application of improved models to increase the understanding of the ignition processes occurring for these flares. These models have been implemented in a two-dimensional computational model and details are described in this paper. Previous work has conducted experiments and validated the computational model at ambient temperature and pressure. More recently the computational model has been validated at pressures down to that equivalent to 40,000 feet but at ambient temperature (∼290 K. This paper describes further experimental work in which the ignition delays of the priming material in inert countermeasure decoy flares were determined for pressures down to 40,000 feet and at temperature extremes of −40 °C and 100 °C. Also included in this paper is a comparison of the measured and predicted ignition delays at low pressures and temperature extremes. The agreement between the predicted and measured ignition delays is acceptable.

  14. Extreme summer temperatures in Iberia: health impacts and associated synoptic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. García-Herrera

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of extreme summer temperatures on daily mortality in two large cities of Iberia: Lisbon (Portugal and Madrid (Spain. Daily mortality and meteorological variables are analysed using the same methodology based on Box-Jenkins models. Results reveal that in both cases there is a triggering effect on mortality when maximum daily temperature exceeds a given threshold (34°C in Lisbon and 36°C in Madrid. The impact of most intense heat events is very similar for both cities, with significant mortality values occurring up to 3 days after the temperature threshold has been surpassed. This impact is measured as the percentual increase of mortality associated to a 1°C increase above the threshold temperature. In this respect, Lisbon shows a higher impact, 31%, as compared with Madrid at 21%. The difference can be attributed to demographic and socio-economic factors. Furthermore, the longer life span of Iberian women is critical to explain why, in both cities, females are more susceptible than males to heat effects, with an almost double mortality impact value.

    The analysis of Sea Level Pressure (SLP, 500hPa geopotential height and temperature fields reveals that, despite being relatively close to each other, Lisbon and Madrid have relatively different synoptic circulation anomalies associated with their respective extreme summer temperature days. The SLP field reveals higher anomalies for Lisbon, but extending over a smaller area. Extreme values in Madrid seem to require a more western location of the Azores High, embracing a greater area over Europe, even if it is not as deep as for Lisbon. The origin of the hot and dry air masses that usually lead to extreme heat days in both cities is located in Northern Africa. However, while Madrid maxima require wind blowing directly from the south, transporting heat from Southern Spain and Northern Africa, Lisbon maxima occur under more easterly

  15. Elucidating the impact of temperature variability and extremes on cereal croplands through remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, John M A; Dash, Jadunandan; Atkinson, Peter M

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing-derived wheat crop yield-climate models were developed to highlight the impact of temperature variation during thermo-sensitive periods (anthesis and grain-filling; TSP) of wheat crop development. Specific questions addressed are: can the impact of temperature variation occurring during the TSP on wheat crop yield be detected using remote sensing data and what is the impact? Do crop critical temperature thresholds during TSP exist in real world cropping landscapes? These questions are tested in one of the world's major wheat breadbaskets of Punjab and Haryana, north-west India. Warming average minimum temperatures during the TSP had a greater negative impact on wheat crop yield than warming maximum temperatures. Warming minimum and maximum temperatures during the TSP explain a greater amount of variation in wheat crop yield than average growing season temperature. In complex real world cereal croplands there was a variable yield response to critical temperature threshold exceedance, specifically a more pronounced negative impact on wheat yield with increased warming events above 35 °C. The negative impact of warming increases with a later start-of-season suggesting earlier sowing can reduce wheat crop exposure harmful temperatures. However, even earlier sown wheat experienced temperature-induced yield losses, which, when viewed in the context of projected warming up to 2100 indicates adaptive responses should focus on increasing wheat tolerance to heat. This study shows it is possible to capture the impacts of temperature variation during the TSP on wheat crop yield in real world cropping landscapes using remote sensing data; this has important implications for monitoring the impact of climate change, variation and heat extremes on wheat croplands. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Associating emergency room visits with first and prolonged extreme temperature event in Taiwan: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Li, Ming-Hsu; Chou, Chang-Hung; Liao, Chun-Hui; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2012-02-01

    The present study evaluated emergency room visit (ERV) risks for all causes and cardiopulmonary diseases associated with temperature and long-lasting extreme temperatures from 2000 to 2009 in four major cities in Taiwan. The city-specific daily average temperatures at the high 95th, 97th, and 99th percentiles, and the low 10th, 5th, and 1st percentiles were defined as extreme heat and cold. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the cumulative relative risk (RR) of ERV for morbidities associated with temperatures (0 to 3-day lags), extreme heat and cold lasting for 2 to 9 days or longer, and with the annual first extreme heat or cold event after controlling for covariates. Low temperatures were associated with slightly higher ERV risks than high temperatures for circulatory diseases. After accounting for 4-day cumulative temperature effect, the ERV risks for all causes and respiratory diseases were found to be associated with extreme cold at the 5th percentile lasting for >8 days and 1st percentile lasting for >3 days. The annual first extreme cold event of 5th percentile or lower temperatures was also significantly associated with ERV, with RRs ranging from 1.09 to 1.12 for all causes and from 1.15 to 1.26 for respiratory diseases. The annual first extreme heat event of 99th percentile temperature was associated with higher ERV for all causes and circulatory diseases. Annual first extreme temperature event and intensified prolonged extreme cold events are associated with increased ERVs in Taiwan.

  17. Trends in indices of daily temperature and precipitations extremes in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filahi, S.; Tanarhte, M.; Mouhir, L.; El Morhit, M.; Tramblay, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of Morocco's climate extreme trends during the last four decades. Indices were computed based on a daily temperature and precipitation using a consistent approach recommended by the ETCCDI. Trends in these indices were calculated at 20 stations from 1970 to 2012. Twelve indices were considered to detect trends in temperature. A large number of stations have significant trends and confirm an increase in temperature, showing increased warming during spring and summer seasons. The results also show a decrease in the number of cold days and nights and an increase in the number of warm days and nights. Increasing trends have also been found in the absolute warmest and coldest temperatures of the year. A clear increase is detected for warm nights and diurnal temperature range. Eight indices for precipitation were also analyzed, but the trends for these precipitation indices are much less significant than for temperature indices and show more mixed spatial patterns of change. Heavy precipitation events do not exhibit significant trends except at a few locations, in the north and central parts of Morocco, with a general tendency towards drier conditions. The correlation between these climate indices and the large-scale atmospheric circulations indices such as the NAO, MO, and WEMO were also analyzed. Results show a stronger relationship with these climatic indices for the precipitation indices compared to the temperature indices. The correlations are more significant in the Atlantic regions, but they remain moderate at the whole country scale.

  18. On the definition of temperature and its fluctuations in small systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltachev, Grey Sh; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2010-10-07

    An analysis of the limits of applicability of the thermodynamic definition of temperature to small systems is given. It is shown that the classical thermodynamic definition, (dS/dU)=1/T (S being the entropy, U the energy, and T the absolute temperature), is not applicable to small systems. It results in an uncertainty in the definition of temperature of the order O(1/N), where N is the number of particles in the system. An alternative definition of temperature is proposed based on the statistical-mechanical description of ensembles of particles. Applying this definition to perfect gases, a rigorous expression for the distribution of temperatures is obtained valid also for small systems and even in the limit N→1. In contrast to alternative approaches based on the thermodynamic definition of temperature, this distribution retains the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with respect to temperature (equality of average temperature of the small system and temperature of the thermostat) also for small systems resolving in this way a widely discussed in the past problem between thermodynamics and its statistical-mechanical interpretation. Further, a generalization of this distribution to nonideal systems of interacting particles is developed. The results are applied to an interpretation of recent molecular dynamics simulations of argon condensation. Some further consequences and different possible definitions of temperature for macroscopic systems are discussed briefly as well.

  19. Equation of state density models for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-10-01

    The necessity of exploring ultradeep reservoirs requires the accurate prediction of hydrocarbon density data at extreme temperatures and pressures. In this study, three equations of state (EoS) models, Peng-Robinson (PR), high-temperature high-pressure volume-translated PR (HTHP VT-PR), and perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS are used to predict the density data for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at temperatures to 523 K and pressures to 275 MPa. The calculated values are compared with experimental data. The results show that the HTHP VT-PR EoS and PC-SAFT EoS always perform better than the regular PR EoS for all the investigated hydrocarbons.

  20. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2011-01-22

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30-40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and -0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis.

  1. The Importance of Water Temperature Fluctuations in Relation to the Hydrological Factor. Case Study – Bistrita River Basin (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojoc Gianina Maria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in most components of the climate over the past 50 years, including air and water temperature, is a real phenomenon, as attested by the numerous specialized researches according to IPCC (2013. The water temperature is one of the most important climatic components in analyzing the hydrological regime of the Bistrita River (Romania. The thermal regime of the Bistrita River basin and the frost phenomena associated with the risk factor are particularly important and frequently appear in this area. In recent years, under the Siret Water Basin Administration, this parameter was permanently monitored, so we could do an analysis, which shows that the water temperature fluctuations, influenced by air temperature, lead to the emergence of the ice jam phenomenon. The present study aims to analyze the water temperature, as compared to the air temperature, and the effect of these components on the liquid flow regime (the values were recorded at the hydrological stations on the main course of the Bistrita River. The negative effects resulted from the ice jam phenomenon require developing methods of damage prevention and defense. The frost phenomena recorded after the construction of the Bicaz dam are analyzed in this article

  2. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  3. Novel mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecules: role of thermodynamic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, V I; Petrov, E G; Verkhratsky, A; Krishtal, O A

    2010-04-30

    A novel physical mechanism is proposed to explain the temperature-independent transition reactions in molecular systems. The mechanism becomes effective in the case of conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states. It is shown that at room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low-frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As an example, a physical interpretation of temperature-independent onset of P2X{3} receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes is provided.

  4. Actual and future trends of extreme values of temperature for the NW Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, J.; Brands, S.; Lorenzo, N.

    2009-09-01

    It is now very well established that yearly averaged temperatures are increasing due to anthropogenic climate change. In the area of Galicia (NW Spain) this trend has also been determined. The main objective of this work is to assess actual and future trends of different extreme indices of temperature, which are of curcial importance for many impact studies. Station data for the study was provided by the CLIMA database of the regional government of Galicia (NW Spain). As direct GCM-output significantly underestimates the variance of daily surface temperature variables in NW Spain, these variables are obtained by applying a statistical downscaling technique (analog method), using 850hPa temperature and mean sea level pressure as combined predictors. The predictor fields have been extracted from three GCMs participating in the IPCC AR4 under A1, A1B and A2 scenarios. The definitions of the extreme indices have been taken from the joint CCl/CLIVAR/JCOMM Expert Team (ET) on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) This group has defined a set of standard extreme values to simplify intercomparisons of data from different regions of the world. For the temperatures in the period 1960-2006, results show a significant increase of the number of days with maximum temperatures above the 90th percentile. Furthermore, a significant decrease of the days with maximum temperatures below the 10th percentile has been found. The tendencies of minimum temperatures are reverse: less nights with minimum temperatures below 10th percentile, and more with minimum temperatures above 90th percentile. Those tendencies can be observed all over the year, but are more pronounced in summer. We have also calculated the relationship between the above mentioned extreme values and different teleconnection patterns appearing in the North Atlantic area. Results show that local tendencies are associated with trends of EA (Eastern Atlantic) and SCA (Scandinavian) patterns. NAO (North Atlantic

  5. The physics of nanoelectronics transport and fluctuation phenomena at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkila, Tero T

    2013-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have allowed physicists and engineers to miniaturize electronic structures to the limit where finite-size related phenomena start to impact their properties. This book discusses such phenomena and models made for their description. The book starts from the semiclassical description of nonequilibrium effects, details the scattering theory used for quantum transport calculations, and explains the main interference effects. It also describes how to treat fluctuations and correlations, how interactions affect transport through small islands, and how superconductivity modifies these effects. The last two chapters describe new emerging fields related with graphene and nanoelectromechanics. The focus of the book is on the phenomena rather than formalism, but the book still explains in detail the main models constructed for these phenomena. It also introduces a number of electronic devices, including the single-electron transistor, the superconducting tunnel junction refrigerator, and the s...

  6. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuationsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  7. Modeling the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cuevas, Marina; Fernández, Pablo S; George, Susan; Pin, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    The dynamic model for the growth of a bacterial population described by Baranyi and Roberts (J. Baranyi and T. A. Roberts, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was applied to model the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity (a(w)) values. To model the duration of the lag phase, the dependence of the parameter h(0), which quantifies the amount of work done during the lag period, on the previous and current environmental conditions was determined experimentally. This parameter depended not only on the magnitude of the change between the previous and current environmental conditions but also on the current growth conditions. In an exponentially growing population, any change in the environment requiring a certain amount of work to adapt to the new conditions initiated a lag period that lasted until that work was finished. Observations for several scenarios in which exponential growth was halted by a sudden change in the temperature and/or a(w) were in good agreement with predictions. When a population already in a lag period was subjected to environmental fluctuations, the system was reset with a new lag phase. The work to be done during the new lag phase was estimated to be the workload due to the environmental change plus the unfinished workload from the uncompleted previous lag phase.

  8. Assessment of SOI AND Gate, Type CHT-7408, for Operation in Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla Rivera

    2009-01-01

    Electronic parts based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are finding widespread applications due to their ability to operate in harsh environments and the benefits they offer as compared to their silicon counterparts. Due to their construction, they are tailored for high temperature operation and show good tolerance to radiation events. In addition, their inherent design lessens the formation of parasitic junctions, thereby reducing leakage currents, decreasing power consumption, and enhancing speed. These devices are typically rated in temperature capability from -55 C to about +225 C, and their characteristics over this temperature range are documented in data sheets. Since electronics in some of NASA space exploration missions are required to operate under extreme temperature conditions, both cold and hot, their characteristic behavior within the full temperature spectrum must be determined to establish suitability for use in space applications. The effects of extreme temperature exposure on the performance of a new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) SOI AND gate device were evaluated in this work. The high temperature, quad 2-inputs AND gate device, which was recently introduced by CISSOID, is fabricated using a CMOS SOI process. Some of the specifications of the CHT-7408 chip are listed in a table. By supplying a constant DC voltage to one gate input and a 10 kHz square wave into the other associated gate input, the chip was evaluated in terms of output response, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (tf), and propagation delays (using a 50% level between input and output during low to high (tPLH) and high to low (tPHL) transitions). The supply current of the gate circuit was also obtained. These parameters were recorded at various test temperatures between -195 C and +250 C using a Sun Systems environmental chamber programmed at a temperature rate of change of 10 C/min. In addition, the effects of thermal cycling on this chip were determined by exposing

  9. Implications of dynamics underlying temperature and precipitation distributions for changes in extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelin, J. D.; Loikith, P. C.; Stechmann, S. N.; Sahany, S.; Bernstein, D. N.; Quinn, K. M.; Meyerson, J.; Hales, K.; Langenbrunner, B.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing present-day probability distributions of temperature and precipitation measures are an important part of the pathway to improving quantitative assessment of changes in their extremes. In some cases, relatively simple prototypes for the dynamics underlying these distributions can assist in this characterization, pointing to key physical factors and measures to evaluate even in more complex distributions. In the case of daily temperature distributions, quantifying the widespread occurrence of non-Gaussian tails is motivated in part by tracer-advection across a maintained gradient prototypes. Substantial implications of the shape of these tails for regional changes in probabilities of temperature extremes with large-scale warming motivate measures of non-Gaussianity specific to this problem for assessing climate model present-day simulations. In the case of distributions of precipitation accumulations, simple prototypes yield insights into the form of the present-day distribution and predictions for the form of the global warming changes that can be evaluated in models and observations. Probability drops relatively slowly over a substantial range of accumulation size, followed by a key cutoff scale that limits large event probabilities in current climate but changes under global warming. Precipitation integrated over spatial clusters exhibits similar distribution features.

  10. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field from Convective Air Warming System on Temperature Selection and Distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Rae Cho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia generates potentially severe complications in operating or recovery room. Forced air warmer is effective to maintain body temperature. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF is harmful to human body and mainly produced by electronic equipment including convective air warming system. We investigated ELF-EMF from convective air warming device on various temperature selection and distance for guideline to protect medical personnel and patients.The intensity of ELF-EMF was measured as two-second interval for five minutes on various distance (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 and 1meter and temperature selection (high, medium, low and ambient. All of electrical devices were off including lamp, computer and air conditioner. Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA. P<0.05 was considered significant.Mean values of ELF-EMF on the distance of 30 cm were 18.63, 18.44, 18.23 and 17.92 milligauss (mG respectively (high, medium, low and ambient temperature set. ELF-EMF of high temperature set was higher than data of medium, low and ambient set in all the distances.ELF-EMF from convective air warming system is higher in condition of more close location and higher temperature. ELF-EMF within thirty centimeters exceeds 2mG recommended by Swedish TCO guideline.

  11. Primary collector wall local temperature fluctuations in the area of water-steam phase boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J.; Simo, T. [Energovyzkum Ltd., Brno (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    A limited number of temperature sensors could be installed at the primary collector surface in the area of water - steam phase boundary. The surface temperatures as well WWER 440 steam generator process data were measured and stored for a long time and off-line evaluated. Selected results are presented in the paper. (orig.). 2 refs.

  12. Investigation of non-isothermal fluid mixing and wall temperature fluctuation in a T-junction which has a 90-degree bend in the upsteram area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuki, K.; Toda, S. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Okuyama, K. [Hitachi coap, Hitachi (Japan); Hashizume, H.; Muramatsu, T. [Oarai Engineering center, (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    In a region where two fluids with different temperatures are mixed together, unsteady temperature fluctuation occurs in going through the unstable fluid mixing process, and structural materials in the surrounding area are damaged by high-cycle thermal fatigue. In this study, in order to clarify the relation between the fluid mixing and the wall temperature fluctuation in a T-junction area which has a 90-degree bend in the upstream area, a PIV measuring system is used to visualize the flow field first, and its effect on the wall temperature fluctuation is estimated by measuring the fluid temperature fluctuation near the wall with a thin thermocouple. It is confirmed that jet flow, which is flowing out from a branch pipe into a main pipe, vibrates unsteadily and that its behavior is strongly affected by circulating flow, Karman-like vortices formed behind the jet flow, and especially by flow fluctuation which exists as background-flow in the main pipe. In particular, the frequency band of the flow fluctuation existing in the main pipe flow almost corresponds to that of the vibration of the jet flow in the case that the flow rate of branch pipe flow is relatively lower than that of the main pipe flow. Furthermore, it is shown that the band of dominant frequency of the temperature fluctuation in the vicinity of wall is almost the same as the flow fluctuation and the vibration of jet flow mentioned above. In addition, visualization experiment of secondary flow formed in the 90-degree bend clarifies that its flow pattern changes unsteadily and intensely and that its frequency band is nearly equal to that of the temperature fluctuation. It is concluded that the flow fluctuation in the main pipe is due to unsteady decay process of the secondary flow itself and that the fluid mixing and the temperature fluctuation in the T-junction area with the 90-degree bend upstream are strongly dominated by the unsteadiness of the secondary flow generated in the bend as well as by the

  13. Mesoscale convection system and occurrence of extreme low tropopause temperatures. Observations over Asian summer monsoon region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, A.R.; Mandal, T.K.; Gautam, R. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India). Radio and Atmospheric Div.; Panwar, V. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India). Radio and Atmospheric Div.; Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics; Rao, V.R. [India Meteorology Dept., New Delhi (India). Satellite Meteorology Div.; Goel, A. [Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics; Das, S.S. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Trivandrum (India). Space Physics Lab.; Dhaka, S.K. [Delhi Univ., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics and Electronics

    2010-07-01

    The present study examines the process of how tropospheric air enters the stratosphere, particularly in association with tropical mesoscale convective systems (TMCS) which are considered to be one of the causative mechanisms for the observation of extremely low tropopause temperature over the tropics. The association between the phenomena of convection and the observation of extreme low tropopause temperature events is, therefore, examined over the Asian monsoon region using data from multiple platforms. Satellite observations show that the area of low outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), which is a proxy for the enhanced convection, is embedded with high altitude clouds top temperatures ({<=}193 K). A detailed analysis of OLR and 100 hPa temperature shows that both are modulated by westward propagating Rossby waves with a period of {proportional_to}15 days, indicating a close linkage between them. The process by which the tropospheric air enters the stratosphere may, in turn, be determined by how the areas of convection and low tropopause temperature (LTT) i.e. T {<=}191K are spatially located. In this context, the relative spatial distribution of low OLR and LTT areas is examined. Though, the locations of low OLR and LTT are noticed in the same broad area, the two do not always overlap, except for partial overlap in some cases. When there are multiple low OLR areas, the LTT area generally appears in between the low OLR areas. Implications of these observations are also discussed. The present analysis also shows that the horizontal mean winds have a role in the spatial distribution of low OLR and LTT. (orig.)

  14. Observed Trends in Indices of Daily Precipitation and Temperature Extremes in Rio de Janeiro State (brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W. L.; Dereczynski, C. P.; Cavalcanti, I. F.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main concerns of contemporary society regarding prevailing climate change is related to possible changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme events. Strong heat and cold waves, droughts, severe floods, and other climatic extremes have been of great interest to researchers because of its huge impact on the environment and population, causing high monetary damages and, in some cases, loss of life. The frequency and intensity of extreme events associated with precipitation and air temperature have been increased in several regions of the planet in recent years. These changes produce serious impacts on human activities such as agriculture, health, urban planning and development and management of water resources. In this paper, we analyze the trends in indices of climatic extremes related to daily precipitation and maximum and minimum temperatures at 22 meteorological stations of the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) in Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil) in the last 50 years. The present trends are evaluated using the software RClimdex (Canadian Meteorological Service) and are also subjected to statistical tests. Preliminary results indicate that periods of drought are getting longer in Rio de Janeiro State, except in the North/Northwest area. In "Vale do Paraíba", "Região Serrana" and "Região dos Lagos" the increase of consecutive dry days is statistically significant. However, we also detected an increase in the total annual rainfall all over the State (taxes varying from +2 to +8 mm/year), which are statistically significant at "Região Serrana". Moreover, the intensity of heavy rainfall is also growing in most of Rio de Janeiro, except in "Costa Verde". The trends of heavy rainfall indices show significant increase in the "Metropolitan Region" and in "Região Serrana", factor that increases the vulnerability to natural disasters in these areas. With respect to temperature, it is found that the frequency of hot (cold) days and nights is

  15. Recent changes in Georgia׳s temperature means and extremes: Annual and seasonal trends between 1961 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Keggenhoff

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen temperature minimum and maximum series are used to quantify annual and seasonal changes in temperature means and extremes over Georgia (Southern Caucasus during the period 1961 and 2010. Along with trends in mean minimum and maximum temperature, eight indices are selected from the list of climate extreme indices as defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI of the Commission for Climatology of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO, for studying trends in temperature extremes. Between the analysis periods 1961–2010, 1971–2010 and 1981–2010 pronounced warming trends are determined for all Georgia-averaged trends in temperature means and extremes, while all magnitudes of trends increase towards the most recent period. During 1981 and 2010, significant warming trends for annual minimum and maximum temperature at a rate of 0.39 °C (0.47 °C days/decade and particularly for the warm temperature extremes, summer days, warm days and nights and the warm spell duration index are evident, whereas warm extremes show larger trends than cold extremes. The most pronounced trends are determined for summer days 6.2 days/decade, while the warm spell duration index indicates an increase in the occurrence of warm spells by 5.4 days/decade during 1981 and 2010. In the comparison of seasonal changes in temperature means and extremes, the largest magnitudes of warming trends can be observed for temperature maximum in summer and temperature minimum in fall. Between 1981 and 2010, summer maximum temperature shows a significant warming at a rate of 0.84 °C/decade, increasing almost twice as fast as its annual trend (0.47 °C/decade. The Georgia-averaged trends for temperature minimum in fall increase by 0.59 °C/decade. Strongest significant trends in temperature extremes are identified during 1981 and 2010 for warm nights (4.6 days/decade in summer and fall as well as for warm days (5.6 days/decade in summer

  16. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode;

    2015-01-01

    experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover...... microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow...

  17. Comparing regional precipitation and temperature extremes in climate model and reanalysis products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Angélil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing field of research aims to characterise the contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the likelihood of extreme weather and climate events. These analyses can be sensitive to the shapes of the tails of simulated distributions. If tails are found to be unrealistically short or long, the anthropogenic signal emerges more or less clearly, respectively, from the noise of possible weather. Here we compare the chance of daily land-surface precipitation and near-surface temperature extremes generated by three Atmospheric Global Climate Models typically used for event attribution, with distributions from six reanalysis products. The likelihoods of extremes are compared for area-averages over grid cell and regional sized spatial domains. Results suggest a bias favouring overly strong attribution estimates for hot and cold events over many regions of Africa and Australia, and a bias favouring overly weak attribution estimates over regions of North America and Asia. For rainfall, results are more sensitive to geographic location. Although the three models show similar results over many regions, they do disagree over others. Equally, results highlight the discrepancy amongst reanalyses products. This emphasises the importance of using multiple reanalysis and/or observation products, as well as multiple models in event attribution studies.

  18. Comparing regional precipitation and temperature extremes in climate model and reanalysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angélil, Oliver; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah; Alexander, Lisa V; Stone, Dáithí; Donat, Markus G; Wehner, Michael; Shiogama, Hideo; Ciavarella, Andrew; Christidis, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    A growing field of research aims to characterise the contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the likelihood of extreme weather and climate events. These analyses can be sensitive to the shapes of the tails of simulated distributions. If tails are found to be unrealistically short or long, the anthropogenic signal emerges more or less clearly, respectively, from the noise of possible weather. Here we compare the chance of daily land-surface precipitation and near-surface temperature extremes generated by three Atmospheric Global Climate Models typically used for event attribution, with distributions from six reanalysis products. The likelihoods of extremes are compared for area-averages over grid cell and regional sized spatial domains. Results suggest a bias favouring overly strong attribution estimates for hot and cold events over many regions of Africa and Australia, and a bias favouring overly weak attribution estimates over regions of North America and Asia. For rainfall, results are more sensitive to geographic location. Although the three models show similar results over many regions, they do disagree over others. Equally, results highlight the discrepancy amongst reanalyses products. This emphasises the importance of using multiple reanalysis and/or observation products, as well as multiple models in event attribution studies.

  19. Air temperature fluctuations in Guadalajara, Mexico, from 1926 to 1994 in relation to urban growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, I. E.; Filonov, A. E.

    2001-03-01

    Daily, monthly and annual mean air temperatures in Guadalajara, Mexico, were gathered from the time periods: 1926-1994, 1957-1994, 1978-1994. The heat island effect was detected in a trend analysis of the series of minimum temperatures over the period 1926-1994. Also, it was found that the annual mean temperature increased 0.05°C per year. A sharp increase has occurred over the last 20 years because of the abrupt expansion and industrialization of the city of Guadalajara. This study revealed the presence of a cool island in the centre of the metropolitan zone of Guadalajara (MZG) during the wet season. A cross-spectral analysis was used to study the thermal variations with different frequencies. Temperature oscillations in the MZG occurred in time intervals ranging from 3-5 days up to 22 years. The study suggests a relationship between urban growth and temperature variations. The temperature rise relates to urban growth with a correlation co-efficient equal to 0.857.

  20. SiC JFET Transistor Circuit Model for Extreme Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for simulating extreme-temperature operation of integrated circuits that incorporate silicon carbide (SiC) junction field-effect transistors (JFETs) has been developed. The technique involves modification of NGSPICE, which is an open-source version of the popular Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) general-purpose analog-integrated-circuit-simulating software. NGSPICE in its unmodified form is used for simulating and designing circuits made from silicon-based transistors that operate at or near room temperature. Two rapid modifications of NGSPICE source code enable SiC JFETs to be simulated to 500 C using the well-known Level 1 model for silicon metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). First, the default value of the MOSFET surface potential must be changed. In the unmodified source code, this parameter has a value of 0.6, which corresponds to slightly more than half the bandgap of silicon. In NGSPICE modified to simulate SiC JFETs, this parameter is changed to a value of 1.6, corresponding to slightly more than half the bandgap of SiC. The second modification consists of changing the temperature dependence of MOSFET transconductance and saturation parameters. The unmodified NGSPICE source code implements a T(sup -1.5) temperature dependence for these parameters. In order to mimic the temperature behavior of experimental SiC JFETs, a T(sup -1.3) temperature dependence must be implemented in the NGSPICE source code. Following these two simple modifications, the Level 1 MOSFET model of the NGSPICE circuit simulation program reasonably approximates the measured high-temperature behavior of experimental SiC JFETs properly operated with zero or reverse bias applied to the gate terminal. Modification of additional silicon parameters in the NGSPICE source code was not necessary to model experimental SiC JFET current-voltage performance across the entire temperature range from 25 to 500 C.

  1. Effect of extreme temperatures on battery charging and performance of electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Juuso; Lund, Peter D.

    2016-10-01

    Extreme temperatures pose several limitations to electric vehicle (EV) performance and charging. To investigate these effects, we combine a hybrid artificial neural network-empirical Li-ion battery model with a lumped capacitance EV thermal model to study how temperature will affect the performance of an EV fleet. We find that at -10 °C, the self-weighted mean battery charging power (SWMCP) decreases by 15% compared to standard 20 °C temperature. Active battery thermal management (BTM) during parking can improve SWMCP for individual vehicles, especially if vehicles are charged both at home and at workplace; the median SWMCP is increased by over 30%. Efficiency (km/kWh) of the vehicle fleet is maximized when ambient temperature is close to 20 °C. At low (-10 °C) and high (+40 °C) ambient temperatures, cabin preconditioning and BTM during parking can improve the median efficiency by 8% and 9%, respectively. At -10 °C, preconditioning and BTM during parking can also improve the fleet SOC by 3-6%-units, but this also introduces a "base" load of around 140 W per vehicle. Finally, we observe that the utility of the fleet can be increased by 5%-units by adding 3.6 kW chargers to workplaces, but further improved charging infrastructure would bring little additional benefit.

  2. Increase of record-breaking temperature and precipitation extremes in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumou, D.; Lehmann, J.; Robinson, A.; Rahmstorf, S.

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen many record-breaking weather events, including severe heat waves, as well as rainfall and drought extremes. At the same time, this decade was globally the warmest since accurate measurements started in the 19th century. This raises the question, often asked by public and media directly after the occurrence of a specific extreme, whether these extremes are related to global warming. Here we analyze record-breaking events in the last decade using global gridded datasets of monthly-mean surface temperature and precipitation. We compare the number of observed records with those expected in a stationary climate, for which the simple 1/n relationship holds, with n the number of previous data points (e.g. years). In addition, we develop a first-order theoretical model to quantify the respective contributions of climate change and natural variability to the occurrence of records. World wide the number of monthly heat records is now, on average 5 times larger than expected in a stationary climate. This indicates that record-breaking heat waves lasting for several weeks now have, on average, an 80% chance of being due to climatic warming. Some tropical regions including East-Africa, India and Amazonia have seen an even larger increase in the number of record breaking events, pushing the probability that a record event is due to climatic warming to more than 90%. The high number of observed records is well explained by a model assuming a linear warming over the last 40 years. Precipitation extremes are more complex than heat extremes as different physical processes associated with global warming are likely to affect them. Warmer air can hold more moisture and thus, in principle, enhances extremes in both rainfall maxima and minima. Also, changes in wind patterns will affect precipitation and it is expected that dry areas will become drier and wet areas wetter. We show that, globally averaged the number of observed records, both for minima and maxima

  3. Estimating the Effect of Climate Change on Crop Yields and Farmland Values: The Importance of Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation titled Estimating the Effect of Climate Change on Crop Yields and Farmland Values: The Importance of Extreme Temperatures that was given for the National Center for Environmental Economics

  4. Fluctuations in Brain Temperature Induced by Lypopolysaccharides: Central and Peripheral Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S. Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined changes in central (anterior-preoptic hypothalamus and peripheral (temporal muscle and facial skin temperatures in freely moving rats following intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS at low doses (1 and 10 μg/kg at thermoneutral conditions (28˚C. Recordings were made with high temporal resolution (5-s bin and the effects of LPS were compared with those induced by a tail-pinch, a standard arousing somato-sensory stimulus. At each dose, LPS moderately elevated brain, muscle and skin temperatures. In contrast to rapid, monophasic and relatively short hyperthermic responses induced by a tail-pinch, LPS-induced increases in brain and muscle temperatures occurred with ~40 min onset latencies, showed three not clearly defined phases, were slightly larger with the 10 μm/kg dose and maintained for the entire 4-hour post-injection recording duration. Based on dynamics of brain-muscle and skin-muscle temperature differentials, it appears that the hyperthermic response induced by LPS at the lowest dose originates from enhanced peripheral heat production, with no evidence of brain metabolic activation and skin vasoconstriction. While peripheral heat production also appears to determine the first phase of brain and body temperature elevation with LPS at 10 μg/kg, a further prolonged increase in brain-muscle differentials (onset at ~100 min suggests metabolic brain activation as a factor contributing to brain and body hyperthermia. At this dose, skin temperature increase was weaker than in temporal muscle, suggesting vasoconstriction as another contributor to brain/ body hyperthermia. Therefore, although both LPS at low doses and salient sensory stimuli moderately increase brain and body temperatures, these hyperthermic responses have important qualitative differences, reflecting unique underlying mechanisms.

  5. Fluctuations in some climate parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, A D; Wolfendale, A W; 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.021

    2011-01-01

    There is argument as to the extent to which there has been an increase over the past few decades in the frequency of the extremes of climatic parameters, such as temperature, storminess, precipitation, etc, an obvious point being that Global Warming might be responsible. Here we report results on those parameters of which we have had experience during the last few years: Global surface temperature, Cloud Cover and the MODIS Liquid Cloud Fraction. In no case we have found indications that fluctuations of these parameters have increased with time.

  6. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliar, Mikhail [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested

  7. Multidecadal changes in the relationship between extreme temperature events in Uruguay and the general atmospheric circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renom, Madeleine; Barreiro, Marcelo [Universidad de la Republica, Unidad de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Montevideo (Uruguay); Rusticucci, Matilde [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Ciencias de la Atmosfera y los Oceanos, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    We analyze changes in the relationship between extreme temperature events and the large scale atmospheric circulation before and after the 1976 climate shift. To do so we first constructed a set of two temperature indices that describe the occurrence of warm nights (TN90) and cold nights (TN10) based on a long daily observed minimum temperature database that spans the period 1946-2005, and then divided the period into two subperiods of 30 years each (1946-1975 and 1976-2005). We focus on summer (TN10) and winter (TN90) seasons. During austral summer before 1976 the interannual variability of cold nights was characterized by a negative phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) with a cyclonic anomaly centered off Uruguay that favoured the entrance of cold air from the south. After 1976 cold nights are associated not with the SAM, but with an isolated vortex at upper levels over South Eastern South America. During austral winter before 1976, the El Nino phenomenon dominated the interannual variability of warm nights through an increase in the northerly warm flow into Uruguay. However, after 1976 the El Nino connection weakened and the variability of warm nights is dominated by a barotropic anticyclonic anomaly located in the South Atlantic and a low pressure center over South America. This configuration also strengthens the northward flow of warm air into Uruguay. Our results suggest that changes in El Nino evolution after 1976 may have played a role in altering the relationship between temperature extreme events in Uruguay and the atmospheric circulation. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the fluctuating temperature field in a heated swirling jet with BOS tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Henning M.; Oberleithner, Kilian; Paschereit, C. Oliver; Sieber, Moritz

    2017-07-01

    This work investigates the potential of background-oriented schlieren tomography (3D-BOS) for the temperature field reconstruction in a non-isothermal swirling jet undergoing vortex breakdown. The evaluation includes a quantitative comparison of the mean and phase-averaged temperature field with thermocouple and fast-response resistance thermometer as well as a qualitative comparison between the temperature field and the flow field obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV). Compared to other temperature-measuring techniques, 3D-BOS enables non-invasive capturing of the entire three-dimensional temperature field. In contrast to previous 3D-BOS applications, the present investigation makes use of the special character of the flow, which provides a global instability that leads to a rotational symmetry of the jet. Additionally, the rotational motion of the jet is used to obtain a tomographic reconstruction from a single camera. The quality of 3D-BOS results with respect to the physical setup as well as the numerical procedure is analyzed and discussed. Furthermore, a new approach for the treatment of thin occluding objects in the field of view is presented.

  9. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vereshchetin P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Vereshchetin, Thomas W McCann Jr, Navdeep Ojha, Ramakrishna Venugopalan, Brian L Levy Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Care Companies, Chesterbrook, PA, USA Abstract: The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithium-ion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging. Keywords: insulin pumps, diabetes mellitus, safety, heating

  10. A new mean-extreme vector for the trends of temperature and precipitation over China during 1960-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, G. B.; Oliveira-Júnior, J. F.; Gois, G.; Cunha-Zeri, G.; Zeri, M.

    2016-06-01

    A mean-extreme (M-E) vector is defined to combine the changes of climate means and extremes. The direction of the vertical axis represents changes in means, whereas the direction of the horizontal axis represents changes in extremes. Therefore, the M-E vector can clearly reflect both the amplitude and direction of changes in climate means and extremes. Nine types of M-E vectors are defined. They are named as MuEu, MuEd, MuEz, MdEu, MdEd, MdEz, MzEu, MzEd, and MzEz. Here M and E stand for climate means and extremes, respectively, whereas u, d, and z indicate an upward, downward trend and no trend, respectively. Both temperature mean and extremely high temperature days are consistently increased (MuEu) in nearly whole China throughout four seasons. However, the MuEd-type vector dominates in some regions. The MuEd-type vector appears over the Huang Huai river basin in spring, summer and winter. For the M-E vector of temperature mean and extremely low temperature days, the MuEd-type spreads the entire China for all seasons. The M-E vector for precipitation mean and the extreme precipitation days possesses identical trends (MuEu or MdEd) despite of seasons. The MuEu-type dominates in northeastern China and west of 105°E in spring, northwestern and central/southern China in summer, west of 100°E and northeastern China in autumn, and nearly whole China in winter. Precipitation mean and extreme precipitation days are all decreased (MdEd) in the rest of China for all reasons. The trends relationship in means and extremes over China presented herein could provide a scientific foundation to predict change of extremes using change of mean as the predictor.

  11. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction under fluctuating light in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozturk, Isik; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    to 35 A degrees C. The interaction effect of PAR and temperature on induction state was not significant. The rate of photosynthetic induction and the time required at which the induction reached its 90 % value (t (90)) was influenced by PAR significantly. The light history of a leaf had a significant......The photosynthetic response was investigated on Chrysanthemum morifolium under dynamic light conditions in the 20-35 A degrees C temperature range to evaluate the effect of climatic variables on photosynthetic induction. The plant material was grown under uniform, controlled conditions and its gas...... exchange was analyzed. The gas exchange measurements were used to investigate the rate of induction, momentary induction state, and the opening of stomata. At the varying temperature ranges and under dynamic light conditions, C. morifolium reached a quasi-steady-state induction equilibrium (ISeq...

  12. Future changes in extreme temperature events using the statistical downscaling model (SDSM in the trans-boundary region of the Jhelum river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Mahmood

    2014-10-01

    On the whole in the Jhelum basin, the intensity and frequency of warm temperature extremes are likely to be higher and the intensity and frequency of cold temperature extremes to be lower in the future.

  13. Power and temperature control of fluctuating biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    This paper addresses how the power and temperature are controlled in a biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and micro gas turbine (MGT) hybrid system. A SOFC and MGT dynamic model are developed and used to simulate the hybrid system performance operating on biomass gas. The transient behavior of both the SOFC and MGT are discussed in detail. An unstable power output is observed when the system is fed biomass gas. This instability is due to the fluctuation of gas composition in the fuel. A specially designed fuel controller succeeded not only in allowing the hybrid system to follow a step change of power demand from 32 to 35 kW, but also stably maintained the system power output at 35 kW. In addition to power control, fuel cell temperature is controlled by introduction and use of a bypass valve around the recuperator. By releasing excess heat to the exhaust, the bypass valve provided the control means to avoid the self-exciting behavior of system temperature and stabilized the temperature of SOFC at 850 °C.

  14. Effects of solar wind ultralow-frequency fluctuations on plasma sheet electron temperature: Regression analysis with support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Yue, Chao; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether ultralow-frequency (ULF) fluctuations from 0.5 to 8.3 mHz in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can affect the plasma sheet electron temperature (Te) near geosynchronous distances, we use a support vector regression machine technique to decouple the effects from different solar wind parameters and their ULF fluctuation power. Te in this region varies from 0.1 to 10 keV with a median of 1.3 keV. We find that when the solar wind ULF power is weak, Te increases with increasing southward IMF Bz and solar wind speed, while it varies weakly with solar wind density. As the ULF power becomes stronger during weak IMF Bz ( 0) or northward IMF, Te becomes significantly enhanced, by a factor of up to 10. We also find that mesoscale disturbances in a time scale of a few to tens of minutes as indicated by AE during substorm expansion and recovery phases are more enhanced when the ULF power is stronger. The effect of ULF powers may be explained by stronger inward radial diffusion resulting from stronger mesoscale disturbances under higher ULF powers, which can bring high-energy plasma sheet electrons further toward geosynchronous distance. This effect of ULF powers is particularly important during weak southward IMF or northward IMF when convection electric drift is weak.

  15. Biodegradation of Toluene under seasonal and diurnal fluctuations of soil-water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yadav, B.K.; Shrestha, S.R.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of

  16. Biodegradation of Toluene under seasonal and diurnal fluctuations of soil-water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yadav, B.K.; Shrestha, S.R.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of

  17. Adaptation to fluctuating temperatures in an RNA virus is driven by the most stringent selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Arribas

    Full Text Available The frequency of change in the selective pressures is one of the main factors driving evolution. It is generally accepted that constant environments select specialist organisms whereas changing environments favour generalists. The particular outcome achieved in either case also depends on the relative strength of the selective pressures and on the fitness costs of mutations across environments. RNA viruses are characterized by their high genetic diversity, which provides fast adaptation to environmental changes and helps them evade most antiviral treatments. Therefore, the study of the adaptive possibilities of RNA viruses is highly relevant for both basic and applied research. In this study we have evolved an RNA virus, the bacteriophage Qβ, under three different temperatures that either were kept constant or alternated periodically. The populations obtained were analyzed at the phenotypic and the genotypic level to characterize the evolutionary process followed by the virus in each case and the amount of convergent genetic changes attained. Finally, we also investigated the influence of the pre-existent genetic diversity on adaptation to high temperature. The main conclusions that arise from our results are: i under periodically changing temperature conditions, evolution of bacteriophage Qβ is driven by the most stringent selective pressure, ii there is a high degree of evolutionary convergence between replicated populations and also among populations evolved at different temperatures, iii there are mutations specific of a particular condition, and iv adaptation to high temperatures in populations differing in their pre-existent genetic diversity takes place through the selection of a common set of mutations.

  18. The oxidation behavior of classical thermal barrier coatings exposed to extreme temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina DRAGOMIRESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC are designed to protect metal surfaces from extreme temperatures and improve their resistance to oxidation during service. Currently, the most commonly used systems are those that have the TBC structure bond coat (BC / top coat (TC layers. The top coat layer is a ceramic layer. Oxidation tests are designed to identify the dynamics of the thermally oxide layer (TGO growth at the interface of bond coat / top coat layers, delamination mechanism and the TBC structural changes induced by thermal conditions. This paper is a short study on the evolution of aluminum oxide protective layer along with prolonged exposure to the testing temperature. There have been tested rectangular specimens of metal super alloy with four surfaces coated with a duplex thermal barrier coating system. The specimens were microscopically and EDAX analyzed before and after the tests. In order to determine the oxide type, the samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation are encouraging for future studies. The results show a direct relationship between the development of the oxide layer and long exposure to the test temperature. Future research will focus on changing the testing temperature to compare the results.

  19. Extreme Brightness Temperatures and Refractive Substructure in 3C273 with RadioAstron

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D; Gwinn, Carl R; Gurvits, Leonid I; Narayan, Ramesh; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Jauncey, David L; Voitsik, Peter A; Anderson, James M; Sokolovsky, Kirill V; Lisakov, Mikhail M

    2016-01-01

    Earth-space interferometry with RadioAstron provides the highest direct angular resolution ever achieved in astronomy at any wavelength. RadioAstron detections of the classic quasar 3C273 on interferometric baselines up to 171,000 km suggest brightness temperatures exceeding expected limits from the "inverse-Compton catastrophe" by two orders of magnitude. We show that at 18 cm, these estimates most probably arise from refractive substructure introduced by scattering in the interstellar medium. We use the scattering properties to estimate an intrinsic brightness temperature of 7*10^12 K, which is consistent with expected theoretical limits, but which is ~15 times lower than estimates that neglect substructure. At 6 cm, the substructure influences the measured values appreciably but gives an estimated brightness temperature that is comparable to models that do not account for the substructure. At 1.3 cm, the substructure does not affect the extremely high inferred brightness temperatures, in excess of 10^13 K....

  20. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ruth; Argüeso, Daniel; Donat, Markus G.; Pitman, Andrew J.; Hurk, Bart; Berg, Alexis; Lawrence, David M.; Chéruy, Frédérique; Ducharne, Agnès.; Hagemann, Stefan; Meier, Arndt; Milly, P. C. D.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how soil moisture variability and trends affect the simulation of temperature and precipitation extremes in six global climate models using the experimental protocol of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (GLACE-CMIP5). This protocol enables separate examinations of the influences of soil moisture variability and trends on the intensity, frequency, and duration of climate extremes by the end of the 21st century under a business-as-usual (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5) emission scenario. Removing soil moisture variability significantly reduces temperature extremes over most continental surfaces, while wet precipitation extremes are enhanced in the tropics. Projected drying trends in soil moisture lead to increases in intensity, frequency, and duration of temperature extremes by the end of the 21st century. Wet precipitation extremes are decreased in the tropics with soil moisture trends in the simulations, while dry extremes are enhanced in some regions, in particular the Mediterranean and Australia. However, the ensemble results mask considerable differences in the soil moisture trends simulated by the six climate models. We find that the large differences between the models in soil moisture trends, which are related to an unknown combination of differences in atmospheric forcing (precipitation, net radiation), flux partitioning at the land surface, and how soil moisture is parameterized, imply considerable uncertainty in future changes in climate extremes.

  1. Observations on fluctuations of sound transmission and temperature field from the ASIAEX 2001 South China Sea experiment and inversion of the characterizations of internal tides (waves)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shaoqiang; WU Lixin; WANG Huiwen; ZHANG Renhe; James F. Lynch; Timothy F. Duda

    2004-01-01

    Two conclusions are obtained by analyzing the fluctuation data of the temperature field and the sound transmission in the South China Sea from ASIAEX 2001 volume interaction experiment. First of all, the peak-to-peak value of the particle vertical mean displacement due to the internal waves exceeds 40 m. Secondly, the peak-to-peak value of the sound transmission fluctuations represented by the pulse leading-edge fluctuations of the travel-time average exceeds 100 ms. Based on that, the major components of the internal waves are obtained by analyzing the spectrum of the temperature field fluctuations. The spectrum structures of the temperature field fluctuations in the across-shelf and the along-shore directions are compared respectively, and the spectrum structures of the sound transmission in such two different directions are also compared. The multi-path signals and the travel-time of the pulse are respectively used to capture the information of the sound transmission fluctuations, and their spectrum structures are compared also.

  2. Variable temperature hot wire anemometry applied to the joint analysis of the velocity and temperature fluctuations in a mixing layer

    OpenAIRE

    Ndoye, M.; Delville, J.; Dorignac, E.; Arroyo, G.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Our study provides a detailed description of the thermal mixing process in an anisothermal mixing layer. Velocity and temperature are simultaneously measured at the same point by using a new hot wire anemometer. This anemometer implements the multiple overheat principle, associated with a non linear Levenberg-Marquardt signal processing. These simultaneous measurements allowed an analysis based on conditional Probability Density Functions (PDFs), joint PDFs and a quadr...

  3. Manipulation of Samples at Extreme Temperatures for Fast in-situ Synchrotron Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Richard [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, IL (United States)

    2016-04-22

    An aerodynamic sample levitation system with laser beam heating was integrated with the APS beamlines 6 ID-D, 11 ID-C and 20 BM-B. The new capability enables in-situ measurements of structure and XANES at extreme temperatures (300-3500 °C) and in conditions that completely avoid contact with container surfaces. In addition to maintaining a high degree of sample purity, the use of aerodynamic levitation enables deep supercooling and greatly enhanced glass formation from a wide variety of melts and liquids. Development and integration of controlled extreme sample environments and new measurement techniques is an important aspect of beamline operations and user support. Processing and solidifying liquids is a critical value-adding step in manufacturing semiconductors, optical materials, metals and in the operation of many energy conversion devices. Understanding structural evolution is of fundamental importance in condensed materials, geology, and biology. The new capability provides unique possibilities for materials research and helps to develop and maintain a competitive materials manufacturing and energy utilization industry. Test samples were used to demonstrate key features of the capability including experiments on hot crystalline materials, liquids at temperatures from about 500 to 3500 °C. The use of controlled atmospheres using redox gas mixtures enabled in-situ changes in the oxidation states of cations in melts. Significant innovations in this work were: (i) Use of redox gas mixtures to adjust the oxidation state of cations in-situ (ii) Operation with a fully enclosed system suitable for work with nuclear fuel materials (iii) Making high quality high energy in-situ x-ray diffraction measurements (iv) Making high quality in-situ XANES measurements (v) Publishing high impact results (vi) Developing independent funding for the research on nuclear materials This SBIR project work led to a commercial instrument product for the niche market of processing and

  4. Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The chemical stability of high temperature materials must be known for use in the extreme environments of combustion applications. The characterization techniques available at NASA Glenn Research Center vary from fundamental thermodynamic property determination to material durability testing in actual engine environments. In this paper some of the unique techniques and facilities available at NASA Glenn will be reviewed. Multiple cell Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry is used to determine thermodynamic data by sampling gas species formed by reaction or equilibration in a Knudsen cell held in a vacuum. The transpiration technique can also be used to determine thermodynamic data of volatile species but at atmospheric pressures. Thermodynamic data in the Si-O-H(g) system were determined with this technique. Free Jet Sampling Mass Spectrometry can be used to study gas-solid interactions at a pressure of one atmosphere. Volatile Si(OH)4(g) was identified by this mass spectrometry technique. A High Pressure Burner Rig is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrocarbon-fueled combustion environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) volatility rates were measured in the burner rig as a function of total pressure, gas velocity and temperature. Finally, the Research Combustion Lab Rocket Test Cell is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine environments to assess material durability. SiC recession due to rocket engine exposures was measured as a function of oxidant/fuel ratio, temperature, and total pressure. The emphasis of the discussion for all techniques will be placed on experimental factors that must be controlled for accurate acquisition of results and reliable prediction of high temperature material chemical stability.

  5. Fluctuating in the hopping rate of CuO thin films with respect to substrate temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serin, N.; Yildiz, A.; Çam, E.; Uzun, Ş.; Serin, T.

    2012-10-01

    Electrical transport properties in CuO thin films processed using d.c. magnetron sputtering technique is investigated to understand the correlation between the processing conditions and electrical properties. It is identified that the temperature dependent conductivity of the investigated films is controlled by the multi-phonon hopping conduction mechanism. A detailed analysis in terms of carrier hopping parameters is used to correlate electrical transport properties with the d.c. magnetron sputtering conditions.

  6. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  7. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg C Ganzenmüller

    Full Text Available We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  8. Study by neutron diffusion of magnetic fluctuations in iron in the curie temperature region; Etude des fluctuations d'aimantation dans le fer au voisinage de la temperature de curie par diffusion des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson-Galula, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-12-15

    The critical diffusion of neutrons in iron is due to the magnetisation fluctuations which occur in ferromagnetic substances in the neighbourhood of the Curie temperature. The fluctuations can be described in correlation terms; a correlation function {gamma}{sub R{sub vector}} (t) is defined, {gamma}{sub R{sub vector}} (t) = mean value of the scalar product of a reference spin and a spin situated at a distance (R) from the first and considered at the instant t. In chapter I we recall the generalities on neutron diffusion cross-sections; a brief summary is given of the theory of VAN HOVE, who has shown that the magnetic diffusion cross section of neutrons is the Fourier transformation of the correlation function. In chapter Il we study the spatial dependence of the correlation function, assumed to be independent of time. It can then be characterised by two parameters K{sub 1} and r{sub 1}, by means of which the range and intensity of the correlations can be calculated respectively. After setting out the principle of the measurement of these parameters, we shall describe the experimental apparatus. The experimental values obtained are in good agreement with the calculations, and the agreement is better if it is supposed that the second and not the first neighbours of an iron atom are magnetically active, as proposed by Neel. In chapter III we study the evolution with time of the correlation function; this evolution is characterised by a parameter {lambda} depending on the temperature, which occurs in the diffusion equation obeyed by the magnetisation fluctuations: {delta}M{sub vector}/{delta}t = {lambda} {nabla}{sup 2} M{sub vector}. The principle of the measurement of {lambda} is given, after which the modifications carried out on the experimental apparatus mentioned in chapter II are described. The results obtained are then discussed and compared with the theoretical forecasts of De Gennes, mode by using the

  9. Evolution of extreme temperatures over western Iberia; reporting on recent changes and future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Santo, Fátima E.

    2010-05-01

    We report on changes in surface air temperature extremes over mainland Portugal during the period 1941-2006 using daily maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) from 23 of the most reliable Portuguese station records. Here we have used indices corresponding to the number of days above the 90th and below the 10th percentile for both Tmax and Tmin. This allowed us, to compute trends for the entire period of data (1941-2006) as well as for two consecutive 31-year periods: 1945-1975 (relative cooling period) and 1976-2006 (relative warming period), based on results found by Karl et al, 2000. The most striking results are related with the last period (1976-2006) that reveal a significant increase in extreme heat events for both spring and summer seasons, and a decrease in extreme cold events in winter. In the second part of this work we present an analysis of climate change over Portugal simulated by the Hadley Centre regional climate model (HadRM3) with data obtained from Project PRUDENCE. The ability of the model to reproduce the present climate (1961-1990) is tested and evaluated. For this purpose, values of Tmax and Tmin of all 23 climatological weather stations (1961-1990 climate normals) were aggregated into a new time series. Additionally we have computed the seasonal percentiles in 1% steps (ranging from 1% to 99%). For comparison purposes we have aggregated HadRM3 values into a new time series averaging grid points located closest to the 23 climatological weather stations considered, and computed the corresponding seasonal percentiles in 1% steps. This procedure allowed an objective comparison between the two probability distributions (climatological and simulated by the model), using standard q-q plots. Finally we have evaluated changes of probability distributions for future climate projections under the IPCC emission scenarios (B2 and A2), for the period between 2071-2100 when compared to the present climate (1961-1990) simulated by the model. The

  10. Pair Fluctuations in Ultra-small Fermi Systems within Self-Consistent RPA at Finite Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Storozhenko, A; Dukelsky, J; Röpke, G; Vdovin, A I

    2003-01-01

    A self-consistent version of the Thermal Random Phase Approximation (TSCRPA) is developed within the Matsubara Green's Function (GF) formalism. The TSCRPA is applied to the many level pairing model. The normal phase of the system is considered. The TSCRPA results are compared with the exact ones calculated for the Grand Canonical Ensemble. Advantages of the TSCRPA over the Thermal Mean Field Approximation (TMFA) and the standard Thermal Random Phase Approximation (TRPA) are demonstrated. Results for correlation functions, excitation energies, single particle level densities, etc., as a function of temperature are presented.

  11. Simulation of leaf photosynthesis of C3 plants under fluctuating light and different temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Isik; Holst, Niels; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2012-01-01

    of darkness (initial stomatal conductance, ). The model was parameterized for both Chrysanthemum morifolium and Spinacia oleracea by artificially changing the induction states of the leaves in the climate chamber. The model was tested under natural conditions that were including frequent light flecks due...... to partial cloud cover and varying temperatures. The temporal course of observed photosynthesis rate and the carbon gain was compared to the simulation. The ability of the current model to predict the carbon assimilation rate was assessed using different statistical indexes. The model predictions were...

  12. Extreme temperatures, foundation species, and abrupt ecosystem change: an example from an iconic seagrass ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jordan A; Burkholder, Derek A; Heithaus, Michael R; Fourqurean, James W; Fraser, Matthew W; Statton, John; Kendrick, Gary A

    2015-04-01

    Extreme climatic events can trigger abrupt and often lasting change in ecosystems via the reduction or elimination of foundation (i.e., habitat-forming) species. However, while the frequency/intensity of extreme events is predicted to increase under climate change, the impact of these events on many foundation species and the ecosystems they support remains poorly understood. Here, we use the iconic seagrass meadows of Shark Bay, Western Australia--a relatively pristine subtropical embayment whose dominant, canopy-forming seagrass, Amphibolis antarctica, is a temperate species growing near its low-latitude range limit--as a model system to investigate the impacts of extreme temperatures on ecosystems supported by thermally sensitive foundation species in a changing climate. Following an unprecedented marine heat wave in late summer 2010/11, A. antarctica experienced catastrophic (>90%) dieback in several regions of Shark Bay. Animal-borne video footage taken from the perspective of resident, seagrass-associated megafauna (sea turtles) revealed severe habitat degradation after the event compared with a decade earlier. This reduction in habitat quality corresponded with a decline in the health status of largely herbivorous green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the 2 years following the heat wave, providing evidence of long-term, community-level impacts of the event. Based on these findings, and similar examples from diverse ecosystems, we argue that a generalized framework for assessing the vulnerability of ecosystems to abrupt change associated with the loss of foundation species is needed to accurately predict ecosystem trajectories in a changing climate. This includes seagrass meadows, which have received relatively little attention in this context. Novel research and monitoring methods, such as the analysis of habitat and environmental data from animal-borne video and data-logging systems, can make an important contribution to this framework.

  13. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor La-214

    CERN Document Server

    Yung Moo Hu

    2001-01-01

    charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance zeta sub c becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO sub 2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H sub c sub 2. Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 sub - subdelta, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H(parallel)c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T sub c , magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied ove...

  14. Modified and double-clad large mode-area leakage channel fibers for extreme temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavasi Raja, G.; Varshney, Shailendra K.

    2015-03-01

    Recently large-mode-area hybrid leakage channel fibers (HLCFs) were reported to overcome the limitation on mode area with single-mode (SM) operation for the practical bending radius of 7.5 cm at the preferred wavelength of 1064 nm. In this paper, we present the effects of a thermally induced refractive index change on the mode area of bend-compensated extremely LMA modified HLCFs (M-HLCFs) and double-clad M-HLCFs. A full-vectorial finite-element method-based modal solver is used to obtain the modal characteristics of M-HLCFs in various heat load conditions. Numerical simulations reveal that the effective mode area of M-HLCFs is ˜1433 μm2 at room temperature, which marginally decreases to ˜1387 μm2 while SM operation is maintained when the temperature distribution rises to ˜125 °C over the fiber geometry during high-power operations. We have also investigated a double-clad M-HLCF design exhibiting a mode area > ˜ 1000 μm2 for all heat load density variations up to a maximum of 12 × 109 W m-3, corresponding to a 250 °C temperature in the center of the fiber core region.

  15. Low-pressure systems and extreme precipitation in central India: sensitivity to temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørland, Silje Lund; Sorteberg, Asgeir

    2016-07-01

    Extreme rainfall events in the central Indian region are often related to the passage of synoptic scale monsoon low-pressure systems (LPS). This study uses the surrogate climate change method on ten monsoon LPS cases connected to observed extreme rainfall events, to investigate how sensitive the precipitation and runoff are to an idealized warmer and moister atmosphere. The ten cases are simulated with three different initial and lateral boundary conditions: the unperturbed control run, and two sets of perturbed runs where the atmospheric temperature is increased uniformly throughout the atmosphere, the specific humidity increased according to Clausius Clapeyron's relation, but the large-scale flow is unchanged. The difference between the control and perturbed simulations are mainly due to the imposed warming and feedback influencing the synoptic flow. The mean precipitation change with warming in the central Indian region is 18-20 %/K, with largest changes at the end of the LPS tracks. The LPS in the warmer runs are bringing more moisture further inland that is released as precipitation. In the perturbed runs the precipitation rate is increasing at all percentiles, and there is more frequent rainfall with very heavy intensities. This leads to a shift in which category that contributes most to the total precipitation: more of the precipitation is coming from the category with very heavy intensities. The runoff changes are similar to the precipitation changes, except the response in intensity of very heavy runoff, which is around twice the change in intensity of very heavy precipitation.

  16. Extreme High and Low Temperature Operation of the Silicon-On-Insulator Type CHT-OPA Operational Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    A new operational amplifier chip based on silicon-on-insulator technology was evaluated for potential use in extreme temperature environments. The CHT-OPA device is a low power, precision operational amplifier with rail-to-rail output swing capability, and it is rated for operation between -55 C and +225 C. A unity gain inverting circuit was constructed utilizing the CHT-OPA chip and a few passive components. The circuit was evaluated in the temperature range from -190 C to +200 C in terms of signal gain and phase shift, and supply current. The investigations were carried out to determine suitability of this device for use in space exploration missions and aeronautic applications under wide temperature incursion. Re-restart capability at extreme temperatures, i.e. power switched on while the device was soaked at extreme temperatures, was also investigated. In addition, the effects of thermal cycling under a wide temperature range on the operation of this high performance amplifier were determined. The results from this work indicate that this silicon-on-insulator amplifier chip maintained very good operation between +200 C and -190 C. The limited thermal cycling had no effect on the performance of the amplifier, and it was able to re-start at both -190 C and +200 C. In addition, no physical degradation or packaging damage was introduced due to either extreme temperature exposure or thermal cycling. The good performance demonstrated by this silicon-on-insulator operational amplifier renders it a potential candidate for use in space exploration missions or other environments under extreme temperatures. Additional and more comprehensive characterization is, however, required to establish the reliability and suitability of such devices for long term use in extreme temperature applications.

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of Gaseous Plasmas in the Limit of Extremely Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Limiting structure of thermodynamic functions of gaseous plasmas is under consideration in the limit of zero temperature and density. Remarkable tendency, which was claimed previously (Iosilevskiy and Gryaznov, 1985) is carried to extreme. Both equations of state, thermal and caloric ones obtain in this limit identical stepped structure ("ionization stairs") for plasma of any single element when this limit (T -> 0, n -> 0) is carried out at fixed value of chemical potential for electrons (or atoms). The same stepped structure is valid for plasma of mixtures or compounds. This structure appears within a fixed (negative) range of chemical potential of electrons bounded below by value of major ionization potential of element and above by the value depending on sublimation energy of substance. Binding energies of all possible bound complexes (atomic, molecular, ionic and clusters) in its ground state are the only quantities that manifest itself in meaningful details of this limiting picture as location and value ...

  18. On regional dynamical downscaling for the assessment and projection of temperature and precipitation extremes across Tasmania, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J.; McInnes, Kathleen L.; Cechet, Robert P.; Corney, Stuart P.; Grose, Michael R.; Holz, Gregory K.; Katzfey, Jack J.; Bindoff, Nathaniel L.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of an ensemble of six GCMs, downscaled to a 0.1° lat/lon grid using the Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model over Tasmania, Australia, to simulate observed extreme temperature and precipitation climatologies and statewide trends is assessed for 1961-2009 using a suite of extreme indices. The downscaled simulations have high skill in reproducing extreme temperatures, with the majority of models reproducing the statewide averaged sign and magnitude of recent observed trends of increasing warm days and warm nights and decreasing frost days. The warm spell duration index is however underestimated, while variance is generally overrepresented in the extreme temperature range across most regions. The simulations show a lower level of skill in modelling the amplitude of the extreme precipitation indices such as very wet days, but simulate the observed spatial patterns and variability. In general, simulations of dry extreme precipitation indices are underestimated in dryer areas and wet extremes indices are underestimated in wetter areas. Using two SRES emissions scenarios, the simulations indicate a significant increase in warm nights compared to a slightly more moderate increase in warm days, and an increase in maximum 1- and 5- day precipitation intensities interspersed with longer consecutive dry spells across Tasmania during the twenty-first century.

  19. Changes in extreme temperature and precipitation events in the Loess Plateau (China) during 1960-2013 under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenyi; Mu, Xingmin; Song, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dan; Cheng, Aifang; Qiu, Bing

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, extreme climatic events have been a major issue worldwide. Regional assessments on various climates and geographic regions are needed for understanding uncertainties in extreme events' responses to global warming. The objective of this study was to assess the annual and decadal trends in 12 extreme temperature and 10 extreme precipitation indices in terms of intensity, frequency, and duration over the Loess Plateau during 1960-2013. The results indicated that the regionally averaged trends in temperature extremes were consistent with global warming. The occurrence of warm extremes, including summer days (SU), tropical nights (TR), warm days (TX90), and nights (TN90) and a warm spell duration indicator (WSDI), increased by 2.76 (P spell duration indicator (CSDI) exhibited decreases of - 3.22 (P wet-day and extremely wet-day precipitation were not significant. Large-scale atmospheric circulation indices, such as the Western Pacific Subtropical High Intensity Index (WPSHII) and Arctic Oscillation (AO), strongly influences warm/cold extremes and contributes significantly to climate changes in the Loess Plateau. The enhanced geopotential height over the Eurasian continent and increase in water vapor divergence in the rainy season have contributed to the changes of the rapid warming and consecutive drying in the Loess Plateau.

  20. The role of Cu-O bond length fluctuations in the high temperature superconductivity mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Guy

    2012-06-01

    We review three different kinds of experiments that emphasize the non-BCS, inhomogeneous aspects of superconductivity in the high Tc cuprates. The first is the existence of two different energy scales in the superconducting state, initially identified by a comparison between tunneling and Andreev-Saint-James spectroscopies [Deutscher, Nature (London) 397, 410 (1999)]. The second are EXAFS measurements of the Cu-O bond length distribution, which have shown that below a temperature T* > Tc, it becomes broader than expected from the Debye-Waller broadening and presents a split [Bianconi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3412 (1996)]. The third one is the effect of frozen lattice disorder on critical current and vortex pinning, which profoundly affects the pairing landscape [Gutierrez et al., Nature Mater. 6, 367 (2007)]. We then discuss how these results fit with models in which the electron-lattice interaction plays a leading role.

  1. Biodiversity and geochemistry of an extremely acidic, low-temperature subterranean environment sustained by chemolithotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Sakurako; Bryan, Christopher G; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2011-08-01

    The geochemical dynamics and composition of microbial communities within a low-temperature (≈ 8.5°C), long-abandoned (> 90 years) underground pyrite mine (Cae Coch, located in north Wales) were investigated. Surface water percolating through fractures in the residual pyrite ore body that forms the roof of the mine becomes extremely acidic and iron-enriched due to microbially accelerated oxidative dissolution of the sulfide mineral. Water droplets on the mine roof were found to host a very limited diversity of exclusively autotrophic microorganisms, dominated by the recently described psychrotolerant iron/sulfur-oxidizing acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and smaller numbers of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. In contrast, flowing water within the mine chamber was colonized with vast macroscopic microbial growths, in the form of acid streamers and microbial stalactites, where the dominant microorganisms were Betaproteobacteria (autotrophic iron oxidizers such as 'Ferrovum myxofaciens' and a bacterium related to Gallionella ferruginea). An isolated pool within the mine showed some similarity (although greater biodiversity) to the roof droplets, and was the only site where archaea were relatively abundant. Bacteria not previously associated with extremely acidic, metal-rich environments (a Sphingomonas sp. and Ralstonia pickettii) were found within the abandoned mine. Data supported the hypothesis that the Cae Coch ecosystem is underpinned by acidophilic, mostly autotrophic, bacteria that use ferrous iron present in the pyrite ore body as their source of energy, with a limited role for sulfur-based autotrophy. Results of this study highlight the importance of novel bacterial species (At. ferrivorans and acidophilic iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria) in mediating mineral oxidation and redox transformations of iron in acidic, low-temperature environments. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Climate change scenarios of extreme temperatures and atmospheric humidity for Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejeda-Martinez, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)]. E-mail: atejeda@uv.mx; Conde-Alvarez, C. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Valencia-Treviso, L.E. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2008-10-15

    The following study explores climatic change scenarios of extreme temperature and atmospheric humidity for the 2020 and 2050 decades. They were created for Mexico through the GFDLR30, ECHAM4 and HadCM2 general circulation models. Base scenario conditions were associated with the normal climatological conditions for the period 1961-1990, with a database of 50 surface observatories. It was necessary to empirically estimate the missing data in approximately half of the pressure measurements. For the period 1961-1990, statistical models of the monthly means of maximum and minimum temperatures and atmospheric humidity (relative and specific) were obtained from the observed data of temperature, solar radiation and precipitation. Based on the simulations of the GFDLR30, ECHAM4 and HADCM2 models, a future scenario of monthly means of maximum and minimum temperatures and humidity in climatic change conditions was created. The results shown are for the representative months of winter (January) and summer (July). [Spanish] En este articulo se presentan escenarios de cambio climatico referidos a temperaturas extremas y humedad atmosferica para las decadas de 2020 y 2050. Fueron generados para Mexico a partir de los modelos de circulacion general GFDLR30, ECHAM4 y HADCM2. El escenario base corresponde a las normales climatologicas del periodo 1961-1990 para 50 observatorios de superficie. Para la mitad de ellos fue necesario estimar empiricamente la presion atmosferica a partir de la altitud y para la totalidad se obtuvieron modelos estadisticos de los promedios mensuales de temperaturas maxima y minima asi como de humedad atmosferica (relativa y especifica). Esos modelos estadisticos, combinados con las salidas de los modelos de circulacion general mencionados, produjeron escenarios futuros de medias mensuales de temperaturas extremas y de humedad bajo condiciones de cambio climatico. Se mostraran los resultados para un mes representativo del invierno (enero) y otro del verano

  3. CHANGES IN FREQUENCY, PERSISTENCE AND INTENSITY OF EXTREME HIGH-TEMPERATURE EVENTS IN THE ROMANIAN PLAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGOTĂ CARMEN-SOFIA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent summer heat waves (2003, 2010 had a strong socio-economic impact in different parts of the continent by means of crop shortfalls and forest fires. Sustained hot days became more frequent in the recent decades in many European regions, affecting human health and leading to additional deaths. This signal has been outlined in many studies conducted in Romania, suggesting that the southern region of Romania is particularly subject to large temperature increase. This work investigates the changing annual and seasonal heat waves at regional scale of the Romanian Plain, over period 1961-2014. Daily maximum temperature recorded at six weather stations available from the ECA&D project (European Climate Assessment and Datasets were analyzed. The changes in the seasonal frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves were studied using the Mann-Kendall nonparametric trend test, as recommended by the scientific expert team on climate change detection. The likelyhood of higher maximum temperatures rise, particularly after the mid 1980s, and the changes in the upper tail of the probability density functions of these temperatures, within the extreme domain (beyond the 95% percentile level, explain the persistence and intensity of heat waves. The upward trends are dominant most of the year, and many of the calculated decadal slopes were found statistically significant (relative to the 5% level, proving an ongoing and strong warming all over the region. Our findings are in good agreement with several recent studies carried out at European and national scale and pledge for further scientific analyses i.e. heat stress impact on public health and agriculture.

  4. Multi-scenario-based hazard analysis of high temperature extremes experienced in China during 1951-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhan'e; YIN Jie; ZHANG Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    China is physically and socio-economically susceptible to global warming-derived high temperature extremes because of its vast area and high urban population density.This article presents a scenario-based analysis method for high temperature extremes aimed at illustrating the latter's hazardous potential and exposure across China.Based on probability analysis,high temperature extreme scenarios with return periods of 5,10,20,and 50 years were designed,with a high temperature hazard index calculated by integrating two differentially-weighted extreme temperature indices (maximum temperature and high temperature days).To perform the exposure analysis,a land use map was employed to determine the spatial distribution of susceptible human activities under the different scenarios.The results indicate that there are two heat-prone regions and a sub-hotspot occupying a relatively small land area.However,the societal and economic consequences of such an environmental impact upon the North China Plain and middle/lower Yangtze River Basin would be substantial due to the concentration of human activities in these areas.

  5. Development of Pasteuria penetrans in Meloidogyne javanica females as affected by constantly high vs fluctuating temperature in an in-vivo system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DARBAN D.A.; GOWEN S.R.; PEMBROKE B.; MAHAR A.N.

    2005-01-01

    Growth room and glasshouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of constant and fluctuating temperatures on the development of Pasteuria penetrans a hyperparasite of root-knot nematodes. Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) were inoculated with Meloidogynejavanica second-stage juveniles attached with endospores ofP. penetrans and were grown in growth room at 26-29 ℃ and in glasshouse at 20-32 ℃. The tomato plants were sampled from the growth room after 600 degree-days based on 17 ℃/d, accumulating each day above a base temperature of 10 ℃ and from the glasshouse after 36 calendar days. Temperature affected the development ofP. penetrans directly. The rate of development at constant temperature in growth room was faster than that in the glasshouse at fluctuating temperatures.

  6. Analysis and Comparison of Trends in Extreme Temperature Indices in Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 1985–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Ali S. Alghamdi; Todd W. Moore

    2014-01-01

    This study employed the time series of thirteen extreme temperature indices over the period 1985–2010 to analyze and compare temporal trends at two weather stations in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. The trend analysis showed warming of the local air for the city. Significant increasing trends were found in annual average maximum and minimum temperatures, maximum of minimum temperature, warm nights, and warm days for an urban and a rural station. Significant decreasing trends were detected in the ...

  7. Response of Bacillus subtilis spores to dehydration and UV irradiation at extremely low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, K; Klein, A

    1996-02-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis have been exposed to the conditions of extreme dehydration (argon/silica gel; simulated space vacuum) for up to 12 weeks at 298 K and 80 K in the dark. The inactivation has been correlated with the production of DNA-double strand-breaks. The temperature-dependence of the rate constants for inactivation or production of DNA-double strand-breaks is surprisingly low. Controls kept in the frozen state at 250 K for the same period of time showed no sign of deterioration. In another series of experiments the spores have been UV irradiated (253.7 nm) at 298 K, 200 K and 80 K after exposure to dehydrating conditions for 3 days. Fluence-effect relationships for inactivation, production of DNA-double strand-breaks and DNA-protein cross-links are presented. The corresponding F37-values for inactivation and production of DNA lesions are significantly increased only at 80 K (factor of 4 to 5). The data indicate that the low temperatures that prevail in the outer parts of the Solar System or at the nightside of Mars or the Moon are not sufficiently low to crucially inhibit inactivation by dehydration. Our data place further constraints on the panspermia hypothesis.

  8. Short-term cropland responses to temperature extreme events during late winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. De Simon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies have focused on terrestrial ecosystem response to extreme events. Most of this research has been conducted in natural ecosystems, but few have considered agro-ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the impact of a manipulated warmer or cooler late winter-early spring on the carbon budget and final harvest of a soybean crop (Glycine max (L. Merr.. Soil temperature was altered by manipulating soil albedo by covering the soil surface with a layer of inert silica gravel. We tested three treatments: cooling (Co, warming (W, mix (M and control (C. An automated system continuously measured soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh, soil temperature profiles, and soil water content across the entire year in each plot. Phenological phases were periodically assessed and final harvest was measured in each plot. Results showed that treatments had only a transient effect on daily Rh rates which did not result in a total annual carbon budget significantly different from control, even though cooling showed a significant reduction in final harvest. We also observed anticipation in seed germination in both W and M treatments and a delay in germination for Co. Moreover, plant density and growth increased in W and M and decreased in Co.

  9. Simulation evaluation and future prediction of the IPCC-AR4 GCMs on the extreme temperatures in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji; JIANG Zhihong; SONG Jie; LOU Dejun

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the temperature observations during 1961-2000 in China, seven coupled general circulation models' (GCMs) extreme temperature products are evaluated supplied by the Intergovemmental Panel on Climate Change's 4th Assessment Report (IPCC-AR4). The extreme temperature indices in use are frost days (FD), growing season length (GSL), extreme tempera-ture range (ETR), warm nights (TN90), and heat wave duration index (HWDI). Results indicate that all the seven models are capable of simulating spatial and temporal variations in temperature characteristics, and their ensemble acts more reliable than any single one. Among the seven models, GFDL-CM2.0 and MIROC3.2 performances are much better. Besides, most of the mod-els are able to present linear trends of the same positive/negative signs as the observations but for weaker intensities. The simula-tion effects are different on a nationwide basis, with 110°N as the division, east (west) of which the effects are better (worse) and the poorer over the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in China. The predictions for the 21st century on emissions scenarios show that except decreases in the FD and ETR, other indices display significant increasing trend, especially for the indices of HWDI and TN90, which represent the notable extreme climate. This indicates that the temperature-related climate is moving towards the ex-treme. In the late 21st century, the GSL and TN90 (HWDI) increase most notably in southwest China (the Qinghai--Tibetan Plateau), and the FD decrease most remarkably in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, northwest and northeast of China. Apart from South China, the yearly change range of the extreme temperature is reduced in most of China.

  10. Lysosomal responses to heat-shock of seasonal temperature extremes in Cd-exposed mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múgica, M; Izagirre, U; Marigómez, I

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of temperature extremes on lysosomal biomarkers in mussels exposed to a model toxic pollutant (Cd) at different seasons. For this purpose, temperature was elevated 10°C (from 12°C to 22°C in winter and from 18°C to 28°C in summer) for a period of 6h (heat-shock) in control and Cd-exposed mussels, and then returned back to initial one. Lysosomal membrane stability and lysosomal structural changes in digestive gland were investigated. In winter, heat-shock reduced the labilisation period (LP) of the lysosomal membrane, especially in Cd-exposed mussels, and provoked transient lysosomal enlargement. LP values recovered after the heat-shock cessation but lysosomal enlargement prevailed in both experimental groups. In summer, heat-shock induced remarkable reduction in LP and lysosomal enlargement (more markedly in Cd-exposed mussels), which recovered within 3 days. Besides, whilst heat-shock effects on LP were practically identical for Cd-exposed mussels in winter and summer, the effects were longer-lasting in summer than in winter for control mussels. Thus, lysosomal responsiveness after heat-shock was higher in summer than in winter but recovery was faster as well, and therefore the consequences of the heat shock seem to be more decisive in winter. In contrast, inter-season differences were attenuated in the presence of Cd. Consequently, mussels seem to be better prepared in summer than in winter to stand short periods of abrupt temperature change; this is, however, compromised when mussels are exposed to pollutants such as Cd.

  11. Temperaturas extremas en verano. Implicaciones en salud Extreme temperatures in summer time. Health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Linares Gil

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El incremento que se ha detectado en las temperaturas estivales en los últimos años, unido las tendencias que se esperan para el clima durante el próximo siglo, hacen prever un aumento en la frecuencia e intensidad de los eventos térmicos extremos, fundamentalmente olas de calor. La clara relación existente entre la temperatura y la mortalidad, hace necesaria una cuantificación para la caracterización de los efectos esperados de la temperatura sobre la mortalidad en las denominadas olas de calor.En este trabajo se presenta una descripción del estado del conocimiento de este problema, haciendo especial referencia a la ola de calor que asoló Europa en el verano de 2003, de cómo se han caracterizado las olas de calor y en base a ello de cuáles son las características que han de tener los planes de alerta y prevención encaminados a minimizar los efectos del calor sobre la salud de la población.The increment that has been detected in summer temperatures in the last years joined to the trends expected to climate for the next century provide an increase in frequency and intensity of the extreme climate events, basically in heat waves. The undoubted relationship between temperature and mortality makes necessary a quantifying in order to characterize the expected effects of temperature over mortality particularly in heat waves.This study show a state-of-the-art review this problem, with a special emphasis in the heat wave that Europe suffered in summer of 2003 and how the heat waves has been characterized until now. Lastly, which are the characteristics that should have the preventive measures designed to minimized the effects of heat waves over population ́s health.

  12. Local sea surface temperatures add to extreme precipitation in northeast Australia during La Niña

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jason P.; Boyer-Souchet, Irène

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the role played by high sea surface temperatures around northern Australia, in producing the extreme precipitation which occurred during the strong La Niña in December 2010. These extreme rains produced floods that impacted almost 1,300,000 km2, caused billions of dollars in damage, led to the evacuation of thousands of people and resulted in 35 deaths. Through the use of regional climate model simulations the contribution of the observed high sea surface temperatures to the rainfall is quantified. Results indicate that the large-scale atmospheric circulation changes associated with the La Niña event, while associated with above average rainfall in northeast Australia, were insufficient to produce the extreme rainfall and subsequent flooding observed. The presence of high sea surface temperatures around northern Australia added ˜25% of the rainfall total.

  13. The effect of simulated heat-shock and daily temperature fluctuations on seed germination of four species from fire-prone ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Zupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seed germination in many species from fire-prone ecosystems may be triggered by heat shock and/or temperature fluctuation, and how species respond to such fire-related cues is important to understand post-fire regeneration strategies. Thus, we tested how heat shock and daily temperature fluctuations affect the germination of four species from fire-prone ecosystems; two from the Cerrado and two from the Mediterranean Basin. Seeds of all four species were subjected to four treatments: Fire (F, temperature fluctuations (TF, fire+temperature fluctuations (F+TF and control (C. After treatments, seeds were put to germinate for 60 days at 25ºC (dark. Responses differed according to species and native ecosystem. Germination percentage for the Cerrado species did not increase with any of the treatments, while germination of one Mediterranean species increased with all treatments and the other only with treatments that included fire. Although the Cerrado species did not respond to the treatments used in this study, their seeds survived the exposure to heat shock, which suggests they possess tolerance to fire. Fire frequency in the Cerrado is higher than that in Mediterranean ecosystems, thus traits related to fire-resistance would be more advantageous than traits related to post-fire recruitment, which are widespread among Mediterranean species.

  14. Evolution of extreme temperature events in short term climate projection for Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alfredo; Tarquis, Ana M.; Sanchez, Enrique; Dosio, Alessandro; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2014-05-01

    Extreme events of maximum and minimum temperatures are a main hazard for agricultural production in Iberian Peninsula. For this purpose, in this study we analyze projections of their evolution that could be valid for the next decade, represented in this study by the 30-year period 2004-2034 (target period). For this purpose two kinds of data were used in this study: 1) observations from the station network of AEMET (Spanish National Meteorological Agency) for five Spanish locations, and 2) simulated data at a resolution of 50 ×50 km horizontal grid derived from the outputs of twelve Regional Climate Models (RCMs) taken from project ENSEMBLES (van der Linden and Mitchell, 2009), with a bias correction (Dosio and Paruolo, 2011; Dosio et al., 2012) regarding the observational dataset Spain02 (Herrera et al., 2012). To validate the simulated climate, the available period of observations was compared to a baseline period (1964-1994) of simulated climate for all locations. Then, to analyze the changes for the present/very next future, probability of extreme temperature events for 2004-2034 were compared to that of the baseline period. Although only minor changes are expected, small variations in variability may have a significant impact in crop performance. The objective of the work is to evaluate the utility of these short term projections for potential users, as for instance insurance companies. References Dosio A. and Paruolo P., 2011. Bias correction of the ENSEMBLES high-resolution climate change projections for use by impact models: Evaluation on the present climate. Journal of Geophysical Research, VOL. 116,D16106, doi:10.1029/2011JD015934 Dosio A., Paruolo P. and Rojas R., 2012. Bias correction of the ENSEMBLES high resolution climate change projections for use by impact models: Analysis of the climate change signal. Journal of Geophysical Research,Volume 117, D17, doi: 0.1029/2012JD017968 Herrera et. al. (2012) Development and Analysis of a 50 year high

  15. Physiological Responses to Firefighting in Extreme Temperatures Do Not Compare to Firefighting in Temperate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Windisch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine physiological responses to two different simulated firefighting exercises: a firefighting exercise with flashovers, smoke, poor visibility and extreme temperatures (300° in a burning container and a standard firefighting exercise in temperate conditions. Furthermore, a second purpose of the study was to find out if the contribution of strength and endurance capacities to firefighting performance changes when the demands of the firefighting exercise change.Methods: Sixteen professional firefighters performed a maximum treadmill test, strength testing, a standard simulated firefighting exercise (SFE without heat and flashovers and a firefighting exercise with a simulation of the flashover phenomenon in a burning container (FOT. The treadmill testing was used to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak, ventilatory threshold (VT1 and respiratory compensation point (RCP. Three intensity zones were identified according to heart rate (HR values corresponding to VT1 and RCP: zone 1–HR below VT1, zone 2-HR between VT1 and RCP, zone 3–HR above RCP. Firefighting performance was determined by a simple time-strain-air depletion model (TSA taking the sum of z-transformed parameters of time to finish the exercise, strain in terms of mean heart rate, and air depletion from the breathing apparatus. Correlations were then established between TSA based firefighting performance parameters and fitness variables representing strength and endurance.Results: HR was significantly lower during SFE (79.9 ± 6.9%HRmax compared to FOT (85.4 ± 5.2%HRmax. During SFE subjects spent 24.6 ± 30.2% of time in zone 1, 65.8 ± 28.1% in zone 2 and 9.7 ± 16.6% in zone 3. During FOT subjects spent 16.3 ± 12.8% in zone 1, 50.4 ± 13.2% in zone 2 and 33.3 ± 16.6% in zone 3. Out of all correlations, relative VO2peak showed the highest relation to mean HR during SFE (−0.593 as well as FOT (−0.693.Conclusions: Endurance in terms of

  16. 恒定和波动温度下丽斑麻蜥孵出幼体的表型变异%Phenotypic variation in hatchling Mongolian racerunners Eremias argus from eggs incubated at constant versus fluctuating temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝琦蕾; 刘红霞; 计翔

    2006-01-01

    We used the Mongolian racerunner Eremias argus as a model animal to evaluate the effects of constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures on hatching success and hatchling phenotypes. Eggs were incubated under four constant [24, 27, 30 and 33 ( ± 0.3)℃ ] and one fluctuating temperature regimes. Hatching success did not differ among treatments, and incubation temperature did not affect the sexual phenotype of hatchlings. Incubation length decreased exponentially as incubation temperature increased, and eggs incubated at fluctuating temperatures took a longer time to complete development than did those incubated at constant temperatures with the same mean. Of the hatchling phenotypes examined, body dry mass, carcass dry mass, residual yolk dry mass and locomotor performance of hatchlings were more likely to be affected by incubation temperature. Overall, locomotor performance was best in the low temperature treatments (24℃ and 27℃ ) and worst in the highest temperature treatment (33℃), with the moderate temperature treatments (30℃ and fluctuating temperatures) in between. Our data show that: (1) daily exposure of eggs to extreme temperatures that are potentially lethal to embryos for brief periods does not have detectable adverse effects on hatching success and morphological phenotypes in E. argus; and (2) thermal fluctuations exert no positive effects on locomotor performance of hatchlings but influence incubation length differently than constant temperatures with the same mean [ Acta Zoologica Sinica 52 (6): 1049-1057, 2006].%作者以丽斑麻蜥(Eremias argus)为模型动物研究恒定和波动孵化温度对孵化成功率和孵出幼体表型的影响.卵在四个恒定[24,27,30 and 33(±0.3)℃]、一个波动温度下孵化.不同温度处理下的孵化成功率相同,但孵出幼体表型不同.孵化期随孵化温度升高呈指数式缩短;在相同平均温度下,波动温度孵化卵的孵化期比恒温孵化卵长.在所有被检

  17. Assessing the impacts of changing precipitation and temperature extremes on the current and future ecohydrology of grassland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, N. A.; Nippert, J. B.; Ocheltree, T.

    2012-12-01

    Extreme weather events have profound impacts on water and carbon cycling. However, events of similar magnitude may have very different impacts depending upon the timing of the event in the phenological cycle. We assess these impacts of extreme daily weather events including precipitation, maximum and minimum temperature using data collected from the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research site in the central U.S. We utilize the long term weather and biomass collection data at the LTER site to examine the historical variability of extreme events and the impacts on annual carbon dynamics. Timescales of interactions between daily weather and fluxes are quantified through a multiscale information theoretic approach. In addition, we quantify the impacts of the timing and magnitude of extreme events through a Critical Climate Period (CCP) analysis. Results indicate a strong sensitivity to spring precipitation and summer temperature. Using six years of eddy covariance data, we can isolate more of the biophysical mechanisms governing the responses to extreme weather events. Of particular interest is the heat wave of July, 2011, where daily maximum temperatures were over 38 C for 24 consecutive days and resulted in drastically reduced above ground carbon allocation than in previous years. In addition, we employ the Agro-BGC model to assess the biophysical processes responsible for determining the response of water and carbon dynamics to extreme weather events. This is done by employing a stochastic weather generator with prescribed changes in annual precipitation and temperature conistent with GCM projections. Developing a more thorough understanding of extreme events and the differential responses due to the timing and magnitude of the events will potentially assist in the mitigation of future climate change.

  18. On the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on turbulent heat transport in the edge plasma of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudoin, C.; Tamain, P.; Ciraolo, G.; Futtersack, R.; Gallo, A.; Ghendrih, P.; Nace, N.; Norscini, C. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper we study the impact of electron temperature fluctuations in a two-dimensional turbulent model. This modification adds a second linear instability, known as sheath-driven conducting-wall instability, with respect to the previous isothermal model only driven by the interchange instability. Non-linear simulations, backed up by the linear analysis, show that the additional mechanism can change drastically the dynamics of turbulence (scales, density-potential correlation, and statistical momentum). Moreover, its importance relatively to the interchange instability should be more significant in the private flux region than in the main scrape of layer. Its effect on heat transport is also investigated for different regimes of parameters, results show that both instabilities are at play in the heat transport. Finally, the sheath negative resistance instability could be responsible for the existence of corrugated heat flux profiles in the scrape-off layer leading to a multiple decay length. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Logarithmic spatial variations and universal f-1 power spectra of temperature fluctuations in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; van Gils, Dennis P M; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-05-02

    We report measurements of the temperature variance σ(2)(z,r) and frequency power spectrum P(f,z,r) (z is the distance from the sample bottom and r the radial coordinate) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) for Rayleigh numbers Ra = 1.6 × 10(13) and 1.1 × 10(15) and for a Prandtl number Pr ≃ 0.8 for a sample with a height L = 224 cm and aspect ratio D/L=0.50 (D is the diameter). For z/L ≲ 0.1 σ(2)(z,r) was consistent with a logarithmic dependence on z, and there was a universal (independent of Ra, r, and z) normalized spectrum which, for 0.02 ≲ fτ(0) ≲ 0.2, had the form P(fτ(0)) = P(0)(fτ(0))(-1) with P(0) = 0.208 ± 0.008 a universal constant. Here τ(0) = sqrt[2R] where R is the radius of curvature of the temperature autocorrelation function C(τ) at τ = 0. For z/L ≃ 0.5 the measurements yielded P(fτ(0))∼(fτ(0))(-α) with α in the range from 3/2 to 5/3. All the results are similar to those for velocity fluctuations in shear flows at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, suggesting the possibility of an analogy between the flows that is yet to be determined in detail.

  20. Evaluation of large-scale meteorological patterns associated with temperature extremes in the NARCCAP regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loikith, Paul C.; Waliser, Duane E.; Lee, Huikyo; Neelin, J. David; Lintner, Benjamin R.; McGinnis, Seth; Mearns, Linda O.; Kim, Jinwon

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale meteorological patterns (LSMPs) associated with temperature extremes are evaluated in a suite of regional climate model (RCM) simulations contributing to the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. LSMPs are characterized through composites of surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and 500 hPa geopotential height anomalies concurrent with extreme temperature days. Six of the seventeen RCM simulations are driven by boundary conditions from reanalysis while the other eleven are driven by one of four global climate models (GCMs). Four illustrative case studies are analyzed in detail. Model fidelity in LSMP spatial representation is high for cold winter extremes near Chicago. Winter warm extremes are captured by most RCMs in northern California, with some notable exceptions. Model fidelity is lower for cool summer days near Houston and extreme summer heat events in the Ohio Valley. Physical interpretation of these patterns and identification of well-simulated cases, such as for Chicago, boosts confidence in the ability of these models to simulate days in the tails of the temperature distribution. Results appear consistent with the expectation that the ability of an RCM to reproduce a realistically shaped frequency distribution for temperature, especially at the tails, is related to its fidelity in simulating LMSPs. Each ensemble member is ranked for its ability to reproduce LSMPs associated with observed warm and cold extremes, identifying systematically high performing RCMs and the GCMs that provide superior boundary forcing. The methodology developed here provides a framework for identifying regions where further process-based evaluation would improve the understanding of simulation error and help guide future model improvement and downscaling efforts.

  1. Extreme climatic events: impacts of drought and high temperature on physiological processes in agronomically important plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eFeller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate models predict more frequent and more severe extreme events (e.g. heat waves, extended drought periods, flooding in many regions for the next decades. The impact of adverse environmental conditions on crop plants is ecologically and economically relevant. This review is focused on drought and heat effects on physiological status and productivity of agronomically important plants. Stomatal opening represents an important regulatory mechanism during drought and heat stress since it influences simultaneously water loss via transpiration and CO2 diffusion into the leaf apoplast which further is utilized in photosynthesis. Along with the reversible short-term control of stomatal opening, stomata and leaf epidermis may produce waxy deposits and irreversibly down-regulate the stomatal conductance and non-stomatal transpiration. As a consequence photosynthesis will be negatively affected. Rubisco activase - a key enzyme in keeping the Calvin cycle functional – is heat-sensitive and may become a limiting factor at elevated temperature. The accumulated reactive oxygen species during stress represent an additional challenge under unfavorable conditions. Drought and heat cause accumulation of free amino acids which are partially converted into compatible solutes such as proline. This is accompanied by lower rates of both nitrate reduction and de novo amino acid biosynthesis. Protective proteins (e.g. dehydrins, chaperones, antioxidant enzymes or the key enzyme for proline biosynthesis play an important role in leaves and may be present at higher levels under water deprivation or high temperatures. On the whole plant level, effects on long-distance translocation of solutes via xylem and phloem and on leaf senescence (e.g. anticipated, accelerated or delayed senescence are important. The factors mentioned above are relevant for the overall performance of crops under drought and heat and must be considered for genotype selection and breeding programs.

  2. Choice of optimal working fluid for binary power plants at extremely low temperature brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.; Sorokina, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    The geothermal energy development problems based on using binary power plants utilizing lowpotential geothermal resources are considered. It is shown that one of the possible ways of increasing the efficiency of heat utilization of geothermal brine in a wide temperature range is the use of multistage power systems with series-connected binary power plants based on incremental primary energy conversion. Some practically significant results of design-analytical investigations of physicochemical properties of various organic substances and their influence on the main parameters of the flowsheet and the technical and operational characteristics of heat-mechanical and heat-exchange equipment for binary power plant operating on extremely-low temperature geothermal brine (70°C) are presented. The calculation results of geothermal brine specific flow rate, capacity (net), and other operation characteristics of binary power plants with the capacity of 2.5 MW at using various organic substances are a practical interest. It is shown that the working fluid selection significantly influences on the parameters of the flowsheet and the operational characteristics of the binary power plant, and the problem of selection of working fluid is in the search for compromise based on the priorities in the field of efficiency, safety, and ecology criteria of a binary power plant. It is proposed in the investigations on the working fluid selection of the binary plant to use the plotting method of multiaxis complex diagrams of relative parameters and characteristic of binary power plants. Some examples of plotting and analyzing these diagrams intended to choose the working fluid provided that the efficiency of geothermal brine is taken as main priority.

  3. Extreme maximum temperature events and their relationships with large-scale modes: potential hazard on the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Andrés; Martín, M. L.; Fernández-González, S.; Sánchez, J. L.; Valero, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze spatiotemporal distribution of maximum temperatures in the Iberian Peninsula (IP) by using various extreme maximum temperature indices. Thresholds for determining temperature extreme event (TEE) severity are defined using 99th percentiles of daily temperature time series for the period 1948 to 2009. The synoptic-scale fields of such events were analyzed in order to better understand the related atmospheric processes. The results indicate that the regions with a higher risk of maximum temperatures are located in the river valleys of southwest and northeast of the IP, while the Cantabrian coast and mountain ranges are characterized by lower risk. The TEEs were classified, by means of several synoptic fields (sea level pressure, temperature, and geopotential height at 850 and 500 hPa), in four clusters that largely explain their spatiotemporal distribution on the IP. The results of this study show that TEEs mainly occur associated with a ridge elongated from Subtropical areas. The relationships of TEEs with teleconnection patterns, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Western Mediterranean Oscillation (WeMO), and Mediterranean Oscillation (MO), showed that the interannual variability of extreme maximum temperatures is largely controlled by the dominant phase of WeMO in all seasons except wintertime where NAO is prevailing. Results related to MO pattern show less relevance in the maximum temperatures variability. The correct identification of synoptic patterns linked with the most extreme temperature event associated with each cluster will assist the prediction of events that can pose a natural hazard, thereby providing useful information for decision making and warning systems.

  4. Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Observations of the Temperature Structure of the Quiet Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, David H; Williams, David R; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    We present a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6 to 6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of Iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1" pixels...

  5. PRTs and Their Bonding for Long-Duration, Extreme-Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Cucullu, Gordon C., III; Mikhaylov, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Research was conducted on the qualification of Honeywell platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) bonding for use in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This is the first time these sensors will be used for Mars-related projects. Different types of PRTs were employed for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project, and several reliability issues were experienced, even for a shortduration mission like MER compared to MSL. Therefore, the development of a qualification process for the Honeywell PRT bonding was needed for the MSL project. Reliability of the PRT sensors, and their bonding processes, is a key element to understand the health of the hardware during all stages of the project, and particularly during surface operations on Mars. Three extreme temperature summer season cycles and three winter season cycles (total: 1983 thermal cycles) were completed, and no Honeywell PRT failures associated with the bonding process were found. Seventy-eight PRTs were bonded onto six different substrate materials using four different adhesives during the thermal cycling, which included a planetary protection cycle to +125 C for two hours, three protoflight/qualification cycles (-135 to 70 C), 1,384 summer cycles (-105 to 40 C), and 599 winter cycles (-130 to 15 C). There were no observed changes in PRT resistances, bonding characteristics, or damage identified from the package evaluation as a result of the qualification tests.

  6. Temperature and extreme rainfalls on France in a climatic change scenario; Temperature et precipitations extremes sur la france dans un scenario de changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deque, M

    2007-07-01

    Impact of an anthropogenic climate change scenario on the frequency distribution of temperature and precipitation over France is studied with a numerical simulation calibrated with observed daily data from the synoptic network. (author)

  7. Analysis and Comparison of Trends in Extreme Temperature Indices in Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 1985–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S. Alghamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study employed the time series of thirteen extreme temperature indices over the period 1985–2010 to analyze and compare temporal trends at two weather stations in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. The trend analysis showed warming of the local air for the city. Significant increasing trends were found in annual average maximum and minimum temperatures, maximum of minimum temperature, warm nights, and warm days for an urban and a rural station. Significant decreasing trends were detected in the number of cool nights and cool days at both stations. Comparison of the trends suggests that, in general, the station closer to the city center warmed at a slower rate than the rural station. Significant differences were found in a lot of the extreme temperature indices, suggesting that urbanization and other factors may have had negative effects on the rate of warming at the urban station.

  8. Simulations of The Extreme Precipitation Event Enhanced by Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly over the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakan Doǧan, Onur; Önol, Barış

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul Technical University, Aeronautics and Astronautics Faculty, Meteorological Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey In this study, we examined the extreme precipitation case over the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey by using regional climate model, RegCM4. The flood caused by excessive rain in August 26, 2010 killed 12 people and the landslides in Rize province have damaged many buildings. The station based two days total precipitation exceeds 200 mm. One of the usual suspects for this extreme event is positive anomaly of sea surface temperature (SST) over the Black Sea where the significant warming trend is clear in the last three decades. In August 2010, the monthly mean SST is higher than 3 °C with respect to the period of 1981-2010. We designed three sensitivity simulations with RegCM4 to define the effects of the Black Sea as a moisture source. The simulation domain with 10-km horizontal resolution covers all the countries bordering the Black Sea and simulation period is defined for entire August 2010. It is also noted that the spatial variability of the precipitation produced by the reference simulation (Sim-0) is consistent with the TRMM data. In terms of analysis of the sensitivity to SST, we forced the simulations by subtracting 1 °C (Sim-1), 2 °C (Sim-2) and 3 °C (Sim-3) from the ERA-Interim 6-hourly SST data (considering only the Black Sea). The sensitivity simulations indicate that daily total precipitation for all these simulations gradually decreased based on the reference simulation (Sim-0). 3-hourly maximum precipitation rates for Sim-0, Sim-1, Sim-2 and Sim-3 are 32, 25, 13 and 10.5 mm respectively over the hotspot region. Despite the fact that the simulations signal points out the same direction, degradation of the precipitation intensity does not indicate the same magnitude for all simulations. It is revealed that 2 °C (Sim-2) threshold is critical for SST sensitivity. We also calculated the humidity differences from the simulation and these

  9. Mechanism of early-summer low-temperature extremes in Japan projected by a nonhydrostatic regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Murata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the mechanisms associated with projected early-summer low-temperature extremes in Japan at the end of the 21st century by means of a well-developed nonhydrostatic regional climate model under the A1B scenario provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change-Special Report on Emission Scenario. The projected surface air temperature reveals that even in a climate warmer than that at present, extremely low daily minimum temperatures in early summer are comparable to those in the present climate at several locations. At locations where future low temperatures are remarkable, the temperature drop at night is larger in the future than at present. This temperature drop results from mainly two heat fluxes: upward longwave radiation and latent heat flux. In the future climate, upward longwave radiation increases owing to high temperature at the surface around the time of the sunset. In addition, the upward flux of latent heat increases owing to low relative humidity just above the surface. These dryer conditions are associated with lower relative humidity at 850 hPa, suggesting the effects of synoptic systems. These two fluxes act to reduce the surface temperature, and hence surface air temperature.

  10. Trends in extreme temperature indices in Huang-Huai-Hai River Basin of China during 1961-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Yan, Denghua; He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhang, Cheng; Xing, Ziqiang; Kan, Guangyuan; Qin, Tianling; Ren, Minglei; Li, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature extremes have been investigated in Huang-Huai-Hai (HHH) region based on the daily series of temperature observations from 162 meteorological stations. A total of 11 indices were used to assess the changes of temperature pattern. Linear trend analyses revealed that the daily maximum temperature (TXx) increased at α = 0.05 level with a magnitude of 0.15 °C per decade on the regional scale during the period of 1961-2014. More pronounced warming trend of the daily minimum temperature (TNn) was detected at a rate of 0.49 °C per decade (α = 0.01 level). Consequently, a decreasing trend of the temperature range of TXx and TNn (extreme temperature range) was observed. The frequency of hot days (TXf90) and annual average of warm events (warm spell duration indicator, WSDI) showed significant increasing trends, while that of cold nights (TNf10) and cold events (cold spell duration indicator, CSDI) showed opposite behaviors. Both warm winter (W-W) and hot summer (H-S) series displayed significant increasing trends at α = 0.01 confidence level. The cold winter (C-W) series showed a decreasing trend at α = 0.01 confidence level, while the cool summer (C-S) series showed a nonsignificant decreasing trend that is not passing the 90% confidence level (α = 0.1). Abrupt increments of warm­related extremes (TXx, TXf90, WSDI) have been detected since 1990s, and a steadily decreasing trend of cold related extremes (TNf10, CSDI) was found since 1970s. Ten hot summers out of 11 and nine warm winters out of 10 occurred after 1990s. Altitude has a large impact on spatial pattern of extreme temperature indices, and the urban heat island effect also has an impact on amplitude of variation in extreme temperature. Trend magnitudes are significantly larger at sites with high altitudes for warm­related indices (TXx, TXf90, WSDI), while those involving cold-related indices (TNn, TNf10) are remarkably larger for stations with low

  11. How extreme are extremes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  12. Recent changes in daily precipitation and surface air temperature extremes in mainland Portugal, in the period 1941-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Santo, Fátima Espírito; Ramos, Alexandre M.; de Lima, João L. M. P.

    2013-06-01

    Changes in the climatology of precipitation and surface air temperature are being investigated worldwide, searching for changes in variability, the mean and extreme events (maximum and minimum). By exploring recent adjustments in the climate of mainland Portugal, particularly in the intensity, frequency and duration of extreme events, this study investigates trends in selected specific indices that are calculated from daily precipitation data from 57 and surface air temperature data from 23 measuring stations scattered across the territory. Special attention is paid to regional differences and variations in seasonality. The data cover the periods 1941-2007 for precipitation, and 1941-2006 for temperature. They are explored at the annual and seasonal scales and for different sub-periods. Results show that trends in annual precipitation indices are generally weak and, overall, not statistically significant at the 5% level. Nevertheless, a decreasing trend is revealed by regional indices of total wet-day precipitation and extreme precipitation (above the 99th percentile). Seasonal precipitation exhibits significant decreasing trends in spring precipitation, while extreme heavy precipitation events, in terms of both magnitude and frequency, have become more pronounced in autumn. Results for winter and summer suggest that the extremes have not suffered any significant aggravation. Trends for air temperature are statistically more significant and marked than for precipitation and indicate general warming across the territory. This warming trend is revealed very consistently by the time series of individual stations and regional mean temperature, and is also consistent with the findings reported in other studies for Portugal and at the European scale.

  13. CAREER: Hydrothermal vent flow and temperature fluctuations: exploring long-term variability through an integrated research and education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, D.

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic scintillation system was built in partnership with ASL Environmental Sciences (Sidney BC Canada), which provided a unique opportunity for two engineering undergraduate students to live and work abroad. The acoustic instrumentation was tested in coastal waters and then deployed to study deep-sea hydrothermal plume dynamics. Undergraduate students were involved in the deployment of instrumentation and the development of processing software to give vertical velocities and temperature fluctuations from a vigorous hydrothermal vent. A graduate student thesis has yielded insights into the vertical and azimuthal dependence of entrainment and into plume bending and rise height. Teachers and Ocean Science Bowl students also participated in research cruises describing physical oceanography of estuaries, coastal waters, and deep-sea hydrothermal vents and participated in data collection, processing and analysis. Teachers used the knowledge they gained to develop creative educational curricula at their schools, to present their experiences at national conferences and to publish an article in the National Science Teachers Association - The Science Journal. One of the teachers was recently recognized with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Working with the ocean bowl team at Oconee County High School has led to top ten placements in the national championships in 2005 (fourth place) and 2006 (sixth place). In order to increase quantitative methods in an undergraduate class, students acquire data from an ocean observatory and analyze the data for specific quantities of interest. One such project led to the calculation of the upper ocean heat content for the Greenland Sea using 7 years of Argo profiles, which showed a 0.04oC/year trend. These results were then published in JGR.

  14. Future trend of extreme value distributions of wintertime surface air temperatures over Korea and the associated physical changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Cho, Chun-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Daily winter temperatures in Korea have been analyzed via CSEOF analysis. Then, each PC time series was detrended and was fitted to an AR (autoregressive) model. Based on the identified AR model, an artificial time series of arbitrary length can be generated by using an arbitrary white-noise time series. In this way, one hundred new sets of PC time series were generated over the period of 1973-2058. Then, the trend for each PC time series was added back to the artificial PC time series extending the trend until 2058. Ultimately, artificial daily winter temperatures in Korea have been constructed by using the artificial PC time series and the original loading vectors derived from the observational data. The 100 new data sets have been investigated in order to understand the winter temperature variability 50 years into the future. Regression analysis in CSEOF space shows that temperature increase in Korea is associated with increased 850-hPa air temperature over most of the Asian domain (97°-153°E × 22°-73°N) and increased 850-hPa geopotential height in the southern part of the domain. As a result, southerly and southeasterly wind anomalies develop carrying positive temperature anomalies northward and northwestward. Both the 200-hPa air temperature and geopotential height changes indicate that there will be fairly significant northward shift of the jet stream in future. The standard deviation of the 200-hPa potential vorticity increases implying that shortwave trough and henceforth baroclinic instability will increase in future. Finally, GEV (Generalized Extreme Value) distribution and GPD (Generalized Pareto distribution) distribution have been compared between the observational records and the future records of the same length. The extreme value distributions based on the synthetic datasets show that warm extreme events will be more extreme in future and cold extreme events, on the other hand, will be less extreme. This study provides an estimate of future

  15. A Stable, Extreme Temperature, High Radiation, Compact. Low Power Clock Oscillator for Space, Geothermal, Down-Hole & other High Reliability Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Efficient and stable clock signal generation requirements at extreme temperatures and high radiation are not met with the current solutions. Chronos Technology...

  16. CYTOGENETIC AND MOLECULAR RESPONSES OF AMMONIUM SULPHATE APPLICATION FOR TOLERANCE TO EXTREME TEMPERATURES IN VICIA FABA L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öney, S; Tabur, S; Tuna, M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of ammonium sulphate [(NH4)2SO4] on mitosis, cell cycle and chromosomes in Vicia faba L. seeds exposed to extreme temperatures were investigated using flowcytometric and cytogenetic analysis. Seeds germinated at high and low temperatures showed a signiicant decrease in mitotic index as compared to those of optimum temperature conditions. Application of 50 and 1000 µM (NH4)2SO4 were successful in alleviating the negative effects of low and high temperature on mitotic activity, respectively. 50 µM (NH4)2SO4 showed the most positive effect on cell cycle at the extreme temperatures. This concentration increased the cell division removing or decreasing the negative effects of temperature stress. Namely, the highest G2/M and S phase percentages under stress conditions were obtained with application of 50 µM (NH4)2SO4. Chromosomal aberrations were not observed in cells of seeds germinated in distilled water and also at any temperatures. However, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations increased significantly by increasing (NH4)2SO4 concentration. The highest aberration frequency in all temperature degree tested was found at 1000 µM (NH4)2SO4 concentration.

  17. Main periodicities of the minimum extreme temperature of three stations near the Mexican Pacific coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, B.; Maravilla, D. [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: blanca@geofisica.unam.mx; Jauregui, E. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-01-15

    Three minimum extreme temperature series from meteorological stations located in or near the Mexican Pacific coast, Acapulco, Comitan and Manzanillo, are spectrally analyzed. The series cover a period from 1941 to 1981. The spectral analysis indicates that a significant quasiquinquenial periodicity ({approx}5 years) is present in Comitan and Manzanillo, even more, Acapulco also shows a frequency {approx} 5 year if the uncertainties are taken into account. This spectral peak can be considered either as related to solar activity or to strong El Nino events. The remaining periodicities can be associated to meteorological phenomena like El Nino and the quasi-biennial oscillation or to some solar activity phenomena. Furthermore, the behavior deduced from a coherence spectral analysis between the temperature and the Southern Oscillation Index, considered as a proxy of El Nino, and sunspot number, considered as a proxy of solar activity, indicates that the stations closer to the ocean might be more influenced by El Nino than by solar activity, while the station inland has both influences. [Spanish] Se analizan espectralmente tres series de temperatura minima extrema de las estaciones meteorologicas localizadas en o cerca de la costa del Pacifico mexicano: Acapulco, Comitan y Manzanillo. Las series tienen una longitud de 41 anos, abarcando los anos de 1941 a 1981. Del analisis se observa que existe una periodicidad cuasi-quinquenal significativa en los espectros de Comitan y Manzanillo, Acapulco tambien presenta una periodicidad cercana a los 5 anos si se toman en cuenta las incertidumbres. Este pico espectral pudiera estar relacionado con eventos fuertes de El Nino o bien con la actividad solar. Las otras periodicidades encontradas tal vez estan asociadas con fenomenos tales como la oscilacion cuasi-bienal o El Nino, o bien con fenomenos solares. Aunado a esto, los resultados del analisis de coherencia espectral entre la temperatura y la Oscilacion del Sur, considerada un

  18. Resilience of coral calcification to extreme temperature variations in the Kimberley region, northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandan, S. S.; Falter, J. L.; Lowe, R. J.; McCulloch, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    We report seasonal changes in coral calcification within the highly dynamic intertidal and subtidal zones of Cygnet Bay (16.5°S, 123.0°E) in the Kimberley region of northwest Australia, where the tidal range can reach nearly 8 m and the temperature of nearshore waters ranges seasonally by ~9 °C from a minimum monthly mean of ~22 °C to a maximum of over 31 °C. Corals growing within the more isolated intertidal sites experienced maximum temperatures of up to ~35 °C during spring low tides in addition to being routinely subjected to high levels of irradiance (>1500 µmol m-2 s-1) under near stagnant conditions. Mixed model analysis revealed a significant effect of tidal exposure on the growth of Acropora aspera, Dipsastraea favus, and Trachyphyllia geoffroyi ( p ≤ 0.04), as well as a significant effect of season on A. aspera and T. geoffroyi ( p ≤ 0.01, no effect on D. favus); however, the growth of both D. favus and T. geoffroyi appeared to be better suited to the warm summer conditions of the intertidal compared to A. aspera. Through an additional comparative study, we found that Acropora from Cygnet Bay calcified at a rate 69 % faster than a species from the same genus living in a backreef environment of a more typical tropical reef located 1200 km southwest of Cygnet Bay (0.59 ± 0.02 vs. 0.34 ± 0.02 g cm-2 yr-1 for A. muricata from Coral Bay, Ningaloo Reef; p < 0.001, df = 28.9). The opposite behaviour was found for D. favus from the same environments, with colonies from Cygnet Bay calcifying at rates that were 33 % slower than the same species from Ningaloo Reef (0.29 ± 0.02 vs. 0.44 ± 0.03 g cm-2 yr-1, p < 0.001, df = 37.9). Our findings suggest that adaption and/or acclimatization of coral to the more thermally extreme environments at Cygnet Bay is strongly taxon dependent.

  19. Trends and variability of daily and extreme temperature and precipitation in the Caribbean region, 1961-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T. L.; Stephenson, T. S.; Vincent, L.; Van Meerbeeck, C.; McLean, N.

    2013-05-01

    A workshop was held at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, in May 2012 to build capacity in climate data rescue and to enhance knowledge about climate change in the Caribbean region. Scientists brought their daily surface temperature and precipitation data for an assessment of quality and homogeneity and for the preparation of climate change indices helpful for studying climate change in their region. This study presents the trends in daily and extreme temperature and precipitation indices in the Caribbean region for records spanning the 1961-2010 and 1986-2010 intervals. Overall, the results show a warming of the surface air temperature at land stations. Region-wide, annual means of the daily minimum temperatures (+1.4°C) have increased more than the annual means of the daily m