WorldWideScience

Sample records for extreme environmental stresses

  1. Environmental Sustainability of Agriculture Stressed by Changing Extremes of Drought and Excess Moisture: A Conceptual Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Wheaton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As the climate changes, the effects of agriculture on the environment may change. In the future, an increasing frequency of climate extremes, such as droughts, heat waves, and excess moisture, is expected. Past research on the interaction between environment and resources has focused on climate change effects on various sectors, including agricultural production (especially crop production, but research on the effects of climate change using agri-environmental indicators (AEI of environmental sustainability of agriculture is limited. The aim of this paper was to begin to address this knowledge gap by exploring the effects of future drought and excess moisture on environmental sustainability of agriculture. Methods included the use of a conceptual framework, literature reviews, and an examination of the climate sensitivities of the AEI models. The AEIs assessed were those for the themes of soil and water quality, and farmland management as developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Additional indicators included one for desertification and another for water supply and demand. The study area was the agricultural region of the Canadian Prairie Provinces. We found that the performance of several indicators would likely decrease in a warming climate with more extremes. These indicators with declining performances included risks for soil erosion, soil salinization, desertification, water quality and quantity, and soil contamination. Preliminary trends of other indicators such as farmland management were not clear. AEIs are important tools for measuring climate impacts on the environmental sustainability of agriculture. They also indicate the success of adaptation measures and suggest areas of operational and policy development. Therefore, continued reporting and enhancement of these indicators is recommended.

  2. Ecological model of competitive interaction among three species of amphipods associated to Bryocladia thrysigera (J. Agardh and extreme environmental stress effects

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    Máurea Nicoletti Flynn

    Full Text Available Population rates of the three dominant amphipod species (Hyale nigra, Caprella danileviskii and Caprella penantis associated to Bryocladia thrysigera, were calculated revealing similar values for the intrinsic growth rate. The empirical data modeled presented a good fit to the May-Leonard three-species competition model in a discrete Ricker form with periodic cycles for the carrying capacity. In adjusting model to data, a new method to calculate competition coefficients emerged in good agreement with ecological and behavior particularities. A simulation of environmental stochasticity was achieved by the insertion of random parameters for the calculation of each species carrying capacity. H. nigra presented a persistent behavior in extreme environmental stress, whereas C. penantis is highly sensitive to stress.

  3. environmental stress indicators system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Therefore, if proper measures are not adopted in time, the current weak sustainability will lead ... land area as a transit basis for the carrying capacity of productivity and ..... results we know that environmental stress grew synchronously with ...

  4. Stress fractures in the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Ferco H. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jonge, Milko C. de [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.maas@amc.uva.nl

    2007-04-15

    Stress fractures are fatigue injuries of bone usually caused by changes in training regimen in the population of military recruits and both professional and recreational athletes. Raised levels of sporting activity in today's population and refined imaging technologies have caused a rise in reported incidence of stress fractures in the past decades, now making up more than 10% of cases in a typical sports medicine practice. Background information (including etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatment and prevention) as well as state of the art imaging of stress fractures will be discussed to increase awareness amongst radiologists, providing the tools to play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of stress fractures. Specific fracture sites in the lower extremity will be addressed, covering the far majority of stress fracture incidence. Proper communication between treating physician, physical therapist and radiologist is needed to obtain a high index of suspicion for this easily overlooked entity. Radiographs are not reliable for detection of stress fractures and radiologist should not falsely be comforted by them, which could result in delayed diagnosis and possibly permanent consequences for the patient. Although radiographs are mandatory to rule out differentials, they should be followed through when negative, preferably by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as this technique has proven to be superior to bone scintigraphy. CT can be beneficial in a limited number of patients, but should not be used routinely.

  5. Survival and longevity improvements at extreme ages: an interpretation assuming an ecological stress theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Peter A

    2007-04-01

    The primary determinant of survival during aging is the energetic efficiency and metabolic stability required to counter the accumulated internal and external stresses of a lifetime. Hence, genetically stress-resistant individuals should accumulate with age; frailer, less robust, less energetically efficient and less metabolically stable individuals should succumb in parallel. This selection process implies the accumulation of energetically efficient stress-resistant individuals with age to the exclusion of all others. High additive genetic variability for survival is expected under extreme circumstances, however there is limited evidence close to the absolute extremes of life that diversity may fall. At this stage, only a few highly adaptive, oxidative-stress-resistant and presumably somewhat homozygous genotypes should remain. Therefore a fall in variability may occur in these outliers, when frailer individuals are unable to cope and are eliminated at extreme ages. This process could provide an explanation of mortality-rate declines in domesticated (laboratory) and free-living populations of the extremely old. That is, mortality-rate declines may be an expectation from a process of genetic sorting resulting from the accumulated responses to environmental stress over time. Application of an ecological stress theory of aging, which combines the external stresses to which organisms are exposed with internal stresses, appears to be the prerequisite for this conclusion.

  6. [Guidelines on asthma in extreme environmental conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnic, Franchek; Borderías Clau, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent chronic disease which, if not properly controlled, can limit the patient's activities and lifestyle. In recent decades, owing to the diffusion of educational materials, the application of clinical guidelines and, most importantly, the availability of effective pharmacological treatment, most patients with asthma are now able to lead normal lives. Significant social changes have also taken place during the same period, including more widespread pursuit of sporting activities and tourism. As a result of these changes, individuals with asthma can now participate in certain activities that were inconceivable for these patients only a few years ago, including winter sports, underwater activities, air flight, and travel to remote places with unusual environmental conditions (deserts, high mountain environments, and tropical regions). In spite of the publication of several studies on this subject, our understanding of the effects of these situations on patients with asthma is still limited. The Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) has decided to publish these recommendations based on the available evidence and expert opinion in order to provide information on this topic to both doctors and patients and to avert potentially dangerous situations that could endanger the lives of these patients.

  7. Evolution Under Environmental Stress at Macro- and Microscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-01-01

    Environmental stress has played a major role in the evolution of living organisms (Hoffman AA, Parsons PA. 1991. Evolutionary genetics and environmental stress. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Parsons PA. 2005. Environments and evolution: interactions between stress, resource inadequacy, and energetic efficiency. Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 80:589–610). This is reflected by the massive and background extinctions in evolutionary time (Nevo E. 1995a. Evolution and extinction. Encyclopedia of Environmental Biology. New York: Academic Press, Inc. 1:717–745). The interaction between organism and environment is central in evolution. Extinction ensues when organisms fail to change and adapt to the constantly altering abiotic and biotic stressful environmental changes as documented in the fossil record. Extreme environmental stress causes extinction but also leads to evolutionary change and the origination of new species adapted to new environments. I will discuss a few of these global, regional, and local stresses based primarily on my own research programs. These examples will include the 1) global regional and local experiment of subterranean mammals; 2) regional experiment of fungal life in the Dead Sea; 3) evolution of wild cereals; 4) “Evolution Canyon”; 5) human brain evolution, and 6) global warming. PMID:21979157

  8. Evolution under environmental stress at macro- and microscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-01-01

    Environmental stress has played a major role in the evolution of living organisms (Hoffman AA, Parsons PA. 1991. Evolutionary genetics and environmental stress. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Parsons PA. 2005. Environments and evolution: interactions between stress, resource inadequacy, and energetic efficiency. Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 80:589-610). This is reflected by the massive and background extinctions in evolutionary time (Nevo E. 1995a. Evolution and extinction. Encyclopedia of Environmental Biology. New York: Academic Press, Inc. 1:717-745). The interaction between organism and environment is central in evolution. Extinction ensues when organisms fail to change and adapt to the constantly altering abiotic and biotic stressful environmental changes as documented in the fossil record. Extreme environmental stress causes extinction but also leads to evolutionary change and the origination of new species adapted to new environments. I will discuss a few of these global, regional, and local stresses based primarily on my own research programs. These examples will include the 1) global regional and local experiment of subterranean mammals; 2) regional experiment of fungal life in the Dead Sea; 3) evolution of wild cereals; 4) "Evolution Canyon"; 5) human brain evolution, and 6) global warming.

  9. Whole lot of parts: stress in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, G Daniel

    2005-06-01

    Stress has been a central interest for researchers of human behavior in extreme and unusual environments and also for those who are responsible for planning and carrying out expeditions involving such environments. This paper compares the actuarial and case study methods for predicting reactions to stress. Actuarial studies are useful, but do not tap enough variables to allow us to predict how a specific individual will cope with the rigors of an individual mission. Case histories provide a wealth of detail, but few investigators understand the challenges of properly applying this method. This study reviews some of the strengths and weaknesses of the actuarial and case history methods, and presents a four celled taxonomy of stress based on method (actuarial and case history) and effects (distress and eustress). For both research and operational purposes, the person, the setting, and time should not be considered independently; rather, it is an amalgam of these variables that provides the proper basis of analysis.

  10. What are extreme environmental conditions and how do organisms cope with them?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John C. WINGFIELD; J. Patrick KELLEY; Frédéric ANGELIER

    2011-01-01

    Severe environmental conditions affect organisms in two major ways. The environment may be predictably severe such as in deserts, polar and alpine regions, or individuals may be exposed to temporarily extreme conditions through weather, presence of predators, lack of food, social status etc. Existence in an extreme environment may be possible, but then to breed or molt in addition can present major bottlenecks that have resulted in the evolution of hormone-behavior adaptations to cope with unpredictable events. Examples of hormone-behavior adaptations in extreme conditions include attenuated testosterone secretion because territoriality and excess courtship may be too costly when there is one opportunity to reproduce. The individual may even become insensitive to testosterone when target areas of the brain regulating reproductive behavior no longer respond to the hormone. A second example is reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids following acute stress during the breeding season or molt that allows successful reproduction and/or a vital renewal of the integument to endure extreme conditions during the rest of the year. Reduced sensitivity could involve: (a) modulated response of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, (b) reduced sensitivity to high glucocorticoid levels, or (c) a combination of (a) and (b). Moreover, corticosteroid binding proteins (CBP) buffer responses to stress by reducing the movement of glucocorticoids into target cells. Finally, intracellular enzymes (11β-hydroxysteroid dehy-drogenase and variants) can deactivate glucocorticoids entering cells thus reducing interaction with receptors. These mechanisms have important implications for climate change and increasing extremes of weather.

  11. Adrenocortical stress responses influence an invasive vertebrate's fitness in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Tim S; Letnic, Mike; Webb, Jonathan K; Dempster, Tim

    2013-10-07

    Continued range expansion into physiologically challenging environments requires invasive species to maintain adaptive phenotypic performance. The adrenocortical stress response, governed in part by glucocorticoid hormones, influences physiological and behavioural responses of vertebrates to environmental stressors. However, any adaptive role of this response in invasive populations that are expanding into extreme environments is currently unclear. We experimentally manipulated the adrenocortical stress response of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) to investigate its effect on phenotypic performance and fitness at the species' range front in the Tanami Desert, Australia. Here, toads are vulnerable to overheating and dehydration during the annual hot-dry season and display elevated plasma corticosterone levels indicative of severe environmental stress. By comparing unmanipulated control toads with toads whose adrenocortical stress response was manipulated to increase acute physiological stress responsiveness, we found that control toads had significantly reduced daily evaporative water loss and higher survival relative to the experimental animals. The adrenocortical stress response hence appears essential in facilitating complex phenotypic performance and setting fitness trajectories of individuals from invasive species during range expansion.

  12. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

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    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  13. Environmental stresses disrupt telomere length homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Hagit Romano

    Full Text Available Telomeres protect the chromosome ends from degradation and play crucial roles in cellular aging and disease. Recent studies have additionally found a correlation between psychological stress, telomere length, and health outcome in humans. However, studies have not yet explored the causal relationship between stress and telomere length, or the molecular mechanisms underlying that relationship. Using yeast as a model organism, we show that stresses may have very different outcomes: alcohol and acetic acid elongate telomeres, whereas caffeine and high temperatures shorten telomeres. Additional treatments, such as oxidative stress, show no effect. By combining genome-wide expression measurements with a systematic genetic screen, we identify the Rap1/Rif1 pathway as the central mediator of the telomeric response to environmental signals. These results demonstrate that telomere length can be manipulated, and that a carefully regulated homeostasis may become markedly deregulated in opposing directions in response to different environmental cues.

  14. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Disorders of Extreme Stress (DESNOS) symptoms following prostitution and childhood abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunjung; Klein, Carolin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Hoon-Jin

    2009-08-01

    With the participation of 46 prostituted women in Korea, this study investigates the relationship between prostitution experiences, a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and disorders of extreme stress not otherwise specified (DESNOS). Prostituted women showed higher levels of PTSD and DESNOS symptoms compared to a control group. Women who had experienced both CSA by a significant other and prostitution showed the highest levels of traumatic stress. However, posttraumatic reexperiencing and avoidance and identity, relational, and affect regulation problems were significant for prostitution experiences even when the effects of CSA were controlled.

  15. Extreme Precision Environmental Control for Next Generation Radial Velocity Spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur K.; Hearty, Fred; Levi, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matt; Halverson, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radial velocity precisions of order 10cm/s will enable the discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. Temperature and pressure variations inside a spectrograph can lead to thermomechanical instabilities in the optics and mounts, and refractive index variations in both the optical elements as well as the surrounding air. Together, these variations can easily induce instrumental drifts of several tens to hundreds of meters per second. Enclosing the full optical train in thermally stabilized high-vacuum environments minimizes such errors. In this talk, I will discuss the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrograph: a near infrared (NIR) facility class instrument we will commission at the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2016. The ECS will maintain the HPF optical bench stable at 180K at the sub milli-Kelvin level on the timescale of days, and at the few milli-Kelvin level over months to years. The entire spectrograph is kept under high-quality vacuum (compensated for with an actively controlled radiation shield outfitted with custom feedback electronics. High efficiency Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blankets, and a passive external thermal enclosure further isolate the optics from ambient perturbations. This environmental control scheme is versatile, suitable to stabilize both next generation NIR, and optical spectrographs. I will show how we are currently testing this control system for use with our design concept of the Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS), the next generation optical spectrograph for the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our most recent results from full-scale stability tests will be presented.

  16. What are extreme environmental conditions and how do organisms cope with them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. WINGFIELD, J. Patrick KELLEY, Frédéric ANGELIER

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe environmental conditions affect organisms in two major ways. The environment may be predictably severe such as in deserts, polar and alpine regions, or individuals may be exposed to temporarily extreme conditions through weather, presence of predators, lack of food, social status etc. Existence in an extreme environment may be possible, but then to breed or molt in addition can present major bottlenecks that have resulted in the evolution of hormone-behavior adaptations to cope with unpredictable events. Examples of hormone-behavior adaptations in extreme conditions include attenuated testosterone secretion because territoriality and excess courtship may be too costly when there is one opportunity to reproduce. The individual may even become insensitive to testosterone when target areas of the brain regulating reproductive behavior no longer respond to the hormone. A second example is reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids following acute stress during the breeding season or molt that allows successful reproduction and/or a vital renewal of the integument to endure extreme conditions during the rest of the year. Reduced sensitivity could involve: (a modulated response of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, (b reduced sensitivity to high glucocorticoid levels, or (c a combination of (a and (b. Moreover, corticosteroid binding proteins (CBP buffer responses to stress by reducing the movement of glucocorticoids into target cells. Finally, intracellular enzymes (11b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and variants can deactivate glucocorticoids entering cells thus reducing interaction with receptors. These mechanisms have important implications for climate change and increasing extremes of weather [Current Zoology 57 (3: 363–374, 2011].

  17. Biomonitor of Environmental Stress: Coral Trace Metal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumet, N.; Hughen, K.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical reef corals are extremely sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and, as a result of environmental degradation and global climate change, coral reefs around the globe are severely threatened. Increased human population and development in tropical regions is leading to higher turbidity and silt loading from terrestrial runoff, increased pesticides and nutrients from agricultural land-use and sewage, and the release of toxic trace metals to coastal waters from industrial pollution. The uptake of these metals and nutrients within the coral skeletal aragonite is a sensitive biomonitor of environmental stresses on coral health. We analyzed 18 trace metals from the surface of coral skeletons collected in Bermuda, Indonesia and Belize to assess a range of threats to coral reef health - including climate change, agricultural runoff and pesticides, and coastal development and tourism. This surface sample network also includes samples representing 4 different coral species. Trace metal analysis was performed on an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to a high degree of accuracy and precision at extremely low (ppb) concentrations using a protocol we developed for samples less than 2 mg. Proper cleaning techniques were employed to minimize blank level concentrations for ultra-trace metal ICP-MS solution analysis. However, Zn/Ca and Ni/Ca concentrations remain below analytical detection limits. Initial results indicate that sea surface temperature proxies (e.g., Sr/Ca, B/Ca and Mg/Ca) display similar ratios between the different sites, whereas those metals associated with anthropogenic activities, such as Co, Pb and Cu, are site-specific and are linked to individual environmental stressors. Results from this study will be applied to down core trace metal records in the future. In doing so, we aim to understand the impacts of compounding environmental stresses on coral health, and to identify regional threshold values beyond which corals

  18. Resilience under conditions of extreme stress: a multilevel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante

    2010-10-01

    Resilience has been conceptualized as a dynamic developmental process encompassing the attainment of positive adaptation within the context of significant threat, severe adversity, or trauma. Until the past decade, the empirical study of resilience predominantly focused on behavioral and psychosocial correlates of, and contributors to, the phenomenon and did not examine neurobiological or genetic correlates of and contributors to resilience. Technological advances in molecular genetics and neuroimaging, and in measuring other biological aspects of behavior, have made it more feasible to begin to conduct research on pathways to resilient functioning from a multilevel perspective. Child maltreatment constitutes a profound immersion in severe stress that challenges and frequently impairs development across diverse domains of biological and psychological functioning. Research on the determinants of resilience in maltreated children is presented as an illustration of empirical work that is moving from single-level to multilevel investigations of competent functioning in the face of adversity and trauma. These include studies of personality, neural, neuroendocrine, and molecular genetic contributors to resilient adaptation. Analogous to neural plasticity that takes place in response to brain injury, it is conjectured that it may be possible to conceptualize resilience as the ability of individuals to recover functioning after exposure to extreme stress. Multilevel randomized control prevention and intervention trials have substantial potential for facilitating the promotion of resilient functioning in diverse high-risk populations that have experienced significant adversity. Determining the multiple levels at which change is engendered through randomized control trials will provide insight into the mechanisms of change, the extent to which neural plasticity may be promoted, and the interrelations between biological and psychological processes in the development of

  19. Dissociative symptomatology in posttraumatic stress disorder and disorders of extreme stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Marla; Spinazzola, Joseph; Blaustein, Margaret; van der Kolk, Bessel A

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess differences in dissociative symptoms in adults with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) vs. PTSD plus Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS). This study was done for two reasons: (1) to better understand the clinical profile of DESNOS clients in order to inform more effective treatment, and (2) to further empirical research on the validity of the DESNOS construct. To assess severity of dissociative symptoms, the authors administered the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) to 155 participants with PTSD. Using the Structured Interview for Disorders of Extreme Stress (SIDES), participants were divided into two groups: those who also met criteria for DESNOS and those who did not. DES means are provided for the two groups. Participants with PTSD plus DESNOS scored higher than participants with only PTSD on the measure of dissociative symptomatology, particularly on the DES scales that tap absorption/fantasy and depersonalization/derealization. The two groups did not differ on the amnesia subscale of the DES. Findings support the construct validity of the DESNOS concept and further delineate the clinical profiles of community-based PTSD with and without DESNOS, thus contributing to the knowledge base on the assessment of complex adaptations to trauma.

  20. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-03

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV.

  1. Anticipating environmental and environmental-health implications of extreme storms: ARkStorm scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Alpers, Charles N.; Morman, Suzette A.; San Juan, Carma A.

    2016-01-01

    The ARkStorm Scenario predicts that a prolonged winter storm event across California would cause extreme precipitation, flooding, winds, physical damages, and economic impacts. This study uses a literature review and geographic information system-based analysis of national and state databases to infer how and where ARkStorm could cause environmental damages, release contamination from diverse natural and anthropogenic sources, affect ecosystem and human health, and cause economic impacts from environmental-remediation, liability, and health-care costs. Examples of plausible ARkStorm environmental and health concerns include complex mixtures of contaminants such as petroleum, mercury, asbestos, persistent organic pollutants, molds, and pathogens; adverse physical and contamination impacts on riverine and coastal marine ecosystems; and increased incidences of mold-related health concerns, some vector-borne diseases, and valley fever. Coastal cities, the San Francisco Bay area, the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, parts of the Central Valley, and some mountainous areas would likely be most affected. This type of screening analysis, coupled with follow-up local assessments, can help stakeholders in California and disaster-prone areas elsewhere better plan for, mitigate, and respond to future environmental disasters.

  2. Analysis of Environmental Stress Factors Using an Artificial Growth System and Plant Fitness Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meonghun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The environment promotes evolution. Evolutionary processes represent environmental adaptations over long time scales; evolution of crop genomes is not inducible within the relatively short time span of a human generation. Extreme environmental conditions can accelerate evolution, but such conditions are often stress inducing and disruptive. Artificial growth systems can be used to induce and select genomic variation by changing external environmental conditions, thus, accelerating evolution. By using cloud computing and big-data analysis, we analyzed environmental stress factors for Pleurotus ostreatus by assessing, evaluating, and predicting information of the growth environment. Through the indexing of environmental stress, the growth environment can be precisely controlled and developed into a technology for improving crop quality and production.

  3. Analysis of environmental stress factors using an artificial growth system and plant fitness optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meonghun; Yoe, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The environment promotes evolution. Evolutionary processes represent environmental adaptations over long time scales; evolution of crop genomes is not inducible within the relatively short time span of a human generation. Extreme environmental conditions can accelerate evolution, but such conditions are often stress inducing and disruptive. Artificial growth systems can be used to induce and select genomic variation by changing external environmental conditions, thus, accelerating evolution. By using cloud computing and big-data analysis, we analyzed environmental stress factors for Pleurotus ostreatus by assessing, evaluating, and predicting information of the growth environment. Through the indexing of environmental stress, the growth environment can be precisely controlled and developed into a technology for improving crop quality and production.

  4. Uncertainty related to Environmental Data and Estimated Extreme Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    The design loads on rubble mound breakwaters are almost entirely determined by the environmental conditions, i.e. sea state, water levels, sea bed characteristics, etc. It is the objective of sub-group B to identify the most important environmental parameters and evaluate the related uncertaintie...

  5. Resistance to Extreme Stresses in the Tardigrada: Experiments on Earth and in Space and Astrobiological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecchi, L.; Altiero, T.; Guidetti, R.; Cesari, M.; Rizzo, A. M.; Bertolani, R.

    2010-04-01

    The ability of tardigrades to enter cryptobiosis al-lows them to resist to extreme stresses: very low or high temperatures, chemicals, high pressure, ionizing and UV radiations This has lead to propose tardigrades as suitable model in space research.

  6. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-), which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  7. Prebiotic cell membranes that survive extreme environmental pressure conditions.

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    Kapoor, Shobhna; Berghaus, Melanie; Suladze, Saba; Prumbaum, Daniel; Grobelny, Sebastian; Degen, Patrick; Raunser, Stefan; Winter, Roland

    2014-08-04

    Attractive candidates for compartmentalizing prebiotic cells are membranes comprised of single-chain fatty acids. It is generally believed that life may have originated in the depth of the protoocean, that is, under high hydrostatic pressure conditions, but the structure and physical-chemical properties of prebiotic membranes under such conditions have not yet been explored. We report the temperature- and pressure-dependent properties of membranes composed of prebiotically highly-plausible lipids and demonstrate that prebiotic membranes could not only withstand extreme temperatures, but also serve as robust models of protocells operating in extreme pressure environments. We show that pressure not only increases the stability of vesicular systems but also limits their flexibility and permeability to solutes, while still keeping the membrane in an overall fluid-like and thus functional state. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Proteomic responses of fruits to environmental stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhulong eChan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables are extremely susceptible to decay and easily lose commercial value after harvest. Different strategies have been developed to control postharvest decay and prevent quality deterioration during postharvest storage, including cold storage, controlled atmosphere, and application of biotic and abiotic stimulus. In this review, mechanisms related to protein level responses of host side and pathogen side were characterized. Protein extraction protocols have been successfully developed for recalcitrant, low protein content fruit tissues. Comparative proteome profiling and functional analysis revealed that defense related proteins, energy metabolism and antioxidant pathway played important roles in fruits in response to storage conditions and exogenous elicitor treatments. Secretome of pathogenic fungi has been well investigated and the results indicated that hydrolytic enzymes were the key virulent factors for the pathogen infection. These protein level changes shed new light on interaction among fruits, pathogens and environmental conditions. Potential postharvest strategies to reduce risk of fruit decay were further proposed based on currently available proteomic data.

  9. Trends in Extremes of Surface Humidity, Temperature, and Summertime Heat Stress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the past half century, the mean summertime temperature in China has increased, with nights warm ing more than days. Using surface station observations, we show that the frequency of extreme heat-stress events in China, caused by extremely hot and humid days as well as by heatwaves lasting for a few days, has increased over the period from 1951 to 1994. When humidity is high, hot weather can cause heat stress in humans. The increased heat-stress trend may pose a public health problem.

  10. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  11. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  12. Going Extreme For Small Solutions To Big Environmental Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagwell, Christopher E.

    2011-03-31

    This chapter is devoted to the scale, scope, and specific issues confronting the cleanup and long-term disposal of the U.S. nuclear legacy generated during WWII and the Cold War Era. The research reported is aimed at complex microbiological interactions with legacy waste materials generated by past nuclear production activities in the United States. The intended purpose of this research is to identify cost effective solutions to the specific problems (stability) and environmental challenges (fate, transport, exposure) in managing and detoxifying persistent contaminant species. Specifically addressed are high level waste microbiology and bacteria inhabiting plutonium laden soils in the unsaturated subsurface.

  13. Evolution Under Environmental Stress at Macro- and Microscales

    OpenAIRE

    Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-01-01

    Environmental stress has played a major role in the evolution of living organisms (Hoffman AA, Parsons PA. 1991. Evolutionary genetics and environmental stress. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Parsons PA. 2005. Environments and evolution: interactions between stress, resource inadequacy, and energetic efficiency. Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 80:589?610). This is reflected by the massive and background extinctions in evolutionary time (Nevo E. 1995a. Evolution and extinction. Encyclopedia of Env...

  14. Extreme environmental testing of a rugged correlated photon source

    CERN Document Server

    Grieve, James A; Ling, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in long distance quantum key distribution have motivated the development of ruggedised single photon sources, capable of producing useful correlations even when removed from the warm, nurturing environment found in most optics laboratories. As part of an ongoing pro- gramme to place such devices into low earth orbit (LEO), we have developed and built a number of rugged single photon sources based on spontaneous parametric downconversion. In order to evalu- ate device reliability, we have subjected our design to various thermal, mechanical and atmospheric stresses. Our results show that while such a device may tolerate launch into orbit, operation in orbit and casual mishandling by graduate students, it is probably unable to survive the forcible disassembly of a launch vehicle at the top of a ball of rapidly expanding and oxidising kerosene and liquid oxygen.

  15. Nematodynamics modelling under extreme mechanical and electric stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoddeo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystals confined in asymmetric π-cells and subjected to intense electrical and mechanical stresses undergo strong distortions which can be relaxed by means of the order reconstruction, a fast switching mechanism connecting topologically different textures, assuming bulk and/or surface characteristics depending on both amplitude of the applied electric fields and anchoring angles of the nematic molecules on the confining surfaces. In the frame of the Landau-de Gennes order tensor theory, we provide a numerical model implemented with a moving mesh finite element method appropriate to describe the nematic order dynamics, allowing to map the switching properties of the nematic texture.

  16. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Reale

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD, have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a

  17. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahanov L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leamor Kahanov,1 Lindsey E Eberman,2 Kenneth E Games,2 Mitch Wasik2 1College of Health Science, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, USA; 2Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA Abstract: Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. Keywords: medial tibial stress syndrome, stress injury, nonunion stress fracture

  18. Monitoring percieves stress, recovery and non-traumatic lower extremity injuries in competitive runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, R.T.A.; Brink, M.S.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Runners often sustain lower extremity injuries (19-79%) (van Gent et al, 2007). In a theoretical model it has been described that a disturbance in perceived stress and recovery can increase the risk of sustaining an injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). Therefore, the purpose of this stud

  19. Long-Term Maternal Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms Related to Developmental Outcome of Extremely Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerach, Gadi; Elsayag, Adi; Shefer, Shahar; Gabis, Lidia

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we examined the relations between the severity of developmental outcomes of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) children and their mothers' stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, 4-16 years after birth. Israeli mothers (N = 78) of a cohort of extremely premature infants (24-27 weeks) born 4-16 years earlier were asked to report about the medical and developmental condition of their child and their current perceived stress and PTSD symptoms. Results show that mothers of ELBW children with normal development reported the lowest perceived stress compared with mothers of ELBW children with developmental difficulties. We also found that 25.6% of the mothers had the potential to suffer from PTSD following the birth of an ELBW child. Furthermore, the severity of prematurity developmental outcomes made a significant contribution to mothers' perceived stress. To sum, mothers of ELBW infants' perceived stress is related to their children's severity of prematurity developmental outcomes, 4-16 years after birth. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Impact of prenatal environmental stress on cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji eIshii

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to various types of environmental stress increases susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Given that even subtle perturbations by prenatal environmental stress in the cerebral cortex impair the cognitive and memory functions, this review focuses on underlying molecular mechanisms of pathological cortical development. We especially highlight recent works that utilized animal exposure models, human specimens or/and induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells to demonstrate: 1. molecular mechanisms shared by various types of environmental stressors, 2. the mechanisms by which the affected extracortical tissues indirectly impact the cortical development and function, and 3. interaction between prenatal environmental stress and the genetic predisposition of neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss current challenges for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the role of environmentally disturbed molecular expressions in cortical maldevelopment, knowledge of which may eventually facilitate discovery of interventions for prenatal environment-linked neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  2. Resistance of Microorganisms to Extreme Environmental Conditions and Its Contribution to Astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabulo Henrique Rampelotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, substantial changes have occurred regarding what scientists consider the limits of habitable environmental conditions. For every extreme environmental condition investigated, a variety of microorganisms have shown that not only can they tolerate these conditions, but that they also often require these extreme conditions for survival. Microbes can return to life even after hundreds of millions of years. Furthermore, a variety of studies demonstrate that microorganisms can survive under extreme conditions, such as ultracentrifugation, hypervelocity, shock pressure, high temperature variations, vacuums, and different ultraviolet and ionizing radiation intensities, which simulate the conditions that microbes could experience during the ejection from one planet, the journey through space, as well as the impact in another planet. With these discoveries, our knowledge about the biosphere has grown and the putative boundaries of life have expanded. The present work examines the recent discoveries and the principal advances concerning the resistance of microorganisms to extreme environmental conditions, and analyzes its contributions to the development of the main themes of astrobiology: the origins of life, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the dispersion of life in the Universe.

  3. Global crop yield response to extreme heat stress under multiple climate change futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryng, D.; Conway, D.; Ramankutty, N.; Price, J.; Warren, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heat stress during the crop reproductive period can be critical for crop productivity. Projected changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events are expected to negatively impact crop yields and global food production. This study applies the global crop model PEGASUS to quantify, for the first time at the global scale, impacts of extreme heat stress on maize, spring wheat and soybean yields resulting from 72 climate change scenarios for the 21st century. Our results project maize to face progressively worse impacts under a range of RCPs but spring wheat and soybean to improve globally through to the 2080s due to CO2 fertilization effects, even though parts of the tropic and sub-tropic regions could face substantial yield declines. We find extreme heat stress at anthesis (HSA) by the 2080s (relative to the 1980s) under RCP 8.5, taking into account CO2 fertilization effects, could double global losses of maize yield (dY = -12.8 ± 6.7% versus -7.0 ± 5.3% without HSA), reduce projected gains in spring wheat yield by half (dY = 34.3 ± 13.5% versus 72.0 ± 10.9% without HSA) and in soybean yield by a quarter (dY = 15.3 ± 26.5% versus 20.4 ± 22.1% without HSA). The range reflects uncertainty due to differences between climate model scenarios; soybean exhibits both positive and negative impacts, maize is generally negative and spring wheat generally positive. Furthermore, when assuming CO2 fertilization effects to be negligible, we observe drastic climate mitigation policy as in RCP 2.6 could avoid more than 80% of the global average yield losses otherwise expected by the 2080s under RCP 8.5. We show large disparities in climate impacts across regions and find extreme heat stress adversely affects major producing regions and lower income countries.

  4. Applied Stress Affecting the Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is affected by the mode of applied stress, i.e., tension, compression, or torsion. The cracking is measured in terms of initiation time to nucleate a crack or time to failure. In a simple uniaxial loading under tension or compression, it is observed that the initiation time can vary in orders of magnitude depending on the alloy and the environment. Fracture can be intergranular or transgranular or mixed mode. Factors that affect SCC are solubility of the metal into surrounding chemical solution, and diffusion rate (like hydrogen into a tensile region) of an aggressive element into the metal and liquid metallic elements in the grain boundaries. Strain hardening exponent that affects the local internal stresses and their gradients can affect the diffusion kinetics. We examine two environments (Ga and 3.5 pct NaCl) for the same alloy 7075-T651, under constant uniaxial tension and compression load. These two cases provide us application to two different governing mechanisms namely liquid metal embrittlement (7075-Ga) and hydrogen-assisted cracking (7075-NaCl). We note that, in spite of the differences in their mechanisms, both systems show similar behavior in the applied K vs crack initiation time plots. One common theme among them is the transport mechanism of a solute element to a tensile-stress region to initiate fracture.

  5. Environmental Stress: Usaha Mengatasi Stress yang Bersumber dari Lingkungan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Atosökhi Gea

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There are times where human relationships with the surrounding environment takes place in a state of balance, so as not to cause pressure against him for human life. But there is also time to balance the relationship is disturbed by various events that often exceed the limits of human adaptability. This last condition arises either by events beyond human control, such as natural disasters or events that arise as a result of human engagement itself, such as over-exploitation of nature and creation of various technology products. The events that happened outside the human self has become a source of stress, which is sometimes understood as external conditions that suppress human adaptation and demanding, and sometimes also understood as a human response to external conditions, which showed special signs, either on the physical, psychological as well as on the visible behavior. Faced with the events that potentially lead to stress, humans need to do assessments leading to a positive attitude toward the stimulus. In addition it should also be developed in ways that help to achieve the adaptation that produces a good balance and lower levels of stress itself. Better anticipation can also be reached in which humans make important changes, mainly related to the views and treatment of the natural environment, and attitudes in developing and utilizing technology, especially related to the negative impacts caused.  

  6. Environmental and perceived stress in Australian dental undergraduates: Preliminary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Astill

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dental students have reported a high prevalence of psychological stress and the causes are associated with the challenging dental environmental and demographic factors. This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation on dental students’ stress status, using a sample of first-to-third-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in an Australian university. Special interests included causes of dental environmental stress and access to help services. Methods. A sample of 145 students was surveyed with a modified Dental Environmental Survey and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale in 2014. The participants’ demographic information was also collected. Results. The response rate was 95.4%. Second-year (P = 0.042, third-year (P < 0.001 and employed students (P = 0.027 were more likely to report stress resulting from transition to clinical learning. Third-year students were more often stressed about communicating and approaching staff (P = 0.023 as well as different opinions between staff (P < 0.001 and reduced holidays (P < 0.001. Students that were younger than 21 years of age (P = 0.001, that were first years (P < 0.001, and that were not in a relationship (P = 0.010 more often found difficulty of course work stressful. Students who were not in a relationship more often considered learning manual dexterity a source of stress (P = 0.034. Students previously seeking professional help were more likely to be stressed (P = 0.010. Conclusion. Causes of dental environment stress varied among years of study and demographic backgrounds. Professional support to stressed students should be enhanced. Further investigation is indicated.

  7. Does extreme environmental severity promote plant facilitation? An experimental field test in a subtropical coastal dune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, Camila T; Oliveira, Alexandre A; Prado, Paulo Inácio K L

    2015-07-01

    The stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) postulates how the balance between plant competition and facilitation shifts along environmental gradients. Early formulations of the SGH predicted that facilitation should increase monotonically with stress. However, a recent theoretical refinement of the SGH postulates stronger facilitation under moderate stress, followed by a decreasing role of facilitation in the most severe environments. We conducted field experiments along the most severe part of a coastal dune gradient in southeast Brazil to test the effect of stress on the intensity and importance of the net interactions between two tree species. First, we compared the performance of distinct life stages of Ternstroemia brasiliensis in the presence and absence of Guapira opposita adults along a beach-to-inland gradient, a gradient of environmental severity. To test the effect of one stress factor in particular, we also manipulated water availability, a limiting resource due to the sandy soils. At the most severe part of the coastal gradient (i.e. closest to the seashore), both intensity and importance of the interaction between G. opposita and T. brasiliensis were negatively related to stress, with a pattern consistent across distinct life stages of the target species. However, the sign of the net interaction depended on the life stage of the target species. Our results provide empirical evidence that the role of facilitation tends to wane, leading to neutral or even negative net interactions between species as stress reaches its maximum, as predicted by the recent refinements of the SGH.

  8. The influence of wheelchair propulsion hand pattern on upper extremity muscle power and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Jonathan S; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-06-14

    The hand pattern (i.e., full-cycle hand path) used during manual wheelchair propulsion is frequently classified as one of four distinct hand pattern types: arc, single loop, double loop or semicircular. Current clinical guidelines recommend the use of the semicircular pattern, which is based on advantageous levels of broad biomechanical metrics implicitly related to the demand placed on the upper extremity (e.g., lower cadence). However, an understanding of the influence of hand pattern on specific measures of upper extremity muscle demand (e.g., muscle power and stress) is needed to help make such recommendations, but these quantities are difficult and impractical to measure experimentally. The purpose of this study was to use musculoskeletal modeling and forward dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of the hand pattern used on specific measures of upper extremity muscle demand. The simulation results suggest that the double loop and semicircular patterns produce the most favorable levels of overall muscle stress and total muscle power. The double loop pattern had the lowest full-cycle and recovery-phase upper extremity demand but required high levels of muscle power during the relatively short contact phase. The semicircular pattern had the second-lowest full-cycle levels of overall muscle stress and total muscle power, and demand was more evenly distributed between the contact and recovery phases. These results suggest that in order to decrease upper extremity demand, manual wheelchair users should consider using either the double loop or semicircular pattern when propelling their wheelchairs at a self-selected speed on level ground.

  9. Environmental Assessment for the Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite Beddown and Deployment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Fish and Wildlife Service Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite Final Environmental Assessment v VIF Vehicle Integration Facility WMO World...Vehicle Mate Operations Upon arrival on CCAFS, the transporter would take the encapsulated payload to the Vehicle Integration Facility ( VIF ), which...is located just south of LC-41 (Figure 2-2). At the VIF , the encapsulated payload would be mated to the Atlas V Launch Vehicle (LV) using a mobile

  10. Environmental Stress Response and Adaptation Mechanisms in Rhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kajić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are bacteria that can fixate atmospheric nitrogen in association within the root or the stem nodules of legume plants and transform atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Soil environmental conditions are critical factors for the persistence and survival of rhizobia in the soil. The changes in the rhizosphere environment can affect both growth and saprophytic competence, which will influence competitiveness and persistence. Environmental stress imposes a major threat to symbiotic nitrogen fixation and agriculture that can be limited by soil and climatic factors such as salinity, drought, temperature, acidity/alkalinity and heavy metals. In this review we present several different mechanisms in rhizobia adaptation under stress factors.

  11. The thyroid and environmental stress in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galton, V. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of hyperoxia at ambient pressure on thyroid function and thyroid hormone metabolism have been assessed. Thyroidal activity was depressed in mice and rats by exposure to hyperoxia, due at least in part to a decrease in the rate of secretion of pituitary thyrotropin. The effects of hyperoxia on the peripheral deiodination of thyroxine were dependent on the concentration of oxygen employed and/or the duration of exposure. When significant changes were observed a reduction in the rate of deiodination and in the deiodinative clearance of T sub 4 occurred. Hyperoxia also resulted in a marked fall in circulating T sub 4 concentration and a decrease in T sub 4-binding activity in serum. Many of these effects of hyperoxia were prevented by the concomitant administration of large amounts of Vitamin E. These decreases in thyroid function and T sub 4 metabolism were associated with a decrease in the rate of whole body oxygen consumption. It was concluded that the deleterious effects of oxygen in the rat were not due to an oxygen induced hyperthyroid state in the peripheral tissues. Thyroxine was shown to be essential for survival during acute cold stress.

  12. The impact of environmental stress on male reproductive development in plants: biological processes and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    In plants, male reproductive development is extremely sensitive to adverse climatic environments and (a)biotic stress. Upon exposure to stress, male gametophytic organs often show morphological, structural and metabolic alterations that typically lead to meiotic defects or premature spore abortion and male reproductive sterility. Depending on the type of stress involved (e.g. heat, cold, drought) and the duration of stress exposure, the underlying cellular defect is highly variable and either involves cytoskeletal alterations, tapetal irregularities, altered sugar utilization, aberrations in auxin metabolism, accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS; oxidative stress) or the ectopic induction of programmed cell death (PCD). In this review, we present the critically stress-sensitive stages of male sporogenesis (meiosis) and male gametogenesis (microspore development), and discuss the corresponding biological processes involved and the resulting alterations in male reproduction. In addition, this review also provides insights into the molecular and/or hormonal regulation of the environmental stress sensitivity of male reproduction and outlines putative interaction(s) between the different processes involved.

  13. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Abstract  This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306±22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycli...

  14. Environmental stress, displacement and the challenge of rights protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Zetter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available "Examination of migration histories and current politics in Kenya, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Ethiopia and Ghana sheds light on how rights are articulated for groups and individuals displaced in a context of environmental stress and climate change. Both migration and rights are sensitive issues in these case-study countries, and the conjunction of the two is especially sensitive."

  15. Extreme weather-year sequences have non-additive effects on environmental nitrogen losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javed; Necpalova, Magdalena; Archontoulis, Sotirios V; Anex, Robert P; Bourguignon, Marie; Herzmann, Daryl; Mitchell, David C; Sawyer, John E; Zhu, Qing; Castellano, Michael J

    2017-08-14

    The frequency and intensity of extreme weather years, characterized by abnormal precipitation and temperature, are increasing. In isolation, these years have disproportionately large effects on environmental N losses. However, the sequence of extreme weather years (e.g., wet-dry vs. dry-wet) may affect cumulative N losses. We calibrated and validated the DAYCENT ecosystem process model with a comprehensive set of biogeophysical measurements from a corn-soybean rotation managed at three N fertilizer inputs with and without a winter cover crop in Iowa, USA. Our objectives were to determine: i) how two-year sequences of extreme weather affect two-year cumulative N losses across the crop rotation, and ii) if N fertilizer management and the inclusion of a winter cover crop between corn and soybean mitigate the effect of extreme weather on N losses. Using historical weather (1951-2013), we created nine two-year scenarios with all possible combinations of the driest ('dry'), wettest ('wet'), and average ('normal') weather years. We analyzed the effects of these scenarios following several consecutive years of relatively normal weather. Compared to the normal-normal two-year weather scenario, two-year extreme weather scenarios affected two-year cumulative NO3(-) leaching (range: -93 to +290%) more than N2 O emissions (range: -49 to +18%). The two-year weather scenarios had non-additive effects on N losses: compared to the normal-normal scenario, the dry-wet sequence decreased two-year cumulative N2 O emissions while the wet-dry sequence increased two-year cumulative N2 O emissions. Although dry weather decreased NO3(-) leaching and N2 O emissions in isolation, two-year cumulative N losses from the wet-dry scenario were greater than the dry-wet scenario. Cover crops reduced the effects of extreme weather on NO3(-) leaching but had a lesser effect on N2 O emissions. As the frequency of extreme weather is expected to increase, these data suggest that the sequence of inter

  16. Environmental stress and flowering time: the photoperiodic connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboni, Matteo; Robustelli Test, Alice; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara; Conti, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Plants maximize their chances to survive adversities by reprogramming their development according to environmental conditions. Adaptive variations in the timing to flowering reflect the need for plants to set seeds under the most favorable conditions. A complex network of genetic pathways allows plants to detect and integrate external (e.g., photoperiod and temperature) and/or internal (e.g., age) information to initiate the floral transition. Furthermore different types of environmental stresses play an important role in the floral transition. The emerging picture is that stress conditions often affect flowering through modulation of the photoperiodic pathway. In this review we will discuss different modes of cross talk between stress signaling and photoperiodic flowering, highlighting the central role of the florigen genes in this process.

  17. Responses of Yeast Biocontrol Agents to Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yuan; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing wild species and strains of antagonistic yeast species, is a research topic that has received considerable attention in the literature over the past 30 years. In principle, it represents a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for the management of postharvest decay of fruits, vegetables, and grains. A yeast-based biocontrol system is composed of a tritrophic interaction between a host (commodity), a pathogen, and a yeast species, all of which are affected by environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and UV light as well as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Additionally, during the production process, biocontrol agents encounter various severe abiotic stresses that also impact their viability. Therefore, understanding the ecological fitness of the potential yeast biocontrol agents and developing strategies to enhance their stress tolerance are essential to their efficacy and commercial application. The current review provides an overview of the responses of antagonistic yeast species to various environmental stresses, the methods that can be used to improve stress tolerance and efficacy, and the related mechanisms associated with improved stress tolerance. PMID:25710368

  18. Boron stress response and accumulation potential of the extremely tolerant species Puccinellia frigida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rámila, Consuelo d.P. [Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Contreras, Samuel A.; Di Domenico, Camila [Facultad de Agronomía e Ingeniería Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Molina-Montenegro, Marco A. [Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Áridas (CEAZA), Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Católica del Norte, Larrondo 1281, Coquimbo (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Talca, Avda. Lircay s/n, Talca (Chile); Vega, Andrea [Facultad de Agronomía e Ingeniería Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Handford, Michael [Departmento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Las Palmeras 3425, 7800024 Santiago (Chile); Bonilla, Carlos A. [Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Centro de Desarrollo Urbano Sustentable (CEDEUS), Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); and others

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • P. frigida presents an extremely high boron toxicity threshold. • Restricting uptake and internal tolerance mechanisms could confer boron tolerance. • P. frigida is a boron hyperaccumulator over a wide range of concentrations. • The species has potential for phytoremediation purposes. - Abstract: Phytoremediation is a promising technology to tackle boron toxicity, which restricts agricultural activities in many arid and semi-arid areas. Puccinellia frigida is a perennial grass that was reported to hyperaccumulate boron in extremely boron-contaminated sites. To further investigate its potential for phytoremediation, we determined its response to boron stress under controlled conditions (hydroponic culture). Also, as a first step towards understanding the mechanisms underlying its extreme tolerance, we evaluated the presence and expression of genes related with boron tolerance. We found that P. frigida grew normally even at highly toxic boron concentrations in the medium (500 mg/L), and within its tissues (>5000 mg/kg DW). We postulate that the strategies conferring this extreme tolerance involve both restricting boron accumulation and an internal tolerance mechanism; this is consistent with the identification of putative genes involved in both mechanisms, including the expression of a possible boron efflux transporter. We also found that P. frigida hyperaccumulated boron over a wide range of boron concentrations. We propose that P. frigida could be used for boron phytoremediation strategies in places with different soil characteristics and boron concentrations. Further studies should pave the way for the development of clean and low-cost solutions to boron toxicity problems.

  19. A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Vineet; Stallings, Jonathan D; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-12-01

    Severe cases of environmental or exertional heat stress can lead to varying degrees of organ dysfunction. To understand heat-injury progression and develop efficient management and mitigation strategies, it is critical to determine the thermal response in susceptible organs under different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat, which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal, and extended it to simulate various heat-stress scenarios, including 1) different environmental conditions, 2) exertional heat stress, 3) circadian rhythm effect on the thermal response, and 4) whole body cooling. Our predictions were consistent with published in vivo temperature measurements for all cases, validating our simulations. We observed a differential thermal response in the organs, with the liver experiencing the highest temperatures for all environmental and exertional heat-stress cases. For every 3°C rise in the external temperature from 40 to 46°C, core and organ temperatures increased by ∼0.8°C. Core temperatures increased by 2.6 and 4.1°C for increases in exercise intensity from rest to 75 and 100% of maximal O2 consumption, respectively. We also found differences as large as 0.8°C in organ temperatures for the same heat stress induced at different times during the day. Even after whole body cooling at a relatively low external temperature (1°C for 20 min), average organ temperatures were still elevated by 2.3 to 2.5°C compared with normothermia. These results can be used to optimize experimental protocol designs, reduce the amount of animal experimentation, and design and test improved heat-stress prevention and management strategies.

  20. Protection of the photosynthetic apparatus from extreme dehydration and oxidative stress in seedlings of transgenic tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Almoguera

    Full Text Available A genetic program that in sunflower seeds is activated by Heat Shock transcription Factor A9 (HaHSFA9 has been analyzed in transgenic tobacco seedlings. The ectopic overexpression of the HSFA9 program protected photosynthetic membranes, which resisted extreme dehydration and oxidative stress conditions. In contrast, heat acclimation of seedlings induced thermotolerance but not resistance to the harsh stress conditions employed. The HSFA9 program was found to include the expression of plastidial small Heat Shock Proteins that accumulate only at lower abundance in heat-stressed vegetative organs. Photosystem II (PSII maximum quantum yield was higher for transgenic seedlings than for non-transgenic seedlings, after either stress treatment. Furthermore, protection of both PSII and Photosystem I (PSI membrane protein complexes was observed in the transgenic seedlings, leading to their survival after the stress treatments. It was also shown that the plastidial D1 protein, a labile component of the PSII reaction center, and the PSI core protein PsaB were shielded from oxidative damage and degradation. We infer that natural expression of the HSFA9 program during embryogenesis may protect seed pro-plastids from developmental desiccation.

  1. Genetic and environmental modulation of neurotrophic and anabolic stress response: Counterbalancing forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Marcus K; Carpenter, Jennifer; Stone, Michael; Hernandez, Lisa M; Rauh, Mitchell J; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Granger, Douglas A

    2015-11-01

    The serotonin transporter genetic variant 5HTTLPR influences activation and feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and has been shown to influence the effect of stressful life events on behavioral health. We recently reported that 5HTTLPR modulates cortisol response in healthy military men exposed to intense stress. Less is known of its combined effects with environmental factors in this context, or of its effect on neuroprotective stress responses. In this follow-up study, we examined the unique and combined effects of 5HTTLPR and prior trauma exposure on neuroprotective (salivary nerve growth factor [sNGF]), anabolic (dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate [DHEAS] and testosterone), and catabolic (cortisol) stress responses. Ninety-three healthy, active-duty military men were studied before, during, and 24h after a stressful 12-day survival course. Distinct and interactive effects of 5HTTLPR long allele carriage [L] versus homozygous short allele carriage [SS]) and prior trauma exposure (low versus high) were evaluated, after which a priori group comparisons were performed between hypothesized high resilience (L/low) and low resilience (SS/high) groups. For sNGF, L/low produced the greatest sNGF throughout stress exposure while SS/high demonstrated the smallest; L/high and SS/low bisected these two extremes and were nearly identical to each other (i.e., SS/high < SS/low = L/high < L/low). Thus, 5HTTLPR and prior trauma exposure demonstrated counterbalancing (additive) forces. Similar patterns were found for DHEAS. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report counterbalancing genetic and environmental effects on novel biomarkers related to resilience in humans exposed to real-world stress. These findings have profound implications for health, performance and training in high-stress occupational settings.

  2. Environmental prediction, risk assessment and extreme events: adaptation strategies for the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Peter J; Jian, Jun

    2011-12-13

    The uncertainty associated with predicting extreme weather events has serious implications for the developing world, owing to the greater societal vulnerability to such events. Continual exposure to unanticipated extreme events is a contributing factor for the descent into perpetual and structural rural poverty. We provide two examples of how probabilistic environmental prediction of extreme weather events can support dynamic adaptation. In the current climate era, we describe how short-term flood forecasts have been developed and implemented in Bangladesh. Forecasts of impending floods with horizons of 10 days are used to change agricultural practices and planning, store food and household items and evacuate those in peril. For the first time in Bangladesh, floods were anticipated in 2007 and 2008, with broad actions taking place in advance of the floods, grossing agricultural and household savings measured in units of annual income. We argue that probabilistic environmental forecasts disseminated to an informed user community can reduce poverty caused by exposure to unanticipated extreme events. Second, it is also realized that not all decisions in the future can be made at the village level and that grand plans for water resource management require extensive planning and funding. Based on imperfect models and scenarios of economic and population growth, we further suggest that flood frequency and intensity will increase in the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Yangtze catchments as greenhouse-gas concentrations increase. However, irrespective of the climate-change scenario chosen, the availability of fresh water in the latter half of the twenty-first century seems to be dominated by population increases that far outweigh climate-change effects. Paradoxically, fresh water availability may become more critical if there is no climate change.

  3. The behavior of Kevlar fibers under environmental-stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark Charles

    There are a myriad of mechanisms by which polymers can degrade and fail. It is therefore important to understand the physical mechanics, chemistry, their interactions, and kinetics. This pursuit becomes more than just "academic" because these mechanisms might just change with service conditions (i.e. environment and loading). If one does not understand these processes from the molecular to macroscopic scale it would be exceedingly difficult to gain information from accelerated testing because the mechanisms just might change from one condition to another. The purpose of this study was to probe these processes on scales ranging from molecular to macroscopic in environmental stress conditions. This study reports the results of environmental-stress degradation of Kevlar 49 fibers. The environmental agent of focus was the ubiquitous air pollutant complex NOsb{x}. Other materials and environments were investigated to a lesser extent for purposes of comparison. Mechanical property (i.e., short-term strength, modulus, and creep lifetime) degradation was examined using single fiber, yarn, and epoxy coated yarn (composite) specimens under environmental-stress conditions. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were employed to examine and compare the appearance of fracture features resulting from the various testing conditions. Atomic force microscopy augmented these studies with detailed topographical mappings and measures of the fracture surface frictional and modulus properties. Molecular processes (i.e., chain scission and other mechanical-chemical reactions) were probed by measures of changes in viscosity average molecular weight and the infrared spectra. It was demonstrated that environmental-stress degradation effects do occur in the Kevlar-NOsb{x} gas system. Strength decay in environmentally exposed unloaded fibers was demonstrated and a synergistic response in creep reduced fiber lifetimes by three orders of magnitude at moderate loadings. That is to say, the

  4. Environmental Stress and Pathogen Dynamics in the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Neigel, J.; Gelpi, C. G.

    2016-02-01

    The blue crab Callinectes sapidus is an ecologically and economically valuable species along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts of North America. Throughout its range, the blue crab encounters a diverse array of parasitic and pathogenic microorganisms that have episodic and occasionally severe impacts on population numbers and viability. This makes understanding factors that influence pathogen dynamics, such as host stress, an important priority. To explore the role of environmental stress on the susceptibility of blue crabs to pathogens we screened individuals collected during the summers of 2014 and 2015 for a number of infectious agents. We sampled three life stages (megalopae, juvenile, and adult) from multiple marsh and offshore locations in Louisiana. Duration of stressful environmental conditions at each location was quantified from hourly recordings provided by the Louisiana Coastwide Reference Monitoring System. Pathogenic microorganisms were detected in crabs from multiple locations and multiple years. Some of the variability in prevalence of infection can be explained by exposure to stressful extremes of temperature and salinity during summer months.

  5. Back to the Future -Precipitation Extremes, Climate Variability, Environmental Planning and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    --"The last major climatic oscillation peak was about 1856, or 74 years ago. Practically all of our important railroad and public highway work has been done since that time. Most of our parks systems driveways, and roads of all type for auto travel, in the various States, have been completed within the past 30 years, namely, beginning at the very lowest point of our climatic swing (1900-1910). There is every reason to believe, therefore, as the next 20 years comes on apace, we will witness considerable damage to work done during the past regime of weather."-- Schuman, 1931 At the beginning of the 21st century, as at the beginning of the 20th century, the fundamental question is whether the nation is more prepared for natural disasters today than it was eight decades ago. Indeed, the question is whether the best science, engineering and policy tools are in place to prepare for and respond to extreme events. Changes in the risk and magnitude of extreme precipitation events rank among the most studied impacts, and indicators (symptoms) of climatic variations. Extreme precipitation translates generally into extreme flooding, landslides, collapse of lifeline infrastructure, and the breakdown of public health services among others. In approaching the problem of quantifying the risk and magnitude of extreme precipitation events, there are two major challenges: 1) it is difficult to characterize "observed" (20th century) conditions due to the lack of long-term observations - i.e., short and incomplete historical records; and 2) it is difficult to characterize "predicted" (21st century) conditions due to the lack of skill of precipitation forecasts at spatial and temporal scales meaningful for impact studies, and the short-duration of climate model simulations themselves. The first challenge translates in estimating the probability of occurrence (rare) and magnitude (very large) of events that may have not happened yet. The second challenge is that of quantifying

  6. Optimization Model for Environmental Stress Screening of Electronic Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Environmental stress screening (ESS) is a technological process to reduce the costly early field failure ofelectronic components. This paper builds an optimization model for ESS of electronic components to obtain the optimalESS duration. The failure phenomena of ESS are modeled by mix ed distribution, and optimal ESS duration is definedby maximizing life-cycle cost savings under the condition of meeting reliability requirement.

  7. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Randomized to Stress Dose Hydrocortisone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehal A Parikh

    Full Text Available To compare the effects of stress dose hydrocortisone therapy with placebo on survival without neurodevelopmental impairments in high-risk preterm infants.We recruited 64 extremely low birth weight (birth weight ≤1000 g infants between the ages of 10 and 21 postnatal days who were ventilator-dependent and at high-risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Infants were randomized to a tapering 7-day course of stress dose hydrocortisone or saline placebo. The primary outcome at follow-up was a composite of death, cognitive or language delay, cerebral palsy, severe hearing loss, or bilateral blindness at a corrected age of 18-22 months. Secondary outcomes included continued use of respiratory therapies and somatic growth.Fifty-seven infants had adequate data for the primary outcome. Of the 28 infants randomized to hydrocortisone, 19 (68% died or survived with impairment compared with 22 of the 29 infants (76% assigned to placebo (relative risk: 0.83; 95% CI, 0.61 to 1.14. The rates of death for those in the hydrocortisone and placebo groups were 31% and 41%, respectively (P = 0.42. Randomization to hydrocortisone also did not significantly affect the frequency of supplemental oxygen use, positive airway pressure support, or need for respiratory medications.In high-risk extremely low birth weight infants, stress dose hydrocortisone therapy after 10 days of age had no statistically significant effect on the incidence of death or neurodevelopmental impairment at 18-22 months. These results may inform the design and conduct of future clinical trials.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00167544.

  8. Multi-model ensemble projections of future extreme heat stress on rice across southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liang; Cleverly, James; Wang, Bin; Jin, Ning; Mi, Chunrong; Liu, De Li; Yu, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Extreme heat events have become more frequent and intense with climate warming, and these heatwaves are a threat to rice production in southern China. Projected changes in heat stress in rice provide an assessment of the potential impact on crop production and can direct measures for adaptation to climate change. In this study, we calculated heat stress indices using statistical scaling techniques, which can efficiently downscale output from general circulation models (GCMs). Data across the rice belt in southern China were obtained from 28 GCMs in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) with two emissions scenarios (RCP4.5 for current emissions and RCP8.5 for increasing emissions). Multi-model ensemble projections over the historical period (1960-2010) reproduced the trend of observations in heat stress indices (root-mean-square error RMSE = 6.5 days) better than multi-model arithmetic mean (RMSE 8.9 days) and any individual GCM (RMSE 11.4 days). The frequency of heat stress events was projected to increase by 2061-2100 in both scenarios (up to 185 and 319% for RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively), especially in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River. This increasing risk of exposure to heat stress above 30 °C during flowering and grain filling is predicted to impact rice production. The results of our study suggest the importance of specific adaption or mitigation strategies, such as selection of heat-tolerant cultivars and adjustment of planting date in a warmer future world.

  9. Empirical applications of an environmental stress indicator and the environmental efficiency revolution in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Shen Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, the first aim is to apply the structure of material flow analysis (MFA and ecological footprint model to construct an environmental stress indicator. Secondly, an impact, population, affluence and technology (IPAT analysis is used to resolve indicators related to MFA and resource yield productivity. The research indicates following results: (1 The 2007 per capita ecological deficit in Taiwan is 6.3441 square hm.The figures reflect that productivity and life intensity of residents have exceeded the carrying capacity of Taiwan's ecological economic system. (2 Wealth becomes the most important factor in material needs and pollution discharge. (3 Environmental efficiency and ecological efficiency slowed down dramatically, demonstrating that use of resources and total amount of environmental stress stay at a developmental stage. Therefore, if proper measures are not adopted, the current weak sustainability will lead into the vicious circle which departs from sustainable development.

  10. Sex-specific selection under environmental stress in seed beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinossi-Allibert, I; Arnqvist, G; Berger, D

    2017-01-01

    Sexual selection can increase rates of adaptation by imposing strong selection in males, thereby allowing efficient purging of the mutation load on population fitness at a low demographic cost. Indeed, sexual selection tends to be male-biased throughout the animal kingdom, but little empirical work has explored the ecological sensitivity of this sex difference. In this study, we generated theoretical predictions of sex-specific strengths of selection, environmental sensitivities and genotype-by-environment interactions and tested them in seed beetles by manipulating either larval host plant or rearing temperature. Using fourteen isofemale lines, we measured sex-specific reductions in fitness components, genotype-by-environment interactions and the strength of selection (variance in fitness) in the juvenile and adult stage. As predicted, variance in fitness increased with stress, was consistently greater in males than females for adult reproductive success (implying strong sexual selection), but was similar in the sexes in terms of juvenile survival across all levels of stress. Although genetic variance in fitness increased in magnitude under severe stress, heritability decreased and particularly so in males. Moreover, genotype-by-environment interactions for fitness were common but specific to the type of stress, sex and life stage, suggesting that new environments may change the relative alignment and strength of selection in males and females. Our study thus exemplifies how environmental stress can influence the relative forces of natural and sexual selection, as well as concomitant changes in genetic variance in fitness, which are predicted to have consequences for rates of adaptation in sexual populations. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Protein expression and genetic structure of the coral Porites lobata in an environmentally extreme Samoan back reef: Does host genotype limit phenotypic plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshis, D.J.; Stillman, J.H.; Gates, R.D.; Toonen, R.J.; Smith, L.W.; Birkeland, C.

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which coral reef ecosystems will be impacted by global climate change depends on regional and local differences in corals' susceptibility and resilience to environmental stressors. Here, we present data from a reciprocal transplant experiment using the common reef building coral Porites lobata between a highly fluctuating back reef environment that reaches stressful daily extremes, and a more stable, neighbouring forereef. Protein biomarker analyses assessing physiological contributions to stress resistance showed evidence for both fixed and environmental influence on biomarker response. Fixed influences were strongest for ubiquitin-conjugated proteins with consistently higher levels found in back reef source colonies both pre and post-transplant when compared with their forereef conspecifics. Additionally, genetic comparisons of back reef and forereef populations revealed significant population structure of both the nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial genomes of the coral host (FST = 0.146 P < 0.0001, FST = 0.335 P < 0.0001 for rDNA and mtDNA, respectively), whereas algal endosymbiont populations were genetically indistinguishable between the two sites. We propose that the genotype of the coral host may drive limitations to the physiological responses of these corals when faced with new environmental conditions. This result is important in understanding genotypic and environmental interactions in the coral algal symbiosis and how corals may respond to future environmental changes. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. A Combination of Extreme Environmental Conditions Favor the Prevalence of Endospore-Forming Firmicutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Wunderlin, Tina; Junier, Thomas; Jeanneret, Nicole; Dorador, Cristina; Molina, Veronica; Johnson, David R.; Junier, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    growth could be expected, and phylotypes that are most likely in the state of endospores, in all the sites. In summary, our results suggest that diversified survival strategies, including sporulation and metabolic adaptations, explain the biological success of EFF in geothermal and natural springs, and that multiple extreme environmental factors favor the prevalence of EFF. PMID:27857706

  13. A combination of extreme environmental conditions favor the prevalence of Endospore-forming Firmicutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevasti Filippidou

    2016-11-01

    for which active growth could be expected, and phylotypes that are most likely in the state of endospores, in all the sites. In summary, our results suggest that diversified survival strategies, including sporulation and metabolic adaptations, explain the biological success of EFF in geothermal and natural springs, and that multiple extreme environmental factors favor the prevalence of EFF.

  14. Characterisation of random Gaussian and non-Gaussian stress processes in terms of extreme responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of military land vehicles, random vibration processes generated by all-terrain wheeled vehicles in motion are not classical stochastic processes with a stationary and Gaussian nature. Non-stationarity of processes induced by the variability of the vehicle speed does not form a major difficulty because the designer can have good control over the vehicle speed by characterising the histogram of instantaneous speed of the vehicle during an operational situation. Beyond this non-stationarity problem, the hard point clearly lies in the fact that the random processes are not Gaussian and are generated mainly by the non-linear behaviour of the undercarriage and the strong occurrence of shocks generated by roughness of the terrain. This non-Gaussian nature is expressed particularly by very high flattening levels that can affect the design of structures under extreme stresses conventionally acquired by spectral approaches, inherent to Gaussian processes and based essentially on spectral moments of stress processes. Due to these technical considerations, techniques for characterisation of random excitation processes generated by this type of carrier need to be changed, by proposing innovative characterisation methods based on time domain approaches as described in the body of the text rather than spectral domain approaches.

  15. Habitat diversity and adaptation to environmental stress in encysted embryos of the crustacean Artemia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joshua A Tanguay; Reno C Reyes; James S Clegg

    2004-12-01

    Encysted embryos (cysts) of the brine shrimp, Artemia, provide excellent opportunities for the study of biochemical and biophysical adaptation to extremes of environmental stress in animals. Among other virtues, this organism is found in a wide variety of hypersaline habitats, ranging from deserts, to tropics, to mountains. One adaptation implicated in the ecological success of Artemia is p26, a small heat shock protein that previous evidence indicates plays the role of a molecular chaperone in these embryos. We add to that evidence here. We summarize recently published work on thermal tolerance and stress protein levels in embryos from the San Francisco Bay (SFB) of California inoculated into experimental ponds in southern Vietnam where water temperatures are much higher. New results on the relative contents of three stress proteins (hsp70, artemin and p26) will be presented along with data on cysts of A. tibetiana collected from the high plateau of Tibet about 4.5 km above sea level. Unpublished results on the stress protein artemin are discussed briefly in the context of this paper, and its potential role as an RNA chaperone. Interestingly, we show that the substantial tolerance of A. franciscana embryos to ultraviolet (UV) light does not seem to result from intracellular biochemistry but, rather, from their surrounding thick shell, a biophysical adaptation of considerable importance since these embryos receive heavy doses of UV in nature.

  16. Human beings' adaptability to extreme environmental changes from medical and physical points of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga; Ragulskaya, Maria; Dimitrova, Svetla; Safaraly-Oghlu Babayev, Elchin; Samsonov, Sergey; Med. Dimitry Markov, Of; Nazarova, Of Med. Olga N.; Rudenchik, Evgeny

    The question about features of human reaction on the sharp environmental physical activity (EPA) changes is considered by international group of physicists and physicians on the base of results of monitoring of human health state in different cities spread on latitude and longitude. The typical reaction of human body on the influences, exceeding the organisms' ability to adaptation, is of stress-reaction character. From medical point of view there is no significant difference for human body -what external (EPA) agent shocked an organism (emotional or some physical threats). First attempt of the organism to restore its homeostasis is stress-reaction, being universal for many stress-factors. Its main stages (such as alarm, resistance, and exhaustion) are detectable by different medical equipments, but we tried to find universal, non-traumatic method of daily measurements, enough sensitive and appropriate for observation of people reaction both on weather and space weather (geomagnetic activity) changes. The experiment was based on a method of electrical conductivity measurements of biologically active (acupunctural) points of human skin. The used method (electroacupunctural method by Dr. R.Voll) is very sensitive to current state of an organism and characterize the functional condition of different organs and systems of human body and allows to express so-called "group's health status" in the units, suitable for comparison with meteorological and heliogeophysical parameters. We conduct the parallel investigations as a part of collaborative study in different geographic latitudes-longitudes (Baku:40° 23'43"N -49° 52'56"E, Troitsk (Moscow region): 55° 28'40"N -37° 18'42"E, Yakutsk: 62° 02'00"N -129° 44'00"E). Measurements were carried out on daily basis with permanent group of functionally healthy persons (Moscow -19, Yakutsk -22, CityBaku -12 volunteers). Daily monitoring of nervous, endocrinological, lymphatic systems, blood, lungs, thick and thin intestine

  17. Stress reactivity and personality in extreme sport athletes: The psychobiology of BASE jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasterio, Erik; Mei-Dan, Omer; Hackney, Anthony C; Lane, Amy R; Zwir, Igor; Rozsa, Sandor; Cloninger, C Robert

    2016-12-01

    This is the first report of the psychobiology of stress in BASE jumpers, one of the most dangerous forms of extreme sport. We tested the hypotheses that indicators of emotional style (temperament) predict salivary cortisol reactivity, whereas indicators of intentional goal-setting (persistence and character) predict salivary alpha-amylase reactivity during BASE jumping. Ninety-eight subjects completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) the day before the jump, and 77 also gave salivary samples at baseline, pre-jump on the bridge over the New River Gorge, and post-jump upon landing. Overall BASE jumpers are highly resilient individuals who are highly self-directed, persistent, and risk-taking, but they are heterogeneous in their motives and stress reactivity in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) stress system (cortisol reactivity) and the sympathetic arousal system (alpha-amylase reactivity). Three classes of jumpers were identified using latent class analysis based on their personality profiles, prior jumping experience, and levels of cortisol and alpha-amylase at all three time points. "Masterful" jumpers (class 1) had a strong sense of self-directedness and mastery, extensive prior experience, and had little alpha-amylase reactivity and average cortisol reactivity. "Trustful" jumpers (class 2) were highly cooperative and trustful individuals who had little cortisol reactivity coincident with the social support they experienced prior to jumping. "Courageous" jumpers (class 3) were determined despite anxiety and inexperience, and they had high sympathetic reactivity but average cortisol activation. We conclude that trusting social attachment (Reward Dependence) and not jumping experience predicted low cortisol reactivity, whereas persistence (determination) and not jumping experience predicted high alpha-amylase reactivity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on stress factors: a study in Dictyostelium discoideum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaroli, Andrea; Chessa, Maria Giovanna; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Bianco, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    The development of technologies that generate environmental electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has led public opinion and the scientific community to debate upon the existence of possible effects caused by man-made EMFs on the human population and, more generally, on terrestrial ecosystems. Protozoa are known to be excellent bioassay systems in bioelectromagnetic studies because of their features that combine the reliability of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro ones. For this reason, we examined the possible stressful effects of a 50-Hz, 300-μT extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on the protozoan Dictyostelium discoideum, which was used as it is included in the eight bioassay alternatives to vertebrate models for the study of human disease by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Our results show how a 24-h exposure of D. discoideum cells to ELF-EMF can affect the net fission rate, the activity and presence of the pseudocholinesterase as well as the presence of the heat shock protein-70, while no change in the catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities was observed. However, this effect seems to be transient and all the altered parameters returned to their respective control value after a 24-h stay under dummy exposure conditions.

  19. The Development of a Warm-Weather Relative Stress Index for Environmental Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jill D.; Kalkstein, Laurence S.

    2004-04-01

    The heat stress index (HSI) is a new, comprehensive summer index that evaluates daily relative stress for locations throughout the United States based on deviations from the norm. The index is based on apparent temperature and other derived meteorological variables, including cloud cover, cooling degree-days, and consecutive days of extreme heat. Statistical distributions of meteorological variables are derived for 10-day periods of the annual cycle so that percentile values for each parameter can be determined. The daily percentile values for each variable are then summed, and a statistical distribution is fit to the summed frequencies. The daily HSI value is the percentile associated with the location of the daily summed value under the summation curve. The index is analyzed and spatially verified by comparing intra- and interregional results. Although stations from various climate regions have different criteria defining an excessive heat stress event, neighboring stations typically produce similar HSI results because they are usually affected by the same air mass. To test the effectiveness of the HSI, a relationship between the index results and mortality values is made. Overall, the highest mortality days are associated with the highest HSI values, but high-HSI days are not always associated with high numbers of deaths. A mortality study such as this one is just one of many potential environmental applications of the HSI. Other applications include implementing the index to correlate extreme weather conditions with resource consumption, such as electric-utility load, to determine conditions for which load levels are excessive. The ability to forecast the HSI using a variety of weather forecasting tools has also generated interest within various industries that have a need to issue weather stress advisories, watches, and warnings.

  20. Environmental extremes versus ecological extremes: impact of a massive iceberg on the population dynamics of a high-level Antarctic marine predator†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambert, Thierry; Rotella, Jay J.; Garrott, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme events have been suggested to play a disproportionate role in shaping ecological processes, but our understanding of the types of environmental conditions that elicit extreme consequences in natural ecosystems is limited. Here, we investigated the impact of a massive iceberg on the dynamics of a population of Weddell seals. Reproductive rates of females were reduced, but survival appeared unaffected. We also found suggestive evidence for a prolonged shift towards higher variability in reproductive rates. The annual number of females attending colonies showed unusual swings during the iceberg period, a pattern that was apparently the consequence of changes in sea-ice conditions. In contrast to the dramatic effects that were recorded in nearby populations of emperor penguins, our results suggest that this unusual environmental event did not have an extreme impact on the population of seals in the short-term, as they managed to avoid survival costs and were able to rapidly re-achieve high levels of reproduction by the end of the perturbation. Nevertheless, population projections suggest that even this modest impact on reproductive rates could negatively affect the population in the long run if such events were to occur more frequently, as is predicted by models of climate change. PMID:23015628

  1. Stress evolution in molybdenum/silicon multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, James Mac

    The continued shrinking of microelectronic device size necessitates advances in lithography, including possibly using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light. The Mo/Si multilayer system is a promising candidate for reflective optics at a wavelength of roughly 135 A. However, these multilayers manifest high compressive stresses of approximately -350 MPa, which cause unacceptable distortion of the optical element. The goal of this project was to develop fundamental understanding of the origins of stress during growth of Mo/Si multilayers. A 40-bilayer structure deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering yielded a peak reflectivity of 65.7% at a wavelength of 136 A. We collected the stress data during deposition by in situ substrate curvature measurements using a multiple parallel laser beam technique. We measured large tensile and compressive curvature transients during initial growth of Mo on Si and Si on Mo. However, by sputtering with Kr rather than conventional Ar, it is possible to suppress the compressive transient upon Si deposition and thereby redress the compressive stress. Evidence implies that intermixing and alloying at the Mo-Si interfaces by asymmetric Si diffusion cause the transients. Indeed, Mo/Si multilayers sputtered with Kr exhibit less intermixing and high EUV reflectivity. However, the roughness of the multilayer may limit reflectivity and we therefore compare the roughness of Kr- and Ar-sputtered multilayers. Roughness, which leads to nonspecular scattering is problematic for EUV imaging systems because it decreases the useful throughput of a lithography system. We used x-ray diffraction to characterize the evolution of roughness with increasing number of bilayers in Mo/Si multilayers sputtered by Ar and Kr. By fitting a self-affine model of roughness to the diffuse spectra, we extracted the roughness and in-plane correlation lengths. We find that the lateral length scale of the roughness increases with the number of bilayers; however, the magnitude of the

  2. Color-pattern evolution in response to environmental stress in butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuki eHiyama

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that butterfly wing color patterns have ecological and behavioral functions that evolved through natural selection. However, particular wing color patterns may physiologically be produced in response to environmental stress without significant function. These patterns would represent an extreme expression of phenotypic plasticity and can eventually be fixed genetically in a population. Here, three such cases in butterflies are concisely reviewed and their possible mechanisms of genetic assimilation are discussed. First, certain modified color pattern of Vanessa indica induced by temperature treatments resembles the natural color patterns of its closely related species of the genus Vanessa (sensu stricto. Second, a different type of color-pattern modification can be induced in Vanessa cardui as a result of a general stress response, which is very similar to the natural color pattern of its sister species Vanessa kershawi. Third, a field observation was reported, together with experimental support, to show that the color-pattern diversity of a regional population of Zizeeria maha increased at the northern range margin of this species in response to temperature stress. In these three cases, modified color patterns are unlikely to have significant functions, and these cases suggest that phenotypic plasticity plays an important role in butterfly wing color-pattern evolution. A neutral or non-functional trait can be assimilated genetically if it is linked, like a parasitic trait, with another functional trait. In addition, it is possible that environmental stress causes epigenetic modifications of genes related to color patterns and that their transgenerational inheritance facilitates the process of genetic assimilation of a neutral or non-functional trait.

  3. A New Stress-Based Model of Political Extremism: Personal Exposure to Terrorism, Psychological Distress, and Exclusionist Political Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Halperin, Eran; Sharvit, Keren; Hobfoll, Stevan E.

    2009-01-01

    Does exposure to terrorism lead to hostility toward minorities? Drawing on theories from clinical and social psychology, we propose a stress-based model of political extremism in which psychological distress--which is largely overlooked in political scholarship--and threat perceptions mediate the relationship between exposure to terrorism and…

  4. A New Stress-Based Model of Political Extremism: Personal Exposure to Terrorism, Psychological Distress, and Exclusionist Political Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Halperin, Eran; Sharvit, Keren; Hobfoll, Stevan E.

    2009-01-01

    Does exposure to terrorism lead to hostility toward minorities? Drawing on theories from clinical and social psychology, we propose a stress-based model of political extremism in which psychological distress--which is largely overlooked in political scholarship--and threat perceptions mediate the relationship between exposure to terrorism and…

  5. Monitoring percieves stress, recovery and non-traumatic lower extremity injuries in competitive runners : [24-27 juni 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, R.T.A.; Brink, M.S.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Runners often sustain lower extremity injuries (19-79%) (van Gent et al, 2007). In a theoretical model it has been described that a disturbance in perceived stress and recovery can increase the risk of sustaining an injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). Therefore, the purpose of this stud

  6. Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

  7. DNA and Flavonoids Leach out from Active Nuclei of Taxus and Tsuga after Extreme Climate Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Walter; Schmid, Markus; Treutter, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    Severe over-stresses of climate caused dramatic changes in the intracellular distribution of the flavonoids. This was studied in needles from the current year's growth of the following species and varieties: Tsuga canadensis, Taxus baccata, T. aurea, T. repens, T. nana, and T. compacta. The mode of steady changes in flavonoids was evaluated by microscopic techniques. Most of the flavonoids stain visibly yellow by themselves. The colorless flavanol subgroup can be stained blue by the DMACA reagent. In mid-summer 2013, outstanding high temperatures and intense photo-oxidative irradiation caused in a free-standing tree of Taxus baccata dramatic heat damage in a limited number of cells of the palisade layers. In these cells, the cytoplasm was burned brown. However, the nucleus maintained its healthy "blue" colored appearance which apparently was a result of antioxidant barrier effects by these flavanols. In late May 2014, excessive rainfall greatly affected all study trees. Collectively, in all study trees, a limited number of the mesophyll nuclei from the needless grown in 2013 and 2014 became overly turgid, enlarged in size and the flavanols leached outward through the damaged nuclear membranes. This diffusive stress event was followed one to three days later by a similar efflux of DNA. Such a complete dissolution of the nuclei in young tissues was the most spectacular phenomenon of the present study. As a common feature, leaching of both flavanols and DNA was markedly enhanced with increasing size and age of the cells. There is evidence that signalling flavonoids are sensitized to provide in nuclei and cytoplasm multiple mutual protective mechanisms. However, this well-orchestrated flavonoid system is broken down by extreme climate events.

  8. DNA and Flavonoids Leach out from Active Nuclei of Taxus and Tsuga after Extreme Climate Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Feucht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe over-stresses of climate caused dramatic changes in the intracellular distribution of the flavonoids. This was studied in needles from the current year’s growth of the following species and varieties: Tsuga canadensis, Taxus baccata, T. aurea, T. repens, T. nana, and T. compacta. The mode of steady changes in flavonoids was evaluated by microscopic techniques. Most of the flavonoids stain visibly yellow by themselves. The colorless flavanol subgroup can be stained blue by the DMACA reagent. In mid-summer 2013, outstanding high temperatures and intense photo-oxidative irradiation caused in a free-standing tree of Taxus baccata dramatic heat damage in a limited number of cells of the palisade layers. In these cells, the cytoplasm was burned brown. However, the nucleus maintained its healthy “blue” colored appearance which apparently was a result of antioxidant barrier effects by these flavanols. In late May 2014, excessive rainfall greatly affected all study trees. Collectively, in all study trees, a limited number of the mesophyll nuclei from the needless grown in 2013 and 2014 became overly turgid, enlarged in size and the flavanols leached outward through the damaged nuclear membranes. This diffusive stress event was followed one to three days later by a similar efflux of DNA. Such a complete dissolution of the nuclei in young tissues was the most spectacular phenomenon of the present study. As a common feature, leaching of both flavanols and DNA was markedly enhanced with increasing size and age of the cells. There is evidence that signalling flavonoids are sensitized to provide in nuclei and cytoplasm multiple mutual protective mechanisms. However, this well-orchestrated flavonoid system is broken down by extreme climate events.

  9. Phase transformations and residual stresses in environmental barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan J.

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are promising materials for high-temperature structural applications in turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) were developed to protect the underlying substrate. In the case of silicon carbide (SiC), multilayer coating systems consist of a Ba1-xSrxAl2Si 2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite or mullite + SrAl2Si 2O8 (SAS) interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. In this work, biaxial strains were measured on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples to analyze the stress and phase evolution in the coating system as a function of depth and temperature. Models were used to compare the results with an ideal coating system. In the assprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 175 MPa were measured, and cracking was observed. After thermally cycling the samples, stresses were significantly reduced and cracks in the topcoat had closed. The addition of SAS to the interlayer increased the compressive stress in the BSAS topcoat in thermally-cycled samples, which was desirable for EBC applications. The BSAS topcoat transformed from the as-deposited hexacelsian state to the stable celsian above 1200°C. This phase transformation is accompanied by a CTE reduction. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation were quantified for freestanding plasma-sprayed BSAS. Activation energies for bulk bars and crushed powder were determined to be ˜340 kJ/mol and ˜500 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction were used to establish how microstructural constraints reduce the transformation energy. Barrier coating lifetime and stability are also influenced by exposure to reactive, low-melting point calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) deposits formed from dust and sand. Multilayer doped aluminosilicate coatings and bulk BSAS material were

  10. The relations between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and disorder of extreme stress (not otherwise specified) symptoms following war captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2013-01-01

    War captivity is a recognized pathogenic agent for both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and disorder of extreme stress not otherwise specified (DESNOS) symptoms, also known as Complex PTSD. However, the relationship between the two disorders remains unclear. While some scholars assume that the two diagnoses are overlapping and share the same predictors, others believe that the two diagnoses are relatively independent and differ in phenomenology and functional impairment. This study aims to assess both PTSD and DESNOS symptoms and their inter-relations among ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and matched controls, 35 years after the end of the war. The sample included two groups of male Israeli veterans from the 1973 Yom Kippur War: ex-POWs (n = 176) and comparable veterans who had not been held captive (n = 118). PTSD and DESNOS symptoms, battlefield and captivity stressors, and ways of coping in captivity were assessed using self-report questionnaires in 2008. Ex-POWs reported a higher number of PTSD symptoms and higher rates of PTSD symptoms that fill criteria for the diagnosis of PTSD than controls. Furthermore, ex-POWs reported a higher number of DESNOS symptom clusters and higher rates of DESNOS symptoms that fill criteria for the diagnosis of DESNOS. Moreover, we found positive relationships between PTSD symptom clusters and DESNOS symptom clusters. Finally, weight loss and mental suffering in captivity, loss of emotional control and total number of DESNOS symptoms predicted total number of PTSD symptoms. However, only the total number of PTSD symptoms predicted the total number of DESNOS symptoms. This study demonstrated the heavy and extensive toll of war captivity, three decades after the ex-POWs' release from captivity. Importantly, approaching the publication of DSM-5, this study depicts both the high number of DESNOS symptom clusters alongside PTSD symptoms and highlights the complex relationship between the two diagnostic entities. Thus

  11. Extremely Low-Stress Triaxiality Tests in Calibration of Fracture Models in Metal-Cutting Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebek, František; Kubík, Petr; Petruška, Jindřich; Hůlka, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    The cutting process is now combined with machining, milling, or drilling as one of the widespread manufacturing operations. It is used across various fields of engineering. From an economical point of view, it is desirable to maintain the process in the most effective way in terms of the fracture surface quality or minimizing the burr. It is not possible to manage this experimentally in mass production. Therefore, it is convenient to use numerical computation. To include the crack initiation and propagation in the computations, it is necessary to implement a suitable ductile fracture criterion. Uncoupled ductile fracture models need to be calibrated first from fracture tests when the test selection is crucial. In the present article, there were selected widespread uncoupled ductile fracture models calibrated with, among others, an extremely low-stress triaxiality test realized through the compression of a cylinder with a specific recess. The whole experimental program together with the cutting process experiment were carried out on AISI 1045 carbon steel. After the fracture models were calibrated and the cutting process was simulated with their use, fracture surfaces and force responses from computations were compared with those experimentally obtained and concluding remarks were made.

  12. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikonda, Pavan K; Rajendra, Pilankatta; Devendranath, D; Gunasekaran, B; Channakeshava; Aradhya, Shivakumara R S; Sashidhar, Rao B; Subramanyam, Chivukula

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to understand the influence of long-term exposure of rats to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF), focusing on oxidative stress (OS) on different regions of rat's brain. Male Wistar rats (21-day-old) were exposed to ELF-MF (50 Hz; 50 and 100 µT) for 90 days continuously; hippocampal, cerebellar and cortical regions from rats were analyzed for (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) metabolites indicative of OS and (iii) antioxidant enzymes. In comparison to control group rats, the rats that were continuously exposed to ELF-MF caused OS and altered glutathione (GSH/GSSG) levels in dose-dependent manner in all the regions of the brain. Accumulation of ROS, lipid peroxidation end products and activity of superoxide dismutase in different regions was in the descending order of cerebellum glutathione peroxidase activity were in the descending order of hippocampus 50 µT. Varied influences observed in different regions of the brain, as documented in this study, may contribute to altered metabolic patterns in its related regions of the central nervous system, leading to aberrant neuronal functions.

  13. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEAT AND COLD STRESS ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO ORGANOPHOSPHATES AND OTHER TOXICANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most toxicological and pharmacological studies are performed in laboratory rodents maintained under comfortable environmental conditions. However, exposure to toxicants as well as some drugs can occur under stressful conditions during rest or while exercising. Heat stress can exa...

  14. Exercise-induced dehydration with and without environmental heat stress results in increased oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Angela R; Vince, Rebecca V; Taylor, Lee; McNaughton, Lars; Mitchell, Nigel; Siegler, Jason

    2011-10-01

    While in vitro work has revealed that dehydration and hyperthermia can elicit increased cellular and oxidative stress, in vivo research linking dehydration, hyperthermia, and oxidative stress is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise-induced dehydration with and without hyperthermia on oxidative stress. Seven healthy male, trained cyclists (power output (W) at lactate threshold (LT): 199 ± 19 W) completed 90 min of cycling exercise at 95% LT followed by a 5-km time trial (TT) in 4 trials: (i) euhydration in a warm environment (EU-W, control), (ii) dehydration in a warm environment (DE-W), (iii) euhydration in a thermoneutral environment (EU-T), and (iv) dehydration in a thermoneutral environment (DE-T) (W: 33.9 ± 0.9 °C; T: 23.0 ± 1.0 °C). Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) increased significantly postexercise in dehydration trials only (DE-W: p dehydration trials (p = 0.08 for both). Monocyte heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) concentration was increased (p = 0.01) while lymphocyte HSP32 concentration was decreased for all trials (p = 0.02). Exercise-induced dehydration led to an increase in GSSG concentration while maintenance of euhydration attenuated these increases regardless of environmental condition. Additionally, we found evidence of increased cellular stress (measured via HSP) during all trials independent of hydration status and environment. Finally, both 90-min and 5-km TT performances were reduced during only the DE-W trial, likely a result of combined cellular stress, hyperthermia, and dehydration. These findings highlight the importance of fluid consumption during exercise to attenuate thermal and oxidative stress during prolonged exercise in the heat.

  15. Facilitation as Attenuating of Environmental Stress among Structured Microbial Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Cláudia Silveira Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently an intense debate in microbial societies on whether evolution in complex communities is driven by competition or cooperation. Since Darwin, competition for scarce food resources has been considered the main ecological interaction shaping population dynamics and community structure both in vivo and in vitro. However, facilitation may be widespread across several animal and plant species. This could also be true in microbial strains growing under environmental stress. Pure and mixed strains of Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa were grown in mineral culture media containing phenol. Growth rates were estimated as the angular coefficients computed from linearized growth curves. Fitness index was estimated as the quotient between growth rates computed for lineages grown in isolation and in mixed cultures. The growth rates were significantly higher in associated cultures than in pure cultures and fitness index was greater than 1 for both microbial species showing that the interaction between Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa yielded more efficient phenol utilization by both lineages. This result corroborates the hypothesis that facilitation between microbial strains can increase their fitness and performance in environmental bioremediation.

  16. The effects of urban green space on environmental health equity and resilience to extreme weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Exposure to environmental hazards and beneficial factors varies with income and other socioeconomic and demographic factors. The resulting environmental inequalities have direct and indirect impacts on health and wellbeing. Many environmental inequalities relate to n...

  17. The effects of urban green space on environmental health equity and resilience to extreme weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Exposure to environmental hazards and beneficial factors varies with income and other socioeconomic and demographic factors. The resulting environmental inequalities have direct and indirect impacts on health and wellbeing. Many environmental inequalities relate to n...

  18. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. M. S.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M. J. N.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T. C. E.

    2014-05-01

    The Cape Lookout cold-water coral area off the coast of North Carolina forms the shallowest and northernmost cold-water coral mound area on the Blake Plateau in the NW Atlantic. Cold-water coral habitats near Cape Lookout are occasionally bathed in the Gulf Stream, which is characterised by oligotrophic warm water and strong surface currents. Here, we present the first insights into the mound distribution and morphology, sedimentary environment and coral cover and near-bed environmental conditions as recorded by bottom landers from this coral area. The mounds occur between 320 and 550 m water depth and are characterised by high acoustic backscatter indicating the presence of hard structure. Three distinct mound morphologies were observed: (1) a mound with a flattened top at 320 m, (2) multi-summited mounds with a teardrop shape in the middle part of the area and (3) a single mound at 540 m water depth. Echosounder profiles show the presence of a strong reflector underneath all mound structures that forms the base of the mounds. This reflector cropped out at the downstream side of the single mound and consists of carbonate slabs. Video analysis revealed that all mounds are covered by Lophelia pertusa and that living colonies only occur close to the summits of the SSW side of the mounds, which is the side that faces the strongest currents. Off-mound areas were characterised by low backscatter and sediment ripples, indicating the presence of relatively strong bottom currents. Two bottom landers were deployed amidst the coral mounds between December 2009 and May 2010. Both landers recorded prominent events, characterised by large fluctuations in environmental conditions near the seabed as well as in the overlying water column. The period between December and April was characterised by several events of increasing temperature and salinity, coinciding with increased flow and near-bed acoustic backscatter. During these events temperature fluctuated by up to 9 °C within a

  19. Brazilian version of the Structured Interview for Disorders of Extreme Stress - Revised (SIDES-R: adaptation and validation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Camargo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD contemplates the impact of acute traumatic events, but the literature indicates that this is not true for chronic exposure to stress. In this sense, the category disorders of extreme stress not otherwise specified (DESNOS has been proposed to characterize the behavior and cognitive alterations derived from exposure to continuous early life stress. The Structured Interview for Disorders of Extreme Stress - Revised (SIDES-R was developed to investigate and measure DESNOS. Considering the lack of instruments designed to assess DESNOS, especially in Brazil, the aim of this study was to translate, adapt, and validate the contents of SIDES-R to Brazilian Portuguese (SIDES-R-BR. METHOD: The original interview was subjected to translation, back-translation, semantic equivalence and conceptual correspondence analyses by naive and specialized judges, respectively, an acceptability trial, and inter-rater validity analysis. RESULTS: The interview underwent semantic and structural adaptations considering the Brazilian culture. The final version, SIDES-R-BR, showed a mean understanding score of 4.98 on a 5-point verbal rating scale, in addition to a kappa coefficient of 0.853. CONCLUSION: SIDES-R-BR may be a useful tool in the investigation of DESNOS and contributes a valuable input to clinical research in Brazil. The availability of the instrument allows to test symptoms with adequate reliability, as verified by the kappa coefficient and translation steps.

  20. Effect of cold water and inverse lighting on growth performance of broiler chickens under extreme heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-oh; Park, Byung-sung; Hwangbo, Jong

    2015-07-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of provision of extreme heat stress diet (EHD), inverse lighting, cold water on growth performance of broiler chickens exposed to extreme heat stress. The chickens were divided into four treatment groups, (T1, T2, T3, T4) as given below: Ti (EHD 1, 10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light, cool water 9 degrees C); T2 (EHD 2, 10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light, cool water 9 degrees C); T3 (EHD 1, 09:00-18:00 dark, 18:00-09:00 light, cool water 141C); T4 (EHD 2, 09:00-18:00 dark, 18:00-09:00 light, cool water 14 degrees C. EHD 1 contained soybean oil, molasses, methionine and lysine; EHD 2 contained the same ingredients as EHD 1 with addition of vitamin C. Groups T1 and T2 were given cooler water than the othertwo groups, and displayed higher body weight increase and diet intake as compared to T3 and T4 (pstress diet, inverse lighting (10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light) with cold water at 9 degrees C under extreme heat stress could enhance growth performance of broiler chickens.

  1. Significance of Environmental Variables on Flight Electronics and Design Concerns for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeli, K.; Kingstedt, O. T.

    2017-05-01

    It is critical to investigate the performance of electronic systems and their components under the environments experienced during proposed missions to improve spacecraft and robotic vehicle functionality and performance in extreme environments.

  2. Organismal climatology: analyzing environmental variability at scales relevant to physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmuth, Brian; Broitman, Bernardo R; Yamane, Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E; Mach, Katharine; Mislan, K A S; Denny, Mark W

    2010-03-15

    Predicting when, where and with what magnitude climate change is likely to affect the fitness, abundance and distribution of organisms and the functioning of ecosystems has emerged as a high priority for scientists and resource managers. However, even in cases where we have detailed knowledge of current species' range boundaries, we often do not understand what, if any, aspects of weather and climate act to set these limits. This shortcoming significantly curtails our capacity to predict potential future range shifts in response to climate change, especially since the factors that set range boundaries under those novel conditions may be different from those that set limits today. We quantitatively examine a nine-year time series of temperature records relevant to the body temperatures of intertidal mussels as measured using biomimetic sensors. Specifically, we explore how a 'climatology' of body temperatures, as opposed to long-term records of habitat-level parameters such as air and water temperatures, can be used to extrapolate meaningful spatial and temporal patterns of physiological stress. Using different metrics that correspond to various aspects of physiological stress (seasonal means, cumulative temperature and the return time of extremes) we show that these potential environmental stressors do not always occur in synchrony with one another. Our analysis also shows that patterns of animal temperature are not well correlated with simple, commonly used metrics such as air temperature. Detailed physiological studies can provide guidance to predicting the effects of global climate change on natural ecosystems but only if we concomitantly record, archive and model environmental signals at appropriate scales.

  3. Comparative Effects of Salt Stress and Extreme pH Stress Combined on Glycinebetaine Accumulation, Photosynthetic Abilities and Growth Characters of Two Rice Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriyan CHA-UM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycinebetaine (Glybet accumulation, photosynthetic efficiency and growth performance in indica rice cultivated under salt stress and extreme pH stress were investigated. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH activity and Glybet accumulation in the seedlings of salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive rice varieties grown under saline and acidic conditions peaked after treatment for 72 h and 96 h, respectively, and were higher than those grown under neutral pH and alkaline salt stress. A positive correlation was found between BADH activity and Glybet content in both salt-tolerant (r2 = 0.71 and salt-sensitive (r2 = 0.86 genotypes. The chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll and total carotenoids contents in the stressed seedlings significantly decreased under both acidic and alkaline stresses, especially in the salt-sensitive genotype. Similarly, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm, photon yield of PSII (ΦPSII, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ and net photosynthetic rate (Pn in the stressed seedlings were inhibited, leading to overall growth reduction. The positive correlations between chlorophyll a content and Fv/Fm, total chlorophyll content and ΦPSII, ΦPSII and Pn as well as Pn and leaf area in both salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive genotypes were found. Saline acidic and saline alkaline soils may play a key role affecting vegetative growth prior to the reproductive stage in rice plants.

  4. Oxidative stress in limpets exposed to different environmental conditions in the Beagle Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malanga, Gabriela; Estevez, Maria Susana; Calvo, Jorge; Puntarulo, Susana

    2004-09-20

    .) deaurata (491 {+-} 137 and 839 {+-} 63 pmol/g FW, respectively) was observed. Taken as a whole, the data presented here indicated that coping with environmental stressing conditions requires a complex adjustment of the physiological metabolic pathways to ensure survival by minimizing intracellular damage. It is likely that N. (P.) magellanica has a particular evolutionary adaptation to extreme environmental conditions by keeping iron content low and antioxidant activities high.

  5. An inducible HSP70 gene from the midge Chironomus dilutus: Characterization and transcription profile under environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Rao, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and characterized an inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from the midge Chironomus dilutus and investigated the transcriptional profile of the gene under baseline and environmentally stressful conditions. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we observed increased expression of CD-HSP70-1 in response to both heat shock and copper stress. We also investigated the expression of this gene during midge development. All C. dilutus developmental stages expressed CD-HSP70-1 under normal conditions, although at extremely low levels. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence demonstrated distinct clustering of this gene with inducible HSP70s from other insect species. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  6. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of circadian clock genes under environmental stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Ju; Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-05-19

    The circadian clock enables living organisms to anticipate recurring daily and seasonal fluctuations in their growth habitats and synchronize their biology to the environmental cycle. The plant circadian clock consists of multiple transcription-translation feedback loops that are entrained by environmental signals, such as light and temperature. In recent years, alternative splicing emerges as an important molecular mechanism that modulates the clock function in plants. Several clock genes are known to undergo alternative splicing in response to changes in environmental conditions, suggesting that the clock function is intimately associated with environmental responses via the alternative splicing of the clock genes. However, the alternative splicing events of the clock genes have not been studied at the molecular level. We systematically examined whether major clock genes undergo alternative splicing under various environmental conditions in Arabidopsis. We also investigated the fates of the RNA splice variants of the clock genes. It was found that the clock genes, including EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL) that have not been studied in terms of alternative splicing, undergo extensive alternative splicing through diverse modes of splicing events, such as intron retention, exon skipping, and selection of alternative 5' splice site. Their alternative splicing patterns were differentially influenced by changes in photoperiod, temperature extremes, and salt stress. Notably, the RNA splice variants of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) and ELF3 were degraded through the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway, whereas those of other clock genes were insensitive to NMD. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that the major clock genes examined undergo extensive alternative splicing under various environmental conditions, suggesting that alternative splicing is a molecular scheme that underlies the linkage between the clock and environmental stress

  7. Climate-related environmental stress in intertidal grazers: scaling-up biochemical responses to assemblage-level processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Maggi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Organisms are facing increasing levels of environmental stress under climate change that may severely affect the functioning of biological systems at different levels of organization. Growing evidence suggests that reduction in body size is a universal response of organisms to global warming. However, a clear understanding of whether extreme climate events will impose selection directly on phenotypic plastic responses and how these responses affect ecological interactions has remained elusive. Methods We experimentally investigated the effects of extreme desiccation events on antioxidant defense mechanisms of a rocky intertidal gastropod (Patella ulyssiponensis, and evaluated how these effects scaled-up at the population and assemblage levels. Results With increasing levels of desiccation stress, limpets showed significant lower levels of total glutathione, tended to grow less and had reduced per capita interaction strength on their resources. Discussion Results suggested that phenotypic plasticity (i.e., reduction in adults’ body size allowed buffering biochemical responses to stress to scale-up at the assemblage level. Unveiling the linkages among different levels of biological organization is key to develop indicators that can anticipate large-scale ecological impacts of climate change.

  8. Climate-related environmental stress in intertidal grazers: scaling-up biochemical responses to assemblage-level processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, Mario; Del Corso, Antonella; Lenzarini, Francesca; Peroni, Eleonora; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Organisms are facing increasing levels of environmental stress under climate change that may severely affect the functioning of biological systems at different levels of organization. Growing evidence suggests that reduction in body size is a universal response of organisms to global warming. However, a clear understanding of whether extreme climate events will impose selection directly on phenotypic plastic responses and how these responses affect ecological interactions has remained elusive. Methods We experimentally investigated the effects of extreme desiccation events on antioxidant defense mechanisms of a rocky intertidal gastropod (Patella ulyssiponensis), and evaluated how these effects scaled-up at the population and assemblage levels. Results With increasing levels of desiccation stress, limpets showed significant lower levels of total glutathione, tended to grow less and had reduced per capita interaction strength on their resources. Discussion Results suggested that phenotypic plasticity (i.e., reduction in adults’ body size) allowed buffering biochemical responses to stress to scale-up at the assemblage level. Unveiling the linkages among different levels of biological organization is key to develop indicators that can anticipate large-scale ecological impacts of climate change. PMID:27781156

  9. Meta-analysis of studies using suppression subtractive hybridization and microarrays to investigate the effects of environmental stress on gene transcription in oysters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Anderson

    Full Text Available Many microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH studies have analyzed the effects of environmental stress on gene transcription in marine species. However, there have been no unifying analyses of these data to identify common stress response pathways. To address this shortfall, we conducted a meta-analysis of 14 studies that investigated the effects of different environmental stressors on gene expression in oysters. The stressors tested included chemical contamination, hypoxia and infection, as well as extremes of temperature, pH and turbidity. We found that the expression of over 400 genes in a range of oyster species changed significantly after exposure to environmental stress. A repeating pattern was evident in these transcriptional responses, regardless of the type of stress applied. Many of the genes that responded to environmental stress encoded proteins involved in translation and protein processing (including molecular chaperones, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, anti-oxidant activity and the cytoskeleton. In light of these findings, we put forward a consensus model of sub-cellular stress responses in oysters.

  10. Meta-analysis of studies using suppression subtractive hybridization and microarrays to investigate the effects of environmental stress on gene transcription in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kelli; Taylor, Daisy A; Thompson, Emma L; Melwani, Aroon R; Nair, Sham V; Raftos, David A

    2015-01-01

    Many microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) studies have analyzed the effects of environmental stress on gene transcription in marine species. However, there have been no unifying analyses of these data to identify common stress response pathways. To address this shortfall, we conducted a meta-analysis of 14 studies that investigated the effects of different environmental stressors on gene expression in oysters. The stressors tested included chemical contamination, hypoxia and infection, as well as extremes of temperature, pH and turbidity. We found that the expression of over 400 genes in a range of oyster species changed significantly after exposure to environmental stress. A repeating pattern was evident in these transcriptional responses, regardless of the type of stress applied. Many of the genes that responded to environmental stress encoded proteins involved in translation and protein processing (including molecular chaperones), the mitochondrial electron transport chain, anti-oxidant activity and the cytoskeleton. In light of these findings, we put forward a consensus model of sub-cellular stress responses in oysters.

  11. Stress channelling in extreme couple-stress materials Part II: Localized folding vs faulting of a continuum in single and cross geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgiotis, Panos A.; Bigoni, Davide

    2016-03-01

    The antiplane strain Green's functions for an applied concentrated force and moment are obtained for Cosserat elastic solids with extreme anisotropy, which can be tailored to bring the material in a state close to an instability threshold such as failure of ellipticity. It is shown that the wave propagation condition (and not ellipticity) governs the behaviour of the antiplane strain Green's functions. These Green's functions are used as perturbing agents to demonstrate in an extreme material the emergence of localized (single and cross) stress channelling and the emergence of antiplane localized folding (or creasing, or weak elastostatic shock) and faulting (or elastostatic shock) of a Cosserat continuum, phenomena which remain excluded for a Cauchy elastic material. During folding some components of the displacement gradient suffer a finite jump, whereas during faulting the displacement itself displays a finite discontinuity.

  12. To explore relationships between physiological stress signals and stress behaviors in preterm infants during periods of exposure to environmental stress in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Niang-Huei; Chen, Chao-Huei; Bachman, Jean; Lin, Hong-Chin; Wang, Teh-Ming; Chang, Yue-Cune; Chang, Yu-Shan

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to examine relationships among physiological stress signals (heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturation) and stress behaviors (6 stress behaviors related to sleep-wake states, 10 self-regulatory behaviors, and 17 behavioral stress cues) in preterm infants during periods of environmental stress. This research used a prospective repeated-measures design in a convenience sample of preterm infants of equations were used to determine relationships. Variables were measured every 2 min over 4 hr, for a total of 4,164 observations in 37 preterm infants. There were statistically significant relationships between 9 stress behavioral responses and changes in HR (seven stress behaviors and two self-regulatory behaviors; p stress behavioral responses and changes in RR (seven stress behaviors and two self-regulatory behaviors; p stress behavioral responses and changes in oxygen saturation (seven stress behaviors and four self-regulatory behaviors; p stress are related to physiological stress signals. However, results should be investigated further in larger samples.

  13. Salivary cortisol and self-reported stress among persons with environmental annoyance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Frida; Persson, Roger; Karlson, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Increased vulnerability to stress has been suggested as a possible mechanism behind medically unexplained conditions such as sensitivity to electricity and common smells. This study examined whether subjective environmental annoyance among the general population is associated with increased physi...

  14. OsAPX4 gene response to several environmental stresses in rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Stress Molecular Biology Laboratory (Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education), Alkali Soil Natural Environmental ... processes, metabolism and existence. They adversely affect plant growth, development or productivity. In Nort ...

  15. Assessment of environmental stresses for enhanced microalgal biofuel production-an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal biofuels are currently considered to be the most promising alternative to future renewable energy source. Microalgae have great potential to produce various biofuels, including biodiesel, bioethanol, biomethane, and biohydrogen. Cultivation of biofuel-producing microalgae demands favorable environmental conditions, such as suitable light, temperature, nutrients, salinity, and pH. However, these conditions are not always compatible with the conditions beneficial to biofuel production, because biofuel-related compounds (such as lipids and carbohydrates tend to accumulate under environmental-stress conditions of light, temperature, nutrient, and salt. This paper presents a brief overview of the effects of environmental conditions on production of microalgal biomass and biofuel, with specific emphasis on how to utilize environmental stresses to improve biofuel productivity. The potential avenues of reaping the benefits of enhanced biofuel production by environmental stresses while maintaining high yields of biomass production have been discussed.

  16. Stress reaction in freshwater ifsh in response to extreme impacts and during the reproduction period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir Ivamovich; Martemyanov

    2015-01-01

    The original and published data on the physiological and biochemical reactions in fish in response to stress impact and during the reproduction period are presented. It is shown that at the initial period of stress and before spawning the protective functions in fish are enhanced which relates to the adaptation syndrome. However, during the initial period of stress the damaging effects prevail over the adaptive processes resulting in the decrease in the level of resistance (“alarm reaction” according to Selye). In contrary, during pre-spawning period protective systems dominate along with enhancement of general adaptation syndromes. This facilitates the increase in the level of resistance in the parental fish (“resistance stage”according to Selye). Before the spawning the alarm stage is not manifested. The state comparable to strong stress occurs in the parental fish only during the spawning. This state is accompanied by decrease in the resistance of organism in spawner evidencing exhaustion of protective functions (“exhaustion stage” according to Selye). With time, both at stress and after spawning, within two to three weeks period, the physiological-biochemical parameters recover and stabilize with the normal limits.

  17. Roles of Thin Film Stress in Making Extremely Lightweight X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William W.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray optics typically must be coated with one of the noble metals, gold, platinum, or iridium, to enhance their photon collection area. In general, iridium is preferred to the other two because it generates the highest X-ray reflectivity in the I to 10 keV band. Unfortunately, iridium films typically have also the highest stress that can severely degrade the optical figure of the mirror substrate, resulting in a poorer image quality. In this paper we will report our work in understanding this stress and our method to counterbalance it. In particular we will also report on potential ways of using this stress to improve the substrate's optical figure, turning a bug into a desirable feature. This work is done in the context of developing an enabling technology for the International X-ray Observatory which is a collaborative mission of NASA, ESA, and JAXA, and expected to be launched into an L2 orbit in 2021.

  18. Metabolomic analysis of the selection response of Drosophila melanogaster to environmental stress: are there links to gene expression and phenotypic traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Overgaard, Johannes; Holmstrup, Martin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including gene expression, physiological traits, and organismal stress tolerance phenotype. Overall, we found that selection for environmental stress tolerance changes the metabolomic 1H NMR fingerprint largely in a similar manner independent of the trait selected for, indicating that experimental evolution led to a general stress selection response at the metabolomic level. Integrative analyses across data sets showed little similarity when general correlations between selection effects at the level of the metabolome and gene expression were compared. This is likely due to the fact that the changes caused by these selection regimes were rather mild and/or that the dominating determinants for gene expression and metabolite levels were different. However, expression of a number of genes was correlated with the metabolite data. Many of the identified genes were general stress response genes that are down-regulated in response to selection for some of the stresses in this study. Overall, the results illustrate that selection markedly alters the metabolite profile and that the coupling between different levels of biological organization indeed is present though not very strong for stress selection at this level. The results highlight the extreme complexity of environmental stress adaptation and the difficulty of extrapolating and interpreting responses across levels of biological organization.

  19. Plant transcriptomics and responses to environmental stress: an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sameen Ruqia Imadi; Alvina Gul Kazi; Mohammad Abass Ahanger; Salih Gucel; Parvaiz Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    Different stresses include nutrient deficiency, pathogen attack, exposure to toxic chemicals etc. Transcriptomic studies have been mainly applied to only a few plant species including the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have provided valuable insights into the genetic networks of plant stress responses. Transcriptomics applied to cash crops including barley, rice, sugarcane, wheat and maize have further helped in understanding physiological and molecular responses in terms of genome sequence, gene regulation, gene differentiation, posttranscriptional modifications and gene splicing. On the other hand, comparative transcriptomics has provided more information about plant’s response to diverse stresses. Thus, transcriptomics, together with other biotechnological approaches helps in development of stress tolerance in crops against the climate change.

  20. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Extreme Personality Dispositions in Adolescent Female Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergadia, Michele L.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Lessov, Christina N.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The objective was to determine whether the pattern of environmental and genetic influences on deviant personality scores differs from that observed for the normative range of personality, comparing results in adolescent and adult female twins. Methods: A sample of 2,796 female adolescent twins ascertained from birth records provided…

  1. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Extreme Personality Dispositions in Adolescent Female Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergadia, Michele L.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Lessov, Christina N.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The objective was to determine whether the pattern of environmental and genetic influences on deviant personality scores differs from that observed for the normative range of personality, comparing results in adolescent and adult female twins. Methods: A sample of 2,796 female adolescent twins ascertained from birth records provided…

  2. Role of the Red Ginseng in Defense against the Environmental Heat Stress in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kui-Jin; Yoon, Kye-Yoon; Hong, Hee-Do; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2015-11-10

    Global temperature change causes heat stress related disorders in humans. A constituent of red ginseng has been known the beneficial effect on the resistance to many diseases. However, the mechanism of red ginseng (RG) against heat stress still remains unclear. To determine the effect of RG on heat stress, we examined the effect of the RG on the gene expression profiles in rats subjected to environmental heat stress. We evaluated the transcripts associated with hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats subjected to heat stress. We also analyzed the reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents. Our results suggested RG inhibited heat stress mediated altering mRNA expressions include HSPA1, DEAF1, HMGCR, and FMO1. We also determined RG attenuated fat accumulation in the liver by altering C/EBPβ expression. RG promoted to repress the heat stress mediated hepatic cell death by inhibiting of Bcl-2 expression in rats subjected to heat stress. Moreover, RG administered group during heat stress dramatically decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and ROS associated genes compared with the control group. Thus, we suggest that RG might influence inhibitory effect on environmental heat stress induced abnormal conditions in humans.

  3. The impact of environmental factors on nursing stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Diane; Fowler, Susan; Fiedler, Nancy; Osinubi, Omowunmi; Robson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental factors of odor, noise, light, and color and perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. The physical work environment may positively or negatively influence nurses' stress, and stress may negatively impact their job satisfaction and intention to change jobs. The research questions were answered using a descriptive, correlational design. The sample (n = 116) consisted of medical-surgical nurses working in acute-care settings. A 36-item questionnaire addressed odor, noise, light, color, perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Significant relationships were found between noise and perceived stress, perceived stress and job satisfaction, job satisfaction and turnover intention, and perceived stress and turnover intention. Nurses tend to overlook their physical environment and "do their job." Common environmental stressors in the work environment can be stressful to staff and influence job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs. Mitigating or eliminating these environmental factors has the potential to improve staff satisfaction and retention. Stress influences nursing job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs.

  4. Epigenetic and chromatin-based mechanisms in environmental stress adaptation and stress memory in plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jorn Lamke; Isabel Baurle

    2017-01-01

    .... Given their potential epigenetic nature, such modifications may provide a mechanistic basis for a stress memory, enabling plants to respond more efficiently to recurring stress or even to prepare...

  5. Contribution of early environmental stress to alcoholism vulnerability

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Joannalee C.; Karen K Szumlinski; Kippin, Tod E.

    2009-01-01

    The most problematic aspects of alcohol abuse disorder are excessive alcohol consumption and the inability to refrain from alcohol consumption during attempted abstinence. The root causes that predispose certain individuals to these problems are poorly understood but are believed to be produced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Early environmental trauma alters neurodevelopmental trajectories that can predispose an individual to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, inc...

  6. Arsenic-rich acid mine water with extreme arsenic concentration: mineralogy, geochemistry, microbiology, and environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Plášil, Jakub; Škoda, Radek; Gescher, Johannes; Kögler, Felix; Rusznyak, Anna; Küsel, Kirsten; Neu, Thomas R; Mangold, Stefan; Rothe, Jörg

    2014-12-02

    Extremely arsenic-rich acid mine waters have developed by weathering of native arsenic in a sulfide-poor environment on the 10th level of the Svornost mine in Jáchymov (Czech Republic). Arsenic rapidly oxidizes to arsenolite (As2O3), and there are droplets of liquid on the arsenolite crust with high As concentration (80,000-130,000 mg·L(-1)), pH close to 0, and density of 1.65 g·cm(-1). According to the X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the frozen droplets, most of the arsenic is As(III) and iron is fully oxidized to Fe(III). The EXAFS spectra on the As K edge can be interpreted in terms of arsenic polymerization in the aqueous solution. The secondary mineral that precipitates in the droplets is kaatialaite [Fe(3+)(H2AsO4)3·5H2O]. Other unusual minerals associated with the arsenic lens are běhounekite [U(4+)(SO4)2·4H2O], štěpite [U(4+)(AsO3OH)2·4H2O], vysokýite [U(4+)[AsO2(OH)2]4·4H2O], and an unnamed phase (H3O)(+)2(UO2)2(AsO4)2·nH2O. The extremely low cell densities and low microbial biomass have led to insufficient amounts of DNA for downstream polymerase chain reaction amplification and clone library construction. We were able to isolate microorganisms on oligotrophic media with pH ∼ 1.5 supplemented with up to 30 mM As(III). These microorganisms were adapted to highly oligotrophic conditions which disabled long-term culturing under laboratory conditions. The extreme conditions make this environment unfavorable for intensive microbial colonization, but our first results show that certain microorganisms can adapt even to these harsh conditions.

  7. Environmental stress level evaluation approach based on physical model and interval grey association degree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Guanqian; Qiu Jing; Liu Guanjun; Lv Kehong

    2013-01-01

    Associating environmental stresses (ESs) with built-in test (BIT) output is an important means to help diagnose intermittent faults (IFs).Aiming at low efficiency in association of traditional time stress measurement device (TSMD),an association model is built.Thereafter,a novel approach is given to evaluate the integrated environmental stress (IES) level.Firstly,the selection principle and approach of main environmental stresses (MESs) and key characteristic parameters (KCPs) are presented based on fault mode,mechanism,and ESs analysis (FMMEA).Secondly,reference stress events (RSEs) are constructed by dividing IES into three stress levels according to its impact on faults; and then the association model between integrated environmental stress event (IESE) and BIT output is built.Thirdly,an interval grey association approach to evaluate IES level is proposed due to the interval number of IES value.Consequently,the association output can be obtained as well.Finally,a case study is presented to demonstrate the proposed approach.Results show the proposed model and approach are effective and feasible.This approach can be used to guide ESs measure,record,and association.It is well suited for on-line assistant diagnosis of faults,especially IFs.

  8. System-level understanding of the potential acid-tolerance components of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 under extreme acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    In previous study, two extremely acidophilic strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 (collection site: bioleaching leachate) and ZJJN-5 (collection site: bioleaching wastewater) were isolated from a typical industrial bio-heap in China. Here, we unraveled the potential acid-tolerance components of ZJJN-3 by comparing the physiological differences with ZJJN-5 under different acid stresses. The parameters used for comparison included intracellular pH (pHin), capsule morphology, fatty acid composition of cell membrane, transcription of key molecular chaperones, H(+)-ATPase activities and NAD(+)/NADH ratio. It was indicated that the acid-tolerance of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 was systematically regulated. Capsule first thickened and then shed off along with increased acid stress. Cell membrane maintained the intracellular stability by up-regulating the proportion of unsaturated fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acids. Meanwhile, the transcription of key repair molecular chaperones (GrpE-DnaK-DnaJ) was up-regulated by 2.2-3.5 folds for ensuring the proper folding of peptide. Moreover, low pHin promoted ZJJN-3 to biosynthesize more H(+)-ATPase for pumping H(+) out of cells. Furthermore, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio increased due to the decreased H(+) concentration. Based on the above physiological analysis, the potential acid-tolerance components of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 were first proposed and it would be useful for better understanding how these extremophiles responded to the high acid stress.

  9. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  10. A Virtual Rat for Simulating Environmental and Exertional Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, MCMR-TT, 504 Scott St., Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5012...Shaik OS, Helwig BG, Leon LR, Doyle FJ 3rd. A physiological systems approach to modeling and resetting of mouse thermoregulation under heat stress. J

  11. Urban Environmental Stress and Behavioral Adaptation in Bhopal City of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Rishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the effect of the urban environmental stress on the subjective well-being of the people in Bhopal city of India. The objectives were to assess the perceived urban environmental stressors and to explore the coping strategies adopted by the people to combat the outcomes of Urban Environmental Stress. Perceived Urban Environmental stressors’ Scale (UES and Urban Hassle Index were administered. The findings indicated that though people described their city as pleasant, a high level of stress was still perceived and its major reasons were found to be noise, waste accumulation, polluted air with smoke, and unhealthy environment in slums. The outcome of research suggests that the city planners should give equal priority to the natural resources and environment by various pollution management interventions and proper city planning. It is crucial for the well-being of the human beings to lower down the effect of stressors, so that the life in the city can be livable and of good quality. This paper provided guidelines for other metropolitan cities too for developing Environmental Competence and for generating mass awareness about the Urban Environmental Stress and its possible management options to help people develop Environmental Resilience and functional coping.

  12. The value of crossdating to retain high-frequency variability, climate signals, and extreme events in environmental proxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan A; Griffin, Daniel; van der Sleen, Peter; Wanamaker, Alan D; Speer, James H; Frank, David C; Stahle, David W; Pederson, Neil; Copenheaver, Carolyn A; Trouet, Valerie; Griffin, Shelly; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution biogenic and geologic proxies in which one increment or layer is formed per year are crucial to describing natural ranges of environmental variability in Earth's physical and biological systems. However, dating controls are necessary to ensure temporal precision and accuracy; simple counts cannot ensure that all layers are placed correctly in time. Originally developed for tree-ring data, crossdating is the only such procedure that ensures all increments have been assigned the correct calendar year of formation. Here, we use growth-increment data from two tree species, two marine bivalve species, and a marine fish species to illustrate sensitivity of environmental signals to modest dating error rates. When falsely added or missed increments are induced at one and five percent rates, errors propagate back through time and eliminate high-frequency variability, climate signals, and evidence of extreme events while incorrectly dating and distorting major disturbances or other low-frequency processes. Our consecutive Monte Carlo experiments show that inaccuracies begin to accumulate in as little as two decades and can remove all but decadal-scale processes after as little as two centuries. Real-world scenarios may have even greater consequence in the absence of crossdating. Given this sensitivity to signal loss, the fundamental tenets of crossdating must be applied to fully resolve environmental signals, a point we underscore as the frontiers of growth-increment analysis continue to expand into tropical, freshwater, and marine environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Environmental stress, oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism, and mental health following collective stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Holman, E Alison

    2013-04-01

    We examined whether the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs53576 genotype buffers the combined impact of negative social environments (e.g., interpersonal conflict/constraint) and economic stress on post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and impaired daily functioning following collective stress (September 11th terrorist attacks). Saliva was collected by mail and used to genotype 704 respondents. Participants completed Web-based assessments of pre-9/11 mental health, acute stress 9-23 days after 9/11, the quality of social environments 1 year post-9/11, economic stress 18 months post-9/11, and PTS symptoms and impaired functioning 2 and 3 years post-9/11. Interactions between negative social environments and economic stress were examined separately based on OXTR rs53576 genotype (GG vs. any A allele). For individuals with an A allele, a negative social environment significantly increased PTS symptoms without regard to the level of economic stress experienced. However, for respondents with a GG genotype, negative social environments predicted elevated PTS symptoms only for those also experiencing high economic stress. Gender moderated associations between negative social environments, economic stress, and impaired functioning. The functioning of females was most affected by negative social environments regardless of genotype and economic stress, whereas the functioning of males was differentially susceptible to economic stress depending on OXTR genotype and negative social environments. These findings suggest that it is important to consider the combined impact of gender and ongoing stress in different domains as moderators of genetic vulnerability following collective stress.

  14. Extremal states of energy of a double-layered thick-walled tube - application to residually stressed arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Various biological tissues are designed to optimally support external loads for complex geometries and mechanobiological structures. This results in complex microstructures of such materials. The design of, for instance, (healthy) arteries, which are in the focus of this work, is characterised by a residually stressed fibre-reinforced multi-layered composite with highly non-linear elastic response. The complex interaction of material properties with the geometry and residual stress effects enables the optimal support under different blood pressures, respectively blood flow, within the vessel. The fibres reinforcing the arterial wall, as well as residual stresses present in the vessel, strongly influence its overall behaviour and performance. Turn-over and remodelling processes of the collagenous fibres occurring in the respective layers - either resulting from natural growth phenomena or from artificially induced changes in loading condition such as stent deployment - support the optimisation of the multi-layered composite structure of arteries for the particular loading conditions present in the artery. Within this contribution, the overall energetic properties of an artery are discussed by means of the inflation, bending and extension of a double-layered cylindrical tube. Different states of residual stresses and different fibre orientations are considered so that, for instance, representative fibre angles that result in extremal states of the total potential energy can be identified. In view of turn-over and remodelling processes, these orientations are considered to constitute preferred directions of fibre alignment. In summary, the main goal of this work is to calculate optimal material, structural and loading parameters by concepts of energy-minimisation. Several numerical studies show that the obtained values - such as the fibre orientations, the residual axial stretch and the opening angle - are in good agreement with respective physiological parameters

  15. Rhythmicity in mice selected for extremes in stress reactivity: behavioural, endocrine and sleep changes resembling endophenotypes of major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadi Touma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, including hyper- or hypo-activity of the stress hormone system, plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders such as major depression (MD. Further biological hallmarks of MD are disturbances in circadian rhythms and sleep architecture. Applying a translational approach, an animal model has recently been developed, focusing on the deviation in sensitivity to stressful encounters. This so-called 'stress reactivity' (SR mouse model consists of three separate breeding lines selected for either high (HR, intermediate (IR, or low (LR corticosterone increase in response to stressors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: In order to contribute to the validation of the SR mouse model, our study combined the analysis of behavioural and HPA axis rhythmicity with sleep-EEG recordings in the HR/IR/LR mouse lines. We found that hyper-responsiveness to stressors was associated with psychomotor alterations (increased locomotor activity and exploration towards the end of the resting period, resembling symptoms like restlessness, sleep continuity disturbances and early awakenings that are commonly observed in melancholic depression. Additionally, HR mice also showed neuroendocrine abnormalities similar to symptoms of MD patients such as reduced amplitude of the circadian glucocorticoid rhythm and elevated trough levels. The sleep-EEG analyses, furthermore, revealed changes in rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM sleep as well as slow wave activity, indicative of reduced sleep efficacy and REM sleep disinhibition in HR mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, we could show that by selectively breeding mice for extremes in stress reactivity, clinically relevant endophenotypes of MD can be modelled. Given the importance of rhythmicity and sleep disturbances as biomarkers of MD, both animal and clinical studies on the interaction of behavioural, neuroendocrine and sleep parameters may

  16. Effects of interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors on moose resource selection and environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Fryxell, John M; Liu, Hui; Dou, Hongliang; Ma, Yingjie; Jiang, Guangshun

    2017-01-27

    Resource selection of herbivores is a complex ecological process that operates in relation to biological or non-biological factors, which may affect the feeding and movement, and subsequently their spatial distribution and environmental stress. Here, we estimated moose (Alces alces cameloides) resource selection for habitat variables and the effect of interspecific interactions related to roe deer (Capreolus pygargus bedfordi) on its population distribution and environmental stress in the Khingan Mountain region of northeast China at local and regional scales. Different response patterns of moose resource selection, spatial distribution, and environmental stress to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors were shown at the two scales. A general ecological chain, response of moose to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors, was exhibited at the regional scale, and at the local scale, heterogeneous responses, linkages of habitat selection and environmental stress of moose population might be driven by different interspecific interaction patterns. Our study firstly suggested that moose resource selection, food availability, diet quality, population density and environmental stress indicators were impacted by interactions with the distribution of other sympatric herbivore species and showed differences in ecological response chains at various spatial scales. These findings are useful for sympatric herbivore assembly conservation, habitat quality monitoring and management.

  17. 极端环境条件下TLP平台的应力校核%Stress verification of a TLP under extreme wave environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫发锁; 张大刚; 孙丽萍; 戴仰山

    2009-01-01

    计算校核了某TLP平台垂向肘板在极端环境条件下的应力响应.该垂向肘板为TLP立柱与张力支撑系统(TSS)间的连接件,是TLP平台强度评估的关键部位.根据通用的业界标准,平台的环境载荷计算采用三维线性理论,结构分析使用有限元方法.应力数值计算与处理与实测应变片的位置和方向完全一致.平台在位监测的数据使用FFT技术进行了处理,得到了不同时段统计下各浪向的应力谱密度(RAO).数值计算与平台在位实测对比表明,数值模拟的应力谱密度与实测数据吻合较好,业界的分析方法可以在极端条件下对TLP的关键部位进行有效的强度分析.%Stress response of a tension leg platform (TLP) in extreme environments was investigated in this paper. A location on one of the gussets was selected as the object point, where directional stresses were numerically simulated and also experimentally verified by a strain gage. Environmental loading and the platform.s structural strength were analyzed in accordance with industrial standards, utilizing linear wave theory and the finite element method (FEM). The fast Fourier transform technique was used to calculate the stress response amplitude operators (RAO) from the records of measurements. A comparison was performed between the stress RAO of the numerical simulation and that of the actual measurements. The results indicated that the stress RAO of the numerical simulation fitted well with measured data at specified wave headings with different periods.

  18. Ultramarathon is an outstanding model for the study of adaptive responses to extreme load and stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millet Grégoire P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultramarathons comprise any sporting event involving running longer than the traditional marathon length of 42.195 km (26.2 miles. Studies on ultramarathon participants can investigate the acute consequences of ultra-endurance exercise on inflammation and cardiovascular or renal consequences, as well as endocrine/energetic aspects, and examine the tissue recovery process over several days of extreme physical load. In a study published in BMC Medicine, Schütz et al. followed 44 ultramarathon runners over 4,487 km from South Italy to North Cape, Norway (the Trans Europe Foot Race 2009 and recorded daily sets of data from magnetic resonance imaging, psychometric, body composition and biological measurements. The findings will allow us to better understand the timecourse of degeneration/regeneration of some lower leg tissues such as knee joint cartilage, to differentiate running-induced from age-induced pathologies (for example, retropatelar arthritis and finally to assess the interindividual susceptibility to injuries. Moreover, it will also provide new information about the complex interplay between cerebral adaptations/alterations and hormonal influences resulting from endurance exercise and provide data on the dose-response relationship between exercise and brain structure/function. Overall, this study represents a unique attempt to investigate the limits of the adaptive response of human bodies. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/78

  19. Ectomycorrhizal fungal community structure of pinyon pines growing in two environmental extremes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, C.A.; Theimer, T.C.; Whitham, T.G.; Keim, P. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1998-07-01

    The authors used molecular techniques to examine the ectomycorrhizal fungal community associated with pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) growing in two soil types in a semiarid region of northern Arizona. Pinyon performance (e.g., growth, reproduction, water stress) has been shown to be markedly lower in cinder than in sandy-loam environments. Fungal community composition and richness were determined using RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis of ectomycorrhizal root tips collected from three sites within each soil type. Several patterns emerged from these analyses. First, communities in both cinder and sandy-loam soils were dominated by one or a few abundant ectomytcorrhizal types, a species abundance pattern common to many plant and animal communities. Second, unlike the pattern for many other organisms, ectomycorrhizal fungal type richness was not correlated with measures of ecosystem productivity such as soil nutrient and moisture levels; cinder and sandy-loam soils had similar numbers of ectomycorrhizal fungal types. Third, soil type and fungal community composition were linked, as cluster analysis demonstrated greater similarity of fungal communities from sites within soil types than between them. Fourth, a preliminary survey of 14--45 ectomycorrhizal root tips from each of 20 trees at one cinder site indicated that trees were dominated by one or a few ectomycorrhizal RFLP types. Fifth, the RFLP patterns of some fungal sporocarps matched those of ectomycorrhizal root tips, but many did not, indicating that many of the ectomycorrhizal fungi at these sites fruit infrequently, whereas other fungi with more abundant sporocarps may not form ectomycorrhiza.

  20. Stress of Conscience among psychiatric nursing staff in relation to environmental and individual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Eklund, Mona; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2012-03-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between environmental and individual factors and Stress of Conscience among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care. A questionnaire involving six different instruments measuring Stress of Conscience, the ward atmosphere, the psychosocial work environment, Perceived Stress, Moral Sensitivity, and Mastery was answered by 93 nursing staff at 12 psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden. The findings showed that Sense of Moral Burden, Mastery, Control at Work and Angry and Aggressive Behavior were related to Stress of Conscience. We conclude that Mastery and Control at Work seemed to work as protective factors, while Sense of Moral Burden and perceptions of Angry and Aggressive Behavior made the nursing staff more vulnerable to Stress of Conscience. Future research should investigate whether measures to increase the level of perceived control and being part of decision making will decrease the level of Stress of Conscience among the staff.

  1. Resistance of the Extreme Halophile Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 to Multiple Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygli, Patrick E.; Prajapati, Surendra; DeVeaux, Linda C.; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Mestari, Mohammed Amine; Wells, Douglas P.

    2009-03-01

    The model Archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 is an extreme halophile known for its resistance to multiple stressors, including electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation. It is a well-developed system with a completely sequenced genome and extensive post-genomic tools for the study of a variety of biological processes. To further understand the mechanisms of Halobacterium's, radiation resistance, we previously reported the selection for multiple independent highly resistant mutants using repeated exposure to high doses of 18-20 MeV electrons using a medical S-band Linac. Molecular analysis of the transcriptional profile of several of these mutants revealed a single common change: upregulation of the rfa3 operon. These genes encode proteins homologous to the subunits of eukaryotic Replication Protein A (RPA), a DNA binding protein with major roles in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. This operon has also been implicated in a somewhat lesser role in resistance of wild type Halobacterium to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting common mechanisms for resistance. To further understand the mechanism of radiation resistance in the mutant strains, we measured the survival after exposure to both electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation, UV-A, B, and C All mutant strains showed increased resistance to electrons when compared with the parent. However, the mutant strains do not display increased UV resistance, and in one case is more sensitive than the parent strain. Thus, the protective role of increased RPA expression within a cell may be specific to the DNA damage caused by the different physical effects induced by high energy electron-beam radiation.

  2. Morphological variations of wild populations of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) living in extreme environmental conditions in the Kenyan Rift-Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Ndiwa, T.C.; Nyingi, D. W.; Claude, J.; Agnèse, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we use geometric morphometric method to establish morphological differences between natural populations of Nile tilapia from two extreme environmental conditions (high temperature and salinity) in Kenya, and compare them to two populations from regions experiencing less extreme conditions. To determine genetic influence on morphology, we correlated genetic data with morphological data. The study observed significant morphological differences between all studied populations, inc...

  3. Effect of environmental stress factors on the uptake and survival of Campylobacter jejuni in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Qvortrup, Klaus; Wolff, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Background: Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre......-exposure to heat, starvation, oxidative or osmotic stresses encountered in the environment may affect the subsequent interaction of C. jejuni with free-living protozoa. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of environmental stress on expression of virulence-associated genes (ciaB, dnaJ, and htrA) of C....... jejuni and on its uptake by and intracellular survival within Acanthamoeba castellanii. Results: Heat, starvation and osmotic stress reduced the survival of C. jejuni significantly, whereas oxidative stress had no effect. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that the transcription of virulence genes...

  4. The microbial opsin homologue sop1 is involved in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum development and environmental stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang eLyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial opsins play a crucial role in responses to various environmental signals. Here, we report that the microbial opsin gene sop1 in the necrotrophic phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was dramatically up-regulated during infection and sclerotial development compared with the vegetative growth stage. Further study showed sop1 was essential for growth, sclerotial development and full virulence of S. sclerotiorum. Sop1-silenced transformants were more sensitive to high salt stress, fungicides and high osmotic stress. However, they were more tolerant to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain, suggesting that sop1 is involved in different stress responses and fungicide resistance, which plays a role in the environmental adaptability of S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, a Delta blast search showed that microbial opsins are not present in animals and almost all higher plants, indicating that as a predicted transmembrane protein, sop1 is a potential drug target for disease control of S. sclerotiorum.

  5. Predictable variation of range-sizes across an extreme environmental gradient in a lizard adaptive radiation: evolutionary and ecological inferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of current species geographic range-size variation reflect historical dynamics of dispersal and provide insights into future consequences under changing environments. Evidence suggests that climate warming exerts major damage on high latitude and elevation organisms, where changes are more severe and available space to disperse tracking historical niches is more limited. Species with longer generations (slower adaptive responses, such as vertebrates, and with restricted distributions (lower genetic diversity, higher inbreeding in these environments are expected to be particularly threatened by warming crises. However, a well-known macroecological generalization (Rapoport's rule predicts that species range-sizes increase with increasing latitude-elevation, thus counterbalancing the impact of climate change. Here, I investigate geographic range-size variation across an extreme environmental gradient and as a function of body size, in the prominent Liolaemus lizard adaptive radiation. Conventional and phylogenetic analyses revealed that latitudinal (but not elevational ranges significantly decrease with increasing latitude-elevation, while body size was unrelated to range-size. Evolutionarily, these results are insightful as they suggest a link between spatial environmental gradients and range-size evolution. However, ecologically, these results suggest that Liolaemus might be increasingly threatened if, as predicted by theory, ranges retract and contract continuously under persisting climate warming, potentially increasing extinction risks at high latitudes and elevations.

  6. Hurricane Sandy puts NJ hospital under extreme stress, highlighting vulnerabilities, areas requiring improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    When monster storm, Hurricane Sandy, struck the northeastern coast in late October, the emergency systems for many hospitals in the region were stressed beyond their limits. At least four hospitals in the region had to be evacuated, and many hospitals lost power and access to essential services. Using backup generators, CentraState Medical Center in Freehold, NJ, was able to keep its doors open throughout the emergency, but the event highlighted a number of vulnerabilities that administrators will work to improve. Demand for care spiked because people in the hospital's service area could not get in to see their primary care providers. The hospital established care areas next to its emergency department to handle the demand, and it also enabled physicians in the region to see patients in offices on an ambulatory campus, adjacent to the hospital. Emergency department visits increased by about 41% during the hurricane week, admits went up by about 50%, and the number patients sent to observation went up by 450%, according to hospital administrators. In the future, hospital leaders say practice drills need to regularly test for events that cause many systems to go down, rather then testing for one vulnerability at a time.

  7. Effect of environmental stress factors on the uptake and survival of Campylobacter jejuni in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Xuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre-exposure to heat, starvation, oxidative or osmotic stresses encountered in the environment may affect the subsequent interaction of C. jejuni with free-living protozoa. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of environmental stress on expression of virulence-associated genes (ciaB, dnaJ, and htrA of C. jejuni and on its uptake by and intracellular survival within Acanthamoeba castellanii. Results Heat, starvation and osmotic stress reduced the survival of C. jejuni significantly, whereas oxidative stress had no effect. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that the transcription of virulence genes was slightly up-regulated under heat and oxidative stresses but down-regulated under starvation and osmotic stresses, the htrA gene showing the largest down-regulation in response to osmotic stress. Pre-exposure of bacteria to low nutrient or osmotic stress reduced bacterial uptake by amoeba, but no effect of heat or oxidative stress was observed. Finally, C. jejuni rapidly lost viability within amoeba cells and pre-exposure to oxidative stress had no significant effect on intracellular survival. However, the numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered 5 h post-gentamicin treatment were lower with starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria than with control bacteria. Also, while ~1.5 × 103 colony forming unit/ml internalized bacteria could typically be recovered 24 h post-gentamicin treatment with control bacteria, no starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria could be recovered at this time point. Overall, pre-exposure of C. jejuni to environmental stresses did not promote intracellular survival in A. castellanii

  8. Effect of environmental stress factors on the uptake and survival of Campylobacter jejuni in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Xuan Thanh; Qvortrup, Klaus; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Creuzenet, Carole

    2012-10-11

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre-exposure to heat, starvation, oxidative or osmotic stresses encountered in the environment may affect the subsequent interaction of C. jejuni with free-living protozoa. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of environmental stress on expression of virulence-associated genes (ciaB, dnaJ, and htrA) of C. jejuni and on its uptake by and intracellular survival within Acanthamoeba castellanii. Heat, starvation and osmotic stress reduced the survival of C. jejuni significantly, whereas oxidative stress had no effect. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that the transcription of virulence genes was slightly up-regulated under heat and oxidative stresses but down-regulated under starvation and osmotic stresses, the htrA gene showing the largest down-regulation in response to osmotic stress. Pre-exposure of bacteria to low nutrient or osmotic stress reduced bacterial uptake by amoeba, but no effect of heat or oxidative stress was observed. Finally, C. jejuni rapidly lost viability within amoeba cells and pre-exposure to oxidative stress had no significant effect on intracellular survival. However, the numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered 5 h post-gentamicin treatment were lower with starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria than with control bacteria. Also, while ~1.5 × 103 colony forming unit/ml internalized bacteria could typically be recovered 24 h post-gentamicin treatment with control bacteria, no starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria could be recovered at this time point. Overall, pre-exposure of C. jejuni to environmental stresses did not promote intracellular survival in A. castellanii. Together, these findings suggest that the stress

  9. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-01-01

    Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature), and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice sho...

  10. Chemoprotective action of lotus seedpod procyanidins on oxidative stress in mice induced by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoping; Chen, Meng; Duan, Yuqing; Duan, Wenyi; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Yin, Chunchun; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing use of electromagnetic technology, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on biological systems, central neurotransmitter systems, and human health have attracted extensive attention worldwide. In this study, lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) were evaluated for their protective effects on ELF-EMF induced oxidative stress injury in mice. Sixty male ICR mice were used for the experiment. The mice were randomly divided into five equal groups. The control group did not receive LSPCs or ELF-EMF but orally received normal saline. The ELF-EMF group received ELF-EMF exposure plus normal saline orally. The other three groups received ELF-EMF exposure plus LSPCs orally (60, 90, or 120mg kg(-1).bw, respectively). Each group exposed to ELF-EMF at 8 mT, 4h day(-1) for 28 consecutive days after administration daily of LSPCs or normal saline to mice for 15 consecutive days with the exception of the control group. Thereafter, blood and cerebral cortex of the mice were analyzed for antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and malondialdehyde (MDA). LSPCs administration at different doses significantly inhibited oxidative stress damage of mice induced by ELF-EMF. LSPCs treatment augmented SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, GR and GST activity. Furthermore, administration significantly lowered MDA level in LSPCs treatment groups LSPCs. All results indicated LSPCs can effectively prevent oxidative stress injury induced by ELF-EMF exposure, which may be related to its ability of scavenging free radicals and stimulating antioxidant enzyme activity.

  11. Improving alkenone paleothermometry by incorporating cell response to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, F. G.; Wolfe, G. V.; Mix, A. C.; Sparrow, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    A linear, global coretop calibration now exists for the alkenone unsaturation index Uk’37 and mean annual SST (maSST). The calibration equation is statistically the same as that for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) grown exponentially under isothermal conditions in batch culture. Although the calibration has been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still exists, stemming from two key factors: genetic variability among strains, and physiologic response to stress and growth state. We will discuss in this talk the extent that Uk’37 and other aspects of cellular alkenone composition vary in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation in isothermal (15^oC) batch cultures of Ehux isolated from three different ocean locations - a Norwegian fjord (CCMP370); the subarctic Pacific (CCMP1742) and the Sargasso Sea (CCMP 372). We will also present results from detailed alkenone compositional analysis in thirty surface sediments collected between ˜50^oS and 10^oS along the Chile-Peru margin in the SE Pacific Ocean. The Uk’37 - maSST relationship derived from this dataset is statistically indistinguishable from the global coretop calibration. But, comparison of other compositional properties shows that the alkenone signature preserved in the Chile-Peru margin sediments is also not consistent with that expressed by exponentially growing cells of any of the three cultured Ehux strains. Alkenone signatures preserved in sediments appear more like that in algal cells that have experienced some level of non-thermal, physiological stress such as nutrient and light limitation. Given our observations as a precedent, improved confidence in paleotemperature estimates derived from Uk’37 measurements may require interpretation of unsaturation patterns in full context with the overall alkenone composition preserved in the sediment.

  12. Environmental Social Stress, Paranoia and Psychosis Liability: A Virtual Reality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Pot-Kolder, Roos; Counotte, Jacqueline; van Os, Jim; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The impact of social environments on mental states is difficult to assess, limiting the understanding of which aspects of the social environment contribute to the onset of psychotic symptoms and how individual characteristics moderate this outcome. This study aimed to test sensitivity to environmental social stress as a mechanism of psychosis using Virtual Reality (VR) experiments. Fifty-five patients with recent onset psychotic disorder, 20 patients at ultra high risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of patients with psychosis, and 53 controls walked 5 times in a virtual bar with different levels of environmental social stress. Virtual social stressors were population density, ethnic density and hostility. Paranoia about virtual humans and subjective distress in response to virtual social stress exposures were measured with State Social Paranoia Scale (SSPS) and self-rated momentary subjective distress (SUD), respectively. Pre-existing (subclinical) symptoms were assessed with the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), Green Paranoid Thoughts Scale (GPTS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). Paranoia and subjective distress increased with degree of social stress in the environment. Psychosis liability and pre-existing symptoms, in particular negative affect, positively impacted the level of paranoia and distress in response to social stress. These results provide experimental evidence that heightened sensitivity to environmental social stress may play an important role in the onset and course of psychosis.

  13. Rab from the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: characterization and its regulation upon environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Jin; Chen, Chu-Xian; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-10-01

    With the destruction of the ecological environment, shrimp cultivation in China has been seriously affected by outbreaks of infectious diseases. Rab, which belong to small GTPase Ras superfamily, can regulate multiple steps in eukaryotic vesicle trafficking including vesicle budding, vesicle tethering, and membrane fusion. Knowledge of Rab in shrimp is essential to understanding regulation and detoxification mechanisms of environmental stress. In this study, we analyzed the functions of Rab from the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Full-length cDNA of Rab was obtained, which was 751 bp long, with open reading frame encoding 206 amino acids. In this study, for the first time, the gene expression of Rab of L. vannamei was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR after exposure to five kinds of environmental stresses (bacteria, pH, Cd, salinity and low temperature). The results demonstrate that Rab is sensitive and involved in bacteria, pH, and Cd stress responses and Rab is more sensitive to bacteria than other stresses. Therefore we infer that Rab may have relationship with the anti-stress mechanism induced by environment stress in shrimp and Rab could be used as critical biomarkers for environmental quality assessment.

  14. The impact of extreme environmental factors on the mineralization potential of the soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinyakova, Natalia; Semenov, Vyacheslav

    2016-04-01

    Warming, drying, wetting are the prevalent disturbing natural impacts that affect the upper layers of uncultivated and arable soils. The effect of drying-wetting cycles act as a physiological stress for the soil microbial community and cause changes in its structure, the partial death or lysis of the microbial biomass. The mobilization of the SOM and the stabilization of the potentially mineralizable components lead to change of mineralization potential in the soil. To test the effects of different moisture regime on plant growth and soil biological properties, plot experiment with the gray forest soil including trials with plants (corn) and bare fallow was performed. Different regimes of soil moisture (conditionally optimal, relatively deficient soil moisture and repeated cycles of drying-wetting) were created. Control of soil moisture was taken every two or three days. Gas sampling was carried out using closed chambers. Soil samples were collected at the end of the pot experiment. The potentially mineralizable content of soil organic carbon (SOC) was measured by biokinetic method based on (1) aerobic incubation of soil samples under constant temperature and moisture conditions during 158 days, (2) quantitation of C-CO2, and (3) fitting of C-CO2 cumulative curve by a model of first-order kinetic. Total soil organic carbon was measured by Tyrin's wet chemical oxidation method. Permanent deficient moisture in the soil favored the preservation of potentially mineralizable SOC. Two repeated cycles of drying-wetting did not reduce the potentially mineralizable carbon content in comparison with control under optimal soil moisture during 90 days of experiment. The emission loss of C-CO2 from the soil with plants was 1.4-1.7 times higher than the decrease of potentially mineralizable SOC due to the contribution of root respiration. On the contrary, the decrease of potentially mineralized SOC in the soil without plants was 1.1-1.2 times larger than C-CO2 emissions from the

  15. Environmental Proteomics: Changes in the Proteome of Marine Organisms in Response to Environmental Stress, Pollutants, Infection, Symbiosis, and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Environmental proteomics, the study of changes in the abundance of proteins and their post-translational modifications, has become a powerful tool for generating hypotheses regarding how the environment affects the biology of marine organisms. Proteomics discovers hitherto unknown cellular effects of environmental stressors such as changes in thermal, osmotic, and anaerobic conditions. Proteomic analyses have advanced the characterization of the biological effects of pollutants and identified comprehensive and pollutant-specific sets of biomarkers, especially those highlighting post-translational modifications. Proteomic analyses of infected organisms have highlighted the broader changes occurring during immune responses and how the same pathways are attenuated during the maintenance of symbiotic relationships. Finally, proteomic changes occurring during the early life stages of marine organisms emphasize the importance of signaling events during development in a rapidly changing environment. Changes in proteins functioning in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein stabilization and turnover, oxidative stress, and signaling are common responses to environmental change.

  16. Effects of inter-varietal diversity, biotic stresses and environmental productivity on grain yield of spring barley variety mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiær, Lars Pødenphant; Skovgaard, Ib M.; Østergård, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    than their component varieties when accounting also for the general response to environmental productivity. Hence, most mixtures adapted slightly better to environmental productivity and were less sensitive to environmental stress than their component varieties. We conclude that the efficacy of variety...... mixtures may be enhanced by mixing relatively high-yielding varieties differing in responsiveness to environmental productivity....

  17. Influence of environmental enrichment on hippocampal synapses in adolescent offspring of mothers exposed to prenatal stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaojin Peng; Xiaohong Jian; Lihua Liu; Jianbin Tong; Deliang Lei

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment attenuates hippocampal synaptic injury induced by prenatal stress in offspring.However, the influence of hippocampal synaptic changes and regional differences in prenatal stress remains poorly understood.The present study induced stress in Sprague Dawley rats, which were at gestational age 13 19 days.Following weaning, the offspring were raised in an enriched environment to establish models of stress+enriched environment.Dendritic spine density and synaptophysin expression were detected in hippocampal neurons using Golgi staining and western blot analysis, respectively.Results showed that enriched environment increased dendritic spine density of apical dendrites in CA1 pyramidal cells and basal dendrites of granular cells in the outer layer of the dentate gyrus.In addition, hippocampal synaptophysin expression increased and the effects of prenatal stress on neuronal dendritic spines were reversed in adolescence.

  18. Environmental Effects of Electrically-Stressed Sulfur Hexafluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaiologopoulou Maria D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High Voltage (HV equipment such as power switches, current or voltage transformers, and flexible HV transmission lines insulated by pressurized SF6 (or SF6/N2 mixtures offer component compactness, high reliability and low maintenance demands compared to all conventionally insulating components (i.e. air, organic solid insulants, and mineral oils. Though SF6 insulation for HV applications was initially proposed during late ‘60s, it was spread worldwide rapidly due to offered significant economic advantages, and now SF6 GIS substations dominate the share in electrical networks in densely populated districts. However, it was in mid ‘90s when the first ecological concerns were brought about the SF6 gas use. These mainly stream out by either of the following facts: (i SF6 is a strong green-house gas with a global warming potential of almost 25,000 greater than that of CO2 and its molecules exhibit an exceptionally high lifetime in earth atmosphere estimated to vary between 750 and 2500 years, and (ii when electrically stressed (independent of temperature i.e. either high-power arcs developing at 20,000K during the switching actions, or corona discharges developing at 300K due to high electric field effects toxic byproducts may be formed, some having high cyto-toxicities i.e. S2F10, oxyfluorides, H2S and HF.

  19. Environmental Effects of Electrically-Stressed Sulfur Hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervos, Constantine T.; Mergos, John A.; Palaiologopoulou, Maria D.

    2012-10-01

    High Voltage (HV) equipment such as power switches, current or voltage transformers, and flexible HV transmission lines insulated by pressurized SF6 (or SF6/N2 mixtures) offer component compactness, high reliability and low maintenance demands compared to all conventionally insulating components (i.e. air, organic solid insulants, and mineral oils). Though SF6 insulation for HV applications was initially proposed during late `60s, it was spread worldwide rapidly due to offered significant economic advantages, and now SF6 GIS substations dominate the share in electrical networks in densely populated districts. However, it was in mid `90s when the first ecological concerns were brought about the SF6 gas use. These mainly stream out by either of the following facts: (i) SF6 is a strong green-house gas with a global warming potential of almost 25,000 greater than that of CO2 and its molecules exhibit an exceptionally high lifetime in earth atmosphere estimated to vary between 750 and 2500 years, and (ii) when electrically stressed (independent of temperature i.e. either high-power arcs developing at 20,000K during the switching actions, or corona discharges developing at 300K due to high electric field effects) toxic byproducts may be formed, some having high cyto-toxicities i.e. S2F10, oxyfluorides, H2S and HF.

  20. Formation of diapause cyst shell in brine shrimp, Artemia parthenogenetica, and its resistance role in environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Lei; Zhao, Yang; Dai, Zhong-Min; Chen, Han-Min; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2009-06-19

    Artemia has attracted much attention for its ability to produce encysted embryos wrapped in a protective shell when subject to extremely harsh environmental conditions. However, what the cyst shell is synthesized from and how the formative process is performed remains, as yet, largely unknown. Over 20 oviparous specifically expressed genes were identified through screening the subtracted cDNA library enriched between oviparous and ovoviviparous Artemia ovisacs. Among them, a shell gland-specifically expressed gene (SGEG) has been found to be involved in the cyst shell formation. Lacking SGEG protein (by RNA interference) caused the cyst shell to become translucent and the chorion layer of the shell to become less compact and pultaceous and to show a marked decrease of iron composition within the shell. The RNA interference induced defective diapause cysts with a totally compromised resistibility to UV irradiation, extremely large temperature differences, osmotic pressure, dryness, and organic solvent stresses. In contrast, the natural cyst would provide adequate protection from all such factors. SGEG contains a 345-bp open reading frame, and its consequentially translated peptide consists of a 33-amino acid residue putative signal peptide and an 81-amino acid residue mature peptide. The results of Northern blotting and in situ hybridization indicate that the gene is specifically expressed in the cells of shell glands during the period of diapause cyst formation of oviparous Artemia. This investigation adds strong insight into the mechanism of cyst shell formation of Artemia and may be applicable to other areas of research in extremophile biology.

  1. Study of radon measurement instrumentation in extreme environmental conditions; Estudio de la instrumentacion de medida de radon en condiciones ambientales extremas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, V.; Baixeras, C.; Amgarou, K.; Font, L.; Vargas, A.; Grossi, C.

    2011-07-01

    Within the framework of the scientific project of the Nuclear Safety Council ''Study of environmental monitoring instrumentation and measurement of radon in extreme environmental conditions' at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona has established a partnership with the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) to conduct a study to identify the most appropriate filters to minimize the influence of measurement conditions, particularly with respect to moisture on the response of continuous radon detectors and integrators. (Author)

  2. Global gradients of coral exposure to environmental stresses and implications for local management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Maina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The decline of coral reefs globally underscores the need for a spatial assessment of their exposure to multiple environmental stressors to estimate vulnerability and evaluate potential counter-measures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study combined global spatial gradients of coral exposure to radiation stress factors (temperature, UV light and doldrums, stress-reinforcing factors (sedimentation and eutrophication, and stress-reducing factors (temperature variability and tidal amplitude to produce a global map of coral exposure and identify areas where exposure depends on factors that can be locally managed. A systems analytical approach was used to define interactions between radiation stress variables, stress reinforcing variables and stress reducing variables. Fuzzy logic and spatial ordinations were employed to quantify coral exposure to these stressors. Globally, corals are exposed to radiation and reinforcing stress, albeit with high spatial variability within regions. Based on ordination of exposure grades, regions group into two clusters. The first cluster was composed of severely exposed regions with high radiation and low reducing stress scores (South East Asia, Micronesia, Eastern Pacific and the central Indian Ocean or alternatively high reinforcing stress scores (the Middle East and the Western Australia. The second cluster was composed of moderately to highly exposed regions with moderate to high scores in both radiation and reducing factors (Caribbean, Great Barrier Reef (GBR, Central Pacific, Polynesia and the western Indian Ocean where the GBR was strongly associated with reinforcing stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite radiation stress being the most dominant stressor, the exposure of coral reefs could be reduced by locally managing chronic human impacts that act to reinforce radiation stress. Future research and management efforts should focus on incorporating the factors that mitigate the effect of

  3. Zooplankton Responses In A Tropical System With Environmental Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Javier Aranguren Riaño

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Processes of environmental transformation that currently occur in the climatic change context generate changes in ecosystems and biological communities. ¿How populations respond to these stressors? ¿what effects could occur on taxonomic and ecological diversity? The taxonomic composition and structure of the zooplankton was analyzed with relationship to environmental changes in a tropical water reservoir located at 6º02`18``N and 73º29`16`` W. During four months, samples were taken weekly covering stations of low, medium, and high precipitation. A high degree of temporal variability was established, it associated with a short hydraulic retention time estimated at 8 days.  Nine species were collected, of which Keratella tropica tropica and Thermocyclops decipiens were the two most abundant and constant species. Found values of H’ diversity and S richness were considered low, corresponding to a little mature community associated with a fluctuating physical environment and supported by high variation coefficients of electrical conductivity and Sechhi disk transparency. Drastic variations on the system volume in short time lapses generate important changes in the physical expression of system with a direct effect on composition and structure of the zooplankton. In general, the response model of the zooplankton in the reservoir according to the statement by the intermediate disturbance hypothesis.  RESPUESTAS DEL ZOOPLANCTON EN UN SISTEMA TROPICAL CON ALTA TENSIÓN AMBIENTAL Los procesos de transformación ambiental que se dan en la actualidad, en un marco de cambio climático, generan modificaciones en los ecosistemas y comunidades biológicas, ¿Cómo responden las poblaciones a estos factores de tensión? ¿Qué efectos se darían sobre la diversidad taxonómica y ecológica? Se analizó la variación de la composición taxonómica y estructura del zooplancton en función de los cambios ambientales en un reservorio tropical ubicado a 6º

  4. The University of California Institute of Environmental Stress Marathon Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1973, the Institute of Environmental Stress of the University of California-Santa Barbara, under the direction of Steven M. Horvath, began a series of field and laboratory studies of marathon runners during competition. As one of Horvath's graduate students, many of these studies became part of my doctoral dissertation. The rationale for…

  5. The University of California Institute of Environmental Stress Marathon Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1973, the Institute of Environmental Stress of the University of California-Santa Barbara, under the direction of Steven M. Horvath, began a series of field and laboratory studies of marathon runners during competition. As one of Horvath's graduate students, many of these studies became part of my doctoral dissertation. The rationale for…

  6. Obtaining Heat Stress Measurements. Module 15. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on obtaining heat stress measurements. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and describing the…

  7. Toward a New Understanding of Early Menarche: The Role of Environmental Stress in Pubertal Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierson, Michelle; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined divorce and interparental conflict in light of theory that environmental stress may trigger early menarche in adolescents. Findings from 71 adolescent females and their mothers revealed that, compared to girls from intact families, those from divorced families had earlier onset of menarche. Higher maternal reports of interparental…

  8. Early perturbation in mitochondria redox homeostasis in response to environmental stress predicts cell fate in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Creveld, Shiri Graff; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Schatz, Daniella; Koren, Ilan; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous marine photosynthetic eukaryotes that are responsible for about 20% of global photosynthesis. Nevertheless, little is known about the redox-based mechanisms that mediate diatom sensing and acclimation to environmental stress. Here we used a redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein sensor targeted to various subcellular organelles in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, to map the spatial and temporal oxidation patterns in response to environmental stresses. Specific organelle oxidation patterns were found in response to various stress conditions such as oxidative stress, nutrient limitation and exposure to diatom-derived infochemicals. We found a strong correlation between the mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) redox potential (EGSH) and subsequent induction of cell death in response to the diatom-derived unsaturated aldehyde 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DD), and a volatile halocarbon (BrCN) that mediate trophic-level interactions in marine diatoms. Induction of cell death in response to DD was mediated by oxidation of mitochondrial EGSH and was reversible by application of GSH only within a narrow time frame. We found that cell fate can be accurately predicted by a distinct life-death threshold of mitochondrial EGSH (-335 mV). We propose that compartmentalized redox-based signaling can integrate the input of diverse environmental cues and will determine cell fate decisions as part of algal acclimation to stress conditions.

  9. Environmental stress speeds up DNA replication in Pseudomonas putida in chemostat cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Sarah; Jahn, Michael; Koepff, Joachim; Müller, Susann; Takors, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Cellular response to different types of stress is the hallmark of the cell's strategy for survival. How organisms adjust their cell cycle dynamics to compensate for changes in environmental conditions is an important unanswered question in bacterial physiology. A cell using binary fission for reproduction passes through three stages during its cell cycle: a stage from cell birth to initiation of replication, a DNA replication phase and a period of cell division. We present a detailed analysis of durations of cell cycle phases, investigating their dynamics under environmental stress conditions. Applying continuous steady state cultivations (chemostats), the DNA content of a Pseudomonas putida KT2440 population was quantified with flow cytometry at distinct growth rates. Data-driven modeling revealed that under stress conditions, such as oxygen deprivation, solvent exposure and decreased iron availability, DNA replication was accelerated correlated to the severity of the imposed stress (up to 1.9-fold). Cells maintained constant growth rates by balancing the shortened replication phase with extended cell cycle phases before and after replication. Transcriptome data underpin the transcriptional upregulation of crucial genes of the replication machinery. Hence adaption of DNA replication speed appears to be an important strategy to withstand environmental stress.

  10. Resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize and peanut: Molecular biology, breeding, environmental stress, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake C. Fountain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The colonization of maize (Zea mays L. and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the contamination of kernels with carcinogenic mycotoxins known as aflatoxins leading to economic losses and potential health threats to humans. The regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis in various Aspergillus spp. has been extensively studied, and has been shown to be related to oxidative stress responses. Given that environmental stresses such as drought and heat stress result in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS within host plant tissues, host-derived ROS may play an important role in cross-kingdom communication between host plants and A. flavus. Recent technological advances in plant breeding have provided the tools necessary to study and apply knowledge derived from metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies in the context of productive breeding populations. Here, we review the current understanding of the potential roles of environmental stress, ROS, and aflatoxin in the interaction between A. flavus and its host plants, and the current status in molecular breeding and marker discovery for resistance to A. flavus colonization and aflatoxin contamination in maize and peanut. We will also propose future directions and a working model for continuing research efforts linking environmental stress tolerance and aflatoxin contamination resistance in maize and peanut.

  11. An overview of the contribution of studies with cladocerans to environmental stress research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Luiz Suhett

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cladocerans are microcrustaceans component of the zooplankton in a wide array of aquatic ecosystems. These organisms, in particular the genus Daphnia, have been widely used model organisms in studies ranging from biomedical sciences to ecology. Here, we present an overview of the contribution of studies with cladocerans to understanding the consequences at different levels of biological organization of stress induced by environmental factors. We discuss how some characteristics of cladocerans (e.g., small body size, short life cycles, cyclic parthenogenesis make them convenient models for such studies, with a particular comparison with other major zooplanktonic taxa. Then we illustrate the contribution of cladocerans to stress research with examples encompassing stress responses spanning from the molecular to the populational level. Most worth of note are recent studies that presented evidence of beneficial consequences of mild stress caused by natural stressors (cross-tolerance, which may be passed along across generations, favoring individual survival and species persistence in fluctuating environments. This would be particularly relevant for environments prone to frequent natural environmental fluctuations, such as coastal lagoons and other shallow aquatic ecosystems. Based on reviewed studies, a conceptual model is presented summarizing the potential effects of a first stressor on the organism's resistance to a second one. We finish by highlighting some gaps on environmental stress research that could benefit from further studies using cladocerans as model organisms.

  12. Effects of aluminum and extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on oxidative stress and memory in brain of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanxin; Zhang, Yanwen; Jia, Shujie; Liu, Junkang; Liu, Yanxia; Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Lei

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of aluminum and extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) on oxidative stress and memory of SPF Kunming mice. Sixty male SPF Kunming mice were divided randomly into four groups: control group, ELF-MF group (2 mT, 4 h/day), load aluminum group (200 mg aluminum/kg, 0.1 ml/10 g), and ELF-MF + aluminum group (2 mT, 4 h/day, 200 mg aluminum/kg). After 8 weeks of treatment, the mice of three experiment groups (ELF-MF group, load aluminum group, and ELF-MF + aluminum group) exhibited firstly the learning memory impairment, appearing that the escaping latency to the platform was prolonged and percentage in the platform quadrant was reduced in the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Secondly are the pathologic abnormalities including neuronal cell loss and overexpression of phosphorylated tau protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. On the other hand, the markers of oxidative stress were determined in mice brain and serum. The results showed a statistically significant decrease in superoxide dismutase activity and increase in the levels of malondialdehyde in the ELF-MF group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), load aluminum group (P < 0.01), and ELF-MF + aluminum group (P < 0.01). However, the treatment with ELF-MF + aluminum induced no more damage than ELF-MF and aluminum did, respectively. In conclusion, both aluminum and ELF-MF could impact on learning memory and pro-oxidative function in Kunming mice. However, there was no evidence of any association between ELF-MF exposure with aluminum loading.

  13. Fluxomics of the Eastern Oyster for Environmental Stress Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey P. Tikunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of 2-13C/15N-glycine and U-13C-glucose was determined in four tissue blocks (adductor muscle, stomach and digestive gland, mantle, and gills of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica using proton (1H and carbon-13 (13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The oysters were treated in aerated seawater with three treatments (5.5 mM U-13C-glucose, 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine, and 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine and the relative mass balance and 13C fractional enrichments were determined in the four tissue blocks. In all tissues, glycine was metabolized by the glycine cycle forming serine exclusively in the mitochondria by the glycine cleavage system forming 2,3-13C-serine. In muscle, a minor amount of serine-derived pyruvate entered the Krebs cycle as substantiated by detection of a trace of 2,3-13C-aspartate. In all tissues, U-13C-glucose formed glycogen by glycogen synthesis, alanine by glycolysis, and glutamate and aspartate through the Krebs cycle. Alanine was formed exclusively from glucose via alanine transaminase and not glycine via alanine-glyoxylate transaminase. Based on isotopomer analysis, pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase appeared to be equal points for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle. In the 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine emergence treatment used to simulate 12 h of “low tide”, oysters accumulated more 13C-labeled metabolites, including both anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic Krebs cycle intermediates. The aerobic metabolites could be the biochemical result of the gaping behavior of mollusks during emergence. The change in tissue distribution and mass balance of 13C-labeled nutrients (U-13C-glucose and 2-13C/15N-glycine provides the basis for a new quantitative fluxomic method for elucidating sub-lethal environmental effects in marine organisms called whole body mass balance phenotyping (WoMBaP.

  14. Responses to Environmental Stress in Plants Adapted to Mediterranean Gypsum Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep V. LLINARES

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum areas are stressful environments inhabited by gypsophytes, plants that are exclusive for such habitats, and by plants that grow on gypsum but also on other soil types, the so-called gypsovags. To investigate possible differences between gypsovags and gypsophytes with respect to basic stress response mechanisms, two common osmolytes, glycine betaine and total soluble sugars, as well as monovalent (Na+ and K+ and bivalent (Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations, were quantified, under field conditions, in two Iberian endemic gypsophytes (Gypsophila struthium subsp. hispanica and Ononis tridentata and two common Mediterranean gypsovags (Rosmarinus officinalis and Helianthemum syriacum. Their spatial variation according to a topographic gradient and their temporal variation over a period of three successive seasons were correlated with climatic data and soil characteristics. This analysis confirmed that water stress is the main environmental stress factor in gypsum habitats, whereas the percentage of gypsum in the soil does not seem to play any relevant role in the activation of stress responses in plants. Glycine betaine may contribute to stress tolerance in the gypsophytes, but not in the gypsovags, according to the close correlation found between the level of this osmolyte and the gypsophily of the investigated taxa. Cation contents in the plants did not correlate with those present in the soil, but the gypsophytes have higher levels of Ca2+ and Mg2+ than the gypsovags, under all environmental conditions, which may represent an adaptation mechanism to their specific habitat.

  15. Extracellular and cellular Hsp72 differ as biomarkers in acute exercise/environmental stress and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E C-H; Muñoz, C X; McDermott, B P; Beasley, K N; Yamamoto, L M; Hom, L L; Casa, D J; Armstrong, L E; Kraemer, W J; Anderson, J M; Maresh, C M

    2017-01-01

    Stress-inducible Hsp72 is a potential biomarker to track risk of exertional heat illness during exercise/environmental stress. Characterization of extracellular (eHsp72) vs cellular Hsp72 (iHsp72) responses is required to define the appropriate use of Hsp72 as a reliable biomarker. In each of four repeat visits, participants (n = 6 men, 4 trials; total n = 24): (a) passively dehydrated overnight, (b) exercised (2 h) with no fluid in a hot, humid environmental chamber, (c) rested and rehydrated (1 h), (d) maximally exercised for 0.5 h, and (e) returned after 24 h of at-home recovery and rehydration. We measured rectal temperature, hydration status (% body mass loss, urine markers, serum osmolality), and Hsp72 (ELISA, flow cytometry. eHsp72 (circulating) and iHsp72 (CD3(+) PBMCs) correlated (P stresses. eHsp72 immediately post-exercise (>15% above baseline, P stress, using cellular Hsp72 as an indicator of lasting effects of stress into recovery may be most appropriate for determining long-term effects of stress on risk for exertional heat illness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Environmental maternal effects mediate the resistance of maritime pine to biotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Vivas

    Full Text Available The resistance to abiotic stress is increasingly recognised as being impacted by maternal effects, given that environmental conditions experienced by parent (mother trees affect stress tolerance in offspring. We hypothesised that abiotic environmental maternal effects may also mediate the resistance of trees to biotic stress. The influence of maternal environment and maternal genotype and the interaction of these two factors on early resistance of Pinus pinaster half-sibs to the Fusarium circinatum pathogen was studied using 10 mother genotypes clonally replicated in two contrasting environments. Necrosis length of infected seedlings was 16% shorter in seedlings grown from favourable maternal environment seeds than in seedlings grown from unfavourable maternal environment seeds. Damage caused by F. circinatum was mediated by maternal environment and maternal genotype, but not by seed mass. Mechanisms unrelated to seed provisioning, perhaps of epigenetic nature, were probably involved in the transgenerational plasticity of P. pinaster, mediating its resistance to biotic stress. Our findings suggest that the transgenerational resistance of pines due to an abiotic stress may interact with the defensive response of pines to a biotic stress.

  17. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the behaviour, physiology and stress protein levels of desert locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Shepherd, Sebastian; Sharkh, Suleiman; Jackson, Christopher W; Newland, Philip L

    2016-11-03

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are present throughout the modern world and are derived from many man-made sources including overhead transmission lines. The risks of extremely-low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are particularly poorly understood especially at high field strengths as they are rarely encountered at ground level. Flying insects, however, can approach close to high field strength transmission lines prompting the question as to how these high levels of exposure affect behaviour and physiology. Here we utilise the accessible nervous system of the locust to ask how exposure to high levels of ELF EMF impact at multiple levels. We show that exposure to ELF EMFs above 4 mT leads to reduced walking. Moreover, intracellular recordings from an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron, show increased spike latency and a broadening of its spike in exposed animals. In addition, hind leg kick force, produced by stimulating the extensor tibiae muscle, was reduced following exposure, while stress-protein levels (Hsp70) increased. Together these results suggest that ELF EMF exposure has the capacity to cause dramatic effects from behaviour to physiology and protein expression, and this study lays the foundation to explore the ecological significance of these effects in other flying insects.

  18. Leaf developmental stability of Platanus acerifolia under urban environmental stress and its implication as an environmental indicator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; WANG Xiangrong

    2006-01-01

    The developmental stability indices,leaf width based fluctuating asymmetry (FA1),and lateral vein length based directional asymmetry (RDA1) of Platanus acerifolia were studied.All the leaves were sampled from 14 sites that were categorized based on different urban environmental stress levels (UESL) in Shanghai metropolitan,China.Besides,foliar stomatal density and stomatal length were also studied as the subsidiary indices to test the availability of developmental stability indices as the indicator under a stressful environment.Results showed seasonal variation of FA1 and RDA1 existed among the 14 sites,but the data showed significant negative correlation between FA1 and UESL (FA1=0.029-0.000 9UESL+0.000 3UESL2,r=0.766 5,P=0.001 4).However,a similar trend was not found between RDA1 and UESL.Furthermore,the significant correlation among FA1 and leaf stomatal length and stomatal density implied they could be used as indicators of urban stress levels on a small scale.It seemed that RDA1 was possibly a normal parameter during leaf development but it was unavailable for use as an indicator of urban stresses.

  19. Environmental emigration stress of slope farmland in the Three Gorges area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The project of 'grain for green', to restore woodland and grass by retreating from slopefarmland, as a fundamental measure of eeo-environmental rehabilitation, is being conducted in thereservoir area of the Three Gorges gradually. However, the de-farming of slope farmland will reducethe amount of farmland in de-farmed areas, especially in the areas with concentrated slope farmland,which would cause the problems of environmental emigration. The people who cannot regain enoughfarmland by relocating farmlands within village after de-farming and have to emigrate to other placesare called environmental emigrants or ecological emigrants. In the research, a de-farming stress indexmodel and an environmental emigration model are developed based on GRID data, and the potentialamount of environmental emigration caused by de-farming of slope farmland in the reservoir area issimulated aided with GIS. The simulation indicates that the potential emigration amount caused byde-farming is quite large. When the de-farming stress index reaches 40%, the amount is as large as890,000 people, which is equivalent to the emigrants caused by the submergence of the ThreeGorges reservoir. So it should be considered as a big problem during the eco-environmentalrehabilitation in this area. Some suggestions are raised to tackle the problem. Firstly, the emigrationplan should be included in the de-farming plan. Secondly, some provinces, especially those located inthe lower reaches of the Yangtze River, should accommodate part of the environmental emigrants.

  20. Expression of steroid 5α-reductase isozymes in prostate of adult rats after environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Pilar; Torres, Jesús M; Castro, Beatriz; Olmo, Asunción; del Moral, Raimundo G; Ortega, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    The elevated incidence of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy is a cause of increasing public health concern in the Western world. The normal and pathological growth of the prostate are both dependent on stimulation by dihydrotestosterone, which is synthesized from circulating testosterone by two 5α-reductase (5α-R) isozymes, 5α-reductase type 1 (5α-R1) and 5α-reductase type 2 (5α-R2). Both isozymes have been implicated in prostate disease. We used quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, to quantify mRNA and protein levels of 5α-R isozymes in the ventral prostate of adult rats under environmental stress conditions analogous to those found in some common workplace situations, i.e. artificial light, excessive heat, and the sensation of immobility in a small space. Transcription and expression levels of both 5α-R isozymes were significantly higher in environmentally stressed rats than in unstressed rats. Increased 5α-R isozyme levels may play a role in the development or maintenance of prostate disease. Further research is warranted to explore these effects of environmental stress on human health and their implications for environmental and occupational health policies. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  1. A theoretical model of the evolution of actuarial senescence under environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, H; Cohen, A A; Isaksson, C

    2015-11-01

    Free-living organisms are exposed to a wide range of stressors, all of which can disrupt components of stress-related and detoxification physiology. The subsequent accumulation of somatic damage is widely believed to play a major role in the evolution of senescence. Organisms have evolved sophisticated physiological regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in response to environmental perturbations, but these systems are likely to be constrained in their ability to optimise robustness to multiple stressors due to functional correlations among related traits. While evolutionary change can accelerate due to human ecological impacts, it remains to be understood how exposure to multiple environmental stressors could affect senescence rates and subsequently population dynamics and fitness. We used a theoretical evolutionary framework to quantify the potential consequences for the evolution of actuarial senescence in response to exposure to simultaneous physiological stressors--one versus multiple and additive versus synergistic--in a hypothetical population of avian "urban adapters". In a model in which multiple stressors have additive effects on physiology, species may retain greater capacity to recover, or respond adaptively, to environmental challenges. However, in the presence of high synergy, physiological dysregulation suddenly occurs, leading to a rapid increase in age-dependent mortality and subsequent population collapse. Our results suggest that, if the synergistic model is correct, population crashes in environmentally-stressed species could happen quickly and with little warning, as physiological thresholds of stress resistance are overcome.

  2. Thermoregulatory responses to environmental toxicants: the interaction of thermal stress and toxicant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Lisa R

    2008-11-15

    Thermal stress can have a profound impact on the physiological responses that are elicited following environmental toxicant exposure. The efficacy by which toxicants enter the body is directly influenced by thermoregulatory effector responses that are evoked in response to high ambient temperatures. In mammals, the thermoregulatory response to heat stress consists of an increase in skin blood flow and moistening of the skin surface to dissipate core heat to the environment. These physiological responses may exacerbate chemical toxicity due to increased permeability of the skin, which facilitates the cutaneous absorption of many environmental toxicants. The core temperature responses that are elicited in response to high ambient temperatures, toxicant exposure or both can also have a profound impact on the ability of an organism to survive the insult. In small rodents, the thermoregulatory response to thermal stress and many environmental toxicants (such as organophosphate compounds) is often biphasic in nature, consisting initially of a regulated reduction in core temperature (i.e., hypothermia) followed by fever. Hypothermia is an important thermoregulatory survival strategy that is used by small rodents to diminish the effect of severe environmental insults on tissue homeostasis. The protective effect of hypothermia is realized by its effects on chemical toxicity as molecular and cellular processes, such as lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species, are minimized at reduced core temperatures. The beneficial effects of fever are unknown under these conditions. Perspective is provided on the applicability of data obtained in rodent models to the human condition.

  3. Minimal evidence for consistent changes in maize DNA methylation patterns following environmental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Eichten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a chromatin modification that is sometimes associated with epigenetic regulation of gene expression. As DNA methylation can be reversible at some loci, it is possible that methylation patterns may change within an organism that is subjected to environmental stress. In order to assess the effects of abiotic stress on DNA methylation patterns in maize (Zea mays, seeding plants were subjected to heat, cold, and UV stress treatments. Tissue was later collected from individual adult plants that had been subjected to stress or control treatments and used to perform DNA methylation profiling to determine whether there were consistent changes in DNA methylation triggered by specific stress treatments. DNA methylation profiling was performed by immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by microarray hybridization to allow for quantitative estimates of DNA methylation abundance throughout the low-copy portion of the maize genome. By comparing the DNA methylation profiles of each individual plant to the average of the control plants it was possible to identify regions of the genome with variable DNA methylation. However, we did not find evidence of consistent DNA methylation changes resulting from the stress treatments used in this study. Instead, the data suggest that there is a low-rate of stochastic variation that is present in both control and stressed plants.

  4. Effect of severe environmental thermal stress on redox state in salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Toshiki; Kameda, Masumi; Shoji, Yui; Hayashi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiyasu; Sato, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fish are exposed to many kinds of environmental stressors and the chances of succumbing to infectious diseases may be increased a result. For example, an acute increase in temperature can induce numerous physiological changes in the body. In the present study, we examined the redox state in response to a severe acute stress resulting from heat shock in teleost coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The plasma lipid peroxides levels in fish gradually increased after heat shock treatment. By 2.5 h post-heat stress, plasma glutathione (GSH) levels had decreased, but they had returned to basal levels by 17.5 h post-stress. Plasma superoxide dismutase activities in stressed fish were significantly increased compared with those in control fish at 17.5 h post-stress, but had returned to basal levels by 48 h post-stress. Expression levels of hepatic GSH and heat shock protein 70 gradually increased after heat shock treatment. These results concerning the changing patterns of multiple important redox-related biomarkers suggest that severe thermal stressors can affect the redox state and induce oxidative stress in ectothermal animals, such as fish, in vivo. Hence, manipulation of appropriate thermal treatment may possibly be useful to control fish fitness.

  5. Effect of severe environmental thermal stress on redox state in salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish are exposed to many kinds of environmental stressors and the chances of succumbing to infectious diseases may be increased a result. For example, an acute increase in temperature can induce numerous physiological changes in the body. In the present study, we examined the redox state in response to a severe acute stress resulting from heat shock in teleost coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch. The plasma lipid peroxides levels in fish gradually increased after heat shock treatment. By 2.5 h post-heat stress, plasma glutathione (GSH levels had decreased, but they had returned to basal levels by 17.5 h post-stress. Plasma superoxide dismutase activities in stressed fish were significantly increased compared with those in control fish at 17.5 h post-stress, but had returned to basal levels by 48 h post-stress. Expression levels of hepatic GSH and heat shock protein 70 gradually increased after heat shock treatment. These results concerning the changing patterns of multiple important redox-related biomarkers suggest that severe thermal stressors can affect the redox state and induce oxidative stress in ectothermal animals, such as fish, in vivo. Hence, manipulation of appropriate thermal treatment may possibly be useful to control fish fitness.

  6. Climate variability and environmental stress in the Sudan-Sahel zone of West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Ole; D'haen, Sarah Ann Lise; Maiga, Abdou

    2012-01-01

    Environmental change in the Sudan-Sahel region of West Africa (SSWA) has been much debated since the droughts of the 1970s. In this article we assess climate variability and environmental stress in the region. Households in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, and Nigeria were asked about climatic...... to household perceptions, observed rainfall patterns showed an increasing trend over the past 20 years. However, August rainfall declined, and could therefore potentially explain the contrasting negative household perceptions of rainfall trends. Most households reported degradation of soils, water resources......, vegetation, and fauna, but more so in the 500–900 mm zones. Adaptation measures to counter environmental degradation included use of manure, reforestation, soil and water conservation, and protection of fauna and vegetation. The results raise concerns for future environmental management in the region...

  7. Observed Rates of Lower Extremity Stress Fractures After Implementation of the Army Physical Readiness Training Program at JBSA Fort Sam Houston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Aberle, Curtis; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    Millions of dollars are lost each year to the US military in medical discharges from injuries sustained in the initial training of recruits. Most medical discharges in recruits are related to musculoskeletal overuse injuries, including stress fractures. Any strategies that can reduce injury rates are also likely to reduce rates of medical discharge. This study evaluated the Army Physical Readiness Training (PRT) program which was established to provide a method of physical fitness training that would reduce the number of preventable injuries. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the number of lower extremity stress fractures that were diagnosed in the 6 months prior to and 6 months following the implementation of the PRT program. Electronic medical records were queried for specific diagnoses of stress fractures to the pelvis, femoral neck, femoral shaft, tibia, fibula, tarsals and metatarsals. The observed number of diagnoses in each time period were compared using the χ² method. Decrease was shown not only in the overall occurrence of stress fractures, but specifically in the occurrence of stress fractures of the femoral neck, femoral shaft, and tarsals. Our study was able to show a correlation between the PRT program and a decrease in the observed occurrence of lower extremity stress fractures.

  8. A Modelling Study for Predicting Life of Downhole Tubes Considering Service Environmental Parameters and Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianliang Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A modelling effort was made to try to predict the life of downhole tubes or casings, synthetically considering the effect of service influencing factors on corrosion rate. Based on the discussed corrosion mechanism and corrosion processes of downhole tubes, a mathematic model was established. For downhole tubes, the influencing factors are environmental parameters and stress, which vary with service duration. Stress and the environmental parameters including water content, partial pressure of H2S and CO2, pH value, total pressure and temperature, were considered to be time-dependent. Based on the model, life-span of an L80 downhole tube in oilfield Halfaya, an oilfield in Iraq, was predicted. The results show that life-span of the L80 downhole tube in Halfaya is 247 months (approximately 20 years under initial stress of 0.1 yield strength and 641 months (approximately 53 years under no initial stress, which indicates that an initial stress of 0.1 yield strength will reduce the life-span by more than half.

  9. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature, and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice should be avoided during those hours with the highest solar radiation and temperature on this type of surface.

  10. Environmental stress model for evaluation of vessel traffic in ports and waterways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhiwu; CHEN Weijiong; INOUE K

    2005-01-01

    Environmental stress model is proposed as an effective tool to the analysis and evaluation of navigational safety in ports and waterways. Marine traffic simulations are carried out in a virtual port area with various arrangements and conditions. Calculations of stress values and traffic volume criteria are illustrated. The simulation results provide a valuable hint for safety management of vessel traffic. The model provides quantitative information and helps administrators in decision making to achieve desired safety level and improve the efficiency of vessel traffic in ports and waterways.

  11. Environmental adaptability and stress tolerance of Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Susanna KP

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea and it can reside in human, fish, frogs and water. In this study, we performed an in-depth annotation of the genes in its genome related to adaptation to the various environmental niches. Results L. hongkongensis possessed genes for DNA repair and recombination, basal transcription, alternative σ-factors and 109 putative transcription factors, allowing DNA repair and global changes in gene expression in response to different environmental stresses. For acid stress, it possessed a urease gene cassette and two arc gene clusters. For alkaline stress, it possessed six CDSs for transporters of the monovalent cation/proton antiporter-2 and NhaC Na+:H+ antiporter families. For heavy metals acquisition and tolerance, it possessed CDSs for iron and nickel transport and efflux pumps for other metals. For temperature stress, it possessed genes related to chaperones and chaperonins, heat shock proteins and cold shock proteins. For osmotic stress, 25 CDSs were observed, mostly related to regulators for potassium ion, proline and glutamate transport. For oxidative and UV light stress, genes for oxidant-resistant dehydratase, superoxide scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, exclusion and export of redox-cycling antibiotics, redox balancing, DNA repair, reduction of disulfide bonds, limitation of iron availability and reduction of iron-sulfur clusters are present. For starvation, it possessed phosphorus and, despite being asaccharolytic, carbon starvation-related CDSs. Conclusions The L. hongkongensis genome possessed a high variety of genes for adaptation to acid, alkaline, temperature, osmotic, oxidative, UV light and starvation stresses and acquisition of and tolerance to heavy metals.

  12. A definition of normovolaemia and consequences for cardiovascular control during orthostatic and environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, Jasper; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2010-01-01

    that a given central blood volume may be associated with markedly different central vascular pressures. The central blood volume varies with posture and, consequently, stroke volume and cardiac output (Q) are affected, but with the increased central blood volume during head-down tilt, stroke volume and Q do...... not increase further indicating that in the supine resting position the heart operates on the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve which, therefore, may be taken as a functional definition of normovolaemia. Since the capacity of the vascular system surpasses the blood volume, orthostatic and environmental...... stress including bed rest/microgravity, exercise and training, thermal loading, illness, and trauma/haemorrhage is likely to restrict venous return and Q. Consequently the cardiovascular responses are determined primarily by their effect on the central blood volume. Thus during environmental stress, flow...

  13. Intertidal macrofauna and environmental stress at a riverine-marine boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Anxo; Novais, Júlio M; Domínguez, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    A field experiment was carried out to test the effect of pore water salinity on the macrobenthic assemblages in an estuarine region of the Tagus estuary (Portugal) subjected to wide fluctuations in salinity. The conditions at the experimental site ranged from freshwater (minimum salinity 0.2) to mesohaline (maximum salinity 15.3). The experimental site was affected by an unexpected deposition of fluid mud during summer. Redundancy Analysis discriminated the experimental treatments along the first canonical ordination axis. The analysis also revealed an experimental gradient of increasing environmental stress, in which the minimal presence of organisms corresponded to treatments representing a high level of environmental stress. Sediment dynamics and saline fluctuations were the major factors that, together, determined the low macrofaunal abundance and species diversity at the experimental site. The most abundant macrofaunal species in this harsh environment were the polychaetes Hediste diversicolor and Streblospio shrubsolii. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduction of cerebral oxidative stress following environmental enrichment in mice with Alzheimer-like pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Arne; Blome, Mareike; Ambrée, Oliver; Sachser, Norbert; Paulus, Werner; Keyvani, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a key feature during progression of chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. In aging humans and animals, voluntary exercise lowers oxidative stress reactions. Additionally, recent work in our lab demonstrated that cognitive and physical stimulation (termed environmental enrichment) counteracts amyloid beta pathology, neurovascular dysfunction and behavioral symptoms in mice with Alzheimer-like disease. Based on these facts, we hypothesized that cognitive and physical activity can also protect against oxidative stress in Alzheimer-diseased brain. We, therefore, kept female TgCRND8 mice under standard and enriched housing from day 30 until 5 months of age. Environmental stimulation attenuated pro-oxidative processes and triggered anti-oxidative defense mechanisms as indicated by diminished biomarkers for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, downregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative mediators, decreased expression of pro-apoptotic caspases, and upregulation of SOD1 and SOD2. This study identifies a thus far undescribed antagonizing effect of environmental stimulation on Alzheimer's disease-related oxidative damage.

  15. Remote in vivo stress assessment of aquatic animals with microencapsulated biomarkers for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Bedulina, Daria; Baduev, Boris; Borvinskaya, Ekaterina; Meglinski, Igor; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    Remote in vivo scanning of physiological parameters is a major trend in the development of new tools for the fields of medicine and animal physiology. For this purpose, a variety of implantable optical micro- and nanosensors have been designed for potential medical applications. At the same time, the important area of environmental sciences has been neglected in the development of techniques for remote physiological measurements. In the field of environmental monitoring and related research, there is a constant demand for new effective and quick techniques for the stress assessment of aquatic animals, and the development of proper methods for remote physiological measurements in vivo may significantly increase the precision and throughput of analyses in this field. In the present study, we apply pH-sensitive microencapsulated biomarkers to remotely monitor the pH of haemolymph in vivo in endemic amphipods from Lake Baikal, and we compare the suitability of this technique for stress assessment with that of common biochemical methods. For the first time, we demonstrate the possibility of remotely detecting a change in a physiological parameter in an aquatic organism under ecologically relevant stressful conditions and show the applicability of techniques using microencapsulated biomarkers for remote physiological measurements in environmental monitoring.

  16. Differential positioning of C4 mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts: aggregative movement of C4 mesophyll chloroplasts in response to environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kawasaki, Michio; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2009-10-01

    In C(4) plants, mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are randomly distributed along the cell walls, while bundle sheath (BS) chloroplasts are typically located in either a centripetal or centrifugal position. We investigated whether these intracellular positions are affected by environmental stresses. When mature leaves of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) were exposed to extremely high intensity light, most M chloroplasts aggregatively re-distributed to the BS side, whereas the intracellular arrangement of BS chloroplasts was unaffected. Compared with the homologous light-avoidance movement of M chloroplasts in C(3) plants, it requires extremely high light (3,000-4,000 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and responds more slowly (distinctive movement observed in 1 h). The high light-induced movement of M chloroplasts was also observed in maize (Zea mays), another C(4) species, but with a distinct pattern of redistribution along the sides of anticlinal walls, analogous to C(3) plants. The aggregative movement of M chloroplasts occurred at normal light intensities (250-500 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) in response to environmental stresses, such as drought, salinity and hyperosmosis. Moreover, the re-arrangement of M chloroplasts was observed in field-grown C(4) plants when exposed to mid-day sunlight, but also under midsummer drought conditions. The migration of M chloroplasts was controlled by actin filaments and also induced in a light-dependent fashion upon incubation with ABA, which may be the physiological signal transducer. Together these results suggest that M and BS cells of C(4) plants have different mechanisms controlling intracellular chloroplast positioning, and that the aggregative movement of C(4) M chloroplasts is thought to be a protective response under environmental stress conditions.

  17. Oxidative Stress and Ageing: The Influence of Environmental Pollution, Sunlight and Diet on Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khimara Naidoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin ageing is a complex process that is determined by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which leads to a progressive loss of structure and function. There is extensive evidence indicating that oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the process of human skin ageing. Mitochondria are the major source of cellular oxidative stress and are widely implicated in cutaneous ageing. Extrinsic skin ageing is driven to a large extent by environmental factors and external stressors such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR, pollution and lifestyle factors which have been shown to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species and generate oxidative stress. The oxidative damage from these exogenous sources can impair skin structure and function, leading to the phenotypic features of extrinsic skin ageing. The following review highlights the current evidence surrounding the role of mitochondria and oxidative stress in the ageing process and the influence of environmental factors such as ultraviolet radiation, pollution and diet on skin ageing.

  18. Molecular mechanism of dehydrin in response to environmental stress in plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuxiu; WANG Zi; XU Jin

    2007-01-01

    Dehydrins, known as the D-11 subgroup of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, are an immunologically distinct family of proteins, which typically accumulate in desiccation-tolerant seed embryo or in vegetative tissues in response to various environmental stresses such as drought, salinity and freezing. The existence of conservative sequences designated as K, S, and Y segments is a structural feature of dehydrins, and the K segment found in all dehydrins represents a highly conserved 15 amino acid motif (EKKGIMDKIKEKLPG) and forms an amphiphilic a-helix. According to the arrangement of these domains and clustering analysis, dehydrins are subdivided into 5 subtypes: YnSK, Kn, KnS, SKn and YnK. Different types of dehydrins are induced by different environmental stress in plants. Study results showed that dehydrins might play important protective roles under abiotic stress via a number of different mechanisms, including improving or protecting enzyme activities by the cryoprotective activity in responding to freeze/thaw or dehydration; stabilizing vesicles or other endomembrane structures by function as the membrane stabilizer during freeze induced dehydration,and preventing the membrane system from the oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen radicals as the radical scavenger. Here, the gene expression and molecular mechanisms of dehydrin in response to stress in plants are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of environmental fate and sinks of PCDD/Fs during specific extreme weather events in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kai Hsien; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Ou Yang, Chang-Feng; Hsu, Shih Chieh; Chen, Ya Fang; Luo, Shangde; Kao, Shuh Ji

    2013-11-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that are formed and released unintentionally from anthropogenic sources. The high persistence of PCDD/Fs results in the concentrations of these contaminants in environment decreasing only very slowly. Two transport pathways, air and water, carry PCDD/Fs into all regions of the world. Recently, more frequent extreme weather events, such as storms and floods, have been projected to occur as a result of global warming. Extreme weather events have a documented impact on the remobilization and subsequent bioavailability of POPs. In this study, three specific episodes, namely winter monsoon, southeast biomass burning and tropical cyclone (typhoon) events, which influence the environmental fate and transport of PCDD/Fs in Taiwan, were evaluated based on a climate change scenario. During the winter (northeast) monsoon period, the temperature and relative humidity observed in northern Taiwan decreases sharply. During this time, the quantity of PCDD/Fs adsorbed onto suspended particles, as observed at background sites, was found to increase from 300 ± 127 to 630 ± 115 pg I-TEQ g-TSP-1, which is even higher than that measured in Taipei City (438 ± 80 pg I-TEQ g-TSP-1). Hence, the winter monsoon not only brings cold air but also transports air pollutants and dust over long distances from mainland China to Taiwan. During the 2010 Southeast Asia biomass burning events (2010/3/22-3/28), the level of atmospheric PCDD/Fs were measured in central Taiwan (Mt. Lulin) and in the source region of northern Thailand (Chiang Mai); this revealed that the variations in atmospheric PCDD/F concentrations at these two sites followed a similar pattern. On 25 March 2010, the atmospheric PCDD/F concentration increased dramatically from 1.43 to 6.09 fg I-TEQ m-3 at Mt. Lulin and from 7.64 to 12.1 fg I-TEQ m-3 in northern Thailand. However, the atmospheric PCDD

  20. Environmental enrichment reduces behavioural alterations induced by chronic stress in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, A; Houdelier, C; Calandreau, L; Arnould, C; Favreau-Peigné, A; Leterrier, C; Boissy, A; Lumineau, S

    2015-02-01

    Animals perceiving repeated aversive events can become chronically stressed. Chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can have deleterious consequences on physiological parameters (e.g. BW, blood chemistry) and behaviour (e.g. emotional reactivity, stereotypies, cognition). Environmental enrichment (EE) can be a mean to reduce animal stress and to improve welfare. The aim of this study was first, to assess the effects of EE in battery cages on the behaviour of young Japanese quail and second, to evaluate the impact of EE on quail exposed to chronic stress. The experiment involved quail housed in EE cages and submitted or not to a chronic stress procedure (CSP) (EE cages, control quail: n=16, CSP quail: n=14) and quail housed in standard cages and exposed or not to the CSP (standard non-EE cages, control quail: n=12, CSP quail: n=16). Our procedure consisted of repeated aversive events (e.g. ventilators, delaying access to food, physical restraint, noise) presented two to five times per 24 h, randomly, for 15 days. During CSP, EE improved quail's welfare as their stereotypic pacing decreased and they rested more. CSP decreased exploration in all quail. After the end of CSP, quail presented increased emotional reactivity in emergence test. However, the effect of EE varied with test. Finally, chronic stress effects on comfort behaviours in the emergence test were alleviated by EE. These results indicate that EE can alleviate some aspects of behavioural alterations induced by CSP.

  1. Nurses' perceptions of environmental pressures in relation to their occupational stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Fen; Boore, Jennifer; Jenkins, Mary; Liu, Po-Erh; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore nurses' stress experiences of working under the current health care system in Taiwan (the context) using a qualitative approach. Although most global health care institutions have been changing in response to the economic contraction, there is a deficit of information in understanding the changes of the ecology of the health care system in Taiwan from nurses' perspectives. Grounded theory. A grounded theory approach was used to collect the data from a sample of 28 critical care nurses from seven hospitals in Taiwan. Data were analysed using a multi-step analytic procedure, based on the approaches of Glaser, Chesler and Strauss and Corbin. The health care system changes were found to increase critical care nurses' occupational stress and work dilemmas. For the purpose of this study, the two categories that emerged in the 'context' component of the paradigm model are investigated. They were: hospital reorganisation and cultural burden of the nurse's role. The findings indicated that hospital organisational changes and people's own belief of the nurse's role were recognised as the environmental pressures which increase critical care nurses' occupational stress. Cultural background may play an important role in influencing nurses' work atmosphere and their ways of being seen. Critical care nurses perceived that their hospitals were under huge demands due to the changes in health care policies; these had subsequently caused them a high level of occupational stress. Beliefs in the embedded culture were also identified as significant factors in causing nurses' role stress. These findings could enhance the knowledge of critical care nurses' occupational stress and identify the most appropriate stress management skills available to them. Findings will add to the understanding of Chinese nurses who may work globally.

  2. Environmental Enrichment Blunts Ethanol Consumption after Restraint Stress in C57BL/6 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianno, Priscila; Abrahao, Karina Possa

    2017-01-01

    Elevated alcohol intake after abstinence is a key feature of the addiction process. Some studies have shown that environmental enrichment (EE) affects ethanol intake and other reinforcing effects. However, different EE protocols may vary in their ability to influence alcohol consumption and stress-induced intake. The present study evaluated whether short (3 h) or continuous (24 h) EE protocols affect ethanol consumption after periods of withdrawal. Mice were challenged with stressful stimuli (24 h isolation and restraint stress) to evaluate the effects of stress on drinking. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a two-bottle choice drinking-in-the-dark paradigm for 15 days (20% ethanol and water, 2 h/day, acquisition phase). Control mice were housed under standard conditions (SC). In the first experiment, one group of mice was housed under EE conditions 24 h/day (EE24h). In the second experiment, the exposure to EE was reduced to 3 h/day (EE3h). After the acquisition phase, the animals were deprived of ethanol for 6 days, followed by 2 h ethanol access once a week. Animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) during ethanol withdrawal. During the last 2 weeks, the mice were exposed to 24 h ethanol access. A 1-h restraint stress test was performed immediately before the last ethanol exposure. EE24h but not EE3h increased anxiety-like behavior during withdrawal compared to controls. Neither EE24h nor EE3h affected ethanol consumption during the 2 h weekly exposure periods. However, EE24h and EE3h mice that were exposed to acute restraint stress consumed less ethanol than controls during a 24 h ethanol access. These results showed that EE reduces alcohol intake after an acute restraint stress. PMID:28107511

  3. Small RNAs: essential regulators of gene expression and defenses against environmental stresses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lin V; Chekanova, Julia A

    2016-05-01

    Eukaryotic genomes produce thousands of diverse small RNAs (smRNAs), which play vital roles in regulating gene expression in all conditions, including in survival of biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. SmRNA pathways intersect with most of the pathways regulating different steps in the life of a messenger RNA (mRNA), starting from transcription and ending at mRNA decay. SmRNAs function in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments; the regulation of mRNA stability and translation in the cytoplasm and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus are the main and best-known modes of smRNA action. However, recent evidence from animal systems indicates that smRNAs and RNA interference (RNAi) also participate in the regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing, one of the most crucial steps in the fast, efficient global reprogramming of gene expression required for survival under stress. Emerging evidence from bioinformatics studies indicates that a specific class of plant smRNAs, induced by various abiotic stresses, the sutr-siRNAs, has the potential to target regulatory regions within introns and thus may act in the regulation of splicing in response to stresses. This review summarizes the major types of plant smRNAs in the context of their mechanisms of action and also provides examples of their involvement in regulation of gene expression in response to environmental cues and developmental stresses. In addition, we describe current advances in our understanding of how smRNAs function in the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:356-381. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1340 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. [The ability for psych self-regulation as a factor in resistance to the stresses in extreme conditions of space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodova, A G; Bystritskaia, A F; Smirnova, T M

    2005-01-01

    Significance of the ability for psych self-regulation in the context of resistance to the stresses of space flight was studied in an experiment with 9 test-subjects simulating such factors of space flights as 8 to 9-day isolation and confinement, some physiological effects of microgravity in a head-down position at -8 degrees for 7 d, artificial climate, and implementation of dock and piloting operations. Stress resistance, self-regulation, mental performance and behavior were assessed with the use of computerized tests "Mirror coordinograph", "Relaxometer", and "SOPR-monitoring". The ability to voluntary control psych was shown to be favorable to stress-resistance and rapid recovery of mental efficiency after the natural decline in consequence of the experimental simulation. The ability for psych self-regulation is one of the major criteria of professional selection for exposure to extreme conditions.

  5. How are grassland ecosystem functions impacted by flood or drought and how do they recover following single or multiple extreme stress events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, R.; Jones, D.; Chadwick, D.; Hill, P.; Rodriquez, A.; Gina, M.; Hayes, F.; Robinson, D.; Humphreys, M.; Loka, D.; Kingston-Smith, A.; Scullion, J.; Doonan, J.; Gwyn Jones, D.; Collier, J.

    2016-12-01

    Improved grasslands make up an important part of UK agriculture and in addition to providing forage for livestock, grasslands provide additional ecosystem services including carbon storage, pollution attenuation and the regulation of water quantity and quality. In the context of global climate change the most recent IPCC report predicts greater uncertainty in weather patterns and an increased incidence of extreme weather events, such as heat waves, drought and heavy rains and storms. Subsequently, new areas of grassland are likely to be exposed to such stresses which may include multiple successive extreme events, for example a spring flood followed by summer drought. Better information on how these systems respond to extreme and multiple events and their ability to recover is vital to safeguard the UK's agricultural sector. Despite the large risks posed, our understanding of how extreme events will impact on plant and soil functioning and the downstream benefits/impacts remains poor. To address this gap we established a plot-scale field trial on an improved lowland sheep grazed pasture. The trial design consists of 16 field plots 3 m by 3 m subjected to four treatment regimes with four replicates as follows; (i) control, (ii) spring flood, (iii) summer drought, (iv) spring flood & summer drought. Each treatment regime was imposed for 8 weeks and the following recovery is being monitored over a year. The spring flood was initiated in April 2016 and the summer drought was initiated in July 2016 allowing a 4 week recovery period between the two stresses in treatment (iv). During the 8 weeks of each stress event and during the subsequent recovery period, plant and soil indicators of ecosystem function were measured. These include plant biomass, sward composition and forage quality, soil physical, chemical and biological indicators, greenhouse gas emissions and soil water chemistry. We will present the results to date and discuss the implications for agriculture.

  6. Surviving environmental stress: the role of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in marine crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NA Stephens-Camacho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH family, an ancestral group of enzymes responsible for aldehyde detoxification in several organisms. The BADH enzyme catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine (GB an important osmoptrotector and osmoregulator accumulated in response to cellular osmotic stress. The BADH enzymes have been extensively described in terrestrial organisms, but information in marine crustaceans remains scarce. Research on crustacean stress-adaptive capacity to environmental stressors relates GB accumulation in response to salinity variations. Although GB de novo synthesis is confirmed on crustaceans, its metabolic pathways and regulation mechanism are unexplored. In this work, the state of the knowledge of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in marine crustaceans is summarized, as a mechanism to overcome the deleterious effects of changes in temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration in seawater. The purpose of this review is to provide a more comprehensive overview to set the basis for exploring novel functions and properties of BADHs on the response of crustaceans to environmental stress.

  7. Fluctuating asymmetry and environmental stress: understanding the role of trait history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Greet; Van Dongen, Stefan; Malaki, Phillista; Muchane, Muchai; Alcántara-Exposito, Angelica; Matheve, Hans; Lens, Luc

    2013-01-01

    While fluctuating asymmetry (FA; small, random deviations from perfect symmetry in bilaterally symmetrical traits) is widely regarded as a proxy for environmental and genetic stress effects, empirical associations between FA and stress are often weak or heterogeneous among traits. A conceptually important source of heterogeneity in relationships with FA is variation in the selection history of the trait(s) under study, i.e. traits that experienced a (recent) history of directional change are predicted to be developmentally less stable, potentially through the loss of canalizing modifiers. Here we applied X-ray photography on museum specimens and live captures to test to what extent the magnitude of FA and FA-stress relationships covary with directional shifts in traits related to the flight apparatus of four East-African rainforest birds that underwent recent shifts in habitat quality and landscape connectivity. Both the magnitude and direction of phenotypic change varied among species, with some traits increasing in size while others decreased or maintained their original size. In three of the four species, traits that underwent larger directional changes were less strongly buffered against random perturbations during their development, and traits that increased in size over time developed more asymmetrically than those that decreased. As we believe that spurious relationships due to biased comparisons of historic (museum specimens) and current (field captures) samples can be ruled out, these results support the largely untested hypothesis that directional shifts may increase the sensitivity of developing traits to random perturbations of environmental or genetic origin.

  8. Fluctuating asymmetry and environmental stress: understanding the role of trait history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greet De Coster

    Full Text Available While fluctuating asymmetry (FA; small, random deviations from perfect symmetry in bilaterally symmetrical traits is widely regarded as a proxy for environmental and genetic stress effects, empirical associations between FA and stress are often weak or heterogeneous among traits. A conceptually important source of heterogeneity in relationships with FA is variation in the selection history of the trait(s under study, i.e. traits that experienced a (recent history of directional change are predicted to be developmentally less stable, potentially through the loss of canalizing modifiers. Here we applied X-ray photography on museum specimens and live captures to test to what extent the magnitude of FA and FA-stress relationships covary with directional shifts in traits related to the flight apparatus of four East-African rainforest birds that underwent recent shifts in habitat quality and landscape connectivity. Both the magnitude and direction of phenotypic change varied among species, with some traits increasing in size while others decreased or maintained their original size. In three of the four species, traits that underwent larger directional changes were less strongly buffered against random perturbations during their development, and traits that increased in size over time developed more asymmetrically than those that decreased. As we believe that spurious relationships due to biased comparisons of historic (museum specimens and current (field captures samples can be ruled out, these results support the largely untested hypothesis that directional shifts may increase the sensitivity of developing traits to random perturbations of environmental or genetic origin.

  9. Biopolymer microencapsulations of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal preparations for increased stability and resistance to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaolin; Sun, Zhongqin; He, Kanglai; Guo, Shuyuan

    2017-04-01

    Parasporal crystals synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been widely used as microbial pesticides because of their toxicity to the larval stages of specific insects. However, parasporal crystals can be damaged by environmental stresses, such as high temperature, ultraviolet radiation, and desiccation. To reduce environmental susceptibility of parasporal crystals and extend the duration of their activity, we developed a new type of protection by making microcapsules of crystals (MCs). The microcapsules were self-assembled by alternate deposition (layer by layer) of low-cost chitosan and sodium alginate (or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose) on the crystal surface. Crystal toxins (Cry1Ac) were released from microcapsules at pH values above 9.0. Bioassay results demonstrated that microencapsulated preparations had larvicidal toxicity equivalent to the non-encapsulated form. Microencapsuled crystals were protected from environmental stresses such as high temperature and desiccation. The results indicate that microcapsule protection can enhance the efficacy of Bt in pest control, especially to Lepidoptera larvae that have a alkaline midgut.

  10. [Environmental uncertainty and arousal/stress as the direct determinants of animal behaviour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, S V

    2010-01-01

    A model of direct behavioural mechanisms is suggested. The suggestion is founded on the following prerequisites: the law of optimum arousal by Yerkes-Dodson; the data on animals' purposeful striving towards the optimum; and the data on effect of stimuli uncertainty (unpredictability and/or uncontrollability) on susceptibility to the stimuli. The key postulate of the model is animals' ability to affect the environment uncertainty with their behaviour and, hence, to change their susceptibility to various stimuli and optimize their stress/arousal level. This function of behaviour had never been discussed and seems to be rather important for proximal behavioural mechanisms and for forming direct motives of behaviour. Optimization of arousal level may be viewed as "universal benefit" at the level of direct behavioural mechanisms (similar to "joint genetic fitness" at the level of evolutional mechanisms). Within the model framework it is possible to take up some sophisticated aspects of ethology such as social relations forming, "begging for punishment", "zoo stereotypy", and so on. Among verifiable predictions that can be derived from its analysis, the following ones are worthwhile: (1) the stronger of two similar social relations cannot be more stressful than the weaker one; (2) the intensity of marking activity never increases as arousal/stress level decreases; (3) stress/arousal level of an animal having been experienced "zoo stereotypy" for a long time can never be higher than that of a conspecific individual showing the behaviour for the first time; (4) the rate of "begging for punishment" behaviour of an individual should positively correlate with environmental uncertainty; (5) arousal/stress level of an individual looking for novelty can never be higher than arousal/stress level of the same individual when avoiding novelty; (6) the striving of a specimen for displaying the behaviour promoting an increase in uncertainty can be suppressed by raising the

  11. Expression of Candida albicans glutathione transferases is induced inside phagocytes and upon diverse environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcerá, Ana; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Candida albicans has four ORFs for glutathione transferases (GSTs) of the GTT classes, and another one coding for an Omega class member. Under laboratory conditions, only GTT11 (GTT1/2 class) and GTO1 (Omega class) are expressed significantly in exponentially growing cells, particularly when these are subjected to diverse environmental stresses, including oxidative stress. They also become transitorily upregulated at the early stationary phase. Accordingly, the levels of the CaGto1 and CaGtt11 proteins increase after treatment with oxidants and upon osmotic stress, in addition to the early stationary phase. GTT11 and GTO1 transcription shows a complex dependence on the Hog1 and Cap1 factors upon different stresses. Purified CaGtt11 and CaGto1 proteins display enzyme activities similar to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologues. Thus, CaGtt11 has activity against standard GST substrates and is also active as peroxidase, while CaGto1 displays thiol oxidoreductase and dehydroascorbate reductase activities. Fluorescence microscopy and subfractionation studies indicate that CaGto1 is cytosolic, while CaGtt11 is associated with a particulate fraction. Under ex vivo conditions, CaGto1 and CaGtt11 become transitorily upregulated inside macrophages and neutrophils. Under these conditions, the promoter of GTT14 (GTT1/2 class) also becomes activated. These observations point to the importance of C. albicans GSTs in the defence against phagocytes.

  12. Environmental stress-induced testis differentiation: androgen as a by-product of cortisol inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandino, Juan I; Hattori, Ricardo S; Moreno Acosta, Omar D; Strüssmann, Carlos A; Somoza, Gustavo M

    2013-10-01

    This review deals with the gonadal masculinization induced by thermal stress in fish with focus on the action of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) as this mechanism key transducer. High temperatures have been reported to produce male-skewed sex ratios in several species with TSD (temperature-dependent sex determination), and in some of them, this process was reported to be associated with high levels of cortisol, the hormone-related stress in vertebrates, during early gonad development. In addition, in pejerrey larvae reared at high-masculinizing temperatures, 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), the main and most potent androgen in fish, was also detected at high levels. In testicular explants, cortisol induced the synthesis of 11-KT, suggesting that its synthesis could be under the control of the stress axis at the time of gonadal fate determination. 11β-HSD is one of the enzymes shared by the glucocorticoid and androgen pathways; this enzyme converts cortisol to cortisone and also participates in the finals steps of the synthesis of the 11-oxigenated androgens. Based on these data and literature information, here we propose that the masculinization induced by thermal stress can be considered as a consequence of cortisol inactivation and the concomitant synthesis of 11-KT and discussing this as a possible mechanism of masculinization induced by different types of environmental stressors.

  13. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  14. Conservation of Modules but not Phenotype in Bacterial Response to Environmental Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timberlake, Sonia; Joachimiak, Marcin; Joyner, Dominique; Chakraborty, Romy; Baumohl, Jason; Dehal, Paramvir; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Alm, Eric

    2010-05-17

    Microbes live in changing environments and change their phenotype via gene regulation in response. Although this transcriptional response is important for fitness, very little is known about how it evolves in microbes. We started by asking a number of high-level questions about the evolution of transcriptional phenotype: (1) To what extent is transcriptional response conserved, i.e. do conserved genes respond similarly to the same condition; (2) To what extent are transcriptional modules conserved; and (3) Does there exist a general stress response to a variety of stressors? To illuminate these questions, we analyzed more than 500 microarray experiments across the bacterial domain. We looked for conservation of transcriptional regulation both in close sister species and vastly divergent clades. In addition, we produced and analyzed an extensive in-house compendium of environmental stress data in three metal-reducing bacteria.

  15. Temporal variation of sandy beach macrofauna at two sites with distinct environmental conditions on Cassino Beach, extreme southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro de Sá Rodrigues da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variations of the macrofauna of sandy beaches have been related to variations in the beach morphodynamics and also to the population dynamics of dominant species. The aim of this article is to describe the temporal variation of the intertidal macrofauna at two sites with distinct environmental condition on Cassino Beach, extreme southern Brazil. At each site three transect lines 50 m apart were defined perpendicular to the shore line, from which samples were collected monthly in triplicate at 4 intertidal levels (10 m apart from June 2004 to May 2005. During winter a generally low density was observed, due to the absence of recruitments and to the mud deposition, which occurred just before sampling (in April 2004, and to low intensity stranding events. Spring witnessed a population explosion of Scolelepis gaucha, a migration of Mesodesma mactroides adults from the subtidal zone, and a strong stranding event. In the summer, recruitment of M. mactroides, Donax hanleyanus and Emerita brasiliensis was observed. Fall was characterized by low densities, except for D. hanleyanus recruitment. The macrofauna at both sites showed a striking seasonal variation in density and diversity, perhaps attributable to the recruitment of numerically dominant species and physical disturbances (stranding and mud deposition.Variações sazonais da macrofauna bentônica de praias arenosas têm sido relacionadas com variações da morfodinâmica da praia e também aos recrutamentos das espécies dominantes. Este trabalho objetiva avaliar a variabilidade temporal da macrofauna da zona entremarés de dois locais com distintas características ambientais na praia do Cassino, extremo sul do Brasil. Em cada local foram demarcadas três transversais (separadas por 50m perpendiculares à linha de água, nas quais amostras foram coletadas em triplicata em 4 níveis entremarés (separados por 10 m, entre junho/2004 e maio/2005. Durante o inverno ocorreram baixas

  16. Residual stresses and phase transformations in Ytterbium silicate environmental barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Fabian

    Due to their high melting temperature, low density, and good thermomechanical stability, silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are some of the most promising materials systems for high temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, their silica surface layer reacts with water vapor contained in combustion environments. The resulting hydroxide layer volatilizes, leading to component recession. Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the substrate from degradation. Next generation coatings for silicon-based ceramics based on ytterbium silicates have shown a promising combination of very low and good thermomechanical properties. The focus of this thesis is threefold: In the first part, phase transformations in plasma sprayed ytterbium silicates were investigated. Plasma sprayed materials are known to contain large amounts of amorphous material. Phase changes during the conversion from amorphous to crystalline materials were investigated as they have been known to lead to failure in many coatings. The second part of this work focused on measuring residual stresses in multilayer EBCs using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). Strains were resolved spatially, with probe sizes as small as 20 um. Stresses were calculated using mechanical properties of ytterbium silicates, determined with in-situ loading and heating experiments. In-situ and ex-situ heating experiments allowed for the study of changes in stress states that occur in these EBC materials during heating and cooling cycles. Lastly, the interaction of ytterbium silicates with low-melting environmental calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glasses was studied. Synchrotron XRD was used to study the influence of CMAS on the stress state in the coating, X-ray computed tomography was used to provide 3D images of coatings, and EDS and TEM analysis were used to study the interactions at the CMAS/ytterbium silicate interface in detail.

  17. Clinical methods for the assessment of the effects of environmental stress on fish health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Yasutake, William T.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical methods are presented for biological monitoring of hatchery and native fish populations to assess the effects of environmental stress on fish health. The choice of methods is based on the experience of the authors and the judgment of colleagues at fishery laboratories of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Detailed analysis methods, together with guidelines for sample collection and for the interpretation of results, are given for tests on blood (cell counts, chloride, cholesterol, clotting time, cortisol, glucose, hematocrit, hemoglobin, lactic acid, methemoglobin, osmolality, and total protein); water (ammonia and nitrite content); and liver and muscle (glycogen content).

  18. Oxidative stress enzyme and histopathological lesions in Colossoma macropomum (pisces, ariidae) for environmental impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Dantas, Janaina Gomes; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    This study used oxidative stress enzyme (Glutathione S-Transferase and Catalase), histopathological lesions (Branchial lesions) and biometric data in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in an Environmental Protection Area at São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations (A1 = contaminated area and A2 = reference site) within the protected area on four occasions. The activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in C. macropomum was compared with biometric data and histopathological lesions. Results have shown that biometric data decreased significantly in fish (p<0.05) at the contaminated site. The activity of CAT was higher in fish specifically caught in A1. A significant difference was observed in the GST activity in the liver of C. macropomum when comparing fish from the contaminated site and those from the reference site (p<0.05).

  19. EFFECTS OF VARIOUS SOIL ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON THE OCCURRENCE, DISTRIBUTION AND EFFECTIVENESS OF VA MYCORRHIZAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. KHAN

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular - arbuscular (VA mycorrhizal fungi are geographically ubiquitous soil inhabitants and form universal symbiotic relationship with plants from every phylum. These fungi link host plants with host soils and their biota in the mycorrhizosphere and play an important role in plant health, productivity and soil structure. Although VA mycorrhizal fungi do not show any host specificity, there is increasing evidence that various climatic and edaphic environmental factors such as land use and management practices, physical, chemical and biological properties of host soils and host plant characteristics influence their occurrence, taxonomic distribution and effectiveness. The interaction of these factors with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM is poorly understood except in a few cases. It is now very clear that VA mycorrhizal associations are ecologically significant factors that require more attention than previously accorded. This paper discusses the occurrence, distribution and significance of VAM in environmentally stressed soil conditions that limit plant growth such as drought, waterlogging and salinity.

  20. Oxidative stress by peripheral blood mononuclear cells is increased in hypertensives with an extreme-dipper pattern and/or morning surge in blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kensaku; Yasunari, Kenichi; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro

    2005-09-01

    Because oxidative stress and inflammation are known to play important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events that occur most frequently in the morning, we studied the association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or mononuclear cells (MNCs) and morning blood pressure (BP) rhythm. A total of 31 hypertensives in whom ambulatory BP monitoring was performed participated in this study. They were first divided into three groups according to their nocturnal BP rhythm (non-dippers, dippers and extreme dippers), and then into two groups according to their morning BP change (surge-type and sustained-type). ROS formation by PMNs and MNCs was measured by gated flow cytometry. C-reactive protein and traditional risk factors such as age, gender, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, and total cholesterol were also measured. ROS formation by MNCs was significantly increased in extreme dippers (vs. dippers, p<0.05, n=11) and in morning BP surge-type hypertensives (vs. sustained-type, p<0.05, n=13). In patients who were both extreme dippers and morning BP surge-types, ROS formation by MNCs was significantly higher than that in other groups. These results suggest that both extreme dippers and morning BP surge-type hypertensives may suffer increased ROS formation by MNCs, and that increased ROS formation by MNCs may underlie morning strokes.

  1. Modeling the survival responses of a multi-component biofilm to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles Brangarí, Albert; Manzoni, Stefano; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are consortia of microorganisms embedded in self-produced matrices of biopolymers. The survival of such communities depends on their capacity to improve the environmental conditions of their habitat by mitigating, or even benefitting from some adverse external factors. The mechanisms by which the microbial habitat is regulated remain mostly unknown. However, many studies have reported physiological responses to environmental stresses that include the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the induction of a dormancy state. A sound understanding of these capacities is required to enhance the knowledge of the microbial dynamics in soils and its potential role in the carbon cycle, with significant implications for the degradation of contaminants and the emission of greenhouse gases, among others. We present a numerical analysis of the dynamics of soil microbes and their responses to environmental stresses. The conceptual model considers a multi-component heterotrophic biofilm made up of active cells, dormant cells, EPS, and extracellular enzymes. Biofilm distribution and properties are defined at the pore-scale and used to determine nutrient availability and water saturation via feedbacks of biofilm on soil hydraulic properties. The pore space micro-habitat is modeled as a simplified pore-network of cylindrical tubes in which biofilms proliferate. Microbial compartments and most of the carbon fluxes are defined at the bulk level. Microbial processes include the synthesis, decay and detachment of biomass, the activation/deactivation of cells, and the release and reutilization of EPS. Results suggest that the release of EPS and the capacity to enter a dormant state offer clear evolutionary advantages in scenarios characterized by environmental stress. On the contrary, when the conditions are favorable, the diversion of carbon into the production of the aforementioned survival mechanisms does not confer any additional benefit and the population

  2. Climate variability and environmental stress in the Sudan-Sahel zone of West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Ole; D'haen, Sarah; Maiga, Abdou; Moussa, Ibrahim Bouzou; Barbier, Bruno; Diouf, Awa; Diallo, Drissa; Da, Evariste Dapola; Dabi, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Environmental change in the Sudan-Sahel region of West Africa (SSWA) has been much debated since the droughts of the 1970s. In this article we assess climate variability and environmental stress in the region. Households in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, and Nigeria were asked about climatic changes and their perceptions were compared across north-south and west-east rainfall gradients. More than 80% of all households found that rainfall had decreased, especially in the wettest areas. Increases in wind speeds and temperature were perceived by an overall 60-80% of households. Contrary to household perceptions, observed rainfall patterns showed an increasing trend over the past 20 years. However, August rainfall declined, and could therefore potentially explain the contrasting negative household perceptions of rainfall trends. Most households reported degradation of soils, water resources, vegetation, and fauna, but more so in the 500-900 mm zones. Adaptation measures to counter environmental degradation included use of manure, reforestation, soil and water conservation, and protection of fauna and vegetation. The results raise concerns for future environmental management in the region, especially in the 500-900 mm zones and the western part of SSWA.

  3. Evolutionary rescue and adaptation to abrupt environmental change depends upon the history of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Bell, Graham

    2013-01-19

    Whether evolution will be rapid enough to rescue declining populations will depend upon population size, the supply of genetic variation, the degree of maladaptation and the historical direction of selection. We examined whether the level of environmental stress experienced by a population prior to abrupt environmental change affects the probability of evolutionary rescue (ER). Hundreds of populations of two species of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus were exposed to a range of sublethal concentrations of salt for approximately a hundred generations before transfer to a concentration of salt lethal to the ancestor (150 g l(-1) NaCl). The fitness of surviving populations of both species was a quadratic function of yield: fitness was greatest for large populations that had been selected on low salt concentrations (less than 20 g l(-1) NaCl) and small populations that had adapted to high salt (more than 80 g l(-1) NaCl). However, differences occurred between species in the probability of ER. The frequency of ER was positively correlated with salt concentration for S. cerevisiae, but negatively correlated with salt concentration in S. paradoxus. These results not only demonstrate that past environmental conditions can determine the probability of ER after abrupt environmental change, but also suggest that there may even be differences between closely related species that are worth further exploration.

  4. From transcriptome to biological function: environmental stress in an ectothermic vertebrate, the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Alister C

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the importance of transcriptional regulation for biological function is continuously improving. We still know, however, comparatively little about how environmentally induced stress affects gene expression in vertebrates, and the consistency of transcriptional stress responses to different types of environmental stress. In this study, we used a multi-stressor approach to identify components of a common stress response as well as components unique to different types of environmental stress. We exposed individuals of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis to hypoxic, hyposmotic, cold and heat shock and measured the responses of approximately 16,000 genes in liver. We also compared winter and summer responses to heat shock to examine the capacity for such responses to vary with acclimation to different ambient temperatures. Results We identified a series of gene functions that were involved in all stress responses examined here, suggesting some common effects of stress on biological function. These common responses were achieved by the regulation of largely independent sets of genes; the responses of individual genes varied greatly across different stress types. In response to heat exposure over five days, a total of 324 gene loci were differentially expressed. Many heat-responsive genes had functions associated with protein turnover, metabolism, and the response to oxidative stress. We were also able to identify groups of co-regulated genes, the genes within which shared similar functions. Conclusion This is the first environmental genomic study to measure gene regulation in response to different environmental stressors in a natural population of a warm-adapted ectothermic vertebrate. We have shown that different types of environmental stress induce expression changes in genes with similar gene functions, but that the responses of individual genes vary between stress types. The functions of heat

  5. Epinephrine, DNA integrity and oxidative stress in workers exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) at 132 kV substations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ravindra; Lakshmi, N K; Bhargava, S C; Ahuja, Y R

    2015-03-01

    There is apprehension about widespread use of electrical and electromagnetic gadgets which are supposed to emit electromagnetic radiations. Reports are controversy. These electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have considerable effect on endocrine system of exposed subjects. This study was focused to assess the possible bioeffects of extremely low-frequency (ELF)-EMFs on epinephrine level, DNA damage and oxidative stress in subjects occupationally exposed to 132 kV high-voltage substations. The blood sample of 142 exposed subjects and 151 non-exposed individuals was analyzed. Plasma epinephrine was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DNA damage was studied by alkaline comet assay along with oxidative stress. Epinephrine levels of sub-groups showed mean concentration of 75.22  ±  1.46, 64.43  ±  8.26 and 48.47  ±  4.97 for high, medium and low exposed groups, respectively. DNA damage ranged between 1.69 µm and 9.91 µm. The oxidative stress levels showed significant increase. The individuals employed in the live-line procedures were found to be vulnerable for EM stress with altered epinephrine concentrations, DNA damage and increased oxidative stress.

  6. How extreme are extremes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  7. Breeding on the extreme edge : Modulation of the adrenocortical response to acute stress in two High Arctic passerines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Brian G; Meddle, Simone L; Romero, L Michael; Landys, MM; Reneerkens, Jeroen; Wingfield, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic weather in spring is unpredictable and can also be extreme, so Arctic-breeding birds must be flexible in their breeding to deal with such variability. Unpredictability in weather conditions will only intensify with climate change and this in turn could affect reproductive capability of migrat

  8. Spectrofluorescent characterization of changes in hair chemistry induced by environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Roger L; Chen, Susan; Moore, David J

    2011-01-01

    Hair is frequently exposed to environmental stresses and chemical insults that result in damage to its internal structure and its outer cuticular components. Spectrofluorescence is a useful tool to monitor the health of biological tissues as it can measure the level of tryptophan (Trp), which is representative of protein integrity. In addition to Trp fluorescence, several other fluorophores are also present in hair and are believed to be attributed to kynurenenine, N-formylkynurenine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine, which are known metabolic and degradation products of Trp that are affected by environmental stresses normally experienced by hair. In this work, we were able to construct an endogenous fingerprint of fluorescent compounds present in hair by employing a range of excitation wavelengths from 270 nm to 450 nm with a resolution of 2 nm. As a result, we generated surface plots of fluorescence emission as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (excitation-emission matrices). Thus, we were able to profile the levels of various structural molecules in hair before and after exposure to UV irradiation and thermal straightening irons as well as to chemical treatment such as bleaching and straightening.

  9. Using Markov Models of Fault Growth Physics and Environmental Stresses to Optimize Control Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Brian; Goebel, Kai; Vachtsevanos, George

    2012-01-01

    A generalized Markov chain representation of fault dynamics is presented for the case that available modeling of fault growth physics and future environmental stresses can be represented by two independent stochastic process models. A contrived but representatively challenging example will be presented and analyzed, in which uncertainty in the modeling of fault growth physics is represented by a uniformly distributed dice throwing process, and a discrete random walk is used to represent uncertain modeling of future exogenous loading demands to be placed on the system. A finite horizon dynamic programming algorithm is used to solve for an optimal control policy over a finite time window for the case that stochastic models representing physics of failure and future environmental stresses are known, and the states of both stochastic processes are observable by implemented control routines. The fundamental limitations of optimization performed in the presence of uncertain modeling information are examined by comparing the outcomes obtained from simulations of an optimizing control policy with the outcomes that would be achievable if all modeling uncertainties were removed from the system.

  10. Application of oxidative stress indices in natural populations of Perna viridis as biomarker of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, K B; Verlecar, X N; Chainy, G B N

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress indices were measured in gills and digestive glands of Perna viridis collected from three coastal locations in Goa i.e., Bambolim, Marmugao Harbour and Malim. In addition to lipid peroxidation, the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase and two non-enzymatic antioxidants (ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione) were investigated in order to understand their variation with respect to pollution status of the sampling locations. We observed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes of both the tissues at Mormugao Harbour and Malim, suggesting that the animals at these two locations are at higher level of oxidative stress as compared to those at Bambolim. Conversely, low levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants such as ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione, observed at Mormugao Harbour and Malim indicate that the animals may use these compounds to counteract stress in the tissues. This study shows that changes in lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and reduced glutathione in tissues of P. viridis can be used as molecular biomarkers in environmental monitoring programs.

  11. Cellular and biochemical responses to environmental and experimentally induced stress in sea urchin coelomocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matranga, Valeria; Toia, Giuseppe; Bonaventura, Rosa; Müller, Werner E.G.

    2000-01-01

    Coelomocytes are considered to be immune effectors of sea urchins. Subpopulations of coelomocytes can be purified from a total cell suspension. The proportion of each cell type can vary not only among species, but also between individuals of the same species, according to their size and physiological conditions. We tested the hypothesis that coelomocytes play a role in defense mechanisms activated by adverse external conditions. Total coelomocytes from control and stressed (temperature, pollution, and injuries) sea urchins were analyzed for their expression of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70), a well recognized stress marker. Further analysis was performed by separation of coelomocytes into subpopulations by step gradients. We demonstrated that sea urchin coelomocytes respond to temperature shock and to polluted seawater by the upregulation of hsp70. Among coelomocytes certain cells, known as red spherula cells, showed a great increase in number in animals collected from polluted seawaters or subjected to “accidental” injury. The present study confirms the immunological function of sea urchin coelomocytes, as indicated by the upregulation of the hsp70 molecular marker, and suggests that sea urchin coelomocytes can be utilized as sensitive bio-indicators of environmental stress. PMID:11147962

  12. Role of Free Radicals, Oxidative Stress and Xenobiotics in Carcinogenesis by Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyajyoti Saha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis by many small molecular weight chemicals involves either a direct action of the chemical on cellular DNA or metabolism of the parent chemical to an active or ultimate form, which can than react with cellular DNA to produce a permanent chemical change in a DNA structure. A free radical is an atom or molecule that has one or more unpaired electron(s. These are highly reactive species capable of wide spread, indiscriminate oxidation and per oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA which can lead to significant cellular damage and even tissue and/or organ failure. . Oxidative stress is a leading cause to damage cells by oxidation. The rate at which oxidative damage is induced (input and the rate at which it is efficiently repaired and removed (output. Xenobiotics are a compound that is foreign to the body. Xenobiotics can produce a variety of biological effects, including pharmacologic responses, toxicity, genes, immunologic reactions and cancer. Oxidative stress is a leading cause to damage cells by oxidation. The rate at which oxidative damage is induced (input and the rate at which it is efficiently repaired and removed (output. This communication highlights the role of carcinogens as environmental pollutants with the possible mechanism of free radicals, oxidative stress and xenobiotics.

  13. Evidence of volcanic induced environmental stress during the end-Triassic event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Sofie; Sanei, Hamed; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Krarup Pedersen, Gunver; Dybkjær, Karen; van der Weijst, Carolien; Hovedskov Hansen, Katrine

    2015-04-01

    The end-Triassic biotic crisis is generally explained by massive input of CO2 and/or methane to the atmosphere linked to the formation of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. Such massive volcanism can be compared to industrial pollution releasing large amounts of the greenhouse gases CO2 and SO2 to the atmosphere. Indeed, the fossil record provides evidence of major perturbations in the δ13C-record of both calcareous and organic material. In the marine realm loss of calcifying organisms provides evidence of ocean acidification due to the increased pCO2, while in the terrestrial realm physiological responses in fossil plants indicate intense global warming across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Changing climatic conditions is further indicated by charcoal records from Greenland, Denmark, Sweden and Poland showing increased wildfire activity. Increased reworking of palynological material and marked changes in fluvial style in terrestrial successions seem to indicate an increased hydrological cycle. Here we examine and compare two proxies, Mercury and palynology, that may both, each in their own way, indicate volcanic induced environmental stress. Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic elements on the planet, with volcanic emissions being the largest natural input to the Hg-cycle. The temporal distribution of Hg in relation to organic matter can provide evidence of atmospheric Hg loading on the marine ecosystem. In the terrestrial realm, pollen and spores are known to be sensitive bioindicators of atmospheric pollution and environmental stress. Quantitive abundances of aberrant, and thus probably non-viable, pollen and spores are often used to assess environmental impact on polluted sites today. We present, compare and discuss Hg and aberrant spore/pollen records from the stratigraphically well-constrained Triassic-Jurassic boundary succession at Stenlille in the Danish Basin, and the possible impact of these data on the interpretation of events during end

  14. Assessing the relative importance of environmental effects, carry-over effects and species differences in thermal stress resistance: a comparison of Drosophilids across field and laboratory generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Michele; Hangartner, Sandra; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2013-10-15

    There is increasing interest in comparing species of related organisms for their susceptibility to thermal extremes in order to evaluate potential vulnerability to climate change. Comparisons are typically undertaken on individuals collected from the field with or without a period of acclimation. However, this approach does not allow the potential contributions of environmental and carry-over effects across generations to be separated from inherent species differences in susceptibility. To assess the importance of these different sources of variation, we here considered heat and cold resistance in Drosophilid species from tropical and temperate sites in the field and across two laboratory generations. Resistance in field-collected individuals tended to be lower when compared with F1 and F2 laboratory generations, and species differences in field flies were only weakly correlated to differences established under controlled rearing conditions, unlike in F1-F2 comparisons. This reflected large environmental effects on resistance associated with different sites and conditions experienced within sites. For the 8 h cold recovery assay there was no strong evidence of carry-over effects, whereas for the heat knockdown and 2 h cold recovery assays there was some evidence for such effects. However, for heat these were species specific in direction. Variance components for inherent species differences were substantial for resistance to heat and 8 h cold stress, but small for 2 h cold stress, though this may be a reflection of the species being considered in the comparisons. These findings highlight that inherent differences among species are difficult to characterise accurately without controlling for environmental sources of variation and carry-over effects. Moreover, they also emphasise the complex nature of carry-over effects that vary depending on the nature of stress traits and the species being evaluated.

  15. Living under stressful conditions: Fish life history strategies across environmental gradients in estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Nils; Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Borja, Angel; Chust, Guillem; Uriarte, Ainhize; Lepage, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The life history strategies of fishes can be defined by specific combinations of demographic traits that influence species performances depending on environmental features. Hence, the constraints imposed by the local conditions restrict the range of successful strategies by excluding species poorly adapted. In the present study, we compared the demographic strategies of fish caught in 47 estuaries of the North East Atlantic coast, aiming to determine the specific attributes of resident species and test for changes in trait associations along the environmental gradients. Eight demographic traits were considered to project our findings within a conceptual triangular model, composed on three endpoint strategies: (i) periodic (large size, long generation time, high fecundity); (ii) opportunistic (small size, short generation time, high reproductive effort); and (iii) equilibrium (low fecundity, large egg size, parental care). We demonstrated that various life history strategies co-exist in estuaries, but equilibrium species were scarce and restricted to euhaline open-water. Resident species form a specialised assemblage adapted to high spatiotemporal variability of estuarine conditions, i.e. opportunistic attributes associated with parental care. Even with these singular attributes, our findings revealed changes in distribution of resident species across the estuarine gradients linked to their life history traits. Among other patterns, the diversity of life history strategies significantly decreased from euhaline to oligohaline areas and along gradient of human disturbances. These trends were associated with a convergence of species traits toward short generation times, suggesting that long-lived species with late maturation are more severely impacted by disturbance and environmental stress.

  16. Evidence for altered metabolic pathways during environmental stress: (1)H-NMR spectroscopy based metabolomics and clinical studies on subjects of sea-voyage and Antarctic-stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anand Prakash; Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Kamla Prasad; Pal, Sunil; Ganju, Lilly; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2014-08-01

    The Antarctic context is an analogue of space travel, with close similarity in ambience of extreme climate, isolation, constrained living spaces, disrupted sleep cycles, and environmental stress. The present study examined the impact of the harsh habitat of Antarctica on human physiology and its metabolic pathways, by analyzing human serum samples, using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy for identification of metabolites; and quantifying other physiological and clinical parameters for correlation between expression data and metabolite data. Sera from seven adult males (of median age 36years) who participated in this study, from the 28th Indian Expeditionary group to the Antarctica station Maitri, were collected in chronological sequence. These included: i) baseline control; ii) during ship journey; iii) at Antarctica, in the months of March, May, August and November; to enable study of temporal evolution of monitored physiological states. 29 metabolites in serum were identified from the 400MHz (1)H-NMR spectra. Out of these, 19 metabolites showed significant variations in levels, during the ship journey and the stay at Maitri, compared to the base-line levels. Further biochemical analysis also supported these results, indicating that the ship journey, and the long-term Antarctic exposure, affected kidney and liver functioning. Our metabolite data highlights for the first time the effect of environmental stress on the patho-physiology of the human system. Multivariate analysis tools were employed for this metabonomics study, using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Functional evolution of leptin of Ochotona curzoniae in adaptive thermogenesis driven by cold environmental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental stress can accelerate the directional selection and evolutionary rate of specific stress-response proteins to bring about new or altered functions, enhancing an organism's fitness to challenging environments. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae, an endemic and keystone species on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is a high hypoxia and low temperature tolerant mammal with high resting metabolic rate and non-shivering thermogenesis to cope in this harsh plateau environment. Leptin is a key hormone related to how these animals regulate energy homeostasis. Previous molecular evolutionary analysis helped to generate the hypothesis that adaptive evolution of plateau pika leptin may be driven by cold stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis, recombinant pika leptin was first purified. The thermogenic characteristics of C57BL/6J mice injected with pika leptin under warm (23±1°C and cold (5±1°C acclimation is investigated. Expression levels of genes regulating adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and the hypothalamus are compared between pika leptin and human leptin treatment, suggesting that pika leptin has adaptively and functionally evolved. Our results show that pika leptin regulates energy homeostasis via reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure under both warm and cold conditions. Compared with human leptin, pika leptin demonstrates a superior induced capacity for adaptive thermogenesis, which is reflected in a more enhanced β-oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and heat production. Moreover, leptin treatment combined with cold stimulation has a significant synergistic effect on adaptive thermogenesis, more so than is observed with a single cold exposure or single leptin treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the hypothesis that cold stress has driven the functional evolution of plateau pika leptin as an ecological adaptation to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  18. Functional Evolution of Leptin of Ochotona curzoniae in Adaptive Thermogenesis Driven by Cold Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Bromage, Timothy G.; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Bao Hong; Gao, Wei Li; Tian, Hui Fang; Tang, Hui Jun; Liu, Dian Wu; Zhao, Xin Quan

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental stress can accelerate the directional selection and evolutionary rate of specific stress-response proteins to bring about new or altered functions, enhancing an organism's fitness to challenging environments. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae), an endemic and keystone species on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is a high hypoxia and low temperature tolerant mammal with high resting metabolic rate and non-shivering thermogenesis to cope in this harsh plateau environment. Leptin is a key hormone related to how these animals regulate energy homeostasis. Previous molecular evolutionary analysis helped to generate the hypothesis that adaptive evolution of plateau pika leptin may be driven by cold stress. Methodology/Principal Findings To test the hypothesis, recombinant pika leptin was first purified. The thermogenic characteristics of C57BL/6J mice injected with pika leptin under warm (23±1°C) and cold (5±1°C) acclimation is investigated. Expression levels of genes regulating adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and the hypothalamus are compared between pika leptin and human leptin treatment, suggesting that pika leptin has adaptively and functionally evolved. Our results show that pika leptin regulates energy homeostasis via reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure under both warm and cold conditions. Compared with human leptin, pika leptin demonstrates a superior induced capacity for adaptive thermogenesis, which is reflected in a more enhanced β-oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and heat production. Moreover, leptin treatment combined with cold stimulation has a significant synergistic effect on adaptive thermogenesis, more so than is observed with a single cold exposure or single leptin treatment. Conclusions/Significance These findings support the hypothesis that cold stress has driven the functional evolution of plateau pika leptin as an ecological adaptation to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. PMID:21698227

  19. Stress and environmental shift characteristics of HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzellotti, J.F.; Smith, D.J.; Chrzan, Z.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Sczupak, R.J. [Barr Associates, Inc., Westford, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} polarizer coatings for 1054 nm have been produced that have low stress at explicit environmental conditions without the employment of backside stress-compensation films. In this process hafnia is condensed from a metallic melt and silica from an oxide source, both via electron-beam evaporation. Specifically, this process has been adopted for multilayer designs with stringent requirements on spectral control and wavefront distortion. Efforts to meet these requirements have prompted various investigations of coating stress and spectral behavior, especially under changing environmental conditions. Results have shown that coating stress and optical thickness vary significantly with humidity. These quantities have been measured under both ambient air and dry nitrogen atmospheres. The effects of coating parameters on stress and environmental stability have been examined for an experimental hafnia/silica polarizer coating. The aforementioned parameters are hafnia deposition rate, oxygen pressure during hafnia deposition, and oxygen pressure during silica deposition. Results indicate a strong correlation of coating stress to oxygen pressure during the silica evaporation. Data on the aging of stress in hafnia/silica coatings will also be presented. The HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} process has been utilized in high-laser-damage-threshold coatings for the OMEGA laser system and for National Ignition Facility development coatings at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  20. A decrease in bulk water and mannitol and accumulation of trehalose and trehalose-based oligosaccharides define a two-stage maturation process towards extreme stress resistance in ascospores of Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, T.T.; Golovina, E.A.; Leeuwen, van R.; Wösten, H.A.B.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal propagules survive stresses better than vegetative cells. Neosartorya fischeri, an Aspergillus teleomorph, forms ascospores that survive high temperatures or drying followed by heat. Not much is known about maturation and development of extreme stress resistance in fungal cells. This study pr

  1. The RosR transcription factor is required for gene expression dynamics in response to extreme oxidative stress in a hypersaline-adapted archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Kriti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work has shown that the hypersaline-adapted archaeon, Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, is highly resistant to oxidative stress caused by exposure to hydrogen peroxide, UV, and gamma radiation. Dynamic alteration of the gene regulatory network (GRN has been implicated in such resistance. However, the molecular functions of transcription regulatory proteins involved in this response remain unknown. Results Here we have reanalyzed several existing GRN and systems biology datasets for H. salinarum to identify and characterize a novel winged helix-turn-helix transcription factor, VNG0258H, as a regulator required for reactive oxygen species resistance in this organism. This protein appears to be unique to the haloarchaea at the primary sequence level. High throughput quantitative growth assays in a deletion mutant strain implicate VNG0258H in extreme oxidative stress resistance. According to time course gene expression analyses, this transcription factor is required for the appropriate dynamic response of nearly 300 genes to reactive oxygen species damage from paraquat and hydrogen peroxide. These genes are predicted to function in repair of oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. In vivo DNA binding assays demonstrate that VNG0258H binds DNA to mediate gene regulation. Conclusions Together these results suggest that VNG0258H is a novel archaeal transcription factor that regulates gene expression to enable adaptation to the extremely oxidative, hypersaline niche of H. salinarum. We have therefore renamed VNG0258H as RosR, for reactive oxygen species regulator.

  2. Analysis of environmental stress in plants with the aid of marker genes for H2O2 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieno, Ayaka; Naznin, Hushna Ara; Sawaki, Katsunobu; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Ishino, Haruka; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide acts as a signaling molecule mediating the acquisition of tolerance to both biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of marker genes for H2O2 response could help to intercept the signaling network of stress response of plants. Here, we describe application of marker genes for H2O2 responses to monitoring several abiotic stress responses. Arabidopsis plants were treated with UV-B, high light, and cold stresses, where involvement of H2O2-mediated signaling is known or suggested. Monitoring of these stress responses with molecular markers using quantitative real-time RT-PCR can detect landmark events in the sequential stress responses. These methods can be used for analysis of mutants and transgenic plants to examine natural H2O2 responses that are involved in environmental adaptation.

  3. Surface-active potential of biosurfactants produced in curd whey by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain-PP2 and Kocuria turfanesis strain-J at extreme environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Kirti V; Charde, Pravin N; Meshram, Sudhir U; Shendre, Latika P; Dubey, Vijay S; Juwarkar, Asha A

    2012-12-01

    Surface-active potential of biosurfactants produced cost-effectively in curd whey by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain-PP2 and Kocuria turfanesis strain-J were tested using parameters viz. surface tension (ST) reduction, F(CMC) (highest dilution factor to reach critical micelle concentration) and emulsification index (EI-24) of pesticides; monocrotophos and imidacloprid at extreme environmental conditions. Results have shown that ST reduction of biosurfactants was stable at pH 2-11. High F(CMC) of the biosurfactant in the fermented whey at low pH improved emulsification of pesticides. ST marginally increased at 5% and 15% NaCl, resulting in high EI-24 and F(CMC). Over a range of temperatures 30-121 °C, ST remained low with a higher F(CMC) and EI-24 at 60 °C than at 121 and 30 °C. The biosurfactants have shown differences in their surface-active property and have marked specificity to emulsify pesticides in extreme environmental conditions.

  4. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 9. Alleviation of environmental stress on renewable resource productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, G. S.

    1982-09-01

    It is pointed out that temperature and water stress are the key factors that will be influenced by a rise in ambient CO/sub 2/ concentration. Improvement of the capacity of crop plants to withstand water and temperature stress will require an undergirding effort in basic research, to support required advances in plant breeding and development of novel crop management systems. The most important considerations for future research on environmental stress in crops are: the need for interdisciplinary approaches in all aspects of stress research; the need for centralized stress testing capabilities; plant-breeding, the long-term solution with greatest potential benefit and least cost; improvement in management techniques, becoming more effective as increased attention is directed to the management of specific genotypes; the need for understanding of more stress effects closer to the optimum than to lethality; the need to optimize rather than maximize production; the need for understanding different stress effects during different, critical developmental stages; the need for development of usable, physiologically-based crop models to serve as predictive tools for agronomists and breeders; the recognition that improvement options in annual crops are greater than in perennial crops; efforts to culture perennial crops as annuals as a means of avoiding winter stress; and the need for a major effort to devise techniques to shorten the breeding cycle in perennials so that genetic solutions can be more readily employed.

  5. Molecular mechanism of the impact of environmental stress on plant flowerin g%环境胁迫影响植物开花的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张吉顺; 张孝廉; 王仁刚; 谢升东; 王轶; 任学良

    2016-01-01

    鉴于植物对开花时间的调节是其适应逆境的重要机制,且在复杂的遗传网络调控下,植物检测并整合外源(如光周期和温度)和/或内源(如年龄和激素水平)信号来诱导或抑制成花转变。今从分子生物学角度详细介绍光、温、水、盐和营养等环境胁迫对植物开花时间的影响,这些过程涉及遗传学和表观遗传学上的改变;其目的在于从植物与环境互作的角度对植物开花时间的分子遗传调控网络进行补充,以期为科研工作者更好地研究环境与植物开花时间的关系提供参考。%Summary All living organisms are under continuous stress of one kind or more because the surrounding environment in which they live is dynamic. In a way, the essence of evolution lies in the incorporation of opportunistic changes that enable populations to survive in the stressful environment.Plants being sessile face various extreme environmental conditions throughout their life cycle and respond accordingly to maintain their vital metabolic homeostasis by regulating their gene activity.In addition,plants have developed excellent mechanisms of stress perception and signal transduction.Abiotic stresses affect the plant growth and yield potential,and therefore the response of plants to them is important for plants to cope with the environmental changes to survive.Plants can detect the environmental condition change and alter the developmental mode to obtain survival chances in the adversity.Several abiotic stresses affect plant growth and productivity with differential regulations at different levels.Therefore,any stimulus can trigger relative gene expression and lead to the physiological changes.These signal transduction pathways act independently and also have a significant crosstalk among them. When to initiate flowering is obviously a critical step in the plant life cycle,especially under an unfavorable environment.Under the control of a complex genetic

  6. Adaptive Coping under Conditions of Extreme Stress: Multilevel Influences on the Determinants of Resilience in Maltreated Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of resilience in maltreated children reveals the possibility of coping processes and resources on multiple levels of analysis as children strive to adapt under conditions of severe stress. In a maltreating context, aspects of self-organization, including self-esteem, self-reliance, emotion regulation, and adaptable yet reserved…

  7. Adaptive Coping under Conditions of Extreme Stress: Multilevel Influences on the Determinants of Resilience in Maltreated Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of resilience in maltreated children reveals the possibility of coping processes and resources on multiple levels of analysis as children strive to adapt under conditions of severe stress. In a maltreating context, aspects of self-organization, including self-esteem, self-reliance, emotion regulation, and adaptable yet reserved…

  8. Environmental proteomics of the mussel Mytilus: implications for tolerance to stress and change in limits of biogeographic ranges in response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2012-11-01

    Climate change will affect temperature extremes and averages, and hyposaline conditions in coastal areas due to extreme precipitation events and oceanic pH. How climate change will push species close to, or beyond, their physiological tolerance limits as well as change the limits of their biogeographic ranges can probably be investigated best in species that have already responded to climate change and whose distribution ranges are currently in flux. Blue mussels provide such a study system, with the invading warm-adapted Mediterranean Mytilus galloprovincialis having replaced the native more cold-adapted Mytilus trossulus from the southern part of its range in southern California over the past century, possibly due to climate change. However, freshwater input may prevent the latter species from expanding further north. We used a proteomics approach to characterize the responses of the two congeners to acute heat stress, chronic thermal acclimation, and hyposaline stress. In addition, we investigated the proteomic changes in response to decreasing seawater pH in another bivalve, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a common costressor during environmental stress, including oceanic acidification, and possibly cause modifications of cytoskeletal elements. All stressors disrupted protein homeostasis, indicated by the induction of molecular chaperones and, in the case of acute heat stress, proteasome isoforms, possibly due both to protein denaturation directly by the stressor and to the production of ROS. Acute stress by heat and hyposalinity changed several small G-proteins implicated in cytoskeletal modifications and vesicular transport, respectively. Changes in abundance of proteins involved in energy metabolism and ROS scavenging further suggest a possible trade-off during acute and chronic stress from heat and cold between ROS-generating NADH-producing pathways and ROS-scavenging NADPH

  9. Early remote laser detection of vegetation damage caused by certain environmental stress factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, Emmett W.; Mcmurtrey, James E., III

    1989-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra of plants excited with a pulsed nitrogen laser beam emitting at 337 nm were found to be related to plant type, as well as with changes in the physiology of the plant as the result of various kinds of environmental stress. The plant types which were studied included herbaceous dicots, monocots, hardwoods, and conifers. These plant types could be identified on the basis of differences in either the number of fluorescent bands, or the relative intensity of the bands. The dicots and monocots had fluorescent maxima at 440, 685, and 740 nm. The monocots could be distinguished from the dicots by virtue of having a much higher 440 nm/685 nm ratio. Hardwoods and conifers had an additional fluorescence band at 525 nm, but healthy conifers did not have a band at 685 nm.

  10. Chemical contamination of soft drinks in sealed plastic bottles by environmental stress cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Dan; Israelsohn-Azulay, Osnat

    2009-01-01

    A contamination of soft drinks in sealed bottles by organic solvents is reported: closed bottles full of soft drinks were accidentally placed on a cardboard soaked with thinner and the organic fluid subsequently fissured the bottom of the bottles and penetrated into the soft drinks without any apparent leakage of the soft drinks. Experiments were carried out to simulate the process: the penetration of different organic solvents into soft drinks through the bottom of closed bottles was tested. The penetration occurred only when the closed bottles contained carbonated soft drinks (CSD), indicating that inner pressure is a necessary condition for the fissuring of the bottles. This paper discusses environmental stress cracking of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles by organic solvents and migration of chemicals to CSD. Experiments were conducted to determine the conditions in which PET can be permeable to poisoning organic products.

  11. Mesocosms of aquatic bacterial communities from the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (Mexico): a tool to test bacterial community response to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Bonilla-Rosso, German; Travisano, Michael; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Microbial communities are responsible for important ecosystem processes, and their activities are regulated by environmental factors such as temperature and solar ultraviolet radiation. Here we investigate changes in aquatic microbial community structure, diversity, and evenness in response to changes in temperature and UV radiation. For this purpose, 15 mesocosms were seeded with both microbial mat communities and plankton from natural pools within the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (Mexico). Clone libraries (16S rRNA) were obtained from water samples at the beginning and at the end of the experiment (40 days). Phylogenetic analysis indicated substantial changes in aquatic community composition and structure in response to temperature and UV radiation. Extreme treatments with elevation in temperature or UV radiation reduced diversity in relation to the Control treatments, causing a reduction in richness and increase in dominance, with a proliferation of a few resistant operational taxonomic units. Each phylum was affected differentially by the new conditions, which translates in a differential modification of ecosystem functioning. This suggests that the impact of environmental stress, at least at short term, will reshape the aquatic bacterial communities of this unique ecosystem. This work also demonstrates the possibility of designing manageable synthetic microbial community ecosystems where controlled environmental variables can be manipulated. Therefore, microbial model systems offer a complementary approach to field and laboratory studies of global research problems associated with the environment.

  12. Micro-environmental mechanical stress controls tumor spheroid size and morphology by suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cheng

    Full Text Available Compressive mechanical stress produced during growth in a confining matrix limits the size of tumor spheroids, but little is known about the dynamics of stress accumulation, how the stress affects cancer cell phenotype, or the molecular pathways involved.We co-embedded single cancer cells with fluorescent micro-beads in agarose gels and, using confocal microscopy, recorded the 3D distribution of micro-beads surrounding growing spheroids. The change in micro-bead density was then converted to strain in the gel, from which we estimated the spatial distribution of compressive stress around the spheroids. We found a strong correlation between the peri-spheroid solid stress distribution and spheroid shape, a result of the suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death in regions of high mechanical stress. By compressing spheroids consisting of cancer cells overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes, we demonstrate that mechanical stress-induced apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway.Our results provide detailed, quantitative insight into the role of micro-environmental mechanical stress in tumor spheroid growth dynamics, and suggest how tumors grow in confined locations where the level of solid stress becomes high. An important implication is that apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, induced by compressive stress, may be involved in tumor dormancy, in which tumor growth is held in check by a balance of apoptosis and proliferation.

  13. Measurement of extremely (2) H-enriched water samples by laser spectrometry: application to batch electrolytic concentration of environmental tritium samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, L I; Kumar, B; Douence, C; Belachew, D L; Aggarwal, P K

    2016-02-15

    Natural water samples artificially or experimentally enriched in deuterium ((2) H) at concentrations up to 10,000 ppm are required for various medical, environmental and hydrological tracer applications, but are difficult to measure using conventional stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Here we demonstrate that off-axis integrated cavity output (OA-ICOS) laser spectrometry, along with (2) H-enriched laboratory calibration standards and appropriate analysis templates, allows for low-cost, fast, and accurate determinations of water samples having δ(2) HVSMOW-SLAP values up to at least 57,000 ‰ (~9000 ppm) at a processing rate of 60 samples per day. As one practical application, extremely (2) H-enriched samples were measured by laser spectrometry and compared to the traditional (3) H Spike-Proxy method in order to determine tritium enrichment factors in the batch electrolysis of environmental waters. Highly (2) H-enriched samples were taken from different sets of electrolytically concentrated standards and low-level (tritium samples, and all cases returned accurate and precise initial low-level (3) H results. The ability to quickly and accurately measure extremely (2) H-enriched waters by laser spectrometry will facilitate the use of deuterium as a tracer in numerous environmental and other applications. For low-level tritium operations, this new analytical ability facilitated a 10-20 % increase in sample productivity through the elimination of spike standards and gravimetrics, and provides immediate feedback on electrolytic enrichment cell performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and biomarkers of oxidative stress among patients hospitalised with acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian L Megson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was associated with oxidative stress among patients hospitalised for acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN: An existing cohort study of 1,261 patients hospitalised for acute myocardial infarction. SETTING: Nine acute hospitals in Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty never smokers who had been exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (admission serum cotinine ≥3.0 ng/mL were compared with 60 never smokers who had not (admission serum cotinine ≤0.1 ng/mL. INTERVENTION: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Three biomarkers of oxidative stress (protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde (MDA and oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL were measured on admission blood samples and adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for baseline differences in age, sex and socioeconomic status, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was associated with serum concentrations of both protein carbonyl (beta coefficient 7.96, 95% CI 0.76, 15.17, p = 0.031 and MDA (beta coefficient 10.57, 95% CI 4.32, 16.81, p = 0.001 but not ox-LDL (beta coefficient 2.14, 95% CI -8.94, 13.21, p = 0.703. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was associated with increased oxidative stress. Further studies are requires to explore the role of oxidative stress in the association between environmental tobacco smoke and myocardial infarction.

  15. The halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus adapts to multiple environmental extremes using a large repertoire of Na(K)/H antiporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Cook, Gregory M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2009-10-01

    Natranaerobius thermophilus is an unusual extremophile because it is halophilic, alkaliphilic and thermophilic, growing optimally at 3.5 M Na(+), pH(55 degrees C) 9.5 and 53 degrees C. Mechanisms enabling this tripartite lifestyle are essential for understanding how microorganisms grow under inhospitable conditions, but remain unknown, particularly in extremophiles growing under multiple extremes. We report on the response of N. thermophilus to external pH at high salt and elevated temperature and identify mechanisms responsible for this adaptation. N. thermophilus exhibited cytoplasm acidification, maintaining an unanticipated transmembrane pH gradient of 1 unit over the entire extracellular pH range for growth. N. thermophilus uses two distinct mechanisms for cytoplasm acidification. At extracellular pH values at and below the optimum, N. thermophilus utilizes at least eight electrogenic Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporters for cytoplasm acidification. Characterization of these antiporters in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc showed overlapping pH profiles (pH 7.8-10.0) and Na(+) concentrations for activity (K(0.5) values 1.0-4.4 mM), properties that correlate with intracellular conditions of N. thermophilus. As the extracellular pH increases beyond the optimum, electrogenic antiport activity ceases, and cytoplasm acidification is achieved by energy-independent physiochemical effects (cytoplasmic buffering) potentially mediated by an acidic proteome. The combination of these strategies allows N. thermophilus to grow over a range of extracellular pH and Na(+) concentrations and protect biomolecules under multiple extreme conditions.

  16. Temperature-induced lipocalin (TIL): a shield against stress-inducing environmental shocks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berterame, Nadia Maria; Bertagnoli, Stefano; Codazzi, Vera; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2017-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-established workhorse, either for recombinant or natural products, thanks to its natural traits and easily editable metabolism. However, during a bio-based industrial process it meets multiple stresses generated by operative conditions such as non-optimal temperature, pH, oxygenation and product accumulation. The development of tolerant strains is therefore indispensable for the improvement of production, yield and productivity of fermentative processes. In this regard, plants as resilient organisms are a generous source for fishing genes and/or metabolites that can help the cell factory to counteract environmental constraints. Plants possess proteins named temperature-induced lipocalins, TIL, whose levels in the cells correlates with the tolerance to sudden temperature changes and with the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. In this work, the gene encoding for the Arabidopsis thaliana TIL protein was for the first time expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant strain was compared and analysed against the parental counterpart under heat shock, freezing, exposure to organic acid and oxidative agents. In all the tested conditions, TIL expression conferred a higher tolerance to the stress imposed, making this strain a promising candidate for the development of robust cell factories able to overtake the major impairments of industrial processes. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Follicular apoptosis in the mussel (Mytella strigata) as potential indicator of environmental stress in coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gasca, Alejandra; Leal-Tarin, Beatriz; Rios-Sicairos, Julian; Hernandez-Cornejo, Rubi; Aguilar-Zarate, Gabriela; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Follicular apoptosis in the tropical mussel Mytella strigata was assessed in three coastal lagoons located in the southern Gulf of California, Mexico. Mussels were collected from three coastal lagoons associated with different scenarios of anthropogenic stress during one year. The gonad of each mussel was dissected, weighed, and sampled for histology and apoptosis analysis by TUNEL labeling. Two apoptotic indices were used: the apoptotic index of cells (AIC) based on the number of follicular cells in apoptosis in one thousand cells counted per gonad, and the apoptotic index of follicles (AIF) based on the number of follicular cells per follicle per gonad. Both indices showed high association with each other for all developmental stages, although AIF seemed to better discriminate among sites. Higher AIF and AIC were observed at the Urias Estuary (1.6 and 1.5 respectively) ranked as highly polluted, followed by Ensenada del Pabellon (0.82 and 0.95 respectively), ranked as moderately polluted, and the Teacapan Estuary (0.57 and 0.76 respectively) ranked as slightly polluted. Our data indicate that the apoptotic index in tropical mussels could be a useful indicator of environmental stress in coastal ecosystems; however, the ecological relevance of follicular apoptosis in polluted environments needs further investigation.

  18. Environmental stress cracking in gamma-irradiated polycarbonate - A diffusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pietro Paolo J. C. de O.; Araújo, Patricia L. B.; da Silveira, Leopoldo B. B.; Araújo, Elmo S.

    2017-01-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is an engineering polymer which presents interesting properties. This material has been also used in medical devices, which is frequently exposed to gamma radiosterilization and to chemical agents. This may produce significant changes in polymer structure, leading to failure in service. The present work brings about a new approach on environmental stress cracking (ESC) processes elucidation in 100 kGy gamma-irradiated PC, by evaluating the diffusion process of methanol or 2-propanol in test specimens and determining the diffusion parameters on solvent-irradiated polymer systems. A comparison of diffusion parameters for both solvents indicated that methanol has a considerable ESC action on PC, with diffusion parameter of 7.5×10-14±1% m2 s-1 for non-irradiated PC and 7.8×10-14±2.8% m2 s-1 for PC irradiated at 100 kGy. In contrast, 2-propanol did not act as an ESC agent, as it did promote neither swelling nor cracks in the test specimens. These results were confirmed by visual analysis and optical microscopy. Unexpectedly, structural damages evidenced in tensile strength tests suggested that 2-propanol is as aggressive as methanol chemical for PC. Moreover, although some manufacturers indicate the use of 2-propanol as a cleaning product for PC artifacts, such use should be avoided in parts under mechanical stress.

  19. Effect of environmental stress on regulation of gene expression in the yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eitan

    2015-07-01

    Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict the activation state of a transcription factor (TF) from the expression levels of its target genes. This inference problem is complicated however due to the fact that different genes may be regulated by different activation schemes (linear, exponential, sigmoidal, etc.). In addition to transcription regulation, the rate of gene expression at any instantaneous point in time is also determined by the independent rates of baseline production and degradation. Consequently, the set of solutions to any model equations describe an infinite number of trajectories in probability space, thus rendering the problem NP-hard. In the current study we used a Gaussian process (GP) approach to address this inverse problem. Experimental gene expression data were modeled by a putative linear activation scheme and discrepancy between theory and experiment was modeled by a GP. Model hyperparameters were calculated using maximum likelihood estimates to generate continuous TF state-space profiles. Identifiability of model parameters was optimized by obtaining TF state-space functions for multiple genes simultaneously. We found that model parameters were sensitive to environmental stress conditions, producing different state-space profiles for different stresses.

  20. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing, E-mail: tianbing@zju.edu.cn; Hua, Yuejin, E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans.

  1. Behavioural and physiological stress responses to environmental and human factors in different small mammal species: implications for their conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Castilla, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Tesis Doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Biología Wild animal populations are continuously subjected to periodic disturbances by environmental and anthropogenic causes. Thereby, in this doctoral thesis, we carried out different investigations to study the behavioural and physiological stress responses of several small mammal species to different environmental and human factors. Behavioral responses to predation ris...

  2. Universal Stress Proteins as New Targets for Environmental and Therapeutic Interventions of Schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Masamba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of various control measures and eradication methods that have been in progress, schistosomiasis still prevails as one of the most prevalent debilitating parasitic diseases, typically affecting the poor and the underprivileged that are predominantly concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. The parasitic schistosome blood fluke responsible for causing the disease completes its complex developmental cycle in two hosts: humans and freshwater snails, where they physically undergo gross modifications to endure the different conditions associated with each host. Just like any other organism, the worm possesses mechanisms that help them respond to environmental insults. It has been hypothesized that a special class of proteins known as Universal Stress Proteins (USPs are up-regulated during sudden environmental changes, thus assisting the worm to tolerate the unfavourable conditions associated with its developmental cycle. The position of praziquantel as the drug of choice against all schistosome infections has been deemed vulnerable due to mounting concerns over drug pressure and so the need for alternative treatment is now a matter of urgency. Therefore, this review seeks to explore the associations and possible roles of USPs in schistosomiasis as well as the functioning of these proteins in the schistosomulae stage in order to develop new therapeutic interventions against this disease.

  3. Plant resistance to cold stress: Mechanisms and environmental signals triggering frost hardening and dehardening

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Erwin H Beck; Richard Heim; Jens Hansen

    2004-12-01

    This introductory overview shows that cold, in particular frost, stresses a plant in manifold ways and that the plant’s response, being injurious or adaptive, must be considered a syndrome rather than a single reaction. In the course of the year perennial plants of the temperate climate zones undergo frost hardening in autumn and dehardening in spring. Using Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) as a model plant the environmental signals inducing frost hardening and dehardening, respectively, were investigated. Over 2 years the changes in frost resistance of Scots pine needles were recorded together with the annual courses of day-length and ambient temperature. Both act as environmental signals for frost hardening and dehardening. Climate chamber experiments showed that short day-length as a signal triggering frost hardening could be replaced by irradiation with far red light, while red light inhibited hardening. The involvement of phytochrome as a signal receptor could be corroborated by respective night-break experiments. More rapid frost hardening than by short day or far red treatment was achieved by applying a short period (6 h) of mild frost which did not exceed the plant’s cold resistance. Both types of signals were independently effective but the rates of frost hardening were not additive. The maximal rate of hardening was – 0.93°C per day and frost tolerance of < – 72°C was achieved. For dehardening, temperature was an even more effective signal than day-length.

  4. Environmental stresses induce transgenerationally inheritable survival advantages via germline-to-soma communication in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Saya; Uno, Masaharu; Okabe, Emiko; Nono, Masanori; Nishida, Eisuke

    2017-01-01

    Hormesis is a biological phenomenon, whereby exposure to low levels of toxic agents or conditions increases organismal viability. It thus represents a beneficial aspect of adaptive responses to harmful environmental stimuli. Here we show that hormesis effects induced in the parental generation can be passed on to the descendants in Caenorhabditis elegans. Animals subjected to various stressors during developmental stages exhibit increased resistance to oxidative stress and proteotoxicity. The increased resistance is transmitted to the subsequent generations grown under unstressed conditions through epigenetic alterations. Our analysis reveal that the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling effector DAF-16/FOXO and the heat-shock factor HSF-1 in the parental somatic cells mediate the formation of epigenetic memory, which is maintained through the histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylase complex in the germline across generations. The elicitation of memory requires the transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf in somatic tissues. We propose that germ-to-soma communication across generations is an essential framework for the transgenerational inheritance of acquired traits, which provides the offspring with survival advantages to deal with environmental perturbation. PMID:28067237

  5. Neonatal pain-related stress, functional cortical activity and visual-perceptual abilities in school-age children born at extremely low gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesburg, Sam M; Chau, Cecil M; Cheung, Teresa P L; Moiseev, Alexander; Ribary, Urs; Herdman, Anthony T; Miller, Steven P; Cepeda, Ivan L; Synnes, Anne; Grunau, Ruth E

    2013-10-01

    Children born very prematurely (neonatal experience and neurodevelopment, remain poorly understood. Repeated procedural pain-related stress during neonatal intensive care has been proposed to contribute to altered neurocognitive development in these children. Due to critical periods in the development of thalamocortical systems, the immature brain of infants born at extremely low gestational age (ELGA; neonatal pain. In a cohort of school-age children followed since birth we assessed relations between functional brain activity measured using magnetoencephalogragy (MEG), visual-perceptual abilities and cumulative neonatal pain. We demonstrated alterations in the spectral structure of spontaneous cortical oscillatory activity in ELGA children at school-age. Cumulative neonatal pain-related stress was associated with changes in background cortical rhythmicity in these children, and these alterations in spontaneous brain oscillations were negatively correlated with visual-perceptual abilities at school-age, and were not driven by potentially confounding neonatal variables. These findings provide the first evidence linking neonatal pain-related stress, the development of functional brain activity, and school-age cognitive outcome in these vulnerable children.

  6. Assessment of the neurotoxic potential of exposure to 50Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) in naïve and chemically stressed PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Kock, Marjolijn D M; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Increasing exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), generated by power lines and electric appliances, raises concern about potential adverse health effects of ELF-EMF. The central nervous system is expected to be particularly vulnerable to ELF-EMF as its function strongly depends on electrical excitability. We therefore investigated effects of acute (30min) and sub-chronic (48h) exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF on naïve and chemically stressed pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The latter have higher levels of iron and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) and display increased vulnerability to environmental insults. Effects of ELF-EMF on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity were assessed using Fura-2 single cell fluorescence microscopy, H2-DCFDA and CFDA assays, respectively. Our data demonstrate that acute exposure of naïve PC12 cells to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT fails to affect basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i. Moreover, sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000μT has no consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis in naïve PC12 cells and does not affect ROS production and membrane integrity. Notably, in chemically stressed PC12 cells both acute and sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure also failed to exert consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity. Our combined findings thus indicate that exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT, i.e. 10,000 times above background exposure, does not induce neurotoxic effects in vitro, neither in naïve nor in chemically stressed PC12 cells. Though our data require confirmation, e.g. in developing neuronal cells in vitro or (developing) animals, it appears that the neurotoxic risk of ELF-EMF exposure is limited.

  7. Population-level effects of multiple stresses on fish and shellfish. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 1967

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanciruk, P.; Breck, J.E.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1982-11-01

    Because the cumulative effects of many stresses may cause the collapse of a population even when the effects of each stress alone may appear insignificant, it is important to (1) document the effects of multiple stresses on fish and shellfish population, (2) provide an overview of experimental data concerning the effects of multiple stresses on fish and shellfish, and (3) evaluate existing methods of quantifying responses to multiple stresses. Stress refers to the environmental forces acting on an individual or population through changes in rates of survival, growth, or reproduction. The classification of stresses, population responses, and the terminology for interactions among stresses are discussed. A brief review of case histories for natural populations indicated that catastrophic changes in community structure and function can be induced by multiple stresses. In particular, fishing pressure can be a powerful agent reducing the capacity of populations to respond to stress. An overview of experimental studies that evaluated acute and chronic effects of two or more stresses on fish and fish populations highlights the need for studies that examine sublethal responses (i.e., growth and reproduction) to chronic exposures. Some of the theoretical approaches to multiple stresses on fish and fish populations are surveyed, including discussions of quantal responses, response surface analysis, dose-response theory for multiple toxic factors, and certain ecological theories that may aid in an understanding of the effect of multiple stresses on fish populations. Studies are needed that provide greater insight into the physiological mechanisms affected by the toxicant and reflected by the population responses of survival, growth, and reproduction.

  8. Induced damage in Carrara Marble as a result of long-term low-magnitude environmental stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael; Walter, Jens M.

    2015-04-01

    Damage of intact rock is commonly driven by the interaction of long-term low-magnitude external environmental stresses in combination with surface chemistry, rather than short-term loading in excess of intact rock strength. In order to determine the contribution of environmental stresses to the propagation of micro- and macroscopic fractures under natural environmental conditions we undertook long-term three-point bending tests on large size Carrara Marble specimens. The interaction of mechanical stresses induced by external loading and corrosive conditions (e.g. the presence of water) at the tip of a pre-existing crack is termed stress corrosion. We investigate stress corrosion below saw cut notches in wet and dry samples of Carrara Marble (M1-5, each 10cm x 10cm x 110cm). These were pre-loaded to about 66% of their assumed ultimate strength (determined by the fracture toughness (Kic) calculated for the crack tip). Two marble beams (M1, M3) were initially loaded to 22% and three (M2, M4, M5) to 55% of Kic. CaC03 saturated water was continuously dripped in the notch of samples --M1-4 to create corrosive conditions, while M5 was kept dry. After a three-week bedding period, loading on sample M1 was increased to 55%, M2 and M5 to 77% and M3 and M4 to 85% of Kic respectively. The tests were interrupted prior to failure of the specimens in order to allow the assessment of the crack-tip structure. During the testing period we used classical strain gages and acoustic emission sensors to measure strain and elastic stress changes through coda wave interferometry. Temperature and humidity were monitored and the outflowing fluid was collected for future analysis, throughout. The effect of induced damage on residual intrinsic stresses was evaluated using neutron diffraction on the SALSA instrument at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France), while texture measurements were undertaken using the X-ray goniometer at the Geoscience Center, University Göttingen, and

  9. Dunaliella spp. Under Environmental Stress: Enhancing Lipid Production and Optimizing Harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson, Stephanie Marie

    Agricultural crops including corn, sugar cane, and oil palm have been investigated as potential sources for biofuel; however, they produce only a fraction of the oil percent biomass as compared to that of microalgae. Growth and lipid production by microalgae is regulated by a variety of environmental factors, including light intensity, availability of nutrients, temperature regime and salinity. We assessed 14 strains of the saltwater algae Dunaliella spp. (Teodoresco) in unialgal cultures within four species to determine a best strain or strain(s) as potential feedstock for biofuels. The taxonomy of these 14 strains was elucidated by comparing both physiological characteristics and the ITS2 and 18S regions. After careful analysis, the data suggest that the 14 strains grouped within four species: D. tertiolecta, D. pseudosalina, D. salina, and D. viridis. In addition, the isolation and accurate quantification of neutral lipids in Dunaliella was developed from existing techniques. Nile Red was optimized as a qualitative stain to rapidly screen and visualize neutral lipids. Direct transesterification was determined to be the best quantitative method because it yielded high amounts of neutral lipids with precise and reproducible results when compared to conventional extraction methods. Seven strains were selected for further efforts to enhance lipid production using salinity stress, nutrient limitation, pH stress, continuous light, and bubbling with carbon dioxide (CO2). High salinity yielded the maximum total fatty acid (FA) content (up to 65% by dry weight) in comparison to controls (˜10-25% total FAs). High pH x low salinity, low pH, and continuous light x CO2 yielded near maximum FA content (56%, 43%, and 42%, respectively). Nitrogen and/or phosphorus limitation and 12:12 (light:dark photoperiod) x CO 2 did not significantly enhance FA production (23% and 31%, respectively). Results were strain-specific with high intraspecific variation observed within each

  10. Leaves of Field-Grown Mastic Trees Suffer Oxidative Stress at the Two Extremes of their Lifespan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Juvany; Maren Müller; Sergi Munné-Bosch

    2012-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex phenomenon occurring in all plant species,but it is still poorly understood in plants grown in Mediterranean field conditions and well-adapted to harsh climatic conditions.To better understand the physiological processes underlying leaf senescence in mastic trees (Pistacia lentiscus L.),we evaluated leaf growth,water and N content,photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) photochemistry,lipid peroxidation and levels of photosynthetic pigments,antioxidants,abscisic acid,and salicylic acid and jasmonic acid during the complete leaf lifespan,from early expansion to late senescence in relation to natural climatic conditions in the field.While mature leaves suffered from water and N deficit during late spring and summer,both young (emerging) and old (senescing) leaves were most sensitive to photooxidative stress,as indicated by reductions in the Fv/Fm ratio and enhanced lipid peroxidation during late autumn and winter.Reductions in the Fv/Fm ratio were associated with low α-tocopherol (vitamin E) levels,while very old,senescing leaves additionally showed severe anthocyanin losses.We have concluded that both young (emerging) and old (senescing) leaves suffer oxidative stress in mastic trees,which may be linked in part to suboptimal temperatures during late autumn and winter as well as to low vitamin E levels.

  11. Leaves of field-grown mastic trees suffer oxidative stress at the two extremes of their lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvany, Marta; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-08-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex phenomenon occurring in all plant species, but it is still poorly understood in plants grown in Mediterranean field conditions and well-adapted to harsh climatic conditions. To better understand the physiological processes underlying leaf senescence in mastic trees (Pistacia lentiscus L.), we evaluated leaf growth, water and N content, photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, lipid peroxidation and levels of photosynthetic pigments, antioxidants, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid and jasmonic acid during the complete leaf lifespan, from early expansion to late senescence in relation to natural climatic conditions in the field. While mature leaves suffered from water and N deficit during late spring and summer, both young (emerging) and old (senescing) leaves were most sensitive to photo-oxidative stress, as indicated by reductions in the F(v)/F(m) ratio and enhanced lipid peroxidation during late autumn and winter. Reductions in the F(v)/F(m) ratio were associated with low α-tocopherol (vitamin E) levels, while very old, senescing leaves additionally showed severe anthocyanin losses. We have concluded that both young (emerging) and old (senescing) leaves suffer oxidative stress in mastic trees, which may be linked in part to suboptimal temperatures during late autumn and winter as well as to low vitamin E levels.

  12. Inferences on the biochemical and environmental regulation of universal stress proteins from Schistosomiasis parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbah AN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreas N Mbah,1,2 Ousman Mahmud,1 Omotayo R Awofolu,2 Raphael D Isokpehi11Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South AfricaBackground: Human schistosomiasis is a freshwater snail-transmitted disease caused by parasitic flatworms of the Schistosoma genus. Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma mansoni, and Schistosoma japonicum are the three major species infecting humans. These parasites undergo a complex developmental life cycle, in which they encounter a plethora of environmental signals. The presence of genes encoding the universal stress protein (USP domain in the genomes of Schistosoma spp. suggests these flatworms are equipped to respond to unfavorable conditions. Though data on gene expression is available for USP genes, their biochemical and environmental regulation are incompletely understood. The identification of additional regulatory molecules for Schistosoma. USPs, which may be present in the human, snail, or water environments, could also be useful for schistosomiasis interventions.Methods: We developed a protocol that includes a visual analytics stage to facilitate integration, visualization, and decision making, from the results of sequence analyses and data collection on a set of 13 USPs from S. mansoni and S. japonicum.Results: Multiple sequence alignment identified conserved sites that could be key residues regulating the function of USPs of the Schistosoma spp. Based on the consistency and completeness of sequence annotation, we prioritized for further research the gene for a 184-amino-acid-long USP that is present in the genomes of the three human-infecting Schistosoma spp. Calcium, zinc, and magnesium ions were predicted to interact with the protein product of the gene.Conclusion: Given that the initial effects of

  13. Analysis of transient thermal stress in heat-generating plates and hollow cylinders caused by sudden environmental temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, G. S.; Schoeberle, D. F.; Valentin, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Analysis and solution are presented for transient thermal stresses in a free heat-generating flat plate and a free, hollow-generating cylinder as a result of sudden environmental changes. The technique used and graphical results obtained are of interest to the heat transfer industry.

  14. Risk Factors for Adolescent Suicide and Suicidal Behavior: Mental and Substance Abuse Disorders, Family Environmental Factors, and Life Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews psychopathologic risk factors for adolescent suicide and suicidal behavior, namely, affective, disruptive, substance abuse, psychotic, and personality disorders. Discusses interaction of psychopathology with age and gender. Reviews role of family environmental risk factors and stress events in suicide and suicidal behavior, both alone and…

  15. Species richness and diversity in different functional groups across environmental stress gradients : a model for marine rocky shores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scrosati, Ricardo A.; van Genne, Barbara; Heaven, Christine S.; Watt, Cortney A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model predicting how the species richness and diversity within benthic functional groups should vary across the full environmental stress gradient across which a regional biota from marine rocky shores can occur. Built upon previous models, our model makes predictions for sessile specie

  16. Resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize and peanut:Molecular biology, breeding, environmental stress, and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jake C. Fountain; Baozhu Guo; Pawan Khera; Liming Yang; Spurthi N. Nayak; Brian T. Scully; Robert D. Lee; Zhi-Yuan Chen; Robert C. Kemerait; Rajeev K. Varshney

    2015-01-01

    The colonization of maize (Zea mays L.) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the contamination of kernels with carcinogenic mycotoxins known as aflatoxins leading to economic losses and potential health threats to humans. The regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis in various Aspergillus spp. has been extensively studied, and has been shown to be related to oxidative stress responses. Given that environmental stresses such as drought and heat stress result in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within host plant tissues, host-derived ROS may play an important role in cross-kingdom communication between host plants and A. flavus. Recent technological advances in plant breeding have provided the tools necessary to study and apply knowledge derived from metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies in the context of productive breeding populations. Here, we review the current understanding of the potential roles of environmental stress, ROS, and aflatoxin in the interaction between A. flavus and its host plants, and the current status in molecular breeding and marker discovery for resistance to A. flavus colonization and aflatoxin contamination in maize and peanut. We will also propose future directions and a working model for continuing research efforts linking environmental stress tolerance and aflatoxin contamination resistance in maize and peanut.

  17. Resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize and peanut:Molecular biology, breeding, environmental stress,and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jake; C.Fountain; Pawan; Khera; Liming; Yang; Spurthi; N.Nayak; Brian; T.Scully; Robert; D.Lee; Zhi-Yuan; Chen; Robert; C.Kemerait; Rajeev; K.Varshney; Baozhu; Guo

    2015-01-01

    The colonization of maize(Zea mays L.) and peanut(Arachis hypogaea L.) by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the contamination of kernels with carcinogenic mycotoxins known as aflatoxins leading to economic losses and potential health threats to humans. The regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis in various Aspergillus spp. has been extensively studied, and has been shown to be related to oxidative stress responses. Given that environmental stresses such as drought and heat stress result in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species(ROS) within host plant tissues, host-derived ROS may play an important role in cross-kingdom communication between host plants and A. flavus. Recent technological advances in plant breeding have provided the tools necessary to study and apply knowledge derived from metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies in the context of productive breeding populations. Here, we review the current understanding of the potential roles of environmental stress, ROS, and aflatoxin in the interaction between A.flavus and its host plants, and the current status in molecular breeding and marker discovery for resistance to A. flavus colonization and aflatoxin contamination in maize and peanut. We will also propose future directions and a working model for continuing research efforts linking environmental stress tolerance and aflatoxin contamination resistance in maize and peanut.

  18. Role of a major facilitator superfamily transporter in adaptation capacity of Penicillium funiculosum under extreme acidic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Chen, Jinyin; Xu, Houjuan; Li, Duochuan

    2014-08-01

    Fungal species present in extreme low pH environments are expected to have adapted for tolerance to high H(+) concentrations. However, their adaptability mechanism is unclear. In this study, we isolated an acid-tolerant strain of Penicillium funiculosum, which can grow actively at pH 1.0 and thrived in pH 0.6. A major facilitator superfamily transporter (PfMFS) was isolated from an acid-sensitive random insertional mutant (M4) of the fungus. It encodes a putative protein of 551 residues and contains 14 transmembrane-spanning segments. A targeted mutant (M7) carrying an inactivated copy of PfMFS showed an obvious reduction of growth compared with the wild type (WT) and complementation of M7 with PfMFS restored the wild-type level of growth at pH 1.0. Further data showed that the wild-type showed higher intracellular pH than M7 in response to pH 1. Subcellular localization showed that PfMFS was a cell membrane protein. Homology modeling showed structural similarity with an MFS transporter EmrD from Escherichiacoli. These results demonstrate that the PfMFS transporter is involved in the acid resistance and intracellular pH homeostasis of P. funiculosum.

  19. Calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera reflects ambient conditions irrespective of environmental stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. G. Weinkauf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic Foraminifera are important marine calcifiers, and the ongoing change in the oceanic carbon system makes it essential to understand the influence of environmental factors on the biomineralisation of their shells. The amount of calcite deposited by planktonic Foraminifera during calcification has been hypothesized to reflect a range of environmental factors. However, it has never been assessed whether their calcification only passively responds to the conditions of the ambient seawater or whether it reflects changes in resource allocation due to physiological stress. To disentangle these two end-member scenarios, an experiment is required where the two processes are separated. A natural analogue to such an experiment occurred during the deposition of the Mediterranean sapropels, where large changes in surface water composition and stratification at the onset of the sapropel deposition were decoupled from local extinctions of planktonic Foraminifera species. We take advantage of this natural experiment and investigate the reaction of calcification intensity, expressed as size-normalized weight (SNW, of four species of planktonic Foraminifera to changing conditions during the onset of Sapropel S5 (126–121 ka in a sediment core from the Levantine Basin. We observe a significant relationship between SNW and surface water properties, as reflected by stable isotopes in the calcite of Foraminifera shells, but we failed to observe any reaction of calcification intensity on ecological stress during times of decreasing abundance culminating in local extinction. The reaction of calcification intensity to surface water perturbation at the onset of the sapropel was observed only in surface dwelling species, but all species calcified more strongly prior to the sapropel deposition and less strongly within the sapropel than at comparable conditions during the present day. These results indicate that the high-salinity environment of the glacial

  20. Methylphenidate and environmental enrichment ameliorate the deleterious effects of prenatal stress on attention functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubedat, Salman; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Cymerblit-Sabba, Adi; Ritter, Ami; Nachmani, Maayan; Avital, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Either pre- or post-natal environmental factors seem to play a key role in brain and behavioral development and to exert long-term effects. Increasing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal stress (PS) leads to motor and learning deficits and elevated anxiety, while enriched environment (EE) shows protective effects. The dopaminergic system is also sensitive to environmental life circumstances and affects attention functioning, which serves as the preliminary gate to cognitive processes. However, the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on the dopaminergic system and attentional functioning, in the context of these life experiences, remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the effects of EE or PS on distinct types of attention, along with possible effects of MPH exposure. We found that PS impaired selective attention as well as partial sustained attention, while EE had beneficial effects. Both EE and MPH ameliorated the deleterious effects of PS on attention functioning. Considering the possible psychostimulant effect of MPH, we examined both anxiety-like behavior as well as motor learning. We found that PS had a clear anxiogenic effect, whereas EE had an anxiolytic effect. Nevertheless, the treatment with both MPH and/or EE recovered the deleterious effects of PS. In the motor-learning task, the PS group showed superior performance while MPH led to impaired motor learning. Performance decrements were prevented in both the PS + MPH and EE + MPH groups. This study provides evidence that peripubertal exposure to EE (by providing enhanced sensory, motor, and social opportunities) or MPH treatments might be an optional therapeutic intervention in preventing the PS long-term adverse consequences.

  1. Exposure to extremely low frequency (50 Hz electromagnetic field changes the survival rate and morphometric characteristics of neurosecretory neurons of the earthworm Eisenia foetida (Oligochaeta under illumination stress

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    Banovački Zorana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An in vivo model was set up to establish the behavioral stress response (rate of survival and morphometric characteristics of A1 protocerebral neurosecretory neurons (cell size of Eisenia foetida (Oligochaeta as a result of the synergetic effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF - 50 Hz, 50 μT, 17 V/m and 50 Hz, 150 μT, 17 V/m, respectively and constant illumination (420-450 lux. If combined, these two stressors significantly (p<0.05 increased the survival rate of E. foetida in the 150 μT-exposed animals, because of delayed caudal autotomy reflex, an indicator of stress response. In addition, morphometric analysis indicated that there were changes in the protocerebral neurosecretory cells after exposure to the ELF-EMF. The present data support the view that short-term ELF-EMF exposure in “windows” of intensity is likely to stimulate the immune and neuroendocrine response of E. foetida.

  2. A Non-canonical Melanin Biosynthesis Pathway Protects Aspergillus terreus Conidia from Environmental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Elena; Gressler, Markus; Viediernikova, Iuliia; Hillmann, Falk; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertweck, Christian; Brock, Matthias

    2016-05-19

    Melanins are ubiquitous pigments found in all kingdoms of life. Most organisms use them for protection from environmental stress, although some fungi employ melanins as virulence determinants. The human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and related Ascomycetes produce dihydroxynaphthalene- (DHN) melanin in their spores, the conidia, and use it to inhibit phagolysosome acidification. However, biosynthetic origin of melanin in a related fungus, Aspergillus terreus, has remained a mystery because A. terreus lacks genes for synthesis of DHN-melanin. Here we identify genes coding for an unusual NRPS-like enzyme (MelA) and a tyrosinase (TyrP) that A. terreus expressed under conidiation conditions. We demonstrate that MelA produces aspulvinone E, which is activated for polymerization by TyrP. Functional studies reveal that this new pigment, Asp-melanin, confers resistance against UV light and hampers phagocytosis by soil amoeba. Unexpectedly, Asp-melanin does not inhibit acidification of phagolysosomes, thus likely contributing specifically to survival of A. terreus conidia in acidic environments.

  3. Environmental heat stress induces epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of robustness in parthenogenetic Artemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzitallab, Parisa; Baruah, Kartik; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Stappen, Gilbert; Catania, Francesco; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The notion that phenotypic traits emerging from environmental experiences are heritable remains under debate. However, the recent report of nonmendelian transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, i.e., the inheritance of traits not determined by the DNA sequence, might make such a phenomenon plausible. In our study, by carrying out common garden experiments, we could provide clear evidences that, on exposure to nonlethal heat shocks, a parental population of parthenogenetic (all female) Artemia (originating from one single female) experiences an increase in levels of Hsp70 production, tolerance toward lethal heat stress, and resistance against pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. Interestingly, these acquired phenotypic traits were transmitted to three successive generations, none of which were exposed to the parental stressor. This transgenerational inheritance of the acquired traits was associated with altered levels of global DNA methylation and acetylated histones H3 and H4 in the heat-shocked group compared to the control group, where both the parental and successive generations were reared at standard temperature. These results indicated that epigenetic mechanisms, such as global DNA methylation and histones H3 and H4 acetylation, have particular dynamics that are crucial in the heritability of the acquired adaptive phenotypic traits across generations.

  4. Effects of environmental stress on the condition of Littorina littorea along the Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Heidi; De Wolf, Hans; Backeljau, Thierry; Blust, Ronny

    2007-04-15

    The condition of the periwinkle Littorina littorea, expressed in terms of its shell morphology, reproductive impairment (i.e. female sterility/intersex, male penis shedding), trematode infestation load, lipid reserves and dry/wet weight ratio, was determined in function of environmental stress along the polluted Western and relatively clean Eastern Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands). The upstream increasing pollution and decreasing salinity levels along the Western Scheldt estuary (Fig. 1) are reflected in the dry/wet weight ratio and lipid content of the periwinkles. Compared to the Eastern Scheldt, female intersex (i.e. indicator of TBT pollution) and sterility occurred more frequently in the Western Scheldt estuary, while male penis shedding was even restricted to the latter estuary. The highest population intersex and sterility incidence was found near the harbour of Vlissingen and reflects potential nautical activities. The number of trematode infested periwinkles did not differ between both estuaries, although local sampling site differences were detected within each estuary, reflecting the complex interactions that exist among parasites, hosts and the local environment. Finally, both estuaries were maximally discriminated from each other based on the shell weight of the periwinkles using a canonical discriminant analysis. Periwinkles with the heaviest shells were found in the Western Scheldt estuary and may reflect growth rate or structural population differences caused by the less favourable living conditions in the Western Scheldt estuary.

  5. The endocrine stress response is linked to one specific locus on chromosome 3 in a mouse model based on extremes in trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonik Mariya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is essential to control physiological stress responses in mammals. Its dysfunction is related to several mental disorders, including anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci underlying the endocrine regulation of the HPA axis. Method High (HAB and low (LAB anxiety-related behaviour mice were established by selective inbreeding of outbred CD-1 mice to model extremes in trait anxiety. Additionally, HAB vs. LAB mice exhibit comorbid characteristics including a differential corticosterone response upon stress exposure. We crossbred HAB and LAB lines to create F1 and F2 offspring. To identify the contribution of the endocrine phenotypes to the total phenotypic variance, we examined multiple behavioural paradigms together with corticosterone secretion-based phenotypes in F2 mice by principal component analysis. Further, to pinpoint the genomic loci of the quantitative trait of the HPA axis stress response, we conducted genome-wide multipoint oligogenic linkage analyses based on Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach as well as parametric linkage in three-generation pedigrees, followed by a two-dimensional scan for epistasis and association analysis in freely segregating F2 mice using 267 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, which were identified to consistently differ between HAB and LAB mice as genetic markers. Results HPA axis reactivity measurements and behavioural phenotypes were represented by independent principal components and demonstrated no correlation. Based on this finding, we identified one single quantitative trait locus (QTL on chromosome 3 showing a very strong evidence for linkage (2ln (L-score > 10, LOD > 23 and significant association (lowest Bonferroni adjusted p -28 to the neuroendocrine stress response. The location of the linkage peak was estimated at 42.3 cM (95% confidence interval: 41.3 - 43.3 cM and was shown to be in

  6. The sigma factor RpoS is required for stress tolerance and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Loper, Joyce E

    2005-09-01

    Many micro-organisms exist in natural habitats that are subject to severe or dramatically fluctuating environmental conditions. Such is the case for bacteria inhabiting plant surfaces, where they are exposed to UV irradiation, oxygen radicals, and large fluctuations in temperature and moisture. This study focuses on the role of RpoS, a central regulator of stationary-phase gene expression in bacterial cells, in stress response and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. Strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium that suppresses plant diseases caused by several plant-pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Previous studies demonstrated that rpoS was required for osmotic and oxidative stress resistance of Pf-5. The results of this study demonstrate a role for rpoS in tolerance of Pf-5 to freezing, starvation, UV irradiation and desiccation stress. In field studies, an rpoS mutant was compromised in rhizosphere colonization of plants in dry soil, whereas similar rhizosphere populations were established by Pf-5 and an rpoS mutant in well-irrigated soils. RpoS is a key determinant in stress response and environmental fitness of the rhizosphere bacterium P. fluorescens Pf-5.

  7. Patterns of shrub species richness and abundance in relation to environmental factors on the Alxa Plateau:Prerequisites for conserving shrub diversity in extreme arid desert regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Shrub species are considered the dominant plants in arid desert ecosystems,unlike in semiarid steppe zones or in grassland ecosystems.On the Alxa Plateau,northern China,sparse vegetation with cover ranging from 15% to 30% is characterized mainly by multifarious shrubs because herbaceous species are strongly restricted by the extreme drought climate,wind erosion,overgrazing and sand burial.Patterns in shrub species richness and species abundance in relation to environmental conditions were examined by DCA(detrended correspondence analysis) and interpreted by a biplot.The rela-tionships between species diversity and environmental factors were examined using regression analyses.Our results show that the distributions of the shrub species in response to environmental conditions can be grouped into four ecological types,corresponding with the biological traits of the shrubs and their responses to the gradients of soil texture and soil water content.Patterns in species richness and species abundance were mainly determined by the deeper soil water content,instead of the soil texture as hypothesized by numerous studies in semiarid grasslands.With exception of the deeper soil water content,soil organic matter and total N content were positively correlated with species abundance,while pH was negatively correlated with it.These findings imply that it is vital for cur-rent shrub diversity conservation to reduce agricultural water use in the middle reaches of the Heihe River,which supplies water for the lower reaches in the western parts of the plateau,and to reduce the amount of groundwater exploitation and urban and oasis water use,to increase the water supply from Helan Mountain to the eastern desert of the Alxa Plateau.

  8. Patterns of shrub species richness and abundance in relation to environmental factors on the Alxa Plateau: Prerequisites for conserving shrub diversity in extreme arid desert regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XinRong; TAN HuiJuan; HE MingZhu; WANG XinPing; LI XiaoJun

    2009-01-01

    Shrub species are considered the dominant plants in arid desert ecosystems, unlike in semiarid steppe zones or in grassland ecosystems. On the Alxa Plateau, northern China, sparse vegetation with cover ranging from 15% to 30% is characterized mainly by multifarious shrubs because herbaceous species are strongly restricted by the extreme drought climate, wind erosion, overgrazing and sand burial. Patterns in shrub species richness and species abundance in relation to environmental conditions were examined by DCA (detrended correspondence analysis) and interpreted by a biplot. The rela-tionships between species diversity and environmental factors were examined using regression analyses. Our results show that the distributions of the shrub species in response to environmental conditions can be grouped into four ecological types, corresponding with the biological traits of the shrubs and their responses to the gradients of soil texture and soil water content. Patterns in species richness and species abundance were mainly determined by the deeper soil water content, instead of the soil texture as hypothesized by numerous studies in semiarid grasslands. With exception of the deeper soil water content, soil organic matter and total N content were positively correlated with spe-cies abundance, while pH was negatively correlated with it. These findings imply that it is vital for cur-rent shrub diversity conservation to reduce agricultural water use in the middle reaches of the Heihe River, which supplies water for the lower reaches in the western parts of the plateau, and to reduce the amount of groundwater exploitation and urban and oasis water use, to increase the water supply from Helan Mountain to the eastern desert of the Alxa Plateau.

  9. Using energetic budgets to assess the effects of environmental stress on corals: are we measuring the right things?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, M. P.

    2013-03-01

    Historically, the response of marine invertebrates to their environment, and environmentally induced stress, has included some measurement of their physiology or metabolism. Eventually, this approach developed into comparative energetics and the construction of energetic budgets. More recently, coral reefs, and scleractinian corals in particular, have suffered significant declines due to climate change-related environmental stress. In addition to a number of physiological, biophysical and molecular measurements to assess "coral health," there has been increased use of energetic approaches that have included the measurement of specific biochemical constituents (i.e., lipid concentrations) as a proxy for energy available to assess the potential outcomes of environmental stress on corals. In reading these studies, there appears to be some confusion between energy budgets and carbon budgets. Additionally, many assumptions regarding proximate biochemical composition, metabolic fuel preferences and metabolic quotients have been made, all of which are essential to construct accurate energy budgets and to convert elemental composition (i.e., carbon) to energy equivalents. Additionally, models of energetics such as the metabolic theory of ecology or dynamic energy budgets are being applied to coral physiology and include several assumptions that are not appropriate for scleractinian corals. As we assess the independent and interactive effects of multiple stressors on corals, efforts to construct quantitative energetic budgets should be a priority component of realistic multifactor experiments that would then improve the use of models as predictors of outcomes related to the effects of environmental change on corals.

  10. Use of response surface methodology to optimise environmental stress conditions on Penicillium glabrum, a food spoilage mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Laurent; Vasseur, Valérie; Debaets, Stella; Barbier, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous microorganisms often associated with spoilage and biodeterioration of a large variety of foods and feedstuffs. Their growth may be influenced by temporary changes in intrinsic or environmental factors such as temperature, water activity, pH, preservatives, atmosphere composition, all of which may represent potential sources of stress. Molecular-based analyses of their physiological responses to environmental conditions would help to better manage the risk of alteration and potential toxicity of food products. However, before investigating molecular stress responses, appropriate experimental stress conditions must be precisely defined. Penicillium glabrum is a filamentous fungus widely present in the environment and frequently isolated in the food processing industry as a contaminant of numerous products. Using response surface methodology, the present study evaluated the influence of two environmental factors (temperature and pH) on P. glabrum growth to determine 'optimised' environmental stress conditions. For thermal and pH shocks, a large range of conditions was applied by varying factor intensity and exposure time according to a two-factorial central composite design. Temperature and exposure duration varied from 30 to 50 °C and from 10 min to 230 min, respectively. The effects of interaction between both variables were observed on fungal growth. For pH, the duration of exposure, from 10 to 230 min, had no significant effect on fungal growth. Experiments were thus carried out on a range of pH from 0.15 to 12.50 for a single exposure time of 240 min. Based on fungal growth results, a thermal shock of 120 min at 40 °C or a pH shock of 240 min at 1.50 or 9.00 may therefore be useful to investigate stress responses to non-optimal conditions.

  11. Environmental enrichment protects against stress-induced anxiety: Role of glucocorticoid receptor, ERK, and CREB signaling in the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Leonardo S; Dos Santos, Nilton Barreto; Batalhote, Rafaela F P; Malta, Marília Brinati; Camarini, Rosana; Scavone, Cristoforo; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi

    2017-02-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental animal model that enhances an animal's opportunity to interact with sensory, motor, and social stimuli, compared to standard laboratory conditions. A prominent benefit of EE is the reduction of stress-induced anxiety. The relationship between stress and the onset of anxiety-like behavior has been widely investigated in experimental research, showing a clear correlation with structural changes in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). However, the mechanisms by which EE exerts its protective roles in stress and anxiety remain unclear, and it is not known whether EE reduces the effects of acute stress on animal behavior shortly following the cessation of stress. We found that EE can prevent the emergence of anxiety-like symptoms in rats measured immediately after acute restraint stress (1 h) and this effect is not due to changes in systemic release of corticosterone. Rather, we found that stress promotes a rapid increase in the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the BLA, an effect prevented by previous EE exposure. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of ERK (a MAPK protein) and CREB activity in the BLA promoted by both EE and acute stress. Finally, we found that EE decreases the expression of the immediate-early gene EGR-1 in the BLA, indicating a possible reduction of neuronal activity in this region. Hyperactivity of BLA neurons has been reported to accompany anxiety-like behavior and changes in this process may be one of the mechanism by which EE exerts its protective effects against stress-induced anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extreme Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ...

  13. Comparison of measures of physiologic stress during treadmill exercise in a patient with 20% lower extremity burn injuries and healthy matched and nonmatched individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, J L; Giuffrida, C; Petrazzi, A; Schlanser, J; McDowell-Montini, C; Pietrzyk, C; Landry, V L

    2000-01-01

    Patients with burn injuries are referred for rehabilitation within days after the injuries to encourage early ambulation and functional training. Many of these patients are hypermetabolic at rest. Metabolic demands of activity are added to the already hypermetabolic state and elevate total energy requirements and some physiologic measures. Reports on the physiologic stress imposed by therapeutic activities for patients with burn injuries are limited to low levels of metabolic demand (burn injuries. The purpose of this study was to report the clinical measures of myocardial and physiologic stress in a patient with 20% lower extremity total body surface area burns during an exercise challenge equivalent to stair climbing. Physiologic measures were assessed before and during a treadmill activity (5 METS) for a 40-year-old obese man 3 weeks after he had lower extremity burn injuries. These measures were compared with mean values for 62 healthy counterparts and 6 healthy subjects matched for age, gender, and fitness level. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, rate pressure product, and the rating of perceived exertion for the patient with burn injuries were higher at baseline and during exercise than the mean values for the 62 healthy individuals and the 6 matched subjects. The steady state exercise values for heart rate, systolic blood pressure, rate pressure product, and rating of perceived exertion at 6 minutes were 189 beats per minute, 190 mm Hg, 3591, and 17, respectively, for the patient with burn injuries and were 111.3 beats per minute, 149 mm Hg, 1680, and 11.7, respectively, for the 6 matched subjects. Ventilation during exercise also increased for the patient with burn injuries more than for the matched subjects (3/4 vs 1/4). Pain experienced by the patient with burn injuries decreased with activity (9.8 vs 7.3 on a 15-cm scale). Treadmill walking produced near maximal responses for most physiologic measures for this patient who was hypermetabolic at rest

  14. 'Four Seasons' in an animal rescue centre; classical music reduces environmental stress in kennelled dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, A; Scottish Spca; Dowell, F J; Evans, N P

    2015-05-01

    On admission to rescue and rehoming centres dogs are faced with a variety of short- and long-term stressors including novelty, spatial/social restriction and increased noise levels. Animate and inanimate environmental enrichment techniques have been employed within the kennel environment in an attempt to minimise stress experienced by dogs. Previous studies have shown the potential physiological and psychological benefits of auditory stimulation, particularly classical music, within the kennel environment. This study determined the physiological/psychological changes that occur when kennelled dogs are exposed to long-term (7 days) auditory stimulation in the form of classical music through assessment of effects on heart rate variability (HRV), salivary cortisol and behaviour. The study utilised a cross over design in which two groups were exposed to two consecutive 7 day treatments; silence (control) and classical music (test). Group A was studied under silent conditions followed by 7 days of test conditions during which a fixed classical music playlist was played from 10:00-16:30 h. Group B received treatment in the reverse order. Results showed that auditory stimulation induced changes in HRV and behavioural data indicative of reduced stress levels in dogs in both groups (salivary cortisol data did not show any consistent patterns of change throughout the study). Specifically, there was a significant increase in HRV parameters such as μRR, STDRR, RMSSD, pNN50, RRTI, SD1 and SD2 and a significant decrease in μHR and LF/HF from the first day of silence (S1) to the first day of music (M1). Similarly, examination of behavioural data showed that dogs in both groups spent significantly more time sitting/lying and silent and less time standing and barking during auditory stimulation. General Regression Analysis (GRA) of the change in HRV parameters from S1 to M1 revealed that male dogs responded better to auditory stimulation relative to female. Interestingly, HRV and

  15. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2016-02-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005-2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as (1) large central metropolitan (LCM), (2) large fringe metropolitan, (3) small-medium metropolitan, or (4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005-2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0% (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 to 90% more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions.

  16. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D.; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005–2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as 1) large central metropolitan (LCM), 2) large fringe metropolitan (LFM), 3) small–medium metropolitan (SMM), or 4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005–2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0 % (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 % to 90 % more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions. PMID:26205070

  17. Genetic Approaches to Study Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Khaled; Cross, Joanna M

    2016-05-17

    The assessment of gene expression levels is an important step toward elucidating gene functions temporally and spatially. Decades ago, typical studies were focusing on a few genes individually, whereas now researchers are able to examine whole genomes at once. The upgrade of throughput levels aided the introduction of systems biology approaches whereby cell functional networks can be scrutinized in their entireties to unravel potential functional interacting components. The birth of systems biology goes hand-in-hand with huge technological advancements and enables a fairly rapid detection of all transcripts in studied biological samples. Even so, earlier technologies that were restricted to probing single genes or a subset of genes still have their place in research laboratories. The objective here is to highlight key approaches used in gene expression analysis in plant responses to environmental stresses, or, more generally, any other condition of interest. Northern blots, RNase protection assays, and qPCR are described for their targeted detection of one or a few transcripts at a once. Differential display and serial analysis of gene expression represent non-targeted methods to evaluate expression changes of a significant number of gene transcripts. Finally, microarrays and RNA-seq (next-generation sequencing) contribute to the ultimate goal of identifying and quantifying all transcripts in a cell under conditions or stages of study. Recent examples of applications as well as principles, advantages, and drawbacks of each method are contrasted. We also suggest replacing the term "Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)" with another less confusing synonym such as "RNA-seq", "high throughput sequencing", or "massively parallel sequencing" to avoid confusion with any future sequencing technologies.

  18. Feeding behaviour of an intertidal snail: Does past environmental stress affect predator choices and prey vulnerability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestoso, Ignacio; Arenas, Francisco; Olabarria, Celia

    2015-03-01

    Predation is one of the most important factors in determining structure and dynamics of communities on intertidal rocky shores. Such regulatory role may be of special relevance in novel communities resulting from biological invasions. Non-indigenous species frequently escape natural predators that limit their distribution and abundance in the native range. However, biological interactions also can limit the establishment and spread of non-native populations. There is a growing concern that climate change might affect predator-prey interactions exacerbating the ecological impacts of non-indigenous species. However, mechanisms underlying such interactions are poorly understood in marine ecosystems. Here, we explored if past environmental stress, i.e., increasing temperature and decreasing pH, could affect the vulnerability of two mussel prey, the native Mytilus galloprovincialis and the non-indigenous Xenostrobus securis, to predation by the native dogwhelk Nucella lapillus. In addition, we evaluated the consequences on the feeding behaviour of N. lapillus. First, we exposed monospecific assemblages of each mussel species to combined experimental conditions of increasing temperature and decreasing pH in mesocosms for 3 weeks. Then assemblages were placed on a rocky shore and were enclosed in cages with dogwhelks where they remained for 3 weeks. Despite the lack of preference, consumption was much greater on the native than on the invasive mussels, which barely were consumed by dogwhelks. However, this trend was diverted when temperature increased. Thus, under a coastal warming scenario shifts in dogwhelks feeding behaviour may help to contain invader's populations, especially in estuarine areas where these predators are abundant.

  19. Mandelbrot's Extremism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beirlant, J.; Schoutens, W.; Segers, J.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the sixties Mandelbrot already showed that extreme price swings are more likely than some of us think or incorporate in our models.A modern toolbox for analyzing such rare events can be found in the field of extreme value theory.At the core of extreme value theory lies the modelling of maxima

  20. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes. Shopdiabetes.org: Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! - 2017-03-book-oclock-scramble.html Shopdiabetes.org Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! A year of delicious meals to help prevent ...

  1. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  2. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W;

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses human capacity for movement in the context of extreme loading and with it the combined effects of metabolic, biomechanical and gravitational stress on the human body. This topic encompasses extreme duration, as occurs in ultra-endurance competitions (e.g. adventure racing...... and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may...

  3. Long-term impact of maternal substance use during pregnancy and extrauterine environmental adversity: stress hormone levels of preadolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Charles R; Lambert, Brittany L; Bann, Carla M; Lester, Barry M; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta S; Whitaker, Toni M; Lagasse, Linda L; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2011-08-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with blunted stress responsivity within the extrauterine environment. This study investigated the association between PCE and diurnal salivary cortisol levels in preadolescent children characterized by high biological and/or social risk (n = 725). Saliva samples were collected at their home. Analyses revealed no group differences in basal evening or morning cortisol levels; however, children with higher degrees of PCE exhibited blunted overnight increases in cortisol, controlling for additional risk factors. Race and caregiver depression were also associated with diurnal cortisol patterns. Although repeated PCE may contribute to alterations in the normal or expected stress response later in life, sociodemographic and environmental factors are likewise important in understanding hormone physiology, especially as more time elapses from the PCE. Anticipating the potential long-term medical, developmental, or behavioral effects of an altered ability to mount a normal protective cortisol stress response is essential in optimizing the outcomes of children with PCE.

  4. Chronic environmental stress enhances tolerance to seasonal gradual warming in marine mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múgica, Maria; Izagirre, Urtzi; Sokolova, Inna M.

    2017-01-01

    In global climate change scenarios, seawater warming acts in concert with multiple stress sources, which may enhance the susceptibility of marine biota to thermal stress. Here, the responsiveness to seasonal gradual warming was investigated in temperate mussels from a chronically stressed population in comparison with a healthy one. Stressed and healthy mussels were subjected to gradual temperature elevation for 8 days (1°C per day; fall: 16–24°C, winter: 12–20°C, summer: 20–28°C) and kept at elevated temperature for 3 weeks. Healthy mussels experienced thermal stress and entered the time-limited survival period in the fall, became acclimated in winter and exhibited sublethal damage in summer. In stressed mussels, thermal stress and subsequent health deterioration were elicited in the fall but no transition into the critical period of time-limited survival was observed. Stressed mussels did not become acclimated to 20°C in winter, when they experienced low-to-moderate thermal stress, and did not experience sublethal damage at 28°C in summer, showing instead signs of metabolic rate depression. Overall, although the thermal threshold was lowered in chronically stressed mussels, they exhibited enhanced tolerance to seasonal gradual warming, especially in summer. These results challenge current assumptions on the susceptibility of marine biota to the interactive effects of seawater warming and pollution. PMID:28333994

  5. Molecular characterization of two glutathione peroxidase genes of Panax ginseng and their expression analysis against environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Jang, Moon-Gi; Noh, Hae-Yong; Lee, Hye-Jin; Sukweenadhi, Johan; Kim, Jong-Hak; Kim, Se-Yeong; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-02-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) are a group of enzymes that protect cells against oxidative damage generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPX catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or organic hydroperoxides to water or alcohols by reduced glutathione. The presence of GPXs in plants has been reported by several groups, but the roles of individual members of this family in a single plant species have not been studied. Two GPX cDNAs were isolated and characterized from the embryogenic callus of Panax ginseng. The two cDNAs had an open reading frame (ORF) of 723 and 681bp with a deduced amino acid sequence of 240 and 226 residues, respectively. The calculated molecular mass of the matured proteins are approximately 26.4kDa or 25.7kDa with a predicated isoelectric point of 9.16 or 6.11, respectively. The two PgGPXs were elevated strongly by salt stress and chilling stress in a ginseng seedling. In addition, the two PgGPXs showed different responses against biotic stress. The positive responses of PgGPX to the environmental stimuli suggested that ginseng GPX may help to protect against environmental stresses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluctuating asymmetry and developmental instability in Protoreaster nodosus (Chocolate Chip Sea Star as a biomarker for environmental stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. V. Trono

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, pertains to small and random departures from perfect symmetry of an organism's bilateral traits and has been used as a measurement of developmental instability and as a potential indicator of stress in populations. It measures the variations from symmetry of a symmetrical structure whose sides are said to be genetically identical, with similar history of gene activity and experiencing the same environment. Symmetries are potentially the basis for studies on FA. Hence, this study assessed the potential of FA as a reliable developmental instability and environmental stress indicator in five-fold dihedral symmetrical Protoreaster nodosus (Chocolate chip sea fish from three (3 different sites (Linamon, Lanao del Norte; Initao, Misamis Oriental and Jasaan, Misamis Oriental. FA for each population from every site was measured for comparison. In this study, anatomical landmarks were subjected to Procrustes superimposition and Principal Component Analysis (PCA using "Symmetry and Asymmetry in Geometric Data" (SAGE program. Results showed highly significant FA and significant DA for population from Jasaan and Linamon where habitat disturbance due to anthropogenic activities were prevalent. Thus, experienced more stress compared to the other populations, suggesting that significant variation in size or left-right side of each individual could be a product of genotype-environment interaction. Moreover, insignificant FA and high DA was obtained from Initao (protected seascape area which indicated that variation among individual genotypes and asymmetry in phenotypes is mostly induced by genetics under less stressful environment. Significant FA and increase FA present inability of species to buffer stress in its developmental pathways and have implications on species fitness. Hypothesis assumes that fluctuating asymmetry has costs, reflects the quality of individuals and the level of genetic and environmental stress experienced by

  7. The genomic sequence of Exiguobacterium chiriqhucha str. N139 reveals a species that thrives in cold waters and extreme environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gutiérrez-Preciado

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the genome sequence of Exiguobacterium chiriqhucha str. N139, isolated from a high-altitude Andean lake. Comparative genomic analyses of the Exiguobacterium genomes available suggest that our strain belongs to the same species as the previously reported E. pavilionensis str. RW-2 and Exiguobacterium str. GIC 31. We describe this species and propose the chiriqhucha name to group them. ‘Chiri qhucha’ in Quechua means ‘cold lake’, which is a common origin of these three cosmopolitan Exiguobacteria. The 2,952,588-bp E. chiriqhucha str. N139 genome contains one chromosome and three megaplasmids. The genome analysis of the Andean strain suggests the presence of enzymes that confer E. chiriqhucha str. N139 the ability to grow under multiple environmental extreme conditions, including high concentrations of different metals, high ultraviolet B radiation, scavenging for phosphorous and coping with high salinity. Moreover, the regulation of its tryptophan biosynthesis suggests that novel pathways remain to be discovered, and that these pathways might be fundamental in the amino acid metabolism of the microbial community from Laguna Negra, Argentina.

  8. Plant volatiles in extreme terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Steinke, Michael; McGenity, Terry; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding on plant and algal volatile organic compound (VOC) production and emission in extreme environments, where temperature, water availability, salinity or other environmental factors pose stress on vegetation. Here, the extreme environments include terrestrial systems, such as arctic tundra, deserts, CO₂ springs and wetlands, and marine systems such as sea ice, tidal rock pools and hypersaline environments, with mangroves and salt marshes at the land-sea interface. The emission potentials at fixed temperature and light level or actual emission rates for phototrophs in extreme environments are frequently higher than for organisms from less stressful environments. For example, plants from the arctic tundra appear to have higher emission potentials for isoprenoids than temperate species, and hypersaline marine habitats contribute to global dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emissions in significant amounts. DMS emissions are more widespread than previously considered, for example, in salt marshes and some desert plants. The reason for widespread VOC, especially isoprenoid, emissions from different extreme environments deserves further attention, as these compounds may have important roles in stress resistance and adaptation to extremes. Climate warming is likely to significantly increase VOC emissions from extreme environments both by direct effects on VOC production and volatility, and indirectly by altering the composition of the vegetation.

  9. Expression pattern and core region analysis of AtMPK3 promoter in response to environmental stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The protein kinase AtMPK3,a component of the MAP kinase cascade,plays an important role in stress signal transduction in plant cells. To clarify how AtMPK3 is regulated at the transcriptional level in response to various environmental factors, the 1016-bp promoter sequence upstream of the transcription start site of the AtMPK3 gene was isolated. Analyses of the promoter sequence using plant promoter databases revealed that the AtMPK3 promoter contains many potential cis-acting elements involved in environmental stress responses. We constructed four deletion mutants of the AtMPK3 promoter, and introduced the intact and truncated promoter sequences fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene into Arabidopsis. GUS histochemical staining and quantitative fluorometric GUS assays were performed to visualize and compare the expression patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. The region between-188 and-62 upstream of the transcription start site was identified as the essential DNA sequence of the AtMPK3 promoter for responses to drought, high salinity, low temperature, and wounding. These results advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling AtMPK3 expression in response to different environmental stimuli.

  10. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  11. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  12. Is the adaptation to UV stress correlated with a higher resistance to other environmental stressors? First results of the space experiment ADAPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Petra; Wassmann, Marko; Rabbow, Elke; Moeller, Ralf; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean

    resistance against the simultaneous action of further `extreme' environmental factors that exist in space or on other planets like vacuum / low pressure or cosmic radiation. In preparation of ADAPT a continuos culture of Bacillus subtilis 168 cells was grown for 700 generations under periodical polychromatic mars-like UV irradiation. Populations that evolved under this UV stress were about 4.7fold more resistant than the ancestral and non-UV evolved populations. In addition to the acquired increased UV resistance, further changes in microbial stress response to hydrogen peroxide, increased salinity and desiccation were observed in UV-evolved cells. For the space experiment spores of the strain MW01, isolated from this UV-resistant population, were exposed in earth orbit to space and simulated martian conditions. The biological endpoints under investigation include among others survival, mutation induction, loss of sporulation capability. The results of this experiment will contribute to our understanding of the adaptability of life to extreme environments on earth and on other planets in general.

  13. Environmental heat stress modulates thyroid status and its response to repeated endotoxin challenge in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, S; Elsasser, T H; Rhoads, R P; Collier, R J; Baumgard, L H

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in cattle, the effects of acute exposure to a heat stress (HS) environment on the status of the pituitary (thyrotropin, TSH)-thyroid (thyroxine, T4)-peripheral tissue T4 deiodination (type 1 5'-deiodinase [D1]; triiodothyronine [T3]; reverse-triiodothyronine [rT3]) axis, and the further response of this pituitary-thyroid-peripheral tissue axis (PTTA) to perturbation caused by the induction of the proinflammatory innate immune state provoked by the administration of gram-negative bacteria endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). Ten steers (318 ± 49 kg body weight) housed in controlled environment chambers were subjected to either a thermoneutral (TN: constant 19°C) or HS temperature conditions (cyclical daily temperatures: 32.2°C-40.0°C) for a total period of 9 d. To minimize the effects of altered plane of nutrition due to HS, steers in TN were pair-fed to animals in HS conditions. Steers received 2 LPS challenges 3 d apart (LPS1 and LPS2; 0.2 μg/kg body weight, intravenously, Escherichia coli 055:B5) with the first challenge administered on day 4 relative to the start of the environmental conditioning. Jugular blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 24 h relative to the start of each LPS challenge. Plasma TSH, T4, T3, and rT3 were measured by radioimmunoassay. Liver D1 activity was measured in biopsy samples collected before the LPS1 (0 h) and 24 h after LPS2. Before the start of LPS1, HS decreased (P thyroid components of the PTTA, whereas a normal capacity to generate T3 from T4 in the liver is preserved. The data also suggest that LPS challenge further suppresses all components of the PTTA including liver T3 generation, and these PTTA perturbations are more pronounced in steers that encounter a HS exposure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Virtual Special Issue Preface: Forest Response to Environmental Stress: Impacts and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven McNulty; Enzai Du; Elena Paoletti

    2017-01-01

    The current distribution of forest typeswas largely established at the beginning of the Holocene epoch (approximately 12,000 BCE), but forests are constantly in flux. Many regional scale stresses (e.g., drought, heat, fire, and insect) and even a few multi-regional or global stresses (e.g., 8200 BCE cooling, or the medievalwarming period) have occurred over the past 12...

  15. Environmental enrichment and gut inflammation modify stress-induced c-Fos expression in the mouse corticolimbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Florian; Painsipp, Evelin; Holzer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) has a beneficial effect on rodent behaviour, neuronal plasticity and brain function. Although it may also improve stress coping, it is not known whether EE influences the brain response to an external (psychological) stressor such as water avoidance stress (WAS) or an internal (systemic) stressor such as gastrointestinal inflammation. This study hence explored whether EE modifies WAS-induced activation of the mouse corticolimbic system and whether this stress response is altered by gastritis or colitis. Male C67BL/6N mice were housed under standard or enriched environment for 9 weeks, after which they were subjected to a 1-week treatment with oral iodoacetamide to induce gastritis or oral dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis. Following exposure to WAS the expression of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was measured by immunocytochemistry. EE aggravated experimentally induced colitis, but not gastritis, as shown by an increase in the disease activity score and the colonic myeloperoxidase content. In the brain, EE enhanced the WAS-induced activation of the dentate gyrus and unmasked an inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression within this part of the hippocampus. Conversely, EE inhibited the WAS-evoked activation of the central amygdala and prevented the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this region. EE, in addition, blunted the WAS-induced activation of the infralimbic cortex and attenuated the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this area. These data reveal that EE has a region-specific effect on stress-induced c-Fos expression in the corticolimbic system, which is likely to improve stress resilience. The response of the prefrontal cortex - amygdala - hippocampus circuitry to psychological stress is also modified by the systemic stress of gut inflammation, and this interaction between external and internal

  16. Environmental enrichment and gut inflammation modify stress-induced c-Fos expression in the mouse corticolimbic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Reichmann

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment (EE has a beneficial effect on rodent behaviour, neuronal plasticity and brain function. Although it may also improve stress coping, it is not known whether EE influences the brain response to an external (psychological stressor such as water avoidance stress (WAS or an internal (systemic stressor such as gastrointestinal inflammation. This study hence explored whether EE modifies WAS-induced activation of the mouse corticolimbic system and whether this stress response is altered by gastritis or colitis. Male C67BL/6N mice were housed under standard or enriched environment for 9 weeks, after which they were subjected to a 1-week treatment with oral iodoacetamide to induce gastritis or oral dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis. Following exposure to WAS the expression of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was measured by immunocytochemistry. EE aggravated experimentally induced colitis, but not gastritis, as shown by an increase in the disease activity score and the colonic myeloperoxidase content. In the brain, EE enhanced the WAS-induced activation of the dentate gyrus and unmasked an inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression within this part of the hippocampus. Conversely, EE inhibited the WAS-evoked activation of the central amygdala and prevented the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this region. EE, in addition, blunted the WAS-induced activation of the infralimbic cortex and attenuated the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this area. These data reveal that EE has a region-specific effect on stress-induced c-Fos expression in the corticolimbic system, which is likely to improve stress resilience. The response of the prefrontal cortex - amygdala - hippocampus circuitry to psychological stress is also modified by the systemic stress of gut inflammation, and this interaction between external

  17. Environmental stress alters genes expression and induces ovule abortion: reactive oxygen species appear as ovules commit to abort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kelian; Cui, Yuehua; Hauser, Bernard A

    2005-11-01

    Environmental stress dramatically reduces plant reproduction. Previous results showed that placing roots in 200 mM NaCl for 12 h caused 90% of the developing Arabidopsis ovules to abort (Sun et al. in Plant Physiol 135:2358-2367, 2004). To discover the molecular responses that occur during ovule abortion, gene expression was monitored using Affymetrix 24k genome arrays. Transcript levels were measured in pistils that were stressed for 6, 12, 18, and 24 h, then compared with the levels in healthy pistils. Over the course of this experiment, a total of 535 salt-responsive genes were identified. Cluster analysis showed that differentially expressed genes exhibited reproducible changes in expression. The expression of 65 transcription factors, some of which are known to be involved in stress responses, were modulated during ovule abortion. In flowers, salt stress led to a 30-fold increase in Na+ ions and modest, but significant, decreases in the accumulation of other ions. The expression of cation exchangers and ion transporters were induced, presumably to reestablish ion homeostasis following salt stress. Genes that encode enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS), including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase, were downregulated after ovules committed to abort. These changes in gene expression coincided with the synthesis of ROS in female gametophytes. One day after salt stress, ROS spread from the gametophytes to the maternal chalaza and integuments. In addition, genes encoding proteins that regulate ethylene responses, including ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene signal transduction and ethylene-responsive transcription factors, were upregulated after stress. Hypotheses are proposed on the basis of this expression analysis, which will be evaluated further in future experiments.

  18. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Bahn, M.; Ciais, P.; Mahecha, M. D.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Zscheischler, J.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a key component of the global carbon cycle and its carbon balance is strongly influenced by climate. Ongoing environmental changes are thought to increase global terrestrial carbon uptake. But evidence is mounting that rare climate extremes can lead to a decrease in ecosystem carbon stocks and therefore have the potential to negate the expected increase in terrestrial carbon uptake. Here we explore the mechanisms and impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle, and propose a pathway to improve our understanding of present and future impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon budget. In addition to direct impact on the carbon fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration via extreme temperature and (or) drought, effects of extreme events may also lead to lagged responses, such as wildfires triggered by heat waves and droughts, or pest and pathogen outbreaks following wind-throw caused by heavy storms, reduced plant health due to drought stress or due to less frequent cold extremes in presently cold regions. One extreme event can potentially override accumulated previous carbon sinks, as shown by the Western European 2003 heat wave.. Extreme events have the potential to affect the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance through a single factor, or as a combination of factors. Climate extremes can cause carbon losses from accumulated stocks, as well as long-lasting impacts on (e.g. lagged effects) on plant growth and mortality, extending beyond the duration of the extreme event itself. The sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystems and their carbon balance to climate change and extreme events varies according to the type of extreme, the climatic region, the land cover, and the land management. Extreme event impacts are very relevant in forests due to the importance of lagged and memory effects on tree growth and mortality, the longevity of tree species, the large forest carbon stocks and their vulnerability, as well as the

  19. Recovery from hybrid breakdown in a marine invertebrate is faster, stronger and more repeatable under environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, A S; Pritchard, V L; Edmands, S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how environmental stress alters the consequences of hybridization is important, because the rate of hybridization and the likelihood of hybrid speciation both appear elevated in harsh, disturbed or marginal habitats. We assessed fitness, morphometrics and molecular genetic composition over 14 generations of hybridization between two highly divergent populations of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus. Replicated, experimental hybrid populations in both control and high-salinity conditions showed a decline in fitness, followed by a recovery. Recovery was faster in the salinity stress treatment, returning to parental levels up to two generations earlier than in the control. This recovery was stable in the high-salinity treatment, whereas in the control treatment, fitness dropped back below parental levels at the final time point. Recovery in the high-salinity treatment was also stronger in terms of competitive fitness and heat-shock tolerance. Finally, consequences of hybridization were more repeatable under salinity stress, where among-replicate variance for survivorship and molecular genetic composition was lower than in the control treatment. In a system with low effective population sizes (estimates ranged from 17 to 63), where genetic drift might be expected to be the predominate force, strong selection under harsh environmental conditions apparently promoted faster, stronger and more repeatable recovery from depressed hybrid fitness.

  20. Reformation of tissue balls from tentacle explants of coral Goniopora lobata: self-organization process and response to environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiongxuan; Liu, Tao; Tang, Xianming; Dong, Bo; Guo, Huarong

    2017-02-01

    Coral has strong regeneration ability, which has been applied for coral production and biodiversity protection via tissue ball (TB) culture. However, the architecture, morphological processes, and effects of environmental factors on TB formation have not been well investigated. In this study, we first observed TB formation from the cutting tentacle of scleractinia coral Goniopora lobata and uncovered its inner organization and architecture by confocal microscopy. We then found that the cutting tentacle TB could self-organize and reform a solid TB (sTB) in the culture media. Using chemical drug treatment and dissection manipulation approaches, we demonstrated that the mechanical forces for bending and rounding of the cutting fragments came from the epithelial cells, and the cilia of epithelial cell played indispensable roles for the rounding process. Environmental stress experiments showed that high temperature, not CO2-induced acidification, affected TB and sTB formation. However, the combination of high temperature and acidification caused additional severe effects on sTB reformation. Our studies indicate that coral TB has strong regeneration ability and therefore could serve as a new model to further explore the molecular mechanism of TB formation and the effects of environmental stresses on coral survival and regeneration.

  1. Determination of extremely low (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios in environmental samples by sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using high-efficiency sample introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Heumann, Klaus G

    2006-01-01

    A method by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed which allows the measurement of (236)U at concentration ranges down to 3 x 10(-14)g g(-1) and extremely low (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios in soil samples of 10(-7). By using the high-efficiency solution introduction system APEX in connection with a sector-field ICP-MS a sensitivity of more than 5,000 counts fg(-1) uranium was achieved. The use of an aerosol desolvating unit reduced the formation rate of uranium hydride ions UH(+)/U(+) down to a level of 10(-6). An abundance sensitivity of 3 x 10(-7) was observed for (236)U/(238)U isotope ratio measurements at mass resolution 4000. The detection limit for (236)U and the lowest detectable (236)U/(238)U isotope ratio were improved by more than two orders of magnitude compared with corresponding values by alpha spectrometry. Determination of uranium in soil samples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) resulted in that the (236)U/(238)U isotope ratio is a much more sensitive and accurate marker for environmental contamination by spent uranium in comparison to the (235)U/(238)U isotope ratio. The ICP-MS technique allowed for the first time detection of irradiated uranium in soil samples even at distances more than 200 km to the north of Chernobyl NPP (Mogilev region). The concentration of (236)U in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers varied from 2 x 10(-9)g g(-1) within radioactive spots close to the Chernobyl NPP to 3 x 10(-13)g g(-1) on a sampling site located by >200 km from Chernobyl.

  2. Marine environmental pollution stress detection through direct viable counts of bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Kenkre, V.D.; Verlecar, X.N.

    are direct indices of potential bacterial metabolic activity, reliable for sensing metabolic stress experienced by bacterial communities in situ and can be useful for evaluating risks in marine environment through human (industrial) activities....

  3. Environmental enrichment and cafeteria diet attenuate the response to chronic variable stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, N; Bassil, M; Fromentin, G; Chaumontet, C; Darcel, N; Tome, D; Daher, C F

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment (EE) or the intake of a highly palatable diet may reduce the response to chronic stress in rodents. To further explore the relationships between EE, dietary intake and stress, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of two diets for 5 weeks: high carbohydrate (HC) or "cafeteria" (CAF) (Standard HC plus a choice of highly palatable cafeteria foods: chocolate, biscuits, and peanut butter). In addition, they were either housed in empty cages or cages with EE. After the first two weeks, half of the animals from each group were stressed daily using a chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm, while the other half were kept undisturbed. Rats were sacrificed at the end of the 5-week period. The effects of stress, enrichment and dietary intake on animal adiposity, serum lipids, and stress hormones were analyzed. Results showed an increase in intra-abdominal fat associated with the CAF diet and an increase in body weight gain associated with both the CAF diet and EE. Furthermore, the increase in ACTH associated with CVS was attenuated in the presence of EE and the CAF diet independently while the stress-induced increase in corticosterone was reduced by the combination of EE and CAF feeding. The present study provides evidence that the availability of a positive environment combined to a highly palatable diet increases resilience to the effects of CVS in rats. These results highlight the important place of palatable food and supportive environments in reducing central stress responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental and Intrinsic Correlates of Stress in Free-Ranging Wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Barbara; Fattebert, Julien; Palme, Rupert; Ciucci, Paolo; Betschart, Bruno; Smith, Douglas W; Diehl, Peter-Allan

    2015-01-01

    When confronted with a stressor, animals react with several physiological and behavioral responses. Although sustained or repeated stress can result in severe deleterious physiological effects, the causes of stress in free-ranging animals are yet poorly documented. In our study, we aimed at identifying the main factors affecting stress levels in free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus). We used fecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) as an index of stress, after validating the method for its application in wolves. We analyzed a total of 450 fecal samples from eleven wolf packs belonging to three protected populations, in Italy (Abruzzo), France (Mercantour), and the United States (Yellowstone). We collected samples during two consecutive winters in each study area. We found no relationship between FCM concentrations and age, sex or social status of individuals. At the group level, our results suggest that breeding pair permanency and the loss of pack members through processes different from dispersal may importantly impact stress levels in wolves. We measured higher FCM levels in comparatively small packs living in sympatry with a population of free-ranging dogs. Lastly, our results indicate that FCM concentrations are associated with endoparasitic infections of individuals. In social mammals sharing strong bonds among group members, the death of one or several members of the group most likely induces important stress in the remainder of the social unit. The potential impact of social and territorial stability on stress levels should be further investigated in free-ranging populations, especially in highly social and in territorial species. As persistent or repeated stressors may facilitate or induce pathologies and physiological alterations that can affect survival and fitness, we advocate considering the potential impact of anthropogenic causes of stress in management and conservation programs regarding wolves and other wildlife.

  5. Environmental and Intrinsic Correlates of Stress in Free-Ranging Wolves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Molnar

    Full Text Available When confronted with a stressor, animals react with several physiological and behavioral responses. Although sustained or repeated stress can result in severe deleterious physiological effects, the causes of stress in free-ranging animals are yet poorly documented. In our study, we aimed at identifying the main factors affecting stress levels in free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus.We used fecal cortisol metabolites (FCM as an index of stress, after validating the method for its application in wolves. We analyzed a total of 450 fecal samples from eleven wolf packs belonging to three protected populations, in Italy (Abruzzo, France (Mercantour, and the United States (Yellowstone. We collected samples during two consecutive winters in each study area. We found no relationship between FCM concentrations and age, sex or social status of individuals. At the group level, our results suggest that breeding pair permanency and the loss of pack members through processes different from dispersal may importantly impact stress levels in wolves. We measured higher FCM levels in comparatively small packs living in sympatry with a population of free-ranging dogs. Lastly, our results indicate that FCM concentrations are associated with endoparasitic infections of individuals.In social mammals sharing strong bonds among group members, the death of one or several members of the group most likely induces important stress in the remainder of the social unit. The potential impact of social and territorial stability on stress levels should be further investigated in free-ranging populations, especially in highly social and in territorial species. As persistent or repeated stressors may facilitate or induce pathologies and physiological alterations that can affect survival and fitness, we advocate considering the potential impact of anthropogenic causes of stress in management and conservation programs regarding wolves and other wildlife.

  6. The Need for an Ecological Approach to Parental Stress in Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Combined Role of Individual and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derguy, C.; M'Bailara, K.; Michel, G.; Roux, S.; Bouvard, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify parental stress predictors in ASD by considering individual and environmental factors in an ecological approach. Participants were 115 parents of children with ASD aged from 3 to 10 years. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the best predictors of parental stress among child-related, parent-related…

  7. Phyto-adaptogens protect against environmental stress-induced death of embryos from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon-Niermeijer, E K; van den Berg, A; Wikman, G; Wiegant, F A

    2000-10-01

    The main purpose of the studies presented in this paper is twofold: 1) to evaluate whether phyto-adaptogens (Acanthopanax senticosus and Rhodiola rosea) are able to exert a protective action against stress-induced death of embryos of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis; and 2) whether a possible protective action by phyto-adaptogens can be explained by the induction of heat shock proteins. Enhancement in resistance by phyto-adaptogens was studied by applying plant extracts for a period of 20 hours to 3-day old larvae of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Subsequently they were exposed to a high and toxic dose of different environmental stressors. The following stress conditions were selected: a physical stress condition (heat shock: 43 degrees C for 4 minutes), an oxidative stress condition (superoxide radicals induced by menadione (600 microM for 2 hours)) and heavy metal-induced stress (copper (150 microM for 1 hour) or cadmium (20 microM during 1 hour)). Both Acanthopanax and Rhodiola exert a strong protective action against a lethal heat shock. These adaptogens also significantly protect against the negative effect of superoxide radicals as induced by menadione. With respect to the protective action against exposure to heavy metals a small but significant protection was observed against intoxication with copper or cadmium by the phyto-adaptogens. In summary, there appears to be a difference in efficiency in enhancing resistance to the various stress conditions used (heat shock>menadione>copper>cadmium). Based on the results presented in this paper, we can conclude that phyto-adaptogens are able to enhance the resistance against the different stress conditions tested in developing individuals of Lymnaea. Although the degree to which resistance is enhanced appears to depend on the type of stressor applied, our results confirm the definition of phyto-adaptogens as being universal enhancers of non-specific resistance against different kinds of stress conditions. With

  8. Expression and distribution of neuropeptides in the nervous system of the crab Carcinus maenas and their roles in environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhuo; Buchberger, Amanda; Muthuvel, Gajanthan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Environmental fluctuations, such as salinity, impose serious challenges to marine animal survival. Neuropeptides, signaling molecules involved in the regulation process, and the dynamic changes of their full complement in the stress response have yet to be investigated. Here, a MALDI-MS-based stable isotope labeling quantitation strategy was used to investigate the relationship between neuropeptide expression and adaptability of Carcinus maenas to various salinity levels, including high (60 parts per thousand [p.p.t.]) and low (0 p.p.t.) salinity, in both the crustacean pericardial organ (PO) and brain. Moreover, a high salinity stress time course study was conducted. MS imaging (MSI) of neuropeptide localization in C. maenas PO was also performed. As a result of salinity stress, multiple neuropeptide families exhibited changes in their relative abundances, including RFamides (e.g. APQGNFLRFamide), RYamides (e.g. SSFRVGGSRYamide), B-type allatostatins (AST-B; e.g. VPNDWAHFRGSWamide), and orcokinins (e.g. NFDEIDRSSFGFV). The MSI data revealed distribution differences in several neuropeptides (e.g. SGFYANRYamide) between color morphs, but salinity stress appeared to not have a major effect on the localization of the neuropeptides.

  9. Selected Abiotic and Biotic Environmental Stress Factors Affecting Two Economically Important Sugarcane Stalk Boring Pests in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T. Showler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane, Saccharum spp., in the United States is attacked by a number of different arthropod pests. The most serious among those pests are two stalk boring moths in the Family Crambidae: the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F., and the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar. The two species are affected by abiotic and biotic environmental stress factors. Water deficit and excessive soil nitrogen alter physical and physiochemical aspects of the sugarcane plant that make the crop increasingly vulnerable to E. loftini. Weed growth can be competitive with sugarcane but it also supports enhanced abundances and diversity of natural enemies that can suppress infestations of D. saccharalis. In an instance where the stalk borer is considered a stress factor, proximity of vulnerable crops to sugarcane can influence levels of E. loftini infestation of sugarcane. The adverse effects of each stress factor, in terms of stalk borer attack, can be reduced by adopting appropriate cultural practices, such as adequate irrigation, judicious use of nitrogen fertilizer, using noncompetitive weed growth, and not planting vulnerable crops near sugarcane fields. Understanding the relationships between stress factors and crop pests can provide valuable insights for plant breeders and tools for incorporation into integrated pest management strategies.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Stress Induced Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans following Exposure to Environmental and Lab Reconstituted Complex Metal Mixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjeet Kumar

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for many physiological processes and are ubiquitously present in the environment. However, high metal concentrations can be harmful to organisms and lead to physiological stress and diseases. The accumulation of transition metals in the environment due to either natural processes or anthropogenic activities such as mining results in the contamination of water and soil environments. The present study used Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate gene expression as an indicator of physiological response, following exposure to water collected from three different locations downstream of a Swedish mining site and a lab reconstituted metal mixture. Our results indicated that the reconstituted metal mixture exerted a direct stress response in C. elegans whereas the environmental waters elicited either a diminished or abrogated response. This suggests that it is not sufficient to use the biological effects observed from laboratory mixtures to extrapolate the effects observed in complex aquatic environments and apply this to risk assessment and intervention.

  11. Metabolomics Reveals Cryptic Interactive Effects of Species Interactions and Environmental Stress on Nitrogen and Sulfur Metabolism in Seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Castorani, Max C. N.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication of estuaries and coastal seas is accelerating, increasing light stress on subtidal marine plants and changing their interactions with other species. To date, we have limited understanding of how such variations in environmental and biological stress modify the impact of interactions...... among foundational species and eventually affect ecosystem health. Here, we used metabolomics to assess the impact of light reductions on interactions between the seagrass Zostera marina, an important habitat-forming marine plant, and the abundant and commercially important blue mussel Mytilus edulis....... Plant performance varied with light availability but was unaffected by the presence of mussels. Metabolomic analysis, on the other hand, revealed an interaction between light availability and presence of M. edulis on seagrass metabolism. Under high light, mussels stimulated seagrass nitrogen and energy...

  12. Tolerance of the widespread cyanobacterium Nostoc commune to extreme temperature variations (-269 to 105°C), pH and salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Jespersen, Thomas Sand

    2012-06-01

    Nostoc commune is a widespread colonial cyanobacterium living on bare soils that alternate between frost and thaw, drought and inundation and very low and high temperatures. We collected N. commune from alternating wet and dry limestone pavements in Sweden and tested its photosynthesis and respiration at 20°C after exposure to variations in temperature (-269 to 105°C), pH (2-10) and NaCl (0.02-50 g NaCl kg(-1)). We found that dry field samples and rewetted specimens tolerated exposure beyond that experienced in natural environmental conditions: -269 to 70°C, pH 3-10 and 0-20 g NaCl kg(-1), with only a modest reduction of respiration, photosynthesis and active carbon uptake at 20°C. (14)CO(2) uptake from air declined markedly below zero and above 55°C, but remained positive. Specimens maintained a high metabolism with daily exposure to 6 h of rehydration and 18 h of desiccation at -18 and 20°C, but died at 40°C. The field temperature never exceeded the critical 40°C threshold during the wet periods, but it frequently exceeded this temperature during dry periods when N. commune is already dry and unaffected. We conclude that N. commune has an excellent tolerance to low temperatures, long-term desiccation and recurring cycles of desiccation and rewetting. These traits explain why it is the pioneer species in extremely harsh, nutrient-poor and alternating wet and dry environments.

  13. Applied environmental stresses to enhance the levels of polyphenolics in leaves of hawthorn plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter; Warber, Sara; Zick, Suzanna; Aaronson, Keith; Bolling, Steven; Chul Chang, Soo

    2004-06-01

    In this investigation, two species of Crataegus (hawthorn) were chosen because their polyphenolic constituents have recently received greater attention for the treatment of patients with severe heart disease. One-year-old plants of hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata and C. monogyna) were subjected to water-deficit (continuous water deprivation), cold (4 degrees C), flooding (immersion of roots of plants in water) or herbivory (leaf removal) stress treatments (each of 10 days duration) in order to assess their effects on levels of polyphenolics, namely (-)-epicatechin, catechin, chlorogenic acid, vitexin, vitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, acetylvitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, hyperoside, quercetin, and rutin in the leaves. The working hypothesis followed is that one or more of these stress treatment will elicit increases in the levels of these polyphenolics. Cold stress causes increases in levels of vitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, acetylvitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, hyperoside, and quercetin in both Crataegus species. Water-deficit stress increased the productivity of chlorogenic acid, catechin, and (-)-epicatechin in both hawthorn species. Flooding and herbivory caused no net increases, and in some cases, decreases in levels of polyphenolics. These studies indicate that either water-deficit stress or cold stress treatments, or a combination of the two, can be used to enhance the levels of desired polyphenolics in the leaves of these two hawthorn species in a photobioreactor system. These results may have significance for hawthorn in adapting to water-deficit or cold stress and are important considerations for the use of hawthorn in the treatment of heart disease in humans.

  14. Analysis of EF-Hand Proteins in Soybean Genome Suggests Their Potential Roles in Environmental and Nutritional Stress Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houqing Zeng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a universal second messenger that plays a critical role in plant responses to diverse physiological and environmental stimuli. The stimulus-specific signals are perceived and decoded by a series of Ca2+ binding proteins serving as Ca2+ sensors. The majority of Ca2+ sensors possess the EF-hand motif, a helix-loop-helix structure which forms a turn-loop structure. Although EF-hand proteins in model plant such as Arabidopsis have been well described, the identification, classification, and the physiological functions of EF-hand-containing proteins from soybean are not systemically reported. In this study, a total of at least 262 genes possibly encoding proteins containing one to six EF-hand motifs were identified in soybean genome. These genes include 6 calmodulins (CaMs, 144 calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs, 15 calcineurin B-like proteins, 50 calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, 13 CDPK-related protein kinases, 2 Ca2+- and CaM-dependent protein kinases, 17 respiratory burst oxidase homologs, and 15 unclassified EF-hand proteins. Most of these genes (87.8% contain at least one kind of hormonal signaling- and/or stress response-related cis-elements in their -1500 bp promoter regions. Expression analyses by exploring the published microarray and Illumina transcriptome sequencing data revealed that the expression of these EF-hand genes were widely detected in different organs of soybean, and nearly half of the total EF-hand genes were responsive to various environmental or nutritional stresses. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to confirm their responsiveness to several stress treatments. To confirm the Ca2+-binding ability of these EF-hand proteins, four CMLs (CML1, CML13, CML39, and CML95 were randomly selected for SDS–PAGE mobility-shift assay in the presence and absence of Ca2+. Results showed that all of them have the ability to bind Ca2+. This study provided the first comprehensive analyses of genes encoding for EF

  15. Comparison of the impact of environmental stress on male and female skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblong, J E

    2012-06-01

    Past research on understanding gender differences of skin biology and its response to environmental insults has focused on morphological and gross physiological comparisons. In general it has been found that male skin has a greater susceptibility to being negatively impacted by environmental stressors, in particular ultraviolet radiation. These noted differences in response to environmental insults are probably due to a combination of underlying biologically based differences and variable sun-protection and skin-care product usage between genders. Overall, published data support the hypothesis that male facial skin undergoes significant challenges from environmental insults that lead to a more damaged condition compared with female skin. These changes occur both from acute insults and from the impact of cumulative chronic exposure. Appropriate sun protection should be viewed as an important step in male skin care and grooming habits.

  16. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  17. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  18. DNA damage in earthworms (Eisenia spp.) as an indicator of environmental stress in the industrial zone of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Reyes, Guillermo; Ilizaliturri, Cesar A; Gonzalez-Mille, Donaji J; Costilla, Rogelio; Diaz-Barriga, Fernando; Carmen Cuevas, Maria Del; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Mejia-Saavedra, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz is one of the major industrial areas of Mexico. Presently, the Coatzacoalcos River and the areas surrounding the industrial complex are considered by various authors to be some of most polluted sites in Mexico. The objective of this study was to determine if earthworms could be used as indicators of environmental stress in the Coatzacoalcos industrial zone. Often, detritivores and decomposers such as earthworms are the first to be affected when the soil is contaminated. We collected soil samples to be used for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) quantification by gas chromatography. Concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, lindane and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the soil were above the maximum permissible limits of the Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines (CEQG). Comet assay was conducted in coelomocytes of wild earthworms collected in Coatzacoalcos and compared with the control earthworms. We found DNA damage in earthworms from Coatzacoalcos that was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in comparison to laboratory earthworms. Earthworms are an appropriate organism to use as an indicator of environmental impact in contaminated sites. DNA damage recorded in the earthworms provides clear evidence of environmental impacts by the chemical industry on the wildlife of this region.

  19. Extreme cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The universe is all about extremes. Space has a temperature 270°C below freezing. Stars die in catastrophic supernova explosions a billion times brighter than the Sun. A black hole can generate 10 million trillion volts of electricity. And hypergiants are stars 2 billion kilometres across, larger than the orbit of Jupiter. Extreme Cosmos provides a stunning new view of the way the Universe works, seen through the lens of extremes: the fastest, hottest, heaviest, brightest, oldest, densest and even the loudest. This is an astronomy book that not only offers amazing facts and figures but also re

  20. Herbal supplement extends life span under some environmental conditions and boosts stress resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Villeponteau

    Full Text Available Genetic studies indicate that aging is modulated by a great number of genetic pathways. We have used Drosophila longevity and stress assays to test a multipath intervention strategy. To carry out this strategy, we supplemented the flies with herbal extracts (SC100 that are predicted to modulate the expression of many genes involved in aging and stress resistance, such as mTOR, NOS, NF-KappaB, and VEGF. When flies were housed in large cages with SC100 added, daily mortality rates of both male and female flies were greatly diminished in mid to late life. Surprisingly, SC100 also stabilized midlife mortality rate increases so as to extend the maximum life span substantially beyond the limits previously reported for D. melanogaster. Under these conditions, SC100 also promoted robust resistance to partial starvation stress and to heat stress. Fertility was the same initially in both treated and control flies, but it became significantly higher in treated flies at older ages as the fertility of control flies declined. Mean and maximum life spans of flies in vials at the same test site were also extended by SC100, but the life spans were short in absolute terms. In contrast, at an independent test site where stress was minimized, the flies exhibited much longer mean life spans, but the survival curves became highly rectangular and the effects of SC100 on both mean and maximum life spans declined greatly or were abolished. The data indicate that SC100 is a novel herbal mix with striking effects on enhancing Drosophila stress resistance and life span in some environments, while minimizing mid to late life mortality rates. They also show that the environment and other factors can have transformative effects on both the length and distribution of survivorship, and on the ability of SC100 to extend the life span.

  1. Neonatal handling and environmental enrichment increase the expression of GAP-43 in the hippocampus and promote cognitive abilities in prenatally stressed rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Hua; Du, Baoling; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2012-07-26

    Neonatal handling and environmental enrichment have been used to aid the treatment and recovery of a diverse variety of brain dysfunctions. However, the underlying mechanism and the effects on cognitive function following neonatal handling and environmental enrichment are still unclear. In this study, we investigated GAP-43 protein levels in the hippocampus of prenatally stressed rat pups by Western blot on postnatal day (P) 10, P20 and P45. The cognitive ability of prenatally stressed rat pups was tested by using the Morris water maze on P45. GAP-43 protein levels were upregulated on P10 in the prenatal restraint stress (RS) group and the prenatal restraint stress plus neonatal handling and environmental enrichment (RE) group compared to the negative control (NC) group. However, the expression of GAP-43 in RS pups was lower on P20 and P45 than that in NC and RE pups. Exposure to prenatal stress prolonged average latency and total swim distance, but neonatal handling and environmental enrichment could reverse the change. Differences were also observed in the selection of search strategies. These results indicate that neonatal handling and environmental enrichment can improve the spatial learning and memory ability of prenatally stressed offspring, and the possible mechanism is the upregulation of GAP-43. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Effects of self-fertilization, environmental stress and exposure to xenobiotics on fitness-related traits of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutellec, Marie-Agnès; Lagadic, Laurent

    2006-03-01

    Genetic and ecological factors may interact in their effects on fitness. Such interactions are thus to be expected between inbreeding and exposure of a population to a toxicant. The magnitude of inbreeding depression is thought to increase in stressful environments. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the combined effects of environmental conditions and inbreeding on fitness in the self-fertile snail Lymnaea stagnalis, using a stress gradient (0-2) applied to a 100 isolated and paired lineages: laboratory control (0), outdoor microcosm control (1) and pesticide exposure under outdoor microcosm conditions (2). Outdoor stress conditions were maintained for 28 days prior to measurements of fitness traits (fecundity, hatching success, and size at hatching) under laboratory conditions, so that delayed environmental effects could be estimated. Under laboratory control conditions, we found significant initial family level heterogeneity for most measured traits, including physiological performances as assessed through energetic biomarkers. Whatever the environmental conditions, inbreeding depression was very low for progeny performances. Negative values of self-fertilization depression (SFD) were obtained. Unexpectedly, SFD showed a negative relationship with the assumed stress intensity, reflecting a higher sensitivity under pairing than under selfing, mostly due to parental fecundity. This suggests that stressful conditions may favour selfing. Stress intensity increased the distribution limits of both depression indices, suggesting that changes in fitness are less predictable in a population under stress. Implications of such findings for environmental risk assessment of pesticides are discussed.

  3. Chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase from Chlorella vulgaris alleviates environmental stresses in yeast together with 2-Cys peroxiredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Takeshi; Ishibashi, Akiko; Kirino, Ai; Sato, Jun-ichi; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi; Honjoh, Ken-ichi; Miyamoto, Takahisa

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC) catalyzes the reduction of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) and, thus, probably functions as an antioxidant system. The functions of the enzyme in oxidative and salt stresses have been reported previously. We have previously identified and characterized NTRC in Chlorella vulgaris. In the present study, we isolated a full-length cDNA clone encoding 2-Cys Prx from C. vulgaris and investigated the involvement of Chlorella NTRC/2-Cys Prx system in several environmental stress tolerances by using yeast as a eukaryotic model. Deduced Chlorella 2-Cys Prx was homologous to those of chloroplast 2-Cys Prxs from plants, and two conserved cysteine residues were found in the deduced sequence. Enzyme assay showed that recombinant mature C. vulgaris NTRC (mCvNTRC) transferred electrons from NADPH to recombinant mature C. vulgaris 2-Cys Prx (mCvPrx), and mCvPrx decomposed hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and peroxynitrite by cooperating with mCvNTRC. Based on the results, the mCvNTRC/mCvPrx antioxidant system was identified in Chlorella. The antioxidant system genes were expressed in yeast separately or coordinately. Stress tolerances of yeast against freezing, heat, and menadione-induced oxidative stresses were significantly improved by expression of mCvNTRC, and the elevated tolerances were more significant when both mCvNTRC and mCvPrx were co-expressed. Our results reveal a novel feature of NTRC: it functions as an antioxidant system with 2-Cys Prx in freezing and heat stress tolerances.

  4. Chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase from Chlorella vulgaris alleviates environmental stresses in yeast together with 2-Cys peroxiredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Machida

    Full Text Available Chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC catalyzes the reduction of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx and, thus, probably functions as an antioxidant system. The functions of the enzyme in oxidative and salt stresses have been reported previously. We have previously identified and characterized NTRC in Chlorella vulgaris. In the present study, we isolated a full-length cDNA clone encoding 2-Cys Prx from C. vulgaris and investigated the involvement of Chlorella NTRC/2-Cys Prx system in several environmental stress tolerances by using yeast as a eukaryotic model. Deduced Chlorella 2-Cys Prx was homologous to those of chloroplast 2-Cys Prxs from plants, and two conserved cysteine residues were found in the deduced sequence. Enzyme assay showed that recombinant mature C. vulgaris NTRC (mCvNTRC transferred electrons from NADPH to recombinant mature C. vulgaris 2-Cys Prx (mCvPrx, and mCvPrx decomposed hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and peroxynitrite by cooperating with mCvNTRC. Based on the results, the mCvNTRC/mCvPrx antioxidant system was identified in Chlorella. The antioxidant system genes were expressed in yeast separately or coordinately. Stress tolerances of yeast against freezing, heat, and menadione-induced oxidative stresses were significantly improved by expression of mCvNTRC, and the elevated tolerances were more significant when both mCvNTRC and mCvPrx were co-expressed. Our results reveal a novel feature of NTRC: it functions as an antioxidant system with 2-Cys Prx in freezing and heat stress tolerances.

  5. Metabolomic analysis of the selection response of Drosophila melanogaster to environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Overgaard, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including gene...

  6. A dynamin-like protein involved in bacterial cell membrane surveillance under environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Prachi; Eissenberger, Kristina; Karier, Laurence; Mascher, Thorsten; Bramkamp, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In ever-changing natural environments, bacteria are continuously challenged with numerous biotic and abiotic stresses. Accordingly, they have evolved both specific and more general mechanisms to counteract stress-induced damage and ensure survival. In the soil habitat of Bacillus subtilis, peptide antibiotics and bacteriophages are among the primary stressors that affect the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane. Dynamin-like proteins (DLPs) play a major role in eukaryotic membrane re-modelling processes, including antiviral activities, but the function of the corresponding bacterial homologues was so far poorly understood. Here, we report on the protective function of a bacterial DLP, DynA from B. subtilis. We provide evidence that DynA plays an important role in a membrane surveillance system that counteracts membrane pore formation provoked by antibiotics and phages. In unstressed cells, DynA is a highly dynamic membrane-associated protein. Upon membrane damage, DynA localizes into large and static assemblies, where DynA acts locally to counteract stress-induced pores, presumably by inducing lipid bilayer fusion and sealing membrane gaps. Thus, lack of DynA increases the sensitivity to antibiotic exposure and phage infection. Taken together, our work suggests that DynA, and potentially other bacterial DLPs, contribute to the innate immunity of bacteria against membrane stress.

  7. Adaptive stress response pathways induced by environmental mixtures of bioaccumulative chemicals in dugongs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ling; Gaus, Caroline; Escher, Beate I

    2015-06-02

    To address the poorly understood mixture effects of chemicals in the marine mammal dugong, we coupled equilibrium-based passive sampling in blubber to a range of in vitro bioassays for screening mixtures of bioaccumulative chemicals. The modes of action included early effect indicators along important toxicity pathways, such as induction of xenobiotic metabolism, and some integrative indicators downstream of the molecular initiating event, such as adaptive stress responses. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response were found to be the most prominent effects, while the p53-mediated DNA damage response and NF-κB-mediated response to inflammation were not significantly affected. Although polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) quantified in the samples accounted for the majority of AhR-mediated activity, PCDDs explained less than 5% of the total oxidative stress response, despite their known ability to activate this pathway. Altered oxidative stress response was observed with both individual chemicals and blubber extracts subject to metabolic activation by rat liver S9 fraction. Metabolic activation resulted in both enhanced and reduced toxicity, suggesting the relevance and utility of incorporating metabolic enzymes into in vitro bioassays. Our approach provides a first insight into the burden of toxicologically relevant bioaccumulative chemical mixtures in dugongs and can be applied to lipid tissue of other wildlife species.

  8. Molecular biomarkers and adaptation to environmental stress in moon jelly (Aurelia spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Werner; Ender, Andrea; Schierwater, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    We describe a strategy that identifies molecular biomarkers and links the study of abiotic stress to evolutionary history. By utilizing the moon jellyfish Aurelia spp. as a model, we identified genes differentially regulated in response to the chemical stressor tributyltin by means of complementary DNA subtraction analyses. Expression of 3 out of 25 identified candidate genes, one oxidative stress gene, one heat shock (hsp70) gene, and one GTP-binding gene, was quantified under laboratory conditions and in field tests using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Differential expression patterns were found following exposure to tributyltin and temperature treatments. The findings suggest that the identified genes are involved in response to chemical as well as heat- induced stress and may serve as biomarkers for monitoring marine habitats. Gene regulatory patterns combined with phylogenetic inferences of the hsp70 gene support a possible role of ecologically driven divergence within the genus Aurelia. We show that added information on genetic variability can raise the predictive power of molecular biomarkers in studies of individual stress response.

  9. Impact of environmental stress on biochemical parameters of bacteria reducing chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rida Batool

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium pollution is produced in connection with industrial processes like in tanneries. It has been suggested that bioremediation could be a good option for clean up. The stress effect of variable chromate levels, pHs and growth temperatures on biochemical parameters of two Cr(VI reducing bacterial strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa Rb-1 and Ochrobactrum intermedium Rb-2 was investigated. Transmission electrone microscopy (TEM was performed to study the intracellular distribution of Cr(VI. It was observed that initial stress of 1000 µgmL-1 caused significant enhancement of all studied biochemical parameters at pH 7.0 and growth temperature of 37 °C showing great bioremediation potential of the strains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the distribution of chromium precipitates was not uniform as they were distributed in the cytoplasm as well as found associated with the periplasm and outer membrane. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the possible involvement of carboxyl, amino, sulpohonate and hydroxyl groups present on the bacterial cell surface for the binding of Cr(VI ions. Cr(VI stress brought about changes in the distridution of these functional groups. It can be concluded that the investigated bacterial strains adjust well to Cr(VI stress in terms of biochemical parameters and along that exhibited alteration in morphology.

  10. Environmental heat stress modulates thyroid status and its response to repeated endotoxin (LPS) challenge in steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones are important in the adaptation to heat stress, allowing the adjustment of metabolic rates in favor of decreased energy utilization and heat production. Thyroid status is compromised in a variety of acute and chronic infections and toxin-mediated disease states. Our objective was to...

  11. Subtle effects of environmental stress observed in the early life stages of the Common frog, Rana temporaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Rebecca; Martin, Francis L.; Jones, Kevin C.; Shore, Richard F.; Halsall, Crispin J.

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide amphibian populations are declining due to habitat loss, disease and pollution. Vulnerability to environmental contaminants such as pesticides will be dependent on the species, the sensitivity of the ontogenic life stage and hence the timing of exposure and the exposure pathway. Herein we investigated the biochemical tissue ‘fingerprint’ in spawn and early-stage tadpoles of the Common frog, Rana temporaria, using attenuated total reflection-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy with the objective of observing differences in the biochemical constituents of the respective amphibian tissues due to varying water quality in urban and agricultural ponds. Our results demonstrate that levels of stress (marked by biochemical constituents such as glycogen that are involved in compensatory metabolic mechanisms) can be observed in tadpoles present in the pond most impacted by pollution (nutrients and pesticides), but large annual variability masked any inter-site differences in the frog spawn. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is capable of detecting differences in tadpoles that are present in selected ponds with different levels of environmental perturbation and thus serves as a rapid and cost effective tool in assessing stress-related effects of pollution in a vulnerable class of organism. PMID:28317844

  12. Laying Stress on Energy-Saving and Environmental Protection of Thermal Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The most attraetive spot of the 11th Five-Year Plan is to change China's present mode of cconomic growth and take a road of circulative cconomy based on effective utilization of resources and environmental protection. Electric power as a basic industry,energy conservation and environmental protection will become one of its working cmphases in a period of time to come. In this connection, the journalist (Zhao Ran) from China Electric Power has exclusively interviewed Tang Yunlin, the former president of the China Electric Power Planning and Engineering Institute. He thought that the most important thing for power industry to save energy and protect environment is to bring about the energy conservation and environmental protection in thermal power plants rather than first devclop hydropower, nuclear power and renewable energy. His viewpoints and suggestions have been recognized by many insiders.

  13. Discussion on Several Failure Modes of Environmental Stress Testing%几种环境应力试验的失效模式探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄少红

    2013-01-01

      环境应力试验是检验产品质量的重要手段之一,对评价产品质量意义重大。产品使用环境复杂多样,环境温度是影响产品性能不可避免的关键因素。建议采用高温应力、温度循环应力、温度冲击应力三种环境应力进行筛选试验,试验中向产品施加合理的环境应力和电应力。本文对环境应力筛选试验的失效模式进行了讨论。%  Environmental stress testing is one of the important means for testing product quality, which is very significant for product quality evaluation. Products will be used in various environments, so the environment temperature is an inevitable influence on most products. We suggest that high temperature stress, temperature cyclic stress,and temperature shock stress be used for environmental stress screening tests, with proper environment stress and electrical stress applying to the product. This paper discuses the failure modes of environmental stress screening tests.

  14. Molecular/genetic determinants of repolarization and their modification by environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, M R; Cohen, I S

    2006-01-01

    Although a variety of factors, inherited or environmental, can influence expression of ion channel proteins to impact on repolarization, that environment can affect genetic determinants of repolarization for intervals of varying duration is a concept that is not as generally appreciated as it should be. In the following pages we review the molecular/genetic determinants of cardiac repolarization and summarize how pathologic events and environmental intrusions can affect these determinants. Understanding the chains of events involved should yield insights into both the causes and potential avenues of treatment for abnormalities of repolarization.

  15. Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Line Skov; Lova, Lotte; Hansen, Zandra Kulikovsky; Schønemann, Emilie; Larsen, Line Lyngby; Colberg Olsen, Maria Sophia; Juhl, Nadja; Magnussen, Bogi Roin

    2012-01-01

    Stress er en tilstand som er meget omdiskuteret i samfundet, og dette besværliggør i en vis grad konkretiseringen af mulige løsningsforslag i bestræbelsen på at forebygge den såkaldte folkesygdom. Hovedkonklusionen er, at selv om der bliver gjort meget for at forebygge, er der ikke meget der aktivt kan sættes i værk for at reducere antallet af stressramte, før en fælles forståelse af stressårsager og effektiv stresshåndtering er fremlagt. Problemformuleringen er besvaret gennem en undersø...

  16. Effects of early adolescent environmental enrichment on cognitive dysfunction, prefrontal cortex development, and inflammatory cytokines after early life stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, Carine H; Narahari, Tanya; Holland, Freedom H; Lee, Ha-Neul; Murthy, Shashi K; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2016-05-01

    Early postnatal stress such as maternal separation causes cognitive dysfunction later in life, including working memory deficits that are largely mediated by the prefrontal cortex. Maternal separation in male rats also yields a loss of parvalbumin-containing prefrontal cortex interneurons in adolescence, which may occur via inflammatory or oxidative stress mechanisms. Environmental enrichment can prevent several effects of maternal separation; however, effects of enrichment on prefrontal cortex development are not well understood. Here, we report that enrichment prevented cognitive dysfunction in maternally separated males and females, and prevented elevated circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines that was evident in maternally separated males, but not females. However, enrichment did not prevent parvalbumin loss or adolescent measures of oxidative stress. Significant correlations indicated that adolescents with higher oxidative damage and less prefrontal cortex parvalbumin in adolescence committed more errors on the win-shift task; therefore, maternal separation may affect cognitive dysfunction via aberrant interneuron development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58: 482-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Treating Stress-Related Pain with the Flotation Restricted Environmental Stimulation Technique: Are There Differences between Women and Men?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Å Bood

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore, for the first time, sex differences among patients diagnosed with stress-related pain before and after flotation restricted environmental stimulation technique (REST treatment, delivered 12 times during seven weeks. The present study included 88 patients (69 women, 19 men from three different studies (post hoc analysis. They had been diagnosed by a physician as having chronic stress-related muscle tension pain. The analyses indicated that the flotation-REST treatment had beneficial effects on stress, anxiety, depression, sleep quality and pain and that there were few sex differences. Women were more depressed than men before treatment, but after treatment there was no difference between sexes. However, there was a sex difference in the ability to endure experimentally induced pain, suggesting that men exhibited greater endurance both before and after the flotation-REST treatment. The results also showed, for the first time, that both sexes improved their ability to endure experimentally induced pain (higher scores for upper pain threshold following the successful flotation-REST pain treatment.

  18. Treatment with Tyrosine a Neurotransmitter Precursor Reduces Environmental Stress in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    brain norepinephrine and dopamine. catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. In animals, administration of tyrosine, a food constituent and precursor of the...Profile of Mood States. Stanford Sleepiness Scale) ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS that have been employed to evaluate a variety of psychoactive drugs foods ... tyramine . However. Plasma tyrosine levels were significantly elevated during behav- this amine is not detectable in the plasma of animals after they

  19. The Assessment of Halogenating Stress in Population by the Environmental and Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazbaeva, Zulkiya I.; Dosybaeva, Gulzhan N.; Sabirov, Zhanbol B.; Bazelyuk, Ludmila T.; Asanov, Galiya K.; Baidaulet, Imanali O.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the dependence of myeloperoxidase content in patients living in the environmentally unfriendly region of Kazakhstan (Taraz), on the PCBs content in the air. During this study, 324 patients were examined to solve the clinical problem. The content of myeloperoxidase fluctuated significantly depending on the age of the…

  20. The Roles of Autophagy and the Inflammasome during Environmental Stress-Triggered Skin Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jane Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory skin diseases are the most common problem in dermatology. The induction of skin inflammation by environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR, hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI and TiO2/ZnO/Ag nanoparticles (NPs has been demonstrated previously. Recent studies have indicated that the inflammasome is often wrongly activated by these environmental irritants, thus inducing massive inflammation and resulting in the development of inflammatory diseases. The regulation of the inflammasome with respect to skin inflammation is complex and is still not completely understood. Autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is associated with the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, plays a key role in inflammasome inactivation. As a housekeeping pathway, cells utilize autophagy to maintain the homeostasis of the organ structure and function when exposed to environmental stressors. However, only a few studies have examined the effect of autophagy and/or the inflammasome on skin pathogenesis. Here we review recent findings regarding the involvement of autophagy and inflammasome activation during skin inflammation. We posit that autophagy induction is a novel mechanism inter-modulating environmental stressor-induced skin inflammation. We also attempt to highlight the role of the inflammasome and the possible underlying mechanisms and pathways reflecting the pathogenesis of skin inflammation induced by UVR, Cr(VI and TiO2/ZnO/Ag NPs. A more profound understanding about the crosstalk between autophagy and the inflammasome will contribute to the development of prevention and intervention strategies against human skin disease.

  1. Developing a dynamic framework to examine the interplay between environmental stress, stakeholder participation processes and hydrological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, G.; Blöschl, G.; Loucks, D. P.

    2014-09-01

    Stakeholder participation is increasingly discussed as essential for sustainable water resource management. Yet detailed understanding of the factors driving its use, the processes by which it is employed, and the outcomes or achievements it can realise remains highly limited, and often contested. This understanding is essential to enable water policy to be shaped for efficient and effective water management. This research proposes and applies a dynamic framework that can explore in which circumstances environmental stress events, such as floods, droughts or pollution, drive changes in water governance towards a more participatory approach, and how this shapes the processes by which participation or stakeholder engagement takes place, and the subsequent water management outcomes that emerge. The framework is able to assess the extent to which environmental events in combination with favourable contextual factors (e.g. institutional support for participatory activities) lead to good participatory processes (e.g. well facilitated and representative) that then lead to good outcomes (e.g. improved ecological conditions). Through applying the framework to case studies from the literature it becomes clear that environmental stress events can stimulate participatory governance changes, when existing institutional conditions promote participatory approaches. The work also suggests that intermediary outcomes, which may be tangible (such as reaching an agreement) or non-tangible (such as developing shared knowledge and understanding among participants, or creating trust), may provide a crucial link between processes and resource management outcomes. If this relationship can be more strongly confirmed, the presence or absence of intermediary outcomes may even be used as a valuable proxy to predict future resource management outcomes.

  2. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure.

  3. Effect of relevant environmental stresses on survival of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in dry-fermented sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Anette; Måge, Ingrid; Heir, Even; Axelsson, Lars; Holck, Askild L

    2016-07-16

    Dry-fermented sausages (DFSs) have been linked to several serious foodborne outbreaks of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). The ability of pathogens to utilize adaptive responses to different stressful conditions intended to control their growth in foods, food preparation and production processes may enhance their survival. In certain cases, induced tolerance to one type of stress may lead to enhanced resistance to the applied stress as well as to other stresses. We exposed two EHEC strains, MF3582 of serotype O157:H- and MF5554 of serogroup O145, to different stresses commonly encountered during a production process. The two EHEC strains, previously shown to have different abilities to survive DFS production process conditions, were subjected to low temperatures (4°C and 12°C), 5% NaCl or 1% lactic acid for 6days prior to being added to sausage batters. Survival of EHEC was recorded in salami of two recipes, fermented at two temperatures (20°C and 30°C). The results showed that recipe type had the largest impact on EHEC reductions where Moderate recipe (MR) salami batters containing increased levels of NaCl, glucose and NaNO2 provided enhanced EHEC reductions in salami (2.6 log10) compared to Standard recipe (SR) salami (1.7 log10). Effects of pre-exposure stresses were dependent both on strain and recipe. While acid adaptation of MF5554 provided enhanced log10 reductions from 2.0 to 3.0 in MR sausages, adaptation to a combination of acid and salt stress showed the opposite effect in SR sausages with reductions of only 1.1 log10 as compared to the average of 1.8 log10 for the other SR sausages. Otherwise, the salt and acid adaptation single stresses had relatively small effects on EHEC survival through the DFS production process and subsequent storage and freeze/thaw treatments. Growing cells and cells frozen in batter survived poorly in MR sausages with an average reduction of 3.4 and 3.2 log10, respectively. The reductions of EHEC after storage of

  4. Adverse effects of enrofloxacin when associated with environmental stress in Tra catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Neil; Nkejabega, Noemie; Hien, Nguyen-Ngoc; Huynh, Thi-Tu; Silvestre, Frederic; Phuong, Nguyen-Thanh; Danyi, Sophie; Widart, Joëlle; Douny, Caroline; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Kestemont, Patrick; Huong, Do-Thi-Thanh

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the adverse effects of enrofloxacin (EF) on Tra catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, in relation with density stress. Fish were held at 40, 80 or 120 fish m(-3) and fed with pellets containing either 1 g kg(-1) EF or no EF. Antibiotic exposure lasted 7d and all fish were fed without EF for another 7-d recovery period. Fish were sampled at 3, 7, 8, 10 and 14 d after the beginning of EF exposure. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total glutathione (GSH) levels, catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and acetylcholine-esterase (AChE) activities were assessed in gill, brain, liver and muscle. At day 7, LPO levels in gills of EF-fish reared at low or high density were significantly more than 5-fold higher than their respective control. On the contrary, LPO in gills of EF-fish reared at medium density was significantly 3-fold lower than the control fish. Similarly, CAT activities in gills of EF-fish reared under low or high density were higher than in their control groups, while this activity was lower in EF-fish of the medium density group. AChE activities in muscles of EF-fish reared at low or high density were lower than controls at days 3 and 7, respectively. These results suggest that EF exposure may lead to disorders like lipid peroxidation and neural dysfunction in fish. However, when reared under lower stress condition (medium density), they may cope better with EF-induced stress than chronically stressed fish (low or high density).

  5. Migratory management and environmental conditions affect lifespan and oxidative stress in honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming H.; Strand, Micheline K.; Rueppell, Olav; Tarpy, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Most pollination in large-scale agriculture is dependent on managed colonies of a single species, the honey bee Apis mellifera. More than 1 million hives are transported to California each year just to pollinate the almonds, and bees are trucked across the country for various cropping systems. Concerns have been raised about whether such “migratory management” causes bees undue stress; however to date there have been no longer-term studies rigorously addressing whether migratory management is detrimental to bee health. To address this issue, we conducted field experiments comparing bees from commercial and experimental migratory beekeeping operations to those from stationary colonies to quantify effects on lifespan, colony health and productivity, and levels of oxidative damage for individual bees. We detected a significant decrease in lifespan of migratory adult bees relative to stationary bees. We also found that migration affected oxidative stress levels in honey bees, but that food scarcity had an even larger impact; some detrimental effects of migration may be alleviated by a greater abundance of forage. In addition, rearing conditions affect levels of oxidative damage incurred as adults. This is the first comprehensive study on impacts of migratory management on the health and oxidative stress of honey bees. PMID:27554200

  6. Integrating stress physiology, environmental change, and behavior in free-living sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuner, Creagh W; Hahn, Thomas P

    2003-01-01

    As weather deteriorates, breeding animals have a diverse array of options to ensure survival. Because of their mobility, birds can easily abandon territories to seek out benign conditions away from the breeding site. The timing of abandonment, however, may have repercussions for territory size, mate quality, reproductive success, and survival. There is a large body of evidence indicating that the adrenocortical response to stress plays a role in mediating the onset and maintenance of this behavioral switch. Here we develop a model describing the interactions of weather, food availability, body condition, and stress physiology in initiating departure from the breeding site. We tested the model using a population of white-crowned sparrows breeding at high elevation in the Sierra Nevada, where severe weather at the beginning of the breeding season often induces temporary abandonment of breeding territories and facultative altitudinal migration to lower elevation refugia. The data show that (1). during inclement weather, exogenous corticosterone delays return to the breeding site after territory abandonment; (2). during good weather, exogenous corticosterone alone does not induce territory abandonment, but does increase activity range around the breeding site; and (3). the magnitude of the corticosteroid response to stress is inversely related to body condition of the sparrow.

  7. Considering environmental water demands in global-scale water stress assessments: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, P.; Shmaktin, V.; Revenga, C.

    2003-04-01

    Freshwater ecosystems need certain water flow regimes to sustain their animal and plant communities. Thus, there is not only a human demand for water (i.e. for domestic, industrial and agricultural purposes) but also a demand by freshwater ecosystems, here called environmental water demand. In order to achieve a sustainable development of river basins, both human and environmental water demands need to be taken into account in water management. For a comparative global-scale analysis of freshwater scarcity, it is therefore useful to compute river- basin specific budgets which contain the following terrestrial water flows (or rather flow components): 1) total renewable water resources (runoff), 2) human water withdrawals (and consumptive water uses) and 3) environmental water demands. In a pilot study, the global water availability and use model WaterGAP 2 (spatial resolution 0.5 degree) was used to derive such budgets for all river basins of the worlds. Its sectoral water use modules estimate human water withdrawals and consumptive water uses, while its hydrological module WGHM computes monthly values of surface runoff, groundwater recharge and river discharge. WGHM calculates both natural and actual discharge by simulating the reduction of river discharge by human water consumption. It is tuned against observed discharge at 724 gauging stations (representing about 50% of the global land area) to achieve a good simulation of the long-term average river discharge. Validation efforts have shown than WGHM can satisfactorily simulate the 90% reliable monthly discharge Q90 of river basins larger than 20,000 km2. Based on these capabilities of WaterGAP 2, a first estimate of basin-specific annual environmental water demands was derived as the sum of a low flow and a high flow requirement. Drawing on experience from South Africa, Q90 was assumed to represent the low flow that the ecosystems can tolerate, as it is the flow value that is not reached in 1 out of 10 months

  8. Environmental factors and unhealthy lifestyle influence oxidative stress in humans--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Sivasudha, T; Jeyadevi, R; Arul Ananth, D

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen is the most essential molecule for life; since it is a strong oxidizing agent, it can aggravate the damage within the cell by a series of oxidative events including the generation of free radicals. Antioxidative agents are the only defense mechanism to neutralize these free radicals. Free radicals are not only generated internally in our body system but also trough external sources like environmental pollution, toxic metals, cigarette smoke, pesticides, etc., which add damage to our body system. Inhaling these toxic chemicals in the environment has become unavoidable in modern civilization. Antioxidants of plant origin with free radical scavenging properties could have great importance as therapeutic agents in several diseases caused by environmental pollution. This review summarizes the generation of reactive oxygen species and damage to cells by exposure to external factors, unhealthy lifestyle, and role of herbal plants in scavenging these reactive oxygen species.

  9. Common genetic and environmental contributions to post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol dependence in young women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, C. E.; McCutcheon, V. V.; Pommer, N. E.; Nelson, E. C.; Grant, J. D.; Duncan, A. E.; Waldron, M.; Bucholz, K. K.; Madden, P. A. F.; Heath, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The few genetically informative studies to examine post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD), all of which are based on a male veteran sample, suggest that the co-morbidity between PTSD and AD may be attributable in part to overlapping genetic influences, but this issue has yet to be addressed in females. Method Data were derived from an all-female twin sample (n=3768) ranging in age from 18 to 29 years. A trivariate genetic model that included trauma exposure as a separate phenotype was fitted to estimate genetic and environmental contributions to PTSD and the degree to which they overlap with those that contribute to AD, after accounting for potential confounding effects of heritable influences on trauma exposure. Results Additive genetic influences (A) accounted for 72 % of the variance in PTSD ; individual-specific environmental (E) factors accounted for the remainder. An AE model also provided the best fit for AD, for which heritability was estimated to be 71 %. The genetic correlation between PTSD and AD was 0.54. Conclusions The heritability estimate for PTSD in our sample is higher than estimates reported in earlier studies based almost exclusively on an all-male sample in which combat exposure was the precipitating traumatic event. However, our findings are consistent with the absence of evidence for shared environmental influences on PTSD and, most importantly, the substantial overlap in genetic influences on PTSD and AD reported in these investigations. Additional research addressing potential distinctions by gender in the relative contributions of genetic and environmental influences on PTSD is merited. PMID:21054919

  10. Catalases play differentiated roles in the adaptation of a fungal entomopathogen to environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng-Liang; Zhang, Long-Bin; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-02-01

    The catalase family of Beauveria bassiana (fungal entomopathogen) consists of catA (spore-specific), catB (secreted), catP (peroxisomal), catC (cytoplasmic) and catD (secreted peroxidase/catalase), which were distinguished in phylogeny and structure and functionally characterized by constructing single-gene disrupted and rescued mutants for enzymatic and multi-phenotypic analyses. Total catalase activity decreased 89% and 56% in ΔcatB and ΔcatP, corresponding to the losses of upper and lower active bands gel-profiled for all catalases respectively, but only 9-12% in other knockout mutants. Compared with wild type and complement mutants sharing similar enzymatic and phenotypic parameters, all knockout mutants showed significant (9-56%) decreases in the antioxidant capability of their conidia (active ingredients of mycoinsecticides), followed by remarkable phenotypic defects associated with the fungal biocontrol potential. These defects included mainly the losses of 40% thermotolerance (45°C) in ΔcatA, 46-48% UV-B resistance in ΔcatA and ΔcatD, and 33-47% virulence to Spodoptera litura larvae in ΔcatA, ΔcatP and ΔcatD respectively. Moreover, the drastic transcript upregulation of some other catalase genes observed in the normal culture of each knockout mutant revealed functionally complimentary effects among some of the catalase genes, particularly between catB and catC whose knockout mutants displayed little or minor phenotypic changes. However, the five catalase genes functioned redundantly in mediating the fungal tolerance to either hyperosmotic or fungicidal stress. The differentiated roles of five catalases in regulating the B. bassiana virulence and tolerances to oxidative stress, high temperature and UV-B irradiation provide new insights into fungal adaptation to stressful environment and host invasion.

  11. CAN'T REMEMBER TO FORGET YOU: Chromatin-based priming of somatic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäurle, Isabel

    2017-09-22

    In nature plants are exposed to frequent changes in their abiotic and biotic environment. While some environmental cues are used to gauge the environment and align growth and development, others are beyond the regularly encountered spectrum of a species and trigger stress responses. Such stressful conditions provide a potential threat to survival and integrity. Plants adapt to extreme environmental conditions through physiological adaptations that are usually transient and are maintained until stressful environments subside. It is increasingly appreciated that in some cases environmental cues activate a stress memory that persists for some time after the extreme condition has subsided. Recent research has shown that this stress-induced environmental memory is mediated by epigenetic and chromatin-based mechanisms and both histone methylation and nucleosome occupancy are associated with it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. S-layer production by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 under environmental stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu-Tudor, Silvia-Simona; Brown, Lucia; Hebert, Elvira M; Brezeanu, Aurelia; Brinzan, Alexandru; Fadda, Silvina; Mozzi, Fernanda; Zamfir, Medana

    2016-05-01

    The ability of microorganisms to synthesize S-layer, the outermost structure of the microbial cell envelope composed of non-covalently bound proteins, has been ascribed to help microorganisms to exert their probiotic properties in the host. In this work, formation of S-layer by the potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 under different stress culture conditions (high incubation temperatures, presence of bile salts or NaCl, and acidic pH) was assayed. A marked S-layer synthesis by L. acidophilus IBB 801 was detected when the strain was grown at 42 °C and in the presence of 0.05 % bile salts or 2.0 % NaCl. The presence of S-layer proteins was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and protein identification by MS/MS. The differential expression of the proteome of this strain at 42 °C, when a marked formation of S-layer was detected, revealed the overexpression of six proteins mainly related to general stress and protein biosynthesis and translation, while four proteins detected in lower amounts were involved in DNA repair and energy metabolism. As L. acidophilus IBB 801 produces both a bacteriocin and S-layer proteins, the strain could be of interest to be used in the formulation of functional food products with specific properties.

  13. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  14. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  15. The stress response to environmental change in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Amy; Terio, Karen A; Ziccardi, Michael H; Munson, Linda

    2004-03-01

    The captive North American cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population is not self-sustaining because of high prevalences of unusual diseases and poor reproductive success. Cheetahs are commonly moved between zoos for breeding purposes to maintain genetic diversity within the captive population, and movement may exacerbate infertility and disease. Fecal corticoids were analyzed by radioimmunoassay to measure the stress response of cheetahs to movement between facilities. Fecal samples were collected from 15 cheetahs for 14 days before movement and for at least 30 days after movement. For each cheetah, premovement fecal corticoid concentrations were used to determine baseline and then compared with trends in postmovement concentrations. In general, postmovement corticoid concentrations either increased (n = 8), did not change (n = 2), or decreased (n = 5). Although individual animal differences occurred, corticoid concentrations increased for most animals moved on-exhibit and decreased in animals moved off-exhibit. Animals moving on-exhibit had an 18-times greater risk of having corticoids elevated more than two standard deviations above baseline for 30 days after movement compared with animals that moved off-exhibit. In addition, greater day-to-day variation in corticoids occurred in animals moved on-exhibit. In general, animals with initially low baseline corticoid concentrations had a greater postmovement corticoid response than cheetahs with initially high baseline levels. These results indicate that some cheetahs have a prolonged stress response when moved between facilities, and the magnitude and character of this response is influenced by the exhibit environment.

  16. Conservation of acquired morphology and community structure in aged biofilms after facing environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, T; Escudié, R; Santa-Catalina, G; Bernet, N; Milferstedt, K

    2016-01-01

    The influence of growth history on biofilm morphology and microbial community structure is poorly studied despite its important role for biofilm development. Here, biofilms were exposed to a change in hydrodynamic conditions at different growth stages and we observed how biofilm age affected the change in morphology and bacterial community structure. Biofilms were developed in two bubble column reactors, one operated under constant shear stress and one under variable shear stress. Biofilms were transferred from one reactor to the other at different stages in their development by withdrawing and inserting the support medium from one reactor to the other. The developments of morphology and microbial community structure were followed by image analysis and molecular tools. When transferred early in biofilm development, biofilms adapted to the new hydrodynamic conditions and adopted features of the biofilm already developed in the receiving reactor. Biofilms transferred at a late state of biofilm development continued their initial trajectories of morphology and community development even in a new environment. These biofilms did not immediately adapt to their new environment and kept features acquired during their early growth phase, a property we called memory effect.

  17. A definition of normovolaemia and consequences for cardiovascular control during orthostatic and environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, Jasper; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2010-01-01

    The Frank-Starling mechanism describes the relationship between stroke volume and preload to the heart, or the volume of blood that is available to the heart--the central blood volume. Understanding the role of the central blood volume for cardiovascular control has been complicated by the fact...... not increase further indicating that in the supine resting position the heart operates on the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve which, therefore, may be taken as a functional definition of normovolaemia. Since the capacity of the vascular system surpasses the blood volume, orthostatic and environmental...

  18. Top-gate zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors with high bias and environmental stress stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, M.; Theisen, M.; Behrendt, A.; Görrn, P.; Riedl, T.

    2014-06-01

    Top gated metal-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) provide two benefits compared to their conventional bottom-gate counterparts: (i) The gate dielectric may concomitantly serve as encapsulation layer for the TFT channel. (ii) Damage of the dielectric due to high-energetic particles during channel deposition can be avoided. In our work, the top-gate dielectric is prepared by ozone based atomic layer deposition at low temperatures. For ultra-low gas permeation rates, we introduce nano-laminates of Al2O3/ZrO2 as dielectrics. The resulting TFTs show a superior environmental stability even at elevated temperatures. Their outstanding stability vs. bias stress is benchmarked against bottom-gate devices with encapsulation.

  19. Environmental Association Analyses Identify Candidates for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Glycine soja, the Wild Progenitor of Cultivated Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Justin E; Kono, Thomas J Y; Stupar, Robert M; Kantar, Michael B; Morrell, Peter L

    2016-04-07

    Natural populations across a species range demonstrate population structure owing to neutral processes such as localized origins of mutations and migration limitations. Selection also acts on a subset of loci, contributing to local adaptation. An understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation to local environmental conditions is a fundamental goal in basic biological research. When applied to crop wild relatives, this same research provides the opportunity to identify adaptive genetic variation that may be used to breed for crops better adapted to novel or changing environments. The present study explores an ex situ conservation collection, the USDA germplasm collection, genotyped at 32,416 SNPs to identify population structure and test for associations with bioclimatic and biophysical variables in Glycine soja, the wild progenitor of Glycine max (soybean). Candidate loci were detected that putatively contribute to adaptation to abiotic stresses. The identification of potentially adaptive variants in this ex situ collection may permit a more targeted use of germplasm collections.

  20. Circadian regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Jack; Stoker, Claire; Carré, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    Extremes of temperatures, drought and salinity cause widespread crop losses throughout the world and impose severe limitations on the amount of land that can be used for agricultural purposes. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop crops that perform better under such abiotic stress conditions. Here, we discuss intriguing, recent evidence that circadian clock contributes to plants' ability to tolerate different types of environmental stress, and to acclimate to them. The clock controls expression of a large fraction of abiotic stress-responsive genes, as well as biosynthesis and signaling downstream of stress response hormones. Conversely, abiotic stress results in altered expression and differential splicing of the clock genes, leading to altered oscillations of downstream stress-response pathways. We propose a range of mechanisms by which this intimate coupling between the circadian clock and environmental stress-response pathways may contribute to plant growth and survival under abiotic stress.

  1. Hydrological extremes and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-04-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and impact on societal livelihood and welfare. Security can be generally understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. The traditional interpretation of security, focused on the state military capabilities, has been replaced by a wider understanding, including economic, societal and environmental aspects that get increasing attention. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state that is responsible for sustaining economic development, and societal and environmental security. The latter can be regarded as the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. An important part of it is water security, which can be defined as the availability of an adequate quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods, ecosystems and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks to people, environments and economies. Security concerns arise because, over large areas, hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - are becoming more frequent and more severe. In terms of dealing with water-related risks, climate change can increase uncertainties, which makes the state's task to deliver security more difficult and more expensive. However, changes in population size and development, and level of protection, drive exposure to hydrological hazards.

  2. Few genetic and environmental correlations between life history and stress resistance traits affect adaptation to fluctuating thermal regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenti, T; Sørensen, J G; Moghadam, N N; Loeschcke, V

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory selection in thermal regimes that differed in the amplitude and the predictability of daily fluctuations had a marked effect on stress resistance and life history traits in Drosophila simulans. The observed evolutionary changes are expected to be the result of both direct and correlated responses to selection. Thus, a given trait might not evolve independently from other traits because of genetic correlations among these traits. Moreover, different test environments can induce novel genetic correlations because of the activation of environmentally dependent genes. To test whether and how genetic correlations among stress resistance and life history traits constrain evolutionary adaptation, we used three populations of D. simulans selected for 20 generations in constant, predictable and unpredictable daily fluctuating thermal regimes and tested each of these selected populations in the same three thermal regimes. We explored the relationship between genetic correlations between traits and the evolutionary potential of D. simulans by comparing genetic correlation matrices in flies selected and tested in different thermal test regimes. We observed genetic correlations mainly between productivity, body size, starvation and desiccation tolerance, suggesting that adaptation to the three thermal regimes was affected by correlations between these traits. We also found that the correlations between some traits such as body size and productivity or starvation tolerance and productivity were determined by test regime rather than selection regime that is expected to limit genetic adaptation to thermal regimes in these traits. The results of this study suggest that several traits and several environments are needed to explore adaptive responses, as genetic and environmentally induced correlations between traits as results obtained in one environment cannot be used to predict the response of the same population in another environment.

  3. Elaboration of the Environmental Stress Hypothesis–Results from a Population-Based 6-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Matthias; Jekauc, Darko; Worth, Annette; Woll, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to contribute to the elaboration of the Environmental Stress Hypothesis framework by testing eight hypotheses addressing the direct impact of gross motor coordination problems in elementary-school on selected physical, behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in adolescence. Results are based on a longitudinal sample of 940 participants who were (i) recruited as part of a population-based representative survey on health, physical fitness and physical activity in childhood and adolescence, (ii) assessed twice within 6 years, between the ages of 6 and 10 years old as well as between the ages of 12 and 16 years old (Response Rate: 55.9%) and (iii) classified as having gross motor coordination problems (N = 115) or having no gross motor coordination problems (N = 825) at baseline. Motor tests from the Körperkoordinationstest, measures of weight and height, a validated physical activity questionnaire as well as the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire were conducted. Data were analyzed by use of binary logistic regressions. Results indicated that elementary-school children with gross motor coordination problems show a higher risk of persistent gross motor coordination problems (OR = 7.99, p elementary-school children without gross motor coordination problems. However, elementary-school children with gross motor coordination problems did not show a significantly higher risk of peer problems (OR = 1.35, p = 0.164) or diminished prosocial behavior (OR = 1.90, p = 0.168) in adolescence, respectively in comparison to elementary-school children without gross motor coordination problems. This study is the first to provide population-based longitudinal data ranging from childhood to adolescence in the context of the Environmental Stress Hypothesis which can be considered a substantial methodological progress. In summary, gross motor coordination problems represent a serious issue for a healthy transition from childhood to adolescence which

  4. Effect of environmental enrichment exposure on neuronal morphology of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and stressed rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Pamidi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental enrichment (EE exposure is known to influence the structural changes in the neuronal network of hippocampus. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EE exposure on the streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic and stressed rat hippocampus. Methods: Male albino rats of Wistar strain (4-5 weeks old were grouped into normal control (NC, vehicle control (VC, diabetes (DI, diabetes + stress (DI + S, diabetes + EE (DI + E, and diabetes + stress + EE (DI + S + E groups (n = 8 in each group. Rats were exposed to stress and EE after inducing diabetes with STZ (40 mg/kg. Rats were sacrificed on Day 30 and brain sections were processed for cresyl violet staining to quantify the number of surviving neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus (DH regions of hippocampus. Results: A significant (p < 0.001 decrease in the number of survived neurons was noticed in DI (CA1, 34.06 ± 3.2; CA3, 36.1 ± 3.62; DH, 9.83 ± 2.02 as well as DI + S (CA1, 14.03 ± 3.12; CA3, 20.27 ± 4.09; DH, 6.4 ± 1.21 group rats compared to NC rats (CA1, 53.64 ± 2.96; CA3, 62.1 ± 3.34; DH, 21.11 ± 1.03. A significant (p < 0.001 increase in the number of survived neurons was observed in DI + E (CA1, 42.3 ± 3.66; CA3, 46.73 ± 4.74; DH, 17.03 ± 2.19 and DI + S + E (CA1, 29.69 ± 4.47; CA3, 36.73 ± 3.89; DH, 12.23 ± 2.36 group rats compared to DI and DI + S groups, respectively. Conclusions: EE exposure significantly reduced the amount of neuronal damage caused by complications of diabetes and stress to the neurons of hippocampus.

  5. The white mullet (Mugil curema) as biological indicator to assess environmental stress in tropical coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gasca, Alejandra; Ríos-Sicairos, Julián; Hernández-Cornejo, Rubí; Cunha, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Jesús N; Plascencia-González, Héctor; de la Parra, Luz María García; Abad-Rosales, Selene; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    Several coastal lagoons and estuaries in Mexico receive untreated domestic and industrial discharges which contain complex mixtures of contaminants. In order to assess the effects of chemical contamination, we used the White mullet (Mugil curema) as biological indicator. We worked in two estuaries located in Northwest Mexico: Urias (highly polluted) and Teacapan (less polluted, therefore used as reference site). We measured several endpoints at different levels of biological organization: vitellogenin transcription in males as biomarker of estrogenic contamination, as well as reproductive, morphological (deformities), morphometric, and meristic parameters. Total RNA was isolated from the liver, and a partial sequence of the mullet vitellogenin gene was obtained; gene expression was analyzed by quantitative PCR. At the same time, gonad samples were analyzed by histologic techniques to determine sex ratios and the reproductive cycle stage. The reproductive season was detected from February to June in both sites, but the gonadosomatic index was consistently higher in Teacapan. Sex ratios were female-biased in both estuaries, and one intersex gonad and several malformations were found in fish from Urias. Vitellogenin gene transcription in males was detected in both sites, although gene expression was slightly higher in Urias. The results obtained in this study indicate that biological effects of contamination are evident in fish, environmental estrogens may be present in both estuaries, and the white mullet is useful as biological indicator to identify and characterize environmental stressors in tropical coastal ecosystems.

  6. The Elaborated Environmental Stress Hypothesis as a Framework for Understanding the Association between Motor Skills and Internalizing Problems: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Oreste Mancini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poor motor skills have been shown to be associated with a range of psychosocial issues, including internalizing problems (anxiety and depression. While well-documented empirically, our understanding of why this relationship occurs remains theoretically underdeveloped. The Elaborated Environmental Stress Hypothesis by Cairney, Rigoli, and Piek (2013 provides a promising framework that seeks to explain the association between motor skills and internalizing problems, specifically in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD. The framework posits that poor motor skills predispose the development of internalizing problems via interactions with intermediary environmental stressors. At the time the model was proposed, limited direct evidence was available to support or refute the framework. Several studies and developments related to the framework have since been published. This mini-review seeks to provide an up-to-date overview of recent developments related to the Elaborated Environmental Stress Hypothesis. We briefly discuss the past research that led to its development, before moving to studies that have investigated the framework since it was proposed. While originally developed within the context of DCD in childhood, recent developments have found support for the model in community samples. Through the reviewed literature, this article provides support for the Elaborated Environmental Stress Hypothesis as a promising theoretical framework that explains the psychosocial correlates across the broader spectrum of motor ability. This evidence promotes the external validity of the framework for use across the broader spectrum of motor ability. However, given its recent conceptualisation, ongoing evaluation of the Elaborated Environmental Stress Hypothesis is recommended.

  7. Environmental heat stress enhances mental fatigue during sustained attention task performing: evidence from an ASL perfusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shaowen; Li, Min; Li, Guoying; Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Jiang, Qingjun; Li, Li; Yang, Zhen; Sun, Gang

    2015-03-01

    This study was to investigate the potential enhancing effect of heat stress on mental fatigue progression during sustained attention task using arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging. Twenty participants underwent two thermal exposures in an environmental chamber: normothermic (NT) condition (25°C, 1h) and hyperthermic (HT) condition (50°C, 1h). After thermal exposure, they performed a twenty-minute psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) in the scanner. Behavioral analysis revealed progressively increasing subjective fatigue ratings and reaction time as PVT progressed. Moreover, heat stress caused worse performance. Perfusion imaging analyses showed significant resting-state cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations after heat exposure. Specifically, increased CBF mainly gathered in thalamic-brainstem area while decreased CBF predominantly located in fronto-parietal areas, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and medial frontal cortex. More importantly, diverse CBF distributions and trend of changes between both conditions were observed as the fatigue level progressed during subsequent PVT task. Specifically, higher CBF and enhanced rising trend were presented in superior parietal lobe, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, while lower CBF or inhibited rising trend was found in dorsolateral frontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe and thalamic-brainstem areas. Furthermore, the decrease of post-heat resting-state CBF in fronto-parietal cortex was correlated with subsequent slower reaction time, suggesting prior disturbed resting-state CBF might be indicator of performance potential and fatigue level in following task. These findings may provide proof for such a view: heat stress has a potential fatigue-enhancing effect when individual is performing highly cognition-demanding attention task.

  8. The role of stress proteins in responses of a montane willow leaf beetle to environmental temperature variation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elizabeth P Dahlhoff; Nathan E Rank

    2007-04-01

    The heat shock response is a critical mechanism by which organisms buffer effects of variable and unpredictable environmental temperatures. Upregulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) increases survival after exposure to stressful conditions in nature, although benefits of Hsp expression are often balanced by costs to growth and reproductive success. Hsp-assisted folding of variant polypeptides may prevent development of unfit phenotypes; thus, some differences in Hsp expression among natural populations of ectotherms may be due to interactions between enzyme variants (allozymes) and Hsps. In the Sierra willow leaf beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis, which lives in highly variable thermal habitats at the southern edge of their range in the Eastern Sierra Nevada, California, allele frequencies at the enzyme locus phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) vary across a climatic latitudinal gradient. PGI allozymes differ in kinetic properties, and expression of a 70 kDa Hsp differs between populations, along elevation gradients, and among PGI genotypes. Differences in Hsp70 expression among PGI genotypes correspond to differences in thermal tolerance and traits important for reproductive success, such as running speed, survival and fecundity. Thus, differential Hsp expression among genotypes may allow functionally important genetic variation to persist, allowing populations to respond effectively to environmental change.

  9. Genomic Comparison of Indigenous African and Northern European Chickens Reveals Putative Mechanisms of Stress Tolerance Related to Environmental Selection Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Damarius S; Weigend, Steffen; Simianer, Henner; Weigend, Annett; Rothschild, Max; Schmidt, Carl; Ashwell, Chris; Persia, Mike; Reecy, James; Lamont, Susan J

    2017-05-05

    Global climate change is increasing the magnitude of environmental stressors, such as temperature, pathogens, and drought, that limit the survivability and sustainability of livestock production. Poultry production and its expansion is dependent upon robust animals that are able to cope with stressors in multiple environments. Understanding the genetic strategies that indigenous, noncommercial breeds have evolved to survive in their environment could help to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying biological traits of environmental adaptation. We examined poultry from diverse breeds and climates of Africa and Northern Europe for selection signatures that have allowed them to adapt to their indigenous environments. Selection signatures were studied using a combination of population genomic methods that employed FST , integrated haplotype score (iHS), and runs of homozygosity (ROH) procedures. All the analyses indicated differences in environment as a driver of selective pressure in both groups of populations. The analyses revealed unique differences in the genomic regions under selection pressure from the environment for each population. The African chickens showed stronger selection toward stress signaling and angiogenesis, while the Northern European chickens showed more selection pressure toward processes related to energy homeostasis. The results suggest that chromosomes 2 and 27 are the most diverged between populations and the most selected upon within the African (chromosome 27) and Northern European (chromosome 2) birds. Examination of the divergent populations has provided new insight into genes under possible selection related to tolerance of a population's indigenous environment that may be baselines for examining the genomic contribution to tolerance adaptions. Copyright © 2017 Fleming et al.

  10. Hepato-Nephrocitic System: A Novel Model of Biomarkers for Analysis of the Ecology of Stress in Environmental Biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Domingues, Caio Eduardo da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Bombus presents a serious global decline of populations and even loss of species. This phenomenon is complex and multifactorial: environmental degradation due to increasing cultivation and grazing areas, indiscriminate use of agrochemicals, and a plethora of xenobiotics daily discharged in the environment. We proposed that bees have an integrated cell system, which ensures protection against chemical stressors up to a certain limit. Therefore, this hypothesis was tested, exposing workers of Bombus morio to cadmium, a harmful trace metal nowadays widespread in our society. The workers were kept in BOD (26°C, RH 70%, in the dark), fed ad libitum, and divided into a control group (n = 20) and an experimental group (n = 20). For the first group, we offered 2 mL of distilled water; for the experimental groups, 2 mL of cadmium at 1 ppb. In relation to the control group, exposed bees showed that their fat body and hemocytes responded in synchronization with pericardial cells in a topographical and temporal cascade of events, where the fat body is the first barrier against xenobiotics, followed by pericardial cells. The immune cells participate throughout the process. To this system, we proposed the name of hepato-nephrocitic system (HNS), which may explain many phenomena that remain unclear in similar research with Apis mellifera and other species of bees, as shown in this paper. The bee's HNS is a system of highly responsive cells to toxicants, considered a novel parameter for the study of the ecology of stress applied in environmental management.

  11. Southwest: a region under stress. [Analysis of environmental, resource-revenues, and water-resources issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.; Kneese, A.V.

    1978-05-01

    The southwestern states of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Arizona share some of the nation's richest natural resources and the poorest people. One goal in the development of the area's resources will be to provide a means of raising the economic level of these people. Three major regional issues (environmental preservation, resource revenues, and water resources) must be faced in terms of the conflicting claims of the states involved. A summary of these issues illustrates the emotional and political strains that have developed. Justification for optimism is seen in the adaptability of new water users, the institutional evolution toward more flexibility in the water rights market, and the growing sophistication and assertiveness of interested parties determined to see that all positions are heard. 14 references.

  12. Responses to abiotic environmental stresses among phylloplane and soil isolates of Beauveria bassiana from two holm oak ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bravo, María; Garrido-Jurado, Inmaculada; Valverde-García, Pablo; Enkerli, Jürg; Quesada-Moraga, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    The response of entomopathogenic mitosporic ascomycete (EMAs) to abiotic stresses might be adapted to the microhabitats in which they inhabit. In phylloplane, these organisms are more exposed to such stresses than they are in soil, which may have led to adaptation to this environment. In the present work, we investigate whether Beauveria bassiana genotype or isolation habitat, i.e., soil or phylloplane, within the same geographic area influences their responses to key environmental stresses, such as temperature, moisture and ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which can affect their successful use in microbial control. Twenty isolates of B. bassiana obtained from the soil and phylloplane in two ecosystems from southern Spain (holm oak dehesa and a reforested area) were selected to study the population distribution of these isolates and evaluate their thermal, humidity and UV-B requirements. Molecular characterization was conducted by using elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), the intergenic nuclear region Bloc and 15 microsatellite primers. The cluster analysis based on concatenated EF-1α and Bloc sequences grouped the 20 isolates into five clades within B. basiana, with Clades a, b, d and e containing both soil and phylloplane isolates and Clade c including three phylloplane isolates. The dendrogram and the minimal spanning network generated from the genetic distances among multilocus genotypes showed four divergent groups corresponding to the five clades obtained based on the sequence data (Clades b and d were represented in the same group), with a high degree of shared alleles within groups and few alleles shared among groups. Although no relationship was found between MLG and the habitat (soil or phylloplane) of isolation, isolates grouped into Clade c, all of which were collected from phylloplane, formed a separate group of MLGs. To investigate our hypothesis, the responses to temperature (germination and colony growth evaluated in the range 15-35°C), water activity

  13. Human Performance under Climatic Stress and the Fallacy of the ’Average’ Soldier: Potentially Serious Implications for Military Operations in Extreme Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-13

    3E16110221808 Envir~on. Strum Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760 Physical Fitness and Med.Pac .nu II. CONTROLLING OFPPICZ N AME AND ADORE$S2SRPRTOT US Army...comparison of the orientation of American and Soviet research on human behavior in extreme cold suggests that cultura ] and other background factors can account

  14. Peroxisomal Monodehydroascorbate Reductase. Genomic Clone Characterization and Functional Analysis under Environmental Stress Conditions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.; Sandalio, Luisa M.; del Río, Luis A.

    2005-01-01

    In plant cells, ascorbate is a major antioxidant that is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) is the enzymatic component of this cycle involved in the regeneration of reduced ascorbate. The identification of the intron-exon organization and the promoter region of the pea (Pisum sativum) MDAR 1 gene was achieved in pea leaves using the method of walking polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA. The nuclear gene of MDAR 1 comprises nine exons and eight introns, giving a total length of 3,770 bp. The sequence of 544 bp upstream of the initiation codon, which contains the promoter and 5′ untranslated region, and 190 bp downstream of the stop codon were also determined. The presence of different regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the gene might indicate distinct responses to various conditions. The expression analysis in different plant organs by northern blots showed that fruits had the highest level of MDAR. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of pea leaves transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens having the binary vectors pGD, which contain the autofluorescent proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein with the full-length cDNA for MDAR 1 and catalase, indicated that the MDAR 1 encoded the peroxisomal isoform. The functional analysis of MDAR by activity and protein expression was studied in pea plants grown under eight stress conditions, including continuous light, high light intensity, continuous dark, mechanical wounding, low and high temperature, cadmium, and the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. This functional analysis is representative of all the MDAR isoforms present in the different cell compartments. Results obtained showed a significant induction by high light intensity and cadmium. On the other hand, expression studies, performed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated differential expression patterns

  15. Proteomic analysis of chemical priming of drought stress resistance in crab apple seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental stresses, such as extreme temperatures, drought, and salinity, are among the most important factors affecting both tree vigor and fruit quality. The ability of plants to resist these stresses can be significantly enhanced by the application of specific chemical compounds. This process...

  16. Explicit control of adaptive automation under different levels of environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Jürgen; Kao, Chung-Shan; Wastell, David; Nickel, Peter

    2011-08-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of three different forms of explicit control of adaptive automation under low- and high-stress conditions, operationalised by different levels of noise. In total, 60 participants were assigned to one of three types of automation design (free, prompted and forced choice). They were trained for 4 h on a highly automated simulation of a process control environment, called AutoCAMS. This was followed by a 4-h testing session under noise exposure and quiet conditions. Measures of performance, psychophysiology and subjective reactions were taken. The results showed that all three modes of explicit control of adaptive automation modes were able to attenuate the negative effects of noise. This was partly due to the fact that operators opted for higher levels of automation under noise. It also emerged that forced choice showed marginal advantages over the two other automation modes. Statement of Relevance: This work is relevant to the design of adaptive automation since it emphasises the need to consider the impact of work-related stressors during task completion. During the presence of stressors, different forms of operator support through automation may be required than under more favourable working conditions.

  17. Blood Volume: Importance and Adaptations to Exercise Training, Environmental Stresses and Trauma/Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawka, Michael N.; Convertino, Victor A.; Eichner, E. Randy; Schnieder, Suzanne M.; Young, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the influence of several perturbations (physical exercise, heat stress, terrestrial altitude, microgravity, and trauma/sickness) on adaptations of blood volume (BV), erythrocyte volume (EV), and plasma volume (PV). Exercise training can induced BV expansion; PV expansion usually occurs immediately, but EV expansion takes weeks. EV and PV expansion contribute to aerobic power improvements associated with exercise training. Repeated heat exposure induces PV expansion but does not alter EV. PV expansion does not improve thermoregulation, but EV expansion improves thermoregulation during exercise in the heat. Dehydration decreases PV (and increases plasma tonicity) which elevates heat strain and reduces exercise performance. High altitude exposure causes rapid (hours) plasma loss. During initial weeks at altitude, EV is unaffected, but a gradual expansion occurs with extended acclimatization. BV adjustments contribute, but are not key, to altitude acclimatization. Microgravity decreases PV and EV which contribute to orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity in astronauts. PV decreases may result from lower set points for total body water and central venous pressure, which EV decrease bay result form increased erythrocyte destruction. Trauma, renal disease, and chronic diseases cause anemia from hemorrhage and immune activation, which suppressions erythropoiesis. The re-establishment of EV is associated with healing, improved life quality, and exercise capabilities for these injured/sick persons.

  18. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  19. Comparative analysis of naturally occurring L-amino acid osmolytes and their D-isomers on protection of Escherichia coli against environmental stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hanief Md Shahjee; Kakoli Banerjee; Faizan Ahmad

    2002-09-01

    Adaptation to high salinity and low or high temperature is essential for bacteria to survive. Accumulation of exogenous osmolytes is one of the ways that helps bacteria to survive under such extracellular stress. We have analysed the capability of various L-amino acids and their D-isomers to act as osmolytes and thus enable Escherichia coli cells to survive under various stress conditions. E. coli cells were grown in the presence or absence of L- and D-proline, alanine, serine and lysine under salt, heat and cold stresses. Of the various amino acids tested, L-proline, closely followed by L-serine turned out to be highly protective against environmental stresses. L-proline provided excellent protection (95%) against salt stress, followed by cold (60%) and heat (40%) stresses. D-amino acids on the other hand, proved to be highly inhibitory under stress conditions. Thus L-amino acids were found to be growth protectants under stress while their D-isomers were inhibitory during stress as well as normal conditions.

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of environmental stress-responsive SAP gene family encoding A20/AN1 zinc finger proteins in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Manoj K; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2009-08-01

    Characterization of genes responsive to stress is important for efforts on improving stress tolerance of plants. To address components involved in stress tolerance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a stress-responsive gene family encoding A20/AN1 zinc finger proteins was characterized. In the present study, 13 members of this gene family were cloned from tomato cultivar Pusa Ruby and named as Stress Associated Protein (SAP) genes. Out of 13 genes, 12 have been mapped on their respective chromosomes. Expression of these genes in response to cold, heat, salt, desiccation, wounding, abscisic acid, oxidative and submergence stresses was analysed. All tomato SAP genes were found to be responsive to one or other type of environmental stress. The phylogenetic analysis of these genes, along with their orthologs from Solanaceae species suggests the presence of a common set of SAP genes in the studied Solanaceae species. The present study characterizes a SAP gene family, which encodes A20/AN1 zinc finger containing proteins from tomato for the first time. Genes showing high expression in response to a particular stress can be exploited for improving stress tolerance of tomato and other Solanaceae members.

  1. Assessment of the effects of multiple extreme floods on flow and transport processes under competing flood protection and environmental management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tongbi; Carr, Kara J; Ercan, Ali; Trinh, Toan; Kavvas, M Levent; Nosacka, John

    2017-07-11

    Extreme floods are regarded as one of the most catastrophic natural hazards and can result in significant morphological changes induced by pronounced sediment erosion and deposition processes over the landscape. However, the effects of extreme floods of different return intervals on the floodplain and river channel morphological evolution with the associated sediment transport processes are not well explored. Furthermore, different basin management action plans, such as engineering structure modifications, may also greatly affect the flood inundation, sediment transport, solute transport and morphological processes within extreme flood events. In this study, a coupled two-dimensional hydrodynamic, sediment transport and morphological model is applied to evaluate the impact of different river and basin management strategies on the flood inundation, sediment transport dynamics and morphological changes within extreme flood events of different magnitudes. The 10-year, 50-year, 100-year and 200-year floods are evaluated for the Lower Cache Creek system in California under existing condition and a potential future modification scenario. Modeling results showed that select locations of flood inundation within the study area tend to experience larger inundation depth and more sediment is likely to be trapped in the study area under potential modification scenario. The proposed two dimensional flow and sediment transport modeling approach implemented with a variety of inflow conditions can provide guidance to decision-makers when considering implementation of potential modification plans, especially as they relate to competing management strategies of large water bodies, such as the modeling area in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental stress affects DNA methylation of a CpG rich promoter region of serotonin transporter gene in a nurse cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka S Alasaari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shift-working nurses are exposed to a stressful work environment, which puts them at an increased risk for burnout and depression. We explored the effect of environmental stress on serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 promoter methylation among nurses from high and low work stress environments. METHODOLOGY: Using bisulfite sequencing, we investigated the methylation status of five CpG residues of a CpG-rich region in the promoter of SLC6A4 by comparing female shift working nurses from a high work stress environment (n = 24 to low work stress environment (n = 25. We also analyzed the association of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism at 5' end of SLC6A4. Work stress was assessed by the Karasek's Model and possible signs of burnout or depression were measured by the Maslach Burnout Index General Survey and Beck Depression Index. Methylation levels were assessed by bisulfite sequencing of DNA extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. Restriction enzyme treatment followed by standard PCR was used to identify 5-HTTLPR genotypes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nurses in the high stress environment had significantly lower promoter methylation levels at all five CpG residues compared to nurses in the low stress environment (p<0.01. There was no significant interaction of 5-HTTLPR genotype and work stress with methylation (p = 0.58. In unadjusted (bivariate analysis, burnout was not significantly associated to methylation levels. However, when mutually adjusted for both, burnout and work stress were significant contributors (p = 0.038 and p<0.0001 respectively to methylation levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that environmental stress is concurrent with decreased methylation of the SLC6A4 promoter. This may lead to increased transcriptional activity of the gene, increased reuptake of serotonin from synaptic clefts, and termination of the activity of serotonin. This could present a possible coping mechanism for environmental stress in humans that

  3. Stability of ranitidine tablets subjected to stress and environmental conditions, by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonté, M G; Yuln, G; Mandrile, A; Longo, R; Cingolani, A

    2001-01-01

    High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) method was applied in this study to comparatively evaluate the stability of tablets in their original package which 150 mg of Ranitidine from six different pharmaceutical laboratories in the market, according to ICH conditions for accelerated testing: 40 degrees C, 75% RH with and without light for six months. The stability at environmental conditions was evaluated for a twelve-month period, with and without light, with the same purpose. Ranitidine is widely used to treat peptic ulcer diseases. Ranitidine is susceptible to degradation under the influence of light, humidity and temperature. The chromatographic conditions were: RP-18 column of 250 mm yen 4 mm ID and a particle size of 5 mm; mobile phase of Acetonitrile-Ammonium acetate solution (0.2 M) (70:30; v/v) (pH*6) adjusted with glacial acetic acid; flow rate of 1 ml min-1; 25 degrees C of temperature; detection at 322 nm; injection volume of 20 ml, using height peak as the integration parameter. The results obtained at six months indicate that the stability of Ranitidine depends on the correct formulation and the primary container. The remaining content of Ranitidine, dissolved percentage in vitro and total impurity percentage were determined by HPLC. Organoleptic characteristics were visually examined. The proposed analytical method was validated and linearity, precision and selectivity were determined. Degradation products were detected.

  4. Deformation of Cases in High Capacitance Value Wet Tantalum Capacitors under Environmental Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Internal gas pressure in hermetic wet tantalum capacitors is created by air, electrolyte vapor, and gas generated by electrochemical reactions at the electrodes. This pressure increases substantially with temperature and time of operation due to excessive leakage currents. Deformation of the case occurs when the internal pressure exceeds pressure of the environments and can raise significantly when a part operates in space. Contrary to the cylinder case wet tantalum capacitors that have external sealing by welding and internal sealing provided by the Teflon bushing and crimping of the case, no reliable internal sealing exists in the button case capacitors. Single seal design capacitors are used for high capacitance value wet tantalum capacitors manufactured per DLA L&M drawings #04003, 04005, and 10011, and require additional analysis to assure their reliable application in space systems. In this work, leakage currents and case deformation of button case capacitors were measured during different environmental test conditions. Recommendations for derating, screening and qualification testing are given. This work is a continuation of a series of NEPP reports related to quality and reliability of wet tantalum capacitors.

  5. Genetic Diversity Caused by Environmental Stress in Natural Populations of Niupidujuan as Revealed by RAPD Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ying-da; XING Ming; YANG Zhi-yong; LIU Yan-fei; CHEN Xia

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex environmental factors are generally expected to have significant effects on genetic diversity of plant populations.In this study,randomly amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD) technique was used to reveal the genetic diversity in the same species of four populations collected from Niupidujuan(Rhododendron chrysanthum) at different altitudes,an endangered species,endemic to Northeast China.Initially,twenty informative and reproducible primers were chosen for final RAPD analysis.A total of 152 clear bands were obtained,including 143 polymorphic ones.With the help of POPGENE software,the poly rate was calculated to be 94.07% and the evenness of amplified bands for every primer was 6.8.Additionally,the mean observed number of alleles was 1.7265 with an effective number of 1.3608.An examination of the gene indicated a diversity of 0.2162 with an information diversity index of 0.3313.For these data,the clustering blurred analysis was performed with the aid of NTSYS-pc software to define the Nei's gene diversity and the Shannon information diversity index of the four plant populations.The relationships between the genetic diversity indexes on the one hand and the geographic and climatic factors on the other hand were estimated by the Pearson correlation with SPSS 11.0 software.The results of the correlation analysis show that there were significant(P<0.05) or highly significant(P<0.01) correlations between each of the genetic diversity indexes and the different temperature which were mainly caused by the altitude different populations located.These data highlight the importance of native populations in shaping the spatial genetic structure in Niupidujuan.

  6. Quantifying environmental stress-induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Sabolis, A.; Reed, R.; Kamykowski, D.

    2015-02-01

    We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana), prymnesiophyte strains (Pleurochrysis carterae), dinoflagellate strains (Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum), and cryptophyte strains (Rhodomonas salina), while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana). Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and temperature (18 to 30 °C) regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~ 2 × 10-17 g(cell)-1h-1 (~ 35 μg (g Chl a)-1 h-1) for isoprene and ~ 5 × 10-19 g (cell)-1 h-1 (~ 1 μg (g Chl a)-1) h-1) for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~ 70% from α-pinene, ~ 20% for d-limonene, and 250 μmol m-2 s-1) irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day, most of the species showed a distinct increase in production rates within the first 4 h while, on the second day, the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause imbalance in chloroplasts and force primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global marine isoprene and monoterpene emissions based on phytoplankton

  7. Quantifying environmental stress induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Sabolis, A.; Reed, R.; Kamykowski, D.

    2014-09-01

    We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains - Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana; prymnesiophyte strains - Pleurochrysis carterae; dinoflagellate strains - Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum; cryptophyte strains - Rhodomonas salina, while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains - Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m-2s-1) and temperature (18 to 30 °C) regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~2x1017g (cell)-1h-1 (~35 μg (g Chl a)-1h-1) for isoprene and ~5x10-19 g (cell)-1h-1 (~1μg (g Chl a)-1) h-1) for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~70% from α-pinene, ~20% for d-limonene, and 250 μmol m-2s-1) irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day most of the species showed distinct increase in production rates within the first four hours, while on the second day the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause disbalance in chloroplasts and forces primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global marine isoprene and monoterpene emissions based on phytoplankton physiological

  8. Biomarkers of environmental stress in gills of ribbed mussel Aulacomya atra atra (Nuevo Gulf, Northern Patagonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratano, Erica; Gil, Mónica N; Malanga, Gabriela

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we assessed in gills of native ribbed mussels Aulacomya atra atra from three sites within Nuevo Gulf (Northern Patagonia) several biomarkers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid radicals (LR), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and metallothionein (MT). Furthermore, concentrations of main trace metals (Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb) were quantified in mussel tissue. Results showed significant induction of SOD, GST, MT and MDA, as well as, higher concentration of Fe, Al and Cd in winter than in summer. The high MDA content measured in mussels from Folías Wreck seemed to be caused by the very high levels of Fe that would come from the corrosion of the vessel. Mussels from the control site Punta Cuevas presented the lowest levels of Cd and the highest of Al in winter. Despite positive correlations were found between Al and GST and MT, no spatial differentiation was detected in those biomarkers. On the other hand, MT was only related to Al been most likely influenced by environmental variables than by the trace metals. It has to be highlighted that the relationship detected among water temperature, nutrients and antioxidant responses in gills is probably related to the fact that this tissue is in direct contact with water and it is sensitive to its fluctuations. Taking into account that mussel gill is a tissue actively proliferating and the first target of contaminants present in water, so that changes in its antioxidant system can provide an earlier warning signal than in other tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic and environmental causes of individual differences in daily life positive affect and reward experience and its overlap with stress-sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Wichers, Marieke

    2012-09-01

    Momentary positive affect (PA) and reward experience may underlie subjective wellbeing, and index mental health resilience. This study examines their underlying sources of variation and the covariation with stress-sensitivity. The experience sampling method was used to collect multiple appraisals of mood and daily life events in 520 female twins. Structural equation model fitting was employed to determine sources of variation of PA, reward experience, and the association between reward experience and stress-sensitivity. PA was best explained by shared and non-shared environmental factors, and reward experience by non-shared environmental factors only, although the evidence was also suggestive of a small genetic contribution. Reward experience and stress-sensitivity showed no association. PA was not heritable. Most-if not all-variance of reward experience was explained by environmental influences. Stress-sensitivity, indexing depression vulnerability, and reward experience were non-overlapping, suggesting that resilience traits are independent from stress-sensitivity levels in a general population sample.

  10. Two-dimensional Electrophoresis Analysis of Proteins in Response to Cold Stress in Extremely Cold-resistant Winter Wheat Dongnongdongmai 1 Tillering Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cang Jing; Yu Jing; Liu Li-jie; Yang Yang; Cui Hong; Hao Zai-bin; Li Zhuo-fu

    2012-01-01

    The overwintering survival ratio of the cultivar Dongnongdongmai 1 with strong cold-resistance in paramos of Heilongjiang Province in China are over 85%. The tillering nodes are the most important organs for overwintering survival of winter wheat, because there are more substances associated with cold resistance in tillering nodes than those in leaves and roots. Proteins in the tillering nodes of the cold-resistant cultivar Dongnongdongmai 1 grown under field conditions with or without any lowtemperature stress were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. In the range of pH 4-7, the expression of 37 proteins showed obvious difference (±more than two fold) in the proteomic maps of cold-stressed and non-stressed tillering nodes, including a new protein spot. All proteins exhibiting the difference in expression were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, followed by a database search for protein identification and function prediction. Five groups of proteins were confirmed, namely stress-related proteins (22%), metabolism-associated proteins (35%), and signaling molecules (24%), cell wall-binding proteins (5%), unclear proteins (14%). This indicated that tillering node cells supported the energy requirements of plant growth and stress resistance by signal transduction adapting to metabolism and structure.

  11. Fluctuating Asymmetry in Two Common Freshwater Fishes as a Biological Indicator of Urbanization and Environmental Stress within the Middle Chattahoochee Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Lutterschmidt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deviations in bilateral symmetry or fluctuating asymmetry of an organism may result under environmental stressors that reduce developmental homeostasis and stability. Anthropogenic stressors such as increased urbanization can negatively impact environmental quality of aquatic ecosystems. Researchers have stressed the value in finding easy, accurate and inexpensive methods for assessing potential stress within ecosystems. Here we use fluctuating asymmetry (FA as a useful quantitative tool in assessing the environmental quality and potential urban-based stressors within eight creeks of the Bull and Upatoi Creeks Watershed within the larger watershed of the Middle Chattahoochee. Using Geographic Information System (GIS, we characterize land-use patterns and a decreasing urbanization gradient as related to each creek’s eastward position from Columbus, Georgia. We collected two common fishes (redbreast sunfish; Lepomis auritus and bluegill; Lepomis macrochirus, measured both metric and meristic traits and investigated if the degree of FA in these two common fishes correlated with the urbanization gradient across creeks. We found significant differences in FA among creeks with one of the highest FA measures for the most urban creek. Principal component analysis (PCA scores of urbanization and water chemistry were regressed against FA scores. We found no significant relationship between urbanization and FA nor environmental water chemistry and FA among creeks. We comment on the use of FA as a potential response variable and biological indicator of environmental stress within this watershed.

  12. Demographic cost and mechanisms of adaptation to environmental stress in resurrected Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Sommer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic feature of the Daphnia (Crustacea: Cladocera life cycle are the so-called ephippia, which are fertilised eggs that need to undergo diapause. When they are shed by the female, they sink to the lake bottom, where they may become embedded in the sediment and may remain viable for decades. Extracting and hatching ephippia in the laboratory and subjecting resurrected lineages to conditions representative of historic lake environments allows retrospective investigation of life-history responses to environmental change. Here we reanalyse data from such a resurrection experiment (Piscia et al., 2015: Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 94:46–51. Contemporary and past lineages of Daphnia galeata Sars 1863 were obtained from Lake Orta (Italy, a deep, subalpine lake with a well-documented history of industrial copper pollution. Experimental Daphnia were subjected to three copper treatments representative of two levels of historic as well as to current (i.e., unpolluted lake conditions, and life-table data were collected. With these data at hand, we first estimated vital rates (survival, maturation, and reproduction and used these rates to project the asymptotic population growth rates (λ for each population-by-treatment combination. Next, we performed life-table response experiments (LTRE to estimate the contributions of the vital rates to observed differences in λ. Finally, we used elasticity analysis to explore the functional relationship between λ and each of the vital rates. We found that survival rates were only compromised at elevated copper levels. Moreover, past, resurrected Daphnia had a higher λ at low copper concentrations compared to unpolluted conditions, but a lower λ when exposed to high copper levels. Contemporary Daphnia, on the other hand, only reproduced successfully in unpolluted water. Under these conditions, however, they had a higher population growth rate than the past Daphnia, suggesting a cost of copper

  13. Quantifying environmental stress induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Meskhidze

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains – Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana; prymnesiophyte strains – Pleurochrysis carterae; dinoflagellate strains – Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum; cryptophyte strains – Rhodomonas salina, while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains – Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m−2s−1 and temperature (18 to 30 °C regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~2x1017g (cell−1h−1 (~35 μg (g Chl a−1h−1 for isoprene and ~5x10−19 g (cell−1h−1 (~1μg (g Chl a−1 h−1 for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~70% from α-pinene, ~20% for d-limonene, and −2s−1 and a gradual increase at high (>250 μmol m−2s−1 irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day most of the species showed distinct increase in production rates within the first four hours, while on the second day the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause disbalance in chloroplasts and forces primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global

  14. The role of the hypothalamic nitric oxide in the pressor responses elicited by acute environmental stress in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, T; Takeda, K; Harada, S; Hatta, T; Moriguchi, J; Miki, S; Morimoto, S; Itoh, H; Nakata, T; Sasaki, S; Nakagawa, M

    2002-08-09

    We quantitatively investigated the change in nitric oxide (NO) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and its effect on cardiovascular regulation during shaker stress (SS) using brain microdialysis in awake rats. Male Wistar rats were fed either N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.7 g/L) or tap water for 2 weeks. Two days after implantation of an arterial catheter and guide shaft, a microdialysis probe was placed to perfuse the PVN with degassed Ringer solution at 2 microl/min in awake normotensive Wistar (CONTROL) and chronic L-NAME-treated hypertensive rats. After the rat was placed in a plastic cage set on a shaker, the blood pressure and heart rate was monitored and 10-min SS was loaded at a frequency of 200 cycles/min. Dialysate samples were analyzed by NO analyzer (based on the Griess reaction) every 10 min, and NOx (NO(2)(-) + NO(3)(-)) was measured. Plasma NOx was also measured before and after SS. Pressor responses elicited by SS were significantly greater in L-NAME-treated rats than in the CONTROL. Although NOx in the PVN dialysate were increased by SS in the CONTROL, these responses were attenuated in chronic L-NAME-treated rats. Resting plasma NOx were higher in the CONTROL than in L-NAME-treated rats. SS elicited no difference between two groups in plasma NOx. These results indicated that NO within the PVN, but not in systemic circulation, may play a role on the attenuation of the pressor responses elicited by SS. The dysfunction of NO release within the PVN may, in part, play a role in the exaggerated pressor responses in acute environmental stress.

  15. Diverse Transcriptional Programs Associated with Environmental Stress and Hormones in the Arabidopsis Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Chae; Sylvia Sudat; Sandrine Dudoit; Tong Zhu; Sheng Luan

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes more than 600 receptor-like kinase (RLK) genes, by far the dominant class of receptors found in land plants. Although similar to the mammalian receptor tyrosine kinases, plant RLKs are serine/threonine kinases that represent a novel signaling innovation unique to plants and, consequently, an excellent opportunity to understand how extracellular signaling evolved and functions in plants as opposed to animals. RLKs are predicted to be major components of the signaling pathways that allow plants to respond to environmental and developmental conditions. However, breakthroughs in identifying these processes have been limited to only a handful of individual RLKs. Here, we used a Syngenta custom Arabidopsis GeneChip array to compile a detailed profile of the transcriptional activity of 604 receptor-like kinase genes after exposure to a cross-section of known signaling factors in plants,including abiotic stresses, biotic stresses, and hormones. In the 68 experiments comprising the study, we found that 582 of the 604 RLK genes displayed a two-fold or greater change in expression to at least one of 12 types of treatments, thereby providing a large body of experimental evidence for targeted functional screens of individual RLK genes. We investigated whether particular subfamilies of RLK genes are responsive to specific types of signals and found that each subfamily displayed broad ranges of expression, as opposed to being targeted towards particular signal classes. Finally, by analyzing the divergence of sequence and gene expression among the RLK subfamilies, we present evidence as to the functional basis for the expansion of the RLKs and how this expansion may have affected conservation and divergences in their function. Taken as a whole, our study represents a preliminary, working model of processes and interactions in which the members of the RLK gene family may be involved, where such information has remained elusive for so many

  16. Response and adaptation of photosynthesis, respiration, and antioxidant systems to elevated CO2 with environmental stress in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhu eXu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that plant photosynthesis and respiration are two fundamental and crucial physiological processes, while the critical role of the antioxidant system in response to abiotic factors is still a focus point for investigating physiological stress. Although one key metabolic process and its response to climatic change have already been reported and reviewed, an integrative review, including several biological processes at multiple scales, has not been well reported. The current review will present a synthesis focusing on the underlying mechanisms in the responses to elevated CO2 at multiple scales, including molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and individual aspects, particularly, for these biological processes under elevated CO2 with other key abiotic stresses, such as heat, drought, and ozone pollution, as well as nitrogen limitation. The present comprehensive review may add timely and substantial information about the topic in recent studies, while it presents what has been well established in previous reviews. First, an outline of the critical biological processes, and an overview of their roles in environmental regulation, is presented. Second, the research advances with regard to the individual subtopics are reviewed, including the response and adaptation of the photosynthetic capacity, respiration, and antioxidant system to CO2 enrichment alone, and its combination with other climatic change factors. Finally, the potential applications for plant responses at various levels to climate change are discussed. The above issue is currently of crucial concern worldwide, and this review may help in a better understanding of how plants deal with elevated CO2 using other mainstream abiotic factors, including molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and whole individual processes, and the better management of the ecological environment, climate change, and sustainable development.

  17. Elaboration of the Environmental Stress Hypothesis – Results from a population-based 6-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wagner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to contribute to the elaboration of the Environmental Stress Hypothesis framework by testing eight hypotheses addressing the direct impact of gross motor coordination problems in elementary-school on selected physical, behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in adolescence. Results are based on a longitudinal sample of 940 participants who were (i recruited as part of a population-based representative survey on health, physical fitness and physical activity in childhood and adolescence, (ii assessed twice within 6 years, between the ages of 6 and 10 years old as well as between the ages of 12 and 16 years old (Response Rate: 55.9% and (iii classified as having gross motor coordination problems (N = 115 or having no gross motor coordination problems (N = 825 at baseline.Motor tests from the Körperkoordinationstest, measures of weight and height, a validated physical activity questionnaire as well as the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire were conducted. Data were analyzed by use of binary logistic regressions. Results indicated that elementary-school children with gross motor coordination problems show a higher risk of persistent gross motor coordination problems (OR = 7.99, p < .001, avoiding organized physical activities (OR = 1.53, p < .05, an elevated body mass (OR = 1.78, p < .05, bonding with sedentary peers (OR = 1.84, p < .01 as well as emotional (OR = 1.73, p < .05 and conduct (OR = 1.79, p < .05 problems in adolescence in comparison to elementary-school children without gross motor coordination problems. However, elementary-school children with gross motor coordination problems did not show a significantly higher risk of peer problems (OR = 1.35, p = .164 or diminished prosocial behavior (OR = 1.90, p = .168 in adolescence, respectively in comparison to elementary-school children without gross motor coordination problems. This study is the first to provide population-based longitudinal data ranging from

  18. Long-term environmental stability of residual stress of SiN{sub x}, SiO{sub x}, and Ge thin films prepared at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, M. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)], E-mail: mariusz@ee.uwa.edu.au; Musca, C.A.; Dell, J.M.; Faraone, L. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2009-06-25

    Optical measurements of thin-film-stress-induced substrate bending have been employed in a characterization of long-term environmental stability of stress of low-temperature (<125 deg. C) plasma enhanced vapor deposited (PECVD) SiN{sub x}, as well as thermally evaporated SiO{sub x}, and Ge thin films for applications in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) fabricated on temperature sensitive, non-standard substrates. It has been found that in comparison to their stress values measured at atmospheric conditions, PECVD SiN{sub x} layers prepared below {approx}100 deg. C as well as layers of thermally evaporated Ge exhibit significantly more tensile (less compressive) stress values when measured in vacuum, which are reversible upon re-exposure to an atmospheric, dry nitrogen, helium, argon, or oxygen ambient. Raising the deposition temperature above {approx}100 deg. C results in PECVD SiN{sub x} stress being stable in vacuum and dry nitrogen storage, which is complemented by stress stability in laboratory atmosphere for films deposited above {approx}125 deg. C. Stress of thermally evaporated SiO{sub x} layers is stable in vacuum and undergoes compressive stress development in either dry nitrogen or laboratory air.

  19. ER signaling is activated to protect human HaCaT keratinocytes from ER stress induced by environmental doses of UVB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mera, Kentaro [Department of Dermatology, Field of Sensory Organology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tada, Ko-ichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro [Department of Dermatology, Field of Sensory Organology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro, E-mail: takurok@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Dermatology, Field of Sensory Organology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)

    2010-06-25

    Proteins are folded properly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Various stress such as hypoxia, ischemia and starvation interfere with the ER function, causing ER stress, which is defined by the accumulation of unfolded protein (UP) in the ER. ER stress is prevented by the UP response (UPR) and ER-associated degradation (ERAD). These signaling pathways are activated by three major ER molecules, ATF6, IRE-1 and PERK. Using HaCaT cells, we investigated ER signaling in human keratinocytes irradiated by environmental doses of ultraviolet B (UVB). The expression of Ero1-L{alpha}, an upstream signaling molecule of ER stress, decreased at 1-4 h after 10 mJ/cm{sup 2} irradiation, indicating that the environmental dose of UVB-induced ER stress in HaCaT cells, without growth retardation. Furthermore, expression of intact ATF6 was decreased and it was translocated to the nuclei. The expression of XBP-1, a downstream molecule of IRE-1, which is an ER chaperone whose expression is regulated by XBP-1, and UP ubiquitination were induced by 10 mJ/cm{sup 2} UVB at 4 h. PERK, which regulates apoptosis, was not phosphorylated. Our results demonstrate that UVB irradiation generates UP in HaCaT cells and that the UPR and ERAD systems are activated to protect cells from UVB-induced ER stress. This is the first report to show ER signaling in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes.

  20. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and response of antioxidants as ROS-scavengers during environmental stress in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik eDas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS were initially recognized as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. In recent years, it has become apparent that ROS plays an important signaling role in plants, controlling processes such as growth, development and especially response to biotic and abiotic environmental stimuli. The major members of the ROS family include free radicals like O2● −, OH● and non-radicals like H2O2 and 1O2. The ROS production in plants is mainly localized in the chloroplast, mitochondria and peroxisomes. There are secondary sites as well like the endoplasmic reticulum, cell membrane, cell wall and the apoplast. The role of the ROS family is that of a double edged sword; while they act as secondary messengers in various key physiological phenomena, they also induce oxidative damages under several environmental stress conditions like salinity, drought, cold, heavy metals, UV irradiation etc., when the delicate balance between ROS production and elimination, necessary for normal cellular homeostasis, is disturbed. The cellular damages are manifested in the form of degradation of biomolecules like pigments, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA, which ultimately amalgamate in plant cellular death. To ensure survival, plants have developed efficient antioxidant machinery having two arms, (i enzymatic components like superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, glutathione reductase (GR, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; (ii non-enzymatic antioxidants like ascorbic acid (AA, reduced glutathione (GSH, α-tocopherol, carotenoids, flavonoids and the osmolyte proline. These two components work hand in hand to scavenge ROS. In this review, we emphasize on the different types of ROS, their cellular production sites, their targets, and their scavenging mechanism mediated by both the branches of the antioxidant systems, highlighting the potential

  1. Hepato-Nephrocitic System: A Novel Model of Biomarkers for Analysis of the Ecology of Stress in Environmental Biomonitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camargo Abdalla

    Full Text Available Bombus presents a serious global decline of populations and even loss of species. This phenomenon is complex and multifactorial: environmental degradation due to increasing cultivation and grazing areas, indiscriminate use of agrochemicals, and a plethora of xenobiotics daily discharged in the environment. We proposed that bees have an integrated cell system, which ensures protection against chemical stressors up to a certain limit. Therefore, this hypothesis was tested, exposing workers of Bombus morio to cadmium, a harmful trace metal nowadays widespread in our society. The workers were kept in BOD (26°C, RH 70%, in the dark, fed ad libitum, and divided into a control group (n = 20 and an experimental group (n = 20. For the first group, we offered 2 mL of distilled water; for the experimental groups, 2 mL of cadmium at 1 ppb. In relation to the control group, exposed bees showed that their fat body and hemocytes responded in synchronization with pericardial cells in a topographical and temporal cascade of events, where the fat body is the first barrier against xenobiotics, followed by pericardial cells. The immune cells participate throughout the process. To this system, we proposed the name of hepato-nephrocitic system (HNS, which may explain many phenomena that remain unclear in similar research with Apis mellifera and other species of bees, as shown in this paper. The bee's HNS is a system of highly responsive cells to toxicants, considered a novel parameter for the study of the ecology of stress applied in environmental management.

  2. Durable Reliability of Jack-up Platforms. The impact of Fatigue, Fracture and Effect of Extreme Environmental Loads on the Structural Reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabakhty, N.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of factors is governing the operational conditions of jack-up platforms. The platforms are moved to different locations, which are causing changes in water depth, environmental and seabed conditions, drilling depths, payload etc. Insight should be gained in how the different factors affect

  3. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems provide against oxidative stress, the addition of diamide or hydrogen peroxide were used concomitant with acid challenge at pH 2.5 to determine bacterial survival. Diamide and hydrogen peroxide both de...

  4. Upper Extremity Injuries in Gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Megan R; Avery, Daniel; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2017-02-01

    Gymnastics is a unique sport, which loads the wrist and arms as weight-bearing extremities. Because of the load demands on the wrist in particular, stress fractures, physeal injury, and overuse syndromes may be observed. This spectrum of injury has been termed "gymnast's wrist," and incorporates such disorders as wrist capsulitis, ligamentous tears, triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, chondromalacia of the carpus, stress fractures, distal radius physeal arrest, and grip lock injury.

  5. In vitro assessment of environmental stress of persistent organic pollutants on the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kuntong; Ding, Liang; Zhang, Lingli; Zhang, Mei; Yi, Meisheng; Wu, Yuping

    2015-12-25

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are detected ubiquitously and are linked to range of adverse health effects. The Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin inhabited the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), China, where high concentrations of POPs have been reported. This study evaluated the threats posed by POPs in the environment to the dolphin using an in vitro system. We selected BNF(β-naphthoflavone) and four POPs (DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes), CHLs(chlorides), HCHs(hexachlorocyclohexanes) and HCB(hexachlorobenzene)) which had been accumulated in the dolphin with high concentrations to treat the cultured skin fibroblast cells (ScSF cells) of the dolphin, and investigated the expression patterns of the ecological stress biomarkers CYP1A1, AHR and HSP70 in the cell line. The results showed that CYP1A1 was up-regulated after being exposed to different concentrations of BNF, DDTs and HCHs. CHLs, HCHs and HCB promoted AHR expression. HSP70 expression was increased by high concentrations of BNF and DDTs. Moreover, comet assay experiments revealed that DDTs produced higher degree of DNA damage to ScSF cells than other POPs, implying that the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin in the PRE has been threatened by POPs accumulated in the body, especially by DDTs. Our results provided important information to assess the risk of the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin raised by environmental POPs in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Theoretical prediction of energy release rate for interface crack initiation by thermal stress in environmental barrier coatings for ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, E.; Umeno, Y.

    2017-05-01

    As weight reduction of turbines for aircraft engines is demanded to improve fuel consumption and curb emission of carbon dioxide, silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) are drawing enormous attention as high-pressure turbine materials. For preventing degradation of SiC/SiC, environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for ceramics are deposited on the composites. The purpose of this study is to establish theoretical guidelines for structural design which ensures the mechanical reliability of EBC. We conducted finite element method (FEM) analysis to calculate energy release rates (ERRs) for interface crack initiation due to thermal stress in EBC consisting of Si-based bond coat, Mullite and Ytterbium (Yb)-silicate layers on a SiC/SiC substrate. In the FEM analysis, the thickness of one EBC layer was changed from 25 μm to 200 μm while the thicknesses of the other layers were fixed at 25 μm, 50 μm and 100 μm. We compared ERRs obtained by the FEM analysis and a simple theory for interface crack in a single-layered structure where ERR is estimated as nominal strain energy in the coating layers multiplied by a constant factor (independent of layer thicknesses). We found that, unlike the case of single-layered structures, the multiplication factor is no longer a constant but is determined by the combination of consisting coating layer thicknesses.

  7. Monitoring exposure of northern cardinals, Cardinalis cardinalis, to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides: enzyme activity, reactivations, and indicators of environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Jonathan D; Farris, Jerry L

    2005-07-01

    Northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) frequently use agricultural field edges in northeast Arkansas, USA, and may be at risk of exposure to cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides. We monitored northern cardinal exposure to ChE-inhibiting pesticides by comparing plasma total ChE (TChE) activity to reference-derived benchmarks and TChE reactivations. Total ChE and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were measured for 128 plasma samples from 104 northern cardinals from nine study sites. Of birds sampled from sites treated with ChE-inhibiting pesticides, 4.3% of the samples had TChE activities below the diagnostic threshold (2 standard deviations [SD] below the reference mean) and 8.7% of the samples had TChE reactivations. No difference was found in TChE (p = 0.553) and AChE (p = 0.288) activity between treated and reference sites; however, activity varied among treated sites (p = 0.003). These data do not suggest uniform exposure to individuals, but rather exposure was variable and likely influenced by mitigating factors at individual and site scales. Furthermore, monitoring of TChE reactivation appeared to be a more sensitive indicator of exposure than the diagnostic threshold. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) was greater at agricultural sites than reference sites (p = 0.016), supporting the hypothesis that FA may be useful for assessing a combination of habitat- and contaminant-related environmental stress.

  8. Drastic changes in aquatic bacterial populations from the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (Mexico) in response to long-term environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Eguiarte, Luis E; Bonilla-Rosso, German; Souza, Valeria

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the changes of aquatic microbial community composition in response to changes in temperature and ultraviolet irradiation is relevant for predicting biogeochemical modifications in the functioning of natural microbial communities under global climate change scenarios. Herein we investigate shifts in the bacterioplankton composition in response to long-term changes in temperature and UV radiation. For this purpose, 15 mesocosms were seeded with composite aquatic microbial communities from natural pools within the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (Mexican Chihuahuan desert) and were subject to different temperatures and UV conditions. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were obtained from water samples at the mid-point (4 months) and the end of the experiment (8 months). An increase in bacterial diversity over time was found in the treatment of constant temperature and UV protection, which suggests that stable environments promote the establishment of complex and diverse bacterial community. Drastic changes in the phylogenetic bacterioplankton composition and structure were observed in response to fluctuating temperature and increasing UV radiation and temperature. Fluctuating temperature induced the largest decrease of bacterial richness during the experiment, indicating that frequent temperature changes drive the reduction in abundance of several species, most notably autotrophs. The long-term impact of these environmental stresses reduced diversity and selected for generalist aquatic bacterial populations, such as Porphyrobacter. These changes at the community level occur at an ecological time scale, suggesting that under global warming scenarios cascade effects on the food web are possible if the microbial diversity is modified.

  9. Environmental Enrichment Modified Epigenetic Mechanisms in SAMP8 Mouse Hippocampus by Reducing Oxidative Stress and Inflammaging and Achieving Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Puigoriol-Illamola, Dolors; Palomera-Ávalos, Verónica; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Companys-Alemany, Júlia; Camins, Antonio; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M. Teresa; Pallàs, Mercè

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in life expectancy, aging and age-related cognitive impairments are becoming one of the most important issues for human health. At the same time, it has been shown that epigenetic mechanisms are emerging as universally important factors in life expectancy. The Senescence Accelerated Mouse P8 (SAMP8) strain exhibits age-related deterioration evidenced in learning and memory abilities and is a useful model of neurodegenerative disease. In SAMP8, Environmental Enrichment (EE) increased DNA-methylation levels (5-mC) and reduced hydroxymethylation levels (5-hmC), as well as increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Likewise, we found changes in the hippocampal gene expression of some chromatin-modifying enzyme genes, such as Dnmt3b. Hdac1. Hdac2. Sirt2, and Sirt6. Subsequently, we assessed the effects of EE on neuroprotection-related transcription factors, such as the Nuclear regulatory factor 2 (Nrf2)–Antioxidant Response Element pathway and Nuclear Factor kappa Beta (NF-κB), which play critical roles in inflammation. We found that EE produces an increased expression of antioxidant genes, such as Hmox1. Aox1, and Cox2, and reduced the expression of inflammatory genes such as IL-6 and Cxcl10, all of this within the epigenetic context modified by EE. In conclusion, EE prevents epigenetic changes that promote or drive oxidative stress and inflammaging. PMID:27803663

  10. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T; Zheng, Yunzhen; Ordway, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the microtubule

  11. Manipulating environmental stresses and stress tolerance of microalgae for enhanced production of lipids and value-added products-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bailing; Wan, Chun; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Chang, Jo-Shu; Bai, Fengwu; Zhao, Xinqing

    2017-05-31

    Microalgae have promising potential to produce lipids and a variety of high-value chemicals. Suitable stress conditions such as nitrogen starvation and high salinity could stimulate synthesis and accumulation of lipids and high-value products by microalgae, therefore, various stress-modification strategies were developed to manipulate and optimize cultivation processes to enhance bioproduction efficiency. On the other hand, advancements in omics-based technologies have boosted the research to globally understand microalgal gene regulation under stress conditions, which enable further improvement of production efficiency via genetic engineering. Moreover, integration of multi-omics data, synthetic biology design, and genetic engineering manipulations exhibits a tremendous potential in the betterment of microalgal biorefinery. This review discusses the process manipulation strategies and omics studies on understanding the regulation of metabolite biosynthesis under various stressful conditions, and proposes genetic engineering of microalgae to improve bioproduction via manipulating stress tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals unique metabolic features in the Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts associated with environmental survival and stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haili

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptosporidium parvum is a globally distributed zoonotic parasite and an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients. Little is known on the metabolic dynamics of the parasite, and study is hampered by the lack of molecular and genetic tools. Here we report the development of the first Agilent microarray for C. parvum (CpArray15K that covers all predicted ORFs in the parasite genome. Global transcriptome analysis using CpArray15K coupled with real-time qRT-PCR uncovered a number of unique metabolic features in oocysts, the infectious and environmental stage of the parasite. Results Oocyst stage parasites were found to be highly active in protein synthesis, based on the high transcript levels of genes associated with ribosome biogenesis, transcription and translation. The proteasome and ubiquitin associated components were also highly active, implying that oocysts might employ protein degradation pathways to recycle amino acids in order to overcome the inability to synthesize amino acids de novo. Energy metabolism in oocysts was featured by the highest level of expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH gene. We also studied parasite responses to UV-irradiation, and observed complex and dynamic regulations of gene expression. Notable changes included increased transcript levels of genes involved in DNA repair and intracellular trafficking. Among the stress-related genes, TCP-1 family members and some thioredoxin-associated genes appear to play more important roles in the recovery of UV-induced damages in the oocysts. Our observations also suggest that UV irradiation of oocysts results in increased activities in cytoskeletal rearrangement and intracellular membrane trafficking. Conclusions CpArray15K is the first microarray chip developed for C. parvum, which provides the Cryptosporidium research community a needed tool to study the parasite transcriptome and functional genomics. CpArray15K has been

  13. Family violence, war, and natural disasters: a study of the effect of extreme stress on children's mental health in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Claudia; Jacob, Nadja; Schauer, Elisabeth; Kohila, Mahendran; Neuner, Frank

    2008-05-02

    The consequences of war violence and natural disasters on the mental health of children as well as on family dynamics remain poorly understood. Aim of the present investigation was to establish the prevalence and predictors of traumatic stress related to war, family violence and the recent Tsunami experience in children living in a region affected by a long-lasting violent conflict. In addition, the study looked at whether higher levels of war violence would be related to higher levels of violence within the family and whether this would result in higher rates of psychological problems in the affected children. 296 Tamil school children in Sri Lanka's North-Eastern provinces were randomly selected for the survey. Diagnostic interviews were carried out by extensively trained local Master level counselors. PTSD symptoms were established by means of a validated Tamil version of the UCLA PTSD Index. Additionally, participants completed a detailed checklist of event types related to organized and family violence. 82.4% of the children had experienced at least one war-related event. 95.6% reported at least one aversive experience out of the family violence spectrum. The consequences are reflected in a 30.4% PTSD and a 19.6% Major Depression prevalence. Linear regression analyses showed that fathers' alcohol intake and previous exposure to war were significantly linked to the amount of maltreatment reported by the child. A clear dose-effect relationship between exposure to various stressful experiences and PTSD was found in the examined children. Data argue for a relationship between war violence and violent behavior inflicted on children in their families. Both of these factors, together with the experience of the recent Tsunami, resulted as significant predictors of PTSD in children, thus highlighting the detrimental effect that the experience of cumulative stress can have on children's mental health.

  14. Family violence, war, and natural disasters: A study of the effect of extreme stress on children's mental health in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauer Elisabeth

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The consequences of war violence and natural disasters on the mental health of children as well as on family dynamics remain poorly understood. Aim of the present investigation was to establish the prevalence and predictors of traumatic stress related to war, family violence and the recent Tsunami experience in children living in a region affected by a long-lasting violent conflict. In addition, the study looked at whether higher levels of war violence would be related to higher levels of violence within the family and whether this would result in higher rates of psychological problems in the affected children. Methods 296 Tamil school children in Sri Lanka's North-Eastern provinces were randomly selected for the survey. Diagnostic interviews were carried out by extensively trained local Master level counselors. PTSD symptoms were established by means of a validated Tamil version of the UCLA PTSD Index. Additionally, participants completed a detailed checklist of event types related to organized and family violence. Results 82.4% of the children had experienced at least one war-related event. 95.6% reported at least one aversive experience out of the family violence spectrum. The consequences are reflected in a 30.4% PTSD and a 19.6% Major Depression prevalence. Linear regression analyses showed that fathers' alcohol intake and previous exposure to war were significantly linked to the amount of maltreatment reported by the child. A clear dose-effect relationship between exposure to various stressful experiences and PTSD was found in the examined children. Conclusion Data argue for a relationship between war violence and violent behavior inflicted on children in their families. Both of these factors, together with the experience of the recent Tsunami, resulted as significant predictors of PTSD in children, thus highlighting the detrimental effect that the experience of cumulative stress can have on children's mental health.

  15. Compact genome of the Antarctic midge is likely an adaptation to an extreme environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joanna L.; Peyton, Justin T.; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Teets, Nicholas M.; Yee, Muh-Ching; Johnston, J. Spencer; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Lee, Richard E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The midge, Belgica antarctica, is the only insect endemic to Antarctica, and thus it offers a powerful model for probing responses to extreme temperatures, freeze tolerance, dehydration, osmotic stress, ultraviolet radiation and other forms of environmental stress. Here we present the first genome assembly of an extremophile, the first dipteran in the family Chironomidae, and the first Antarctic eukaryote to be sequenced. At 99 megabases, B. antarctica has the smallest insect genome sequenced thus far. Although it has a similar number of genes as other Diptera, the midge genome has very low repeat density and a reduction in intron length. Environmental extremes appear to constrain genome architecture, not gene content. The few transposable elements present are mainly ancient, inactive retroelements. An abundance of genes associated with development, regulation of metabolism and responses to external stimuli may reflect adaptations for surviving in this harsh environment. PMID:25118180

  16. Compact genome of the Antarctic midge is likely an adaptation to an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joanna L; Peyton, Justin T; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Teets, Nicholas M; Yee, Muh-Ching; Johnston, J Spencer; Bustamante, Carlos D; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2014-08-12

    The midge, Belgica antarctica, is the only insect endemic to Antarctica, and thus it offers a powerful model for probing responses to extreme temperatures, freeze tolerance, dehydration, osmotic stress, ultraviolet radiation and other forms of environmental stress. Here we present the first genome assembly of an extremophile, the first dipteran in the family Chironomidae, and the first Antarctic eukaryote to be sequenced. At 99 megabases, B. antarctica has the smallest insect genome sequenced thus far. Although it has a similar number of genes as other Diptera, the midge genome has very low repeat density and a reduction in intron length. Environmental extremes appear to constrain genome architecture, not gene content. The few transposable elements present are mainly ancient, inactive retroelements. An abundance of genes associated with development, regulation of metabolism and responses to external stimuli may reflect adaptations for surviving in this harsh environment.

  17. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Batista de Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops.

  18. Early weaning to reduce tissue mobilization in lactating sows and milk supplementation to enhance pig weaning weight during extreme heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J D; Boyd, R D; Cabrera, R; Allee, G L

    2003-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of reduced lactation length and supplemental milk replacer (MR) during high ambient temperatures. Thirty nine primiparous and 100 multiparous sows (PIC, Franklin, KY, C-22) were used in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Treatments consisted of two lactation room temperatures (21 degrees C [TN] and 32 degrees C [HOT]), two lactation lengths (14 or 19 d), and two parity groups (primiparous, multiparous). Pigs were either: 1) sow-reared to 19 d or 2) sow-reared to 14 d, and then reared to 19 d with MR after sow removal. All sows were fed the same diet (1.07% lysine, 3,366 kcal of ME/kg). Sows were weighed and ultrasound for backfat thickness (BF) and longissimus muscle area (LMA) within 6 h after farrowing and at the time of sow removal (d 14 or 19). Pigs were individually weighed at weaning (d 19) and after a 47-d nursery period (d 66). Heat stress increased sow weight loss (-13.35 kg, P Milk replacer decreased the difference normally observed in 19-d weights between primiparous and multiparous sow-reared pigs in TN. Pigs fed MR in both environments and nursing multiparous sows had improved weight gains in the nursery compared with pigs nursing sows to 19 d (428 vs. 406 g/d, respectively; P milk replacer to preserve the sow and to restore pig weaning weights and nursery end weights under heat stress.

  19. Opposite extremes in ethylene/nitric oxide ratio induce cell death in suspension culture and root apices of tomato exposed to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poór, P; Borbély, P; Kovács, Judit; Papp, Anita; Szepesi, Ágnes; Takács, Z; Tari, Irma

    2014-12-01

    The plant hormone ethylene or the gaseous signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) may enhance salt stress tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, first of all K+/Na+ ratio of tissues. Ethylene and NO accumulation increased in the root apices and suspension culture cells of tomato at sublethal salt stress caused by 100 mM NaCl, however, the induction phase of programmed cell death (PCD) was different at lethal salt concentration. The production of ethylene by root apices and the accumulation of NO in the cells of suspension culture did not increase during the initiation of PCD after 250 mM NaCl treatment. Moreover, cells in suspension culture accumulated higher amount of reactive oxygen species which, along with NO deficiency contributed to cell death induction. The absence of ethylene in the apical root segments and the absence of NO accumulation in the cell suspension resulted in similar ion disequilibrium, namely K+/Na+ ratio of 1.41 ± 0.1 and 1.68 ± 0.3 in intact plant tissues and suspension culture cells, respectively that was not tolerated by tomato.

  20. SENSITIVITY TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS OF PRATA,JAPIRA AND VITÓRIA BANANA CULTIVARS PROVEN BY CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRISCILA NOBRES DOS SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the physiological responses to environmental stress during pre- and post-harvest of the following banana cultivars: Prata (AAB, Japira (AAAB and Vitoria (AAAB. Analyses were carried out on young plants at vegetative stage (daughter-plant and adult plants at reproductive stage (motherplant. The experimental design was completely randomized. In the in vivo pre-harvest analysis were used seven replications, in a factorial scheme (3x2x2, three cultivars and two stages (vegetative and reproductive and two collection periods (March and June. For the analysis of post-harvest quality were used five replications in a factorial design (3x2x5, corresponding to three cultivars, two development stages and five periods of post-harvest analysis, carried out every two days from stage 4 of fruit ripening. The chlorophyll a fluorescence emission kinetics showed low photochemical performance of the three cultivars in June, a period characterized by lower temperatures and water deficit. Prata was the cultivar with the lowest tolerance to abiotic physiological behavior changes, which also reflected in fruit quality, because there was a change in physical and physicochemical parameters. Japira and Vitoria cultivars showed similar physiological responses in the pre- and post-harvest periods, according to their phylogenetic proximity. The total performance index, i.e., the conservation of energy absorbed by PSII up to the reduction of the final PSI acceptors (PItotal and the di-malonic aldehyde (MDA content were significantly higher in Japira and Vitoria cultivars compared to Prata cultivar in the reproductive phase. There was no significant change in the potential quantum efficiency of PSII (FV / FM = jP0 among the three cultivars. It was concluded that Japira and Vitoria cultivars showed greater plasticity to tolerate or even adapt to abiotic variations keeping higher fruit yield. PItotal is the most sensitive parameter during

  1. Effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to extremely low-frequency electric fields on mismatch negativity component of the auditory event-related potentials: Relation to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Deniz; Gok, Deniz Kantar; Hidisoglu, Enis; Aslan, Mutay; Ozen, Sukru; Agar, Aysel; Yargicoglu, Piraye

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, the developmental effects of extremely low-frequency electric fields (ELF-EF) on visual and somatosensory evoked potentials in adult rats were studied. There is no study so far examining the effects of 50 Hz electric field (EF) on mismatch negativity (MMN) recordings after exposure of rats during development. Therefore, our present study aimed to investigate MMN and oxidative brain damage in rats exposed to EF (12 kV/m, 1 h/day). Rats were divided into four groups, namely control (C), prenatal (Pr), postnatal (Po), and prenatal+postnatal (PP). Pregnant rats of Pr and PP groups were exposed to EF during pregnancy. Following birth, rats of PP and Po groups were exposed to EF for three months. After exposure to EF, MMN was recorded by electrodes positioned stereotaxically to the surface of the dura, and then brain tissues were removed for histological and biochemical analyses. The MMN amplitude was higher to deviant tones than to standard tones. It was decreased in all experimental groups compared with the C group. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) levels were significantly increased in the Po group with respect to the C group, whereas they were significantly decreased in the PP group compared with Pr and Po groups. Protein carbonyl levels were significantly decreased in the PP group compared with C, Pr, and Po groups. EF decreased MMN amplitudes were possibly induced by lipid peroxidation.

  2. [Modification of bone quality by extreme physical stress. Bone density measurements in high-performance athletes using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, D; Reiter, A; Pfeil, J; Güssbacher, A; Niethard, F U

    1996-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporosis is still controversial. Rehabilitation programs which stress strengthening exercises as well as impact loading activities increase the bone mass. On the other side activity level early in life has not been proven to correlate with increased bone mineral content later in life. Little is known on the influence of high performance sports on the bone density especially in athletes with high demands on weight bearing of the spine. In (n = 40) internationally top ranked high performance athletes of different disciplines (n = 28 weight-lifters, n = 6 sports-boxers and n = 6 bicycle-racers) bone density measurements of the lumbar spine and the left hip were performed. The measurements were carried out by dual-photonabsorptiometry (DEXA; QDR 2000, Siemens) and evaluated by an interactive software-programme (Hologic Inc.). The results were compared to the measurements of 21 age-matched male control individuals. In the high performance weight lifters there was an increase of bone density compared to the control individuals of 23% in the Ward's triangle (p boxers had an increase up to 17% (lumbar spine), 9% (hip) and 7% (Wards' triangle). In the third athletes group (Tour de France-bikers) BMD was decreased 10% in the lumbar spine, 14% in the hip and 17% in the Wards' triangle. Our results show that training programs stressing axial loads of the skeletal system may lead to an increase of BMD in the spine and the hip of young individuals. Other authors findings, that the BMD of endurance athletes may decrease, is confirmed. Nevertheless the bikers BMD-loss of 10 to 17% was surprisingly high.

  3. System-Level Heat Transfer Analysis, Thermal- Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor. A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Soppet, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-03

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in April 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In this report, updates are discussed related to a system level preliminary finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical design-basis thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in NUREG-6909. The discussed models and results are very preliminary. Further advancement of the discussed model is required for more accurate life prediction of reactor components. This report only presents the work related to finite element modelling activities. However, in between multiple tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The related experimental results will be presented in the year-end report.

  4. Genome-wide identification of cassava R2R3 MYB family genes related to abscission zone separation after environmental-stress-induced abscission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenbin; Yang, Yiling; Li, Yayun; Wang, Gan; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) resist environmental stresses by shedding leaves in leaf pulvinus abscission zones (AZs), thus leading to adaptation to new environmental conditions. Little is known about the roles of cassava R2R3 MYB factors in regulating AZ separation. Herein, 166 cassava R2R3 MYB genes were identified. Evolutionary analysis indicated that the 166 R2R3 MYB genes could be divided into 11 subfamilies. Transcriptome analysis indicated that 26 R2R3 MYB genes were expressed in AZs across six time points during both ethylene- and water-deficit stress-induced leaf abscission. Comparative expression profile analysis of similar SOTA (Self Organizing Tree Algorithm) clusters demonstrated that 10 R2R3 MYB genes had similar expression patterns at six time points in response to both treatments. GO (Gene Ontology) annotation confirmed that all 10 R2R3 MYB genes participated in the responses to stress and ethylene and auxin stimuli. Analysis of the putative 10 R2R3 MYB promoter regions showed that those genes primarily contained ethylene- and stress-related cis-elements. The expression profiles of the genes acting downstream of the selected MYBs were confirmed to be involved in cassava abscission zone separation. All these results indicated that R2R3 MYB plays an important regulatory role in AZ separation.

  5. Genome-wide identification of cassava R2R3 MYB family genes related to abscission zone separation after environmental-stress-induced abscission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenbin; Yang, Yiling; Li, Yayun; Wang, Gan; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) resist environmental stresses by shedding leaves in leaf pulvinus abscission zones (AZs), thus leading to adaptation to new environmental conditions. Little is known about the roles of cassava R2R3 MYB factors in regulating AZ separation. Herein, 166 cassava R2R3 MYB genes were identified. Evolutionary analysis indicated that the 166 R2R3 MYB genes could be divided into 11 subfamilies. Transcriptome analysis indicated that 26 R2R3 MYB genes were expressed in AZs across six time points during both ethylene- and water-deficit stress-induced leaf abscission. Comparative expression profile analysis of similar SOTA (Self Organizing Tree Algorithm) clusters demonstrated that 10 R2R3 MYB genes had similar expression patterns at six time points in response to both treatments. GO (Gene Ontology) annotation confirmed that all 10 R2R3 MYB genes participated in the responses to stress and ethylene and auxin stimuli. Analysis of the putative 10 R2R3 MYB promoter regions showed that those genes primarily contained ethylene- and stress-related cis-elements. The expression profiles of the genes acting downstream of the selected MYBs were confirmed to be involved in cassava abscission zone separation. All these results indicated that R2R3 MYB plays an important regulatory role in AZ separation. PMID:27573926

  6. Environmental effects on the expression of life span and aging: an extreme contrast between wild and captive cohorts of Telostylinus angusticollis (Diptera: Neriidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Noriyoshi; Brassil, Chad E; Brooks, Robert C; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2008-09-01

    Most research on life span and aging has been based on captive populations of short-lived animals; however, we know very little about the expression of these traits in wild populations of such organisms. Because life span and aging are major components of fitness, the extent to which the results of many evolutionary studies in the laboratory can be generalized to natural settings depends on the degree to which the expression of life span and aging differ in natural environments versus laboratory environments and whether such environmental effects interact with phenotypic variation. We investigated life span and aging in Telostylinus angusticollis in the wild while simultaneously estimating these parameters under a range of conditions in a laboratory stock that was recently established from the same wild population. We found that males live less than one-fifth as long and age at least twice as rapidly in the wild as do their captive counterparts. In contrast, we found no evidence of aging in wild females. These striking sex-specific differences between captive and wild flies support the emerging view that environment exerts a profound influence on the expression of life span and aging. These findings have important implications for evolutionary gerontology and, more generally, for the interpretation of fitness estimates in captive populations.

  7. Association between occupational stress and musculoskeletal disorders in lower extremity%职业应激与下肢肌肉骨骼系统疾患的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余善法; 谷桂珍; 周文慧; 汪海生; 孙世义; 杨晓发; 周世义

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨职业应激与下肢肌肉骨骼系统疾患的关系.方法 采用横断面研究设计和自报式问卷调查方法对13家企业5338名工人进行整群调查,采用修订的工作内容问卷和付出-回报失衡模式问卷调查职业应激状况.采用肌肉骨骼系统疾患调查表调查过去1年内下肢肌肉骨骼系统疾患和不良姿势情况.使用logistic回归分析职业应激因素与下肢肌肉骨骼系统疾患检出率之间的关系.结果 2个职业应激模式主要因子中,躯体需求和付出是臀部疾患的危险因素,而工作控制是臀部疾患的保护因素.当2个模式的主要因素一起分析时,仅有躯体需求是臀部疾患的危险因素.以4种工作类型的分类变量进行分析时,工作紧张是臀部疾患的危险因素,而付出-回报失衡是臀和膝部疾患的危险因素.随着患病部位的增多,工作紧张和付出-回报失衡的危险增加.工作控制的保护作用随患病部位的增加而增大.以连续变量进行分析时,以躯体需求计算的工作紧张是臀部疾患的危险因素,而付出-回报失衡是臀和膝部疾患的危险因素.结论 职业应激与下肢肌肉骨骼系统疾患存在统计学意义的相关,下肢肌肉骨骼系统疾患的预防应考虑控制职业应激因素和增加工作控制.%Objective To explore the relationshio between occupational stress and musculoskeletal disorders in lower extremity.Methods The cross-sectional study was used to investigate 5338 workers in 13 factories and companies for prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in lower extremity,working postures and occupational stress were investigated with questionnaires for past year.Perceived occupational stress was evaluated by the Chinese version of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model Questionnaire.Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the associations between occupational stress and prevalence of

  8. Magnetic Logic Circuits for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program aims to demonstrate a new genre of all-magnetic logic circuits which are radiation-tolerant and capable of reliable operation in extreme environmental...

  9. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    McMichael, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental c...

  10. Extreme depletion of PIP3 accompanies the increased life span and stress tolerance of PI3K-null C. elegans mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet eBharill

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of animal longevity shows remarkable plasticity, in that a variety of genetic lesions are able to extend lifespan by as much as tenfold. Such studies have implicated several key signaling pathways that must normally limit longevity, since their disruption prolongs life. Little is known, however, about the proximal effectors of aging on which these pathways are presumed to converge, and to date, no pharmacologic agents even approach the life-extending effects of genetic mutation. In the present study, we have sought to define the downstream consequences of age-1 nonsense mutations, which confer 10-fold life extension to the nematode C. elegans ― the largest effect documented for any single mutation. Such mutations insert a premature stop codon upstream of the catalytic domain of the AGE-1/ p110α subunit of class-I PI3K. As expected, we do not detect class-I PI3K (and based on our sensitivity, it constitutes <14% of wild-type levels, nor do we find any PI3K activity as judged by immunodetection of phosphorylated AKT, which strongly requires PIP3 for activation by upstream kinases, or immunodetection of its product, PIP3. In the latter case, the upper 95%-confidence limit for PIP3 is 1.4% of the wild-type level. We tested a variety of commercially available PI3K inhibitors, as well as three phosphatidylinositol analogues (PIAs that are most active in inhibiting AKT activation, for effects on longevity and survival of oxidative stress. Of these, GDC-0941, PIA6 and PIA24 (each at 1 or 10 μM extended lifespan by 7–14%, while PIAs 6, 12 and 24 (at 1 or 10 μM increased survival time in 5-mM peroxide by 12–52%.These effects may have been conferred by insulinlike signaling, since a reporter regulated by the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor, SOD3::GFP, was stimulated by these PIAs in the same rank order (PIA24>PIA6>PIA12 as lifespan. A second reporter, PEPCK::GFP, was equally activated (~40% by all three.

  11. Effects of flotation-restricted environmental stimulation technique on stress-related muscle pain: what makes the difference in therapy--attention-placebo or the relaxation response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bood, Sven A; Sundequist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Anette; Nordstrom, Gun; Norlander, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential effects of attention-placebo on flotation tank therapy. Flotation-restricted environmental stimulation technique is a method whereby an individual lies in a floating tank and all stimuli are reduced to a minimum. Thirty-two patients were diagnosed as having stress-related muscular pain. In addition, 16 of the participants had received the diagnosis of burnout depression. The patients were treated with flotation-restricted environmental stimulation technique for six weeks. One-half of the patients were also given special attention for 12 weeks (high attention), while the remainder received attention for only six weeks (normal attention). The participants exhibited lowered blood pressure, reduced pain, anxiety, depression, stress and negative affectivity, as well as increased optimism, energy and positive affectivity. The results were largely unaffected by the degree of attention-placebo or diagnosis. It was concluded that flotation therapy is an effective, noninvasive method for treating stress-related pain, and that the method is not more affected by placebo than by other methods currently used in pain treatment. The treatment of both burnout depression and pain related to muscle tension constitutes a major challenge for the patient as well as the care provider, an area in which great gains can be made if the treatment is effective. Flotation therapy may constitute an integral part of such treatment.

  12. Environmental stress-mediated changes in transcriptional and translational regulation of protein synthesis in crop plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The research described in this final report focused on the influence of stress agents on protein synthesis in crop plants (primarily soybean). Investigations into the `heat shock` (HS) stress mediated changes in transcriptional and translocational regulation of protein synthesis coupled with studies on anaerobic water deficit and other stress mediated alterations in protein synthesis in plants provided the basis of the research. Understanding of the HS gene expression and function(s) of the HSPs may clarify regulatory mechanisms operative in development. Since the reproductive systems of plants if often very temperature sensitive, it may be that the system could be manipulated to provide greater thermotolerance.

  13. Extremely Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Extremely Preterm Birth Home For Patients Search FAQs Extremely Preterm Birth ... Spanish FAQ173, June 2016 PDF Format Extremely Preterm Birth Pregnancy When is a baby considered “preterm” or “ ...

  14. Plastic responses to four environmental stresses and cross-resistance in a laboratory population of Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubliy, Oleg A; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Kellermann, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    and desiccation hardening as well as acclimation to starvation had a cost under non-stressful conditions leading to reduced longevity. Cold acclimation did not affect longevity, although its effect was difficult to estimate precisely: during pretreatment at a low temperature, biological ageing of the flies might...... such as reduction of metabolic rate and accumulation of energy reserves might be involved. 6. The lack of cross-resistance induced by acclimation ⁄ hardening treatments suggests that in an environment with multiple stresses, evolution of shared protective systems associated with plastic responses may be constrained.......1. Acclimation or hardening to one stress in arthropods can lead to a plastic response, which confers increased resistance to other stresses. Such cross-resistance may indicate shared physiological resistance mechanisms and a possibility of joint evolution for resistance traits. 2. In this study...

  15. Transcriptome analysis in tardigrade species reveals specific molecular pathways for stress adaptations

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Förster; Daniela Beisser; Grohme, Markus A.; Chunguang Liang; Brahim Mali; Alexander Matthias Siegl; Engelmann, Julia C.; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Elham Schokraie; Tobias Müller; Martina Schnölzer; Schill, Ralph O.; Marcus Frohme; Thomas Dandekar

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade \\(Milnesium\\) \\(tardigradum\\) were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from \\(Hypsibius\\) \\(dujardini\\), revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardig...

  16. The Relationship between Personality Dimensions and Resiliency to Environmental Stress in Orange-Winged Amazon Parrots (Amazona amazonica), as Indicated by the Development of Abnormal Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussen, Victoria A; Mench, Joy A

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are popular companion animals, but are frequently relinquished because of behavioral problems, including abnormal repetitive behaviors like feather damaging behavior and stereotypy. In addition to contributing to pet relinquishment, these behaviors are important as potential indicators of diminished psychological well-being. While abnormal behaviors are common in captive animals, their presence and/or severity varies between animals of the same species that are experiencing the same environmental conditions. Personality differences could contribute to this observed individual variation, as they are known risk factors for stress sensitivity and affective disorders in humans. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between personality and the development and severity of abnormal behaviors in captive-bred orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica). We monitored between-individual behavioral differences in enrichment-reared parrots of known personality types before, during, and after enrichment deprivation. We predicted that parrots with higher scores for neurotic-like personality traits would be more susceptible to enrichment deprivation and develop more abnormal behaviors. Our results partially supported this hypothesis, but also showed that distinct personality dimensions were related to different forms of abnormal behavior. While neuroticism-like traits were linked to feather damaging behavior, extraversion-like traits were negatively related to stereotypic behavior. More extraverted birds showed resiliency to environmental stress, developing fewer stereotypies during enrichment deprivation and showing lower levels of these behaviors following re-enrichment. Our data, together with the results of the few studies conducted on other species, suggest that, as in humans, certain personality types render individual animals more susceptible or resilient to environmental stress. Further, this susceptibility/resiliency can have a long

  17. The Relationship between Personality Dimensions and Resiliency to Environmental Stress in Orange-Winged Amazon Parrots (Amazona amazonica, as Indicated by the Development of Abnormal Behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A Cussen

    Full Text Available Parrots are popular companion animals, but are frequently relinquished because of behavioral problems, including abnormal repetitive behaviors like feather damaging behavior and stereotypy. In addition to contributing to pet relinquishment, these behaviors are important as potential indicators of diminished psychological well-being. While abnormal behaviors are common in captive animals, their presence and/or severity varies between animals of the same species that are experiencing the same environmental conditions. Personality differences could contribute to this observed individual variation, as they are known risk factors for stress sensitivity and affective disorders in humans. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between personality and the development and severity of abnormal behaviors in captive-bred orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica. We monitored between-individual behavioral differences in enrichment-reared parrots of known personality types before, during, and after enrichment deprivation. We predicted that parrots with higher scores for neurotic-like personality traits would be more susceptible to enrichment deprivation and develop more abnormal behaviors. Our results partially supported this hypothesis, but also showed that distinct personality dimensions were related to different forms of abnormal behavior. While neuroticism-like traits were linked to feather damaging behavior, extraversion-like traits were negatively related to stereotypic behavior. More extraverted birds showed resiliency to environmental stress, developing fewer stereotypies during enrichment deprivation and showing lower levels of these behaviors following re-enrichment. Our data, together with the results of the few studies conducted on other species, suggest that, as in humans, certain personality types render individual animals more susceptible or resilient to environmental stress. Further, this susceptibility/resiliency can

  18. Effects of Relocation and Individual and Environmental Factors on the Long-Term Stress Levels in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes: Monitoring Hair Cortisol and Behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Yamanashi

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors associated with the long-term stress levels of captive animals is important from the view of animal welfare. In this study, we investigated the effects of relocation in addition to individual and environmental factors related to social management on long-term stress level in group-living captive chimpanzees by examining behaviors and hair cortisol (HC. Specifically, we conducted two studies. The first compared changes in HC levels before and after the relocation of 8 chimpanzees (Study 1 and the second examined the relationship between individual and environmental factors and individual HC levels in 58 chimpanzees living in Kumamoto Sanctuary (KS, Kyoto University (Study 2. We hypothesized that relocation, social situation, sex, and early rearing conditions, would affect the HC levels of captive chimpanzees. We cut arm hair from chimpanzees and extracted and assayed cortisol with an enzyme immunoassay. Aggressive behaviors were recorded ad libitum by keepers using a daily behavior monitoring sheet developed for this study. The results of Study 1 indicate that HC levels increased during the first year after relocation to the new environment and then decreased during the second year. We observed individual differences in reactions to relocation and hypothesized that social factors may mediate these changes. In Study 2, we found that the standardized rate of receiving aggression, rearing history, sex, and group formation had a significant influence on mean HC levels. Relocation status was not a significant factor, but mean HC level was positively correlated with the rate of receiving aggression. Mean HC levels were higher in males than in females, and the association between aggressive interactions and HC levels differed by sex. These results suggest that, although relocation can affect long-term stress level, individuals' experiences of aggression and sex may be more important contributors to long-term stress than

  19. Effects of Relocation and Individual and Environmental Factors on the Long-Term Stress Levels in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Monitoring Hair Cortisol and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Teramoto, Migaku; Morimura, Naruki; Hirata, Satoshi; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Idani, Gen'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors associated with the long-term stress levels of captive animals is important from the view of animal welfare. In this study, we investigated the effects of relocation in addition to individual and environmental factors related to social management on long-term stress level in group-living captive chimpanzees by examining behaviors and hair cortisol (HC). Specifically, we conducted two studies. The first compared changes in HC levels before and after the relocation of 8 chimpanzees (Study 1) and the second examined the relationship between individual and environmental factors and individual HC levels in 58 chimpanzees living in Kumamoto Sanctuary (KS), Kyoto University (Study 2). We hypothesized that relocation, social situation, sex, and early rearing conditions, would affect the HC levels of captive chimpanzees. We cut arm hair from chimpanzees and extracted and assayed cortisol with an enzyme immunoassay. Aggressive behaviors were recorded ad libitum by keepers using a daily behavior monitoring sheet developed for this study. The results of Study 1 indicate that HC levels increased during the first year after relocation to the new environment and then decreased during the second year. We observed individual differences in reactions to relocation and hypothesized that social factors may mediate these changes. In Study 2, we found that the standardized rate of receiving aggression, rearing history, sex, and group formation had a significant influence on mean HC levels. Relocation status was not a significant factor, but mean HC level was positively correlated with the rate of receiving aggression. Mean HC levels were higher in males than in females, and the association between aggressive interactions and HC levels differed by sex. These results suggest that, although relocation can affect long-term stress level, individuals' experiences of aggression and sex may be more important contributors to long-term stress than relocation alone.

  20. Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest.

  2. Low pH Environmental Stress Inhibits LPS and LTA-Stimulated Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley F. Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric aspiration increases the risks for developing secondary bacterial pneumonia. Cytokine elaboration through pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs is an important mechanism in initiating innate immune host response. Effects of low pH stress, a critical component of aspiration pathogenesis, on the PRR pathways were examined, specifically toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and TLR4, using isolated rat alveolar macrophages (aMØs. We assessed the ability of aMØs after brief exposure to acidified saline to elaborate proinflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA stimulation, known ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively. Low pH stress reduced LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine release (CINC-1, MIP-2, TNF-, MCP-1, and IFN-. LPS and LTA increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations while Ca2+ chelation by BAPTA decreased LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine responses. BAPTA blocked the effects of low pH stress on most of LPS-stimulated cytokines but not of LTA-stimulated responses. In vivo mouse model demonstrates suppressed E. coli and S. pneumoniae clearance following acid aspiration. In conclusion, low pH stress inhibits antibacterial cytokine response of aMØs due to impaired TLR2 (MyD88 pathway and TLR4 signaling (MyD88 and TRIF pathways. The role of Ca2+ in low pH stress-induced signaling is complex but appears to be distinct between LPS- and LTA-mediated responses.

  3. Environmental contaminant mixtures at ambient concentrations invoke a metabolic stress response in goldfish not predicted from exposure to individual compounds alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Julia; Zare, Ava; Jackson, Leland J; Habibi, Hamid R; Weljie, Aalim M

    2012-02-03

    Environmental contaminants from wastewater and industrial or agricultural areas are known to have adverse effects on development, reproduction, and metabolism. However, reliable assessment of environmental contaminant impact at low (i.e., ambient) concentrations using genomics and transcriptomics approaches has pro