WorldWideScience

Sample records for extreme crustal thinning

  1. Magma-compensated crustal thinning in continental rift zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybo, H; Nielsen, C A

    2009-02-12

    Continental rift zones are long, narrow tectonic depressions in the Earth's surface where the entire lithosphere has been modified in extension. Rifting can eventually lead to rupture of the continental lithosphere and creation of new oceanic lithosphere or, alternatively, lead to formation of wide sedimentary basins around failed rift zones. Conventional models of rift zones include three characteristic features: surface manifestation as an elongated topographic trough, Moho shallowing due to crustal thinning, and reduced seismic velocity in the uppermost mantle due to decompression melting or heating from the Earth's interior. Here we demonstrate that only the surface manifestation is observed at the Baikal rift zone, whereas the crustal and mantle characteristics can be ruled out by a new seismic profile across southern Lake Baikal in Siberia. Instead we observe a localized zone in the lower crust which has exceptionally high seismic velocity and is highly reflective. We suggest that the expected Moho uplift was compensated by magmatic intrusion into the lower crust, producing the observed high-velocity zone. This finding demonstrates a previously unknown role for magmatism in rifting processes with significant implications for estimation of stretching factors and modelling of sedimentary basins around failed rift structures.

  2. Crustal thinning and tectonic geomorphology: redefining the passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, T.; Osmundsen, P. T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe Scandinavia's passive margin in terms of a hyper-extended distal margin, a variably tapered proximal margin that includes the outer onshore areas, and an upwarped, unstretched, continent-sloping hinterland that terminates against the "undeformed" cratonic interior. Two benchmark locations, defined as the taper break (TB) and the Hinterland Break in Slope (HBSL), occur at the inner boundary of the distal margin and at the transition from the continent-sloping hinterland and craton, respectively. The elevation of the seaward-facing escarpment is directly scaled to the distance between the taper break and the Hinterland Break in Slope. Scaling relationships between the taper of the crystalline crust in the direction of the distal margin and the length/dip of the hinterland backslope follow directly. The shape factors of major catchments are directly scaled to the taper of the proximal margin and drainage azimuths are parallel to the mean transport lineation recorded from a distinct population of range-bounding normal faults. Topographic expressions of the footwalls and offsets in apatite fission-track age-patterns indicate that fault movement controlled topography, locally and regionally inboard of sharp crustal tapers long after the main phase of crustal thinning. We extend our definition of the passive margin to other post-breakup margins. One particularly fine example is SE Brasil. New data (Zalan et al., 2011) suggest the direct correlation of SE Brasil's Taper Break with its escarpment elevation in a manner consistent with our Scandinavian and global observations. The Taper Hypothesis appears to hold across old and young, glaciated, and unglaciated margins. Following the stretching, thinning, and exhumation phase, an "accommodation phase" is warranted. During accommodation, the initially elevated escarpments can be eroded to very low base levels and subsequently undergo inboard rejuvenation by footwall uplift, in response to tensile stresses

  3. Microstructured extremely thin absorber solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, Matteo; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the realization of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells employing conductive glass substrates functionalized with TiO2 microstructures produced by embossing. Nanocrystalline or compact TiO2 films on Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates were embossed...

  4. Robust, Thin Optical Films for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The environment of space presents scientists and engineers with the challenges of a harsh, unforgiving laboratory in which to conduct their scientific research. Solar astronomy and X-ray astronomy are two of the more challenging areas into which NASA scientists delve, as the optics for this high-tech work must be extremely sensitive and accurate, yet also be able to withstand the battering dished out by radiation, extreme temperature swings, and flying debris. Recent NASA work on this rugged equipment has led to the development of a strong, thin film for both space and laboratory use.

  5. Why are some galaxy disks extremely thin?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Arunima

    2012-01-01

    Some low surface brightness galaxies are known to have extremely thin stellar disks with the vertical to planar axes ratio 0.1 or less, often referred to as superthin disks. Although their existence is known for over three decades, the physical origin for the thin distribution is not understood. We model the stellar thickness for a two-component (gravitationally coupled stars and gas) disk embedded in a dark matter halo, for a superthin galaxy UGC 7321 which has a dense, compact halo, and compare with a typical dwarf galaxy HoII which has a non-compact halo. We show that while the presence of gas does constrain the disk thickness, it is the compact dark matter halo which plays the decisive role in determining the superthin disk distribution in low-mass disks. Thus the compact dark matter halo significantly affects the disk structure and this could be important for the early evolution of galaxies.

  6. Crustal thinning between the Ethiopian and East African Plateaus from modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, M H; Nyblade, A A; Pasyanos, M E

    2006-01-17

    The East African and Ethiopian Plateaus have long been recognized to be part of a much larger topographic anomaly on the African Plate called the African Superswell. One of the few places within the African Superswell that exhibit elevations of less than 1 km is southeastern Sudan and northern Kenya, an area containing both Mesozoic and Cenozoic rift basins. Crustal structure and uppermost mantle velocities are investigated in this area by modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion. Modeling results indicate an average crustal thickness of 25 {+-} 5 km, some 10-15 km thinner than the crust beneath the adjacent East African and Ethiopian Plateaus. The low elevations can therefore be readily attributed to an isostatic response from crustal thinning. Low Sn velocities of 4.1-4.3 km/s also characterize this region.

  7. Thinned crustal structure and tectonic boundary of the Nansha Block, southern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Miao; Wu, Shi-Guo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    The southern South China Sea margin consists of the thinned crustal Nansha Block and a compressional collision zone. The Nansha Block's deep structure and tectonic evolution contains critical information about the South China Sea's rifting. Multiple geophysical data sets, including regional magnetic, gravity and reflection seismic data, reveal the deep structure and rifting processes. Curie point depth (CPD), estimated from magnetic anomalies using a windowed wavenumber-domain algorithm, enables us to image thermal structures. To derive a 3D Moho topography and crustal thickness model, we apply Oldenburg algorithm to the gravity anomaly, which was extracted from the observed free air gravity anomaly data after removing the gravity effect of density variations of sediments, and temperature and pressure variations of the lithospheric mantle. We found that the Moho depth (20 km) is shallower than the CPD (24 km) in the Northwest Borneo Trough, possibly caused by thinned crust, low heat flow and a low vertical geothermal gradient. The Nansha Block's northern boundary is a narrow continent-ocean transition zone constrained by magnetic anomalies, reflection seismic data, gravity anomalies and an interpretation of Moho depth (about 13 km). The block extends southward beneath a gravity-driven deformed sediment wedge caused by uplift on land after a collision, with a contribution from deep crustal flow. Its southwestern boundary is close to the Lupar Line defined by a significant negative reduction to the pole (RTP) of magnetic anomaly and short-length-scale variation in crustal thickness, increasing from 18 to 26 km.

  8. Extremely Thin Dielectric Metasurface for Carpet Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, LiYi; Kanté, Boubacar

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel and simple approach to cloaking a scatterer on a ground plane. We use an extremely thin dielectric metasurface ({\\lambda}/12) to reshape the wavefronts distorted by a scatterer in order to mimic the reflection pattern of a flat ground plane. To achieve such carpet cloaking, the reflection angle has to be equal to the incident angle everywhere on the scatterer. We use a graded metasurface and calculate the required phase gradient to achieve cloaking. Our metasurface locally provides additional phase to the wavefronts to compensate for the phase difference amongst light paths induced by the geometrical distortion. We design our metasurface in the microwave range using highly sub-wavelength dielectric resonators. We verify our design by full-wave time-domain simulations using micro-structured resonators and show that results match theory very well. This approach can be applied to hide any scatterer on a ground plane not only at microwave frequencies, but also at higher frequencies up to th...

  9. Thin film composite nanofiltration membranes for extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalwani, Mayur Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on development and performance evaluation of thin film composite (TFC) nanofiltration (NF) membranes, with special attention to extreme pH applications. In Chapter 2 a new method that allows molecular weight cut off (MWCO) characterization of NF membran

  10. Thermodynamics of extremal rotating thin shells in an extremal BTZ spacetime and the extremal black hole entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Minamitsuji, Masato; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2017-02-01

    In a (2 +1 )-dimensional spacetime with a negative cosmological constant, the thermodynamics and the entropy of an extremal rotating thin shell, i.e., an extremal rotating ring, are investigated. The outer and inner regions with respect to the shell are taken to be the Bañados-Teitelbom-Zanelli (BTZ) spacetime and the vacuum ground state anti-de Sitter spacetime, respectively. By applying the first law of thermodynamics to the extremal thin shell, one shows that the entropy of the shell is an arbitrary well-behaved function of the gravitational area A+ alone, S =S (A+). When the thin shell approaches its own gravitational radius r+ and turns into an extremal rotating BTZ black hole, it is found that the entropy of the spacetime remains such a function of A+, both when the local temperature of the shell at the gravitational radius is zero and nonzero. It is thus vindicated by this analysis that extremal black holes, here extremal BTZ black holes, have different properties from the corresponding nonextremal black holes, which have a definite entropy, the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S (A+)=A/+4G , where G is the gravitational constant. It is argued that for extremal black holes, in particular for extremal BTZ black holes, one should set 0 ≤S (A+)≤A/+4G;i.e., the extremal black hole entropy has values in between zero and the maximum Bekenstein-Hawking entropy A/+4 G . Thus, rather than having just two entropies for extremal black holes, as previous results have debated, namely, 0 and A/+4 G , it is shown here that extremal black holes, in particular extremal BTZ black holes, may have a continuous range of entropies, limited by precisely those two entropies. Surely, the entropy that a particular extremal black hole picks must depend on past processes, notably on how it was formed. A remarkable relation between the third law of thermodynamics and the impossibility for a massive body to reach the velocity of light is also found. In addition, in the procedure, it

  11. Entropy of an extremal electrically charged thin shell and the extremal black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, José P S; Zaslavskii, Oleg B

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate as to what is the value of the the entropy $S$ of extremal black holes. There are approaches that yield zero entropy $S=0$, while there are others that yield the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S=A_+/4$, in Planck units. There are still other approaches that give that $S$ is proportional to $r_+$ or even that $S$ is a generic well-behaved function of $r_+$. Here $r_+$ is the black hole horizon radius and $A_+=4\\pi r_+^2$ is its horizon area. Using a thin matter shell with extremal electric charge, we find the entropy expression for the extremal thin shell spacetime. When the shell's radius approaches its own gravitational radius, and thus turns into an extremal black hole, we encounter that the entropy is $S=S(r_+)$, i.e., the entropy of an extremal black hole is a function of $r_+$ alone. We speculate that the range of values for the entropy of an extremal black hole is $0\\leq S(r_+) \\leq A_+/4$.

  12. Entropy of an extremal electrically charged thin shell and the extremal black hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José P.S. Lemos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a debate as to what is the value of the entropy S of extremal black holes. There are approaches that yield zero entropy S=0, while there are others that yield the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy S=A+/4, in Planck units. There are still other approaches that give that S is proportional to r+ or even that S is a generic well-behaved function of r+. Here r+ is the black hole horizon radius and A+=4πr+2 is its horizon area. Using a spherically symmetric thin matter shell with extremal electric charge, we find the entropy expression for the extremal thin shell spacetime. When the shell's radius approaches its own gravitational radius, and thus turns into an extremal black hole, we encounter that the entropy is S=S(r+, i.e., the entropy of an extremal black hole is a function of r+ alone. We speculate that the range of values for an extremal black hole is 0≤S(r+≤A+/4.

  13. South China Sea crustal thickness and lithosphere thinning from satellite gravity inversion incorporating a lithospheric thermal gravity anomaly correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Gozzard, Simon; Alvey, Andy

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of ocean crust and lithosphere within the South China Sea (SCS) are controversial. Sea-floor spreading re-orientation and ridge jumps during the Oligocene-Miocene formation of the South China Sea led to the present complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust, micro-continents and volcanic ridges. We determine Moho depth, crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning (1- 1/beta) for the South China Sea using a gravity inversion method which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir, 2008). The gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition structure and continent-ocean boundary location which is independent of ocean isochron information. A correction is required for the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly in order to determine Moho depth accurately from gravity inversion; the elevated lithosphere geotherm of the young oceanic and rifted continental margin lithosphere of the South China Sea produces a large lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly which in places exceeds -150 mGal. The gravity anomaly inversion is carried out in the 3D spectral domain (using Parker 1972) to determine 3D Moho geometry and invokes Smith's uniqueness theorem. The gravity anomaly contribution from sediments assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. The gravity inversion includes a parameterization of the decompression melting model of White & McKenzie (1999) to predict volcanic addition generated during continental breakup lithosphere thinning and seafloor spreading. Public domain free air gravity anomaly, bathymetry and sediment thickness data are used in this gravity inversion. Using crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor maps with superimposed shaded-relief free-air gravity anomaly, we improve the determination of pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy, rift orientation and sea-floor spreading trajectory. SCS conjugate margins

  14. Crustal thinning in the northern Tyrrhenian Rift: Insights from multichannel and wide-angle seismic data across the basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, S.; Grevemeyer, I.; Ranero, C. R.; Berndt, C.; Klaeschen, D.; Sallares, V.; Zitellini, N.; Franco, R.

    2014-03-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere leads to the formation of rift basins or rifted continental margins if breakup occurs. Seismic investigations have repeatedly shown that conjugate margins have asymmetric tectonic structures and different amount of extension and crustal thinning. Here we compare two coincident wide-angle and multichannel seismic profiles across the northern Tyrrhenian rift system sampling crust that underwent different stages of extension from north to south and from the flanks to the basin center. Tomographic inversion reveals that the crust has thinned homogeneously from ~24 km to ~17 km between the Corsica Margin and the Latium Margin implying a β factor of ~1.3-1.5. On the transect 80 km to the south, the crust thinned from ~24 km beneath Sardinia to a maximum of ~11 km in the eastern region near the Campania Margin (β factor of ~2.2). The increased crustal thinning is accompanied by a zone of reduced velocities in the upper crust that expands progressively toward the southeast. We interpret that the velocity reduction is related to rock fracturing caused by a higher degree of brittle faulting, as observed on multichannel seismic images. Locally, basalt flows are imaged intruding sediment in this zone, and heat flow values locally exceed 100 mW/m2. Velocities within the entire crust range 4.0-6.7 km/s, which are typical for continental rocks and indicate that significant rift-related magmatic underplating may not be present. The characteristics of the pre-tectonic, syn-tectonic and post-tectonic sedimentary units allow us to infer the spatial and temporal evolution of active rifting. In the western part of the southern transect, thick postrift sediments were deposited in half grabens that are bounded by large fault blocks. Fault spacing and block size diminish to the east as crustal thinning increases. Recent tectonic activity is expressed by faults cutting the seafloor in the east, near the mainland of Italy. The two transects show

  15. Quaternary fault-controlled volcanic vents and crustal thinning: new insights from the magma-rich Tyrrhenian passive margin (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Conti, Alessia; Consorti, Lorenzo; Do Couto, Damien

    2017-04-01

    The discover of monogenic Quaternary volcanic vents, that were recently mapped along major fault zones both inland and offshore the Tyrrhenian magma-rich passive margin, poses questions about: timing and role they had into Plio-Pleistocene crustal thinning with relevant consequences for the hazard assessment of an area inhabited by some 0.5 million people. The present-day margin is stretched over 100 km between the Volsci Range (VR) and the Pontian escarpment, being defined by moderate shallow seismicity (Mw≤4.6), relative high geothermal gradient and ongoing hydrothermal activity. Although major central volcanoes (e.g., Colli Albani), occurring at major fault intersections are well studied, smaller volcanic fields were so far unconstrained. Both field survey in the VR and offshore high-resolution geophysical data, allow us to: 1) better define the anatomy of the poorly known VR volcanic field; 2) furnish new insights on the regional Quaternary dynamics; 3) propose modes and reason of magma emplacement. The VR is composed of about 40 punctual and linear monogenic and mostly phreatomagmatic vents occurring at the edges of the Apennine carbonate fold-and-thrust belt and within the VR backbone. Volcanites are characterized by zeolitized to incoherent tuffs and surge deposits locally covered by lavas and slope deposits. Most explosive units host carbonate-rich lithics with different degrees of rounding and decarbonation, which frequently belong to Albian-Cenomanian aquifers. By comparing cross-section with lithic analyses we demonstrate that fragmentation, transport, progressive disintegration and decarbonation occur at multiple depths, depending on the fold-and-thrust belt setting. Thus, along the same vent zone, juvenile lithic composition proves repeated fragmentation within pressured-aquifers, testifying for fissural activity with implications for local seismic and volcanic assessment. Pyroclastic deposits occur as well in the Pontina and Fondi coastal plains at

  16. Thermal and geotectonic setting of Cretaceous volcanic rocks near Ica, Peru, in relation to Andean crustal thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, M. P.; Aguirre, L.

    1992-01-01

    The Cretaceous volcanic rocks of the Ica region, Peru, were deposited in the Cañete marginal basin developed on the Precambrian Arequipa Massif, which was split and thinned along southwardpropagating faults. They are compositionally bimodal, calc-alkaline, high-Al 2O 3 rocks with shoshonitic affinities and a pronounced enriched within-plate character. This contrasts markedly with the equivalent rocks of the Huarmey Basin to the north, which lie directly on mantle-derived material and are chiefly low-K, thleiitic basalts and basaltic andesites, with trace-element abundances related to subduction and/or asthenospheric components. The Ica rocks also show a characteristic very low-grade, nondeformational prehnite-pumpellyite to zeolite facies metamorphism formed under moderate thermal gradients. This contrasts strongly with the high thermal gradient of the rocks to the north, which relates to the more extensive crustal splitting and/or thinning in that direction. These metamorphic patterns, together with the lava chemistry, are important elements in modeling the thermal and geotectonic setting, which has close affinities to a model of the Icelandic rifting system. The source of the Ica rocks is thought to be old enriched mantle beneath the Precambrian Arequipa Massif, in contrast to the mantle beneath the basin to the north, which is much younger and less enriched. This change along the axis of the basin is similar to the K-h relationships suggested at subduction zones. However, the direction of subduction along this sector has been approximately E-W, and the enrichment, which is a right angles to this, relates to the history of the subcontinental mantle along the Andean margin. It is also associated with an abrupt compositional change in the Peruvian Coastal Batholith rocks of slightly younger age, marking a major segmental difference in Mesozoic magma composition along the axis of the Andes. Crustal contributions are not considered to be important, certainly not

  17. Exploratory results from a new rotary shear designed to reproduce the extreme deformation conditions of crustal earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Smith, S.; Violay, M. E.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Di Felice, F.; Di Stefano, G.; Romeo, G.; Scarlato, P.

    2011-12-01

    A challenging goal in experimental rock deformation is to reproduce the extreme deformation conditions typical of coseismic slip in crustal earthquakes: large slip (up to 50 m), slip rates (0.1-10 m/s), accelerations (> 10 m/s2) and normal stress (> 50 MPa). Moreover, fault zones usually contain non-cohesive rocks (gouges) and fluids. The integration of all these deformation conditions is such a technical challenge that there is currently no apparatus in the world that can reproduce seismic slip. Yet, the determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates remains one of the main unknowns in earthquake physics, as it cannot be determined (or very approximately) by seismic wave inversion analysis. In the last thirty years, rotary shear apparatus were designed that combine large normal stresses and slip but low slip rates (high-pressure rotary shears first designed by Tullis) or low normal stresses but large slip rates and slip (rotary shears first designed by Shimamoto). Here we present the results of experiments using a newly-constructed Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), installed at INGV in Rome, which extends the combination of normal stress, slip and slip rate achieved by previous apparatus and reproduces the conditions likely to occur during an earthquake in the shallow crust. SHIVA uses two brushless engines (max power 300 kW, max torque 930 Nm) and an air actuator (thrust 5 tons) in a rotary shear configuration (nominally infinite displacement) to slide hollow rock cylinders (30/50 mm int./ext. diameter) at slip rates ranging from 10 micron/s up to 6.5 m/s, accelerations up to 80 m/s2 and normal stresses up to 50 MPa. SHIVA can also perform experiments in which the torque on the sample (rather than the slip rate) is progressively increased until spontaneous failure occurs: this experimental capability should better reproduce natural conditions. The apparatus is equipped with a sample chamber to carry out experiments in the presence of fluids (up to 15

  18. High-temperature metamorphism during extreme thinning of the continental crust: a reappraisal of the north Pyrenean paleo-passive margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerc

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of field examples in mountain belts show that the formation of passive margins during extreme continent thinning may occur under conditions of high to very high thermal gradient beneath a thin cover of syn-rift sediments. Orogenic belts resulting from the tectonic inversion of distal margins and regions of exhumed continental mantle may exhibit high-temperature, low-pressure (HT-LP metamorphism and coeval syn-extensional, ductile deformation. Recent studies have shown that the northern flank of the Pyrenean belt, especially the North Pyrenean Zone, is one of the best examples of such inverted hot, passive margin. In this study, we provide a map of HT-LP metamorphism based on a dataset of more than one hundred peak-temperature estimates obtained using Raman spectroscopy of the carbonaceous material (RSCM. This dataset is completed by previous PT estimates based on mineral assemblages, and new Ar–Ar (amphibole, micas and U–Pb (titanite ages from metamorphic and magmatic rocks of the North Pyrenean Zone. The implications on the geological evolution of the Cretaceous Pyrenean paleomargins are discussed. Ages range mainly from 110 to 90 Ma and no westward or eastward propagation of the metamorphism and magmatism can be clearly identified. In contrast, the new data reveal a progressive propagation of the thermal anomaly from the base to the surface of the continental crust. Focusing on the key-localities of the Mauléon Basin, Arguenos-Moncaup, Lherz, Boucheville and the Bas-Agly, we analyse the thermal conditions prevailing during the Cretaceous crustal thinning. The results are synthetized into a series of three regional thematic maps, and into two detailed maps of the Arguenos-Moncaup and Lherz areas. The results indicate a first-order control of the thermal gradient by the intensity of crustal thinning. The highest grades of metamorphism are intimately associated with the areas where subcontinental mantle rocks have been

  19. Extremely thin bilayer electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fabricated by chemical solution deposition (CSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Ok; Whang, Chin-Myung; Lee, Yu-Ri; Park, Sun-Young; Prasad, Dasari Hari; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Hae-Weon

    2012-07-03

    An extremely thin bilayer electrolyte consisting of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) is successfully fabricated on a sintered NiO-YSZ substrate. Major processing flaws are effectively eliminated by applying local constraints to YSZ nanoparticles, and excellent open circuit voltage and cell performance are demonstrated in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at intermediate operating temperatures.

  20. An Andean tectonic cycle:From crustal thickening to extension in a thin crust (34º-37ºSL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor A. Ramos; Vanesa D. Litvak; Andrés Folguera; Mauro Spagnuolo

    2014-01-01

    Several orogenic cycles of mountain building and subsequent collapse associated with periods of shal-lowing and steepening of subduction zones have been recognized in recent years in the Andes. Most of them are characterized by widespread crustal delamination expressed by large calderas and rhyolitic flare-up produced by the injection of hot asthenosphere in the subduction wedge. These processes are related to the increase of the subduction angle during trench roll-back. The Payenia paleoflat-slab, in the southern Central Andes of Argentina and Chile (34º~37º S) recorded a complete cycle from crustal thickening and mountain uplift to extensional collapse and normal faulting, which are related to changes in the subduction geometry. The early stages are associated with magmatic expansion and migration, subsequent deformation and broken foreland. New ages and geochemical data show the middle to late Miocene expansion and migration of arc volcanism towards the foreland region was associated with important deformation in the Andean foothills. However, the main difference of this orogenic cycle with the previously described cycles is that the steepening of the oceanic subducted slab is linked to basaltic flooding of large areas in the retroarc under an extensional setting. Crustal delamination is concentrated only in a narrow central belt along the cordilleran axis. The striking differences between the two types of cycles are interpreted to be related to the crustal thickness when steepening the subducting slab. The crustal thickness of the Altiplano is over 60e80 km, whereas Payenia is less than 42 km in the axial part, and near 30 km in the retroarc foothills. The final extensional regime associated with the slab steepening favors the basaltic flooding of more than 8400 km3 in an area larger than 40,000 km2, through 800 central vents and large fissures. These characteristics are unique in the entire present-day Andes.

  1. Crustal thickness controlled by plate tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina M.; Meissner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    /gabbro–eclogite phase transition in crustal evolution and the links between lithosphere recycling, mafic magmatism, and crustal underplating. We advocate that plate tectonics processes, togetherwith basalt/gabbro–eclogite transition, limit crustal thickness worldwide by providing effective mechanisms of crustal...... (lithosphere) recycling. The processes of crust–mantle interaction have created very dissimilar crustal styles in Europe, as seen by its seismic structure, crustal thickness, and average seismic velocities in the basement. Our special focus is on processes responsible for the formation of the thin crust...

  2. Self-similar accretion in thin discs around near-extremal black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Oliveri, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    Near-maximally spinning black holes display conformal symmetry in their near-horizon region, which is therefore the locus of critical phenomena. In this paper, we revisit the Novikov-Thorne accretion thin disc model and find a new self-similar radiation-dominated solution in the extremely high spin regime. Motivated by the self-consistency of the model, we require that matter flows at the sound speed at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). We observe that, when the disc pressure is dominated by radiation at the ISCO, which occurs for the best-fitting Novikov-Thorne model of GRS 1915+105, the Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter can be expressed in terms of the spin, mass accretion rate and radiative efficiency. We quantitatively describe how the exact thin disc solution approaches the self-similar solution in the vicinity of the ISCO and for increasing spins.

  3. Screening an extremal black hole with a thin shell of exotic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culetu, Hristu

    2016-12-01

    We study the possibility of shielding a regular extremal black hole by means of a matter thin-shell. While the surface energy density σ on the static shell is negative, the tangential pressures p are positive, both of them being finite when the shell approaches the black hole horizon. The Darmois-Israel junction conditions are used to find σ and p in terms of the radius a of the shell. The surface gravitational energy ES is computed, keeping track of the pressure contribution. The stability conditions are briefly investigated.

  4. Parapapillary Diffuse Choroidal Atrophy in Children Is Associated With Extreme Thinning of Parapapillary Choroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Tae; Zhu, Dan; Bi, Hong Sheng; Jonas, Jost B; Jonas, Rahul A; Nagaoka, Natsuko; Moriyama, Muka; Yoshida, Takeshi; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2017-02-01

    To analyze morphologic features of segmental parapapillary diffuse choroidal atrophy (PDCA) in children. The study group included children (age ≤15 years) with high myopia who attended the Tokyo High Myopia Clinic. Control groups comprised participants of the population-based Gobi Desert Children Eye Study (GobiDCES). Fundus photographs were examined for presence of PDCA and choroidal thickness (CT) was measured by optical coherence tomography. The study group included 41 eyes of 21 children with PDCA (mean age: 9.4 ± 3.7 years; mean refractive error: -11.5 ± 3.1 diopters) and the GobiDCES included 1463 children (age: 11.8 ± 3.5 years). In the study group, all eyes showed an extreme and abrupt thinning of the temporal parapapillary choroid. At 2500 μm nasal to the foveola, CT was choroidal atrophy in children is associated with abrupt segmental thinning of the choroid in the temporal parapapillary region, in addition to the thinning of the subfoveal choroid after adjusting for refractive error and age.

  5. Crustal influx, indentation, ductile thinning and gravity redistribution in a continental wedge: Building a Moldanubian mantled gneiss dome with underthrust Saxothuringian material (European Variscan belt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, F.; Schulmann, K.; Skrzypek, E.; Lehmann, J.; Dujardin, J. R.; Martelat, J. E.; Lexa, O.; Corsini, M.; Edel, J. B.; Å TíPská, P.; Pitra, P.

    2012-02-01

    The contribution of lateral forces, vertical load, gravity redistribution and erosion to the origin of mantled gneiss domes in internal zones of orogens remains debated. In the Orlica-Śnieżnik dome (Moldanubian zone, European Variscan belt), the polyphase tectono-metamorphic history is initially characterized by the development of subhorizontal fabrics associated with medium- to high-grade metamorphic conditions in different levels of the crust. It reflects the eastward influx of a Saxothuringian-type passive margin sequence below a Teplá-Barrandian upper plate. The ongoing influx of continental crust creates a thick felsic orogenic root with HP rocks and migmatitic orthogneiss. The orogenic wedge is subsequently indented by the eastern Brunia microcontinent producing a multiscale folding of the orogenic infrastructure. The resulting kilometre-scale folding is associated with the variable burial of the middle crust in synforms and the exhumation of the lower crust in antiforms. These localized vertical exchanges of material and heat are coeval with a larger crustal-scale folding of the whole infrastructure generating a general uplift of the dome. It is exemplified by increasing metamorphic conditions and younging of 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages toward the extruded migmatitic subdomes cored by HP rocks. The vertical growth of the dome induces exhumation by pure shear-dominated ductile thinning laterally evolving to non-coaxial detachment faulting, while erosion feeds the surrounding sedimentary basins. Modeling of the Bouguer anomaly grid is compatible with crustal-scale mass transfers between a dense superstructure and a lighter infrastructure. The model implies that the Moldanubian Orlica-Śnieżnik mantled gneiss dome derives from polyphase recycling of Saxothuringian material.

  6. Thin film and multilayer coating development for the extreme ultraviolet spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garoli, D. [INFM-LUXOR DEI University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: garoli@dei.unipd.it; Monaco, G. [INFM-LUXOR DEI University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Frassetto, F. [INFM-LUXOR DEI University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Pelizzo, M.G. [INFM-LUXOR DEI University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Nicolosi, P. [INFM-LUXOR DEI University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Armelao, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); Mattarello, V. [INFN-LNL, strada Romea 35020 Legnaro PD (Italy); Rigato, V. [INFN-LNL, strada Romea 35020 Legnaro PD (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    B{sub 4}C optical coating represents, together with Ir, Pt, SiC, one of best choice for high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet region. This material is also used combined with others materials in multilayer such as Si/B{sub 4}C or as interlayer in Mo/Si multilayer to avoid interdiffusion. In this study we have performed optical, compositional and structural analyses for thin film of B{sub 4}C deposited by means of magnetron sputtering and on preliminary samples deposited by e-beam evaporation. Here we report reflectivity measurements and the derived optical constants of B{sub 4}C in the 400-1500 A region.

  7. Modeling and characterization of extremely thin absorber (eta) solar cells based on ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Seró, Iván; Giménez, Sixto; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Azaceta, Eneko; Tena-Zaera, Ramón; Bisquert, Juan

    2011-04-21

    Extremely thin absorber (eta)-solar cells based on ZnO nanowires sensitized with a thin layer of CdSe have been prepared, using CuSCN as hole transporting material. Samples with significantly different photovoltaic performance have been analyzed and a general model of their behavior was obtained. We have used impedance spectroscopy to model the device discriminating the series resistance, the role of the hole conducting material CuSCN, and the interface process. Correlating the impedance analysis with the microstructural properties of the solar cell interfaces, a good description of the solar cell performance is obtained. The use of thick CdSe layers leads to high recombination resistances, increasing the open circuit voltage of the devices. However, there is an increase of the internal recombination in thick light absorbing layers that also inhibit a good penetration of CuSCN, reducing the photocurrent. The model will play an important role on the optimization of these devices. This analysis could have important implications for the modeling and optimization of all-solid devices using a sensitizing configuration.

  8. Smart freeform optics solution for an extremely thin direct-lit application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Claude; Nemitz, Wolfgang; Schweitzer, Susanne; Wenzl, Franz P.; Kuna, Ladislav; Reil, Frank; Hartmann, Paul; Sommer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Common direct-lit systems for general lighting applications are using LEDs as light sources, which are placed in a certain distance in a regularly arranged array. In order to achieve a homogenous light distribution a diffuser sheet has to be placed on the out-coupling side in a certain height above the LED array. The position of the diffuser sheet is strongly correlated to the distance between the LEDs and is responsible for the positional homogenization of the LED spots, while the rough side of the diffuser averages the angular light distribution. In order to maintain the uniformity of the luminance the distance of the LEDs compared to the height of the diffuser sheet placement (DHR ratio) is of relevance. DHR values of 1 are hardly achievable. To overcome this limitation additional optical elements like freeform lenses are necessary. In this contribution we discuss a smart design concept for an extremely flat direct-lit lighting system. It is characterized by an improved distance (LEDs) to height (diffuser sheet) ratio compared to diffuser sheet only-approaches and a smaller thickness compared to common freeform approaches. For this demand we designed very thin freeform lenses with a maximal height of 75 μm that allow to maintain a uniform illumination in a flat direct-lit backlight using an LEDarray with a comparably large distance between the individual LEDs. The concept emphasizes the use of maskless laser direct write lithography for the cost-effective fabrication of the thin freeform micro-lens array.

  9. Rapid cooling and exhumation as a consequence of extension and crustal thinning: Inferences from the Late Miocene to Pliocene Palu Metamorphic Complex, Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Juliane; Hall, Robert; Forster, Margaret A.; Kohn, Barry P.; Lister, Gordon S.

    2017-08-01

    Metamorphic complexes forming high mountains of 1.5-2 km in Western Sulawesi were previously considered to be Mesozoic or older basement of Gondwana crust. However, many of the metamorphic rocks are much younger than previously thought. Some have Eocene sedimentary protoliths. New geothermobarometric and geochronological data from metamorphic rocks of the Palu Metamorphic Complex (PMC) and associated granitoids provide information on the timing and mechanisms of Neogene metamorphism and contemporaneous rapid exhumation. The metamorphic rocks are strongly deformed and some were partially melted to form migmatites. Schists contain relict andalusite, cordierite, staurolite and Mn-rich garnet which are wrapped by a pervasive fabric. 40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite, white mica and amphibole from strongly deformed, mylonitic schists and recrystallised amphibolites reveals cooling occurred in the Early Pliocene (c. 5.3-4.8 Ma) in the northern part and during the Late Pliocene (c. 3.1-2.7 Ma) in the southern part of the PMC. U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He analyses of various minerals from PMC metamorphic and S-type magmatic rocks give very similar mid to Late Pliocene ages, indicating very fast cooling and rapid exhumation, and show the high speed at which tectonic processes, including magmatism, exhumation, and reworking into a sediment, must have occurred. The high rates could be unique to this area but we suggest they record the true speed of metamorphic complex exhumation in a very young orogenic belt. Rates in older orogens appear lower because they are averages measured over longer periods of time. Contemporaneous magmatism and deformation are interpreted as a consequence of decompressional melting due to extension and thinning of the crust, promoted by possible detachment faults and normal faulting at the major NW-trending Palu-Koro and Tambarana Faults. In contrast, I-type magmatic rocks, separated from the PMC by the Palu-Koro Fault, were exhumed from upper crustal

  10. Interfacial Engineering and Charge Carrier Dynamics in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edley, Michael

    Photovoltaic energy is a clean and renewable source of electricity; however, it faces resistance to widespread use due to cost. Nanostructuring decouples constraints related to light absorption and charge separation, potentially reducing cost by allowing a wider variety of processing techniques and materials to be used. However, the large interfacial areas also cause an increased dark current which negatively affects cell efficiency. This work focuses on extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells that used a ZnO nanowire array as a scaffold for an extremely thin CdSe absorber layer. Photoexcited electrons generated in the CdSe absorber are transferred to the ZnO layer, while photogenerated holes are transferred to the liquid electrolyte. The transfer of photoexcited carriers to their transport layer competes with bulk recombination in the absorber layer. After charge separation, transport of charge carriers to their respective contacts must occur faster than interfacial recombination for efficient collection. Charge separation and collection depend sensitively on the dimensions of the materials as well as their interfaces. We demonstrated that an optimal absorber thickness can balance light absorption and charge separation. By treating the ZnO/CdSe interface with a CdS buffer layer, we were able to improve the Voc and fill factor, increasing the ETA cell's efficiency from 0.53% to 1.34%, which is higher than that achievable using planar films of the same material. We have gained additional insight into designing ETA cells through the use of dynamic measurements. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that characteristic times for electron injection from CdSe to ZnO are less than 1 ps. Electron injection is rapid compared to the 2 ns bulk lifetime in CdSe. Optoelectronic measurements such as transient photocurrent/photovoltage and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were applied to study the processes of charge transport and interfacial recombination

  11. Magnetic Field Gradiometer with Sub-Micron Spatial Resolution Based on Caesium Vapour in an Extremely Thin Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auzinsh M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a device for measuring the magnetic field and its gradient with a spatial resolution of several hundred nanometres. This device is based on caesium metal vapour confined to an extremely thin cell (ETC. To measure magnetic signals, we use absorption and very low laser powers, which might be appealing for modern fabrication techniques. A portable, fully automated device was constructed.

  12. An Andean tectonic cycle: From crustal thickening to extension in a thin crust (34°–37°SL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Ramos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several orogenic cycles of mountain building and subsequent collapse associated with periods of shallowing and steepening of subduction zones have been recognized in recent years in the Andes. Most of them are characterized by widespread crustal delamination expressed by large calderas and rhyolitic flare-up produced by the injection of hot asthenosphere in the subduction wedge. These processes are related to the increase of the subduction angle during trench roll-back. The Payenia paleoflat-slab, in the southern Central Andes of Argentina and Chile (34°–37°S recorded a complete cycle from crustal thickening and mountain uplift to extensional collapse and normal faulting, which are related to changes in the subduction geometry. The early stages are associated with magmatic expansion and migration, subsequent deformation and broken foreland. New ages and geochemical data show the middle to late Miocene expansion and migration of arc volcanism towards the foreland region was associated with important deformation in the Andean foothills. However, the main difference of this orogenic cycle with the previously described cycles is that the steepening of the oceanic subducted slab is linked to basaltic flooding of large areas in the retroarc under an extensional setting. Crustal delamination is concentrated only in a narrow central belt along the cordilleran axis. The striking differences between the two types of cycles are interpreted to be related to the crustal thickness when steepening the subducting slab. The crustal thickness of the Altiplano is over 60–80 km, whereas Payenia is less than 42 km in the axial part, and near 30 km in the retroarc foothills. The final extensional regime associated with the slab steepening favors the basaltic flooding of more than 8400 km3 in an area larger than 40,000 km2, through 800 central vents and large fissures. These characteristics are unique in the entire present-day Andes.

  13. Enhanced transmission of slit arrays in an extremely thin metallic film

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, A; Laurent, N; Edee, K; Granet, G; Moreau, Antoine; Lafarge, Christophe; Laurent, Nicolas; Edee, Kofi

    2006-01-01

    We explore the behaviour of slit arrays for very low thicknesses and found that they could constitute very interesting filters. Two mechanisms are responsible for the enhanced transmission depending on the thickness : first, cavity resonances, for a suprisingly low thickness and a resonance whose nature still has to be understood for extremely small thicknesses.

  14. Effects of crustal thickness on magmatic differentiation in subduction zone volcanism: A global study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farner, Michael J.; Lee, Cin-Ty A.

    2017-07-01

    The majority of arc magmas are highly evolved due to differentiation within the lithosphere or crust. Some studies have suggested a relationship between crustal thickness and magmatic differentiation, but the exact nature of this relationship is unclear. Here, we examine the interplay of crustal thickness and magmatic differentiation using a global geochemical dataset compiled from active volcanic arcs and elevation as a proxy for crustal thickness. With increasing crustal thickness, average arc magma compositions become more silicic (andesitic) and enriched in incompatible elements, indicating that on average, arc magmas in thick crust are more evolved, which can be easily explained by the longer transit and cooling times of magmas traversing thick arc lithosphere and crust. As crustal thickness increases, arc magmas show higher degrees of iron depletion at a given MgO content, indicating that arc magmas saturate earlier in magnetite when traversing thick crust. This suggests that differentiation within thick crust occurs under more oxidizing conditions and that the origin of oxidation is due to intracrustal processes (contamination or recharge) or the role of thick crust in modulating melting degree in the mantle wedge. We also show that although arc magmas are on average more silicic in thick crust, the most silicic magmas (>70 wt.% SiO2) are paradoxically found in thin crust settings, where average compositions are low in silica (basaltic). We suggest that extreme residual magmas, such as those exceeding 70 wt.% SiO2, are preferentially extracted from shallow crustal magma bodies than from deep-seated magma bodies, the latter more commonly found in regions of thick crust. We suggest that this may be because the convective lifespan of crustal magma bodies is limited by conductive cooling through the overlying crustal lid and that magma bodies in thick crust cool more slowly than in thin crust. When the crust is thin, cooling is rapid, preventing residual magmas

  15. Preserved scleral patch graft for unexpected extreme scleral thinning found at the scleral buckling procedure: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spela Stunf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-existing scleral pathology is an important risk factor for globe rupture during scleral buckling procedures. We report here, the surgical management of an unexpected scleral pathology found at the scleral buckling procedure in a retinal detachment patient. A 77-year-old white female with retinal detachment underwent a scleral buckling procedure. The surgery was converted into a scleral graft procedure, as extreme scleral thinning was found intraoperatively. An alcohol-preserved donor sclera graft was used. The second surgery for definitive retinal alignment was performed two weeks later. The presented case of an unexpected scleral pathology in a retinal detachment patient was managed with a combination of scleral grafting and pars plana vitrectomy, without any major complications. The anatomical outcome was excellent and the scleral rupture was prevented; the visual outcome was satisfactory. A conversion of the scleral buckling procedure into a scleral graft procedure has proved to be safe and effective for unexpected scleral pathology.

  16. Nonmonotonic Diameter Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Extremely Thin Si Nanowires: Competition between Hydrodynamic Phonon Flow and Boundary Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2017-02-08

    By carefully and systematically performing Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the thermal conductivity (κ) of Si nanowires (NWs) does not diverge but converges and increases steeply when NW diameter (D) becomes extremely small (dκ/dD < 0), a long debate of one-dimensional heat conduction in history. The κ of the thinnest possible Si NWs reaches a superhigh level that is as large as more than 1 order of magnitude higher than its bulk counterpart. The abnormality is explained in terms of the dominant normal (N) process (energy and momentum conservation) of low frequency acoustic phonons that induces hydrodynamic phonon flow in the Si NWs without being scattered. With D increasing, the downward shift of optical phonons triggers strong Umklapp (U) scattering with acoustic phonons and attenuates the N process, leading to the regime of phonon boundary scattering (dκ/dD < 0). The two competing mechanisms result in nonmonotonic diameter dependence of κ with minima at critical diameter of 2-3 nm. Our results unambiguously demonstrate the converged κ and the clear trend of κ ∼ D for extremely thin Si NWs by fully elucidating the competition between the hydrodynamic phonon flow and phonon boundary scattering.

  17. Significant mobility enhancement in extremely thin highly doped ZnO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Look, David C., E-mail: david.look@wright.edu [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Wyle Laboratories, Inc., 2601 Mission Point Blvd., Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Heller, Eric R. [Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Yao, Yu-Feng; Yang, C. C., E-mail: ccycc@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-13

    Highly Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films of thicknesses d = 5, 25, 50, and 300 nm, grown on 160-nm ZnO buffer layers by molecular beam epitaxy, had 294-K Hall-effect mobilities μ{sub H} of 64.1, 43.4, 37.0, and 34.2 cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. This extremely unusual ordering of μ{sub H} vs d is explained by the existence of a very high-mobility Debye tail in the ZnO, arising from the large Fermi-level mismatch between the GZO and the ZnO. Scattering theory in conjunction with Poisson analysis predicts a Debye-tail mobility of 206 cm{sup 2}/V-s at the interface (z = d), falling to 58 cm{sup 2}/V-s at z = d + 2 nm. Excellent fits to μ{sub H} vs d and sheet concentration n{sub s} vs d are obtained with no adjustable parameters.

  18. Sensing extremely limited H₂ contents by Pd nanogap connected to an amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Tack; Jung, Hwaebong; Nam, Seung Hee; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Kim, Jin Sung; Jang, Byungjin; Lee, Wooyoung; Im, Seongil

    2013-10-07

    A palladium (Pd) nanogap-based thin-film has been connected to an electrically stable amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistor, to form a hydrogen sensor demonstrating a dramatic sensing capability. As a result of the Pd connection to the transistor source, our sensor circuit greatly enhances the hydrogen-induced signal and sensing speed in the sense of output voltage, clearly resolving a minimum hydrogen content of 0.05%. When the nanogap-based Pd thin-film was connected to the transistor gate, an extremely limited hydrogen content of even less than 0.05% was visibly detected through gate voltage shifts. Our results exhibit the most promising and practical ways to sense extremely limited hydrogen contents, originating from two methods: transistor-to-Pd nanogap resistor and transistor-to-Pd nanogap capacitor coupling.

  19. Development of an extremely thin-wall straw tracker operational in vacuum - The COMET straw tracker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, H.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fujii, Y.; Hamada, E.; Mihara, S.; Moiseenko, A.; Noguchi, K.; Oishi, K.; Tanaka, S.; Tojo, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Tsverava, N.; Ueno, K.; Volkov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The COMET experiment at J-PARC aims to search for a lepton-flavour violating process of muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom, μ-e conversion, with a branching-ratio sensitivity of better than 10-16, 4 orders of magnitude better than the present limit, in order to explore the parameter region predicted by most of well-motivated theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. The need for this sensitivity places several stringent requirements on the detector development. The experiment requires to detect the monochromatic electron of 105 MeV, the momentum resolution is primarily limited by the multiple scattering effect for this momentum region. Thus we need the very light material detector in order to achieve an excellent momentum resolution, better than 2%, for 100 MeV region. In order to fulfil such a requirement, the thin-wall straw-tube planar tracker has been developed by an extremely light material which is operational in vacuum. The COMET straw tracker consists of 9.8 mm diameter straw tube, longer than 1 m length, with 20-μm-thick Mylar foil and 70-nm-thick aluminium deposition. Currently even thinner and smaller, 12 μm thick and 5 mm diameter, straw is under development by the ultrasonic welding technique.

  20. The Precambrian crustal structure of East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugume, Fred Alex

    .e., Archean) as well as terrains of different ages. In global studies of continental crustal structure, it is shown that high velocity (Vp ˜ 7km/s and Vs ˜4.0 km/s) lower crustal layers indicate the presence of mafic rocks, and that such layers are common in most Precambrian terrains. In contrast, my results show large variability in lower crustal structure between terrains of similar age within Africa, suggesting that making generalizations about the structure and evolution of continental crust based on global averages of the crustal velocity structure is difficult to do. The results of this study indicate that the local geological history of each terrain can lead to significant variability in crustal structure, making the use of global averages less representative of global processes than previously thought. In the third part of this thesis, forward modeling of receiver functions is used to investigate the crustal structure beneath three of the rift basins in the western branch of the East African Rift System (Lake Albert, Lake Edward and the northern part of the Lake Malawi rifts). Modeling results reveal sediment thickness of about 1 km beneath stations BUTI and KATE, located at the margins of the Lake Albert and Lake Edward rifts, respectively, and about 1.5 km beneath station KYLA in the northern part of the Lake Malawi rift. The Poisson's ratio obtained (0.4) indicate that the sediments are poorly consolidated. A thin sedimentary layer (1--1.5 km) and high Poisson's ratio is consistent with the young age (Miocene) of the rift basins. The Ps from the Moho cannot be easily identified because the first 5--6 sec of data are dominated by the Ps conversion from the sediment-bedrock interface and its reverberations. Therefore crustal thickness beneath these stations remains unknown.

  1. Results of a strategic science study to inform policies targeting extreme thinness standards in the fashion industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Ziff, Sara; Lowy, Alice S; Yu, Kimberly; Austin, S Bryn

    2017-03-01

    The appearance pressures experienced by fashion models have been criticized as harmful to their health, as well as increasing eating disorder risk among youth by promoting ideals of extreme thinness. Given recent legislation to protect models, we undertook a strategic science study to assess professional fashion models' perceptions of the potential impact and feasibility of seven policy proposals. A sample of 85 female fashion models, mean age = 22.7 years (SD 3.7) completed an online survey assessing unhealthy weight control behaviors (UWCB), perceived pressure from agencies to lose weight, as well as the perceived impact and feasibility of seven potential policy actions. Chi-squared analyses and multivariable logistic regressions compared UWCB among models who were asked to lose weight and those who were not. Friedman and Kendall's W tests were conducted to examine differences in impact and feasibility ratings across the seven policy proposals. Models reported high levels of pressure to lose weight, which was associated with higher odds of engaging in UWCB. The policy approaches rated as most impactful were those to increase worker protections, though they were rated as only moderately feasible. Requiring employers to provide food and a 30-min break for jobs longer than 6 h was rated as both impactful and feasible. Imposing restrictions on minimum BMI was rated as the least impactful. Approaches providing employment protections and healthier working conditions are most supported by professional models. These findings help to illuminate viable policy approaches from the perspective of key stakeholders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Optimization of the design of extremely thin absorber solar cells based on electrodeposited ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy-Clément, Claude; Elias, Jamil

    2013-07-22

    The properties of the components of ZnO/CdSe/CuSCN extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells based on electrodeposited ZnO nanowires (NWs) were investigated. The goal was to study the influence of their morphology on the characteristics of the solar cells. To increase the energy conversion efficiency of the solar cell, it was generally proposed to increase the roughness factor of the ZnO NW arrays (i.e. to increase the NW length) with the purpose of decreasing the absorber thickness, improving the light scattering, and consequently the light absorption in the ZnO/CdSe NW arrays. However, this strategy increased the recombination centers, which affected the efficiency of the solar cell. We developed another strategy that acts on the optical configuration of the solar cells by increasing the diameter of the ZnO NW (from 100 to 330 nm) while maintaining a low roughness factor. We observed that the scattering of the ZnO NW arrays occurred over a large wavelength range and extended closer to the CdSe absorber bandgap, and this led to an enhancement in the effective absorption of the ZnO/CdSe NW arrays and an increase in the solar cell characteristics. We found that the thicknesses of CuSCN above the ZnO/CdSe NW tips and the CdSe coating layer were optimized at 1.5 μm and 30 nm, respectively. Optimized ZnO/CdSe/CuSCN solar cells exhibiting 3.2% solar energy conversion efficiency were obtained by using 230 nm diameter ZnO NWs.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of a nanostructured TiO2/In2S3-Sb2S3/CuSCN extremely thin absorber (eta) solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Flores, Alí M.; García-Gómez, Nora A.; de la Parra-Arciniega, Salomé M.; Sánchez, Eduardo M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we report the successful assembly and characterization of a TiO2/In2S3-Sb2S3/CuSCN extremely thin absorber solar cell. Nanostructured TiO2 deposited by screen printing on an ITO substrate was used as an n-type electrode. An ∼80 nm extremely thin layer of the system In2S3-Sb2S3 deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and a reaction (silar) method was used as an absorber. The voids were filled with p-type CuSCN and the entire assembly was completed with a gold contact. The solar cell fabricated with this heterostructure showed an energy conversion efficiency of 4.9%, which is a promising result in the development of low cost and simple fabrication of solar cells.

  4. Crustal structure and extension mode in the northwestern margin of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinwei; Wu, Shiguo; McIntosh, Kirk; Mi, Lijun; Liu, Zheng; Spence, George

    2016-06-01

    Combining multi-channel seismic reflection and gravity modeling, this study has investigated the crustal structure of the northwestern South China Sea margin. These data constrain a hyper-extended crustal area bounded by basin-bounding faults corresponding to an aborted rift below the Xisha Trough with a subparallel fossil ridge in the adjacent Northwest Sub-basin. The thinnest crust is located in the Xisha Trough, where it is remnant lower crust with a thickness of less than 3 km. Gravity modeling also revealed a hyper-extended crust across the Xisha Trough. The postrift magmatism is well developed and more active in the Xisha Trough and farther southeast than on the northwestern continental margin of the South China Sea; and the magmatic intrusion/extrusion was relatively active during the rifting of Xisha Trough and the Northwest Sub-basin. A narrow continent-ocean transition zone with a width of ˜65 km bounded seaward by a volcanic buried seamount is characterized by crustal thinning, rift depression, low gravity anomaly and the termination of the break-up unconformity seismic reflection. The aborted rift near the continental margin means that there may be no obvious detachment fault like that in the Iberia-Newfoundland type margin. The symmetric rift, extreme hyper-extended continental crust and hotter mantle materials indicate that continental crust underwent stretching phase (pure-shear deformation), thinning phase and breakup followed by onset of seafloor spreading and the mantle-lithosphere may break up before crustal-necking in the northwestern South China Sea margin.

  5. Posibilidades de atenuación cortical en la cuenca Cuyana a partir del análisis de datos de gravedad Possibilities of crustal thinning in the Cuyo Basin from the analysis of gravity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Miranda

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available La cuenca Cuyana forma parte del conjunto de cuencas triásicas desarrolladas en el antepaís andino de Argentina. El origen de esta estructura ha sido postulado como el resultado de esfuerzos extensionales. La atenuación cortical es un rasgo estructural característico de los paleo-rifts, aunque su identificación es a veces complicada por la cubierta sedimentaria y los eventos tectónicos posteriores. Con el objeto de contribuir a la interpretación geológica, se analizó el campo de gravedad medido sobre la misma. Para este estudio, los efectos de gravedad del relleno sedimentario de la depresión y de la raíz andina al oeste fueron calculados y luego removidos de las anomalías de gravedad observadas. Información sísmica de velocidades y espesores fueron incorporados para el cómputo del efecto de gravedad del relleno sedimentario. Un modelo isostático balanceado en la hipótesis de Airy sirvió para modelar el efecto de gravedad de la raíz andina. El filtrado de superficies de tendencia nos permitió establecer la existencia de máximos de gravedad sobre la cuenca propiamente dicha. Además, el análisis isostático en el concepto de Airy, postulando anti-raíces a nivel de Moho bajo la depresión, indicó un estado actual de leve sobrecompensación. En este sentido la cuenca debería, en lo futuro, subsidir para alcanzar el equilibrio. El modelado gravimétrico sobre dos secciones transversales en 33° 30' y 35° de latitud sur, en términos de la topografía de Moho, señalan que el Moho sería más somero bajo la cuenca. Estos resultados indican que un modelo que admite leve atenuación cortical actual para justificar los excesos de gravedad, es factible de ser postulado para la estructura cortical de la cuenca Cuyana.The Cuyo Basin is a part of the Triassic basin set developed in the Andean foreland of Argentina. The origin of this structure has been postulated as being the result of extensional stresses. Crustal thinning is a

  6. Surface effects of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Feedback between drip dynamics and crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Currie, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For many continental plates, significant vertical motion of Earth's surface has occurred within the plate interior which can not be clearly linked to plate tectonic processes. For example, several craton areas exhibit anomalous basins, e.g., the Williston basin, Illinois basin and Michigan basin in North America. In orogenic belts, there are examples of local areas (~100 km wide) where the surface has undergone subsidence and then uplift of >1 km, such as the Arizaro basin (central Andes) and Wallowa Mountains (northeast Oregon). Given the near-circular shape of the surface deflection, it has been suggested that they may be related to gravitational foundering of dense lower lithosphere, i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor instability (or 'RT drip'). In order to investigate the surface effects of an RT drip, we use two methods: (1) 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models to study links between drip dynamics and crustal deformation and (2) a theoretical analysis of the crustal deformation induced by stresses from the RT drip. The numerical models consist of a continental lithosphere overlying a sublithospheric mantle. A high-density material is placed in the mantle lithosphere or lower crust to initiate a drip event, and a stress-free boundary condition allows the development of surface topography during model evolution. A reasonable range of crustal viscosity and thickness is tested to study the RT drip in different tectonic settings, from a cold craton to a hot orogen with thick crust. Four types of surface deflection are observed: (1) subsidence; (2) subsidence followed by uplift; (3) uplift; and (4) little deflection. When the crust is relatively strong or thin, the surface has a negative elevation, forming a basin. For a weak or thick crust, the RT drip induces crustal flow, leading to crustal thickening that can uplift the surface; an extremely weak crust decouples the surface and RT drip and the surface is unperturbed. Our theoretical analysis considers the surface

  7. Structural and Mechanical Characterization of Nanocrystalline Tungsten and Tungsten-Based Alloy Thin Films for Extreme Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gustavo

    Extreme environments associated with nuclear applications often results in degradation of the physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the materials. Tungsten (W) exhibits unique physical and mechanical properties, which makes tungsten a good candidate for nuclear applications; however, intrinsic W exhibits low fracture toughness at all temperatures in addition to a high ductile to brittle transition. In the present work, nanocrystalline W, W-Y and W-Mo alloys were nanoengineered for nuclear applications. Nanocrystalline tungsten coatings with a thickness of 1 microm were deposited onto Silicon (100) and Sapphire (C-plane) using RF and DC sputtering techniques under various growth conditions. Yttrium content in W-Y alloys has been varied to enhance the irradiation tolerance under optimum concentration. The W, W-Y coatings were characterized to understand the structure and morphology and to establish a mapping of conditions to obtain phase and size controlled materials. The samples were then subjected to depth-controlled irradiation by neutrons and Au3+ ions. Solid solution strengthening was achieved by doping molybdenum (Mo) solute atoms to W matrix under varied sputtering pressures and temperatures with the intention of creating interstitial point defects in the crystals that impede dislocation motion, increasing the hardness and young modulus of the material. The effect of PAr (3-19 mTorr) was also investigated and associated microstructure are significant on the mechanical characteristics; the hardness (H) and modulus of elasticity (Er) of the nc W-Mo thin films were higher at lower pressures but decreases continuously with increasing PAr. Using nano-indentation and nano-scratch technique, mechanical characterization testing was performed before and after irradiation. The structure, mechanics and irradiation stability of the W and W-Y coatings will be presented and discussed to demonstrate that Y-addition coupled with nano-scale features

  8. The Glacial BuzzSaw, Isostasy, and Global Crustal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Oncken, O.; Niu, F.

    2015-12-01

    The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis predicts that maximum elevations in orogens at high latitudes are depressed relative to temperate latitudes, as maximum elevation and hypsography of glaciated orogens are functions of the glacial equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and the modern and last glacial maximum (LGM) snowlines. As a consequence crustal thickness, density, or both must change with increasing latitude to maintain isostatic balance. For Airy compensation crustal thickness should decrease toward polar latitudes, whereas for Pratt compensation crustal densities should increase. For similar convergence rates, higher latitude orogens should have higher grade, and presumably higher density rocks in the crustal column due to more efficient glacial erosion. We have examined a number of global and regional crustal models to see if these predictions appear in the models. Crustal thickness is straightforward to examine, crustal density less so. The different crustal models generally agree with one another, but do show some major differences. We used a standard tectonic classification scheme of the crust for data selection. The globally averaged orogens show crustal thicknesses that decrease toward high latitudes, almost reflecting topography, in both the individual crustal models and the models averaged together. The most convincing is the western hemisphere cordillera, where elevations and crustal thicknesses decrease toward the poles, and also toward lower latitudes (the equatorial minimum is at ~12oN). The elevation differences and Airy prediction of crustal thickness changes are in reasonable agreement in the North American Cordillera, but in South America the observed crustal thickness change is larger than the Airy prediction. The Alpine-Himalayan chain shows similar trends, however the strike of the chain makes interpretation ambiguous. We also examined cratons with ice sheets during the last glacial period to see if continental glaciation also thins the crust toward

  9. Extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongjie; Wei, Yin; Wen, Jiangbo; Niu, Min; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to clarify the extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical behaviors of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension. It is found that fracture stresses show almost no change with increasing strain rate. However, fracture strains decrease gradually due to the appearance of additional N(2c)-Si bond breaking defects in the deformation process. With increasing loading temperature, there is a noticeable drop in fracture stress and fracture strain. In the low temperature range, roughness phases can be observed owing to a combination of factors such as configuration evolution and energy change.

  10. Relaxation mechanisms affecting magneto-optical resonances in an extremely thin cell: experiment and theory for the cesium D$_1$ line

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, M; Ferber, R; Gahbauer, F; Kalnins, U; Kalvans, L; Rundans, R; Sarkisyan, D

    2014-01-01

    We have measured magneto-optical signals obtained by exciting the $D_1$ line of cesium atoms confined to an extremely thin cell (ETC), whose walls are separated by less than one micrometer, and developed an improved theoretical model to describe these signals with experimental precision. The theoretical model was based on the optical Bloch equations and included all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of the magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, and the Doppler effect, as in previous studies. However, in order to model the extreme conditions in the ETC more realistically, the model was extended to include a unified treatment of transit relaxation and wall collisions with relaxation rates that were obtained directly from the thermal velocities of the atoms and the length scales involved. Furthermore, the interaction of the atoms with different regions of the laser beam were modeled separately to account for the varying laser beam intensity over the beam profile as well as saturation effec...

  11. Evaluating effects of climate variability, extreme weather events and thinning on carbon and water exchanges in managed temperate forests in eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, M.; Brodeur, J. J.; Trant, J.; Thorne, R.; Peichl, M.; Kula, M.; Parsaud, A.; Khader, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this study the impact of climate variability and extreme weather events on gross ecosystem productivity (GEP), ecosystem respiration (RE), net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and evapotranspiration (E) is evaluated in an age-sequence (74-, 39- and 11-years old) of temperate pine (Pinus strobus L.) forests, north of Lake Erie in southern Ontario, Canada using ten years (2003-2012) of eddy covariance flux and meteorological data. Fluxes from conifer stands are also compared with measurements made in an 80-year-old deciduous (Carolinian) forest, established in 2012. All four sites are managed forests and part of the Turkey Point Flux Station and global Fluxnet. Ten-year mean NEP values were 169 (75 to 312), 371 (305 to 456, over 2008-2012) and 141 (-10 to 420) g C/m2/year in the 74-, 39-, and 11-year-old stand, respectively, while mean NEP in the 80-year-old deciduous stand was 286 g C/m2/year in 2012. This region is affected by low frequency climate oscillations, such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The study period experienced four distinct extreme weather patterns: warm and dry springs in 2005 and 2012, extremely wet and warm summer in 2006, a summer drought in 2007 and warm summers in 2010 and 2012. In February-March 2012, the 74-year-old stand was selectively thinned and approximately 30% of trees were removed to improve light and water availability and stimulate growth of remaining trees. Thinning and warm/dry spring reduced NEP in the first post-thinning year, with mean annual NEP of 75 g C/m2/year in 2012. Increased supply of dead organic matter and warm temperatures in 2012 increased RE much more than GEP, resulting in lower annual NEP. Heat stress and drought in spring of 2005 reduced NEP of the 74-year stand to 78 g C/m2/year. The impact of this extreme weather event on NEP was similar to that observed in 2012 when stand experienced a drastic structural change, dry spring and warm temperatures throughout the

  12. Visible light dynamical diffraction in a 1-D photonic crystal-based interferometer with an extremely thin spacer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of light diffraction in a Fabry-Pérot-like interferometer composed of two 1-D photonic crystals and a nanometer-thick spacer layer are analytically investigated. It is shown that the resonant enhancement of light wave intensity in such a layer is possible because of light dynamical diffraction from the photonic crystals of the interferometer. Numerical simulations of (i) light reflectivity and transmittance curves of the interferometer having an ultra-thin spacer layer (its thickness changes from less than 1 nm to about 10 nm) and (ii) the resonant distribution of the light wave intensity in the vicinity of the layer are performed. Based on the numerical simulations, potentialities for the determination of the structural parameters (e.g., thicknesses and refraction indexes) of ultra-thin spacer films are discussed. A difference is found to appear in resonant intensity enhancements inside the ultra-thin spacer layers between s- and p-polarized light waves.

  13. Antarctic Crustal Thickness from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The continental lithosphere thinning distribution, used to define the initial thermal model temperature perturbation is derived from the gravity inversion and uses no a priori isochron information; as a consequence the gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition location, which is independent of ocean isochron information. The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the most recent Bedmap2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south (Fretwell et al., 2013) and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica penetrated by narrow continental rifts that feature relatively thinner crust. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS) is a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. This is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system. Intermediate crustal thickness with an inferred linear rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica

  14. Laser ablation for membrane processing of AlGaN/GaN- and micro structured ferroelectric thin film MEMS and SiC pressure sensors for extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetner, J.; Vanko, G.; Dzuba, J.; Ryger, I.; Lalinsky, T.; Benkler, Manuel; Lucki, Michal

    2015-05-01

    AlGaN/GaN based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), Schottky diodes and/or resistors have been presented as sensing devices for mechanical or chemical sensors operating in extreme conditions. In addition we investigate ferroelectric thin films for integration into micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS). Creation of appropriate diaphragms and/or cantilevers out of SiC is necessary for further improvement of sensing properties of such MEMS sensors. For example sensitivity of the AlGaN/GaN based MEMS pressure sensor can be modified by membrane thickness. We demonstrated that a 4H-SiC 80μm thick diaphragms can be fabricated much faster with laser ablation than by electrochemical, photochemical or reactive ion etching (RIE). We were able to verify the feasibility of this process by fabrication of micromechanical membrane structures also in bulk 3C-SiC, borosilicate glass, sapphire and Al2O3 ceramic substrates by femtosecond laser (520nm) ablation. On a 350μm thick 4H-SiC substrate we produced an array of 275μm deep and 1000μm to 3000μm of diameter blind holes without damaging the 2μm AlN layer at the back side. In addition we investigated ferroelectric thin films as they can be deposited and micro-patterned by a direct UV-lithography method after the ablation process for a specific membrane design. The risk to harm or damage the function of thin films was eliminated by that means. Some defects in the ablated membranes are also affected by the polarisation of the laser light. Ripple structures oriented perpendicular to the laser polarisation promote creation of pin holes which would perforate a thin membrane. We developed an ablation technique strongly inhibiting formation of ripples and pin poles.

  15. Mitigation of effects of extreme drought during stage III of peach fruit development by summer pruning and fruit thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gerardo; Mata, Mercè; Arbones, Amadeu; Solans, Josep R; Girona, Joan; Marsal, Jordi

    2006-04-01

    A water deficit during stage III of fruit growth was established with the aim of determining if it is possible to achieve an improvement in tree water status by summer pruning and fruit thinning. The experiment was set up as a randomized block split-plot design across trials (irrigation) where pruning was assigned to the main plot and fruit thinning to the sub-plots. The irrigation treatments were (1) standard full irrigation (FI), and (2) suppression of irrigation during stage III of fruit growth until leaves visibly withered (LWI); the pruning treatments were (1) experimental summer pruning (EP), and (2) standard summer pruning (CP); and three fruit thinning intensities were applied to facilitate analysis of the effects of the treatments in relation to fruit load. Changes in amount of light intercepted and in tree stem water potential (Psi stem) were evaluated. The EP treatment reduced the amount of light intercepted by the tree. In the FI treatment, there was a significant reduction in fruit growth measured as both water accumulation and dry mass accumulation. Under FI conditions, reductions in fruit load as a result of EP were not accompanied by a significant improvement in Psi stem. In the LWI treatment, EP produced a significant improvement of 0.17 MPa in Psi stem, but there was no improvement in fruit growth compared with CP trees. A reduction in fruit load from 350 (commercial load) to 150 per tree significantly improved Psi stem by 0.3 MPa at the end of stage III of fruit growth. These results indicate that improvements in water status in response to pruning may be insufficient to promote fruit growth if the pruned trees are unable to provide an adequate supply of assimilates to the developing fruits.

  16. Ultra-thin metamaterial absorber with extremely bandwidth for solar cell and sensing applications in visible region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingyao; Xiao, Zhongyin; Xu, Kaikai

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a broadband and ultra-thin metamaterial absorber in the visible region. The absorber is composed of three layers, and the most remarkable difference is that the split ring resonators (SRR) made of metal stannum are encrusted in the indium antimonide (InSb) plane on the top layer. Numerical results reveal that a broadband absorption spectrum above 90% can be realized from 353.9 THz to 613.2 THz due to the coupling effect between the material of stannum and InSb. The metamaterial absorber is ultra-thin, having the total thickness of 56 nm, i.e. less than λ/10 with respect to the center frequency of the absorption band more than 90%. In addition, the impedance matching theory, surface current distributions, E-field and H-field are investigated to explain the physical mechanism of the absorption. The sensing applications are discussed and the simulated results show that the proposed absorber operates well with a good efficiency. Moreover, the visible absorber has potential applications in the aspects of solar energy harvest, integrated photodetectors and so on.

  17. M-H loop tracer based on digital signal processing for low frequency characterization of extremely thin magnetic wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butta, M.; Ripka, P. [Department of Measurement, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague 16627 (Czech Republic); Infante, G.; Badini-Confalonieri, G. A.; Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Campus de Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    A high-sensitivity ac hysteresis loop tracer has been developed to measure the low frequency hysteresis loop of soft magnetic materials. It has been applied successfully to characterize straight pieces of amorphous glass-covered microwires with metallic nucleus down to 1.5 {mu}m thick. Based on the electromagnetic induction law, the proposed design is extremely simple and exploits the capabilities of commercially available data acquisition cards together with digital signal processing in order to achieve high-sensitivity without the need of expensive analog equipment.

  18. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and streamflow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Hernan A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; White, Dave D.; Sampson, David A.

    2016-03-01

    To achieve water resource sustainability in the water-limited southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basinwise streamflows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. Using the physically based, spatially distributed triangulated irregular network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) model, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI on the hydrology of Tonto Creek, a basin in the Verde-Tonto-Salt (VTS) system, which provides much of the water supply for the Phoenix metropolitan area. Long-term (20-year) simulations indicate that forest removal can trigger significant shifts in the spatiotemporal patterns of various hydrological components, causing increases in net radiation, surface temperature, wind speed, soil evaporation, groundwater recharge and runoff, at the expense of reductions in interception and shading, transpiration, vadose zone moisture and snow water equivalent, with south-facing slopes being more susceptible to enhanced atmospheric losses. The net effect will likely be increases in mean and maximum streamflow, particularly during El Niño events and the winter months, and chiefly for those scenarios in which soil hydraulic conductivity has been significantly reduced due to thinning operations. In this particular climate, forest thinning can lead to net loss of surface water storage by vegetation and snowpack, increasing the vulnerability of ecosystems and populations to larger and more frequent hydrologic extreme conditions on these semi-arid systems.

  19. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and stream flow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Moreno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To achieve water resources sustainability in the water-limited Southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basin-wise stream flows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. Using the physically based, spatially distributed tRIBS model, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI on the hydrology of Tonto Creek, a basin in the Verde–Tonto–Salt (VTS system, which provides much of the water supply for the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. Long-term (20 year simulations indicate that forest removal can trigger significant shifts in the spatio-temporal patterns of various hydrological components, causing increases in net radiation, surface temperature, wind speed, soil evaporation, groundwater recharge, and runoff, at the expense of reductions in interception and shading, transpiration, vadose zone moisture and snow water equivalent, with south facing slopes being more susceptible to enhanced atmospheric losses. The net effect will likely be increases in mean and maximum stream flow, particularly during El Niño events and the winter months, and chiefly for those scenarios in which soil hydraulic conductivity has been significantly reduced due to thinning operations. In this particular climate, forest thinning can lead to net loss of surface water storage by vegetation and snow pack, increasing the vulnerability of ecosystems and populations to larger and more frequent hydrologic extreme conditions on these semi-arid systems.

  20. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution and crustal architecture of the Orphan Basin during North Atlantic rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouiza, Mohamed; Hall, Jeremy; Welford, J. Kim

    2016-06-01

    The Orphan Basin is located in the deep offshore of the Newfoundland margin, and it is bounded by the continental shelf to the west, the Grand Banks to the south, and the continental blocks of Orphan Knoll and Flemish Cap to the east. The Orphan Basin formed in Mesozoic time during the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean between eastern Canada and western Iberia-Europe. This work, based on well data and regional seismic reflection profiles across the basin, indicates that the continental crust was affected by several extensional episodes between the Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous, separated by events of uplift and erosion. The preserved tectono-stratigraphic sequences in the basin reveal that deformation initiated in the eastern part of the Orphan Basin in the Jurassic and spread towards the west in the Early Cretaceous, resulting in numerous rift structures filled with a Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous syn-rift succession and overlain by thick Upper Cretaceous to Cenozoic post-rift sediments. The seismic data show an extremely thinned crust (4-16 km thick) underneath the eastern and western parts of the Orphan Basin, forming two sub-basins separated by a wide structural high with a relatively thick crust (17 km thick). Quantifying the crustal architecture in the basin highlights the large discrepancy between brittle extension localized in the upper crust and the overall crustal thinning. This suggests that continental deformation in the Orphan Basin involved, in addition to the documented Jurassic and Early Cretaceous rifting, an earlier brittle rift phase which is unidentifiable in seismic data and a depth-dependent thinning of the crust driven by localized lower crust ductile flow.

  1. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Silver, Paul G.; Drake, Lawrence

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20°S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). Waveforms of deep regional events in the downgoing Nazca slab and teleseismic earthquakes were processed to isolate the P-to-S converted phases from the Moho in order to compute the crustal thickness. We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70 74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32 38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20°S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16°S, 55 60 km) to south (20°S, 70 74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton.

  2. Crustal response to lithosphere evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Cherepanova, Yulia;

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the structure of the crust in an area which stretches from the North Atlantic region in the west to the Verkhoyansk Ridge in the east and encompasses Greenland, Iceland, most of Europe, West Siberian basin, and the Siberian cratons. The model is based on critically...... such as lower crust/lithospheric mantle delamination in the Variscan Europe and large-scale rifting across the entire West Siberian basin. The results are summarized in a series of maps of lateral variations in crustal properties, including the depth to the basement and to the Moho, average crustal velocity......, thicknesses of different crustal layers, and Pn seismic velocities....

  3. 3-D solar cells by electrochemical-deposited Se layer as extremely-thin absorber and hole conducting layer on nanocrystalline TiO2 electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy-Cuong; Tanaka, Souichirou; Nishino, Hitoshi; Manabe, Kyohei; Ito, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional selenium solar cell with the structure of Au/Se/porous TiO2/compact TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass plates was fabricated by an electrochemical deposition method of selenium, which can work for the extremely thin light absorber and the hole-conducting layer. The effect of experimental conditions, such as HCl and H2SeO3 in an electrochemical solution and TiO2 particle size of porous layers, was optimized. This kind of solar cell did not use any buffer layer between an n-type electrode (porous TiO2) and a p-type absorber layer (selenium). The crystallinity of the selenium after annealing at 200°C for 3 min in the air was significantly improved. The cells with a selenium layer deposited at concentrations of HCl = 11.5 mM and H2SeO3 = 20 mM showed the best performance, resulting in 1- to 2-nm thickness of the Se layer, short-circuit photocurrent density of 8.7 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, fill factor of 0.53, and conversion efficiency of 3.0%.

  4. Mechanisms of crustal deformation in the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The deformation processes in the western United States were studied, considering both deterministic models and random or statistical models. The role of the intracrustal delamination and mechanisms of crustal thinning were also examined. The application of fractal techniques to understand how the crust is deforming was studied in complex regions. Work continued on the development of a fractal based model for deformation in the western United States. Fractal studies were also extended to the study of topography and the geoid.

  5. Crustal structure of southern Madagascar from receiver functions and ambient noise correlation: Implications for crustal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindraharisaona, E. J.; Tilmann, F.; Yuan, X.; Rümpker, G.; Giese, J.; Rambolamanana, G.; Barruol, G.

    2017-02-01

    The Precambrian rocks of Madagascar were formed and/or modified during continental collision known as the Pan-African orogeny. Aborted Permo-Triassic Karoo rifting and the subsequent separation from Africa and India resulted in the formation of sedimentary basins in the west and volcanic activity predominantly along the margins. Many geological studies have documented the imprint of these processes, but little was known about the deeper structure. We therefore deployed seismic stations along an SE-NW trending profile spanning nearly all geological domains of southern Madagascar. Here we focus on the crustal structure, which we determined based on joint analysis of receiver functions and surface waves derived from ambient noise measurements. For the sedimentary basin we document a thinning of the underlying crystalline basement by up to ˜60% to 13 km. The crustal velocity structure demonstrates that the thinning was accomplished by removal or exhumation of the lower crust. Both the Proterozoic and Archean crust have a 10 km thick upper crust and 10-12 km thick midcrust. However, in contrast to the typical structure of Proterozoic and Archean aged crust, the Archean lower crust is thicker and faster than the Proterozoic one, indicating possible magmatic intrusions; an underplated layer of 2-8 km thickness is present only below the Archean crust. The Proterozoic mafic lower crust might have been lost during continental collision by delamination or subduction or thinned as a result of extensional collapse. Finally, the Cretaceous volcanics along the east coast are characterized by thin crust (30 km) and very large VP/VS ratios.

  6. The crustal structure of Egypt and the northern Red Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Ahmed; Nyblade, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    P-wave receiver functions from 26 stations in the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) have been modeled using the H-k stacking method and in a joint inversion method with Rayleigh wave group velocities to investigate crustal structure across Egypt and the northern Red Sea region. The new estimates of crustal structure, when combined with previous results, show that along the rifted margins of the Red Sea, Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aqaba crustal thickness ranges from 25 to 30 km, the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.77, and the average crustal shear-wave velocity is 3.6 km/s. Beneath northern and central Egypt, including the Sinai Peninsula, crustal thickness ranges from 32 to 38 km, the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.79, and the average crustal shear-wave velocity is 3.5 km/s. Beneath southern Egypt, crustal thickness ranges from 35 to 40 km, the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.76, and the average crustal shear-wave velocity is 3.7 km/s. In southern Egypt, the crust is also characterized by a 10-20 km thick mafic lower crust. These findings indicate that crust along the rifted margins of the northern Red Sea, and Gulfs of Suez and Aqaba have been thinned by about 5 to 10 km. The thick mafic lower crust in southern Egypt can be attributed to suturing during the Neoproterozoic collision of east Gondwana against the Sahara metacraton. Overall, the structure of the crust in Egypt away from the northern Red Sea region is similar to the structure of Precambrian crust in many other parts of Africa.

  7. Moroccan crustal response to continental drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanes, W H; Saadi, M; Ehrlich, E; Alem, A

    1973-06-01

    The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic as a marine carbonate environment; that it was dominated by tensile stresses in the early Mesozoic, resulting in two fault systems paralleling the Atlantic and Mediterranean margins and a basin and range structural-depositional style; and that it was affected by late Paleozoic metamorphism and intrusion. Mesozoic events record the latter portion of African involvement in the spreading episode; late Paleozoic thermal orogenesis might reflect the earlier events in the initiation of the spreading center and its development beneath significant continental crust. In that case, more than 100 million years were required for mantle dynamics to break up Pangea.

  8. Crustal response to lithosphere evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Cherepanova, Yulia;

    2012-01-01

    assessed results from various seismic studies, including reflection and refraction profiles and receiver function studies. The region includes a nearly continuous age record for crustal evolution over ca. 3.6-3.8 billion years. We present an analysis of the crustal structure heterogeneity in relation...... to geological and tectono-thermal ages of the crust, and the tectonic setting. The results indicate that the Precambrian crust is as heterogeneous as Phanerozoic, and we do not observe any evidence for thickening from the Archean to Proterozoic crust. If anything, our analysis rather suggests the opposite trend...

  9. Lateral variations of crustal structure beneath the Indochina Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Youqiang; Hung, Tran D.; Yang, Ting; Xue, Mei; Liu, Kelly H.; Gao, Stephen S.

    2017-08-01

    Crustal thickness (H) and Vp/Vs (κ) measurements obtained by stacking P-to-S receiver functions recorded at 32 broadband seismic stations covering the Indochina Peninsula reveal systematic spatial variations in crustal properties. Mafic bulk crustal composition as indicated by high κ (>1.81) observations is found to exist along major strike-slip faults and the southern part of the Peninsula, where pervasive basaltic magmatism is found and is believed to be the results of lithospheric thinning associated with the indentation of the Indian into the Eurasian plates. In contrast, crust beneath the Khorat Plateau, which occupies the core of the Indochina Block, has relatively large H values with a mean of 36.9 ± 3 km and small κ measurements with an average of 1.74 ± 0.04, which indicates an overall felsic bulk composition. Those observations for the Khorat Plateau are comparable to the undeformed part of the South China Block. The laterally heterogeneous distribution of crustal properties and its correspondence with indentation-related tectonic features suggest that the Indochina lithosphere is extruded as rigid blocks rather than as a viscous flow.

  10. Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor - Poster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor Poster was created at NGDC using the Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor database draped digitally over a relief of the ocean floor...

  11. Crustal structure beneath Eastern Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiche, Sönke; Thybo, H.; Kaip, G.

    2011-01-01

    these mountain belts is needed for assessing the isostatic balance of the crust and to gain insight into possible links between crustal composition, rifting history and present-day topography of the North Atlantic Region. However, the acquisition of geophysical data onshore Greenland is logistically complicated...

  12. Central Andean crustal structure from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jamie; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Wagner, Lara; Minaya, Estela; Tavera, Hernado

    2016-07-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (15°-27°S) is a high plateau in excess of 3 km elevation, associated with thickened crust along the western edge of the South America plate, in the convergent margin between the subducting Nazca plate and the Brazilian craton. We have calculated receiver functions using seismic data from a recent portable deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-21°S) region and combined them with waveforms from 38 other stations in the region to investigate crustal thickness and crust and mantle structures. Results from the receiver functions provide a more detailed map of crustal thickness than previously existed, and highlight mid-crustal features that match well with prior studies. The active volcanic arc and Altiplano have thick crust with Moho depths increasing from the central Altiplano (65 km) to the northern Altiplano (75 km). The Eastern Cordillera shows large along strike variations in crustal thickness. Along a densely sampled SW-NE profile through the Bolivian orocline there is a small region of thin crust beneath the high peaks of the Cordillera Real where the average elevations are near 4 km, and the Moho depth varies from 55 to 60 km, implying the crust is undercompensated by 5 km. In comparison, a broader region of high elevations in the Eastern Cordillera to the southeast near 20°S has a deeper Moho at 65-70 km and appears close to isostatic equilibrium at the Moho. Assuming the modern-day pattern of high precipitation on the flanks of the Andean plateau has existed since the late Miocene, we suggest that climate induced exhumation can explain some of the variations in present day crustal structure across the Bolivian orocline. We also suggest that south of the orocline at 20°S, the thicker and isostatically compensated crust is due to the absence of erosional exhumation and the occurrence of lithospheric delamination.

  13. How extreme are extremes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  14. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells.

  15. Crustal Seismic Anisotropy: Implications for Understanding Crustal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, A.; Christensen, N.; Okaya, D.

    2003-12-01

    The Nanga Parbat - Haramosh massif, in the core of the western syntaxis of the Himalaya, represents a unique exposure of mid-lower continental crust from beneath a collisional orogen. The exhumed core of the massif forms a large scale antiformal structure with axial orientation of N10E and associated lineation directed north-south with near-vertical dips. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity on a suite of quartzofeldspathic gneisses from the massif show a relatively strong degree of anisotropy, up to 12.5% for compressional waves and up to 21% for shear waves. The degree of velocity anisotropy is primarily a function of mica content and rock fabric strength. The strong anisotropy measured in these rocks should be observable in recorded seismic field data and provides a means of mapping rock fabric at depth provided the rock fabric is coherent over appropriate length scales. An IRIS/PASSCAL deployment of 50 short period instruments recorded local and regional earthquakes to characterize seismicity and determine crustal structure beneath the massif as part of a multidisciplinary NSF Continental Dynamics study investigating the active tectonic processes responsible for exhumation and crustal reworking at Nanga Parbat. Microseismicity at Nanga Parbat is distributed along strike beneath the massif but exhibits a sharp drop-off laterally into adjacent terranes and with depth. This data set is ideal for studying crustal seismic anisotropy because the raypaths are restricted to the crust, sharp onsets in P and S allow for clear identification of arrivals, and source-receiver geometries sample a range of azimuths with respect to structure. Preliminary analysis indicates that the majority of local events exhibit some degree of splitting and that splitting patterns, while complicated, are coherent. While splitting delay normally increases with distance traveled through anisotropic material, the range of delay times can be due to heterogeneity in composition, lateral

  16. Regional metamorphism at extreme conditions: Implications for orogeny at convergent plate margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Chen, Ren-Xu

    2017-09-01

    Regional metamorphism at extreme conditions refers either to Alpine-type metamorphism at low geothermal gradients of 30 °C/km. Extreme pressures refer to those above the polymorphic transition of quartz to coesite, so that ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) eclogite-facies metamorphism occurs at mantle depths of >80 km. Extreme temperatures refer to those higher than 900 °C at crustal depths of ≤80 km, so that ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) granulite-facies metamorphism occurs at medium to high pressures. While crustal subduction at the low geothermal gradients results in blueschist-eclogite facies series without arc volcanism, heating of the thinned orogenic lithosphere brings about the high geothermal gradients for amphibolite-granulite facies series with abundant magmatism. Therefore, UHP metamorphic rocks result from cold lithospheric subduction to the mantle depths, whereas UHT metamorphic rocks are produced by hot underplating of the asthenospheric mantle at the crustal depths. Active continental rifting is developed on the thinned lithosphere in response to asthenospheric upwelling, and this tectonism is suggested as a feasible mechanism for regional granulite-facies metamorphism, with the maximum temperature depending on the extent to which the mantle lithosphere is thinned prior to the rifting. While lithospheric compression is associated with subduction metamorphism in accretionary and collisional orogens, the thinned orogenic lithosphere undergoes extension due to the asthenospheric upwelling to result in orogen-parallel rifting metamorphism and magmatism. Thus, the rifting metamorphism provides a complement to the subduction metamorphism and its operation marks the asthenospheric heating of the orogenic lithosphere. Because of the partial melting and melt extraction of the lower continental crust, contemporaneous granite-migmatite-granulite associations may serve as a petrological indicator of rifting orogeny that is superimposed on precedingly accretionary and

  17. Arctic and N Atlantic Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Alvey, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The ocean basins of the Arctic and N. Atlantic formed during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic as a series of distinct ocean basins, both small and large, leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust and rifted continental margins. The plate tectonic framework of this region was demonstrated by the pioneering work of Peter Ziegler in AAPG Memoir 43 " Evolution of the Arctic-North Atlantic and the Western Tethys" published in 1988. The spatial evolution of Arctic Ocean and N Atlantic ocean basin geometry and bathymetry are critical not only for hydrocarbon exploration but also for understanding regional palaeo-oceanography and ocean gateway connectivity, and its influence on global climate. Mapping crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. Using gravity anomaly inversion we have produced comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic and N Atlantic region, We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir 2008). Gravity anomaly and bathymetry data used in the gravity inversion are from the NGA (U) Arctic Gravity Project and IBCAO respectively; sediment thickness is from a new regional compilation. The resulting maps of crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor are used to determine continent-ocean boundary location and the distribution of oceanic lithosphere. Crustal cross-sections using Moho depth from the gravity inversion allow continent-ocean transition structure to be determined and magmatic type (magma poor, "normal" or magma rich). Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Eurasia, Canada, Makarov, Podvodnikov and Baffin Basins

  18. Deep scientific drilling results from Koyna and Killari earthquake regions reveal why Indian shield lithosphere is unusual, thin and warm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.P. Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The nature of crustal and lithospheric mantle evolution of the Archean shields as well as their subsequent deformation due to recent plate motions and sustained intraplate geodynamic activity, has been a subject of considerable interest. In view of this, about three decades ago, a new idea was put forward suggesting that out of all shield terrains, the Indian shield has an extremely thin lithosphere (∼100 km, compared to 250–350 km, elsewhere, apart from being warm, non-rigid, sheared and deformed. As expected, it met with scepticism by heat flow and the emerging seismic tomographic study groups, who on the contrary suggested that the Indian shield has a cool crust, besides a coherent and thick lithosphere (as much as 300–400 km like any other shield. However, recently obtained integrated geological and geophysical findings from deep scientific drillings in 1993 Killari (Mw: 6.3 and 1967 Koyna (Mw: 6.3 earthquake zones, as well as newly acquired geophysical data over other parts of Indian shield terrain, have provided a totally new insight to this debate. Beneath Killari, the basement was found consisting of high density, high velocity mid crustal amphibolite to granulite facies rocks due to exhumation of the deeper crustal layers and sustained granitic upper crustal erosion. Similar type of basement appears to be present in Koyna region too, which is characterized by considerably high upper crustal temperatures. Since, such type of crust is depleted in radiogenic elements, it resulted into lowering of heat flow at the surface, increase in heat flow contribution from the mantle, and upwarping of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Consequently, the Indian shield lithosphere has become unusually thin and warm. This study highlights the need of an integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical approach in order to accurately determine deep crust-mantle thermal regime in continental areas.

  19. Deep scientific drilling results from Koyna and Killari earthquake regions reveal why Indian shield lithosphere is unusual, thin and warm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.P. Pandey

    2016-01-01

    The nature of crustal and lithospheric mantle evolution of the Archean shields as well as their subse-quent deformation due to recent plate motions and sustained intraplate geodynamic activity, has been a subject of considerable interest. In view of this, about three decades ago, a new idea was put forward suggesting that out of all shield terrains, the Indian shield has an extremely thin lithosphere (w100 km, compared to 250e350 km, elsewhere), apart from being warm, non-rigid, sheared and deformed. As expected, it met with scepticism by heat flow and the emerging seismic tomographic study groups, who on the contrary suggested that the Indian shield has a cool crust, besides a coherent and thick lithosphere (as much as 300e400 km) like any other shield. However, recently obtained integrated geological and geophysical findings from deep scientific drillings in 1993 Killari (Mw: 6.3) and 1967 Koyna (Mw: 6.3) earthquake zones, as well as newly acquired geophysical data over other parts of Indian shield terrain, have provided a totally new insight to this debate. Beneath Killari, the basement was found consisting of high density, high velocity mid crustal amphibolite to granulite facies rocks due to exhumation of the deeper crustal layers and sustained granitic upper crustal erosion. Similar type of basement appears to be present in Koyna region too, which is characterized by considerably high upper crustal temperatures. Since, such type of crust is depleted in radiogenic elements, it resulted into lowering of heat flow at the surface, increase in heat flow contribution from the mantle, and upwarping of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Consequently, the Indian shield lithosphere has become unusually thin and warm. This study highlights the need of an integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical approach in order to accurately determine deep crust-mantle thermal regime in continental areas.

  20. Crustal growth in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Katharina; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    There is a broad interest in understanding the physical principles leading to arc magmatisim at active continental margins and different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the composition and evolution of the continental crust. It is widely accepted that water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle allowing for "flux melting" of the hydrated mantle. However, relamination of subducted crustal material to the base of the continental crust has been recently suggested to account for the growth and composition of the continental crust. We use petrological-thermo-mechanical models of active subduction zones to demonstrate that subduction of crustal material to sublithospheric depth may result in the formation of a tectonic rock mélange composed of basalt, sediment and hydrated /serpentinized mantle. This rock mélange may evolve into a partially molten diapir at asthenospheric depth and rise through the mantle because of its intrinsic buoyancy prior to emplacement at crustal levels (relamination). This process can be episodic and long-lived, forming successive diapirs that represent multiple magma pulses. Recent laboratory experiments of Castro et al. (2013) have demonstrated that reactions between these crustal components (i.e. basalt and sediment) produce andesitic melt typical for rocks of the continental crust. However, melt derived from a composite diapir will inherit the geochemical characteristics of its source and show distinct temporal variations of radiogenic isotopes based on the proportions of basalt and sediment in the source (Vogt et al., 2013). Hence, partial melting of a composite diapir is expected to produce melt with a constant major element composition, but substantial changes in terms of radiogenic isotopes. However, crustal growth at active continental margins may also involve accretionary processes by which new material is added to the continental crust. Oceanic plateaus and other

  1. Analysis the 1978–2008 crustal and sub-crustal earthquake catalog of Vrancea region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Telesca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The crustal and sub-crustal seismicity that occurred in the Vrancea area from 1978 to 2008 is investigated. Due to quarry blast contamination, the analysis of the crustal seismicity was restricted to events that occurred between 20 km and 60 km, considering sub-crustal events as all those that occurred at depths larger than 60 km. The completeness magnitude was estimated between 2.3 and 2.5 for the crustal seismicity and between 2.9 and 3.1 for the sub-crustal one. The Gutenberg-Richter b-values show clear differences between crustal and sub-crustal seismicity, with values around 0.9 and 1.3–1.4, respectively. The analysis performed in this study represents a preliminary issue for the seismic hazard assessment of surrounding regions like Moldova, for which the earthquakes generated in Vrancea represent an important threat.

  2. Crustal structure beneath Eastern Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiche, Sönke; Thybo, H.; Kaip, G.

    2011-01-01

    is recorded by 350 Reftek Texan receivers for 10 equidistant shot points along the profile. We use forward ray tracing modelling to construct a two-dimensional velocity model from the observed travel times. These results show the first images of the subsurface velocity structure beneath the Greenland ice...... these mountain belts is needed for assessing the isostatic balance of the crust and to gain insight into possible links between crustal composition, rifting history and present-day topography of the North Atlantic Region. However, the acquisition of geophysical data onshore Greenland is logistically complicated...

  3. Magnetorheological suspensions based on modified carbonyl iron particles with an extremely thin poly(n-butyl acrylate) layer and their enhanced stability properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrlik, Miroslav; Pavlinek, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    This study is focused on the modification of magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles with a thin polymer shell utilizing the atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique, enabling control of the molecular weight and polydispersity of the final grafted polymer chains on the surface of CI particles and therefore also allowing tuning of the magnetorheological (MR) performance as well as stability properties (chemical, sedimentation). Hence, the bare CI particles were coated with a poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) shell by the ATRP technique. The polymerization procedure of polymer grafting on the surface of the CI particles was characterized by gel permeation chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. The presence of the PBA chain on the CI particles was confirmed by Fourier infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. A saturation magnetization analysis using vibrating sample magnetometer proved that a thin polymer shell negligibly affects their magnetic properties, and data fit into the Jiles-Atherton model allowed the finite magnetization saturation for both bare CI and CI-PBA particles to be obtained. Furthermore, it was proved that a thin PBA coating provides sufficiently enhanced chemical and sedimentation stability properties for such a system, while the MR performance investigated using a rotational rheometer was affected negligibly. Finally it can be stated that a controllable coating performed via the ATRP technique is a useful tool to significantly improve stability properties, while the MR performance maintains values suitable for real-life applications.

  4. Moho depth and crustal composition in Southern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina;

    2013-01-01

    heterogeneous crustal structure with short wavelength variations in thickness (H), Vp/Vs-ratio (composition), and Moho sharpness, which defines ~20 blocks that do not everywhere coincide with surface tectonic features. In the Zimbabwe Craton, the Tokwe block has H = 35–38 km and Vp/Vs = 1.74–1.79 whereas...... the thicker crust in the Tati block (H = 47–51 km)may be related to deformation of the Archean crust along the cratonicmargin. Two distinct crustal blocks with similar crustal thickness (42–46 km) but significantly different Vp/Vs-ratios are recognized in the Limpopo Belt. Extreme values of 1......-existing lower crust, which is further supported by a very sharp Moho transition. The exposed cross-section in the Vredefort impact crater is non-representative of cratonic crust due to shallowMoho (34 km) and high Vp/Vs ~ 1.80 attributed to shock metamorphism. High Vp/Vs = 1.76 is typical of the Witwatersrand...

  5. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  6. Spatial variation of crustal coda Q in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, W.S.; Lee, W.H.K.; Newberry, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    Coda wave data from California microearthquakes were studied in order to delineate regional fluctuations of apparent crustal attenuation in the band 1.5 to 24 Hz. Apparent attenuation was estimated using a single back scattering model of coda waves. The coda wave data were restricted to ???30 s following the origin time; this insures that crustal effects dominate the results as the backscattered shear waves thought to form the coda would not have had time to penetrate much deeper. Results indicate a strong variation in apparent crustal attenuation at high frequencies between the Franciscan and Salinian regions of central California and the Long Valley area of the Sierra Nevada. Although the coda Q measurements coincide at 1.5 Hz (Qc=100), at 24 Hz there is a factor of four difference between the measurements made in Franciscan (Qc=525) and Long Valley (Qc=2100) with the Salinian midway between (Qc=900). These are extremely large variations compared to measures of seismic velocities of comparable resolution, demonstrating the exceptional sensitivity of the high frequency coda Q measurement to regional geology. In addition, the frequency trend of the results is opposite to that seen in a compilation of coda Q measurements made worldwide by other authors which tend to converge at high and diverge at low frequencies, however, the worldwide results generally were obtained without limiting the coda lengths and probably reflect upper mantle rather than crustal properties. Our results match those expected due to scattering in random media represented by Von Karman autocorrelation functions of orders 1/2 to 1/3. The Von Karman medium of order 1/3 corresponding to the Franciscan coda Q measurement contains greater amounts of high wavenumber fluctuations. This indicates relatively large medium fluctuations with wavelengths on the order of 100 m in the highly deformed crust associated with the Franciscan, however, the influence of scattering on the coda Q measurement is

  7. History of crustal recycling recorded in transition zone diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. G.; Stachel, T.; Palot, M.; Ickert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's transition zone (TZ) is a key region within the Earth that, from seismology, may be composed of a mixture of relatively primitive material together with the products of crustal recycling throughout the history of plate tectonics. The only samples of the TZ come in the form of inclusions in diamonds, that, for the most-part are retrogressed lower pressure equivalents of their precursor phases that formed at depth. Recent work by our group and others [1] on transition zone diamonds indicate that both peridotite and eclogitic paragenesis diamonds may record the products of crustal recycling. In-situ ion probe nitrogen and carbon isotopic measurements indicate the crystallisation of TZ diamonds from fluids bearing crustal signatures, of both oxidised and reduced forms. At the same time, majoritic garnets record extreme oxygen isotope compositions that track the interaction of oceanic crust with seawater at low temperature [2]. Such an origin is consistent with the few measured Sr-Nd isotope compositions of majorite garnet inclusions which resemble depleted MORB [3]. We have found considerably more enriched Sr isotope compositions (87Sr/86S ranging to > 0.8) in CaSiO3 inclusions that are from deep asthenosphere to TZ depths, supporting an origin that includes incorporation of recycled crustal sediment, in addition to the basaltic oceanic crust required to explain the phase equilibria [4]. Lastly, the discovery of hydrous ringwoodite in a diamond [5] containing more water than is soluble at the lower TZ adiabat indicates the possible role of recycling in transporting water as well as carbon into the TZ via a cool thermally unequilibrated slab. [1] Thomson et al (2014) CMP, 168, 1081. [2] Ickert et al (2015) Geochemical perspectives Letters, 1, 65-74. [3] Harte & Richardson (2011) Gondwana Research, 21, 236-235. [4] Walter et al. (2011) Science, 334, 54-57.[Pearson et al. (2014) Nature, 507, 221-224.

  8. Crustal seismicity of the Black Sea areal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Mihail; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Petruta Constantin, Angela

    2014-05-01

    ), concerning international practice and IAEA recommendation, (ii) applying the observed maximum magnitude or intensity and (iii) using statistical distributions (Cornell and extreme values Gumbel I) to model the seismogenic process for all the earthquake sources from the Black Sea region. The advantage of the statistical method is the possibility to compute all the quantities used in probabilistic hazard assessment, including recurrence times for different magnitudes. Another important issue is to evaluate the seismic hazard for the Black Sea using a probabilistic approach. The major contribution to the total sesimic hazard in the western part of the Black Sea is given by the Shabla crustal source that has a maximum epicentral intensity equal with VIII ½.

  9. Crustal structure of the Gulf of Aden southern margin: Evidence from receiver functions on Socotra Island (Yemen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Leroy, Sylvie; Keir, Derek; Korostelev, Félicie; Khanbari, Khaled; Rolandone, Frédérique; Stuart, Graham; Obrebski, Mathias

    2014-12-01

    Breakup of continents in magma-poor setting occurs primarily by faulting and plate thinning. Spatial and temporal variations in these processes can be influenced by the pre-rift basement structure as well as by early syn-rift segmentation of the rift. In order to better understand crustal deformation and influence of pre-rift architecture on breakup we use receiver functions from teleseismic recordings from Socotra which is part of the subaerial Oligo-Miocene age southern margin of the Gulf of Aden. We determine variations in crustal thickness and elastic properties, from which we interpret the degree of extension related thinning and crustal composition. Our computed receiver functions show an average crustal thickness of ~ 28 km for central Socotra, which decreases westward along the margin to an average of ~ 21 km. In addition, the crust thins with proximity to the continent-ocean transition to ~ 16 km in the northwest. Assuming an initial pre-rift crustal thickness of 35 km (undeformed Arabian plate), we estimate a stretching factor in the range of ~ 2.1-2.4 beneath Socotra. Our results show considerable differences between the crustal structure of Socotra's eastern and western sides on either side of the Hadibo transfer zone; the east displays a clear intracrustal conversion phase and thick crust when compared with the western part. The majority of measurements across Socotra show Vp/Vs ratios of between 1.70 and 1.77 and are broadly consistent with the Vp/Vs values expected from the granitic and carbonate rock type exposed at the surface. Our results strongly suggest that intrusion of mafic rock is absent or minimal, providing evidence that mechanical thinning accommodated the majority of crustal extension. From our observations we interpret that the western part of Socotra corresponds to the necking zone of a classic magma-poor continental margin, while the eastern part corresponds to the proximal domain.

  10. Crustal thickness controlled by plate tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina M.; Meissner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The continental crust on Earth cannot be extracted directly from the mantle, and the primary crust extracted directly from an early magma ocean is not preserved on Earth. We review geophysical and geochemical aspects of global crust–mantle material exchange processes and examine the processes which...... magmatism. While both subduction and delamination recycle crustal material into the mantle, mafic magmatism transports mantle material upward and participates in growth of newoceanic and continental crusts and significant structural and chemicalmodification of the latter. We discuss the role of basalt....../gabbro–eclogite phase transition in crustal evolution and the links between lithosphere recycling, mafic magmatism, and crustal underplating. We advocate that plate tectonics processes, togetherwith basalt/gabbro–eclogite transition, limit crustal thickness worldwide by providing effective mechanisms of crustal...

  11. Spatially-Resolved Spectroscopy of a Balmer-Dominated Shock in the Cygnus Loop: An Extremely Thin Cosmic-Ray Precursor?

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuda, Satoru; Ohira, Yutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Mori, Koji; Aoki, Wako; Morihana, Kumiko; Raymond, John C; Ghavamian, Parviz; Lee, Jae-Joon; Shimoda, Jiro; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We present high-resolution long-slit spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated shock in the northeastern limb of the Cygnus Loop with the Subaru high dispersion spectrograph. By setting the slit angle along the shock normal, we investigate variations of the flux and profile of the H-alpha line from preshock to postshock regions with a spatial resolution of about 4 times 10^{15} cm. The H-alpha line profile can be represented by a narrow (28.9+/-0.7 km/s) Gaussian in a diffuse region ahead of the shock, i.e., a photoionization precursor, and narrow (33.1+/-0.2 km/s) plus broad (130-230 km/s) Gaussians at the shock itself. We find that the width of the narrow component abruptly increases up to 33.1+/-0.2 km/s, or 38.8+/-0.4 km/s if we eliminate projected emission originating from the photoionization precursor, in an unresolved thin layer (< 4 times 10^{15} cm at a distance of 540 pc) at the shock. We show that the sudden broadening can be best explained by heating via damping of Alfven waves in a thin cosmic-ray pr...

  12. Solubilities and transport properties of the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol: laboratory investigations using extremely thin sulphuric acid films. Final report; Loesungs- und Transporteigenschaften des stratosphaerischen Schwefelsaeureaerosols: Laboruntersuchungen an extrem duennen Schwefelsaeurefilmen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurath, U.; Proksch, V.

    2000-04-17

    We have developed a procedure to measure solubilities, diffusion coefficients and rate constants (oxidation; hydrolysis) of trace gases in sulphuric acid at stratospheric temperatures. The results will lead to a better understanding and quantification of heterogeneous reactions in/on sulphuric acid aerosol particles in stratospheric models. Sulphuric acid (19-83 wt-%) is deposited as a thin film (1-3 {mu}m) on the inner surface of a capillary column (i.d. 530 {mu}m). The trace gas under study is injected into the carrier gas which passes through the column. Solubilities, diffusion coefficients and rate constants for the hydrolysis/oxidation of the trace gases in the sulphuric acid film can be deduced from the retention times, shapes and areas of the trace gas peaks which are detected by a mass spectrometer. (orig.) [German] Es wurde ein Verfahren zur Messung von Loeslichkeiten, Diffusionskoeffizienten und Ratenkonstanten (Oxidation; Hydrolyse) von Spurengasen in Schwefelsaeure bei stratosphaerischen Temperaturen entwickelt. Die Messergebnisse dienen dem besseren Verstaendnis und der Quantifizierung von heterogenen Reaktionen am stratosphaerischen Schwefelsaeure-Aerosol in Stratosphaerenmodellen. Die Schwefelsaeure (19-83 Gew.%) befindet sich als duenner Film (1-3 {mu}m) auf der Innenseite einer Kapillarsaeule (ID=530 {mu}m), die von einem Traegergas und dem zu untersuchenden Spurengas durchstroemt wird. Die Kapillarsaeule wird in einem Kryostaten auf 186-263 K gekuehlt. Aus der Ankunftszeit, Form und Flaeche von Spurengaspeaks an einem Massenspektrometer-Detektor koennen Loeslichkeiten und Diffusionskoeffizienten sowie Ratenkonstanten fuer die Hydrolyse/Oxidation von Spurengasen im Schwefelsaeurefilm bestimmt werden. (orig.)

  13. Mantle melting factors and amagmatic crustal accretion of the Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tao; GAO Jinyao; CHEN Mei; YANG Chunguo; SHEN Zhongyan; ZHOU Zhiyuan; WU Zhaocai; SUN Yunfan

    2015-01-01

    Spreading rate is a primary factor of mantle melting and tectonic behavior of the global mid-ocean ridges. The spreading rate of the Gakkel ridge decreases gradually from west to east. However, the Gakkel ridge can be divided into four thick-and-thin zones with varying crustal thicknesses along ridge axis. This phenomenon indicates that mantle melting of the Gakkel ridge is not a simple function of spreading rate. Mantle temperature, water content, mantle composition, and other factors are important in crustal accretion processes. Based on gravity-derived crustal thickness and wet melting model, we estimate that the mantle potential temperatures of the four zones are 1 270, 1 220, 1 280, and 1 280°C (assuming that mantle water content equals to global average value), with corresponding mantle water contents of 210, 0, 340, and 280 mg/kg (assuming that mantle potential temperature is 1 260°C), respectivly. The western thinned crust zone is best modeled with low mantle temperature, whereas the other zones are mainly controlled by the enhanced conduction caused by the slower spreading rate. Along the Gakkel ridge, the crustal thickness is consistent with rock samples types. Predominated serpentinized peridotite and basalt are found in the area with crustal thickness 2.5 km, respectively. The rock samples are including from basalt to peridotite in the area with crustal thickness between 1.5 and 2.5 km. Based on this consistency, the traditional magmatic accretion zone accounted for only 44% and amagmatic accretion accounted for 29% of the Gakkel ridge. The amagmatic accretion is a significant characteristic of the ultra-slow spreading ridge.

  14. Extreme Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ...

  15. Mandelbrot's Extremism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beirlant, J.; Schoutens, W.; Segers, J.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the sixties Mandelbrot already showed that extreme price swings are more likely than some of us think or incorporate in our models.A modern toolbox for analyzing such rare events can be found in the field of extreme value theory.At the core of extreme value theory lies the modelling of maxima

  16. The Crustal Thickness of the Philippine Sea Plate Derived from Gravity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Yuan Yen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a new free-air gravity anomaly map of the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP using ship-tracked gravity data from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC. Our results show that the isogals trend correlates well with the tectonic structures in the PSP. After removing the gravity induced by sea water from the free-air gravity data, we obtained the regional Bouguer gravity anomaly, which is later used to compute the Moho geometry in the PSP by applying the Parker-Oldenburg iterative method. Our results indicate that in the southern part of the West Philippine Basin (WPB the crustal thickness is nearly homogeneous with a value of about 5 km, which implies that the WPB is quite stable. The low-amplitude and near-zero free-air gravity anomalies clearly indicate that the whole WPB, except at trenches and island arcs, is nearly in a state of isostatic equilibrium. The average crustal thickness of the Palau Kyushu Ridge (PKR is more than 10 km. In the eastern PSP the crustal thickness gradually increases eastward. Our results also imply that a relatively thin and low density mantle exists beneath the Parece Vela Basin (PVB as a consequence of back-arc spreading and serpentinized upwells of the thin crustal thickness.

  17. Constraining ice mass loss from Jakobshavn Isbræ (Greenland) using InSAR-measured crustal uplift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lin; Wahr, John; Howat, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ in west Greenland has been undergoing dramatic thinning since 1997. Applying the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique to Radarsat-1 SAR data, we measure crustal uplift near Jakobshavn Isbræ caused by recent ice mass loss. The crustal uplift is predominantly....... Overall, our results suggest that despite the inherent difficulties of working with a signal that has significant large-scale components, InSAR-measured crustal deformation can be used to study the ice mass loss of a rapidly thinning glacier and its surrounding catchment, providing both a constraint...... on any existing model of ice mass loss and a data source that can be used to invert for ice mass loss. These new applications of InSAR can help to better understand a glacier’s rapid response to a warming climate....

  18. Crustal structure beneath northeast India inferred from receiver function modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Kajaljyoti; Bora, Dipok K.; Goyal, Ayush; Kumar, Raju

    2016-09-01

    We estimated crustal shear velocity structure beneath ten broadband seismic stations of northeast India, by using H-Vp/Vs stacking method and a non-linear direct search approach, Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA) technique followed by joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocity and receiver function, calculated from teleseismic earthquakes data. Results show significant variations of thickness, shear velocities (Vs) and Vp/Vs ratio in the crust of the study region. The inverted shear wave velocity models show crustal thickness variations of 32-36 km in Shillong Plateau (North), 36-40 in Assam Valley and ∼44 km in Lesser Himalaya (South). Average Vp/Vs ratio in Shillong Plateau is less (1.73-1.77) compared to Assam Valley and Lesser Himalaya (∼1.80). Average crustal shear velocity beneath the study region varies from 3.4 to 3.5 km/s. Sediment structure beneath Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley shows 1-2 km thick sediment layer with low Vs (2.5-2.9 km/s) and high Vp/Vs ratio (1.8-2.1), while it is observed to be of greater thickness (4 km) with similar Vs and high Vp/Vs (∼2.5) in RUP (Lesser Himalaya). Both Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley show thick upper and middle crust (10-20 km), and thin (4-9 km) lower crust. Average Vp/Vs ratio in Assam Valley and Shillong Plateau suggest that the crust is felsic-to-intermediate and intermediate-to-mafic beneath Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley, respectively. Results show that lower crust rocks beneath the Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley lies between mafic granulite and mafic garnet granulite.

  19. Lower crustal mush generation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ozge; Bachmann, Olivier; Dufek, Josef; Wright, Heather; Mangan, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Recent seismic, field, and petrologic studies on several active and fossil volcanic settings provide important constraints on the time, volume, and melt fraction of their lower crustal magma bodies. However, these studies provide an incomplete picture of the time and length scales involved during their thermal and compositional evolution. What has been lacking is a thermal model that explains the temporal evolution and state of the lower crustal magma bodies during their growth. Here we use a two-dimensional thermal model and quantify the time and length scales involved in the long-term thermal and compositional evolution of the lower crustal mush regions underlying the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (USA), Mt St Helens (USA), and the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (North Italy). Although a number of seismic, tectonic, petrologic, and field studies explained the tectonic and magmatic evolution of these regions, controversy remains on their lower crustal heat sources, melt fraction, and origin of erupted magmas. Our thermal modeling results suggest that given a geologically reasonable range of basalt fluxes (~10^-3 to 10^-4 km3/yr), a long-lived (>105 yr) crystalline mush is formed in the lower crust. The state of the lower crustal mush is strongly influenced by the magma flux, crustal thickness, and water content of intruded basalt, giving an average melt fraction of mush is mainly evolving through fractional crystallization of basalt with minor crustal assimilation in all regions, in agreement with isotopic studies. Quantification of the lower crustal mush regions is key to understanding the mass and heat balance in the crust, evolution of magma plumbing systems, and geothermal energy exploration.

  20. Variations of the crustal thickness in the Betic-Rif domain and their foreland regions, by P-Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, D.; Mancilla, F.; Morales, J.; Martin, R.; Diaz, J.; Pazos, A.; Cordoba, D.; Pulgar, J. A.; Ibarra, P.; Harnafi, M.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.

    2012-12-01

    To image the crustal structure of the Betic-Rif Range and the surrounding area we perform a P-receiver function study (PRF). We calculate PRFs at 110 broadband stations located in South Iberia Peninsula and North Morocco to obtain thickness and average Vp/Vs ratio for the Crust. The Crustal thickness values show strong lateral variations throughout the region. Crustal thicknesses vary between ~19 km and ~46 km. The Betic and Rif ranges are underlined by a thickened crust with crustal thicknesses between ~35 km and ~46 km, reaching the highest values in the contact between the Alboran Domain and External Zones. Southeast Iberia and Northeast Morocco are affected by significant crustal thinning, with crustal thicknesses ranging from ~19 km to ~30 km, with the shallowest Moho along the Mediterranean coast. The transition from thick to thin crust is coincident with the faults system of the Trans-Alboran Shear Zone. Toward the North, the Iberian Massif is an homogeneous domain of average 30-31 km crustal thickness and flat Moho discontinuity with low average Vp/Vs ratios ~1.72. Further south an extended domain, which includes the Atlas domain and its foreland regions, presents crustal thickness of 27-34km. Vp/Vs ratios in north Morocco show normal values of ~1.75 for most stations except for the Atlas domain, where several stations present low Vp/Vs ratios around 1.71. The obtained PRFs are migrated to depth building cross-section images to delineate the crustal mantle discontinuity (Moho) along the study area. In the migrated images, we include altogether ~11.200 PFRs to follow the Moho discontinuity from the Iberian Massif, in the North, along the Gribraltar arc towards the Moroccan Massif in the South. These images show how, in the North, the Iberian crust underthrust the Alboran domain along their contact with the observation of a slab, from the western limit until the 3°W longitude, reaching the maximum depth of ~70 km under the coast coincide with the

  1. A reverse energy cascade for crustal magma transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Paterson, Scott R.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2017-08-01

    Direct constraints on the ascent, storage and eruption of mantle melts come primarily from exhumed, long-frozen intrusions. These structures, relics of a dynamic magma transport network, encode how Earth's crust grows and differentiates over time. Furthermore, they connect mantle melting to an evolving distribution of surface volcanism. Disentangling magma transport processes from the plutonic record is consequently a seminal but unsolved problem. Here we use field data analyses, scaling theory and numerical simulations to show that the size distribution of intrusions preserved as plutonic complexes in the North American Cordillera suggests a transition in the mechanical response of crustal rocks to protracted episodes of magmatism. Intrusion sizes larger than about 100 m follow a power-law scaling expected if energy delivered from the mantle to open very thin dykes and sills is transferred to intrusions of increasing size. Merging, assimilation and mixing of small intrusions into larger ones occurs until irreversible deformation and solidification dissipate available energy. Mantle magma supply over tens to hundreds of thousands of years will trigger this regime, a type of reverse energy cascade, depending on the influx rate and efficiency of crustal heating by intrusions. Identifying regimes of magma transport provides a framework for inferring subsurface magmatic processes from surface patterns of volcanism, information preservation in the plutonic record, and related effects including climate.

  2. Crustal Structure and Extension from Slope to Deepsea Basin in the Northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Dengke; Zhou Di; Wu Xiangjie; He Min; Pang Xiong; Wang Yuwei

    2009-01-01

    The newly acquired long-cable multi-channel seismic (MCS) lines were used to study the crustal structure and extension in an NW-SE elongated 150 km by 260 Van strip from the slope to the deepsea basin in the northern South China Sea (SCS).These profdes are of good penetration that Moho is recognizable in ~70% length of the lines.Seismostrattgraphic interpretation and time-depth conversion were conducted.A power function D = atb+ c was used in the time-depth conversion,which avoided the under-or over-estimation of the depths of deep-seated interfaces by cubic or quadratic polynomial functions.Contour maps of basement depth,Moho depth,crustal thickness,and crustal stretching factor were obtained for the study area.In the dip direction,the Moho depth decreases stepwisely from 28 km in the outer shelf southwards to 19,15,and 12 km in the deepsea basin,with ramps at the shelf break,lower slope,and the continent ocean boundary (COB),respectively.Accordingly,the crustal thickness decreased southwards from 3,and 7 km spectively.Under the center of the Balynn (白云) sag,the crust thins significantly to < 7 kin.The crustal stretching factor βc was calculated by assuming the original crust thickness of 30 km.In the centers of the Baiyun sag,βc exceeds 5.Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic activities show a general trend of intensifying towards the COB.An important finding of this study is the along-strike variation of the crustal structure.A Moho rise extends from the COB NW-ward until the shelf break,about 170 km long and 50-100 km wide,with Moho depth < 20 kin.This is called the Balyun Moho Nose,which is bounded to the east,west,and north by belts of high Moho gradients indicative of crustal or even lithospheric faults.The doming of Moho in the nose area might he the cause of the W-E segmentation of the crustal and geological structures along the slope of the northern South China Sea,and the cause of the strong crustal

  3. Testing Predictions of Continental Insulation using Oceanic Crustal Thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; Shorttle, Oliver; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    The thermal blanketing effect of continental crust has been predicted to lead to elevated temperatures within the upper mantle beneath supercontinents. Initial break-up is associated with increased magmatism and the generation of flood basalts. Continued rifting and sea-floor spreading lead to a steady reduction of this thermal anomaly. Recently, evidence in support of this behaviour has come from the major element geochemistry of mid-ocean ridge basalts, which suggest excess rifting temperatures of ˜ 150 °C that decay over ˜ 100 Ma. We have collated a global inventory of ˜ 1000 seismic reflection profiles and ˜ 500 wide-angle refraction experiments from the oceanic realm. Data are predominantly located along passive margins, but there are also multiple surveys in the centres of the major oceanic basins. Oceanic crustal thickness has been mapped, taking care to avoid areas of secondary magmatic thickening near seamounts or later thinning such as across transform faults. These crustal thicknesses are a proxy for mantle potential temperature at the time of melt formation beneath a mid-ocean ridge system, allowing us to quantify the amplitude and duration of thermal anomalies generated beneath supercontinents. The Jurassic break-up of the Central Atlantic and the Cretaceous rifting that formed the South Atlantic Ocean are both associated with excess temperatures of ˜ 50 °C that have e-folding times of ˜ 50 Ma. In addition to this background trend, excess temperatures reach > 150 °C around the region of the Rio Grande Rise, associated with the present-day Tristan hotspot. The e-folding time of this more local event is ˜ 10 Ma, which mirrors results obtained for the North Atlantic Ocean south of Iceland. In contrast, crustal thicknesses from the Pacific Ocean reveal approximately constant potential temperature through time. This observation is in agreement with predictions, as the western Pacific was formed by rifting of an oceanic plate. In summary

  4. Estimation of the Crustal Bulk Properties Beneath Mainland Portugal from P-Wave Teleseismic Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Süleyman; Dias, Nuno A.; Silveira, Graça; Kind, Rainer; Vinnik, Lev; Matias, Luís; Bianchi, Marcelo

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present results from teleseismic P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) obtained in Portugal, Western Iberia. A dense seismic station deployment conducted between 2010 and 2012, in the scope of the WILAS project and covering the entire country, allowed the most spatially extensive probing on the bulk crustal seismic properties of Portugal up to date. The application of the H- κ stacking algorithm to the PRFs enabled us to estimate the crustal thickness ( H) and the average crustal ratio of the P- and S-waves velocities V p/ V s ( κ) for the region. Observations of Moho conversions indicate that this interface is relatively smooth with the crustal thickness ranging between 24 and 34 km, with an average of 30 km. The highest V p/ V s values are found on the Mesozoic-Cenozoic crust beneath the western and southern coastal domain of Portugal, whereas the lowest values correspond to Palaeozoic crust underlying the remaining part of the subject area. An average V p/ V s is found to be 1.72, ranging 1.63-1.86 across the study area, indicating a predominantly felsic composition. Overall, we systematically observe a decrease of V p/ V s with increasing crustal thickness. Taken as a whole, our results indicate a clear distinction between the geological zones of the Variscan Iberian Massif in Portugal, the overall shape of the anomalies conditioned by the shape of the Ibero-Armorican Arc, and associated Late Paleozoic suture zones, and the Meso-Cenozoic basin associated with Atlantic rifting stages. Thickened crust (30-34 km) across the studied region may be inherited from continental collision during the Paleozoic Variscan orogeny. An anomalous crustal thinning to around 28 km is observed beneath the central part of the Central Iberian Zone and the eastern part of South Portuguese Zone.

  5. Thinning factor distributions viewed through numerical models of continental extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartman Dias, Anna Eliza; Hayman, Nicholas W.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2016-12-01

    A long-standing question surrounding rifted margins concerns how the observed fault-restored extension in the upper crust is usually less than that calculated from subsidence models or from crustal thickness estimates, the so-called "extension discrepancy." Here we revisit this issue drawing on recently completed numerical results. We extract thinning profiles from four end-member geodynamic model rifts with varying width and asymmetry and propose tectonic models that best explain those results. We then relate the spatial and temporal evolution of upper to lower crustal thinning, or crustal depth-dependent thinning (DDT), and crustal thinning to mantle thinning, or lithospheric DDT, which are difficult to achieve in natural systems due to the lack of observations that constrain thinning at different stages between prerift extension and lithospheric breakup. Our results support the hypothesis that crustal DDT cannot be the main cause of the extension discrepancy, which may be overestimated because of the difficulty in recognizing distributed deformation, and polyphase and detachment faulting in seismic data. More importantly, the results support that lithospheric DDT is likely to dominate at specific stages of rift evolution because crustal and mantle thinning distributions are not always spatially coincident and at times are not even balanced by an equal magnitude of thinning in two dimensions. Moreover, either pure or simple shear models can apply at various points of time and space depending on the type of rift. Both DDT and pure/simple shear variations across space and time can result in observed complex fault geometries, uplift/subsidence, and thermal histories.

  6. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  7. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy in the UV-blue range with an extremely broad probe spectrum for the carrier relaxation study in an InGaN thin film with indium-rich nano-clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Lu, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Yang, C C

    2007-03-19

    We implement an extremely broad second-harmonic spectrum of about 90 nm in width based on a 7-fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. This broadband second-harmonic signal is used as the probe in a non-degenerate pump-probe experiment to investigate the ultrafast carrier dynamics in wide band-gap semiconductors. To properly calibrate the pump-probe data, the time delays between the pump of a particular wavelength and the probes of various spectral portions are determined through the interferometry measurement and the dispersion calculation. To demonstrate the pump-probe experiment operation, we measure the carrier relaxation process from the excitation levels down to the free-carrier and the localized states in an InGaN thin-film sample, in which indium-rich nano-clusters exist to form the localized states. From the time-resolved differential transmission profiles at various spectral positions of an infinitesimal spectral width and the temporal evolution of probe spectrum, one can observe the following relaxation process: First, once carriers are excited, only a small portion of carriers relaxes into the free-carrier and localized states independently within 1 ps. Then, the major part of carriers starts to relax into the two groups of states not until several ps after excitation. Such a relaxation process does not seem to be cascading, i.e., relaxation into the localized states through the free-carrier states.

  8. On crustal movement in Mt. Qomolangma area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊勇; 王泽民; 庞尚益; 张骥; 张全德

    2002-01-01

    Mt. Qomolangma lies in the collision zone between the fringe of Eurasia plate and Indian plate. The crustal movement there is still very active so far. In the past three decades China carried out five geodetic campaigns in Mt. Qomolangma and its north vicinal area, independently or cooperatively with other countries, including triangulation, leveling, GPS positioning, atmospheric, astronomical and gravity measurements. On the basis of the observation results achieved in the campaigns the crustal movements in the area were studied and explored. A non-stationary phenomenon both in time and space of the crustal vertical movement in the area is found. There seems to be some relevance between the phenomenon of non-stationary in time and seismic episode in China. The phenomenon of non-stationary in space is possibly relevant to the no-homo- geneity of crustal medium and non-uniform absorption of terrestrial stress. The horizontal crustal movement in the area is in the direction of NEE at a speed of 6—7 cm per year, and the trend of strike slip movement is manifested evidently in the collision fringe of Indian plate and Qinghai-Xizang block.

  9. Spectral Properties of the Martian Crustal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K. W.; Simons, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Although the planet Mars no longer possesses an internal dynamo, its crustal rocks retain strong remanent magnetization thought to have been induced by an ancient core-sourced field. The strength and distribution of the crustal field is extremely heterogeneous, and particularly strong in the Terra Cimmeria region of the southern hemisphere. The field as a whole is inconsistent with induction from a single dipolar source, although previous studies have attempted to isolate individual magnetic anomalies to deduce paleopolar orientations. While several areas of the planet appear to have been demagnetized, including large impact basins and the Tharsis volcanic province, the distribution of the field is generally poorly correlated with surface geologic structures. However, beyond the spatial pattern of crustal magnetization, the magnetic power spectrum can provide information about the nature of the source and formation processes. Previous studies have used the power spectrum of the Martian field to estimate the approximate depth of the magnetic anomalies. We extend this approach by applying the spatiospectral localization technique of Wieczorek and Simons (2005) and Dahlen and Simons (2008) to isolate the magnetic power spectra of several areas of the Martian surface. This method allows us to look beyond the strongly magnetized Terra Cimmeria region, which dominates the global power spectrum. Localized spectral estimates, along with their appropriate errors, allow us to examine the significance of observed variations between distinct regions of the planet, and to evaluate the validity of analyses which operate on the whole sphere. Significant differences are observed between spectra of the Terra Cimmeria region and the remainder of the planet, a result of the concentration of power at certain spherical harmonic degrees in this anomalous region. Approximate depths to the magnetic sources are calculated for tiled windows on the planet using the stochastic magnetized

  10. Thin film device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Inderjeet

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional materials created ab initio by the process of condensation of atoms, molecules, or ions, called thin films, have unique properties significantly different from the corresponding bulk materials as a result of their physical dimensions, geometry, nonequilibrium microstructure, and metallurgy. Further, these characteristic features of thin films can be drasti­ cally modified and tailored to obtain the desired and required physical characteristics. These features form the basis of development of a host of extraordinary active and passive thin film device applications in the last two decades. On the one extreme, these applications are in the submicron dimensions in such areas as very large scale integration (VLSI), Josephson junction quantum interference devices, magnetic bubbles, and integrated optics. On the other extreme, large-area thin films are being used as selective coatings for solar thermal conversion, solar cells for photovoltaic conver­ sion, and protection and passivating layers. Ind...

  11. VARIATIONS IN CRUSTAL THICKNESS OF THE KANE TRANSFORM IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new approach was taken to investigate the crustal stucture of the Kane transform and its aseismic extension, using high quality bathymetry and gravity data. The gravity signatures associated with variations in crustal thickness of the transform were isolated from the observed free-air anomaly,was continued downward to the mean depth of the crust/mantle interface and converted onto the relief on that surface. The crustal thickness of the transform was then calculated by subtracting seawater depth from the depth of the gravity-inferred crust/mantle interface. 3-D gravity investigation results indicate that the Kane transform and adjacent areas are associated with a crust thinner than normal oceanic crust. The transform trough is largely underlain by a crust less than 4.5km thick and in the nodal basins the crust may be as thin as 3 km. The crust beneath the fracture zone valley is 4 - 5.5 km thick. The rift valleys on the spreading segments are also characterized by thin crust (4 - 5 km thick). Thin oceanic crust extends to 20 - 30 km from the transform axis, except for some localized places such as the inside comer highs adjoining the ridge-transform intersections. These gravity-inferred results match fairly well with limited published seismic results. Thinning of the crust is mainly attributable to a thin layer 3, which in tum may be explained by the combined effects of reduced magma supply at the ends of the spreading segments and tectonic activities in the region.

  12. VARIATIONS IN CRUSTAL THICKNESS OF THE KANE TRANSFORM IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PhilipD.Rabinowitz; 胡延昌

    2001-01-01

    A new approach was taken to investigate the crustal stucture of the Kane transform and its aseismic extension, using high quality bathymetry and gravity data. The gravity signatures associated with variations in crustal thickness of the transform were isolated from the observed free-air anomaly,was continued downward to the mean depth of the crust/mantle interface and converted on to the relief onthat surface. The crustal thickness of the transform was then calculated by subtracting seawater depth from the depth of the gravity-inferred crust/mantle interface. 3-D gravity investigation results indicate that the Kane transform and adjacent areas are associated with a crust thinner than normal oceanic crust. The transform trough is largely underlain by a crust less than 4.5kin thick and in the nodal basins the crust may be as thin as 3 kin. The crust beneath the fracture zone valley is 4 - 5.5 km thick. The rift valleys on the spreading segments are also characterized by thin crust (4 - 5 km thick). Thin oceanic crust extends to 20-30 km from the transform axis,except for some localized places such as the inside comerhighs adjoining the ridge-transform intersections. These gravity-inferred results match fairly well with limited published seismic results. Thinning of the crust is mainly attributable to a thin layer 3, which in turn may be explained by the combined effects of reduced magma supply at the ends of the spreading segments and tectonic activities in the region.

  13. Extreme cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The universe is all about extremes. Space has a temperature 270°C below freezing. Stars die in catastrophic supernova explosions a billion times brighter than the Sun. A black hole can generate 10 million trillion volts of electricity. And hypergiants are stars 2 billion kilometres across, larger than the orbit of Jupiter. Extreme Cosmos provides a stunning new view of the way the Universe works, seen through the lens of extremes: the fastest, hottest, heaviest, brightest, oldest, densest and even the loudest. This is an astronomy book that not only offers amazing facts and figures but also re

  14. Trace element differences between Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic crustal components: Implications for crustal growth processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarney, J.; Wyborn, L. E. A.; Sheraton, J. W.; Wyborn, D.

    1988-01-01

    Critical to models for continental crust growth and recycling are the processes through which crustal growth takes place. In particular, it is important to know whether these processes have changed fundamentally with time in response to the earth's thermal evolution, and whether the crustal compositions generated are compatible with crustal remobilization, crustal recycling, or represent primary additions. There are some significant and consistent differences in the major and trace element compositions of crustal components with time which have important implications for crustal growth processes. These will be illustrated with reference to Archean rocks from a number of shield areas, Proterozoic granitoids from Australia and elsewhere, Palaeozoic granitoids from Australia and Scotland, and Mesozoic - recent granitoids from present continental margin belts. Surprisingly some rather simple and consistent patterns energy using this technique. There are then significant differences in compositions of granitoid crustal additions throughout geological time, with a particular type of granitoid apparently dominating a particular time period. This implies that the tectonic processes giving rise to granite generation have changed in response to the earth's thermal evolution.

  15. Reports on crustal movements and deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of tectonic plate motions, regional crustal deformations, strain accumulation and release, deformations associated with earthquakes and fault motion, and micro-plate motion, were collected and are summarized. To a limited extent, papers dealing with global models of current plate motions and crustal stress are included. The data base is restricted to articles appearing in reveiwed technical journals during the years 1970-1980. The major journals searched include: Journal of Geophysical Research (solid earth), Tectonophysics, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Geological Society of America Bulletin, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Journal of Geology.

  16. Crustal structure of the Khartoum Basin, Sudan

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    El Tahir, N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tectonophysics Vol. 593 (2013) 151–160 Crustal structure of the Khartoum Basin, Sudan Nada El Tahir a,b,*, Andrew Nyblade a,b, Jordi Julià c, Raymond Durrheim a,d a School of Geosciences, The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South... Centre for Mining Innovation, Johannesburg, South Africa *Corresponding author: nada_ahmed99@hotmail.com Abstract The crustal structure of the northern part of the Khartoum Basin has been investigated using data from 3 permanent seismic stations...

  17. Crustal accretion at high temperature spreading centres: Rheological control of crustal thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro

    2010-12-01

    New determinations of lateral crustal thickness variations at anomalous oceanic spreading centres such as Iceland have shown that the crust may be thinner at the ridge axis above the plume thickening towards the sides ( Bjarnason and Schmeling, 2009). To understand this behaviour crustal accretion models have been carried out solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy with melting, melt extraction, and feedback of extracted material as newly formed crust for an extending lithosphere system underlain by a hot mantle plume. The dynamics of rifting are thermally and rheologically controlled by the feedback due to accreted new crust. Four accretional modes with characteristic crustal thickness variations are identified depending on the width of the volcanic emplacement zone, the accretional heating rate, which can be associated with the thickness of the surface layer in which magmatic emplacement takes place, and the spreading rate. Mode 1: zero crustal thickness at the spreading axis develops for cool accretion and a wide emplacement zone. Mode 2: strongly or moderately crustal thickening away from the axis develops in case of warm (deep reaching) accretion and wide emplacement zones. Mode 3: nearly constant crustal thickness develops in case of warm (deep reaching) accretion but narrow emplacement zones. Dynamic topography of mode 3 shows only a weak or no regional minimum at all near the axis. Modes 2 or 3 may be identified with the situation in Iceland. Mode 4: a stagnating central crustal block evolves for cool accretion and narrow emplacement. This mode disappears for increasing spreading rates. No accretional mode with maximum crustal thickness above the plume at the rift axis has been found. The absence of mode 1 accretion (with zero crust at ridge axis) on earth may be an indication that in general crustal accretion is not cold (and shallow). The model is also applied to other hotspot-ridge settings (Azores, Galapagos) and suggests modes 2

  18. Crustal structure of the SW Iberian passive margin: The westernmost remnant of the Ligurian Tethys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Fernández, O.; Torne, M.; Sánchez de la Muela, A.; Muñoz, J. A.; Terrinha, P.; Manatschal, G.; Salas, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    At present, the SW Iberian margin is located along the convergent Iberia-Nubia plate boundary. In Mesozoic times, the margin was located at the triple junction of the Ligurian Tethys, Central Atlantic and Northern Atlantic. The characterization of its crustal structure has allowed us to propose a configuration for this triple junction and to determine the role that this transform margin played within the plate kinematic system. In this paper we present an integrated study based on the interpretation of a 2D regional multichannel seismic survey consisting of 58 profiles, tied with onshore geology and exploratory wells, and on gravimetric modeling performed over four NW-SE trending profiles. Integrated interpretation of MCS data combined with 2D gravity modeling reveals a complex pattern in the southward crustal thinning of SW Iberia and supports the possible presence of oceanic crust under the Gulf of Cadiz. The tapering of Iberian crust is characterized by steps with rapid changes in the thickness of the crust, and thinning to Bank. Margin inversion and the pre-existing extensional crustal structure are responsible for the areal distribution and amplitude of the prominent positive gravity anomaly observed in the Gulf of Cadiz.

  19. A view into crustal evolution at mantle depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Ellen; Smit, Matthijs A.; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.

    2017-05-01

    Crustal foundering is an important mechanism in the differentiation and recycling of continental crust. Nevertheless, little is known about the dynamics of the lower crust, the temporal scale of foundering and its role in the dynamics of active margins and orogens. This particularly applies to active settings where the lower crust is typically still buried and direct access is not possible. Crustal xenoliths derived from mantle depth in the Pamir provide a unique exception to this. The rocks are well-preserved and comprise a diverse set of lithologies, many of which re-equilibrated at high-pressure conditions before being erupted in their ultrapotassic host lavas. In this study, we explore the petrological and chronological record of eclogite and felsic granulite xenoliths. We utilized accessory minerals - zircon, monazite and rutile - for coupled in-situ trace-element analysis and U-(Th-)Pb chronology by laser-ablation (split-stream) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each integrated analysis was done on single mineral zones and was performed in-situ in thin section to maintain textural context and the ability to interpret the data in this framework. Rutile thermo-chronology exclusively reflects eruption (11.17 ± 0.06Ma), which demonstrates the reliability of the U-Pb rutile thermo-chronometer and its ability to date magmatic processes. Conversely, zircon and monazite reveal a series of discrete age clusters between 55-11 Ma, with the youngest being identical to the age of eruption. Matching age populations between samples, despite a lack of overlapping ages for different chronometers within samples, exhibit the effectiveness of our multi-mineral approach. The REE systematics and age data for zircon and monazite, and Ti-in-zircon data together track the history of the rocks at a million-year resolution. The data reveal that the rocks resided at 30-40 km depth along a stable continental geotherm at 720-750 °C until 24-20 Ma, and were subsequently

  20. Crustal Movement Patterns of China Continent Measured by GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yibin

    2003-01-01

    This paper uses multi-quadric equations interpolation to es-tablish a widely covered and valuablespeed field model of China, withwhich the horizontal crustal movementpatterns are obtained. The present-dayvertical crustal movement velocity im-age of China is also expressed by GPSobservations, from which we canknow the vertical crustal movementpatterns.

  1. Current knowledge on the crustal properties of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Morelli

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in experimental petrography together with the information derived from the super-deep drilling projects have provided additional constraints for the interpretation of refraction and reflection seismic data. These constraints can also be used in the interpretation of magnetic and gravity data to resolve nonuniqueness. In this study, we re-interpret the magnetic and gravity data of the Italian peninsula and neighbouring areas. In view of the constraints mentioned above, it is now possible to find an agreement between the seismic and gravity models of the Central Alps. By taking into account the overall crustal thickness, we have recognized the existence of three types of Moho: 1 European which extends to the north and west of the peninsula and in the Corsican-Sardinian block. Its margin was the foreland in the Alpine Orogeny and it was the ramp on which European and Adriatic mantle and crustal slices were overthrusted. This additional load caused bending and deepening and the Moho which now lies beneath the Adriatic plate reaching a maximum depth of approximately 75 km. 2 Adriatic (or African which lies beneath the Po plain, the Apennines and the Adriatic Sea. The average depth of the Moho is about 30-35 km below the Po plain and the Adriatic Sea and it increases toward the Alps and the Tyrrhenian Sea (acting as foreland along this margin. The maximum depth (50 km is reached in Calabria. 3 Pery-Tyrrhenian. This is an oceanic or thinned continental crust type of Moho. It borders the oceanic Moho of the Tyrrhenian Sea and it acquires a transitional character in the Ligurian and Provençal basins (<15 km thickness while further thickening occurs toward the East where the Adriatic plate is overthrusted. In addition, the interpretation of the heat flow data appears to confirm the origin of this Moho and its geodynamic allocation.

  2. Distribution of crustal types in Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, D.; Jackson, H. R.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Shimeld, J. W.; Oakey, G. N.; Lebedeva-Ivanova, N.; Li, Q.; Saltus, R. W.; Mosher, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    Seismic velocities determined from 70 sonobuoys widely distributed in Canada Basin were used to discriminate crustal types. Velocities of oceanic layer 3 (6.7-7.1 km/s), transitional (7.2-7.6 km/s) and continental crust (5.5-6.6 km/s) were used to distinguish crustal types. Potential field data supports the distribution of oceanic crust as a polygon with maximum dimensions of 340 km (east-west) by 590 km (north-south) and identification of the ocean-continent boundary (OCB). Paired magnetic anomalies are associated only with crust that has oceanic velocities. Furthermore, the interpreted top of oceanic crust on seismic reflection profiles is more irregular and sometimes shallower than adjacent transitional crust. The northern segment of the narrow Canada Basin Gravity Low (CBGL), often interpreted as a spreading center, bisects this zone of oceanic crust and coincides with the location of a prominent valley in seismic reflection profiles. Data coverage near the southern segment of CBGL is sparse. Velocities typical of transitional crust are determined east of it. Extension in this region, close to the inferred pole of rotation, may have been amagmatic. Offshore Alaska is a wide zone of thinned continental crust up to 300 km across. Published longer offset refraction experiments in the Basin confirm the depth to Moho and the lack of oceanic layer 3 velocities. Further north, toward Alpha Ridge and along Northwind Ridge, transitional crust is interpreted to be underplated or intruded by magmatism related to the emplacement of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). Although a rotational plate tectonic model is consistent with the extent of the conjugate magnetic anomalies that occupy only a portion of Canada Basin, it does not explain the asymmetrical configuration of the oceanic crust in the deep water portion of Canada Basin, and the unequal distribution of transitional and continental crust around the basin.

  3. Crustal wide-angle reflection imaging along Lianxian-Gangkou profile in Guangdong province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongjie Zhang; Bing Zhao; Xi Zhang; Jiwen Teng

    2009-01-01

    A 400 km-long wide-angle seismic experiment along Lianxian-Gangkou profile in South China was carried out to study contact relationship between southeast continental margin of Yangtze block and northwest continental margin of Cathaysia block. We reconstructed crustal wide-angle reflection structure by the depth-domain pre-stack migration and the crustal velocity model constructed from the traveltime fitting. The wide-angle reflection section shows different reflection (from crystalline basement and Moho) pattern beneath the Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks, and suggests the Wuchuan-Sihui fault is the boundary between them. A cluster of well-developed reflections on Mobo and in its underlying topmost mantle probably comes from al-ternative thin layers, which may be seismic signature of strong interaction between crust and mantle in the tectonic environment of lithosphere extension.

  4. Crustal structure in the Falcón Basin area, northwestern Venezuela, from seismic and gravimetric evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezada, Maximiliano J.; Schmitz, Michael; Jácome, María Inés; Rodríguez, Josmat; Audemard, Franck; Izarra, Carlos; The Bolivar Active Seismic Working Group

    2008-05-01

    The Falcón Basin in northwestern Venezuela has a complex geological history driven by the interactions between the South American and Caribbean plates. Igneous intrusive bodies that outcrop along the axis of the basin have been associated with crustal thinning, and gravity modeling has shown evidence for a significantly thinned crust beneath the basin. In this study, crustal scale seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection data derived from onshore/offshore active seismic experiments are interpreted and forward-modeled to generate a P-wave velocity model for a ˜450 km long profile. The final model shows thinning of the crust beneath the Falcón Basin where depth to Moho decreases to 27 km from a value of 40 km about 100 km to the south. A deeper reflected phase on the offshore section is interpreted to be derived from the downgoing Caribbean slab. Velocity values were converted to density and the resulting gravimetric response was shown to be consistent with the regional gravity anomaly. The crustal thinning proposed here supports a rift origin for the Falcón Basin.

  5. Foreland shortening and crustal balancing in the Andes at 30°S latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, R. W.; Figueroa, D.; Synder, D.; Beer, J.; Mpodozis, C.; Isaacks, B. L.

    1990-08-01

    Excellent surface exposures, known Benioff zone geometry, a dynamic morphology, and the availability of industry seismic reflection data all make the Andes at 30°S an excellent transect for investigating crustal-scale balanced sections. 150-170 km of horizontal shortening has occurred in three major belts located between the trench and the foreland. The thin-skinned, east-verging Precordillera of western Argentina accounts for 60-75% of the total shortening and formed mostly since major volcanism ceased at ˜10 Ma. Industry seismic reflection data show that the décollement of the Precordillera belt is located anomalously deep at ˜15 km. The belt is dominated by fault propagation folds and contains several prominent out-of-sequence thrust faults. Seismic stratigraphie analysis shows that Miocene strata in the Iglesia Valley, located between the Precordillera and the crest of the Andes, accumulated in a piggy-back basin. Onlap relations on the western side indicate that the High Cordillera was uplifted as a major fault bend fold over a buried ramp. Thrusting in the two western belts, both in the High Cordillera of Chile, formed during the waning stages of arc volcanism, 11-16 Ma. and account for 25-40% of the shortening. The observed shortening is probably greater than can be accounted for with reasonable crustal thicknesses, indicating the possibility of continental truncation or erosion along the plate margin or an anomalously thick root held down by the nearly flat subducted Nazca Plate. Our preferred crustal geometry puts the ramp between upper and lower crustal deformation west of the high topography, requiring crustal scale tectonic wedging to thicken the crust beneath the crest of the Andes. This non-unique model provides a simple explanation of the first order morphology of the Andes at this latitude.

  6. Deep crustal structure of Baiyun Sag, northern South China Sea revealed from deep seismic reflection profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chunju; ZHOU Di; SUN Zhen; CHEN Changmin; HAO Hujun

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses deep crustal architecture of the Baiyun Sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea based on velocity analysis, time-depth conversion and seismic interpretation of the deep seismic reflection profile DSRP-2002. The profile was acquired and processed to 14 S TWT by the China National Offshore Oil Corp. (CNOOC) in 2002. It extends across the Baiyun Sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, from the northern continental shelf of the SCS to the deepwater province. As the first deep seismic reflection profile in the Pearl River Mouth Basin,this profile reveals seismic phases from basement down to upper most mantle. The Moho surface appears in the profile as an undulating layer of varying thickness of 1-3 km. It is not a single reflector interface, but a velocity gradient or intercon- version layer. The crust thins stepwisely from the shelf to the continental slope and the abyssal plain (from north to south), and also thins under depocenters. The crustal thickness is only 7 km in the depocenter of the main Baiyun Sag, which corresponds to a Moho upwelling mirroring the basement topography. In the lower slope and the ocean-continental transition zone of the southernmost portion of the profile, three sub-parallel, NW-dipping strong reflectors found at depths around 10-21 km are interpreted as indications of a subducted Mesozoic oceanic crust. Crustal faults exist in the northern and southern boundaries of the Baiyun Sag. The intense and persistent subsidence of the Baiyun Sag might be related to the long-term activity of the crustal faults.

  7. Lower crustal flow and the role of shear in basin subsidence: An example from the Dead Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, A.; ten Brink, U.

    2002-01-01

    We interpret large-scale subsidence (5-6 km depth) with little attendant brittle deformation in the southern Dead Sea basin, a large pull-apart basin along the Dead Sea transform plate boundary, to indicate lower crustal thinning due to lower crustal flow. Along-axis flow within the lower crust could be induced by the reduction of overburden pressure in the central Dead Sea basin, where brittle extensional deformation is observed. Using a channel flow approximation, we estimate that lower crustal flow would occur within the time frame of basin subsidence if the viscosity is ??? 7 ?? 1019 - 1 ?? 1021 Pa s, a value compatible with the normal heat flow in the region. Lower crustal viscosity due to the strain rate associated with basin extension is estimated to be similar to or smaller than the viscosity required for a channel flow. However, the viscosity under the basin may be reduced to 5 ?? 1017 - 5 ?? 1019 Pa s by the enhanced strain rate due to lateral shear along the transform plate boundary. Thus, lower crustal flow facilitated by shear may be a viable mechanism to enlarge basins and modify other topographic features even in the absence of underlying thermal anomalies. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Observatory crustal magnetic biases during CHAMP satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanac, G.; Mandea, M.; Bandić, M.; Subašić, S.

    2015-01-01

    Taking advantage of nine years of CHAMP satellite mission (June 2000-August 2009), we investigate the temporal evolution of the observatory monthly crustal magnetic biases. To determine biases we compute X (northward), Y (eastward) and Z (vertically downward) monthly means from 42 observatory one-minute or hourly values, and compare them to synthetic monthly means obtained from a GRIMM3 core field model (V. Lesur, personal communication, 2014). Both short period variations and long term trends in the monthly bias time series are analyzed. A comparison with biases based on MAGSAT and Ørsted satellite data, related to the 1979.92 and 1992.92 epochs is performed. Generally, the larger biases averaged over nine years and the larger differences between biases based on different models are found in Z component. This can be the signature of the induced magnetic fields. Although annual trends in most bias series are observed, no clear evidence that the constant crustal field changed significantly over the studied period is found. Time series of monthly biases exhibit distinct oscillatory pattern in the whole time span, which we assign to the external field contributions. The amplitudes of these variations are linked with the phase of the solar cycle, being significantly larger in the period 2000-2005 than in the period 2006-2009. Clear semi-annual variations are evident in all components, with extremes in spring and fall months of each year. Common external field pattern is found for European monthly biases. A dependence of the bias monthly variations on geomagnetic latitudes is not found for the non-European observatories. The results from this study represent a base to further exploit the observatory and repeat stations magnetic biases together with the data from the new satellite mission SWARM.

  9. Crustal and upper-mantle structure beneath the western Atlas Mountains in SW Morocco derived from receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Kathrin; Wölbern, Ingo; Thomas, Christine; Harnafi, Mimoun; El Moudnib, Lahcen

    2014-09-01

    The High Atlas and the Anti Atlas are fold-belts linked to former and still ongoing continent-continent collisions. Despite their high elevation, studies indicate a lack of a deep crustal root (Morocco to analyse teleseismic P- and S-wave receiver functions. Our study yields a crustal thickness ranging from 24 km near the Atlantic coast to 44 km beneath the High Atlas with an average crustal Vp/Vs ratio of 1.77 in the entire region. A crustal thickness of 40 km cannot entirely support the topography in this region. Furthermore, we find the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ˜80 km depth. The lithosphere beneath SW Morocco is thinner than beneath northern Morocco (>150 km). This lithospheric thinning supports the theory of thermal compensation of the mountain ranges. The mantle transition zone thickness amounts to 240 ± 10 km. The transition zone seems to be slightly thinned which might indicate a higher mantle temperature in this region.

  10. Magnetar Field Evolution and Crustal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The activity of magnetars is believed to be powered by colossal magnetic energy reservoirs. We sketch an evolutionary picture in which internal field evolution in magnetars generates a twisted corona, from which energy may be released suddenly in a single giant flare, or more gradually through smaller outbursts and persistent emission. Given the ages of magnetars and the energy of their giant flares, we suggest that their evolution is driven by a novel mechanism: magnetic flux transport/decay due to persistent plastic flow in the crust, which would invalidate the common assumption that the crustal lattice is static and evolves only under Hall drift and Ohmic decay. We estimate the field strength required to induce plastic flow as a function of crustal depth, and the viscosity of the plastic phase. The star’s superconducting core may also play a role in magnetar field evolution, depending on the star’s spindown history and how rotational vortices and magnetic fluxtubes interact.

  11. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  12. Subduction zone and crustal dynamics of western Washington; a tectonic model for earthquake hazards evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dal; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    1999-01-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone is extremely complex in the western Washington region, involving local deformation of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and complicated block structures in the crust. It has been postulated that the Cascadia subduction zone could be the source for a large thrust earthquake, possibly as large as M9.0. Large intraplate earthquakes from within the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Puget Sound region have accounted for most of the energy release in this century and future such large earthquakes are expected. Added to these possible hazards is clear evidence for strong crustal deformation events in the Puget Sound region near faults such as the Seattle fault, which passes through the southern Seattle metropolitan area. In order to understand the nature of these individual earthquake sources and their possible interrelationship, we have conducted an extensive seismotectonic study of the region. We have employed P-wave velocity models developed using local earthquake tomography as a key tool in this research. Other information utilized includes geological, paleoseismic, gravity, magnetic, magnetotelluric, deformation, seismicity, focal mechanism and geodetic data. Neotectonic concepts were tested and augmented through use of anelastic (creep) deformation models based on thin-plate, finite-element techniques developed by Peter Bird, UCLA. These programs model anelastic strain rate, stress, and velocity fields for given rheological parameters, variable crust and lithosphere thicknesses, heat flow, and elevation. Known faults in western Washington and the main Cascadia subduction thrust were incorporated in the modeling process. Significant results from the velocity models include delineation of a previously studied arch in the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The axis of the arch is oriented in the direction of current subduction and asymmetrically deformed due to the effects of a northern buttress mapped in the velocity models. This

  13. Crustal structure and tectonics of Bangladesh: New constraints from inversion of receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun; Bhushan, Kirti; Singh, Chandrani; Steckler, Michael S.; Akhter, S. Humayun; Seeber, Leonardo; Kim, Won-Young; Tiwari, Ashwani K.; Biswas, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    An understanding of the sedimentary and crustal structure of the Bengal Basin and of the tectonics deforming it remains elusive due to lack of seismic data from Bangladesh. Taking advantage of recently available data from 11 seismic stations deployed over Bangladesh, we determine the crustal structure beneath each station using 2768 high quality receiver functions (RFs). Inversion of the RFs reveals a highly variable thickness of the overlying sediments beneath the Bengal Basin. The thickness of the sediments increases dramatically across the Hinge Zone of the Early Cretaceous passive margin from 3 to 17 km. The thick sediments partly represent progradation of the continental margin due to the influx of clastic sediments from the Himalayas. The Moho shallows across the region. This reflects thinning of the crystalline crust from 38 km in the Indian Craton to 34 km at the Hinge Zone to 4.0 km/s) at lower crustal levels supports an influence of the Kerguelen plume igneous activity during rifting. We invert data for a station near the Dauki Fault, which marks the southern boundary of the uplifted Shillong plateau, for dip and anisotropic effects. Our results show the Dauki as a north-dipping thrust fault at Jaflong with a dip angle of 32° and strike (110°) close to its surficial expression. A strong anisotropy (~ 15%) and the sense of shear (plunge: 24°, trend: 79°) compliment the dipping geometry and deformation seems to be related to the initiation of the Dauki Fault.

  14. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  15. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo

    2015-07-01

    We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  16. Quantitative restoration the Gulf of Mexico continental margins based on a newly-derived, basin-wide, crustal thickness map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L. C.; Mann, P.

    2016-12-01

    For decades, one of the main difficulties for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is quantifying the amount of crustal thinning of its deeply-buried and salt-covered continental margins formed during the Triassic-Jurassic rifting. In this study, we present a new crustal thickness map for the entire GOM and its surrounding areas based on integration of: 1) depth to basement compilation of previous seismic refraction and well data; and 2) regional estimation of Moho depths from 3D gravity inversion. Gravity modeling of salt thickness and Moho depth provide new constraints on crustal thickness in areas where refraction and well data are not available from both the US and Mexican GOM. Our derived crustal thickness map shows a zone of stretched continental crust with an average thickness of 20 km extending 700 km from the Ouachita foldbelt to the Sigsbee escarpment and in a 200-km-wide zone along the north and NW edge of the Yucatan block. To fully reconstruct the GOM to its pre-rift stage, we first close the late Jurassic oceanic part of the deep GOM using the traces of oceanic transform faults mapped from satellite gravity data. We then use our crustal thickness map to restore the thinned continental crust of the conjugate margins. Restoring the Yucatan block in a NW-SE direction produces the optimal, closed-fit model which supports a two-phase, GOM opening concept with early asymmetrical rifting across a broader, more extended, North American lower plate ( 250 km) in the northern, US GOM and a narrower, less extended, Yucatan upper plate ( 100 km) in the southern, Mexican GOM. Our full-fit reconstruction shows a single, post-rift Louann-Campeche salt-filled sag basin and re-aligned Paleozoic magnetic trends between the Yucatan block and Florida.

  17. Deep crustal structure of the Walvis Ridge at the junction with the Namibian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Tanja; Jokat, Wilfried; Behrmann, Jan H.; Ryberg, Trond; Weber, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The Walvis Ridge perpendicular to the African coast offshore Namibia is believed to be caused by a long-lived hotspot, which started to erupt with the opening of the South Atlantic in mid Cretaceous. The ridge in combination with the large igneous provinces (Etendeka and Parana) in South America and Namibia is today considered to be a classical model for hotspot driven continental break-up. To unravel details on how the crust and mantle were modified by such a major thermal event, a large-scale geophysical on- and offshore experiment was conducted in 2011. We present p-wave velocity models of two active seismic profiles along and across Walvis Ridge. The profile along the ridge continues onshore, has a total length of ~730 km and consists of 28 ocean bottom stations, 50 land stations and 8 dynamite shots. This section reveals a complex structure with multiple buried seamounts, strong lateral velocity gradients and indication of a high velocity body at the crust-mantle boundary beneath the shelf area. Lower crustal velocities range from 6.5 km/s in the west to 7.0 km/s in the east while the crustal thickness is approximately 28 km at the coast thinning westwards. The second profile perpendicular to the ridge is located about 140 km west of the first profile, has a length of ~480 km and consists of 27 ocean bottom stations. The crustal thickness is well constrained by multiple Moho reflections showing a thickness of 20km under the crest of the ridge and gradually thinning to 8km towards north and south. A seamount marks the northern termination of the ridge leading to an abrupt thickening of the crust to 14km before reaching the Angola Basin. While crustal velocities of 5.5 km/s and 6.5 km/s in the upper and lower crust are similar to the first profile, lower crustal velocities north of the crest are approximately 6% higher.

  18. Crustal signatures of the tectonic development of the North American midcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlannan, Austin J.; Gilbert, Hersh

    2016-01-01

    The stable eastern portion of the North American continent offers an excellent environment to study the tectonic development of intra-continental structures. The midcontinent of North America formed by the accretion of Proterozoic terranes, and has since experienced episodes of deformation during the subsidence of the Illinois Basin and uplift of the Ozark Plateau. Rifting also initiated in eastern North America, but extension did not continue and arms of failed rifts extend across the region. The New Madrid Seismic Zone, situated within a portion of the failed Reelfoot Rift, represents an active zone of intraplate seismicity. Analyzing the structure of the crust and upper mantle within the midcontinent will therefore provide insight into the factors that lead to intraplate deformation. Using data from over 180 Transportable Array seismic stations, we calculate receiver functions to investigate the crust and upper mantle of the midcontinent. At close to 40 km thick, the crust of the New Madrid Seismic Zone is thinner than in the surrounding areas outside of the Reelfoot Rift and Rough Creek Graben. The Illinois Basin cannot be characterized by a single crustal structure, as crust near 50 km thick in the central portion of the basin thins to between 40 and 45 km thick towards the northern and southern portions of the basin. Discontinuities within the crust and upper mantle are prominent in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone and mark locations of crustal modification and underplating. Comparing changes in crustal structure to the distribution of Bouguer gravity anomalies, the presence of positive gravity anomalies suggests that higher density crust plays a role in maintaining low surface elevations within the Reelfoot Rift. Conversely, a negative gravity anomaly in an area of thinner crust within the Ozark Plateau supports the need for low-density crustal material to influence the uplift of the plateau.

  19. Low Angle Normal Fault System Controls the Structure Evolution of Baiyun Deepwater Basin and Its Lithosphere Thinning, Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Ren, J.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the transition area from ~30 km to weakly thinned continental crust (<12 km) in Baiyun deepwater basin, Northern South China Sea leads to two questions: What controls extreme crustal thinning and what is the nature of Baiyun basin. The 3D seismic data newly acquired show that Baiyun basin is an asymmetric half graben mainly controlled by a set of north-dipping normal faults converging in deep. By employing the principle of back-stripping, we estimate the fault dips and slip amount would be in the absence of post-rift sediments and seawater loading. Results show these Middle Eocene faults were extremely active, with a high accumulation horizontal displacement (> 10 km) and an initial very low angle (<7°), followed by a rotated into sub-horizontal. A general scenario for extension of the uppermost continental crust probably includes simultaneous operation of low angle normal fault (F1) as well as parallel arrays of step-faults (domino-faults, f2-f9). Under such a scenario, it shows no obvious extension discrepancy in Baiyun basin. Our results indicate that Baiyun sag preserves information recording the continent thinning before the seafloor spreading, and it could be an abandoned inner rifted basin.

  20. Crustal permeability: Introduction to the special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gleeson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The topic of crustal permeability is of broad interest in light of the controlling effect of permeability on diverse geologic processes and also timely in light of the practical challenges associated with emerging technologies such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production (‘fracking’), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. This special issue of Geofluids is also motivated by the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic concept of permeability as a static material property that exerts control on fluid flow and the perspective of economic geologists, geophysicists, and crustal petrologists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. Issues associated with fracking, enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration have already begun to promote a constructive dialog between the static and dynamic views of permeability, and here we have made a conscious effort to include both viewpoints. This special issue also focuses on the quantification of permeability, encompassing both direct measurement of permeability in the uppermost crust and inferential permeability estimates, mainly for the deeper crust.

  1. Climate modulated erosion and sediment flux control offshore crustal structure at South China Sea continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, P. D.; Brune, S.; Quinteros, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rifted continental lithosphere subsides as a consequence of combined crustal thinning and mantle lithosphere cooling yet basins on some continental margins experience anomalous subsidence events that postdate active extension. Deep basins on the northern margin of the South China Sea, notably the Baiyun Sag, show basement subsidence accelerating after ~21 Ma, postdating extension by several million years. Similar subsidence events are seen after 5 Ma in the Song Hong Basin and after 11 Ma in the Qiongdongnan Basin. We combine geophysical observations and numerical forward modeling to show that loading of the offshore basins by increased sediment flux caused by faster onshore erosion following Early Miocene monsoon intensification is a viable trigger for ductile flow after the cessation of active extension. Loading works in conjunction with onshore uplift to drive flow of the lower crust away from the rift axis. As well as sediment supply rates distribution patterns and drainage capture can be significant in controlling crustal flow and thinning. This illustrates that offshore basin dynamics at continental margins with weak crust can be controlled by onshore surface processes in a newly recognized form of climate-tectonic coupling.

  2. Crustal structure of the Bighorn Mountains region: Precambrian influence on Laramide shortening and uplift in north-central Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Lindsay L.; Miller, Kate C.; Erslev, Eric A.; Anderson, Megan L.; Chamberlain, Kevin R.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Yeck, William L.; Harder, Steven H.; Siddoway, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    The crustal structure of north-central Wyoming records a history of complex lithospheric evolution from Precambrian accretion to Cretaceous-Paleogene Laramide shortening. We present two active source P wave velocity model profiles collected as part of the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment in 2010. Analyses of these velocity models and single-fold reflection data, together with potential field modeling of regional gravity and magnetic signals, constrain crustal structure and thickness of the Bighorn region. We image a west dipping reflection boundary and model a sharp magnetic contact east of the Bighorn Arch that together may delineate a previously undetected Precambrian suture zone. Localized patches of a high-velocity, high-density lower crustal layer (the "7.× layer") occur across the study area but are largely absent beneath the Bighorn Arch culmination. Moho topography is relatively smooth with no large-scale offsets, with depths ranging from ~50 to 37 km, and is largely decoupled from Laramide basement topography. These observations suggest that (1) the edge of the Archean Wyoming craton lies just east of the Bighorn Mountains, approximately 300 km west of previous interpretations, and (2) Laramide deformation localized in an area with thin or absent 7.× layer, due to its relatively weak lower crust, leading to detachment faulting. Our findings show that Precambrian tectonics in northern Wyoming may be more complicated than previously determined and subsequent Laramide deformation may have been critically dependent on laterally heterogeneous crustal structure that can be linked to Precambrian origins.

  3. Crustal Velocity Model of the Altai-Sayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, M. J.; Mackey, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a crustal velocity model for the the region encompassed by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network of South-Central Russia (45o-55o N. X 79o-98o E.). Geographically, the study area includes the Altai and Sayan Mountain Ranges, Western Mongolia, Eastern Kazakhstan, and Northwest China. To develop our model we used phase arrival data from approximately 175 larger earthquakes recorded by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network between 1977 and 1981 and reported in the bulletin Materialy po Seismichnosti Sibiri. To develop our model, we divided the region into 1o N-S x 2o E-W cells. Events within each cell, plus a small surrounding area, were relocated multiple times using a grid-search routine, in effort to determine the best fitting Pg and Sg velocities. Pg and Sg phase arrivals are generally from the 100-1000 km range and represent secondary arriving phases. These arrivals are dominant in this region and we consider the time picks and phase identifications to be reliable. Velocities tested range from 5.650 to 6.350 km/s for Pg and from 3.310 to 3.710 km/s for Sg. The best fitting velocities for each cell were then assigned to the geographic coordinates of the cell's center point. The standard Jeffreys-Bullen model was used for Pn velocities. The best fitting Pg and Sg velocities are those that minimize the average event residuals in a cell. High residual arrivals were omitted from the location process. In our model, Pg velocities range from 5.975-6.325 km/s, while Sg velocities range from 3.510-3.630 km/s, though the higher velocity extremes are constrained by one event and are not statistically significant. The average Pg velocity of the study area was, 6.147 km/s, and average Sg, 3.576 km/s. Geologically, these velocities are associated with the Central Asiatic Foldbelt and are consistent with regional crustal velocities along the southern edge of the Siberian Craton to the East as determined by previous studies.

  4. Reports on block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Amos

    1990-01-01

    Studies of block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation in the western United States, Israel, and China are discussed. Topics include a three-dimensional model of crustal fracture by distributed fault sets, distributed deformation and block rotation in 3D, stress field rotation, and multiple strike slip fault sets.

  5. THE CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF ELLESMERE ISLAND FROM RECEIVER FUNCTION MODELLING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Oakey, Gordon

    . Preliminary results give estimates of Moho depths and crustal velocity structure and these are discussed with a focus on the relationship to topography, regional geological units and fault zones. The receiver functions reveal crustal roots underneath the Victoria and Albert Mountains (45km) and the Grantland...

  6. Seismic evidence of crustal heterogeneity beneath the northwestern Deccan volcanic province of India from joint inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements and P receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, A. A.; Mohan, G.

    2016-10-01

    , volcano plutonic complexes, lower crustal mafic cumulates and possible partial melt due to elevated geotherms. The significant crustal alterations are possibly a result of weakening of the lithosphere by a mantle thermal source, leading to a thin and weak lithosphere which facilitated the Deccan volcanism through the rift zones of northwestern India.

  7. Horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland from 1999 to 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾国华; 符养; 王武星

    2004-01-01

    The paper introduces the horizontal crustal movement obtained from GPS observations in the regional networks(including the basic network and the fiducial network) of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China(CMONOC) carried out in 1999 and 2001. This paper is characterized by the acquisition of the horizontal dis-placement velocities during the period from 1999 to 2001 at the observation stations in the regional networks withdatum definition of a group of stable stations with small mutual displacements in east China. Based on the mostdetailed map of horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland, the division of blocks, their displacements anddeformations are studied. An approach to analysis of the intensity of the horizontal crustal deformation is proposed.The general characteristics of the recent horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland and that before theKunlunshan earthquake of M=8.1 on November 14, 2001 are analyzed.

  8. Constraints on Crustal Viscosity from Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory measurements of the ductile deformation of crustal rocks demonstrate a range of crystal deformation mechanisms that may be represented by a viscous deformation law, albeit one in which the effective viscosity may vary by orders of magnitude, depending on temperature, stress, grain size, water content and other factors. In such measurements these factors can be separately controlled and effective viscosities can be estimated more or less accurately, though the measured deformation occurs on much shorter time scales and length scales than are typical of geological deformation. To obtain bulk measures of the in situ crustal viscosity law for actual geological processes, estimated stress differences are balanced against measured surface displacement or strain rates: at the continental scale, surface displacement and strain rates can be effectively measured using GPS, and stress differences can be estimated from the distribution of gravitational potential energy; this method has provided constraints on a depth-averaged effective viscosity for the lithosphere as a whole in regions that are actively deforming. Another technique measures the post-seismic displacements that are interpreted to occur in the aftermath of a large crustal earthquake. Stress-differences here are basically constrained by the co-seismic deformation and the elastic rigidity (obtained from seismic velocity) and the strain rates are again provided by GPS. In this technique the strain is a strong function of position relative to the fault, so in general the interpretation of this type of data depends on a complex calculation in which various simplifying assumptions must be made. The spatial variation of displacement history on the surface in this case contains information about the spatial variation of viscosity within the crust. Recent post-seismic studies have shown the potential for obtaining measurements of both depth variation and lateral variation of viscosity in the crust beneath

  9. The crustal composition of the Falkland Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemt, Claudia; Jokat, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    The Falkland Islands are situated in the South Atlantic Ocean 500 km east of Patagonia, South America. The islands are part of the Falkland Plateau, which stretches eastward for more than 1500 km. A bathymetric high, the Maurice Ewing Bank, terminates the plateau in the east. Until Late Jurassic the Falkland Islands were part of Gondwana and were located adjacent to the east coast of South Africa. While the Falkland Islands and Maurice Ewing Bank are proved to be of continental composition, the nature and structure of the Falkland Plateau's basement in between is debatable. The first crustal model derived from sonobuoy data contradicts an only recently published 3D-gravity model. To enhance the understanding of Gondwana break-up considering timing, geometry and amount of volcanism, further knowledge about the structure and thickness of the crust is inevitable. During the ANT-XXIX/5 Polarstern cruise seismic refraction measurements were conducted using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and Reftek land stations onshore of East Falkland. The OBS were deployed at 78 locations along an approximately 1500 km east-west stretching profile. For the western transect a P-wave velocity model is calculated using 2D-raytracing techniques. The results are presented in combination with potential field data showing the extension of the Falkland Islands basement, the continent-ocean transition zone and the crustal structure of the plateau. On the Falkland Plateau Basin sediment thickness is about 6 km with velocities ranging from 1.7 to 4.1 km/s in the upper part and about 4.7 km/s above basement. The crust is of oceanic composition with an igneous section that is considerably thicker than average oceanic crust (up to 17 km). The velocity structure in the upper crustal part is typical for layer 2 with a velocity gradient ranging from 5.4 km/s to 6.5 km/s and thicknesses between 1.5 km and 4 km. Layer 3 is about 14 km thick with a velocity gradient from 6.6 km/s to 7.6 km/s, which is

  10. Visualization and dissemination of global crustal models on virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang-feng; Pan, Xin; Sun, Jian-zhong

    2016-05-01

    Global crustal models, such as CRUST 5.1 and its descendants, are very useful in a broad range of geoscience applications. The current method for representing the existing global crustal models relies heavily on dedicated computer programs to read and work with those models. Therefore, it is not suited to visualize and disseminate global crustal information to non-geological users. This shortcoming is becoming obvious as more and more people from both academic and non-academic institutions are interested in understanding the structure and composition of the crust. There is a pressing need to provide a modern, universal and user-friendly method to represent and visualize the existing global crustal models. In this paper, we present a systematic framework to easily visualize and disseminate the global crustal structure on virtual globes. Based on crustal information exported from the existing global crustal models, we first create a variety of KML-formatted crustal models with different levels of detail (LODs). And then the KML-formatted models can be loaded into a virtual globe for 3D visualization and model dissemination. A Keyhole Markup Language (KML) generator (Crust2KML) is developed to automatically convert crustal information obtained from the CRUST 1.0 model into KML-formatted global crustal models, and a web application (VisualCrust) is designed to disseminate and visualize those models over the Internet. The presented framework and associated implementations can be conveniently exported to other applications to support visualizing and analyzing the Earth's internal structure on both regional and global scales in a 3D virtual-globe environment.

  11. Detailed crustal thickness variations beneath the Illinois Basin area: Implications for crustal evolution of the midcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaotao; Pavlis, Gary L.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Marshak, Stephen; Gilbert, Hersh; Rupp, John; Larson, Timothy H.; Chen, Chen; Carpenter, N. Seth

    2017-08-01

    We present high-resolution imaging results of crustal and upper mantle velocity discontinuities across the Illinois Basin area using both common conversion point stacking and plane wave migration methods applied to P wave receiver functions from the EarthScope Ozark, Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky experiment. The images reveal unusually thick crust (up to 62 km) throughout the central and southeastern Illinois Basin area. A significant Moho gradient underlies the NW trending Ste. Genevieve Fault Zone, which delineates the boundary between the Illinois Basin and Ozark Dome. Relatively thinner crust (convergent margin tectonics around 1.55-1.35 Ga; (3) by Late Precambrian magmatic underplating at the base of older crust, associated with the creation of the Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Province around 1.3 Ga; and (4) through crustal "relamination" during an episode of Proterozoic flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois Basin, possibly associated with the Grenville Orogeny.

  12. Tectonic implications of Mars crustal magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J E P; Acuña, M H; Ness, N F; Kletetschka, G; Mitchell, D L; Lin, R P; Reme, H

    2005-10-18

    Mars currently has no global magnetic field of internal origin but must have had one in the past, when the crust acquired intense magnetization, presumably by cooling in the presence of an Earth-like magnetic field (thermoremanent magnetization). A new map of the magnetic field of Mars, compiled by using measurements acquired at an approximately 400-km mapping altitude by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, is presented here. The increased spatial resolution and sensitivity of this map provide new insight into the origin and evolution of the Mars crust. Variations in the crustal magnetic field appear in association with major faults, some previously identified in imagery and topography (Cerberus Rupes and Valles Marineris). Two parallel great faults are identified in Terra Meridiani by offset magnetic field contours. They appear similar to transform faults that occur in oceanic crust on Earth, and support the notion that the Mars crust formed during an early era of plate tectonics.

  13. Current crustal movement in Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琪

    2003-01-01

    The quantification of tectonic deformation in the Eastern and Central Asia is of great significance for the study on global plate motion and lithospheric dynamics. In the past four years, the velocity field of horizontal crustal movement for the Chinese mainland has been established for the first time thanks to the intensified GPS measurements and its improved accuracy. The velocity field derived from GPS measurements delineates the patterns of tectonic deformation in the Chinese mainland in the unprecedented detail, and thus reveals the new features of the ongoing tectonic process resulted from the collision of Indian plate to Eurasian plate. Meanwhile, the surface offset induced by two strong earthquakes occurred in Chinese mainland was sampled precisely using InSAR technique.

  14. Crustal evolution in Asia: Correlations and connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Kwon, Sanghoon; Santosh, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Asian region records multiple subduction, accretion and collision processes related to the breakup of Gondwana and Pangea, and the ongoing formation of the future supercontinent Amasia. The oldest geological record of Asia is preserved in Archean crustal fragments which were welded together by later collisional events related to the assembly of several supercontinents. The Asian region also records recent geological events such as volcanic activities and mega-earthquakes related to subduction of oceanic plates along active continental margins and collision of microplates. This region is thus regarded as an excellent field laboratory for examining the evolution of continental crust and cratons, formation and destruction of continents and supercontinents, and related metallogenic and surface environmental processes.

  15. Fractal behavior in continental crustal heat production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vedanti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of crustal heat production, which is the most important component in the elucidation of continental thermal structure, still remains a theoretical assumption. In general the heat production values must decrease with depth, but the form of decrease of heat production in the crust is not well understood. The commonly used heat production models are: "block model", in which heat production is constant from the surface to a given depth and the "exponential model", in which heat production diminishes as an exponential function of depth. The exponential model is more widely used wherein sources of the errors are heterogeneity of rock and long wavelength changes due to changes in lithology and tectonic elements, and as such exponential distribution does not work satisfactorily for the entire crust. In the present study, we analyze for the first time, deep crustal heat production data of six global areas namely Dharwar craton (India, Kaapvaal craton (South Africa, Baltic shield (Kola, Russia, Hidaka metamorphic belt (Japan, Nissho pluton (Japan and Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB, Germany. The power spectrum of all the studied data sets exhibits power law behaviour. This would mean slower decay of heat production with depth, which conforms to the known geologic composition of the crust. Minimum value of the scaling exponent has been found for the KTB borehole, which is apparently related to higher heat production of gneisses, however for other study areas, scaling exponent is almost similar. We also found that the lower values of scaling exponents are related to higher heat production in the crust as is the case in KTB. Present finding has a direct relevance in computation of temperature-depth profiles in continental regions.

  16. Crustal transects across the Rif domains in North Morocco, from the RIFSIS seismic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil de la Iglesia, A.; Gallart, J.; Diaz Cusi, J.; Carbonell, R.; Levander, A.; Palomeras, I.; Harnafi, M.

    2013-12-01

    , although the absence of Pn arrivals prevents to constrain upper mantle velocities. Average velocity values for the different layers in the models are, respectively: 3.5 and 4.7 km/s for the sediments, 5.9, 6.3, and 6.8 km/s within the crust, and 8 km/s below Moho. These velocity-depth models obtained at the Rif Cordillera hold major variations in crustal thickness, especially along the EW profile, that shows a rapid change of 20 km in Moho depths within 30 km horizontal distances. Maximum depths around 50 km are found below the external Rif Domain, while thinnest values of about 28 km are located eastwards of Nekor fault zone, in the foreland and Atlasic terranes up to the Algerian border. The model along NS profile displays also marked differences in crustal thicknesses, ranging from 40 km beneath the Betics and internal Rif sampled domains, to 48 km beneath external Rif, and a progressive thinning southwards till Middle Atlas domain where the Moho is found at 30 km depth. Such strong lateral variations in crustal structure and particularly the importance of the crustal root beneath the external Rif areas, rather unexpected according to surface topography or potential field datasets, is a major finding of this experiment that should be integrated in any further geodynamic modeling.

  17. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  18. Deep crustal reflection results from the central Eromanga Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, S. P.

    1983-12-01

    From 1980 to 1982 deep seismic reflection profiles were recorded across the central Eromanga Basin in eastern Australia to study the regional structure, stratigraphy and geological history of the Eromanga Basin and infra-basins. The reflection data were recorded to 20 s to obtain additional information on the nature and structure of the crust below the sediments and their relationship to the development of the basins. The seismic sections show good quality reflections from the deep crust as well as from the sedimentary layers. Based on the character, strength, coherence, continuity and spatial distribution of the reflections, the sections can be divided into four zones. The tope zone between 0 and 2.5 s shows fairly uniform, coherent and continuous events which correlate with the Mesozoic and Late Palaeozoic sediments. The zone from 2.5 to 8 s (4 to 22 km) does not show any primary reflections and is interpreted as the highly-deformed metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of the Early Palaeozoic Thomson Orogen underlying the sediments. Without any recognisable reflection or diffraction patterns in this zone, it is difficult to say whether the faulting and folding observed in the sediments extend into the upper crustal basement. The deeper zone of numerous reflection segments between 8 and 12.5 s (22 to 36 km) is interpreted as thin laminae of alternating low and high velocity (intermediate and basic) rocks, and correlates with the lower crust bounded by refraction velocity discontinuities. The lowest zone of no reflections below 12.5 s corresponds with the upper mantle. The reflection character and thickness as well as the refraction velocity structure of the crust under the central Eromanga Basin area are significantly different from those of the Precambrian crust under the Georgina Basin to the northwest. It is proposed that the crust under the Eromanga Basin is extensionally attenuated crust which had been intruded by sills of basaltic melt from the underlying

  19. Extremely depleted lithospheric mantle and diamonds beneath the southern Zimbabwe Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris B.; Pearson, D. Graham; Bulanova, Galina P.; Beard, Andrew D.; Carlson, Richard W.; Wittig, Nadine; Sims, Keith; Chimuka, Lovemore; Muchemwa, Ellah

    2009-11-01

    Inclusion-bearing diamonds, mantle xenoliths, and kimberlite concentrates from the Cambrian-aged Murowa and Sese kimberlites have been studied to characterise the nature of the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Zimbabwe Craton. The diamonds are mostly octahedral, moderately rich in nitrogen with moderate to high aggregation, and contain mainly dunite-harzburgite mineral inclusions. Similarly, dunite xenoliths predominate over harzburgite and lherzolite and carry olivines with Mg/Mg + Fe (Mg#) values of 0.92-0.95, spanning the average signatures for Kaapvaal Craton peridotites. Eclogitic xenoliths are extremely rare, in contrast to the Kaapvaal mantle lithosphere. The Zimbabwe mantle assemblage has been only slightly affected by later silicic metasomatism and re-fertilisation with re-introduction of pyroxenes in contrast to the Kaapvaal and many cratonic lithospheric blocks elsewhere where strong metasomatism and re-fertilisation is widespread. Pyroxene, garnet and spinel thermobarometry suggests an ambient 40 mW m - 2 geotherm, with the lithosphere extending down to 210 km at the time of kimberlite eruption. Whole rock peridotite Re-Os isotope analyses yield T RD model ages of 2.7 to 2.9 Ga, providing minimum estimates of the time of melt depletion, are slightly younger in age than the basement greenstone formation. These model ages coincide with the mean T RD age of > 200 analyses of Kaapvaal Craton peridotites, whereas the average Re-Os model age for the Zimbabwe peridotites is 3.2 Ga. The Os data and low Yb n/Lu n ratios suggest a model whereby thick lithospheric mantle was stabilised during the early stages of crustal development by shallow peridotite melting required for formation of residues with sufficiently high Cr/Al to stabilise chromite which then transforms to low Ca, high Cr garnet. Sulphide inclusions in diamond produce minimum T RD model ages of 3.4 Ga indicating that parts of the lithosphere were present at the earliest stages of crust

  20. Saudi Arabian seismic-refraction profile: A traveltime interpretation of crustal and upper mantle structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, W. D.; Gettings, M. E.; Blank, H. R.; Healy, J. H.

    1985-02-01

    The crustal and upper mantle compressional-wave velocity structure across the southwestern Arabian Shield has been investigated by a 1000-km-long seismic refraction profile. The profile begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, trends southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan, and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, and six shot points were used, including one in the Red Sea. Two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques, used to analyze amplitude-normalized record sections indicate that the Arabian Shield is composed, to first order, of two layers, each about 20 km thick, with average velocities of about 6.3 km/s and 7.0 km/s, respectively. West of the Shield-Red Sea margin, the crust thins to a total thickness of less than 20 km, beyond which the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain are interpreted to be underlain by oceanic crust. A major crustal inhomogeneity at the northeast end of the profile probably represents the suture zone between two crustal blocks of different composition. Elsewhere along the profile, several high-velocity anomalies in the upper crust correlate with mapped gneiss domes, the most prominent of which is the Khamis Mushayt gneiss. Based on their velocities, these domes may constitute areas where lower crustal rocks have been raised some 20 km. Two intracrustal reflectors in the center of the Shield at 13 km depth probably represent the tops of mafic intrusives. The Mohorovičić discontinuity beneath the Shield varies from a depth of 43 km and mantle velocity of 8.2 km/s in the northeast to a depth of 38 km and mantle velocity of 8.0 km/s depth in the southwest near the Shield-Red Sea transition. Two velocity discontinuities occur in the upper mantle, at 59 and 70 km depth. The crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Arabian Shield is interpreted

  1. Crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Salton Trough, southeast California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.; McCarthy, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents data and modelling results from a crustal and upper mantle wide-angle seismic transect across the Salton Trough region in southeast California. The Salton Trough is a unique part of the Basin and Range province where mid-ocean ridge/transform spreading in the Gulf of California has evolved northward into the continent. In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the final leg of the Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment (PACE). Two perpendicular models of the crust and upper mantle were fit to wide-angle reflection and refraction travel times, seismic amplitudes, and Bouguer gravity anomalies. The first profile crossed the Salton Trough from the southwest to the northeast, and the second was a strike line that paralleled the Salton Sea along its western edge. We found thin crust (???21-22 km thick) beneath the axis of the Salton Trough (Imperial Valley) and locally thicker crust (???27 km) beneath the Chocolate Mountains to the northeast. We modelled a slight thinning of the crust further to the northeast beneath the Colorado River (???24 km) and subsequent thickening beneath the metamorphic core complex belt northeast of the Colorado River. There is a deep, apparently young basin (???5-6 km unmetamorphosed sediments) beneath the Imperial Valley and a shallower (???2-3 km) basin beneath the Colorado River. A regional 6.9-km/s layer (between ???15-km depth and the Moho) underlies the Salton Trough as well as the Chocolate Mountains where it pinches out at the Moho. This lower crustal layer is spatially associated with a low-velocity (7.6-7.7 km/s) upper mantle. We found that our crustal model is locally compatible with the previously suggested notion that the crust of the Salton Trough has formed almost entirely from magmatism in the lower crust and sedimentation in the upper crust. However, we observe an apparently magmatically emplaced lower crust to the northeast, outside of the Salton Trough, and propose that this layer in part

  2. Separation of dynamic and isostatic components of the Venusian gravity and topography and determination of the crustal thickness of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, An; Huang, Jinshui; Wei, Daiyun

    2016-09-01

    Assuming that the long-wavelength geoid and topography of Venus are supported by both mantle convection and Airy isostasy, we propose a method to separate the dynamic and isostatic components of the Venusian gravity and topography with the aid of the dynamic admittance from numerical models of mantle convection and the isostatic admittance from an Airy isostatic model. The global crustal thickness is then calculated based on the isostatic component of the gravity and topography. The results show that some highland plateaus such as Ishtar Terra and Ovda Regio have thick crust, which are largely supported by isostatic compensation. Other highland plateaus such as Thetis and Phoebe Regiones appear to have superimposed contributions from crustal thickening and dynamic support. Volcanic rises such as Atla and Beta Regiones have thin crust, which is consistent with the postulation that these volcanic rises are mainly the products of dynamic uplift caused by mantle plumes.

  3. The crustal structure of Beira High, central Mozambique-Combined investigation of wide-angle seismic and potential field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian Olaf; Jokat, Wilfried; Schreckenberger, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    The timing and geometry of the initial Gondwana break-up between Africa and East Antarctica is still poorly known due to missing information about the continent-ocean boundaries along the rifted margins. In this context, the Beira High off central Mozambique forms a critical geological feature of uncertain crustal fabric. Based on new wide-angle seismic and potential field data across Beira High a P-wave velocity model, supported by amplitude and gravity modelling, provides constraints on the crustal composition of this area. In the Mozambique Basin mainly normal oceanic crust of 5.5-7 km thickness with velocities of 6.5-7.0 km/s in the lower crust is present. A sharp transition towards Beira High marks the continent-ocean boundary. Here the crust thickens to 23 km at maximum. A small velocity-depth gradient and a constant increase in velocity with basal velocities of maximum 7.0 km/s are in good agreement with typical velocities of continental crust and continental fragments. The density model indicates the existence of felsic material in greater depths and supports a fabric of stretched, but highly intruded continental crust below Beira High. A gradual decrease in crustal thickness characterizes the transition towards the Mozambican shelf area. Here, in the Zambezi Delta Depression 12 km of sediments cover the underlying 7 km thick crust. The presence of a high-velocity lower crustal body with velocities of 7.1-7.4 km/s indicates underplated, magmatic material in this part of the profile. However, the velocity structure in the shelf area allows no definite interpretation because of the experimental setup. Thus, the crustal nature below the Zambezi Delta and consequently the landward position of the continent-ocean boundary remains unknown. The difference in stretching below the margins of Beira High suggests the presence of different thinning directions and a rift jump during the early rifting stage.

  4. Measurement of sediment and crustal thickness corrected RDA for 2D profiles at rifted continental margins: Applications to the Iberian, Gulf of Aden and S Angolan margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins and rifted continental margins requires a correction for the anomalous uplift or subsidence arising from mantle dynamic topography. Whilst different global model predictions of mantle dynamic topography may give a broadly similar pattern at long wavelengths, they differ substantially in the predicted amplitude and at shorter wavelengths. As a consequence the accuracy of predicted mantle dynamic topography is not sufficiently good to provide corrections for subsidence analysis. Measurements of present day anomalous subsidence, which we attribute to mantle dynamic topography, have been made for three rifted continental margins; offshore Iberia, the Gulf of Aden and southern Angola. We determine residual depth anomaly (RDA), corrected for sediment loading and crustal thickness variation for 2D profiles running from unequivocal oceanic crust across the continental ocean boundary onto thinned continental crust. Residual depth anomalies (RDA), corrected for sediment loading using flexural backstripping and decompaction, have been calculated by comparing observed and age predicted oceanic bathymetries at these margins. Age predicted bathymetric anomalies have been calculated using the thermal plate model predictions from Crosby & McKenzie (2009). Non-zero sediment corrected RDAs may result from anomalous oceanic crustal thickness with respect to the global average or from anomalous uplift or subsidence. Gravity anomaly inversion incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction and sediment thickness from 2D seismic reflection data has been used to determine Moho depth, calibrated using seismic refraction, and oceanic crustal basement thickness. Crustal basement thicknesses derived from gravity inversion together with Airy isostasy have been used to correct for variations of crustal thickness from a standard oceanic thickness of 7km. The 2D profiles of RDA corrected for both sediment loading and non-standard crustal

  5. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  6. Thermal history of the deepest parts of orogens through U-Pb thermochronology of Tanzanian deep crustal xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondes, M. S.; Rudnick, R. L.; Bowring, S. A.; Piccoli, P. M.; Ramezani, J.

    2009-12-01

    information from a comparison of rutile, apatite, and titanite derived from different depths. The two lowest closure temperature phases, apatite and rutile, contain no appreciable radiogenic Pb in all but one xenolith rock type, consistent with pre-eruptive temperatures above 450 - 550 °C in the middle and lower crust. The presence of abundant radiogenic Pb in coexisting titanite, as well as the diffusion kinetics of Pb in titanite, apatite, and rutile, suggest that the Pb-loss is not due to magmatic entrainment, but rather reflects a widespread lithospheric thermal anomaly. This could be associated with modern rifting and/or reflect increased heat flow since the pan-African due to a thin lithospheric mantle relative to the craton. Closure of Pb in lower crustal titanite and Pb loss in middle crustal apatite is consistent with a measured surface heat flow value of 47 mW/m 2 and a conductive geotherm only if crustal radiogenic heat production is very low (< 0.5 μWm -3 ). As the MB is thought to represent the base of the Pan-African Orogen, these samples from Northern Tanzania offer a unique window into the thermal evolution of deep portions of a large continental orogen.

  7. Mechanism of crustal extension in the Laxmi Basin, Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Pandey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Continental rifting and magmatism has been extensively studied worldwide as it is believed that continental rifting, break up of continents and associated magmatism lead to genesis of new oceanic crust. However, various regions of the world show that these processes may lead to genesis of other types of crust than the oceanic crust. Laxmi Basin in the western continental margin of the India is one such region with an enigmatic crust. Due to its extreme strategic significance for the palaeogeographic reconstruction of continents during Cretaceous continental breakup of India, this basin has attracted various workers for more than two decades. However, still the issue of nature of crust in the basin remains controversial. In this contribution, in order to identify nature of crust, mechanism of continental extension in the Laxmi Basin has been studied for the first time through newly acquired seismic data from the basin. Here, we propose a plausible mechanism of crustal extension in the Laxmi Basin which eventually constrains the nature of crust of the Laxmi Basin. We have demonstrated that the crust in the Laxmi Basin can be categorised in two zones of stretched and transitional crust. In the stretched zone several fault bounded horst and graben structures are identified which preserve syn- and post-rift sediments along with different periods of hiatus in sedimentations as unconformities. These faults are identified as listric faults in the upper crust which sole out in the detachment faults. Detachment faults decouples the upper brittle and lower ductile crust. The transitional crust is identified as heavily intruded by sills and basaltic volcanic which were emplaced due to melting of subcontinental mantle (SCM after hyper-stretching of crust and serpentinisation of the SCM. Panikkar Ridge is proposed to be one such basaltic volcanic body derived from melting of lower part of the SCM.

  8. Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure Beneath the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R.; Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment was conducted on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of a 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array. The experiment extended 100 km along-axis and 60 km cross-axis. Two crustal tomographic analyses have previously been completed using data from the experiment. First, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to develop a three-dimensional model of crustal velocity and thickness in the upper crust (Weekly et al. 2014). Second, this model was used as the starting model in an analysis that incorporated ~19,000 Moho reflection arrivals (PmP) for non-ridge crossing paths to image lower crustal velocity structure and crustal thickness off-axis. A key feature of this model is a ~0.5-1 km increase in crustal thickness beneath a bathymetric plateau that extends to either side of the central portion of the Endeavour segment. We present a tomographic inversions that incorporates ridge-crossing paths to examine spatial variations in lower crustal velocity and crustal thickness beneath the ridge axis. The preliminary results from an inversion that incorporates ~8700 manually picked ridge-crossing PmP arrival times reveals a ~10-km-wide low velocity zone extending throughout the lower crust with a velocity anomaly of -0.3 to -0.5 km/s at ≥4 km depth. This low velocity zone extends both to the north and south of the axial magma chamber reflector imaged previously beneath the central Endeavour. The inversion also shows significant variations in apparent crustal thickness along axis but additional analysis is required to understand whether these variations are well resolved.

  9. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  10. Crustal thickness and images of the lithospheric discontinuities in the Gibraltar arc and surrounding areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Flor de Lis; Stich, Daniel; Morales, José; Martín, Rosa; Diaz, Jordi; Pazos, Antonio; Córdoba, Diego; Pulgar, Javier A.; Ibarra, Pedro; Harnafi, Mimoun; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    The Gibraltar arc and surrounding areas are a complex tectonic region and its tectonic evolution since Miocene is still under debate. Knowledge of its lithospheric structure will help to understand the mechanisms that produced extension and westward motion of the Alboran domain, simultaneously with NW-SE compression driven by Africa-Europe plates convergence. We perform a P-wave receiver function analysis in which we analyse new data recorded at 83 permanent and temporary seismic broad-band stations located in the South of the Iberian peninsula. These data are stacked and combined with data from a previous study in northern Morocco to build maps of thickness and average vP/vS ratio for the crust, and cross-sections to image the lithospheric discontinuities beneath the Gibraltar arc, the Betic and Rif Ranges and their Iberian and Moroccan forelands. Crustal thickness values show strong lateral variations in the southern Iberia peninsula, ranging from ˜19 to ˜46 km. The Variscan foreland is characterized by a relatively flat Moho at ˜31 km depth, and an average vP/vS ratio of ˜1.72, similar to other Variscan terranes, which may indicate that part of the lower crustal orogenic root was lost. The thickest crust is found at the contact between the Alboran domain and the External Zones of the Betic Range, while crustal thinning is observed southeastern Iberia (down to 19 km) and in the Guadalquivir basin where the thinning at the Iberian paleomargin could be still preserved. In the cross-sections, we see a strong change between the eastern Betics, where the Iberian crust underthrusts and couples to the Alboran crust, and the western Betics, where the underthrusting Iberian crust becomes partially delaminated and enters into the mantle. The structures largely mirror those on the Moroccan side where a similar detachment was observed in northern Morocco. We attribute a relatively shallow strong negative-polarity discontinuity to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary

  11. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, a series of controlled source seismic experiments brought new insight into the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their adjacent tectonic provinces. A fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD), and the new Pannonian...... fragment (PA), was interpreted and a triple junction was inferred. The goal of this study has been to relate these deep crustal structures to active tectonics. We used elastic plate modeling to reconsider the Moho fragmentation. We interpret subduction of EU below AD and PA from north to south...... and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting...

  12. Oligocene crustal anatexis in the Tethyan Himalaya, southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-E.; Zeng, Lingsen; Gao, Jiahao; Shang, Zhen; Hou, Kejun; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies in the Xiaru and Malashan gneiss dome of the Tethyan Himalaya, southern Tibet identify that Xiaru and Paiku tourmaline-bearing leucogranite dike formed at 28-29 Ma. Together with 28 Ma Kuday garnet-bearing leucogranites, it is demonstrated that the Himalayan orogenic belt experienced a major episode of crustal melting in the Mid-Oligocene. Geochemical data indicate that three suites of leucogranite are characterized by large variations in the major and trace element compositions as well as Sr-Nd isotope systematics, which could be explained by combined fractional crystallization and relative contributions of micas and accessory phases dissolved into a crustal melt during decompressional melting of metapelitic rocks. Documentation of Oligocene partial melting of crustal rocks could indicate that the exhumation of deep crustal rocks in the Himalayan orogenic belt could have started as early as Oligocene.

  13. Crustal thickness and composition beneath the High Lava Plains of Eastern Oregon from teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, K. C.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.; Carlson, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the crust beneath the High Lava Plains of eastern Oregon is fundamental for understanding the origins of widespread Cenozoic volcanism in the region. Eruptions of flood basalts in the southern Cascadian back arc peaked ~17-15 Ma, and were followed by distributed bimodal volcanism along two perpendicular migrating tracks; the Snake River Plain and the High Lava Plains. The orientations of eruptive centers have led to several competing hypotheses about their cause, including a deep mantle plume, slab retreat and asthenospheric inflow, lithospheric delamination, and lithospheric extension. The goal of this project is to constrain the nature, geometry, and depth of the Moho across the High Lava Plains, which will shed light on questions regarding crustal influence on melt generation and differentiation and the degree of magmatic underplating. In this study, we analyze teleseismic receiver functions from 118 stations of the High Lava Plains temporary broadband array, 34 nearby EarthScope/USArray stations, and 5 other regional broadband stations to determine bulk crustal features of thickness (H) and Vp/Vs ratio (κ). Applying the H-κ stacking method, we search for the best-fitting solution of timing predictions for direct and multiple P-to-S conversions from the Moho interface. Converting Vp/Vs to Poisson ratio, which is dependent primarily upon rock composition, allows for comparison with other direct geological observations. Preliminary results show that the crust of the High Lava Plains is relatively thin (~31 km) with a very sharp gradient to thicker crust (~42 km) at the western edge of the Owyhee Plateau in southwestern Idaho. This gradient is co-located with the western margin of Precambrian North America and is in the vicinity of the Jordan Craters volcanic center. The sharp topography of the Moho might have been a factor in melt migration beneath this area. West of the High Lava Plains, the crust thickens to ~40 km into the Cascade volcanic arc

  14. Extremely Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Extremely Preterm Birth Home For Patients Search FAQs Extremely Preterm Birth ... Spanish FAQ173, June 2016 PDF Format Extremely Preterm Birth Pregnancy When is a baby considered “preterm” or “ ...

  15. Seismic-refraction measurements of crustal structure between Santa Monica Bay and Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, John C.; Healy, John H.

    1963-01-01

    A reversed seismic-refraction profile was recorded between Santa Monica Bay, California, and Lake Mead, Nevada, during November 1961. Depth to the Mohorovicic discontinuity was determined to be approximately 29 km at Santa Monica Bay, 36 km under the Transverse Ranges, 26 km under the Mojave Desert, and 30 km at Lake Mead. Prominent events on the seismograms in the distance range 30 to 150 km are interpreted as reflections from the Mohorovicic discontinuity and from a crustal layer of intermediate velocity. These reflected events are used to make a detailed interpretation of crustal structure. The velocity of compressional waves in the mantle immediately below the Mohorovicic discontinuity was determined to be 7.8 km/sec. The velocity of compressional waves in the intermediate layer is near 7.0 km/sec. The apparent velocity of the direct arrival in the crustal rocks near the surface is 6.l km/sec north-east of Santa Monica Bay, and 6.1 km/sec southwest of Lake Mead. The higher apparent velocity for the direct arrival from Santa Monica Bay seems to be the result of thinning toward the east of low-velocity rocks near the surface. These low-velocity near-surface rocks are Cenozoic sedimentary rocks and fractured and weathered granitic and metamorphic rocks. The velocity of Sg was determined to be 3.4. km/sec near Lake Mead. A prominent phase with apparent velocity of 6.3 to 6.4 km/sec was recorded at distances beyond 200 km. This phase is identified as P and is interpreted as a reflection from the intermediate layer. Amplitude measurements support the conclusion that the P phase is a reflected arrival.

  16. Crustal structure in Gulf of Mexico from OBS refraction and multichannel reflection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, A.K.; Carye, J.; Latham, G.; Buffler, R.T.

    1981-07-01

    Results from 12 reversed refraction profiles each 110 km long have been combined with multichannel reflection data to produce a series of crustal structure sections across the Gulf of Mexico. The refraction data were collected using ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) and explosive charges ranging in size from 1 to 120 lb (0.45 to 54.42 kg). These data show as many as three layers of sedimentary rocks with total thickness between 5 and 9 km and layer velocities between 1.7 and 3.5 km/sec. Beneath most of the Gulf, this sedimentary section is underlain by a layer with velocity between 4.5 and 5.4 km/sec. The acoustic basement as defined by reflection data is confined within this layer. This basement layer, which may be the top of volcanic layer 2, is too thin to be detected in the refraction results. Beneath this layer in most of the deep Gulf is an oceanic crustal layer (layer 3), 3 to 6 km thick which thickens to about 12 km under the Mississippi fan and 10 km in the southeastern Gulf where it is interpreted to be transitional crust. Oceanic layer 3 has a velocity between 6.4 and 7.0 km/sec and overlies a mantle with velocity between 7.6 and 8.2 km/sec. The top of oceanic layer 3 was not observed on regional multichannel seismic profiles. These data confirm earlier refraction interpretation that most of the deep Gulf basin is underlain by an oceanic crustal layer flanked by transitional crust. This layer may have been formed by a mantle thermal event accompanied by a period of rapid sea-floor spreading. 16 figures, 1 table.

  17. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  18. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979–2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8–5.9 tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  19. Pb isotopic geochemical study on the crustal structure of Tongbaishan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Pb isotopic composition of the Tongbai complex, distributed in the Tongbaishan to the west of the Dabieshan, ranges between the Dabie core complex and the Dabie ultral-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic complex, the latter having more radiogenic Pb isotopic composition than the former. Granites from the Jigongshan pluton, which intruded mainly into the Tongbai complex, are distinct from the Tongbai complex but similar to the Dabie core complex in Pb isotopic composition, showing that the magma of the Jigongshan granites was derived from the partial melting of the Dabie core complex. According to Pb isotopic compositional variation model in the vertical crustal section and magma source from the Jigongshan pluton, it is suggested that the Tongbai complex was an upper rock serial of the Dabie core complex, which is beneath the Dabie UHP metamorphic complex in the crustal structure of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt. The Tongbai complex was not well preserved in the Dabie area due to the high exhumed crustal section. However, the crustal section in the Tongbai area was exhumed less than that in the Dabie area, and the deep crust in the Tongbai area still contains the basement composition similar to the Dabie core complex. Therefore, the crustal basements from the Dabie to Tongbai areas are united. The present distribution of the basement blocks in different locations of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt reflects different exposure of the crustal section.

  20. CRUSTAL THICKNESS VARIATIONS AND SEISMICITY OF NORTHWESTERN SOUTH AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Kim Jeong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Any uncompensated mass of the northern Andes Mountains is presumably under pressure to adjust within the Earth to its ideal state of isostatic equilibrium. Isostasy is the ideal state that any
    uncompensated mass seeks to achieve in time. These pressures interact with the relative motions between adjacent plates that give rise to earthquakes along the plate boundaries. By combining the
    gravity MOHO estimates and crustal discontinuities with historical and instrumental seismological catalogs the correlation between isostatically disturbed terrains and seismicity has been established.
    The thinner and thicker crustal regions were mapped from the zero horizontal curvature of the crustal thickness estimates. These boundaries or edges of crustal thickness variations were compared to
    crustal discontinuities inferred from gravity and magnetic anomalies and the patterns of seismicity that have been catalogued for the last 363 years. The seismicity is very intense along the Nazca-North
    Andes, Caribbean-North American and North Andes-South American collision zones and associated with regional tectonic compressional stresses that have locally increased and/or diminished by
    compressional and tensional stress, respectively, due to crustal thickness variations. High seismicity is also associated with the Nazca-Cocos diverging plate boundary whereas low seismicity is associated with the Panama-Nazca Transform Fault and the South American Plate.

  1. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, J.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Currie, P.J. [Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, Alberta T0J 0Y0 (Canada); Davies, J.A. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Siegele, R. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Wallace, S.G. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Zelenitsky, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    1996-06-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as {sup 209}Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass {<=}100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors. (orig.).

  2. Monitoring Crustal Movement of the Coastal Zone in Eastern China with GPS Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, various dominating factors affecting crustal movement of the coastal zone in eastern China are analyzed, and major characteristics of crustal movement are summarized. Subduction of the pacific plate and Philippine plate and southeastward "escape" of Qinghai-Tibet plateau are believed to be dominating factors affecting crustal movement of that zone. Undoubtedly, it is a best way to monitor this kind of large-scale crustal movement with GPS technique. The feasibility of monitoring crustal m...

  3. Crustal control of dissipative ocean tides in Enceladus and other icy moons

    CERN Document Server

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Could tidal dissipation within Enceladus' subsurface ocean account for the observed heat flow? Earthlike models of dynamical tides give no definitive answer because they neglect the influence of the crust. I propose here the first model of dissipative tides in a subsurface ocean, by combining the Laplace Tidal Equations with the membrane approach. For the first time, it is possible to compute tidal dissipation rates within the crust, ocean, and mantle in one go. I show that oceanic dissipation is strongly reduced by the crustal constraint, and thus contributes little to Enceladus' present heat budget. Tidal resonances could have played a role in a forming or freezing ocean less than 100 m deep. The model is general: it applies to all icy satellites with a thin crust and a shallow ocean. Scaling rules relate the resonances and dissipation rate of a subsurface ocean to the ones of a surface ocean. If the ocean has low viscosity, the westward obliquity tide does not move the crust. Therefore, crustal dissipation...

  4. Evidence for Moho-lower crustal transition depth diking and rifting of the Sierra Nevada microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenneth D.; Kent, Graham M.; Seggern, David P.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Eisses, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Lithospheric rifting most often initiates in continental extensional settings where "breaking of a plate" may or may not progress to sea floor spreading. Generally, the strength of the lithosphere is greater than the tectonic forces required for rupture (i.e., the "tectonic force paradox"), and it has been proposed that rifting requires basaltic magmatism (e.g., dike emplacement) to reduce the strength and cause failure, except for the case of a thin lithosphere (structure, each striking N45°W and dipping 50°NE. A single event at 30 km depth that locates on the implied dipping feature between the two swarms is further evidence for a single Moho-transition depth structure. We propose that basaltic or fluid emplacement at or near Moho depths weakens the upper mantle lid, facilitating lithospheric rupture of the Sierra Microplate. Similar to the LT sequence, the SV event is also associated with increased upper crustal seismicity. An 27 October 2011, Mw 4.7 earthquake occurred directly above the deep SV sequence at the base of the upper crustal seismogenic zone ( 15 km depth).

  5. Nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Keppler, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-nine experiments have been carried out at 600-1400 °C, 2-35 kbar, and oxygen fugacities ranging from the Fe-FeO to the Re-ReO2 buffer to investigate the nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal N-H-O fluids. Laser Raman analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in situ in quartz and olivine crystals show that N2 and/or NH3 are the only detectable nitrogen species in the fluids at the conditions of the present study. The results further show that in the fluids of the oxidized shallow upper mantle, nitrogen is mostly present as N2, while in the deep reduced upper mantle, NH3 is the dominant nitrogen species. Nitrogen speciation in subduction zone fluids is also calculated from the experimental data to constrain the efficiency of nitrogen recycling. The data show that a hot, oxidized slab is an efficient barrier for deep nitrogen subduction, while a cold, reduced slab would favor recycling nitrogen into the deep mantle. The nitrogen species in magmatic fluids of mid-ocean ridge basalt and arc magmas are predominantly N2, but a significant fraction of nitrogen can be NH3 at certain conditions. The nitrogen species in fluids released from the solidifying magma ocean and the reduced young mantle may have been mostly NH3. The release of such fluids may have created a reduced atmosphere on the every early Earth, with an elevated concentration of NH3. This may not only resolve the faint young Sun paradox but may also have created favorable conditions for the formation of biomolecules through Miller-Urey type reactions.

  6. Multidimensional extremal dependence coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Extreme values modeling has attracting the attention of researchers in diverse areas such as the environment, engineering, or finance. Multivariate extreme value distributions are particularly suitable to model the tails of multidimensional phenomena. The analysis of the dependence among multivariate maxima is useful to evaluate risk. Here we present new multivariate extreme value models, as well as, coefficients to assess multivariate extremal dependence.

  7. The European Extreme Right and Religious Extremism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Camus

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The ideology of the Extreme Right in Western Europe is rooted in Catholic fundamentalism and Counter-Revolutionary ideas. However, the Extreme Right, like all other political families, has had to adjust to an increasingly secular society. The old link between religion and the Extreme Right has thus been broken and in fact already was when Fascism overtook Europe: Fascism was secular, sometimes even anti-religious, in its essence. Although Catholic fundamentalists still retain strong positions within the apparatus of several Extreme Right parties (Front National, the vote for the Extreme Right is generally weak among regular churchgoers and strong among non-believers. In several countries, the vote for the Extreme Right is stronger among Protestant voters than among Catholics, since while Catholics may support Christian-Democratic parties, there are very few political parties linked to Protestant churches. Presently, it also seems that Paganism is becoming the dominant religious creed within the Extreme Right. In a multicultural Europe, non-Christian forms of religious fundamentalism such as Islamism also exist with ideological similarities to the Extreme Right, but this is not sufficient to categorize Islamism as a form of Fascism. Some Islamist groups seek alliances with the Extreme Right on the basis of their common dislike for Israel and the West, globalization and individual freedom of thought.

  8. Along-Strike Variations in Crustal Seismicity in the Central Andes and Geodynamic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, K.; Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; McGroder, M.; Kendall, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    For the central Andes, we compiled relocated crustal earthquakes (magnitude ≥ 4.5) from the EHB Bulletin and Nipress et al. [2007] and focal mechanisms from the Global CMT catalog and published literature [Alvarado et al., 2005]. These data were plotted in map, cross section, and 3D views in the context of local tomography [Koulakov et al., 2006] and lithospheric boundaries [Tassara et al., in prep]. The results imply major along-strike variations in the mechanisms of crustal deformation. At the latitude of the Altiplano, there is scarce forearc seismicity. The thin-skinned Bolivian retroarc thrust belt shows no seismic events (magnitude ≥ 4.5), suggesting that it is deforming aseismically or locked. In contrast, at the latitude of the Puna to the south (20-25°S), crustal seismicity is more prevalent in both the forearc and retroarc. Within this region, active deformation in the Coastal Cordillera near Antofagasta is occurring along steeply east-dipping normal faults at 15-41 km depth; this is the only part of the central Andean forearc that displays prominent extension. Outboard of this, thrust events at ~15 km depth in the forearc wedge display gently dipping nodal planes, and may be signatures of underplating crust that was tectonically eroded at the trench. Underplating is a likely process by which this region of the forearc has undergone ~1 km of surface uplift during the Neogene. Seismicity with thrust or reverse and oblique focal mechanisms in the retroarc wedge is localized beneath the frontal part of the thick-skinned Eastern Cordilleran thrust belt and the Santa Barbara ranges. Seismicity along discrete, east- and west-dipping planes occurs to near Moho depths (~50 km). While retroarc crustal seismicity continues to the south toward the Juan Fernandez flat slab, there is a concentration of seismic events in the retroarc at the latitude (22-23°S) where there is prominent normal faulting in the forearc. We interpret the compiled data to suggest that

  9. Vp/Vs Anisotropy and Implications for Crustal Composition Identification and Earthquake Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qian; JI Shaocheng; XU Zhiqin

    2009-01-01

    The ratio of P- to S-wave velocities (Vp/Vs) is regarded as one of the most diagnostic properties of natural rocks. It has been used as a discriminant of composition for the continental crust and provides valuable constraints on its formation and evolution processes. Furthermore, the spatial and temporal changes in Vp/Vs before and after earthquakes are probably the most promising avenue to understanding the source mechanics and possibly predicting earthquakes. Here we calibrate the variations in Vp/Vs in dry, anisotropic crustal rocks and provide a set of basic information for the interpretation of future seismic data from the Wenchuan earthquake Fault zone Scientific Drilling (WFSD) project and other surveys. Vp/Vs is a constant (φ0) for an isotropic rock. However, most of crustal rocks are anisotropic due to lattice-preferred orientations of anisotropic minerals (e.g., mica, amphibole, plagioclase and pyroxene) and cracks as well as thin compositional layering. The Vp/Vs ratio of an anisotropic rock measured along a selected pair of propagation-vibration directions is an apparent value (φij) that is significantly different from the value for its isotropic counterpart (φ0). The usefulness of apparent Vp/Vs ratios as a diagnostic of crustal composition depends largely on rock seismic anisotropy. A 5% of P- and S-wave velocity anisotropy is sufficient to make it impossible to determine the crustal composition using the conventional criteria (Vp/Vsl.944 fluid-tidied porous/fractured or partially molten rocks) if the information about the wave propagation-polarization directions with respect to the tectonic framework is unknown. However, the variations in Vp/Vs measured from borehole seismic experiments can be readily interpreted according to the orientations of the ray path and the polarization of the shear waves with respect to the present-day principal stress directions (I.e., the orientation of cracks) and the frozen fabric (I.e., foliation and lineation).

  10. A review of the current knowledge of the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Valencia Trough Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, C.; Torne, M.; Roca, E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we review the current geophysical knowledge of the Valencia Trough Basin, and the surround- ing areas. For this purpose, we summarize the most significant regional geophysical datasets acquired since the seventies to investigate the trough (seismic, gravity, geoid and heat flow data). We then focus on the discussion regarding the geometry and physical properties of the present day crustal and lithospheric structure derived from seismic images, as well as combined potential field modelling and their relationships with the Alpine geo dynamic evolution of the Valencia Trough. Finally, we discuss the differences in the results regard- ing the geometry of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary obtained by different modelling approaches and the features that, in our view, require further investigation to unravel the true nature of the Valencia Trough, including what could have caused the differences between the crustal structure observed in the SW region compared to the NE region, the asymmetric style of thinning across the trough; the origin of the changes in the lower crustal reflectivity across the basin; the fabric of the uppermost mantle, characterized by anomalously low P-wave velocities; and the physical properties of the lithosphere mantle (density, P- waves velocity, thermal conductivity, temperature distribution, mineralogical composition, etc.). (Author)

  11. Crustal structure along the coast of California from seismic-refraction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, J.H.

    1962-01-01

    Two reversed seismic-refraction profiles were recorded between Los Angeles and San Francisco in 1961. The three shotpoints were located in Santa Monica Bay, offshore near San Francisco, and at Camp Roberts, about halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. The velocity of Pg along these profiles is 6.1 ± 0.1 km/sec, with possible exceptions near San Francisco and near Los Angeles, where the scatter in the arrival times indicates complex near-surface velocity variations. The velocity of Pn between Los Angeles and Camp Roberts is 8.2 ± 0.1 km/sec, and between Camp Roberts and San Francisco 8.0 ± 0.2 km/sec. There is no indication of an intermediate crustal layer in the traveltimes of first arrivals. Computed depths to the Mohorovicic discontinuity, if the crust consists of a single layer, are: 35 km at Los Angeles, 23 km at Camp Roberts, and 23 km at San Francisco. Refractions from crustal layers of intermediate velocity need not appear as first arrivals, and in the extreme, the depth to the Mohorovicic discontinuity may be one-third greater than the thickness of a one-layer crust.

  12. A mechanism to thin the continental lithosphere at magma-poor margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavier, Luc L; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2006-03-16

    Where continental plates break apart, slip along multiple normal faults provides the required space for the Earth's crust to thin and subside. After initial rifting, however, the displacement on normal faults observed at the sea floor seems not to match the inferred extension. Here we show that crustal thinning can be accomplished in such extensional environments by a system of conjugate concave downward faults instead of multiple normal faults. Our model predicts that these concave faults accumulate large amounts of extension and form a very thin crust (< 10 km) by exhumation of mid-crustal and mantle material. This transitional crust is capped by sub-horizontal detachment surfaces over distances exceeding 100 km with little visible deformation. Our rift model is based on numerical experiments constrained by geological and geophysical observations from the Alpine Tethys and Iberia/Newfoundland margins. Furthermore, we suggest that the observed transition from broadly distributed and symmetric extension to localized and asymmetric rifting is directly controlled by the existence of a strong gabbroic lower crust. The presence of such lower crustal gabbros is well constrained for the Alpine Tethys system. Initial decoupling of upper crustal deformation from lower crustal and mantle deformation by progressive weakening of the middle crust is an essential requirement to reproduce the observed rift evolution. This is achieved in our models by the formation of weak ductile shear zones.

  13. Crustal structure and rift tectonics across the Cauvery–Palar basin, Eastern Continental Margin of India based on seismic and potential field modelling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Twinkle; G Srinivasa Rao; M Radhakrishna; K S R Murthy

    2016-03-01

    The Cauvery–Palar basin is a major peri-cratonic rift basin located along the Eastern Continental Margin of India (ECMI) that had formed during the rift-drift events associated with the breakup of eastern Gondwanaland (mainly India–Sri Lanka–East Antarctica). In the present study, we carry out an integrated analysis of the potential field data across the basin to understand the crustal structure and the associated rift tectonics. The composite-magnetic anomaly map of the basin clearly shows the onshore-tooffshore structural continuity, and presence of several high-low trends related to either intrusive rocks or the faults. The Curie depth estimated from the spectral analysis of offshore magnetic anomaly data gave rise to 23 km in the offshore Cauvery–Palar basin. The 2D gravity and magnetic crustal models indicate several crustal blocks separated by major structures or faults, and the rift-related volcanic intrusiverocks that characterize the basin. The crustal models further reveal that the crust below southeast Indian shield margin is ∼36 km thick and thins down to as much as 13–16 km in the Ocean Continent Transition (OCT) region and increases to around 19–21 km towards deep oceanic areas of the basin. Thefaulted Moho geometry with maximum stretching in the Cauvery basin indicates shearing or low angle rifting at the time of breakup between India–Sri Lanka and the East Antarctica. However, the additional stretching observed in the Cauvery basin region could be ascribed to the subsequent rifting of Sri Lanka from India. The abnormal thinning of crust at the OCT is interpreted as the probable zone of emplaced Proto-Oceanic Crust (POC) rocks during the breakup. The derived crustal structure along with other geophysical data further reiterates sheared nature of the southern part of the ECMI.

  14. Crustal structure of seismic velocity in southern Tibet and east-westward escape of the crustal material--An example by wide-angle seismic profile from Peigu Tso to Pumoyong Tso

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Zhongjie; TENG; Jiwen; LI; Yingkang; S.Klemperer

    2004-01-01

    The reflecting events from Moho and other interfaces within the crust are recognized from the wavefield characteristics of P- and S-wave for the 480km long wide-angle seismic profile between Peigu Tso and Pumoyong Tso. Then, seismic crustal structures of P- and S-wave velocities and Poisson ratio under the nearly east-west profile in southern Tibet are interpreted by fitting the observed traveltimes with the calculated ones by forward modelling. Our interpreting results demonstrate that the crustal thickness varies remarkably in the east-west direction, showing a pattern that the crust could be divided into three parts bounded by the west of Dingri and the east of Dinggyê, respectively, where the depth of Moho is about 71km for the western part, about 76km for the middle and about 74km for the eastern. There is one lower velocity layer (LVL) at the bottom of the upper crust with depth of 20-30 km. One of the distinct features is that the thickness of LVL abruptly thins from 24km on the west to 6km on the east. The other is that the velocity variation in the crust along east-west direction for both P- and S-wave displays a feature as quasi-periodic variation. The lower velocity (compared to the average value for the continent of the globe) in the lower crust and three sets of north-southward active normal faults are probably attributed to the coupling process of material delamination in the lower crust, crustal thicking and east-westward escape of the crustal material accompanied with the continental collision between India and Eurasia Plate.

  15. Tectonic history of the Ordos Block and Qinling Orogen inferred from crustal thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; An, Meijian; Dong, Shuwen

    2017-07-01

    The Ordos Block and the Qinling Orogen in central China are key regions that have been affected by Indo-Eurasian collision, convergence of the North China, South China and Siberian cratons, and subduction of the Pacific oceanic plate during the Phanerozoic. Investigation of the crustal structure in this area can therefore provide significant insights into the interactions among these tectonic blocks and plates. The Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences deployed ca. 249 portable broad-band seismic stations in this area from 2011 to 2016, and we retrieved P-wave receiver functions (RFs) from these new stations, and also from all other available permanent and portable seismic stations in China. Crustal thicknesses beneath the stations were retrieved using 1-D S-wave velocity models, which were obtained by linearized inversion of the RFs with initial reference models from regionalized S-wave velocities of surface wave inversions. We demonstrate with synthetic tests that this inversion scheme is superior to a jointly linearized inversion of RFs and surface waves. The results show that crustal thicknesses generally correlate with tectonic domains in the study region. Thus, thick crust is present beneath the Daba Shan region and the area close to the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, intermediate-thickness crust is present beneath the Ordos Block and the central North China Craton, and thin crust exists beneath the North China Plain. However, some notable exceptions exist. The crust beneath the central Qinling is thinner than that beneath the neighbouring Daba Shan region and even the Weihe Basin, implying that subduction and collision of the North China and South China cratons in the Palaeozoic did not produce a thick crust beneath the suture. The relatively thin crust beneath the eastern and central Qinling must be denser than that beneath neighbouring areas. All the basins around the Ordos Block have been considered to be graben. However, our results show that the crust

  16. 应用超量扩张形成的超薄皮瓣修复面颈部及四肢关节瘢痕组织%Application of ultra-thin expanded flap for repairing scar of neck and face and joint of extremities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈骥扬; 何海填; 孟晖; 孙东原; 向明

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨应用超量扩张形成的超薄皮瓣修复面颈部及四肢关节瘢痕组织的临床价值。方法回顾性分析2012年1月至2014年12月深圳市蛇口人民医院收治的42例面颈部及四肢关节瘢痕患者的临床资料,共置入112枚皮肤软组织扩张器,进行超过额定容积的超量扩张,形成超薄皮瓣后修复瘢痕组织。观察扩张器外露及皮瓣存活情况,评估总体修复效果,调查患者满意度。结果面颈部及四肢超薄皮瓣厚度为2.0~3.0 mm。扩张器注水期5处扩张器外露,余皆正常。皮瓣转移术后112处扩张皮瓣中10处出现皮瓣远端血运障碍,经处理后3处恢复正常、7处皮瓣坏死,但未严重影响最终治疗效果;余皮瓣成活良好。随访3~6个月,平均随访时间5个月。术后外观功能均获得明显改善,患者总体满意度90%(38/42)。结论超量扩张形成的超薄皮瓣修复面颈部及四肢关节瘢痕组织效果满意。%Objective To explore the applicable value of ultra-thin expanded flap for repairing scar of neck, face or joint of extremities. Methods Clinical data of 42 patients who were treated by ultra-thin exceedingly expanded flaps (by 112 implanted expanders of skin soft tissue) to repair scar of neck and face, joint of extremities in Shekou People's Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014, were analyzed retrospectively. The expander exposure and flap survival were observed, total repair effects were evaluated, and the patient satisfaction degree was investigated. Results The thickness of ultra-thin expanded flap was 2.0 to 3.0 mm. Five expanders were exposed during water-injection period. Of 112 expanded flaps, there were 10 flaps with distal blood circulatory disorders after skin flap transferring, in which 3 flaps survived after treatment, other 7 flaps developed necrosis without serious effects on therapeutic results. The remaining flaps survived well. The follow-up time was

  17. Rheology of Melt-bearing Crustal Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, C. L.; Medvedev, S.; Handy, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    A review and reinterpretation of previous experimental data on the deformation of melt-bearing crustal rocks (Rosenberg and Handy, 2005) revealed that the relationship of aggregate strength to melt fraction is non-linear, even if plotted on a linear ordinate and abscissa. At melt fractions, Φ 0.07, the dependence of aggregate strength on Φ is significantly greater than at Φ > 0.07. This melt fraction (Φ= 0.07) marks the transition from a significant increase in the proportion of melt-bearing grain boundaries up to this point to a minor increase thereafter. Therefore, we suggest that the increase of melt-interconnectivity causes the dramatic strength drop between the solidus and a melt fraction of 0.07. A second strength drop occurs at higher melt fractions and corresponds to the breakdown of the solid (crystal) framework, corresponding to the well-known "rheologically critical melt percentage" (RCMP; Arzi, 1978). Although the strength drop at the RCMP is about 4 orders of magnitude, the absolute value of this drop is small compared to the absolute strength of the unmelted aggregate, rendering the RCMP invisible in a linear aggregate strength vs. melt fraction diagram. Predicting the rheological properties and thresholds of melt-bearing crust on the basis of the results and interpretations above is very difficult, because the rheological data base was obtained from experiments performed at undrained conditions in the brittle field. These conditions are unlikely to represent the flow of partially melted crust. The measured strength of most of the experimentally deformed, partially-melted samples corresponds to their maximum differential stress, before the onset of brittle failure, not to their viscous strength during "ductile" (viscous) flow. To overcome these problems, we extrapolated a theoretically-derived flow law for partially melted granite deforming by diffusion-accommodated grain-boundary sliding (Paterson, 2001) and an experimentally-derived flow law for

  18. Flash Heating of Crustal Rocks at Seismic Slip Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, D. L.; Spagnuolo, E.; Smith, S. A.; Beeler, N. M.; Tullis, T. E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that rocks undergo extreme frictional weakening at near-earthquake slip rates due to the thermal degradation of the strength, or even melting, of microscopic asperity contacts on their sliding surfaces (Goldsby and Tullis, 2012). These previous experiments, conducted at constant normal stress and slip rates of up to ~0.4 m/s, revealed a 1/V dependence of friction on slip rate above a characteristic weakening velocity, Vw, in accord with theories of flash heating (e.g., Rice, 2006). The weakening velocity obtains values of ~0.1 m/s for many crustal silicate rocks (Goldsby and Tullis, 2012). Here we test two further predictions of flash-heating theory - that the degree of weakening saturates at slip rates approaching 1 m/s, and that the weakening behavior due to flash heating is independent of normal stress - by testing samples at slip rates of up to 1 m/s at different normal stresses. Experiments were conducted in a 1-atm, high-velocity friction apparatus at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia in Rome. A sample consisted of a pair of hollow cylinders of Westerly granite or Frederick diabase subjected to a nominally constant normal stress of from 1 to 30 MPa and subjected to a variety of rate-stepping sequences. Data were acquired at rates of up to 1 MHz. As predicted, the experiments demonstrate that the degree of weakening due to flash heating saturates at slip rates approaching 1 m/s; in a few cases, friction even increases slightly with increasing slip rate near 1 m/s. The experiments also demonstrate that, within the scatter of the data, the value of Vw and the friction coefficient in the weakened state is independent of normal stress, the expected result if average contact sizes and contact stresses are independent of normal stress. The data thus further corroborate existing theories and experimental data for flash heating, allowing for a more reliable determination of the conditions under which flash heating

  19. Crustal structure of the Pannonian Basin: The AlCaPa and Tisza Terrains and the Mid-Hungarian Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, György; Ren, Yong; Dando, Ben; Stuart, Graham W.; Hegedűs, Endre; Kovács, Attila Csaba; Houseman, Gregory A.

    2015-04-01

    The Pannonian Basin of Central Europe is one of the key examples of Miocene continental extension that is easily accessible to surface seismological investigation. It comprises two major crustal blocks: AlCaPa and Tisza which abut along a poorly understood structure referred to as the Mid-Hungarian Zone (MHZ), the whole being surrounded by the arc of the Carpathian Mountains, the Alps and the Dinarides. Using data from the CBP (Carpathian Basins Project) temporary broadband seismic array of 46 stations deployed across the western Pannonian Basin in 2006-2007, we calculated receiver functions that constrain the variation of crustal thickness across the basin and derive a map of Moho depth across a NW-SE oriented swath about 450 km long and 75 km wide. The measured Moho depths show no significant change in crustal thickness between AlCaPa and Tisza terrains, but the Moho is not or very weakly imaged along a ca. 40 km wide strip centred on the MHZ. Moho depths within the Pannonian Basin are typically in the range 25-30 km, and increase toward the periphery of the basin. Our measurements are generally consistent with earlier VP models from controlled-source seismic surveys and recent VS models determined by tomographic analysis of ambient noise signals. The lack of a sharp Moho image beneath the MHZ suggests that the crust-mantle boundary in that zone may consist of a gradual increase in velocity with depth. The relatively constant crustal thickness across the two domains of the Pannonian Basin suggests that thinning to the same final state is controlled thermally. This structural characteristic seems to be governed by a large-scale balance of gravitational potential energy that is insensitive to the separate prior histories of the two regions.

  20. Seismic and gravity modelling of crustal structure in the Central Graben, North Sea. Observations along MONA LISA profile 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.; MONA LISA Working Group

    2000-12-01

    High quality wide-angle and deep normal-incidence seismic data sets recorded during the MONA LISA (Marine and Onshore North Sea Acquisition for Lithospheric Seismic Analysis) experiment have allowed detailed crustal investigations in the area of the Central Graben and south-eastern North Sea to be conducted. An integrated velocity-density model based on a joint inversion of traveltimes and gravity data is presented for the crust and uppermost mantle along MONA LISA line 3, which crosses the Central Graben approximately perpendicular to its strike direction. This model shows pronounced crustal thinning and associated Moho uplift beneath the deepest part of the Central Graben. In the graben area, Moho is interpreted to be situated at 25 km depth and the crystalline crust is about a factor of 2 thinner than in the surrounding crustal provinces, where Moho is interpreted to reach depths between 32 and 36 km. Maximum thickness of the sedimentary column in the Central Graben is 10-11 km. The mass deficit of the thick sediments is compensated by the Moho uplift. The modelled Moho coincides with the base of lower crustal reflectivity observed in the coincident normal-incidence seismic section. Good overall agreement between the integrated velocity-density model and the normal-incidence data is observed. The migrated deep seismic reflection section recorded to 26 s traveltime contains deep west-ward and east-ward dipping events symmetric about the deepest part of the Central Graben. These dipping upper mantle reflections may be linked to extensional processes that formed the Central Graben. At least one of the upper mantle dipping reflectors may be a reactivated structure formed originally during Caledonian collision.

  1. Crustal Heat Production and Mantle Heat Flow in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡圣标; 汪集旸

    1994-01-01

    The correlation between seismic velocity (vp) and radiogenic heat production (A) en-ables the distribution of crustal heat production to be evaluated,from which the mantle heat flow for 21seismic velocity-depth profiles located along the two continental geotraverses in Southeast China can bededuced.Several approaches have been proposed to special problems connected with the conversion ofseismic velocities into heat production in orogenic areas.The results show that the crustal heat flow inSoutheast China is quite inhomogeneous,varying between 17.8 and 46 mW·m-2,which can be attribut-ed to the complicated crustal structure related to overthrusting and overlapping in the upper crust.The re-markable regional variation in the mantle heat flow,ranging from 23.2 to 41.6 mW·m-2,correspondsto the large-scale tectonothermal evolution of the orogenic belts.

  2. The Computation of Potential Harmonic Coefficients Using Global Crustal Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoulis, D.

    Topographic/isostatic potential harmonic coefficients can be computed from a global elevation model, when one accounts for the compensation of the upper crust according to a certain model of isostasy. The theory is based on a series expansion of the inverse distance function, which enables an efficient computation of the dimensionless poten- tial coefficients on the sphere. The availability of global crustal models permits the application of the same theory, with the exception that here the theoretically defined boundary between upper crust and mantle is replaced with crustal thickness informa- tion derived mainly from processing repeated seismic observations. The present paper deals with the spherical harmonic analysis of such a model, namely the CRUST 2.0 global crustal model, and compares the derived spectrum with the respective coeffi- cient sets delivered by the application of idealized isostatic models such as those of Airy/Heiskanen or Pratt/Hayford.

  3. Scaling behaviour in temporal fluctuations of crustal seismicity in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Telesca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The crustal seismicity of Taiwan was investigated by means of the Allan Factor analysis and Count-based Periodogram, which allow to identify scaling behaviour in point processes and to quantify their temporal fluctuations by means of the estimate of the scaling exponent. Our findings point out to the presence of two time-scaling regions in the crustal Taiwanese seismicity. The first region, involving the intermediate timescales can be probably linked with aftershock activity, while the second region, involving the large timescales could be related with the background seismicity.

  4. Geodynamical basis for crustal deformation under the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1985-01-01

    Plate tectonics and satellite-derived gravity data are used to examine crustal deformation under the Tibetan Plateau. A spherical harmonic analysis is given for the global plate boundary system, and the crustal stresses in Tibet are calculated from satellite gravity data. A superimposed stress system is constructed. The stress patterns reveal that the cold downwelling mantle convection flow beneath southern Tibet pulls the Indian plate down but applies a bending moment on the end of the plate to uplift and support the mass of the Himalayas.

  5. Monitoring Crustal Deformations with Radar Interferometry:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国祥; 丁晓利; 黄丁发

    2004-01-01

    The crustal movements, probably motivating earthquakes, are considered as one of the main geodynamic sources. The quantitative measurements of ground surface deformations are vital for studying mechanisms of the buried faults or even estimating earthquake potential. A new space-geodetic technology, synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), can be applied to detect such large-area deformations, and has demonstrated some prominent advantages. This paper reviews the capacity and limitations of InSAR, and summarises the existing applications including some of our results in studying the earthquake-related crustal motions.Finally it gives the outlook for the future development of InSAR.

  6. Legacy to the extreme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); T. Kuipers (Tobias); L.M.F. Moonen (Leon)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe explore the differences between developing a system using extreme programming techniques, and maintaining a legacy system. We investigate whether applying extreme programming techniques to legacy maintenance is useful and feasible.

  7. Legacy to the extreme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, A. van; Kuipers, T.; Moonen, L.M.F.

    2000-01-01

    We explore the differences between developing a system using extreme programming techniques, and maintaining a legacy system. We investigate whether applying extreme programming techniques to legacy maintenance is useful and feasible.

  8. Crustal structure across the Three Gorges area of the Yangtze platform, central China, from seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Bai, Z.; Mooney, W.; Wang, C.; Chen, X.; Wang, E.; Teng, J.; Okaya, N.

    2009-01-01

    We present active-source seismic data recorded along a 300??km-long profile across the Three Gorges area of the western Yangtze platform, central China. From west to east, the profile crosses the Zigui basin, Huangling dome and Jianghan basin. The derived crustal P-wave velocity structure changes significantly across the Tongchenghe fault that lies at the transition from the Huangling dome to the Jianghan basin. West of the Tongchenghe fault, beneath the Zigui basin and the Huangling dome, we observe a ~ 42??km thick crust of relatively low average velocity (6.3-6.4??km/s). In contrast, east of the Tongchenghe fault, beneath the Jianghan basin, the crust is only 30??km thick and has a high average velocity (6.6-6.7??km/s). A west-east variation in crustal composition along the Tongchenghe fault is also inferred. West of the fault, P-wave velocities suggest a felsic composition with an intermediate layer at the base of the crust, whilst, east of the fault, felsic, intermediate, and mafic crustal layers are apparent. Our results suggest that the crust beneath the Jianghan basin has been thinned by rifting, accompanied by intrusion of the lower crust by mafic dikes and sills. The west-to-east division of the crust in the Three Gorges area coincides with first-order geophysical contrasts in gravity, topography, crustal and lithospheric thickness. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Crustal structure and magnetic lineation along two geo-traverses from western continental margin of India to Eastern Somali Basin, NW Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, A. K.; Anshu, A.; Sreejith, K.; Pandey, A.

    2012-12-01

    Shipborne gravity and magnetic data along two parallel geo-traverses spanning from western continental margin of India to off Seychelles are used to delineate crustal structure and magnetic pattern of major structural features - western continental margin of India, Laxmi Basin, Laxmi Ridge, Arabian Basin, slow spreading Carlsberg Ridge and Eastern Somali Basin. The seismically constrained gravity models along the geo-traverses suggest considerable variation in crustal thickness - about 38 km on continental shelf of western India to about 4 km of the Eastern Somali Basin. The Eastern Somali Basin is characterized by thin oceanic crustal thickness (~3 to 4 km) as compared to its conjugate Arabian Basin where thickness varies from 5 to 6 km. The magnetic anomalies along the geo-traverse reveal three distinct zones: (i) a zone of relative high frequency short wavelength younger anomalies over the axial parts of the Carlsberg Ridge, (ii) a zone of well developed Early Tertiary magnetic anomalies in both the Arabian and Eastern Somali basins, and (iii) relative magnetic quiet zone, between the above two zones, representing a hiatus in spreading. Based on the results, we present a comparative analysis of crustal configuration and magnetic pattern of major structural features of the study area and discuss its tectonic evolution.

  10. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  11. Phase formation and stability in TiO{sub x} and ZrO{sub x} thin films. Extremely sub-stoichiometric functional oxides for electrical and TCO applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, Ralph A.; Leichtweiss, Thomas; Decker, Yannic; Janek, Juergen [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physical Chemistry; Dorow-Gerspach, Daniel; Schmidt, Ruediger; Wuttig, Matthias [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physics; Wolff, Niklas; Schuermann, Ulrich; Kienle, Lorenz [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Faculty of Engineering

    2017-03-01

    Most functional materials are thermodynamic equilibrium phases representing minima in the thermodynamic phase space. However, it is expected that many metastable phases with highly interesting properties also exist. Here, we report on a systematic approach to prepare thin-films of such non-equilibrium phases based on the gas phase deposition methods sputtering and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Our synthetic strategy is to deposit a ''precursor phase'' which is amorphous or already a crystalline non-equilibrium phase. Subsequent heat treatment leads to the nucleation of crystalline phases which again may be metastable or stable compounds. In the present paper we focus on the binary systems Ti-O and Zr-O, both systems being widely applied and technologically relevant. Highly oxygen-deficient titanium oxide (TiO{sub 1.6}) and zirconium oxide (ZrO) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature are optically absorbing and possess electronic conductivities in the range of 10 S/cm. Both materials are metastable in respect to both composition and structure. For TiO{sub 1.6} we find an amorphous matrix with embedded grains of cubic titanium monoxide (γ-TiO) directly after deposition. Upon annealing nanocrystalline grains of metallic Ti are formed in the amorphous matrix due to an internal solid-state disproportionation whereas the electrical conductivity of the films increases and comes close to metal-like conductivity (1000 S/cm) at about 450 C. Congruently, room temperature deposited ZrO films with an average composition of Zr:O= 1:1 contain small ZrO nanocrystals within an amorphous matrix. Heat treatment again leads to an internal disproportionation reaction whereas small crystals of Zr{sub 2}O and ZrO{sub 2} precipitate at temperatures as low as 75 C. Increasing the temperature then results in the crystallization of metastable tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} at about 400 C. Sputter deposition allows a subtler control of the oxygen partial

  12. Crustal structure in the Elko-Carlin Region, Nevada, during Eocene gold mineralization: Ruby-East Humboldt metamorphic core complex as a guide to the deep crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The deep crustal rocks exposed in the Ruby-East Humboldt metamorphic core complex, northeastern Nevada, provide a guide for reconstructing Eocene crustal structure ???50 km to the west near the Carlin trend of gold deposits. The deep crustal rocks, in the footwall of a west-dipping normal-sense shear system, may have underlain the Pin??on and Adobe Ranges about 50 km to the west before Tertiary extension, close to or under part of the Carlin trend. Eocene lakes formed on the hanging wall of the fault system during an early phase of extension and may have been linked to a fluid reservoir for hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude and timing of Paleogene extension remain indistinct, but dikes and tilt axes in the upper crust indicate that spreading was east-west to northwest-southeast, perpendicular to a Paleozoic and Mesozoic orogen that the spreading overprinted. High geothermal gradients associated with Eocene or older crustal thinning may have contributed to hydrothermal circulation in the upper crust. Late Eocene eruptions, upper crustal dike intrusion, and gold mineralization approximately coincided temporally with deep intrusion of Eocene sills of granite and quartz diorite and shallower intrusion of the Harrison Pass pluton into the core-complex rocks. Stacked Mesozoic nappes of metamorphosed Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks in the core complex lay at least 13 to 20 km deep in Eocene time, on the basis of geobarometry studies. In the northern part of the complex, the presently exposed rocks had been even deeper in the late Mesozoic, to >30 km depths, before losing part of their cover by Eocene time. Nappes in the core plunge northward beneath the originally thicker Mesozoic tectonic cover in the north part of the core complex. Mesozoic nappes and tectonic wedging likely occupied the thickened midlevel crustal section between the deep crustal core-complex intrusions and nappes and the overlying upper crust. These structures, as well as the subsequent large

  13. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  14. Thin book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    En lille bog om teater og organisationer, med bidrag fra 19 teoretikere og praktikere, der deltog i en "Thin Book Summit" i Danmark i 2005. Bogen bidrager med en state-of-the-art antologi om forskellige former for samarbejde imellem teater og organisationer. Bogen fokuserer både på muligheder og...

  15. Crustal Gravitational Potential Energy Change and Subduction Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    Crustal gravitational potential energy (GPE) change induced by earthquakes is an important subject in geophysics and seismology. For the past forty years the research on this subject stayed in the stage of qualitative estimate. In recent few years the 3D dynamic faulting theory provided a quantitative solution of this subject. The theory deduced a quantitative calculating formula for the crustal GPE change using the mathematic method of tensor analysis under the principal stresses system. This formula contains only the vertical principal stress, rupture area, slip, dip, and rake; it does not include the horizontal principal stresses. It is just involved in simple mathematical operations and does not hold complicated surface or volume integrals. Moreover, the hanging wall vertical moving (up or down) height has a very simple expression containing only slip, dip, and rake. The above results are significant to investigate crustal GPE change. Commonly, the vertical principal stress is related to the gravitational field, substituting the relationship between the vertical principal stress and gravitational force into the above formula yields an alternative formula of crustal GPE change. The alternative formula indicates that even with lack of in situ borehole measured stress data, scientists can still quantitatively calculate crustal GPE change. The 3D dynamic faulting theory can be used for research on continental fault earthquakes; it also can be applied to investigate subduction earthquakes between oceanic and continental plates. Subduction earthquakes hold three types: (a) crust only on the vertical up side of the rupture area; (b) crust and seawater both on the vertical up side of the rupture area; (c) crust only on the vertical up side of the partial rupture area, and crust and seawater both on the vertical up side of the remaining rupture area. For each type we provide its quantitative formula of the crustal GPE change. We also establish a simplified model (called

  16. Impact Melt Cover on Central Peaks of Complex Craters: Implications for Deriving Crustal Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, D.; Pieters, C. M.

    2017-05-01

    The use of impact crater central peaks for deriving crustal mineralogy at depth assumes pristine nature of the peaks. Impact melt on several central peaks is evidence for contamination. Central-peaks-derived crustal mineralogy may be affected.

  17. Subsidence history, crustal structure and evolution of the Nogal Rift, Northern Somalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. Y.; Watts, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic reflection profile, gravity anomaly, and biostratigraphic data from deep exploration wells have been used to determine the tectonic subsidence, structure and evolution of the Nogal basin, Northern Somalia, one of a number of ENE-WSW trending early Mesozoic rifts that formed prior to opening of the Gulf of Aden. Backstripping of biostratigraphic data at the Nogal-1 and Kali-1 wells provides new constraints on the age of rifting, and the amount of crustal and mantle extension. The tectonic subsidence and uplift history at the wells can be generally explained as a consequence of two, possibly three, major rifting events. The first event initiated in the Late Jurassic (~156 Ma) and lasted for ~10 Myr. We interpret the rift as a late stage event associated with the break-up of Gondwana and the separation of Africa and Madagascar. The second event initiated in the Late Cretaceous (~80 Ma) and lasted for ~20 Myr. This event probably correlates with a rapid increase in spreading rate on the ridges separating the African and Indian and African and Antarctica plates and a contemporaneous slowing down of Africa's plate motion. The backstripped tectonic subsidence data can be explained by a multi-rift extensional model with a stretching factor, β, in the range 1.17-1.38. The third and most recent event occurred in the Oligocene (~32 Ma) and lasted for ~10 Myr. This rift only developed at the centre of the basin close to Nogal-1 well, and is related to the opening of the Gulf of Aden. The amount of crustal thinning inferred at the Kali-1 well is consistent with the results of Process-Oriented Gravity and Flexure (POGM) modelling, assuming an elastic thickness of ~30 km. The thinning at the Nogal-1 well, however, is greater by ~ 7 km than predicted suggesting that the basin may be locally underplated by magmatic material. Irrespective, POGM suggests the transition between thick crust beneath Northern Somalia to thin crust beneath the Indian Ocean forms a ~500 km wide

  18. Extreme value distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ahsanullah, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the book is to give a through account of the basic theory of extreme value distributions. The book cover a wide range of materials available to date. The central ideas and results of extreme value distributions are presented. The book rwill be useful o applied statisticians as well statisticians interrested to work in the area of extreme value distributions.vmonograph presents the central ideas and results of extreme value distributions.The monograph gives self-contained of theory and applications of extreme value distributions.

  19. Combined crustal-geological cross-section of Ellesmere Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Schiffer, Christian; Oakey, Gordon

    (Eurekan “Orogeny”). An almost complete absence of information about the crustal or lithosphere structure of Ellesmere Island has been addressed by the acquisition of teleseismic data between 2010 and 2012 on a passive seismological array called ELLITE (“Ellesmere Island Teleseismic Experiment...

  20. Crustal growth at active continental margins: Numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Katharina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370618947; Gerya, Taras; Castro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics and melt sources for crustal growth at active continental margins are analyzed by using a 2D coupled petrological–thermomechanical numerical model of an oceanic-continental subduction zone. This model includes spontaneous slab retreat and bending, dehydration of subducted crust, aqueous

  1. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  2. A proposed concept for a crustal dynamics information management network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, G. M.; Renfrow, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The findings of a requirements and feasibility analysis of the present and potential producers, users, and repositories of space-derived geodetic information are summarized. A proposed concept is presented for a crustal dynamics information management network that would apply state of the art concepts of information management technology to meet the expanding needs of the producers, users, and archivists of this geodetic information.

  3. Crustal structure across the Filchner Ronne Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, U.; Jokat, W.

    2012-04-01

    Crustal structure across the Filchner Ronne Shelf, Antarctica U. Herter, W. Jokat One large gap in understanding the tectonic evolution of Antarctica beside the few rock outcrops on the continent is the missing information on crustal thickness along its margins but also in its interior. E.g., the few marine deep seismic lines are located mainly along the Antarctic Peninsula/Pacific margin, but for most of the East Antarctic margins such information is not available. In this contribution we concentrate on one of the most remote areas in Antarctica, the Filchner Ronne Shelf (FRS). The area is underlain by approximately 12 km of sediments, but its crustal fabric is questionable. Thus, some existing deep seismic sounding data were modeled and reinterpreted. Especially, data gathered in 1995 have been analyzed, and a more detailed 2D P-wave velocity model has been calculated. For the profiles in total 12 RefTek stations each with nine geophone chains were placed on the ice shelf and 3175 airgun shots along a 480 km transect were fired by two 32 l BOLT-Airguns each 60 s. Signals were recorded up to distances of 180 km. Due to the ice coverage it was not possible to acquire the data without gaps or along straight lines, which caused some difficulties in the modeling process. Furthermore, in the new model all data from older experiments of the AWI and Soviet Antarctic expeditions acquired with dynamite sources were incorporated. The model shows a sedimentary basin with a thickness up to 12 km and a large velocity inversion in a deeper sediment unit. The crustal thickness varies from 40 km beneath the Antarctic Peninsula, and 14 km of basement in the center part of the profile. Towards Berkner Island the crust thickens again, but the top of the basement is still 11 km deep. The lower crustal velocities range between 6.8 and 7.2 km/s. We interpret the crustal structure as clear evidence for the presence of a failed rift. The initial stretching of the continental crust

  4. Crustal Seismicity and Recent Faults in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Comte, D.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Herail, G.

    2004-12-01

    Most seismological studies in southern Peru have been focused on the downgoing slab seismicity in order to constrain the Wadati-Benioff zone. This study deals with the intra-continental seismicity of the southern Peru forearc (17,3° S - 18,5° S) in a post-seismic context (Arequipa thrust earthquake, Mw=8.4, 23 June, 2001). It is difficult to identify historical crustal earthquake from available catalogues, however some crustal events teleseismically recorded can be found since 1976; they exhibit normal focal mechanism solutions in the southern Peru volcanic arc and inverse focal mechanism solutions in the Central Depression. Following a notable increase of shallow crustal seismicity located close to the Western Cordillera after the 23 June 2001, a temporary seismic network was deployed between January and March 2003 in order to study the Wadati-Benioff zone and monitoring the crustal seismicity in southern Peru. From the about 1700 events locally recorded by the local network, 300 crustal earthquakes were identified in the Peruvian forearc between Tacna and Moquegua. This crustal seismicity is distributed along a lineament located at depths between 0 and 60 km, dipping at about 45° from the Western Cordillera towards the coast, almost perpendicular to the subducting slab; this behaviour was previously observed in northern Chile and in southern Peru, north of the study zone (16° S). In the Central Depression, seismic activity is not superficial occurring between 25-60 km depth and it is mostly characterized by inverse focal mechanism solutions. Superficial faults situated in the Central Depression and in the Coastal Cordillera can not be associated with the seismic activity observed in this area. However, in the Pre-Cordillera, crustal seismicity occurs at depths between 0-15 km and can be correlated with shallow fault systems recognized by satellite images and on the field. For examples, the Incapuquio fault system which was a transpressive system in Cretaceous

  5. Effects of Martian crustal magnetic field on its ionosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the Martian crustal magnetic field is one of the hot topics of the study of Martian ionosphere.The studies on this topic are summarized in this paper.Main data of the Martian ionosphere were resulted from radio occultation experiments.According to the observations,the electron density scale height and the peak electron density of the Martian ionosphere are influenced by its crustal magnetic field.The strong horizontal magnetic field prevents the vertical diffusion of the plasma and makes the electron density scale height in the topside ionosphere close to that in the photo equilibrium region.In the cusp-like regions with strong vertical magnetic field,the enhanced vertical diffusion leads to a larger electron density scale height in the diffusion equilibrium region.The observation of radio occultation experiment onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) showed that the averaged peak electron density observed in the southern hemisphere with strong crustal magnetic field was slightly larger than that in the northern hemisphere with weak crustal magnetic field.The Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionosphere sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express (MEX) was the first topside sounder to be used to observe Martian ionosphere.The MARSIS results confirmed that the enhancement of the peak electron density occurred in cusp-like regions with open field lines,and the amount of the enhancement was much larger than that observed by the radio occultation experiment.There are two possible mechanisms for the peak electron density enhancement in the cusp-like crustal magnetic field regions:One is the precipitation of the energetic particles and the other is the heating by the waves excited by plasma instabilities.It’s difficult to determine which one is the key mechanism for the peak electron density enhancement.Based on these studies,several interesting problems on the Martian ionosphere and plasma environment are presented.

  6. Crustal structure across the Colorado Basin, offshore Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Dieter; Neben, Soenke; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Schulze, Albrecht; Stiller, Manfred; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2006-06-01

    The geology of the wide shelves surrounding the South Atlantic is closely linked to the kinematics and history of the opening of the ocean. However, several wide sedimentary basins, which developed along the margins show peculiarities that are not yet understood in the context of the evolution of the South Atlantic. The Colorado Basin, a wide sedimentary basin on the broad shelf of Argentina, extends in EW direction. The basin's evolution oblique or orthogonal to the continent-ocean boundary indicates that it is not a product of simple progressive extension and crustal thinning. In addition a basement high, paralleling the continental margin and separating the Colorado Basin from the deep-sea basin is a common interpretation. These findings are hardly in accordance with the idea that the Colorado Basin is an extensional basin that developed in conjunction with the early E-W opening phase of the South Atlantic in the Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous. The composition, type, and structure of the basement, key points for the evaluation of the basins evolution, are widely speculative. In this context multichannel seismic reflection data from the Argentine Shelf and a 665-km-long onshore-offshore refraction profile, running across the Colorado Basin onto the coast are discussed in combination with gravity data. The stratigraphy for the sedimentary successions was adopted from the literature and the reflection seismic marker horizons formed besides the interval velocities the input for the starting model for refraction seismic traveltime modelling. The modelling strategy was an iterative procedure between refraction seismic traveltime and gravity modelling. The preparation of the density models was coarsely orientated on published velocity-density relations. The modelling results are in favour of a continuation of the main onshore geological features beneath the sedimentary infill of the Colorado Basin. We interpret the basement along the line from west to east as offshore

  7. Variations in Crustal Structure, Lithospheric Flexural Strength, and Isostatic Compensation Mechanisms of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Lin, J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze gravity and topography of Mars to investigate the spatial variations in crustal thickness, lithospheric strength, and mechanisms of support of prominent topographic features on Mars. The latest gravity model JGMRO110c (released in 2012) from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission has a spatial block size resolution of ~97 km (corresponding to degree-110), enabling us to resolve crustal structures at higher spatial resolution than those determined from previous degree-80 and 85 gravity models [Zuber et al., 2000; McGovern et al., 2002, 2004; Neumann et al., 2004; Belleguic et al., 2005]. Using the latest gravity data, we first inverted for a new version of crustal thickness model of Mars assuming homogeneous crust and mantle densities of 2.9 and 3.5 g/cm3. We calculated "isostatic" topography for the Airy local isostatic compensation mechanism, and "non-isostatic" topography after removing the isostatic part. We find that about 92% of the Martian surface is in relatively isostatic state, indicating either relatively small lithospheric strength and/or small vertical loading. Relatively isostatic regions include the hemispheric dichotomy, Hellas and Argyre Planitia, Noachis and Arabia Terra, and Terra Cimmeria. In contrast, regions with significant amount of non-isostatic topography include the Olympus, Ascraeus, Arsia, Pavonis, Alba, and Elysium Mons, Isidis Planitia and Valles Marineris. Their relatively large "non-isostatc topography" implies relatively strong lithospheric strength and large vertical loading. Spectral analysis of the admittance and correlation relationship between gravity and topography were conducted for the non-isostatic regions using the localized spectra method [Wieczorek and Simons, 2005, 2007] and thin-shell lithospheric flexural approximation [Forsyth, 1985; McGovern et al., 2002, 2004]. The best-fitting models reveal significant variations in the effective lithospheric thickness with the greatest values for the Olympus Mon

  8. Crustal Thickness Across Alaska via Ps Receiver Functions and Gravity Data and Comparison to Lithospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, L.; Saltus, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Porritt, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The geologic mosaic of terranes, adjacent multi-phase plate boundary, rapid lateral topographic variations, and heterogeneous distribution of strain throughout Alaska all suggest strong heterogeneity of crustal architecture. We present a model of crustal thickness across the state is primarily constrained where seismic instrumentation has been deployed - dense coverage in the south-central region and sparse coverage in the north, west, and arc regions. P receiver functions (PRF) were calculated using an upgraded version of Funclab, a software module that retrieves data, calculates receiver functions, facilitates quality control, and calculates H-k stacking, depth mapping via binned Common Conversion Point stacking, and other backend products. 1,678 events and 262 stations yielded 102,000 preliminary PRF that were culled to 21,000 total RFs. Iterative time-domain deconvolution was performed about a 1 Hz central frequency for ZRT traces. Our model reproduces many of the Moho depth variations previously modeled by receiver functions and gravity. Thick (>60 km) crust below the Chugach and St. Elias Ranges transitions to ~40 km thick crust south of the Denali Fault. Immediately to the north, thin (29-35) crust is observed in central Alaska between the Alaska and Brooks Ranges. The central Brooks Range is observed to have a thick crustal root below its topographic high axis. Stations scattered throughout western Alaska and the Bering Sea regions generally show average (~35 km) thickness crust while displaying inter-station uniqueness in the form of stacked RFs. Below the forearc and central Alaska Range, the Yakutat slab Moho is also observed. To complete coverage for the state we use a gravity Moho model calibrated to our receiver function solutions. The resolution of gravity-derived Moho models is limited and can only produce a smoothed approximation of the actual Moho. Where receiver function results are dense we observe significant complexity to the Moho, consistent

  9. Crustal types, distribution of salt and the early evolution of the Gulf of Mexico basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A new contour map on the top of basement shows the overall configuration of the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Basement, as used here, is all rocks lying below (older than) the extensive Middle Jurassic (Callovian ) premarine evaporites (Louann Salt, etc.) plus the Late Jurassic oceanic crust in the deep part of the basin. The contour map combined with all other available geophysical data has been used to subdivide the gulf basin into four crustal types: continental, thick transitional, thin transitional, and oceanic crust. The broad region of transitional crust and the basic architecture of the basin shown by the map is believed to have formed mainly during a separate Middle Jurassic period of widespread attenuation of the entire gulf region. The area of thick transitional crust around the periphery of the northern gulf is characterized by broad basement highs and lows with wave lengths of 200-300 km. These features controlled the general distribution and thickness of salt and the overlying Jurassic through Lower Cretaceous rocks. In the area of thin transitional crust Mesozoic basins tend to be assymetrical and generally trend more parallel to the overall basin. The boundary between thin transitional crust and oceanic crust is characterized by various salt-related features. For example, the northwest and north-central boundaries are defined by two northeast trending salt-cored foldbelts, the Perdido and Mississippi fan foldbelts, respectively. The offset between the two foldbelts may represent a major transform boundary related to the northwest opening of the gulf basin. All these data put important constraints on models for early gulf evolution.

  10. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  11. How extreme is extreme hourly precipitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Pappas, Christoforos

    2016-04-01

    The importance of accurate representation of precipitation at fine time scales (e.g., hourly), directly associated with flash flood events, is crucial in hydrological design and prediction. The upper part of a probability distribution, known as the distribution tail, determines the behavior of extreme events. In general, and loosely speaking, tails can be categorized in two families: the subexponential and the hyperexponential family, with the first generating more intense and more frequent extremes compared to the latter. In past studies, the focus has been mainly on daily precipitation, with the Gamma distribution being the most popular model. Here, we investigate the behaviour of tails of hourly precipitation by comparing the upper part of empirical distributions of thousands of records with three general types of tails corresponding to the Pareto, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Specifically, we use thousands of hourly rainfall records from all over the USA. The analysis indicates that heavier-tailed distributions describe better the observed hourly rainfall extremes in comparison to lighter tails. Traditional representations of the marginal distribution of hourly rainfall may significantly deviate from observed behaviours of extremes, with direct implications on hydroclimatic variables modelling and engineering design.

  12. Crustal Thickness Along the Central American Volcanic Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, L. S.; Abers, G. A.; Rondenay, S.; Fischer, K. M.; Syracuse, E. M.; Protti, J. M.; Gonzalez, V.; Strauch, W.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction zone processes alter the upper plate in a number of ways, including accretion, magmatic addition, serpentinization of the mantle wedge and formation of mafic cumulates in the lower crust. All of these changes affect seismic velocities, and characterizing the structure of underlying terranes in Central America establishes a baseline for composition and continental growth. Tomography Under Costa Rica and Nicaragua (TUCAN) is a PASSCAL deployment of broadband seismometers over an 18-month period. The network has two dense cross arc lines and two along arc lines that cross terrane boundaries. Teleseismic P and PP arrivals recorded on the TUCAN network have been used to estimate crustal thickness and Vp/Vs, and to develop receiver function images. Surface reflected mode conversions (Ppms and Psms) enhance resolution. Crustal thickness ranges from 25 to 44 km with formal errors ranging 1.6-9.2 km. The thinnest crust (24.6 +/- 3.5 km) lies directly beneath the arc in Nicaragua, whereas the thickest crust (43.5 +/- 2.5 km) lies in the backarc in Nicaragua and beneath the Costa Rican arc (37.9 +/- 5.2). Changes in crustal thickness and Vp/Vs show two distinct terrane boundaries crossing the arc. Vp/Vs indicate continental crust (Vp/Vs=1.71-1.77) in Nicaragua, with a transition to gabbroic crust (Vp/Vs=1.82-1.88) in Costa Rica where fragments of the Caribbean large Igneous Province have been found. Crustal thickness beneath the arc in Costa Rica yields a crustal growth rate of 16-36 km3/km/Ma, assuming a base crustal thickness of 30-32 km with 6-14 Ma of magmatism. The Moho shows strong velocity contrasts throughout the study area, and is the only interface seen in the backarc, but it is complicated by interferences caused by shallow structure beneath the arc and forearc. Forward modeling indicates that reverberations in sediment layers interfere with the Ps arrival, however surface reflected arrivals (Ppms) require a velocity contrast on the order of 0.5-1.0 km

  13. The Crustal Structure and Seismicity of Eastern Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M.; Martins, A.; Sobiesiak, M.; Alvarado, L.; Vasquez, R.

    2001-12-01

    Eastern Venezuela is characterized by a moderate to high seismicity, evidenced recently by the 1997 Cariaco earthquake located on the El Pilar Fault, a right lateral strike slip fault which marks the plate boundary between the Caribbean and South-American plates in this region. Recently, the seismic activity seems to migrate towards the zone of subduction of the Lesser Antilles in the northeast, where a mb 6.0 earthquake occurred in October 2000 at 120 km of depth. Periodical changes in the seismic activity are related to the interaction of the stress fields of the strike-slip and the subduction regimes. The seismic activity decreases rapidly towards to the south with some disperse events on the northern edge of the Guayana Shield, related to the Guri fault system. The crustal models used in the region are derived from the information generated by the national seismological network since 1982 and by microseismicity studies in northeastern Venezuela, coinciding in a crustal thickness of about 35 km in depth. Results of seismic refraction measurements for the region were obtained during field campains in 1998 (ECOGUAY) for the Guayana Shield and the Cariaco sedimentary basin and in 2001 (ECCO) for the Oriental Basin. The total crustal thickness decreases from about 45 km on the northern edge of the Guayana Shield to some 36 km close to El Tigre in the center of the Oriental Basin. The average crustal velocity decreases in the same sense from 6.5 to 5.8 km/s. In the Cariaco sedimentary basin a young sedimentary cover of 1 km thickness with a seismic velocity of 2 km/s was derived. Towards the northern limit of the South-American plate, no deep seismic refraction data are available up to now. The improvement of the crustal models used in that region would constitute a step forward in the analysis of the seismic hazard. Seismic refraction studies funded by CONICIT S1-97002996 and S1-2000000685 projects and PDVSA (additional drilling and blasting), recording equipment

  14. Paleoproterozoic subduction-related magmatism and crustal evolution of the Dunhuang Block, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Mei; Han, Chun-Ming; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Su, Ben-Xun; Ding, Jia-Xin

    2017-02-01

    The Precambrian basement rocks of the Tarim Craton, NW China, occur mostly along the margins of the craton. These rocks have been metamorphosed under amphibolite-facies or granulite-facies, particularly in the Dunhuang and Kuluketage Blocks, whose crustal evolution and paleographic relationship are still unclear. This study presents in-situ zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotopes and whole-rock elemental compositions for the Paleoproterozoic meta-felsic and mafic rocks in the NE Altyn Tagh area in order to constrain the Paleoproterozoic tectono-thermal events of the Dunhuang Block and to further investigate its relation to the Kuluketage Block. The meta-felsic rocks have a crystallization age of ∼1.96 Ga. Their zircon εHf(t) values vary from -0.5 to +7.2, with TDM1 model ages from 2.4 to 2.1 Ga, suggesting that their parental magmas were mainly derived from juvenile sources, with a relatively small contribution from pre-existing ancient materials. The meta-felsic rocks have geochemical affinities with typical high-Al TTG generated by slab melting except for the extremely low Cr/Ni ratios. The steeply negative slope of their REE patterns indicates that garnet and/or hornblende extraction was involved in the magma generation process. The ∼2.06 meta-mafic rocks have slightly variable positive εHf(t) values (0 to +3.4), corresponding to fairly uniform TDM1 model ages of 2.4-2.3 Ga. These results indicate that their parental magma was sourced mainly from juvenile components with minor old materials. The meta-mafic rocks have nearly flat REE patterns that bear a remarkably close resemblance to E-MORB, but the depletion in Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf and Th is typical of arc rocks. The wide range of zircon εHf(t) values from the meta-felsic and mafic rocks indicates that the Dunhuang Block experienced both crustal growth and crustal reworking during the Paleoproterozoic. In both the Dunhuang and Kuluketage Blocks, plenty of early Precambrian basement rocks experienced comparable

  15. Tectonic history of continental crustal wedge constrained by EBSD measurements of garnet inclusion trails and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, E.; Schulmann, K.; Lexa, O.; Haloda, J.

    2009-04-01

    microstructural and petrological records bring new insights on the mechanical behaviour of this Variscan continental crustal wedge. Burial was initiated during the formation of the first flat metamorphic foliation and continued during the formation of a steep fabric while a major phase of garnet growth entrapped the orientation of this structure. This metamorphic and structural evolution is interpreted as a result of crustal thickening due to subhorizontal material influx followed by large-scale vertical folding. The following tectonic phase produces a flat fabric without any reorientation of the garnet porphyroblasts as exemplified by strong orientation consistency and good compatibility between internal records (foliations, FIA) and field data (measured or reconstructed positions of S2, F3 fold axes). Thus, the vertical D3 shortening looks like it was controlled by passive amplification of folded S2 surfaces and coaxial (non-rotational) flow in weak micaceous matrix. The homogeneous pure shear vertical shortening could be responsible for crustal thinning corresponding to the 3-4 kbar difference between peak assemblage and mineral association of horizontal S3 fabric. The latter fabric is interpreted as a result of horizontal flow related to ductile thinning of the thickened crustal wedge.

  16. Classifying Returns as Extreme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I consider extreme returns for the stock and bond markets of 14 EU countries using two classification schemes: One, the univariate classification scheme from the previous literature that classifies extreme returns for each market separately, and two, a novel multivariate classification scheme tha...

  17. Joint inversion of local, regional and teleseismic data for crustal thickness in the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Federica; van der Meijde, Mark; van der Lee, Suzan; Giardini, Domenico

    2003-08-01

    A new map for the Moho discontinuity (EAM02) in the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary region is presented. Reliable results have also been obtained for the southern and eastern Mediterranean Basin, the northern African coasts and the eastern Atlantic Ocean, regions only occasionally considered in studies on the Mediterranean region. The Moho topography model is derived from two independent sets of constraints. Information contained in the fundamental and higher-mode Rayleigh waves obtained from waveform modelling is used to constrain the Moho depth between estimates of crustal thickness taken from published reflection and refraction surveys, gravity studies and receiver function analysis. Strong lateral variations in the Moho topography have been observed in the Mediterranean Sea, confirming the complex evolution of this plate boundary region. In the west, the Moho discontinuity has been found at 15-20 km depth, suggesting extended and, at least in some locations, oceanic crust, while in the east the crust is on average 25-30 km thick. There it is interpreted either as Mesozoic oceanic or thinned Precambrian continental crust covered by thick sedimentary deposits. Standard continental crust (30-35 km) is observed along the eastern part of the northern African coast, while to the west a rapid change from a relatively deep Moho (down to 42 km) below the Atlas Mountain Range to the thin crust of the southwestern Mediterranean Sea has been found. The crust beneath the eastern North Atlantic Ocean can be up to 5 km thicker compared with standard oceanic crust (6 km). The crust has been interpreted to be heterogeneous as a consequence of irregular magma supply at the Mid-Atlantic ridge. In addition, serpentinization of the sub-Moho mantle could contribute to the imaging of apparently anomalous thick oceanic crust. In Europe, the presence of crustal roots (>45 km) beneath the major mountain belts has been confirmed, while thin crust (isostatic compensation at 60 km depth

  18. Vertical Crustal Displacements Due to Surface Fluid Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shiyu; ZHONG Min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model data for surface mass changes of the atmosphere, ocean, soil moisture and snow depth, the vertical crustal displacements of 25 ficual stations in China were calculated according to the loading theory. From the spectral analysis of the results, we can see that the periods of displacements are 12 months and the semi-periods are 6 months. The results also show that the maximum seasonal displacements can reach 20 mm and even larger. The covariance analyses and significance tests show that the coefficients of 96 percent of the stations are significant at the 0.1 significance level. The results show that one of the reasons of the vertical crustal displacements is the changing surface fluid loads.

  19. Crustal structure of the Eastern Alps and their foreland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grad, M.; Brückl, E.; Majdanski, M.

    2009-01-01

    plate, Adriatic microplate and the recently identified Pannonian fragment. The seismic data along the presented profile originate from two large experiments: CELEBRATION 2000 and ALP 2002. The wavefield observed in the Eastern Alps is more complex than in the Bohemian Massif. Strong first arrivals (Pg......The subject of this paper concerns the seismic modelling of the crustal structure in the transition zone from the Bohemian Massif, across the Molasse basin and the Eastern Alps to the Southern Alps, mainly on the territory of Austria. The CEL10/Alp04 profile crosses the triple point of the European......) are distinct up to 60-90 km offset and are characterized by large variations in apparent velocity and amplitude. The contact between the Molasse basin and the Eastern Alps represents a barrier for seismic waves. Mid-crustal reflections (Pc) are usually recorded at short distance intervals (20-50 km...

  20. Efficacy of crustal superfluid neutrons in pulsar glitch models

    CERN Document Server

    Hooker, J; Li, Bao-An

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of recent hydrodynamic models of pulsar glitches, we explore systematically the dependence on the stiffness of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density $L$, of the fractional moment of inertia of the pinned neutron superfluid in the crust $G$ and the initial post-glitch relative acceleration of the crust $K$, both of which are confronted with observational constraints from the Vela pulsar. We allow for a variable fraction of core superfluid neutrons coupled to the crust on glitch rise timescales, $Y_{\\rm g}$. We assess whether the crustal superfluid neutrons are still a tenable angular momentum source to explain the Vela glitches when crustal entrainment is included. The observed values $G$ and $K$ are found to provide nearly orthogonal constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy, and thus taken together offer potentially tight constraints on the equation of state. However, when entrainment is included at the level suggested by recent microscopic calculations, the model is un...

  1. Crustal displacements in Greenland caused by ice mass variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina

    The climate of the Earth is changing. A consequence of this is observed at the polar regions such as Greenland, where the ice sheet is melting with an increasing rate. The unloading of ice causes the Earth to respond elastically in terms of uplift and an outward horizontal deformation of the crust....... This motion can be measured by permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. Hence, the rates of crustal displacement are an indirect measure of the occurring mass changes. Currently, 55 GPS sites are located around the margin of the Greenland ice sheet, continuously providing information about...... the state of the ice sheet. However, the Earth is also adjusting viscoelastically to variations in the late Pleistocene ice sheets i.e. glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Observed rates of crustal displacement therefor contain signals from both past and present ice mass variations. Hence, to interpret...

  2. Geoid, topography, and convection-driven crustal deformation on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mark; Hager, Bradford H.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution Magellan images and altimetry of Venus reveal a wide range of styles and scales of surface deformation that cannot readily be explained within the classical terrestrial plate tectonic paradigm. The high correlation of long-wavelength topography and gravity and the large apparent depths of compensation suggest that Venus lacks an upper-mantle low-viscosity zone. A key difference between Earth and Venus may be the degree of coupling between the convecting mantle and the overlying lithosphere. Mantle flow should then have recognizable signatures in the relationships between the observed surface topography, crustal deformation, and the gravity field. Therefore, comparison of model results with observational data can help to constrain such parameters as crustal and thermal boundary layer thicknesses as well as the character of mantle flow below different Venusian features. We explore in this paper the effects of this coupling by means of a finite element modelling technique.

  3. Crustal blocks and seismicity in the Central Apennines of Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, F.; Della Monica, G. (Rome, Univ. ' Roma III' (Italy). Dip di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' ); Caputo, M. (Rome, Univ. ' La Sapienza' (Italy). Dip. di Fisica ' E. Fermi' )

    Kinematics and geo dynamics of crustal-block structures separated by compliant zones with viscoelastic rheology play an important role in defining the conditions for many deformation events such as ordinary seismic ruptures, silent and slow earthquakes and aseismic fault creep phenomena. New seismological data from the Latium-Abruzzi carbonatic platform of central Italy fit a block-tectonic modelling previously proposed for this area on the basis of structural and paleomagnetic evidences.

  4. Topographic Expression of Deep Crustal and Mantle Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, K. X.; Ouimet, W. B.; Baldwin, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The topography of mountain ranges records much information about the history of tectonic events and climatic conditions. Although this record is not easily read, as there are many imperfectly understood factors that influence landscape morphology, there is much encouraging evidence that the river steepness index (a cousin of the Hack gradient index) exhibits a robust correlation with rock uplift rate. Published, and soon to be published, examples span a wide range of field conditions from sites around the globe (e.g., Western US, Bolivia, Nepal, China, Taiwan). Differences in substrate rock properties can have a pronounced influence on channel steepness for a given rock uplift rate, however, and analyses are best limited to regional studies where climatic conditions and lithology are largely uniform. In such settings, careful analysis of river profiles and the relief structure of the landscape can reveal important information about the history of rock uplift, recording temporal changes in uplift/river incision rates. This potential adds considerably to the value of topographic analyses, especially where uplift is driven by deep crustal or mantle processes and not clearly expressed in upper crustal structures and geodetic shortening data. However, this potential comes at the price of complicating the interpretation of the relationship between topography and the modern snapshot of deep crustal/mantle conditions provided by geophysical imaging techniques. Over what timescales does topography retain a record of past events in earth's interior? Important questions remain unanswered about the age of topography in many landscapes where deep crustal or mantle dynamics have been invoked. We discuss the factors that control landscape response time, both to an increase in rock uplift rate and to the cessation of tectonic activity, and present constraints on the antiquity of topography in several field settings.

  5. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  6. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  7. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  8. Crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwafor, Emeka

    The Gulf of Mexico initiated in the Late Triassic as South America and Africa separated from North America during the break up of Pangea. Previous studies indicate three models for the opening of the GOM. These include counter clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block, rotation of the Yucatan Block about the same pole of rotation as those describing seafloor spreading in the central North Atlantic, and clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block. There is much debate about the margin type and the crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico (EGOM), especially below the depth of 6 km where crustal structure is poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. Two 2.5-D forward gravity and magnetic models across the margin are presented. These are constrained by basement picks from sparse seismic reflection and refraction data, spectral analysis of gravity data to determine the depth to source, magnetic susceptibility derived from results from other margins, the empirical relationship between P-wave velocity and density, and crustal scale isostatic modeling. The models, combined with a kinematic reconstruction of the GOM, show that: 1) it is a rifted margin; 2) the point where the Moho deepens downward from ˜17 km to ˜32 km is approximately 50 km outboard of the topographic shelf edge; 3) the carbonate bank retreated by several kilometers from its original termination due to the action of contourite currents; 4) extension and subsidence was accommodated with little shallow brittle faulting; 5) oceanic lithosphere is possibly outboard of the EGOM continental slope.

  9. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  10. Amorphous Dielectric Thin Films with Extremely Low Mechanical Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous low-energy excitations are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. One exception has been a type of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H with 1 at.% H. Using low temperature elastic and thermal measurements of electron-beam evap-orated amorphous silicon (a-Si, we show that TLS can be eliminated in this system as the films become denser and more structurally ordered under certain deposition conditions. Our results demonstrate that TLS are not intrinsic to the glassy state but instead reside in low density regions of the amorphous network. This work obviates the role hydrogen was previously thought to play in removing TLS in a-Si:H and favors an ideal four-fold covalently bonded amorphous structure as the cause for the disappearance of TLS. Our result supports the notion that a-Si can be made a “perfect glass” with “crystal-like” properties, thus offering an encouraging opportunity to use it as a simple crystal dielectric alternative in applications, such as in modern quantum devices where TLS are the source of dissipation, decoherence and 1/f noise.

  11. New geological evidence of crustal thickening in the Gangdese block prior to the Indo-Asian collision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Lin; LAI Qingzhou

    2003-01-01

    Recent mapping in the Gangdese block has revealed many leucogranites that are similar to those in the High Himalaya. These leucogranites formed at ~140 Ma as indicated by monazite Th-Pb ion-microprobe dating and cooled at ~130 Ma as indicated by muscovite 40Ar/39Ar dating. In conjunction with previous structural and paleogeographic studies, the new data indicate that the Gangdese block underwent crustal thickening and associated exhumation during ~140-130 Ma. In this regard, the southern margin of Eurasia continent was comparable to the modern South American Altiplano-Puna plateau, the prime example of active ocean-continent subduction and associated thickened crust. Specifically, the early stages of crustal thickening and uplifting of the Gangdese block may result from subduction of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. If the Tibetan Plateau would form by accretion of a series of blocks with thickened crust, an elevated topographic plateau similar to the Altiplano- Puna plateau had formed before collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Then the Tibetan Plateau would have quickly thickened, uplifted, and begun to extend soon after onset of the collision. Thus, the deformational mechanism of the Tibetan Plateau is not distributed shortening, but rather concentrating deformation within regions of thin crust between the accreted blocks.

  12. Crustal thickening and attenuation as revealed by regional fold interference patterns: Ciudad Rodrigo basement area (Salamanca, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez Fernández, Rubén; Gómez Barreiro, Juan; Martínez Catalán, José R.; Ayarza, Puy

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the Ciudad Rodrigo area (Iberian Massif, Central Iberian Zone) has been revisited in order to integrate new geological data with recent models of the evolution of the Iberian Massif. Detailed mapping of fold structures along with a compilation of field data have been used to constrain the geometry and relative timing of ductile deformation events in this section of the hinterland of the Variscan belt. The structural evolution shows, in the first place, the development of a regional train of overturned folds with associated axial planar foliation (D1). Towards the lower structural levels, the deflection of the fold limbs and a subhorizontal crenulation cleavage depict the upper structural boundary of a superimposed low angle shear zone (D2), which extends at least to the deepest parts of the basement exposed in the study area. The amplification and rotation of D1 folds about a horizontal axis also occurred within this shear zone. The flat-lying character of the D2 structures accounts for the attenuation of the previously thickened crust, which developed following gravity gradients during thermal re-equilibration. Subsequent deformation led to the formation of two orthogonal sets of upright folds (D3), representing a new shift between crustal thinning and crustal thickening in the region.

  13. Early Archaean crustal collapse structures and sedimentary basin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, W.; de Vries, S. T.

    2003-04-01

    Observations in the Lower Archaean (>3.3 Ga) of the Pilbara and Kaapvaal Cratons point to a direct genetic relationship between the thickness and facies distribution of volcano-sedimentary basin fills and non-linear patterns of extensional faults in early Earth. The basin fills consist of mafic volcanic products, largely pillow basalts, with distinct phases of intermediate to felsic volcanism and concentration of silica, either primary or secondary, in sediments deposited near base-level. The extensional structures are listric growth-faults, arranged in superposed arrays, that migrated upwards with the growth of the Early Archaean stratigraphical column. The faults linked intermittently occurring shallow-level felsic intrusions via porphyry pipes, veins and hydrothermal circulations with the surficial sedimentary basin fill of cherty sediments, concurrent mineralisation and alteration products. The non-linear pattern of the fault systems is recorded by their restored facing directions over large areas and corresponds best with over 100 km-wide (semi)circular crustal collapse structures. Crustal collapse, and therefore basin formation, did not represent a reaction to compression and crustal thickening. It also had no relationship with the present-day distribution of granitoid domes and greenstone belts. Collapse followed crustal uplift recorded by shallowing of the basin fill from a general subaqueous level of deposition of pillow basalts towards zero water level for the sediments and low-relief emersion. Maxima of extension coincide with the appearance of intermediate or felsic volcanic rocks in the overall mafic environment. The geodynamical setting is most appropriately explained by crustal delamination and related plume activity. Although individual features may be compared to Phanerozoic and Recent geological phenomena, like calderas, for the collapse structures as a whole such younger counterparts cannot be found. Rather they have their equivalents in collapse

  14. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W;

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses human capacity for movement in the context of extreme loading and with it the combined effects of metabolic, biomechanical and gravitational stress on the human body. This topic encompasses extreme duration, as occurs in ultra-endurance competitions (e.g. adventure racing...... and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may...

  15. Extremal surface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C. [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  16. "Storms of crustal stress" and AE earthquake precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gregori

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE displays violent paroxysms preceding strong earthquakes, observed within some large area (several hundred kilometres wide around the epicentre. We call them "storms of crustal stress" or, briefly "crustal storms". A few case histories are discussed, all dealing with the Italian peninsula, and with the different behaviour shown by the AE records in the Cephalonia island (Greece, which is characterized by a different tectonic setting.

    AE is an effective tool for diagnosing the state of some wide slab of the Earth's crust, and for monitoring its evolution, by means of AE of different frequencies. The same effect ought to be detected being time-delayed, when referring to progressively lower frequencies. This results to be an effective check for validating the physical interpretation.

    Unlike a seismic event, which involves a much limited focal volume and therefore affects a restricted area on the Earth's surface, a "crustal storm" typically involves some large slab of lithosphere and crust. In general, it cannot be easily reckoned to any specific seismic event. An earthquake responds to strictly local rheological features of the crust, which are eventually activated, and become crucial, on the occasion of a "crustal storm". A "crustal storm" lasts typically few years, eventually involving several destructive earthquakes that hit at different times, at different sites, within that given lithospheric slab.

    Concerning the case histories that are here discussed, the lithospheric slab is identified with the Italian peninsula. During 1996–1997 a "crustal storm" was on, maybe elapsing until 2002 (we lack information for the period 1998–2001. Then, a quiet period occurred from 2002 until 26 May 2008, when a new "crustal storm" started, and by the end of 2009 it is still on. During the 1996–1997 "storm" two strong earthquakes occurred (Potenza and

  17. A felsic MASH zone of crustal magmas - Feedback between granite magma intrusion and in situ crustal anatexis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindinger, Martin; Weinberg, Roberto F.

    2017-07-01

    Magma mixing and mingling are described from different tectonic environments and are key mechanisms in the evolution of granitoids. The literature focuses on the interaction between mafic and felsic magmas with only limited research on the interaction between similar magmas. Here, we investigate instead hybridization processes between felsic magmas formed during the 500 Ma Delamerian Orogeny on the south coast of Kangaroo Island. Field relations suggest that a coarse, megacrystic granite intruded and interacted with a fine-grained diatexite that resulted from combined muscovite dehydration and water-fluxed melting of Kanmantoo Group turbidites. The two magmas hybridized during syn-magmatic deformation, explaining the complexity of relationships and variability of granitoids exposed. We suggest that granite intrusion enhanced melting of the turbidites by bringing in heat and H2O. With rising melt fraction, intrusive magmas became increasingly unable to traverse the partially molten terrane, creating a positive feedback between intrusion and anatexis. This feedback loop generated the exposed mid-crustal zone where magmas mixed and homogenized. Thus, the outcrops on Kangaroo Island represent a crustal and felsic melting-assimilation-storage-homogenization (felsic MASH) zone where, instead of having direct mantle magma involvement, as originally proposed, these processes developed in a purely crustal environment formed by felsic magmas.

  18. Analysis of extreme events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khuluse, S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ) determination of the distribution of the damage and (iii) preparation of products that enable prediction of future risk events. The methodology provided by extreme value theory can also be a powerful tool in risk analysis...

  19. Extreme environments and exobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, E I

    1993-01-01

    Ecological research on extreme environments can be applied to exobiological problems such as the question of life on Mars. If life forms (fossil or extant) are found on Mars, their study will help to solve fundamental questions about the nature of life on Earth. Extreme environments that are beyond the range of adaptability of their inhabitants are defined as "absolute extreme". Such environments can serve as terrestrial models for the last stages of life in the history of Mars, when the surface cooled down and atmosphere and water disappeared. The cryptoendolithic microbial community in porous rocks of the Ross Desert in Antarctica and the microbial mats at the bottom of frozen Antarctic lakes are such examples. The microbial communities of Siberian permafrost show that, in frozen but stable communities, long-term survival is possible. In the context of terraforming Mars, selected microorganisms isolated from absolute extreme environments are considered for use in creation of a biological carbon cycle.

  20. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Venous (Extremities) Venous ultrasound uses sound waves to ... limitations of Venous Ultrasound Imaging? What is Venous Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  1. Statistics of extremes

    CERN Document Server

    Gumbel, E J

    2012-01-01

    This classic text covers order statistics and their exceedances; exact distribution of extremes; the 1st asymptotic distribution; uses of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd asymptotes; more. 1958 edition. Includes 44 tables and 97 graphs.

  2. Strain Accumulation Estimated from Seafloor Crustal Deformation at the Nankai Trough, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, K.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Ikuta, R.; Okuda, T.; Kenji, Y.; Sakata, T.

    2012-12-01

    the oblique subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate. We started monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation at a new site, KMC, in this year. This site is located between KMN and KMS. The monitoring at KMC enable us to depict dense (with a span of 10 km) crustal deformation profile that is related to strain accumulation, in the direction perpendicular to the trough axis. We plan to measure the position at KMC twice by the end of this year. We also continue to measure the position at KMS and KME. The number of measurements at KME is extremely few compared to the other sites in particular, and it is important to continue the measurement for obtaining stable site velocity. We report the results of monitoring preformed in this year. Acknowledgments: We are grateful to the captain and crews of R/V "Asama" of Mie Prefecture Fisheries Research Institute, Japan. This study has been partly promoted by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japanese Government.

  3. Subsidence history, crustal structure, and evolution of the Somaliland-Yemen conjugate margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. Y.; Watts, A. B.

    2013-04-01

    We have used biostratigraphic data from deep exploration wells to determine the tectonic subsidence history of the Somaliland (northwestern Somalia)-Yemen conjugate margin, a poorly known margin in the central part of the Gulf of Aden. Bathymetry and magnetic anomaly data suggest the Gulf of Aden is a young feature that formed following the rifting apart and breakup of the African and Arabian plates ~32 Ma. Our tectonic subsidence data suggest, however, that the present-day Gulf of Aden developed on an earlier Mesozoic rift system. The oldest episode of rifting initiated at ~156 Ma and lasted for ~10 Ma and had a NW-SE trend. We interpret the rift as a late stage event associated with the breakup of Gondwana and the separation of Africa and Madagascar. At ~80 Ma, there is evidence of an intermediate rift event which correlates with a rapid increase in spreading rate on the ridges separating the African and Indian and African and Antarctica plates and a contemporaneous slowing down of Africa's plate motion. The combined effect of all three rifting events has been to thin the crust and upper mantle by up to a factor of 2. The amount of thinning deduced from the wells is in accord with the crustal structure inferred from available seismic refraction data and process-oriented gravity and flexure modeling. The margin is asymmetric with a steeper gradient in the Moho on the Yemen side than the Somaliland side. The main discrepancy is on the Yemen side where the gravity-derived Moho is 10 km deeper than the well-derived Moho. We attribute the discrepancy to the addition of material at the base of the crust since rifting, possibly magma sourced from the Afar plume.

  4. The crustal evolution of the west-central Pyrenees revisited: Inferences from a new kinematic scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixell, Antonio; Labaume, Pierre; Lagabrielle, Yves

    2016-03-01

    New evolutionary models for the Pyrenean orogeny must consider feedbacks between the Mid-Cretaceous hyperextension postulated recently and the Pyrenean inversion. We present a new crustal section of the Pyrenees through the Jaca Basin, the western Axial Zone and the Chaînons Béarnais, which allows identifying the ancient continental margins of the Iberian and European plates and a suture. A sequential restoration allows a reassessment of the style of convergence through time. Restoration leads to a progressively thinned crust in narrow continental margins separated by a domain of exhumed mantle peridotite and overlain by a detached sedimentary lid. Early convergence during the Late Cretaceous and the Earliest Paleogene was accommodated by subduction of the peridotite domain. This was followed in the Eocene by initial collision involving overriding of the Iberian margin onto the European margin along the deep ramp of the North-Pyrenean Frontal thrust, which defines the suture. Subsequent full collision and strong relief generation from the late-Mid or Late Eocene to the Early Miocene were associated with thrust accretion of the Iberian plate, underlain by wedging and northward subduction of the decoupled Iberian lower crust.

  5. The Ordovician Sierras Pampeanas-Puna basin connection: Basement thinning and basin formation in the Proto-Andean back-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Steffen H.

    2009-11-01

    The Ordovician Sierras Pampeanas, located in a continental back-arc position at the Proto-Andean margin of southwest Gondwana, experienced substantial mantle heat transfer during the Ordovician Famatina orogeny, converting Neoproterozoic and Early Cambrian metasediments to migmatites and granites. The high-grade metamorphic basement underwent intense extensional shearing during the Early and Middle Ordovician. Contemporaneously, up to 7000 m marine sediments were deposited in extensional back-arc basins covering the pre-Ordovician basement. Extensional Ordovician tectonics were more effective in mid- and lower crustal migmatites than in higher levels of the crust. At a depth of about 13 km the separating boundary between low-strain solid upper and high-strain lower migmatitic crust evolved to an intra-crustal detachment. The detachment zone varies in thickness but does not exceed about 500 m. The formation of anatectic melt at the metamorphic peak, and the resulting drop in shear strength, initiated extensional tectonics which continued along localized ductile shear zones until the migmatitic crust cooled to amphibolite facies P-T conditions. P-T-d-t data in combination with field evidence suggest significant (ca. 52%) crustal thinning below the detachment corresponding to a thinning factor of 2.1. Ductile thinning of the upper crust is estimated to be less than that of the lower crust and might range between 25% and 44%, constituting total crustal thinning factors of 1.7-2.0. While the migmatites experienced retrograde decompression during the Ordovician, rocks along and above the detachment show isobaric cooling. This suggests that the magnitude of upper crustal extension controls the amount of space created for sediments deposited at the surface. Upper crustal extension and thinning is compensated by newly deposited sediments, maintaining constant pressure at detachment level. Thinning of the migmatitic lower crust is compensated by elevation of the crust

  6. Ultimately Thin Metasurface Wave Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Keene, David; Durach, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of a metasurface which can be considered a monolayer of two classical uniaxial metamaterials, parallel-plate and nanorod arrays, are investigated. It is shown that such metasurface acts as an ultimately thin sub-50 nm wave plate. This is achieved via an interplay of epsilon-near-zero and epsilon-near-pole behavior along different axes in the plane of the metasurface allowing for extremely rapid phase difference accumulation in very thin metasurface layers. These effects are shown to not be disrupted by non-locality and can be applied to the design of ultrathin wave plates, Pancharatnam-Berry phase optical elements and plasmon-carrying optical torque wrench devices.

  7. Effects of Crustal Fields on the Ionosphere of Mars as seen by MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Flynn, Casey L.; Andersson, Laila; Brain, David; Mitchell, David; Connerney, Jack; Espley, Jared R.

    2016-10-01

    Mars lacks a global intrinsic magnetic field but possesses regions of strong crustal magnetic field that are concentrated in the southern hemisphere. Previous studies have used Mars Global Surveyor or Mars Express data to show that these crustal fields influence the electron densities in the Martian ionosphere. However, many of these studies relied on remote radio occultation or radar sounding measurements and therefore relied on models to infer the crustal magnetic field strength and direction. In fall 2015 the MAVEN spacecraft passed through these crustal field regions at low altitudes, on the day side, and collected comprehensive measurements of the local plasma and magnetic field properties. The MAVEN observations therefore provide an excellent dataset with which to examine the effects of crustal fields on the ionosphere. We report on the MAVEN electron density measurements in the southern crustal field regions and discuss the influence of the magnetic field direction and topology on the dayside Martian ionosphere.

  8. Persistent basement wrenching as controlling mechanism of Variscan thin-skinned thrusting and sedimentation, Cantabrian Mountains Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, W.; Savage, J. F.

    1989-11-01

    In this classical area of thin-skinned tectonics current models of the complex fold and thrust belt seem to be approaching a successful synthesis without the necessity for extreme regional bending to account for the characteristic horse-shoe form of the orogen. Fundamental wrench fault zones (e.g., the León and Sabero-Gordón lineaments) whose influence is recorded throughout the Palaeozoic stratigraphic history have also played an important role in the sedimentary and structural events of the Variscan cycle. Strike-slip motion not only interfered with thrusting far into Stephanian times, but also effectively controlled molasse fanglomerate sedimentation, rendered traceable by multiple clast sources, depocentre migration, fan skewing and progressive unconformities. From the surficial pattern of sedimentation and structure a left-stepping pull-apart basement structure is deduced. It is held responsible for block tilting opposite to the thrusting, modifying the backfolding of the thrust sheets and generating the concurrent surficial collapse of its fanglomerate cover. It is considered that the persistence of strike-slip motion throughout the Palaeozoic justifies the conclusion that deeper crustal events of this type may form the source of the thrusting and induce the variable stress orientations in the upper crust to implement the complex near-surface deformation. The proposed basement configuration fits well into the plate tectonic concept of a Palaeo-Africo-Iberian promontory to account for the initiation of the Ibero-Armorican arc.

  9. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme

  10. Crustal structure beneath the Songpan-Garze orogenic belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王椿镛; 韩渭宾; 吴建平; 楼海; 白志明

    2003-01-01

    The Benzilan-Tangke deep seismic sounding profile in the western Sichuan region passes through the Songpan-Garze orogenic belt with trend of NNE. Based on the travel times and the related amplitudes of phases in the record sections, the 2-DP-wave crustal structure was ascertained in this paper. The velocity structure has quite strong lateral variation along the profile. The crust is divided into 5 layers, where the first, second and third layer belong to the upper crust, theforth and fifth layer belong to the lower crust. The low velocity anomaly zone generally exists in the central part of the upper crust on the profile, and it integrates into the overlying low velocity basement in the area to the north of Ma.erkang. The crustal structure in the section can be divided into 4 parts: in the south of Garze-Litang fault, between Garze-Litang fault and Xianshuihe fault,between Xianshuihe fault and Longriba fault and in the north of Longriba fault,which are basically coincided with the regional tectonics division. The crustalthickness decreases from southwest to northeast along the profile, that is, from 62 km in the region of the Jinshajiang River to 52 km in the region of the Yellow River. The Moho discontinuity does not obviously change across the Xianshuihe fault based on the PmP phase analysis. The crustal average velocity along the profile is lower, about 6.30 km/s. The Benzilan-Tangke profile reveals that the crust in the study area is orogenic. The Xianshuihe fault belt is located in thecentral part of the profile, and the velocity is positive anomaly on the upper crust, and negative anomaly on the lower crust and upper mantle. It is considered as a deep tectonic setting in favor of strong earthquake's accumulation and occurrence.

  11. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the Earth¡¦s crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The Earth¡¦s gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  12. Recent crustal deformation in west-central South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Matthew Earl

    I use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to create maps of crustal deformation along the coast and within the volcanic arc of central South America. I image deformation associated with six subduction zone earthquakes, four volcanic centers, at least one shallow crustal earthquake, and several salt flats. In addition, I constrain the magnitude and location of post-seismic deformation from the aforementioned subduction zone earthquakes. I combine InSAR observations with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and teleseismic data to explore each source of deformation. I use the observations to constrain earthquake and volcanic processes of this subduction zone, including the plumbing system of the volcanoes and the decadal along strike variations in the subduction zone earthquake cycle. I created interferograms of over 900 volcanoes in the central Andes spanning 1992--2002, and found four areas of deformation. I constrained the temporal variability of the deformation, the depth of the sources of deformation assuming a variety of source geometries and crustal structures, and the possible cause of the deformation. I do not observe deformation associated with eruptions at several volcanoes, and I discuss the possible explanations for this lack of deformation. In addition, I constrain the amount of co-seismic and post-seismic slip on the subduction zone fault interface from the following earthquakes: 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, Chile; 1996 Mw 7.7 Nazca, Peru; 1998 Mw 7.1 Antofagasta, Chile; and 2001 Mw 8.4 Arequipa, Peru. In northern Chile, I compare the location and magnitude of co-seismic slip from 5 Mw > 7 earthquakes during the past 15 years with the post-seismic slip distribution. There is little post-seismic slip from the 1995 and 1996 earthquakes relative to the 2001 event and other recent subduction zone earthquakes.

  13. THE CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF ELLESMERE ISLAND FROM RECEIVER FUNCTION MODELLING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Oakey, Gordon

    Atlantic region. The intraplate Eurekan orogeny in the Cenozoic caused additional crustal shortening in the area, related to the opening of Baffin Bay, the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean basins and the complex plate tectonic responses to these plate boundary reconfigurations. Geophysically Ellesmere...... stations was installed and maintained from 2010 to 2012 with the support of the Geological Survey of Canada and SEIS-UK. The two closest permanent stations (Eureka and Alert) in the area as well as two wide angle seismic profiles across the Canadian Arctic margin have been included to the interpretation...

  14. Imaging the Western Iberia Crustal Structure by Noise Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, G. M.; Dias, N. A.; Custodio, S.; Kiselev, S.; Dündar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Portugal lies close to the Eurasian-African boundary, a region of tectonic regime transition from convergence in the Mediterranean to strike-slip in the Atlantic. Such broad convergence area, characterized by a slow rate of about 4.5-5.6 mm/yr, translates unto a scattered seismicity concentrated mainly in the offshore. Therefore, the irregular source-receiver geometry resulting from the inland seismic stations networks does not permit to derive high-resolution models of the Portuguese crustal structure using traditional passive seismology. Seismic interferometry/ambient noise surface-waves tomography allows imaging regions with a resolution that mainly depends on the seismic network coverage. Over the last decade, both Portuguese and Spanish permanent broadband (BB) seismic networks expanded significantly. This densification enabled to build a detailed image of the crustal structure of the Iberian Peninsula using ambient seismic noise. However, due to the existing network gaps towards west, the crustal image of Western Iberia is on the limit of resolution. The two years temporary deployment by the WILAS project contributed to fill those gaps and provide an excellent opportunity to study the Portuguese crustal structure. Dispersion measurements were computed for each pair of stations using empirical Green's functions generated by cross-correlating one-day-length seismic ambient-noise records. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the empirical Green functions computed from ambient noise records, we applied a phase cross-correlation method, followed by time-frequency domain phase weighted stack. Group-velocities were computed using the S-transform and we use the Fast Marching Surface Tomography algoritm to compute group velocity perturbation maps. Group velocities were then inverted as a function of depth to obtain S-wave velocity maps for diferent depths. The models will be compared with results from Ps receiver functions. The results obtained for the crust using

  15. Magnetar Outbursts from Avalanches of Hall Waves and Crustal Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xinyu; Belovorodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    We explore the interaction between Hall waves and mechanical failures inside a magnetar crust, using detailed one-dimentional models that consider temperature-sensitive plastic flow, heat transport and cooling by neutrino emission, as well as the coupling of the crustal motion to the magnetosphere. We find that the dynamics is enriched and accelerated by the fast, short-wavelength Hall waves that are emitted by each failure. The waves propagate and cause failures elsewhere, triggering avalanches. We argue that these avalanches are the likely sources of outbursts in transient magnetars.

  16. Quantifying Precambrian crustal extraction: the root is the answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Dallas; Sparks, David; Herzberg, Claude; Mooney, Walter; Nikishin, Anatoly; Zhang, Yu Shen

    2000-07-01

    We use two different methods to estimate the total amount of continental crust that was extracted by the end of the Archean and the Proterozoic. The first method uses the sum of the seismic thickness of the crust, the eroded thickness of the crust, and the trapped melt within the lithospheric root to estimate the total crustal volume. This summation method yields an average equivalent thickness of Archean crust of 49±6 km and an average equivalent thickness of Proterozoic crust of 48± 9 km. Between 7 and 9% of this crust never reached the surface, but remained within the continental root as congealed, iron-rich komatiitic melt. The second method uses experimental models of melting, mantle xenolith compositions, and corrected lithospheric thickness to estimate the amount of crust extracted through time. This melt column method reveals that the average equivalent thickness of Archean crust was 65±6 km, and the average equivalent thickness of Early Proterozoic crust was 60±7 km. It is likely that some of this crust remained trapped within the lithospheric root. The discrepancy between the two estimates is attributed to uncertainties in estimates of the amount of trapped, congealed melt, overall crustal erosion, and crustal recycling. Overall, we find that between 29 and 45% of continental crust was extracted by the end of the Archean, most likely by 2.7 Ga. Between 51 and 79% of continental crust was extracted by the end of the Early Proterozoic, most likely by 1.8-2.0 Ga. Our results are most consistent with geochemical models that call upon moderate amounts of recycling of early extracted continental crust coupled with continuing crustal growth (e.g. McLennan, S.M., Taylor, S.R., 1982. Geochemical constraints on the growth of the continental crust. Journal of Geology, 90, 347-361; Veizer, J., Jansen, S.L., 1985. Basement and sedimentary recycling — 2: time dimension to global tectonics. Journal of Geology 93(6), 625-643). Trapped, congealed, iron-rich melt

  17. On ultrahigh temperature crustal metamorphism:Phase equilibria, trace element thermometry, bulk composition, heat sources, timescales and tectonic settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David E. Kelsey; Martin Hand

    2015-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) metamorphism is the most thermally extreme form of regional crustal metamorphism, with temperatures exceeding 900 ?C. UHT crustal metamorphism is recognised in more than 50 localities globally in the metamorphic rock record and is accepted as‘normal’ in the spectrum of regional crustal processes. UHT metamorphism is typically identified on the basis of diagnostic mineral assemblages such as sapphirine þ quartz, orthopyroxene þ sillimanite ? quartz and osumilite in MgeAl-rich rock compositions, now usually coupled with pseudosection-based thermobarometry using internally-consistent thermodynamic data sets and/or Al-in-Orthopyroxene and ternary feldspar ther-mobarometry. Significant progress in the understanding of regional UHT metamorphism in recent years includes: (1) development of a ferric iron activityecomposition thermodynamic model for sapphirine, allowing phase diagram calculations for oxidised rock compositions;(2) quantification of UHT conditions via trace element thermometry, with Zr-in-rutile more commonly recording higher temperatures than Ti-in-zircon. Rutile is likely to be stable at peak UHT conditions whereas zircon may only grow as UHT rocks are cooling. In addition, the extent to which Zr diffuses out of rutile is controlled by chemical communication with zircon; (3) more fully recognising and utilising temperature-dependent thermal properties of the crust, and the possible range of heat sources causing metamorphism in geodynamic modelling studies; (4) recognising that crust partially melted either in a previous event or earlier in a long-duration event has greater capacity than fertile, unmelted crust to achieve UHT conditions due to the heat energy consumed by partial melting reactions;(5) more strongly linking UePb geochronological data from zircon and monazite to PeT points or path segments through using Y þ REE partitioning between accessory and major phases, as well as phase diagrams incorporating Zr and REE

  18. On ultrahigh temperature crustal metamorphism: Phase equilibria, trace element thermometry, bulk composition, heat sources, timescales and tectonic settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Kelsey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature (UHT metamorphism is the most thermally extreme form of regional crustal metamorphism, with temperatures exceeding 900 °C. UHT crustal metamorphism is recognised in more than 50 localities globally in the metamorphic rock record and is accepted as ‘normal’ in the spectrum of regional crustal processes. UHT metamorphism is typically identified on the basis of diagnostic mineral assemblages such as sapphirine + quartz, orthopyroxene + sillimanite ± quartz and osumilite in Mg–Al-rich rock compositions, now usually coupled with pseudosection-based thermobarometry using internally-consistent thermodynamic data sets and/or Al-in-Orthopyroxene and ternary feldspar thermobarometry. Significant progress in the understanding of regional UHT metamorphism in recent years includes: (1 development of a ferric iron activity–composition thermodynamic model for sapphirine, allowing phase diagram calculations for oxidised rock compositions; (2 quantification of UHT conditions via trace element thermometry, with Zr-in-rutile more commonly recording higher temperatures than Ti-in-zircon. Rutile is likely to be stable at peak UHT conditions whereas zircon may only grow as UHT rocks are cooling. In addition, the extent to which Zr diffuses out of rutile is controlled by chemical communication with zircon; (3 more fully recognising and utilising temperature-dependent thermal properties of the crust, and the possible range of heat sources causing metamorphism in geodynamic modelling studies; (4 recognising that crust partially melted either in a previous event or earlier in a long-duration event has greater capacity than fertile, unmelted crust to achieve UHT conditions due to the heat energy consumed by partial melting reactions; (5 more strongly linking U–Pb geochronological data from zircon and monazite to P–T points or path segments through using Y + REE partitioning between accessory and major phases, as well as phase

  19. Crustal wedging triggering recent deformation in the Andean thrust front between 31°S and 33°S: Sierras Pampeanas-Precordillera interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    VergéS, J.; Ramos, V. A.; Meigs, A.; Cristallini, E.; Bettini, F. H.; CortéS, J. M.

    2007-03-01

    We document a new model of crustal structure of the Andean front in Argentina where numerous historic earthquakes destroyed the cities of Mendoza in 1861 (Ms = ˜7) and San Juan in 1944 (Mw = 7.0). The Cerro Salinas anticline is formed above the west directed Cerro Salinas thrust. An east facing monocline with an amplitude of about 2 km folds the Cerro Salinas thrust and overlying Neogene succession. This monocline is formed above a blind crustal thrust in the basement. Its dip of 14° west is inferred from fold geometry. This thick-skinned east directed blind thrust and the thin-skinned west directed Cerro Salinas thrust define a tectonic wedge; the wedge tip occurs at a depth of 5.4 km. Growth of the monocline after ˜8.5 Ma is revealed on multichannel seismic (MSC) profile 31017 (Repsol-YPF). Rates of Cerro Salinas thrust displacement are of the order of 1 mm/yr, whereas vertical uplift of ˜0.45 mm/yr results from the combined displacement on the Cerro Salinas thrust and growth of east facing monocline. The lateral extent of the east directed crustal blind ramp corresponds with the along-strike extent of the Eastern Precordillera. When combined with the low displacement rate, a long earthquake recurrence interval is implied. Smaller magnitude earthquakes, however, indicate that segments of the blind thrust ramps ruptured in historic events. If all the segments of the blind thrust ruptured together the fault area is ˜7000 km2 and could produce a Mw ˜ 7.7 earthquake. The crustal wedge model provides new constraints on the origin and potential size of earthquakes that threaten the densely populated region.

  20. Statistics of Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Davison, Anthony C.

    2015-04-10

    Statistics of extremes concerns inference for rare events. Often the events have never yet been observed, and their probabilities must therefore be estimated by extrapolation of tail models fitted to available data. Because data concerning the event of interest may be very limited, efficient methods of inference play an important role. This article reviews this domain, emphasizing current research topics. We first sketch the classical theory of extremes for maxima and threshold exceedances of stationary series. We then review multivariate theory, distinguishing asymptotic independence and dependence models, followed by a description of models for spatial and spatiotemporal extreme events. Finally, we discuss inference and describe two applications. Animations illustrate some of the main ideas. © 2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  1. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  2. Precursors of extreme increments

    CERN Document Server

    Hallerberg, S; Holstein, D; Kantz, H; Hallerberg, Sarah; Altmann, Eduardo G.; Holstein, Detlef; Kantz, Holger

    2006-01-01

    We investigate precursors and predictability of extreme events in time series, which consist in large increments within successive time steps. In order to understand the predictability of this class of extreme events, we study analytically the prediction of extreme increments in AR(1)-processes. The resulting strategies are then applied to predict sudden increases in wind speed recordings. In both cases we evaluate the success of predictions via creating receiver operator characteristics (ROC-plots). Surprisingly, we obtain better ROC-plots for completely uncorrelated Gaussian random numbers than for AR(1)-correlated data. Furthermore, we observe an increase of predictability with increasing event size. Both effects can be understood by using the likelihood ratio as a summary index for smooth ROC-curves.

  3. Extensional crustal tectonics and crust-mantle coupling, a view from the geological record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Menant, Armel; Clerc, Camille; Sternai, Pietro; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie; Faccenna, Claudio; Gorini, Christian

    2017-04-01

    In passive margins or back-arc regions, extensional deformation is often asymmetric, i.e. normal faults or extensional ductile shear zones dip in the same direction over large distances. We examine a number of geological examples in convergent or divergent contexts suggesting that this asymmetry results from a coupling between asthenospheric flow and crustal deformation. This is the case of the Mediterranean back-arc basins, such as the Aegean Sea, the northern Tyrrhenian Sea, the Alboran domain or the Gulf of Lion passive margin. Similar types of observation can be made on some of the Atlantic volcanic passive margins and the Afar region, which were all formed above a mantle plume. We discuss these contexts and search for the main controlling parameters for this asymmetric distributed deformation that imply a simple shear component at the scale of the lithosphere. The different geodynamic settings and tectonic histories of these different examples provide natural case-studies of the different controlling parameters, including a pre-existing heterogeneity of the crust and lithosphere (tectonic heritage) and the possible contribution of the underlying asthenospheric flow through basal drag or basal push. We show that mantle flow can induce deformation in the overlying crust in case of high heat flow and thin lithosphere. In back-arc regions, the cause of asymmetry resides in the relative motion between the asthenosphere below the overriding plate and the crust. When convergence and slab retreat work concurrently the asthenosphere flows faster than the crust toward the trench and the sense of shear is toward the upper plate. When slab retreat is the only cause of subduction, the sense of shear is opposite. In both cases, mantle flow is mostly the consequence of slab retreat and convergence. Mantle flow can however result also from larger-scale convection, controlling rifting dynamics prior to the formation of oceanic crust. In volcanic passive margins, in most cases

  4. Weather and Climate Extremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Antarctica’s highest (New Zealand Antarctic Society, 1974). This extreme exceeded the record of 58°F (14.4°C) that occurred on 20 October 1956 at Esperanza ... Esperanza (also known as Bahia Esperanza , Hope Bay) was in operation from 1945 through the early 1960s. Meteorological/Climatological Factors: This extreme...cm) Location: Grand Ilet, La R’eunion Island [21°00’S, 55°30’E] Date: 26 January 1980 WORLD’S GREATEST 24-HOUR RAINFALL 72 in (182.5 cm

  5. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure.

  6. Extremal graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The ever-expanding field of extremal graph theory encompasses a diverse array of problem-solving methods, including applications to economics, computer science, and optimization theory. This volume, based on a series of lectures delivered to graduate students at the University of Cambridge, presents a concise yet comprehensive treatment of extremal graph theory.Unlike most graph theory treatises, this text features complete proofs for almost all of its results. Further insights into theory are provided by the numerous exercises of varying degrees of difficulty that accompany each chapter. A

  7. Lower crustal xenoliths, Chinese Peak lava flow, central Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Calk, L.C.; Kistler, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This assemblage of pyroxenite, peridotite and mafic granulite xenoliths in the toe of a 10 m.y. trachybasalt flow remnant overlying late Cretaceous granitic rocks, indicates the presence of a mafic-ultramafic complex beneath this part of central California; orthopyroxenites, websterites and clinopyroxenites are dominant. A few of the xenoliths contain ovoid opaque patches that are apparently pseudomorphs after garnet and have pyralspite garnet compositions; using a garnet-orthopyroxene geobarometer, they indicate a lower crustal depth of approx 40 km. Abundant mafic granulites can be subdivided into those with Al2O3 = or 15% and showing considerable scatter on oxide variation diagrams. The high-alumina granulite xenoliths have relatively low 87Rb/86Sr but high 87Sr/86Sr, whereas the low-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths have a wide range of 87Rb/86Sr, but lower 87Sr/86Sr; the isotopic data indicate roughly the same age as that of overlying granitic plutons (approx 100 m.y.). However, the granitic rocks have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios intermediate between those of the high-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths, suggesting that they result from the mixing of basaltic magma (represented by the ultramafic rocks) and crustal materials, with subsequent crystal fractionation.-R.A.H.

  8. Continental crust composition constrained by measurements of crustal Poisson's ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandt, George; Ammon, Charles J.

    1995-03-01

    DECIPHERING the geological evolution of the Earth's continental crust requires knowledge of its bulk composition and global variability. The main uncertainties are associated with the composition of the lower crust. Seismic measurements probe the elastic properties of the crust at depth, from which composition can be inferred. Of particular note is Poisson's ratio,Σ ; this elastic parameter can be determined uniquely from the ratio of P- to S-wave seismic velocity, and provides a better diagnostic of crustal composition than either P- or S-wave velocity alone1. Previous attempts to measure Σ have been limited by difficulties in obtaining coincident P- and S-wave data sampling the entire crust2. Here we report 76 new estimates of crustal Σ spanning all of the continents except Antarctica. We find that, on average, Σ increases with the age of the crust. Our results strongly support the presence of a mafic lower crust beneath cratons, and suggest either a uniformitarian craton formation process involving delamination of the lower crust during continental collisions, followed by magmatic underplating, or a model in which crust formation processes have changed since the Precambrian era.

  9. Glacio-Seismotectonics: Ice Sheets, Crustal Deformation and Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Stewart, Iain S.; Rose, James

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a significant growth in our understanding of the past and continuing effects of ice sheets and glaciers on contemporary crustal deformation and seismicity. This growth has been driven largely by the emergence of postglacial rebound models (PGM) constrained by new field observations that incorporate increasingly realistic rheological, mechanical, and glacial parameters. In this paper, we highlight some of these recent field-based investigations and new PGMs, and examine their implications for understanding crustal deformation and seismicity during glaciation and following deglaciation. The emerging glacial rebound models outlined in the paper support the view that both tectonic stresses and glacial rebound stresses are needed to explain the distribution and style of contemporary earthquake activity in former glaciated shields of eastern Canada and Fennoscandia. However, many of these models neglect important parameters, such as topography, lateral variations in lithospheric strength and tectonic strain built up during glaciation. In glaciated mountainous terrains, glacial erosion may directly modulate tectonic deformation by resetting the orogenic topography and thereby providing an additional compensatory uplift mechanism. Such effects are likely to be important both in tectonically active orogens and in the mountainous regions of glaciated shields.

  10. Mineralogy of the Martian Surface: Crustal Composition to Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    1997-01-01

    The main results have been published in the refereed literature, and thus this report serves mainly to summarize the main findings and indicate where the detailed papers may be found. Reflectance spectroscopy has been an important tool for determining the mineralogic makeup of the near surface materials on Mars. Analysis of the spectral properties of the surface have demonstrated that these attributes are heterogeneous from the coarse spatial but high spectral resolution spectra obtained with telescopes to the high spatial but coarse spectral resolution Viking data (e.g. Arvidson et al., 1989; McEwen et al., 1989). Low albedo materials show strong evidence for the presence of igneous rock forming minerals while bright materials are generally interpreted as representing heavily altered crustal material. How these materials are physically and genetically related has important implications for understanding martian surface properties and processes, weathering histories and paths, and crustal composition. The goal of this research is to characterize the physical and chemical properties of low albedo materials on Mars and the relationship to intermediate and high albedo materials. Fundamental science questions to be pursued include: (1) the observed distributions of soil, rock, and dust a function of physical processes or weathering and (2) different stages of chemical and physical alteration fresh rock identified. These objectives will be addressed through detailed analyses and modelling of the ISM data from the Phobos-2 mission with corroborating evidence of surface composition and properties provided by data from the Viking mission.

  11. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, Arthur George; Geppert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within $\\sim 10^4$ -- $10^5$ yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths $\\sim 10^{14}$ G maintained over $\\gtrsim 10^6$ yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity $\\epsilon\\sim 10^{-6}$, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after $\\sim 10^5$ ...

  12. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  13. Crustal structure of Northern Latium (central Italy) from receiver functions analysis: New evidences of a post-collisional back-arc margin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttinelli, Mauro; Chiarabba, Claudio; Anselmi, Mario; Bianchi, Irene; De Rita, Donatella; Quattrocchi, Fedora

    2014-05-01

    The crustal velocity structure in a region of central Apennines of Italy at the hinge between the highly stretched portion of the Monte Argentario promontory and the magmatic province of the Tolfa Domes Complex (Northern Latium) is discussed in this study. S-wave velocities at depth have been constrained by the modeling of P-wave receiver functions (RF) from both temporary and permanent broadband seismic stations. The computer 3D Vs models show a thin crust (19-25 km) made of a shallow and thin sedimentary cover, a very high velocity and anisotropic layer related to a metamorphic basement, and a low Vs anisotropic layer in the middle-lower crust above a shallow Moho discontinuity modeled at about 20 km depth. The volcano-tectonic evolution of this portion of Tyrrhenian back-arc margin has been strongly influenced by its peculiar crustal architecture. The low-Vs layer acted as a shear zone in the middle-lower crust during the Tyrrhenian extension, also helping the development of Plio-Quaternary magmatism. Our findings potentially give new constraints on the evolution of the area and to the general comprehension of back-arc development in collisional regions.

  14. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable ext

  15. Hydrological extremes and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-04-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and impact on societal livelihood and welfare. Security can be generally understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. The traditional interpretation of security, focused on the state military capabilities, has been replaced by a wider understanding, including economic, societal and environmental aspects that get increasing attention. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state that is responsible for sustaining economic development, and societal and environmental security. The latter can be regarded as the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. An important part of it is water security, which can be defined as the availability of an adequate quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods, ecosystems and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks to people, environments and economies. Security concerns arise because, over large areas, hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - are becoming more frequent and more severe. In terms of dealing with water-related risks, climate change can increase uncertainties, which makes the state's task to deliver security more difficult and more expensive. However, changes in population size and development, and level of protection, drive exposure to hydrological hazards.

  16. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tend to impact at arterial bifurcations, the commonest site being the ... Other ominous signs of advanced ischaemia include bluish ... Recommended standards for lower extremity ischaemia*. Doppler signals ... of the embolectomy procedure. An ... in a cath-lab or angio-suite under local ... We serially measure the aPTT and.

  17. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  18. Statistics of Local Extremes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Bierbooms, W.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2003-01-01

    . A theoretical expression for the probability density function associated with local extremes of a stochasticprocess is presented. The expression is basically based on the lower four statistical moments and a bandwidth parameter. The theoretical expression is subsequently verified by comparison with simulated...

  19. de Sitter Extremal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, K

    2015-01-01

    We study extremal surfaces in de Sitter space in the Poincare slicing in the upper patch, anchored on spatial subregions at the future boundary ${\\cal I}^+$, restricted to constant boundary Euclidean time slices (focussing on strip subregions). We find real extremal surfaces of minimal area as the boundaries of past lightcone wedges of the subregions in question: these are null surfaces with vanishing area. We find also complex extremal surfaces as complex extrema of the area functional, and the area is not always real-valued. In $dS_4$ the area is real and has some structural resemblance with entanglement entropy in a dual $CFT_3$. There are parallels with analytic continuation from the Ryu-Takayanagi expressions for holographic entanglement entropy in $AdS$. We also discuss extremal surfaces in the $dS$ black brane and the de Sitter "bluewall" studied previously. The $dS_4$ black brane complex surfaces exhibit a real finite cutoff-independent extensive piece. In the bluewall geometry, there are real surface...

  20. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W

    2016-01-01

    and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may...

  1. Crustal thickness variation beneath the Romanian seismic network from Rayleigh wave dispersion and receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan; Zaharia, Bogdan

    2014-05-01

    Variations in crustal thickness in Romania where determined by joint inversion of P wave receiver functions (RFs) and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion. We present new models of shear wave velocity structure of the crust beneath Romanian broad band stations. The data set consist in more than 500 teleseismic earthquake with epicentral distance between 30° and 95°, magnitude greater than 6 and a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3 for the P-wave pulse. Most epicenters are situated along the northern Pacific Rim and arrive with backazimuths (BAZs) between 0° and 135° at the Romanian seismic network. We combine receiver functions with fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave group velocities to further constrain the shear-wave velocity structure.To extract the group velocities we applied the Multiple Filter Technique analysis to the vertical components of the earthquakes recordings. This technique allowed us to identify the Rayleigh wave fundamental mode and to compute the dispersion curves of the group velocities at periods between 10 and 150 s allowing us to resolve shear wave velocities to a depth of 100 km. The time-domain iterative deconvolution procedure of Ligorrıa and Ammon (1999) was employed to deconvolve the vertical component of the teleseismic P waveforms from the corresponding horizontal components and obtain radial and transverse receiver functions at each broadband station. The data are inverted using a joint, linearized inversion scheme (Hermann, 2002) which accounts for the relative influence of each set of observations, and allows a trade-off between fitting the observations, constructing a smooth model, and matching a priori constraints. The results show a thin crust for stations located inside the Pannonian basin (28-30 km) and a thicker crust for those in the East European Platform (36-40 km). The stations within the Southern and Central Carpathian Orogen are characterized by crustal depths of ~35 km. For stations located in the Northern

  2. Receiver functions and crustal structure of the northwestern Andean region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Esteban; Monsalve, Gaspar; Vargas, Carlos Alberto

    2015-04-01

    We used the receiver function technique to deduce crustal thickness beneath the northwestern Andean system, using data from the permanent seismic network of Colombia, combined with some of the IRIS and CTBTO stations in Colombia and Ecuador. The estimation of crustal thickness was made using the primary P to s conversion and crustal reverberations. The bulk crustal VP/VS ratio was constrained using a crustal thickness versus VP/VS stacking method, in addition to estimations using a time to depth conversion technique based on results of a modified Wadati diagram analysis. We observed a wide range of crustal thicknesses, including values around 17 km beneath the Malpelo Island on the Pacific Ocean, 20 to 30 km at the coastal Pacific and Caribbean plains of Colombia, 25 to 40 km beneath the eastern plains and foothills, 35 km beneath the Western Cordillera, 45 km at the Magdalena River intermountain valley, 52 to 58 km under the northern Central Cordillera, and reaching almost 60 km beneath some of the volcanoes of the Southern Cordilleran system of Colombia; crustal thickness can be slightly greater than 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera. The values of VP/VS are particularly high for some of the stations on the volcanic centers, reaching values above 1.79, probably related to the addition of mafic materials to the lower crust, and in the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera near Bogota, where we speculate about the possibility of crustal seismic anisotropy associated with shear zones.

  3. Crustal Flows beneath the Eastern Tibetan Plateau Revealed by Magnetotelluric Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Dengha; TENG Jiwen; MA Xiaobing; KONG Xiangru

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian and Asian continents has created the Himalayan and Tibetan plateau through a range of deformation processes that include crustal thickening, delamination, lateral extrusion and crustal flow. A debate continues as to which of these processes are most significant in terms of the overall mass balance of this continent-continent collision.

  4. Crustal and upper mantle structure of Siberia from teleseismic receiver functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    -frequency P-RF component as it has about an order of magnitude better resolution than S-RF. We find no indication for significant crustal anisotropy in the cratonic areas of Siberia. The preliminary crustal thickness results from the Hk stacking and from the inversion approach agree with a previous study...

  5. NACr14: A 3D model for the crustal structure of the North American Continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-01-01

    Based on the large number of crustal seismic experiments carried out in the last decadeswe create NACr14, a 3D crustal model of the North American continent at a resolution of 1° × 1°. We present maps of thickness and average velocities of the main layers that comprise the North American crystalline

  6. NACr14: A 3D model for the crustal structure of the North American Continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-01-01

    Based on the large number of crustal seismic experiments carried out in the last decadeswe create NACr14, a 3D crustal model of the North American continent at a resolution of 1° × 1°. We present maps of thickness and average velocities of the main layers that comprise the North American crystalline

  7. Crustal and upper mantle structure of Siberia from teleseismic receiver functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina;

    2015-01-01

    -frequency P-RF component as it has about an order of magnitude better resolution than S-RF. We find no indication for significant crustal anisotropy in the cratonic areas of Siberia. The preliminary crustal thickness results from the Hk stacking and from the inversion approach agree with a previous study...

  8. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density......We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity-density...

  9. Mapping sub-crustal reflectors in southwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Ehsan, S. A.; Afonso, J. C.; Diaz Cusi, J.

    2015-12-01

    During the last 15 years, the IBERSEIS and ALCUDIA controlled source experiments have acquired vertical incidence and wide angle seismic reflection data in southwest Spain, in the Variscan Sub-Portuguese, Ossa-Morena and Central-Iberian Zones. Apart from providing detailed information of the crust, these datasets have also imaged a conspicuous sub-crustal reflector. First identified on the IBERSEIS wide-angle reflection dataset, this interface seemed to feature a positive seismic impedance contrast. A boundary located between 61-72 km depth, with a Vp increase from 8.2 km/s to 8.3 km/s allowed us to model clear wide-angle reflections found above 180 km offsets. The fact that this reflector was not identified in the coincident vertical incidence dataset led us to interpret it as a gradient zone. A correlation with the 'Hales gradient zone', i.e. the boundary between spinel and garnet peridotites was our preferred interpretation. The ALCUDIA experiment, later acquired northwards of the IBERSEIS profiles, also shows prominent sub-crustal arrivals with the same characteristics as those observed in the IBERSEIS wide-angle data. However, these reflections also appear, locally and at 19 s TWT, in the vertical incidence dataset, further constraining the depth at which this feature is located. In addition, the ALCUDIA wide-angle dataset shows deeper sub-horizontal reflectivity (at Vred=8 km/s) that maybe preliminarily associated with mantle anisotropy or even, with the lithosphere-astenosphere boundary. Integration of the information provided by the IBERSEIS and ALCUDIA datasets with older and lower resolution data from the ILIHA project, where three sub-crustal phases were identified in SW Iberia, allows us to conclude that, in this area, mantle reflectivity is outstanding. Also, modeling of all the datasets contributes to map, at a regional scale, the Hales discontinuity or gradient zone in southwest Iberia. Further research, involving receiver function analysis is

  10. Kinematics of the crustal velocity field in the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F. F.

    2008-12-01

    GPS measurements embodied in PBO and PBO Nucleus allow the crustal velocity field of the western US to be constructed in unprecedented detail. Velocity and strain fields span the entire San Andreas fault system and Cascadia subduction zone from Baja California to northern Washington as well as the continental interior including the Great Basin and Wasatch Front. Rationalizing the GPS velocity field over the several tectonic regimes provides key tests of prevailing notions of interseismic crustal deformation. In our interpretation, we begin with the premise that the load-carrying portion of the lithosphere coincides with the (seismogenic) upper crust with an effective elastic thickness of ~20 km at the time scales of interseimic motions (Thatcher and Pollitz, 2008). End member kinematic models include (1) viscoelastic relaxation of the ductile lower crust and upper mantle following large earthquakes, and (2) slip in the lower elastic lithosphere, each of which serves to localize strain around major faults during interseismic periods. More detailed kinematic models emphasize the roles of lateral variations in rigidity and/or effective elastic plate thickness as well as distributed deformation. Our modeling of western US kinematics shows that the GPS velocity field is well explained with a range of models involving a combination of all of the above components; no single endmember suffices. Zones of inferred distributed deformation in the continental interior coincide with well-known seismic belts (Eastern California Shear Zone; Walker Lane; Interseismic Mountain Belt). Continued acquisition of vector constraints on crustal motions and study of available geodetic data are needed to clarify active deformation patterns in several areas. Some outstanding issues are: The nature of distributed faulting at the margins of the Great Basin (southern Nevada Transverse Zone, northern Walker Lane); understanding how dextral shear from the eastern boundary of the Sierra Nevada

  11. Non-extremal branes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bueno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We prove that for arbitrary black brane solutions of generic Supergravities there is an adapted system of variables in which the equations of motion are exactly invariant under electric–magnetic duality, i.e. the interchange of a given extended object by its electromagnetic dual. We obtain thus a procedure to automatically construct the electromagnetic dual of a given brane without needing to solve any further equation. We apply this procedure to construct the non-extremal (p,q-string of Type-IIB String Theory (new in the literature, explicitly showing how the dual (p,q-five-brane automatically arises in this construction. In addition, we prove that the system of variables used is suitable for a generic characterization of every double-extremal Supergravity brane solution, which we perform in full generality.

  12. Tibetans at extreme altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyi; Li, Shupin; Ward, Michal P

    2005-01-01

    Between 1960 and 2003, 13 Chinese expeditions successfully reached the summit of Chomolungma (Mt Everest or Sagarmatha). Forty-five of the 80 summiteers were Tibetan highlanders. During these and other high-altitude expeditions in Tibet, a series of medical and physiological investigations were carried out on the Tibetan mountaineers. The results suggest that these individuals are better adapted to high altitude and that, at altitude, they have a greater physical capacity than Han (ethnic Chinese) lowland newcomers. They have higher maximal oxygen uptake, greater ventilation, more brisk hypoxic ventilatory responses, larger lung volumes, greater diffusing capacities, and a better quality of sleep. Tibetans also have a lower incidence of acute mountain sickness and less body weight loss. These differences appear to represent genetic adaptations and are obviously significant for humans at extreme altitude. This paper reviews what is known about the physiologic responses of Tibetans at extreme altitudes.

  13. Extremal periodic wave profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. van Groesen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to deterministic investigations into extreme fluid surface waves, in this paper wave profiles of prescribed period that have maximal crest height will be investigated. As constraints the values of the momentum and energy integrals are used in a simplified description with the KdV model. The result is that at the boundary of the feasible region in the momentum-energy plane, the only possible profiles are the well known cnoidal wave profiles. Inside the feasible region the extremal profiles of maximal crest height are "cornered" cnoidal profiles: cnoidal profiles of larger period, cut-off and periodically continued with the prescribed period so that at the maximal crest height a corner results.

  14. Extreme Photonics & Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Trevor J; Paredes, Sofia A

    2010-01-01

    "Extreme Photonics & Applications" arises from the 2008 NATO Advanced Study Institute in Laser Control & Monitoring in New Materials, Biomedicine, Environment, Security and Defense. Leading experts in the manipulation of light offered by recent advances in laser physics and nanoscience were invited to give lectures in their fields of expertise and participate in discussions on current research, applications and new directions. The sum of their contributions to this book is a primer for the state of scientific knowledge and the issues within the subject of photonics taken to the extreme frontiers: molding light at the ultra-finest scales, which represents the beginning of the end to limitations in optical science for the benefit of 21st Century technological societies. Laser light is an exquisite tool for physical and chemical research. Physicists have recently developed pulsed lasers with such short durations that one laser shot takes the time of one molecular vibration or one electron rotation in an ...

  15. Extremal Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, P A; Saavedra, Joel; Vasquez, Yerko

    2014-01-01

    We consider a gravitating system consisting of a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity with a self-interacting potential and an U(1) electromagnetic field. Solving the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-scalar system we find exact hairy charged black hole solutions with the scalar field regular everywhere. We go to the zero temperature limit and we study the effect of the scalar field on the near horizon geometry of an extremal black hole. We find that except a critical value of the charge of the black hole there is also a critical value of the charge of the scalar field beyond of which the extremal black hole is destabilized. We study the thermodynamics of these solutions and we find that if the space is flat then at low temperature the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole is thermodynamically preferred, while if the space is AdS the hairy charged black hole is thermodynamically preferred at low temperature.

  16. Religious Extremism in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Face (July 2008): 32. 21 Ahmed Rashid , Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan (New York: Viking, 2012). 22 Brian J...promoting extremism. Commentators such as Jessica Stern, Alan Richards, Hussain Haqqani, Ahmed Rashid , and Ali Riaz are a few of the scholars who...www.jstor.org/stable/3183558; See also Ahmed Rashid , Descent Into Chaos: The United States and the Failure of Nation Building in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and

  17. USACE Extreme Sea levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    report summarising the results of the research, together with a set of recommendations arising from the research. This report describes progress to...Southampton University at HR Wallingford and subsequent teleconference with Heidi Moritz and Kate White. The notes summarising the findings of the...suggestion was made that we may want to begin talking about extreme water levels separate from storms. Ivan mentioned an analysis of storminess which

  18. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  19. Extremes in nature

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, Gianfausto; Kottegoda, Nathabandu T

    2007-01-01

    This book is about the theoretical and practical aspects of the statistics of Extreme Events in Nature. Most importantly, this is the first text in which Copulas are introduced and used in Geophysics. Several topics are fully original, and show how standard models and calculations can be improved by exploiting the opportunities offered by Copulas. In addition, new quantities useful for design and risk assessment are introduced.

  20. Crustal deformations at permanent GPS sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Knudsen, Per; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2005-01-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre (KMS) is responsible for the geodetic definition of the reference network in Denmark. Permanent GPS stations play an important role in the monitoring and maintenance of the geodetic network. During 1998 and 1999 KMS established three permanent GPS station in Denmark......, SMID, SULD and BUDP. Using almost 4.5 years of continuous data from the Danish station and the Swedish station, ONSA, we analyse the daily GPS solution due to crustal deformation caused by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Although, displacements due to GIA are only 1–3 mm/year at the Danish GPS...... sites, the current precision of positioning using GPS allows us to observe these effects. The modelled horizontal GIA velocities and the observed horizontal residuals obtained from GPS show almost the same direction for all station. However, the observed velocity residuals are larger than the modelled...

  1. A new model of crustal structure of Siberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We report a new model of the structure of the crust in Siberia that encompasses two large tectonic regions, the Paleozoic West Siberian Basin and the Precambrian Siberian craton. The area of study covers a significant part of the north Eurasia and extends from the Ural mountains in the west...... and receiver functions studies, based on old and newly acquired seismic data (from the late 1960-ies until present). Seismic structure along seismic profiles is digitized with a 50 km lateral spacing which is comparable with the resolution of seismic models. Structural parameters based on gravity modeling...... is paid to the data quality problem, and quality parameters are incorporated into the new database of regional crustal structure. The present database comprises detailed and reliable information on the seismic structure of the crust for most of the tectonic structures of the region and provides valuable...

  2. The crustal micro-deformation anomaly and the credible precursor*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁滨; 蒋骏; 钱家栋; 陈京; 和升棋; 张燕; 和平

    2002-01-01

    @@ What is a credible seismic precursor in observation of deformation A real seismic precursor ought to be resulted from the variations in the earth strain and stress. The deformation observation can provide the information during earthquake gestation and occurrence period for us. Usually the seismic precursors can be divided into field and epicentral region precursors. The precursor information is very useful for seismic prediction from epicentral region or near epicentral region. Micro-deformation observation mainly includes tilt, strain and gravity observation. Compared with GPS, geodesy and mobile deformation observation, micro-deformation (tilt, strain) shows the change of deformation which is continual in a limited volume with dominant observed range of 10(6~10(10 m. Because the variation of the crustal nature and cracking can be directly obtained by micro-deformation observation, it is an effective way to find middle-short term and short-term precursor.

  3. Lower crustal intrusions beneath the southern Baikal Rift Zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer; Thybo, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The Cenozoic Baikal Rift Zone (BRZ) is situated in south-central Siberia in the suture between the Precambrian Siberian Platform and the Amurian plate. This more than 2000-km long rift zone is composed of several individual basement depressions and half-grabens with the deep Lake Baikal at its...... centre. The BEST (Baikal Explosion Seismic Transect) project acquired a 360-km long, deep seismic, refraction/wide-angle reflection profile in 2002 across southern Lake Baikal. The data from this project is used for identification of large-scale crustal structures and modelling of the seismic velocities...... of the crust and uppermost mantle. Previous interpretation and velocity modelling of P-wave arrivals in the BEST data has revealed a multi layered crust with smooth variation in Moho depth between the Siberian Platform (41 km) and the Sayan-Baikal fold belt (46 km). The lower crust exhibits normal seismic...

  4. Crustal deformations at permanent GPS sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Knudsen, Per; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2005-01-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre (KMS) is responsible for the geodetic definition of the reference network in Denmark. Permanent GPS stations play an important role in the monitoring and maintenance of the geodetic network. During 1998 and 1999 KMS established three permanent GPS station in Denmark......, SMID, SULD and BUDP. Using almost 4.5 years of continuous data from the Danish station and the Swedish station, ONSA, we analyse the daily GPS solution due to crustal deformation caused by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Although, displacements due to GIA are only 1–3 mm/year at the Danish GPS...... sites, the current precision of positioning using GPS allows us to observe these effects. The modelled horizontal GIA velocities and the observed horizontal residuals obtained from GPS show almost the same direction for all station. However, the observed velocity residuals are larger than the modelled...

  5. Present-day crustal deformation around Sagaing fault, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigny, Christophe; Socquet, Anne; Rangin, Claude; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Pubellier, Manuel; Bouin, Marie-NoëLle; Bertrand, Guillaume; Becker, M.

    2003-11-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement campaigns in Myanmar, conducted in 1998 and 2000, allow quantifying the present-day crustal deformation around the Sagaing fault system in central Myanmar. Both a regional network installed at four points within the country and a local 18-station network centered on the city of Mandalay across the Sagaing fault demonstrate that active deformation related to the northward motion of India is distributed across Myanmar in a platelet that extends from the western edge of the Shan Plateau in the east to the Andaman Trench in the west. In this platelet, deformation is rather diffuse and distributed over distinct fault systems. In the east, the Sagaing/Shan Scarp fault system absorbs 10 mm/yr). This GPS study combined with an on land geotectonic survey demonstrate that oblique slip of India along the rigid Sundaland block is accommodated by a partitioned system characterized by distribution of deformation over a wide zone.

  6. Palaeoproterozoic high-pressure granulite overprint of the Archaean continental crust: evidence for homogeneous crustal thickening (Man Rise, Ivory Coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitra, Pavel; Kouamelan, Alain N.; Ballèvre, Michel; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    well as coeval intrusion of juvenile magmas. Crustal shortening was mainly accommodated by transpressive shear zones and by lateral crustal spreading rather than large-scale thrust systems. The occurrence of high-pressure granulites does not imply thrust-dominated tectonics. Feybesse, J.-L. & Milési, J.-P., 1994. The Archean/Proterozoic contact zone in West Africa: a mountain belt of décollement thrusting and folding on a continental margin related to 2.1 Ga convergence of Archean cratons? Precambrian Research, 69, 199-227. Schulmann, K., Schaltegger, U., Ježek, J., et al. 2002. Rapid burial and exhumation during orogeny: thickening and synconvergent exhumation of thermally weakened and thinned crust (Variscan orogen in Western Europe). American Journal of Science, 302, 856-879. Schulmann, K., Lexa, O., Štípská, P. et al., 2008. Vertical extrusion and horizontal channel flow of orogenic lower crust: key exhumation mechanisms in large hot orogens? Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 26(2), 273-297.

  7. GPS derived Crustal Deformation and Strain determination in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay P. Singh,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of Plate tectonics has revolutionized the way thinking about the processes of Earth. According to this theory, the surface of the Earth is broken into large plates. The size and position of these plates change over time. The edges of these plates, where they move against each other, are sites of intense tectonic activity, suchas earthquakes, volcanism, and mountain building. It is well known that Indian Plate is currently moving in the northeast direction, while the Eurasian Plate is moving north. This is causing the Indian and Eurasian Plate to deform at the point of contact besides its interior. Modern geophysical and space geodetic techniques such asseismology and GPS (Global Positioning system, have become important tools in the study of the deformation in the Earth due to tectonic processes, leading to earthquakes. Geodesy has provided an important role for plate tectonics study with high temporal resolution of the plate movements, particular from space technologies such as GPS and VLBI. The Global Positioning System (GPS provides accurate measurements of the rate of displacement of crustal. Indeed, the GPS velocity field can only be compared to finite strain if one assumes adeformation mechanism and that the style of deformation has been the same over long periods of geological time. For study of crustal deformation National Center of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad installed highly efficient and accurate LEICA GRX1200 Pro receiver at Ghoorpur near to Allahabad. This instrument is also equipped withMET3A sensor to record pressure, temperature, humidity at regular interval of 30 second. The Latitude and longitude of the GPS sites is 25.21N, 81.28E.

  8. Crustal structure of Australia from ambient seismic noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wave tomography for Australian crustal structure has been carried out using group velocity measurements in the period range 1-32 s extracted from stacked correlations of ambient noise between station pairs. Both Rayleigh wave and Love wave group velocity maps are constructed for each period using the vertical and transverse component of the Green's function estimates from the ambient noise. The full suite of portable broadband deployments and permanent stations on the continent have been used with over 250 stations in all and up to 7500 paths. The permanent stations provide a useful link between the various shorter-term portable deployments. At each period the group velocity maps are constructed with a fully nonlinear tomographic inversion exploiting a subspace technique and the Fast Marching Method for wavefront tracking. For Rayleigh waves the continental coverage is good enough to allow the construction of a 3D shear wavespeed model in a two stage approach. Local group dispersion information is collated for a distribution of points across the continent and inverted for a 1D SV wavespeed profile using a Neighbourhood Algorithm method. The resulting set of 1D models are then interpolated to produce the final 3D wavespeed model. The group velocity maps show the strong influence of thick sediments at shorter periods, and distinct fast zones associated with cratonic regions. Below the sediments the 3D shear wavespeed model displays significant heterogeneity with only moderate correlation with surface tectonic features. For example, there is no evident expression of the Tasman Line marking the eastern edge of Precambrian outcrop. The large number of available inter-station paths extracted from the ambient noise analysis provide detailed shear wavespeed information for crustal structure across the Australian continent for the first time, including regions where there was no prior sampling because of difficult logistics.

  9. Komsomolskaya diamondiferous eclogites: evidence for oceanic crustal protoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Barry, Peter H.; Carmody, Laura; Valley, John W.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Spetsius, Zdislav V.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2014-03-01

    The Komsomolskaya kimberlite is one of numerous (>1,000) kimberlite pipes that host eclogite xenoliths on the Siberian craton. Eclogite xenoliths from the adjacent Udachnaya kimberlite pipe have previously been geochemically well characterized; however, data from surrounding diamond-bearing kimberlite pipes from the center of the craton are relatively sparse. Here, we report major- and trace-element data, as well as oxygen isotope systematics, for mineral separates of diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths from the Komsomolskaya kimberlite, suggesting two distinct subgroups of a metamorphosed, subducted oceanic crustal protolith. Using almandine contents, this suite can be divided into two subgroups: group B1, with a high almandine component (>20 mol%) and group B2, with a low almandine component (oxygen isotope values, which are interpreted to reflect isotopic exchange with seawater at low temperatures (oxygen isotope values, suggesting an origin deep within the crustal pile, where little-to-no interaction with hydrothermal fluids has occurred. Major-element systematics were reconstructed based on mineral modes; group B1 eclogites have higher MgO wt% and lower SiO2 wt%, with respect to typical oceanic basalts, reflecting a partial melting event during slab subduction. Calculated residues from batch partial melt modeling of a range of Precambrian basalts overlap with group B1 trace-element chemistry. When taken together with the respective partial melt trajectories, these melting events are clearly linked to the formation of Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) complexes. As a result, we propose that many, if not all, diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths from Komsomolskaya represent mantle `restites' that preserve chemical signatures of Precambrian oceanic crust.

  10. Trajectory models and reference frames for crustal motion geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Michael; Brown, Abel

    2014-03-01

    We sketch the evolution of station trajectory models used in crustal motion geodesy over the last several decades, and describe some recent generalizations of these models that allow geodesists and geophysicists to parameterize accelerating patterns of displacement in general, and postseismic transient deformation in particular. Modern trajectory models are composed of three sub-models that represent secular trends, annual oscillations, and instantaneous jumps in coordinate time series. Traditionally the trend model invoked constant station velocity. This can be generalized by assuming that position is a polynomial function of time. The trajectory model can also be augmented as needed, by including one or more logarithmic transients in order to account for typical multi-year patterns of postseismic transient motion. Many geodetic and geophysical research groups are using general classes of trajectory model to characterize their crustal displacement time series, but few if any of them are using these trajectory models to define and realize the terrestrial reference frames (RFs) in which their time series are expressed. We describe a global GPS reanalysis program in which we use two general classes of trajectory model, tuned on a station by station basis. We define the network trajectory model as the set of station trajectory models encompassing every station in the network. We use the network trajectory model from the each global analysis to assign prior position estimates for the next round of GPS data processing. We allow our daily orbital solutions to relax so as to maintain their consistency with the network polyhedron. After several iterations we produce GPS time series expressed in a RF similar to, but not identical with ITRF2008. We find that each iteration produces an improvement in the daily repeatability of our global time series and in the predictive power of our trajectory models.

  11. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  12. Crustal composition in southern Norway from active and passive source seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, W. R.; Frassetto, A. M.; Thybo, H.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal composition and structure beneath the Fennoscandian shield are highly variable due to the method of crustal accretion and the long history of extensional and compressional tectonics. In southern Norway, the Moho and crust are inferred to be the youngest of the shield, however, it is likely that a large discrepancy between crustal age and Moho age exists beneath the high southern Scandes where the Caledonian orogeny was in effect and beneath the Oslo Graben where 60 million years of rifting and magmatism has altered the crust. Crustal structure in southern Norway was targeted with a multi-disciplinary seismic study (Magnus-Rex - Mantle investigations of Norwegian uplift Structure). Three ~400 km long active source seismic profiles across the southern Norway and a region wide array of broadband seismometers were deployed. P and S-wave arrivals were recorded in the Magnus-Rex project, from which Poisson ratios for the crust in southern Norway are calculated from both active source profiling and receiver functions. Unusually strong S-wave arrivals allow rare insight into crustal Poisson’s ratio structure, within crustal layers, that is not normally available from active source data and are usually determined by earthquake tomography studies where only bulk crustal values are available. An average Poisson’s ratio of 0.25 is calculated for the crust in southern Norway, suggesting it is predominantly of felsic-intermediate composition and lacks any significant mafic lower crust. This differs significantly from the adjacent crust in the Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian shield where Moho depths reach ~50 km and an up to 20 km thick mafic lower crust is present. The vast difference in Moho depths in the Fennoscandian shield are, therefore, mostly due to the variation in thickness of the high Vp lower crust. Estimates of crustal composition and the effect of Magma intrusion within the Oslo Graben, and possible delamination of the lowermost crust beneath

  13. Multi-mineral geochronology: insights into crustal behaviour during exhumation of an orogenic root

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFlamme, Crystal; McFarlane, Christopher R. M.; Fisher, Christopher M.; Kirkland, Christopher L.

    2017-03-01

    Under rare conditions, reworked cratons and their margins preserve the orogenic roots of ancient mountain-building events. However, based on the preservation of high-temperature ( 800 °C), middle and lower crustal metamorphic assemblages, present day exposure of these terrains is not simply a result of protracted denudation, but also must reflect a multifaceted exhumational history. In situ analysis within thin section preserves the textural setting of target minerals that can be used as thermochronometers such as U-Pb of zircon, monazite, titanite and apatite, and Sm-Nd of apatite. In situ analyses of these chronometers has the potential to provide critical timing constraints on exhumation processes related to decompression, melting and cooling across large metamorphic terrains. The Repulse Bay block of the Rae craton preserves a large composite amphibolite-granulite area (50,000 km2) of Archean orthogneiss, migmatite, and slivers of Proterozoic metasediments that underwent high-grade metamorphism, partial melting, ductile flow and finally exhumation during the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogeny. The granulite domain preserves dry granitoid assemblages, whereas the amphibolite domain is dominated by hydrated migmatites and orthogneiss. Metasediments occur in both domains and preserve mineral assemblages that are consistent with having undergone tectonometamorphic conditions of 9 kbar/800 °C during burial. U-Pb thermochronometers document identical cooling histories of the granulite and amphibolite domains through the U-Pb closure temperatures of titanite ( 650 °C) and apatite ( 450 °C). This suggests that melt-loss from the underlying granulite domain and melt-gain to the amphibolite domain prior to cooling through 650 °C are a controlling factor of the metamorphic assemblages across the composite granulite-amphibolite terrains such as the Repulse Bay block, rather than significant differences in burial history, cooling history, and/or reorganization of

  14. Along-Strike Variations in Focal Mechanisms of Central Andean Crustal Earthquakes: Northern Peru through the Argentina Sierras Pampeanas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, S.; Isacks, B. L.

    2003-12-01

    120 shallow focal mechanisms in the crust above the subducted Nazca plate were assembled from the Harvard CMT catalog and published studies covering over 40 years of seismicity. The study area included the Andes crust above three major segments of the subducted plate, the Peruvian and Argentinean flat-slab segments and the intervening segment where the subducted Nazca plate dips more steeply. The most seismically active regions continue to be the thick-skinned foreland thrust belts in the eastern Andes of Peru and the Sierras Pampeanas. The earthquakes there are clearly associated with youthful tectonic structures with strong topographic signatures as revealed by the new 90 m SRTM digital elevation models. The mechanisms are dominantly of the thrust type but include a minority of strike-slip orientations. However the P axes remain consistent. The thin-skinned thrust belts east of the central Andean Plateau show significant activity only near Santa Cruz, Bolivia and northern Argentina; most of the Sub-Andean thrust belt of Bolivia and southern Peru remains aseismic. The central Andean plateau itself also remains aseismic except for the region of southern Peru and two earthquakes in the Puna. The crustal seismicity in southern Peru is largely concentrated on the western side of the plateau. The focal mechanisms show a strong grouping of T axes in a horizontal, north-south orientation. Both normal and strike-slip mechanisms occur in this region, with no obvious correlation with elevation or surface structures. Remarkably, with the exception of one normal fault type mechanism near the Cusco basin, the earthquakes occur in regions of the western parts of the Altiplano that do not exhibit topographic evidence of substantial crustal deformation. These results are consistent with a model in which the Altiplano of southern Peru, with a trend most oblique to the overall direction of convergence, manifests a left-lateral shearing component across the orogen.

  15. Diapir versus along-channel ascent of crustal material during plate convergence: Constrained by the thermal structure of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Qi; Li, Zhong-Hai; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2017-09-01

    Subduction channel processes are crucial for understanding the material and energy exchange between the Earth's crust and mantle. Crustal rocks can be subducted to mantle depths, interact with the mantle wedge, and then exhume to the crustal depth again, which is generally considered as the mechanism for the formation of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in nature. In addition, the crustal rocks generally undergo dehydration and melting at subarc depths, giving rise to fluids that metasomatize and weaken the overlying mantle wedge. There are generally two ways for the material ascent from subarc depths: one is along subduction channels; the other is through the mantle wedge by diapir. In order to study the conditions and dynamics of these contrasting material ascent modes, systematic petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models are constructed with variable thicknesses of the overriding and subducting continental plates, ages of the subducting oceanic plate, as well as the plate convergence rates. The model results suggest that the thermal structures of subduction zones control the thermal condition and fluid/melt activity at the slab-mantle interface in subcontinental subduction channels, which further strongly affect the material transportation and ascent mode. The thick overriding continental plate and the low-angle subduction style induced by young subducting oceanic plate both contribute to the formation of relatively cold subduction channels with strong overriding mantle wedge, where the along-channel exhumation occurs exclusively to result in the exhumation of HP-UHP metamorphic rocks. In contrast, the thin overriding lithosphere and the steep subduction style induced by old subducting oceanic plate are the favorable conditions for hot subduction channels, which lead to significant hydration and metasomatism, melting and weakening of the overriding mantle wedge and thus cause the ascent of mantle wedge-derived melts by diapir through the mantle wedge

  16. Crustal structure of and boundary between the AlCaPa and Tisza terrains in the Pannonian basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, György; Ren, Yong; Dando, Ben; Stuart, Graham W.; Houseman, Gregory A.

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the Pannonian Basin is strongly linked to that of the surrounding Alpine, Carpathian and Dinaric orogens. The eastward extrusion of Alpine-type basement that accompanied lithospheric thinning must have been accompanied by mantle downwelling and/or subduction along the Carpathians but the motive forces for these movements are debated. The internal structure of the crust within the basin is mostly covered by relatively recent sedimentary infill whose variable thickness further complicates seismic imaging. Palaeomagnetic and geological data have, however, shown that two tectonic terrains of distinct origin: AlCaPa and Tisza, occupy the basin's NW and SE part respectively. The two units have undergone different amounts of extension during opposite orientation rotations (counter-clockwise and clockwise, respectively). The boundary between these two units, known as the Mid-Hungarian Zone, is recognized as a major sinistral shear zone, geophysically clearly marked across the basin by a trough in Bouguer gravity. The Carpathian Basins Project deployed 49 broadband seismological stations perpendicular to the boundary between the AlCaPa and Tisza units. A NW-SE oriented swath of three lines covers a 450 km long and 75 km wide area. We use these and 4 permanent stations to image the crustal structure of and the boundary between AlCaPa and Tisza using the receiver function technique. The measured Moho depths show no significant change in crustal thickness between the two terrains, but the Moho is not or very weakly imaged along a ca. 40 km wide strip centred on the MHZ. Our Moho depths elsewhere in the basin agree with earlier controlled-source seismic results and recent shear-wave velocity models deduced from ambient noise analysis. The lack of a sharp Moho image beneath the MHZ implies that the crust-mantle boundary between AlCaPa and Tisza is not a sharp transition but rather a gradual increase in velocity with depth. The distinct low in gravity anomalies

  17. Crustal Structure of the Central Anatolia - Eastern Mediterrenean, Turkey and Cyprus from Wide-Angle Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denli, Alper; Gürbüz, Cemil; Mechie, James; Weber, Michael

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the CyprusArc project, a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction profiles were carried out in March 2010. The 300 km and 45 km long north-south trending profiles extended from Cihanbeyli in Central Anatolia to Anamur in eastern Mediterranean, Turkey and in southern Cyprus, respectively. The purpose of the project is to observe the impact of the transition from subduction to continent-continent collision of the African plate with the Anatolian plate. The field experiment comprised two land shots (1125 kg explosives) in Turkey and airguns (98 cubic liters) on the Mediterranean sea, beneath Cyprus. 244 stations were installed on land for data acquisition. 77 three-component sensors and 167 vertical-component sensors were installed along ~300 km distances between Cihanbeyli and Anamur with an average spacing of 1.25 km, on Turkey. 24 three-component sensors and 21 vertical component sensors were deployed along 45 km distances on land at southern Cyprus with an average spacing of 1.25 km. To reveal a good data quality, a visual quality check, frequency analysis and filtering were applied to the seismic data. Two land shots on Turkey (also recorded on Cyprus) and airgun shots on the Mediterranean sea beneath Cyprus, geological and previous seismic investigations provide information to derive a layered velocity models beneath from the Anatolian plateau to eastern Mediterranean, Turkey and for the ophiolite complex on Cyprus. After picking observed seismic phases, finite-differences ray tracing of the wide-angle data leads a 2-D crustal P-wave velocity models. The results show moho depth increases from 38 km to 45 km depth along north-south trending profile on Turkey and crustal thinning between south Turkey and Cyprus from 40 km to 36 km. Obtained models were further refined using forward modeling to generate synthetic seismograms for individual shot gathers. Thus, by varying the velocity structure, the theoretical times and amplitudes of the various

  18. Crustal uplift of the Precambrian cratons due to metamorphism in crustal rocks under infiltration of mantle fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyushkov, Eugene; Chekhovich, Peter; Korikovsky, Sergey; Massonne, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Precambrian cratons cover about 70% of the total area of the continents. During the last several million years cratonic areas underwent rapid uplift, from 100-200 m in East Europe to 1000-1500 m Southern Africa. Shortening of the Precambrian crust terminated half a billion years ago or earlier and this popular mechanism cannot be applied to its recent uplift. Large thickness of cratonic mantle lithosphere, 100-200 km in most regions, together with its low density precludes delamination of this layer and magmatic underplating as possible causes of recent uplift. It cannot be precluded that in some cratonic regions recent uplift occurred due to delamination of the lower part of mantle lithosphere with the density increased by metasomatism. Even a small uplift of ≥ 100-200 m would require delamination of a thick layer of mantle lithosphere. As a result a temperature drop of > 200 C would arise at the base of the lithosphere producing a shear wave velocities drop of > 2%. According to the seismic tomography data such a drop in VS is observed only in some regions with the Precambrian lithosphere, e.g., in Northeastern Africa. Spatial distribution of the Precambrian cratons is quite different from that predicted by the main models of dynamic topography in the mantle. Moreover, many uplifted blocks are bounded by steep slopes hundreds of meters to one kilometer high and only tens of kilometers wide. Such slopes could not have been formed by bending of thick cratonic lithosphere under the forces acting from below. Their recent formation indicates rock expansion within the crust at shallow depth comparable with the slope width. Rocks formed at the pressure P ˜ 0.5-1.0 GPa are widespread on the Precambrian cratons. This indicates that during their lifetime a layer of rocks ˜ 15-30 km thick has been removed from the crustal surface by denudation. As a result rocks which were initially located in the lower crust emerged to the middle or upper crust. Due to metamorphic

  19. Domains in Ferroic Crystals and Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Tagantsev, Alexander K; Fousek, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Domains in Ferroic Crystals and Thin Films presents experimental findings and theoretical understanding of ferroic (non-magnetic) domains developed during the past 60 years. It addresses the situation by looking specifically at bulk crystals and thin films, with a particular focus on recently-developed microelectronic applications and methods for observation of domains with techniques such as scanning force microscopy, polarized light microscopy, scanning optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and surface decorating techniques. Domains in Ferroic Crystals and Thin Films covers a large area of material properties and effects connected with static and dynamic properties of domains, which are extremely relevant to materials referred to as ferroics. In most solid state physics books, one large group of ferroics is customarily covered: those in which magnetic properties play a dominant role. Numerous books are specifically devoted to magnetic ferroics and cover a wide spectrum of magnetic domain phenomena. In co...

  20. Electrons on closed field lines of lunar crustal fields in the solar wind wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Saito, Yoshifumi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Harada, Yuki; Yokota, Shoichiro; Matsushima, Masaki; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi

    2015-04-01

    Plasma signature around crustal magnetic fields is one of the most important topics of the lunar plasma sciences. Although recent spacecraft measurements are revealing solar-wind interaction with the lunar crustal fields on the dayside, plasma signatures around crustal fields on the night side have not been fully studied yet. Here we show evidence of plasma trapping on the closed field lines of the lunar crustal fields in the solar-wind wake, using SELENE (Kaguya) plasma and magnetic field data obtained at 14-15 km altitude from the lunar surface. In contrast to expectation on plasma cavity formation at the strong crustal fields, electron flux is enhanced above Crisium Antipode (CA) anomaly which is one of the strongest lunar crustal fields. The enhanced electron fluxes above CA are characterised by (1) occasional bi-directional field-aligned beams in the lower energy range (<150 eV) and (2) a medium energy component (150-300 eV) that has a double loss-cone distribution representing bounce motion between the two footprints of the crustal magnetic fields. The low-energy electrons on the closed field lines may come from the lunar night side surface, while supply mechanism of medium-energy electrons on the closed field line remains to be solved. We also report that a density cavity in the wake is observed not above the strongest magnetic field but in its vicinity.

  1. Crustal structure of Nigeria and Southern Ghana, West Africa from P-wave receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Ofonime; Nyblade, Andrew; Okereke, Chiedu; Oden, Michael; Emry, Erica; Julià, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    We report new estimates of crustal thickness (Moho depth), Poisson's ratio and shear-wave velocities for eleven broadband seismological stations in Nigeria and Ghana. Data used for this study came from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at epicentral distances between 30° and 95° and with moment magnitudes greater than or equal to 5.5. P-wave receiver functions were modeled using the Moho Ps arrival times, H-k stacking, and joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities. The average crustal thickness of the stations in the Neoproterozoic basement complex of Nigeria is 36 km, and 23 km for the stations in the Cretaceous Benue Trough. The crustal structure of the Paleoproterozoic Birimian Terrain, and Neoproterozoic Dahomeyan Terrain and Togo Structural Unit in southern Ghana is similar, with an average Moho depth of 44 km. Poisson's ratios for all the stations range from 0.24 to 0.26, indicating a bulk felsic to intermediate crustal composition. The crustal structure of the basement complex in Nigeria is similar to the average crustal structure of Neoproterozoic terrains in other parts of Africa, but the two Neoproterozoic terrains in southern Ghana have a thicker crust with a thick mafic lower crust, ranging in thickness from 12 to 17 km. Both the thicker crust and thick mafic lower crustal section are consistent with many Precambrian suture zones, and thus we suggest that both features are relict from the collisional event during the formation of Gondwana.

  2. Basins and the South Polar Terrain of Enceladus: Hotspots vs. Coldspots, and More Evidence for Crustal Spreading and Convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, P. M.

    2009-09-01

    Stereo-derived topographic mapping of 50% of Enceladus reveals at least 6 large-scale, ovoid depressions (basins) 90-175 km across and 800-to-1500 m deep and uncorrelated with geologic boundaries (Schenk and McKinnon, GRL, in press). Their shape and scale are inconsistent with impact, geoid deflection, or with dynamically supported topography. Isostatic thinning of Enceladus’ ice shell associated with upwellings (and tidally-driven ice melting) can plausibly account for the basins. Thinning implies upwarping of the base of the shell of 10-20 km beneath the depressions, depending on total shell thickness; loss of near-surface porosity due to enhanced heat flow may also contribute to basin lows. Alternatively, the basins may overly cold, inactive, and hence denser ice, but thermal isostasy alone requires thermal expansion more consistent with clathrate hydrate than water ice. In contrast to the basins, the south polar depression (SPD) is larger ( 350 wide) and shallower ( 0.4-to-0.8 km deep) and correlates with the area of tectonic deformation and active resurfacing. The SPD also differs in that the floor is relatively flat (i.e., conforms roughly to the global triaxial shape, or geoid) with broad, gently sloping flanks. The relative flatness across the SPD suggests that it is in or near isostatic equilibrium, and underlain by denser material, supporting the polar sea hypothesis of Collins and Goodman [2007]. Near flatness is also predicted by a crustal spreading origin for the "tiger stripes” [e.g., Barr, 2008]; the extraordinary, high CIRS heat flows imply half-spreading rates in excess of 10 cm/yr, a very young surface age ( 250,000 yr), and a rather thin lithosphere (hence modest thermal topography). Topographic rises in places along the outer margin of the SPD correlate with parallel ridges and deformation along the edge of the resurfaced terrain, consistent with a compressional, imbricate thrust origin for these ridges, driven by the spreading.

  3. Extreme Programming Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chromatic

    2003-01-01

    Extreme Programming (XP) is a radical new approach to software development that has been accepted quickly because its core practices--the need for constant testing, programming in pairs, inviting customer input, and the communal ownership of code--resonate with developers everywhere. Although many developers feel that XP is rooted in commonsense, its vastly different approach can bring challenges, frustrations, and constant demands on your patience. Unless you've got unlimited time (and who does these days?), you can't always stop to thumb through hundreds of pages to find the piece of info

  4. Mycetoma of lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahariah S

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten cases of mycetoma of the lower extremity were seen and treated at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India, during the years 1973 to 1975. Six were treated by conservative method e.g. antibiotics, sulfonamides and immobilization of the part while remaining four were submitted t o surgery. Four out o f six from the first group had recurrence and has been put on second line of therapy. Recurrence occurred in only one case from the second group and he required an above knee amputation while the remaining three are free of disease and are well rehabilitated.

  5. Metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, D A; Ramond, J-B; Makhalanyane, T P; De Maayer, P

    2015-06-01

    Whether they are exposed to extremes of heat or cold, or buried deep beneath the Earth's surface, microorganisms have an uncanny ability to survive under these conditions. This ability to survive has fascinated scientists for nearly a century, but the recent development of metagenomics and 'omics' tools has allowed us to make huge leaps in understanding the remarkable complexity and versatility of extremophile communities. Here, in the context of the recently developed metagenomic tools, we discuss recent research on the community composition, adaptive strategies and biological functions of extremophiles.

  6. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  7. Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ...

  8. Thin film processes II

    CERN Document Server

    Kern, Werner

    1991-01-01

    This sequel to the 1978 classic, Thin Film Processes, gives a clear, practical exposition of important thin film deposition and etching processes that have not yet been adequately reviewed. It discusses selected processes in tutorial overviews with implementation guide lines and an introduction to the literature. Though edited to stand alone, when taken together, Thin Film Processes II and its predecessor present a thorough grounding in modern thin film techniques.Key Features* Provides an all-new sequel to the 1978 classic, Thin Film Processes* Introduces new topics, and sever

  9. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  10. Deformation of Granulite at 1-2 GPa: Implications for Deep Crustal Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H. W.; Zhang, J.

    2006-12-01

    The eclogitic pseudotachylytes from western Norway demonstrate unambiguously that faulting took place in deep-seated lower crustal rock °C dry granulite, perhaps at pressures approaching 3 GPa. However, the corresponding faulting mechanism remains unclear. It is questionable whether earthquakes can occur by unassisted brittle shear fracture or frictional sliding at such depths, a fluid source is prerequisite for dehydration embrittlement and the transformation-induced faulting mechanism can only operate during polymorphic phase changes with a significant ΔV. Runaway shear heating is also problematic due to lack of evidence of large strains or rapid strain rates in the granulite. Therefore, all these potential high- pressure faulting mechanisms are unlikely to operate alone in the dry Norwegian granulites. We have conducted preliminary deformation experiments on synthetic granulite (+/- added serpentinite for fault trigger) prepared from Norway granulite kindly provided by T. M. Boundy. Rheological experiments on granulite alone show plastic flow with very high strength within and outside its stability field; no evidence was found for a faulting instability. The eclogitization process is extremely sluggish within the dry experimental samples. Most permanent strain is partitioned into feldspar; pyroxene and garnet remain almost rigid. In contrast, experiments with a short specimen of serpentinite on top of a short specimen of granulite showed that faults generated in serpentinite by dehydration propagated into granulite. The fault zones consist of fine- grained (< 1 μm) angular fragments likely to be eclogitic phase transformation products together with water. Based upon such observations, we hypothesize that pseudotachylyte formation occurs during deceleration of fault propagation rather than during acceleration as is generally assumed. Such hypothesis also has potentially important implications for fault propagation into otherwise stable materials at great

  11. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  12. The effects of magmatic processes and crustal recycling on the molybdenum stable isotopic composition of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezard, Rachel; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Hamelin, Cédric; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Kleine, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) stable isotopes hold great potential to investigate the processes involved in planetary formation and differentiation. However their use is currently hampered by the lack of understanding of the dominant controls driving mass-dependent fractionations at high temperature. Here we investigate the role of magmatic processes and mantle source heterogeneities on the Mo isotope composition of Mid-Ocean Ridges Basalts (MORBs) using samples from two contrasting ridge segments: (1) the extremely fast spreading Pacific-Antarctic (66-41°S) section devoid of plume influence and; (2) the slow spreading Mohns-Knipovich segment (77-71°N) intercepted by the Jan Mayen Plume (71°N). We show that significant variations in Mo stable isotope composition exist in MORBs with δ98/95Mo ranging from - 0.24 ‰ to + 0.15 ‰ (relative to NIST SRM3134). The absence of correlation between δ98/95Mo and indices of magma differentiation or partial melting suggests a negligible impact of these processes on the isotopic variations observed. On the other hand, the δ98/95Mo variations seem to be associated with changes in radiogenic isotope signatures and rare earth element ratios (e.g., (La/Sm)N), suggesting mantle source heterogeneities as a dominant factor for the δ98/95Mo variations amongst MORBs. The heaviest Mo isotope compositions correspond to the most enriched signatures, suggesting that recycled crustal components are isotopically heavy compared to the uncontaminated depleted mantle. The uncontaminated depleted mantle shows slightly sub-chondritic δ98/95Mo, which cannot be produced by core formation and, therefore, more likely result from extensive anterior partial melting of the mantle. Consequently, the primitive δ98/95Mo composition of the depleted mantle appears overprinted by the effects of both partial melting and crustal recycling.

  13. Structural extremes in a cretaceous dinosaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, Paul C; Wilson, Jeffrey A; Witmer, Lawrence M; Whitlock, John A; Maga, Abdoulaye; Ide, Oumarou; Rowe, Timothy A

    2007-11-21

    Fossils of the Early Cretaceous dinosaur, Nigersaurus taqueti, document for the first time the cranial anatomy of a rebbachisaurid sauropod. Its extreme adaptations for herbivory at ground-level challenge current hypotheses regarding feeding function and feeding strategy among diplodocoids, the larger clade of sauropods that includes Nigersaurus. We used high resolution computed tomography, stereolithography, and standard molding and casting techniques to reassemble the extremely fragile skull. Computed tomography also allowed us to render the first endocast for a sauropod preserving portions of the olfactory bulbs, cerebrum and inner ear, the latter permitting us to establish habitual head posture. To elucidate evidence of tooth wear and tooth replacement rate, we used photographic-casting techniques and crown thin sections, respectively. To reconstruct its 9-meter postcranial skeleton, we combined and size-adjusted multiple partial skeletons. Finally, we used maximum parsimony algorithms on character data to obtain the best estimate of phylogenetic relationships among diplodocoid sauropods. Nigersaurus taqueti shows extreme adaptations for a dinosaurian herbivore including a skull of extremely light construction, tooth batteries located at the distal end of the jaws, tooth replacement as fast as one per month, an expanded muzzle that faces directly toward the ground, and hollow presacral vertebral centra with more air sac space than bone by volume. A cranial endocast provides the first reasonably complete view of a sauropod brain including its small olfactory bulbs and cerebrum. Skeletal and dental evidence suggests that Nigersaurus was a ground-level herbivore that gathered and sliced relatively soft vegetation, the culmination of a low-browsing feeding strategy first established among diplodocoids during the Jurassic.

  14. Structural extremes in a cretaceous dinosaur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Sereno

    Full Text Available Fossils of the Early Cretaceous dinosaur, Nigersaurus taqueti, document for the first time the cranial anatomy of a rebbachisaurid sauropod. Its extreme adaptations for herbivory at ground-level challenge current hypotheses regarding feeding function and feeding strategy among diplodocoids, the larger clade of sauropods that includes Nigersaurus. We used high resolution computed tomography, stereolithography, and standard molding and casting techniques to reassemble the extremely fragile skull. Computed tomography also allowed us to render the first endocast for a sauropod preserving portions of the olfactory bulbs, cerebrum and inner ear, the latter permitting us to establish habitual head posture. To elucidate evidence of tooth wear and tooth replacement rate, we used photographic-casting techniques and crown thin sections, respectively. To reconstruct its 9-meter postcranial skeleton, we combined and size-adjusted multiple partial skeletons. Finally, we used maximum parsimony algorithms on character data to obtain the best estimate of phylogenetic relationships among diplodocoid sauropods. Nigersaurus taqueti shows extreme adaptations for a dinosaurian herbivore including a skull of extremely light construction, tooth batteries located at the distal end of the jaws, tooth replacement as fast as one per month, an expanded muzzle that faces directly toward the ground, and hollow presacral vertebral centra with more air sac space than bone by volume. A cranial endocast provides the first reasonably complete view of a sauropod brain including its small olfactory bulbs and cerebrum. Skeletal and dental evidence suggests that Nigersaurus was a ground-level herbivore that gathered and sliced relatively soft vegetation, the culmination of a low-browsing feeding strategy first established among diplodocoids during the Jurassic.

  15. Fluvial archives, a valuable record of vertical crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, A.; Mather, A.; Whittaker, A.

    2017-06-01

    The study of drainage network response to uplift is important not only for understanding river system dynamics and associated channel properties and fluvial landforms, but also for identifying the nature of crustal deformation and its history. In recent decades, geomorphic analysis of rivers has proved powerful in elucidating the tectonic evolution of actively uplifting and eroding orogens. Here, we review the main recent developments that have improved and expanded qualitative and quantitative information about vertical tectonic motions (the effects of horizontal deformation are not addressed). Channel long profiles have received considerable attention in the literature, and we briefly introduce basic aspects of the behaviour of bedrock rivers from field and numerical modelling perspectives, before describing the various metrics that have been proposed to identify the information on crustal deformation contained within their steady-state characteristics. Then, we review the literature dealing with the transient response of rivers to tectonic perturbation, through the production of knickpoints propagating through the drainage network. Inverse modelling of river profiles for uplift in time and space is also shown to be very effective in reconstructing regional tectonic histories. Finally, we present a synthetic morphometric approach for deducing the tectonic record of fluvial landscapes. As well as the erosional imprint of tectonic forcing, sedimentary deposits, such as fluvial terrace staircases, are also considered as a classical component of tectonic geomorphology. We show that these studies have recently benefited from rapid advances in dating techniques, allowing more reliable reconstruction of incision histories and estimation of incision rates. The combination of progress in the understanding of transient river profiles and larger, more rigorous data sets of terrace ages has led to improved understanding of river erosion and the implications for terrace

  16. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  17. Deep crustal reflections from a Vibroseis survey in northern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, P.; Ansorge, J.; Mueller, St.; Sprecher, Chr.

    1984-10-01

    In 1982 a Vibroseis survey comprising 180 km of reflection profiles was run in northern Switzerland in order to investigate the suitability of the crystalline basement for the deposition of highly radioactive waste. A configuration was chosen with 144 channels, 25 m of geophone spacing, 20 s sweeps ranging from 11 to 61 Hz and stacking of 4 or 8 sweeps of 3 simultaneous vibrators at twice the geophone spacing. The listening time was generally 4 s and at 4 sites it was extended to 11s for the detection of deeper crustal reflectors. This survey unravelled the complicated fault and thrust system beneath the Swiss folded Jura mountains. The stack from 4 s to 11 s reveals clearly a strong sloping reflector between 3.0 and 3.5 s which is strong evidence for a pronounced differentiation in the upper crust. A series of reflections is observed between 5.8 and 7.2 s the top of which can be correlated with the Conrad discontinuity. A strong "layered" signal between 9.0 and 9.5 s is interpreted as reflections from the M-discontinuity. The main features are compatible with results from nearby refraction surveys in the southern Rhinegraben rift system which show a distinct velocity increase of about 0.5 km/s in the lower crust at a depth ranging from 15 to 20 km, followed by an inversion zone or a laminated structure before reaching the Moho at about 27 km depth. The correlation of the field recordings with the first 10 s of the up-sweep only, shows some loss of resolution in the uppermost 3 s because of the lower frequency content of the signal. However, the lower parts of the sections are nearly identical. The fact that the deeper reflectors in the sections can consistently be traced laterally is a strong argument for using this processing technique. Thus high-coverage Vibroseis surveys utilizing up-sweep can be processed for deep crustal reflections even if the recording time is restricted to the standard 4 s, provided the surface static corrections are carried out with high

  18. Crustal and deep seismicity in Italy (30 years after

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Selvaggi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The first modern studies of seismicity in Italy date back to the late 60's and early 70's. Although with a sparse seismic network available and only a few telemetered short-period stations, significant studies were carried out that outlined the main features of Italian seismicity (see, e.g., Boschi et al., 1969. Among these studies, one of the most important achievements was the reconnaissance of a Wadati-Benioff zone in Southern Tyrrhenian, described for the first time in detail in the papers of Caputo et al.(1970, 1973. Today, after three decades of more and more detailed seismological monitoring of the Italian region and tens of thousands earthquakes located since then, the knowledge of the earthquake generation processes in our country is much improved, although some of the conclusions reached in these early papers still hold. These improvements were made possible by the efforts of many institutions and seismologists who have been working hard to bring seismological research in Italy to standards of absolute quality, under the pivoting role of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING. From the relocation of about 30000 crustal earthquakes and detailed studies on intermediate and deep shocks carried out in the last few years, we show that seismic release in peninsular Italy is only weakly related to the Africa-Eurasia convergence, but rather is best explained by the existence of two separate subduction/collision arcs (Northern Apennines and Southern Apennines-Calabria-Sicily. The width of the deforming belt running along peninsular Italy is 30 to 60 km, it is broader in the north than in the south, and the two arcs are separated by a region of more distributed deformation and stress rotations in the Central Apennines. Along the belt, the reconnaissance of regions of continuous and weak release of seismic energy, adjacent to fault areas which are currently «locked» (and therefore are the best candidates for future earthquakes is another

  19. Crustal structure of the Nordland region, northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystrenko, Yuriy P.; Olesen, Odleiv; Gernigon, Laurent; Gradmann, Sofie

    2016-04-01

    To understand the major structural features of the sedimentary cover and crystalline crust within the Nordland County area of Norway, a data-based 3D structural model has been constructed in the framework of the Neonor2 project, "Neotectonics in Nordland - implications for petroleum exploration". The 3D structural model covers the Lofoten Ridge, the Ribban and Vestfjorden basins and adjacent areas of the Norwegian mainland. The model also covers the northern part of the adjacent Vøring Basin. At the regional scale, the 3D model includes the rifted margin which is located at the transition from the exposed crystalline rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield in the east to the Cenozoic oceanic domain of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea in the west. During the construction of the 3D structural model, all recently published and/or released data have been compiled in order to set the initial model. This initial 3D model has been validated by a 3D density modelling in order to obtain a gravity-consistent 3D structural model of the entire study area. The 3D density modelling has been carried out by using the IGMAS plus software (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). During the 3D density modelling, densities have been assigned as constant values for the crystalline rocks. In contrast, densities of sedimentary rocks have been set to be depth-dependent in order to reflect the compaction of sedimentary rocks with depth. According to the results of the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the investigated region consists of several layers with different densities. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crust which corresponds to the high-velocity lower crustal layer. The regional-scale gravity response associated with the positions of the Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is one of the key factors for performing a proper 3D density model of the study area. At the regional scale, the Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary are

  20. 3D gravity modelling reveals off-axis crustal thickness variations along the western Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita C.; Jokat, Wilfried

    2016-11-01

    Near-orthogonal ultra-slow (13.3 mm yr- 1 to 6.5 mm yr- 1) sea floor spreading in the absence of large transform faults make the Arctic Gakkel Ridge ideally suited for the study of magmatic processes. To enable this, we generated a three-dimensional gravity model of crustal thickness over the ridge and parts of the adjacent Nansen and Amundsen basins west of 65° E. The model shows that oceanic crust accreted prior to chrons C5/C6 is generally very thin (1-3 km). Magnetic anomalies over this thin crust are highly variable both parallel and perpendicular to the ridge axis. This is the result of amagmatic or weakly volcanic spreading that started with the opening of the basins 56 Ma ago. The separation of Greenland from Svalbard at chron C5/C6 led to the inflow of North Atlantic mantle into the western Eurasia Basin leading to a change in the mantle convection system and the establishment of a magmatic dichotomy along the Gakkel Ridge. Robust magmatism was established in the Western Volcanic Zone (6° 30‧ W-3° 30‧ E), leading to creation of a 6.6 km thick igneous crust, characterized by a strong positive axial magnetic anomaly, numerous volcanic cones, and widespread thick mid-ocean ridge basalts. The transition to the neighbouring Sparsely Magmatic (3° 30‧ E-29° E) and Eastern Volcanic (29° E-85° E) zones is sharp. Peridotites cover the central valley and the inner rift flanks, the central magnetic anomaly vanishes and crustal thickness decreases to 1-4 km. Transverse basement ridges, extending for as much as 100 km into the adjacent basins, intersect the central valley. Although partly of tectonic origin, the transverse ridges are also an expression of long-living magmatic centres, as revealed by increased magnetic anomaly intensities and local thickening of the crust to values as great as 5.9 km.

  1. Development of Thin Film Ceramic Thermocouples for High Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    The maximum use temperature of noble metal thin film thermocouples of 1100 C (2000 F) may not be adequate for use on components in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next generation launch technology. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically found in the form of rods or probes. NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of ceramics as thin film thermocouples for extremely high temperature applications to take advantage of the stability and robustness of ceramics and the non-intrusiveness of thin films. This paper will discuss the current state of development in this effort.

  2. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    CERN Document Server

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  3. "Triangular" extremal dilatonic dyons

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'tsov, Dmitri; Orlov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    Explicit dyonic dilaton black holes of the four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory are known only for two particular values of the dilaton coupling constant $a =1,\\sqrt{3}$, while for other $a$ numerical evidence was presented earlier about existence of extremal dyons in theories with the discrete sequence of dilaton couplings $a=\\sqrt{n(n+1)/2}$ with integer $n$. Apart from the lower members $n=1,\\,2$, this family of theories does not have motivation from supersymmetry or higher dimensions, and so far the above quantization rule has not been derived analytically. We fill this gap showing that this rule follows from analyticity of the dilaton at the $AdS_2\\times S^2$ event horizon with $n$ being the leading dilaton power in the series expansion. We also present generalization for asymptotically anti-de Sitter dyonic black holes with spherical, plane and hyperbolic topology of the horizon.

  4. Extreme skin depth waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Jahani, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a paradigm shift in light confinement strategy and introduced a class of extreme skin depth (e-skid) photonic structures (S. Jahani and Z. Jacob, "Transparent sub-diffraction optics: nanoscale light confinement without metal," Optica 1, 96-100 (2014)). Here, we analytically establish that figures of merit related to light confinement in dielectric waveguides are fundamentally tied to the skin depth of waves in the cladding. We contrast the propagation characteristics of the fundamental mode of e-skid waveguides and conventional waveguides to show that the decay constant in the cladding is dramatically larger in e-skid waveguides, which is the origin of sub-diffraction confinement. Finally, we propose an approach to verify the reduced skin depth in experiment using the decrease in the Goos-H\\"anchen phase shift.

  5. Pulsars and Extreme Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Burnell, Jocelyn

    2004-10-01

    Pulsars were discovered 35 years ago. What do we know about them now, and what have they taught us about the extremes of physics? With an average density comparable to that of the nucleus, magnetic fields around 108 T and speeds close to c these objects have stretched our understanding of the behaviour of matter. They serve as extrememly accurate clocks with which to carry out precision experiments in relativity. Created in cataclysmic explosions, pulsars are a (stellar) form of life after death. After half a billion revolutions most pulsars finally die, but amazingly some are born again to yet another, even weirder, afterlife. Pulsar research continues lively, delivering exciting, startling and almost unbelievable results!

  6. JERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Applications: Mapping of Rain Forest Environments and Crustal Deformation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P.; Hensley, S.; Peltzer, G.; Rignot, E.; Werner, C.

    1999-01-01

    This research using JERS-1 SAR data has been very fruitful, resulting in a strong collaboration with geodesists and geophysicists in Japan, and several important papers characterizing crustal deformation, and the capabilities and limitations of JERS data for these studies.

  7. A New System for Understanding Mid-crustal Sheeted Complexes in a Tilted Crustal Section, Joshua Tree National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianno, A. J.; Paterson, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    The western portion of Joshua Tree National Park exposes a tilted crustal section through continental arc crust from 0-30 km. A significant portion of the middle crust is represented by Mesozoic, tabular, intrusive, igneous bodies ranging from 0.1 to 100 m in thickness. While these igneous bodies range in composition (gabbro to peraluminous granites), texture (equigranular to porphyritic), and grain size (very fine to coarse), patterns emerge between different regions of "sheeted complexes" that may be related to their emplacement and geochemical history. No consistent method of describing and comparing sheeted complexes exists in the literature, so we have developed a method of classifying sheeted complexes at Joshua Tree NP, which may be broadly applicable to all sheeted bodies. We classify these sheeted complexes using the terms homogeneous/heterogeneous and focused/defocused. A homogeneous sheeted complex generally contains magmas within a 10 wt% SiO2 range, although we are still testing the validity of this number. A focused sheeted complex has adjacent sheets or close spacing between sheets and Jurassic to Cretaceous sheeted complexes in western Joshua Tree NP. At Keys View, we observe a heterogeneous, spatially focused sheeted complex with 0.1-2 m thick sheets recording pressures indicating 15-22 km depth from top to bottom. Compositions range from gabbro to peraluminous granite, although tonalites-granodiorites and two-mica garnet granites are volumetrically dominant. A zone of elongate plutons (in map view) lying structurally above this could potentially be considered as a very thickly sheeted, homogeneous, focused sheeted complex and is composed of granodiorites, granites, and two-mica garnet granites. A more thickly sheeted (2-10 m), homogeneous, focused, sheeted granite complex with pressures indicating a depth of approximately 12 km is found along the northern edge of the park. The number of sheets decreases and the average thickness increases as this

  8. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3∘S and 11∘S, Indian Ocean: Segmentation and crustal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Kiranmai; Kamesh Raju, K. A.; Rao, P. Rama

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a 750 km long section of the Central Indian Ridge between 3 ∘S and 11 ∘S have been analysed to understand the crustal structure and the ridge segmentation pattern. The mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA) and the residual mantle Bouguer anomalies (RMBA) computed in the study area have shown significant variations along the ridge segments that are separated by transform and non-transform discontinuities. The MBA lows observed over the linear ridge segments bounded by well-defined transform faults are attributed to the thickening of the crust at the middle portions of the ridge segments. The estimates of crustal thickness from the RMBA shows an average of 5.2 km thick crust in the axial part of the ridge segments. The MBA and relative RMBA highs along the two non-transform discontinuities suggests a thinner crust of up to 4.0 km. The most significant MBA and RMBA highs were observed over the Vema transform fault suggesting thin crust of 4 km in the deepest part of the transform fault where bathymetry is more than 6000 m. The identified megamullion structures have relative MBA highs suggesting thinner crust. Besides MBA lows along the ridge axis, significant off-axis MBA lows have been noticed, suggesting off-axis mantle upwelling zones indicative of thickening of the crust. The rift valley morphology varies from the typical V-shaped valley to the shallow valley floor with undulations on the inner valley floor. Segments with shallow rift valley floor have depicted well-defined circular MBA lows with persistent RMBA low, suggesting modulation of the valley floor morphology due to the variations in crustal thickness and the mantle temperature. These are supported by thicker crust and weaker lithospheric mantle.

  9. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S, Indian Ocean: Segmentation and crustal structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiranmai Samudrala; K A Kamesh Raju; P Rama Rao

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a 750 km long section of the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S have been analysed to understand the crustal structure and the ridge segmentation pattern. The mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA) and the residual mantle Bouguer anomalies (RMBA) computed in the study area have shown significant variations along the ridge segments that are separated by transform and non-transform discontinuities. The MBA lows observed over the linear ridge segments bounded by well-defined transform faults are attributed to the thickening of the crust at the middle portions of the ridge segments. The estimates of crustal thickness from the RMBA shows an average of 5.2 km thick crust in the axial part of the ridge segments. The MBA and relative RMBA highs along the two nontransform discontinuities suggests a thinner crust of up to 4.0 km. The most significant MBA and RMBA highs were observed over the Vema transform fault suggesting thin crust of 4 km in the deepest part of the transform fault where bathymetry is more than 6000 m. The identified megamullion structures have relative MBA highs suggesting thinner crust. Besides MBA lows along the ridge axis, significant off-axis MBA lows have been noticed, suggesting off-axis mantle upwelling zones indicative of thickening of the crust. The rift valley morphology varies from the typical V-shaped valley to the shallow valley floor with undulations on the inner valley floor. Segments with shallow rift valley floor have depicted well-defined circular MBA lows with persistent RMBA low, suggesting modulation of the valley floor morphology due to the variations in crustal thickness and the mantle temperature. These are supported by thicker crust and weaker lithospheric mantle.

  10. Crustal structure and kinematics of the TAMMAR propagating rift system on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from seismic refraction and satellite altimetry gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Richard L.; Tilmann, Frederik; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The TAMMAR segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge forms a classic propagating system centred about two degrees south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The segment is propagating to the south at a rate of 14 mm yr-1, 15 per cent faster than the half-spreading rate. Here, we use seismic refraction data across the propagating rift, sheared zone and failed rift to investigate the crustal structure of the system. Inversion of the seismic data agrees remarkably well with crustal thicknesses determined from gravity modelling. We show that the crust is thickened beneath the highly magmatic propagating rift, reaching a maximum thickness of almost 8 km along the seismic line and an inferred (from gravity) thickness of about 9 km at its centre. In contrast, the crust in the sheared zone is mostly 4.5-6.5 km thick, averaging over 1 km thinner than normal oceanic crust, and reaching a minimum thickness of only 3.5 km in its NW corner. Along the seismic line, it reaches a minimum thickness of under 5 km. The PmP reflection beneath the sheared zone and failed rift is very weak or absent, suggesting serpentinisation beneath the Moho, and thus effective transport of water through the sheared zone crust. We ascribe this increased porosity in the sheared zone to extensive fracturing and faulting during deformation. We show that a bookshelf-faulting kinematic model predicts significantly more crustal thinning than is observed, suggesting that an additional mechanism of deformation is required. We therefore propose that deformation is partitioned between bookshelf faulting and simple shear, with no more than 60 per cent taken up by bookshelf faulting.

  11. Reflection Character of the Continental Lithosphere and Crustal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Reflection images represent the high-frequency end member of the suite of seismological tools commonly used to probe the lithosphere. The global inventory of deep reflection profiles has documented reflection characters as varied as the surface geology that provides the primary boundary condition for the interpretation of reflection images. Past reviews of reflection results have stressed similarities in reflection patterns between various geographic regions and attempted to associate these patterns with specific tectonic processes. Examples include: laminated sequences (shear fabrics formed during extension or collision), reflective Mohos (mafic underplating), bright spots (contemporary and fossil magma bodies), dipping mantle reflections rooted in the lower crust (fossil subduction zones) and subhorizontal mantle reflections (phase changes in the lower lithosphere). Here I focus on relating reflection character to the inversion and/or interpretation of results from broadband techniques such as receiver functions, body wave and surface wave tomography. Among the underappreciated aspects of reflectivity are its dependence upon density as well as velocity, and the limitations of 2D images in a 3D world. A core consideration is the need to meaningfully relate integrated physical properties (e.g. velocity inferred from refraction and surface wave measurements) with the differential physical properties (e.g. reflection coefficients) to which reflection images are primarily sensitive. Examples from Tibet and Eurasia are used to illustrate examples of successful integration of controlled (active) and natural (passive) source observations to constrain models of crustal evolution.

  12. Crustal and tectonic controls on large-explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Tom; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying the frequency-Magnitude (f-M) relationship for volcanic eruptions is important to estimate volcanic hazard. Furthermore, understanding how this relationship varies between different groups of volcanoes can provide insights into the processes that control the size and rate of volcanic events. Using a Bayesian framework, which allows us to conceptualise the volcanic record as a series of individual and unique time series, associated by a common group behaviour, we identify variations in the size and rate of volcanism in different volcanic arcs. These variations in behaviour are linked to key parameters that include the motion of subduction, rate of subduction, age of the slab and thickness of the crust. The effects of these parameters on volcanism are interpreted in terms of variations in mantle productivity and the thermal efficiency of magma transfer in arc crustal systems. Understanding the link between subduction architecture, heat content of magmatic systems, and volcanic activity will serve to improve our capacity to quantify volcanic hazard in regions with limited geological and historical records of volcanic activity.

  13. Investigation of upper crustal structure beneath eastern Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Cummnins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Masturyono

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of geology structure in eastern Java causes this region has many potential resources as much as the disasters. Therefore, the East Java province represents an interesting area to be explored, especially regarding its upper crustal structure. To investigate this structure, we employ the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method. We have used seismic waveform data from 25 Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) stationary seismographic stations and 26 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. Inter-station cross-correlation produces more than 800 Rayleigh wave components, which depict the structure beneath eastern Java. Based on the checkerboard resolution test, we found that the optimal grid size is 0.25ox0.25o. Our inversion results for the periods of 1 to 10 s indicate a good agreement with geological and Bouguer anomaly maps. Rembang high depression, most of the southern mountains zone, the northern part of Rembang zone and the central part of the Madura Island, the area of high gravity anomaly and areas dominated with igneous rocks are associated with high velocity zones. On the other hand, Kendeng zone and most of the basin in the Rembang zone are associated with low velocity zones.

  14. Crustal deformation across the Southern Patagonian Icefield observed by GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Ivins, E.; Lange, H.; Mendoza, L.; Schröder, L.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Casassa, G.; Marderwald, E.; Fritsche, M.; Perdomo, R.; Horwath, M.; Dietrich, R.

    2016-10-01

    Geodetic GNSS observations at 43 sites well distributed over the Southern Patagonian Icefield region yield site velocities with a mean accuracy of 1 mm/a and 6 mm/a for the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. These velocities are analyzed to reveal the magnitudes and patterns of vertical and horizontal present-day crustal deformation as well as their primary driving processes. The observed vertical velocities confirm a rapid uplift, with rates peaking at 41 mm/a, causally related to glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA). They yield now an unambiguous preference between two competing GIA models. Remaining discrepancies between the preferred model and our observations point toward an effective upper mantle viscosity even lower than 1.6 ṡ1018 Pas and effects of lateral rheological heterogeneities. An analysis of the horizontal strain and strain-rate fields reveals some complex superposition, with compression dominating in the west and extension in the east. This deformation field suggests significant contributions from three processes: GIA, a western interseismic tectonic deformation field related to plate subduction, and an extensional strain-rate field related to active Patagonian slab window tectonics.

  15. Crustal structure between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lane R.

    1964-01-01

    Interpretation of a reversed seismic-refraction profile between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California, indicates velocities of 6.15 km/sec for the upper layer of the crust, 7.10 km/sec for an intermediate layer, and 7.80 km/sec for the uppermost mantle. Phases interpreted to be reflections from the top of the intermediate layer and the Mohorovicic discontinuity were used with the refraction data to calculate depths. The depth to the Moho increases from about 30 km near Lake Mead to about 40 km near Mono Lake. Variations in arrival times provide evidence for fairly sharp flexures in the Moho. Offsets in the Moho of 4 km at one point and 2 1/2 km at another correspond to large faults at the surface, and it is suggested that fracture zones in the upper crust may displace the Moho and extend into the upper mantle. The phase P appears to be an extension of the reflection from the top of the intermediate layer beyond the critical angle. Bouguer gravity, computed for the seismic model of the crust, is in good agreement with the measured Bouguer gravity. Thus a model of the crustal structure is presented which is consistent with three semi-independent sources of geophysical data: seismic-refraction, seismic-reflection, and gravity.

  16. Crustal kinematics of the Colorado Plateau from GPS geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A. A.; Broermann, J.; Bennett, R. A.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from new continuous and campaign GPS networks spanning the state of Arizona and the southern portion of Utah. The 33 station continuous GPS network, funded by the NSF EarthScope Program, supplements a sparse distribution of continuous GPS stations that comprise the NSF EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory network. The campaign network originally established by the National Geodetic survey in the mid-1990's, has been reoccupied two or more times over the past five years with support from the Arizona Geological Survey. The data from the continuous GPS stations are analyzed independently with the GIPSY and GAMIT software. The new horizontal velocity data set provides an improved image of deformation in the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Northern and Southern Basin and Ranges Provinces. Preliminary modeling of the crustal kinematics reveals that only a very limited part of the region can be modeled as a rigid-body rotation. Most of the area is part of a broad zone of diffuse east-west directed extension from the Rio Grande Rift in the East to the Mojave Desert in the west. Only near the transition from the northern Colorado Plateau to the northern Basin and Range Province is the extension more localized. Besides a discussion of the regional kinematics, we will also discuss the affect the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake had on the geodetic data in the southern Basin and Range.

  17. Fragmentation of wall rock garnets during deep crustal earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austrheim, Håkon; Dunkel, Kristina G.; Plümper, Oliver; Ildefonse, Benoit; Liu, Yang; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Fractures and faults riddle the Earth’s crust on all scales, and the deformation associated with them is presumed to have had significant effects on its petrological and structural evolution. However, despite the abundance of directly observable earthquake activity, unequivocal evidence for seismic slip rates along ancient faults is rare and usually related to frictional melting and the formation of pseudotachylites. We report novel microstructures from garnet crystals in the immediate vicinity of seismic slip planes that transected lower crustal granulites during intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Bergen Arcs area, western Norway, some 420 million years ago. Seismic loading caused massive dislocation formations and fragmentation of wall rock garnets. Microfracturing and the injection of sulfide melts occurred during an early stage of loading. Subsequent dilation caused pervasive transport of fluids into the garnets along a network of microfractures, dislocations, and subgrain and grain boundaries, leading to the growth of abundant mineral inclusions inside the fragmented garnets. Recrystallization by grain boundary migration closed most of the pores and fractures generated by the seismic event. This wall rock alteration represents the initial stages of an earthquake-triggered metamorphic transformation process that ultimately led to reworking of the lower crust on a regional scale.

  18. Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the breakup of Pangaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Davis, Joshua K.; Harding, Jennifer L.; Lawver, Lawrence A.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's mantle has cooled by 6-11 °C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7 km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20 °C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.

  19. Maps of North American crustal stability and geothermal potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbridge, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A three-year program of analysis of crustal movements in North America was planned with the objective of preparing a series of 1 = 5 million scale maps depicting relative stability/instability. The part of the proposal completed during the first year is described; much of this first year's work was preparatory. Three time scales were considered for the data analysis: 1 - 10/sup 2/ yr., 10/sup 4/ yr., and 10/sup 8/ yr. Significant differences in sign and rate were suspected between short and long-term motions and these are now confirmed. The first part of the program is now complete. It consisted of two principal activities: (a) data collection for the short and mid-term scales on a U.S.-wide basis, excluding Alaska and Hawaii (all of this material has been reduced to compatible computer language and is stored on tape ready for further study, analysis and final cartography); (b) map and data analysis of the long-term scale with a completed draft map, applied specifically to the Mid-West and eastern U.S.

  20. Characterization of Polarizing Splitter Optics in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Ryand; Olson, Matthew; Morelli, Gregg

    2013-01-04

    Development of laser systems capable of surviving extreme conditions experienced in military applications requires mounts and components that are able to survive these conditions. The characterization of mounted and/or bonded optical assemblies in harsh environments is critical for the development of laser and optical systems for functionality in these extreme conditions. Customized mounts, bonding assemblies and packaging strategies are utilized to develop and field reliable and robust optical subassemblies. Thin film polarizers operating at 45o and polarizing beam splitter cubes were chosen for initial testing based on past experiences, advancements in optical coating and construction technologies and material properties. Shock, vibration, shear strength, tensile strength and temperature testing are performed on mounted polarizing beam splitter cubes and thin film polarizers from two manufacturers. Previous testing showed that polarizing beam splitter cubes constructed using epoxy would become damaged in the laser resonator. The cubes being tested in this report are constructed using epoxy- free direct optical contact bonding. Thin film polarizers operating at 45o are chosen opposed to Brewster’s angle thin film polarizers to reduce the size and simplify design and construction since an optical wedge is not required. The components and mounts are each environmentally tested beyond the manufacturers’ specifications for shock, vibration, and temperature. Component functionality is monitored during and after the environmental testing. Experimental results from the testing will be discussed as will the impact on future laser resonator designs.

  1. Estimating gravity changes caused by crustal strain: application to the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhi; Xu, Caijun

    2017-08-01

    Temporal gravimetry is an efficient tool for monitoring mass transfers, but distinguishing the contribution of each process to the measured signals is challenging. Few effective methods have been developed to estimate the changes in gravity caused by crustal strain for large-scale geophysical problems. To fill this research gap, we proposed a formula that describes a negative linear correlation between changes in gravity and crustal dilatational strain. Surface observations of gravity changes and dilatational strains were simulated using PSGRN/PSCMP, which is a numerical code used to calculate the surface response to fault dislocations, and the accuracy of the formula was quantitatively verified. Four parameters are required for this formula: the crustal dilatational strain, the crustal density, the Moho depth, and a coefficient that characterizes the degree of crust-mantle coupling. To illustrate the application of this new method to a natural case study, including specifying the values of the necessary parameters, the crustal strain-caused gravity changes (CSGCs) were calculated at 1° × 1° grid nodes over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). The CSGC model shows that most of the crust of the TP is undergoing extension, which generates negative gravity signals. The magnitude of the Tibetan CSGC model is approximately 0.2 μGal yr-1, which is similar to the results obtained from numerical modelling of the crustal tectonics of the Taiwanese Orogen. To evaluate the reliability of the Tibetan CSGC model, the uncertainties in the crustal dilatational strain, crustal density, Moho depth, and crust-mantle coupling factor were evaluated and then used to estimate the CSGC uncertainty by applying the error propagation law. The CSGC model was used to analyse the mass transfers of the TP. The results suggest that a significant mass accumulation process may be occurring beneath the crust of the northern TP.

  2. Crustal shortening and Eocene extension in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera: Some thermal and rheological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mian; Furlong, Kevin P.

    1993-06-01

    Metamorphic core complexes in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera were formed during Eocene crustal extension, shortly (within a few millions of years) after Late Jurassic-Paleocene crustal shortening. Thermal-rheological modeling, constrained by geological and geochronological studies of the Valhalla core complex and other core complexes in this region, is used to investigate two major problems concerning the formation of these core complexes: (1) the dynamic links between crustal shortening and extension and (2) the cooling history and unroofing rates during extension. Thermal-rheological effects associated with crustal shortening are integrated through the history of crustal compression, since crustal shortening in this region was a long and slow process and cannot be treated as an instantaneous event. Our results suggest that crustal shortening may have played an important role in Eocene extension in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera by (1) producing a thickened and therefore unstable crust and (2) thermally weakening the lithosphere. However, heat generated by crustal shortening is not enough to account for the thermal state of the Valhalla complex, and additional heat sources at depth may be necessary. We then investigate thermal evolution during extension in both a simple shear model and a progressive pure stretching model. We show that the geotherm in an extensional region is time-and space-dependent and is affected by many variables including the preextensional thermal history and the mode of extension. Thus caution needs to be exercised when inferring unroofing rates from thermochronologic data. The cooling history of the Valhalla core complex may be explained by unroofing at rates of 1-2 mm/yr.

  3. Crustal architecture across Phanerozoic Australia along the Eromanga-Brisbane Geoscience Transect: evolution and analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, D. M.

    1993-03-01

    The crustal architecture across Phanerozoic Australia has been established from seismic data along an 1100-km-long east-west transect, the Eromanga-Brisbane Geoscience Transect. This has enabled a better understanding of deep structures and processes that have controlled the development of major sedimentary basin systems. It has shown that crustal dynamics throughout geological history have played an important role in the development of these sedimentary basins and that structures developed during the early Palaeozoic have influenced, and continue to influence, basin systems. The transect crosses three major basement provinces of the Tasman Orogenic System in eastern Australia - the Thomson, northern Lachlan, and New England Orogens. The basement geology in the transect region has, until now, been only poorly understood because it is largely obscured by the Mesozoic cover rocks of the Eromanga, Surat and Clarence-Moreton Basins. The transect interpretation has firmly identified crustal-scale ramp structures, multiple intra-crustal detachment surfaces, strike-slip fault architecture, lower-crustal magmatism/underplating, Mono remobilisation, and intra-crustal terranes in the geological reconstructions of southern Queensland. The boundaries between the orogens, the Foyleview and Burunga—Mooki Geosutures, have been identified as lithospheric-scale structures that have influenced the evolution of the Tasman Orogenic System as a whole.

  4. Crustal model for the Middle East and North Africa region: implications for the isostatic compensation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, Dogan; Sandvol, Eric; Sandvol, Christine; Brindisi, Carrie; Barazangi, Muawia

    2001-12-01

    We present a new 3-D crustal model for the Middle East and North Africa region that includes detailed topography, sediment thickness, and Moho depth values. The model is obtained by collecting, integrating, and interpolating reliable, published sedimentary rock thickness and Moho depth measurements in the Middle East and North Africa region. To evaluate the accuracy of the model, the 3-D gravity response of the model is calculated and compared with available observed Bouguer gravity anomalies in the region. The gravity modelling shows that the new crustal model predicts large portions of the observed Bouguer anomalies. However, in some regions, such as the Red Sea and Caspian Sea regions, where crustal structure is relatively well-determined, the residual anomalies are of the order of a few hundred milligals. Since the new crustal model results in large residual anomalies in regions where reasonably good constraints exist for the model, these large residuals cannot simply be explained by inaccuracies in the model. To analyse the cause of these residuals further we developed an isostatically compensated (Airy-type) Moho-depth model and calculated its gravity response. Isostatic gravity anomalies are in nearly perfect agreement with the observed gravity values. However, the isostatic model differs significantly from the new (3-D) crustal model. If isostasy is to be maintained, crustal and/or upper mantle lateral density variations are needed to explain the large observed gravity residuals.

  5. Near-axis crustal structure and thickness of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Dax; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Weekly, Robert T.

    2016-06-01

    A model of crustal thickness and lower crustal velocities is obtained for crustal ages of 0.1-1.2 Ma on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge by inverting travel times of crustal paths and non-ridge-crossing wide-angle Moho reflections obtained from a three-dimensional tomographic experiment. The crust is thicker by 0.5-1 km beneath a 200 m high plateau that extends across the segment center. This feature is consistent with the influence of the proposed Heckle melt anomaly on the spreading center. The history of ridge propagation on the Cobb overlapping spreading center may also have influenced the formation of the plateau. The sharp boundaries of the plateau and crustal thickness anomaly suggest that melt transport is predominantly upward in the crust. Lower crustal velocities are lower at the ends of the segment, likely due to increased hydrothermal alteration in regions influenced by overlapping spreading centers, and possibly increased magmatic differentiation.

  6. Characterization of reliability of printed indium tin oxide thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Jong-Woong; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2013-11-01

    Recently, decreasing the amount of indium (In) element in the indium tin oxide (ITO) used for transparent conductive oxide (TCO) thin film has become necessary for cost reduction. One possible approach to this problem is using printed ITO thin film instead of sputtered. Previous studies showed potential for printed ITO thin films as the TCO layer. However, nothing has been reported on the reliability of printed ITO thin films. Therefore, in this study, the reliability of printed ITO thin films was characterized. ITO nanoparticle ink was fabricated and printed onto a glass substrate followed by heating at 400 degrees C. After measurement of the initial values of sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the printed ITO thin films, their reliabilities were characterized with an isothermal-isohumidity test for 500 hours at 85 degrees C and 85% RH, a thermal shock test for 1,000 cycles between 125 degrees C and -40 degrees C, and a high temperature storage test for 500 hours at 125 degrees C. The same properties were investigated after the tests. Printed ITO thin films showed stable properties despite extremely thermal and humid conditions. Sheet resistances of the printed ITO thin films changed slightly from 435 omega/square to 735 omega/square 507 omega/square and 442 omega/square after the tests, respectively. Optical transmittances of the printed ITO thin films were slightly changed from 84.74% to 81.86%, 88.03% and 88.26% after the tests, respectively. These test results suggest the stability of printed ITO thin film despite extreme environments.

  7. Measuring crustal convergence using rock exhumation along the complex glaciated Chugach Mountains, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotila, J. A.; Buscher, J.

    2002-12-01

    Rates of rock uplift often constrain magnitudes of convergent plate motion in collisional settings. In complex orogenic belts, however, these rates can be difficult to measure. In southeast Alaska, a rapidly-evolving mountain system is centered at a syntaxial bend in the Pacific-North American plate boundary. Rugged topography of the Chugach Mountains stretches for more than 500 km along the hanging wall of the Aleutian Trench, above a colliding microplate, and as coast ranges along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault. At each segment of the plate boundary, crustal convergence within North America should vary according to the obliquity of plate motion and the degree of underthrusting. Geodetic and neotectonic studies of rapidly-eroding structures have yet to define rates of horizontal plate motion partitioning. Surface uplift studies, based on short term geodesy or Holocene motion of coastal landforms, are also complicated by megathrust elastic strain accumulation cycles and the viscoelastic response to recent glacial ice thinning. It is thus important to measure exhumation and the erosional transfer of mass as a proxy for the degree of upper crustal convergence accommodated by rock uplift. We have attempted to determine exhumation pattern where the highly-deformed, oceanic and continental rocks of the Yakutat microplate collide with North America. Although the total shortening rate between this microplate and North America is of the order ~3-5 cm/yr, an unconstrained magnitude of shortening is absorbed by imbricate thrust faults within it, the suture between it and North America, and within the previously accreted terranes that form the edge of the continent. We have constrained rock cooling histories as a proxy for exhumation on samples along a dense grid that spans major structural elements, including the Pamplona and Chugach-St. Elias fault systems. Apatite and zircon radiogenic helium ages provide a range in temperature sensitivity that can be used

  8. Crustal architecture and deep structure of the Namibian passive continental margin around Walvis Ridge from wide-angle seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, Jan H.; Planert, Lars; Jokat, Wilfried; Ryberg, Trond; Bialas, Jörg; Jegen, Marion

    2013-04-01

    Plateau basalts. The most striking feature is the sharp transition in crustal structure and thickness across the northern boundary of Walvis Ridge. Thin oceanic crust (6.5 km) of the Angola Basin lies next to the up to 35 km thick igneous crustal root founding the highest elevated northern portions of Walvis Ridge. Both structures are separated by a very large transform fault zone. The velocity structure of Walvis Ridge lower crust is indicative of gabbro, and, in the lowest parts, of cumulate sequences. On the southern side of Walvis Ridge there is a smooth gradation into the adjacent 25-30 km thick crust underlying the ocean-continent boundary, with a velocity structure resembling that of Walvis Ridge The second profile shows a sharp transition from oceanic to rifted continental crust. The transition zone may be underlain by hydrated uppermost mantle. Below the Etendeka Plateau, an extensive high-velocity body, likely representing gabbros and their cumulates at the base of the crust, indicates magmatic underplating. We summarize by stating that rift-related lithospheric stretching and associated transform faulting play an overriding role in locating magmatism, dividing the margin in a magmatic-dominated segment to the south, and an amagmatic segment north of Walvis Ridge.

  9. Diverse mantle and crustal components in lavas of the NW Cerros del Rio volcanic field, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, K. E.; Wolff, J. A.; Harmon, R. S.; Leat, P. T.; Dickin, A. P.; Thompson, R. N.

    1991-09-01

    Products of Pliocene (2 4 Ma) mafic to intermediate volcanism in the northwestern Cerros del Rio, a dominantly mafic volcanic field in the Española Basin of the Rio Grande Rift (RGR), range from 49% to 63% SiO2 and exhibit diversity in silica saturation, trace-element patterns, and isotopic compositions. Tholeiites, which are largely confined to west of the Rio Grande, have trace-element abundances that resemble those of oceanic basalts, but with mild depletions in Nb and Ta, and high 87Sr/86Sr, low 143Nd/144Nd, and high δ18O compared to typical OIB. They are regarded as asthenospherically-derived magmas contaminated with continental crust. Alkali basalts and hawaiites erupted from vents east of the Rio Grande are geochemically distinct, having generally higher overall incompatible-element abundances, but with pronounced depletions in K, Rb, Nb and Ta with respect to Th and LREE. Spatially-associated benmoreites, mugearites and latites (collectively termed “evolved” lavas) have similar trace-element characteristics to the mafic mildly-alkaline compositions, but are typically not as depleted in K. Hawaiites and evolved lavas exhibit a good negative correlation of 143Nd/144Nd with SiO2, due to interaction with lower continental crust. The most silicic “evolved” lavas carry the highest proportions of crustal material, and consequently have higher K/Th than the related hawaiites. Several (mostly mafic) lavas contain abundant crustally-derived resorbed quartz xenocrysts in O-isotope disequilibrium with the host magma. The δ18O values of xenocrystic quartz range over 4‰, indicating a variety of quartz-bearing crustal contaminants beneath the Española Basin. The hawaiites, with their unusual combination of trace-element enrichments and depletions, cannot be generated by any process of fractionation or crustal contamination superposed on a common mantle source type (oceanic or arc-source). It is a regional mantle source type, inasmuch as it was also present

  10. Crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the eastern margin of the Yilgarn Craton (Australia) from passive seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippl, Christian; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian; Spaggiari, Catherine; Gessner, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    very fast even in the shallowest crust (around or even above 3.5 km/s), with the AFO featuring even higher velocities than the Yilgarn Craton. The most notable feature in the S-velocity map are clearly elevated velocities in the Fraser Zone, a 450 km long elongated region of exhumed lower crustal metagabbros within the AFO. The footprint of the array limits the resolvable depth to about 40 km, hence we image mantle S velocities only in regions with relatively thin crust, i.e. for the Yilgarn Craton and the eastern and southernmost parts of the AFO. Due to the use of Bayesian inversion methods, the obtained results come with robust uncertainty estimates, which is an advantage in interpretation. We combine our results with evidence from active seismic experiments and potential field data to derive a three-dimensional model of the present structure of the region. This is ongoing work and most likely still in a preliminary stage at the time of the presentation. This model will be used to inform existing evolution models of the AFO and processes of modification of Archean crust.

  11. Sedimentary and crustal thicknesses and Poisson's ratios for the NE Tibetan Plateau and its adjacent regions based on dense seismic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilai; Wu, Jianping; Fang, Lihua; Lai, Guijuan; Cai, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The sedimentary and crustal thicknesses and Poisson's ratios of the NE Tibetan Plateau and its adjacent regions are estimated by the h- κ stacking and CCP image of receiver functions from the data of 1,317 stations. The horizontal resolution of the obtained results is as high as 0.5° × 0.5°, which can be used for further high resolution model construction in the region. The crustal thicknesses from Airy's equilibrium are smaller than our results in the Sichuan Basin, Qilian tectonic belt, northern Alxa block and Qaidam Basin, which is consistent with the high densities in the mantle lithosphere and may indicate that the high-density lithosphere drags crust down overall. High Poisson's ratios and low velocity zones are found in the mid- and lower crust beneath eastern Qilian tectonic belt and the boundary areas of the Ordos block, indicating that partial melting may exist in these regions. Low Poisson's ratios and low-velocity anomalies are observed in the crust in the NE Tibetan Plateau, implying that the mafic lower crust is thinning or missing and that the mid- and lower crust does not exhibit melting or partial melting in the NE Tibetan Plateau, and weak flow layers are not likely to exist in this region.

  12. Women in extreme poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Population is estimated to increase from 5.5 billion in 1990 to 10 billion by 2050; the poverty level is expected to increase from 1 billion to 2-3 billion people. Women in development has been promoted throughout the UN and development system, but women in poverty who perform work in the informal sector are still uncounted, and solutions are elusive. The issue of extreme poverty can not be approached as just another natural disaster with immediate emergency relief. Many people live in precarious economic circumstances throughout their lives. Recent research reveals a greater understanding of the underlying causes and the need for inclusion of poor women in sustainable development. Sanitation, water, housing, health facilities need to be improved. Women must have access to education, opportunities for trading, and loans on reasonable terms. UNESCO makes available a book on survival strategies for poor women in the informal sector. The profile shows common problems of illiteracy, broken marriages, and full time involvement in provision of subsistence level existence. Existence is a fragile balance. Jeanne Vickers' "Women and the World" offers simple, low cost interventions for aiding extremely poor women. The 1992 Commission on the Status of Women was held in Vienna. Excerpts from several speeches are provided. The emphasis is on some global responses and an analysis of solutions. The recommendation is for attention to the gender dimension of poverty. Women's dual role contributes to greater disadvantages. Women are affected differently by macroeconomic factors, and that there is intergenerational transfer of poverty. Social services should be viewed as investments and directed to easing the burdens on time and energy. Public programs must be equipped to deal with poverty and to bring about social and economic change. Programs must be aware of the different distribution of resources within households. Women must be recognized as principal economic providers within

  13. Extreme winds in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, L.; Rathmann, O.; Hansen, S.O.

    1999-02-01

    Wind-speed data from four sites in Denmark have been analyzed in order to obtain estimates of the basic wind velocity which is defined as the 50-year wind speed under standard conditions, i.e. ten-minute averages at the height 10 m over a uniform terrain with the roughness length 0.05 m. The sites are, from west, Skjern (15 years), Kegnaes (7 years), Sprogoe (20 years), and Tystofte (15 years). The data are ten minute averages of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and pressure. The last two quantities are used to determine the air density {rho}. The data are cleaned for terrain effects by means of a slightly modified WASP technique where the sector speed-up factors and roughness lengths are linearly smoothed with a direction resolution of one degree. Assuming geotropic balance, all the wind-velocity data are transformed to friction velocity u{sub *} and direction at standard conditions by means of the geotropic drag law for neutral stratification. The basic wind velocity in 30 deg. sectors are obtained through ranking of the largest values of the friction velocity pressure 1/2{rho}u{sub *}{sup 2} taken both one every two months and once every year. The main conclusion is that the basic wind velocity is significantly larger at Skjern, close to the west coast of Jutland, than at any of the other sites. Irrespective of direction, the present standard estimates of 50-year wind are 25 {+-} 1 m/s at Skern and 22 {+-} 1 m/s at the other three sites. These results are in agreement with those obtained by Jensen and Franck (1970) and Abild (1994) and supports the conclusion that the wind climate at the west coast of Jutland is more extreme than in any other part of the country. Simple procedures to translate in a particular direction sector the standard basic wind velocity to conditions with a different roughness length and height are presented. It is shown that a simple scheme makes it possible to calculate the total 50-year extreme load on a general structure without

  14. Stacked Extreme Learning Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongming; Huang, Guang-Bin; Lin, Zhiping; Wang, Han; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2015-09-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) has recently attracted many researchers' interest due to its very fast learning speed, good generalization ability, and ease of implementation. It provides a unified solution that can be used directly to solve regression, binary, and multiclass classification problems. In this paper, we propose a stacked ELMs (S-ELMs) that is specially designed for solving large and complex data problems. The S-ELMs divides a single large ELM network into multiple stacked small ELMs which are serially connected. The S-ELMs can approximate a very large ELM network with small memory requirement. To further improve the testing accuracy on big data problems, the ELM autoencoder can be implemented during each iteration of the S-ELMs algorithm. The simulation results show that the S-ELMs even with random hidden nodes can achieve similar testing accuracy to support vector machine (SVM) while having low memory requirements. With the help of ELM autoencoder, the S-ELMs can achieve much better testing accuracy than SVM and slightly better accuracy than deep belief network (DBN) with much faster training speed.

  15. Solar extreme events

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of "extreme events," defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than $S^{-2}$, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial $^{14}$C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observation...

  16. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaj, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carini, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carron, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Haller, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hart, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Herrmann, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kenney, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Segal, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tomada, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  17. Crustal contamination versus an enriched mantle source for intracontinental mafic rocks: Insights from early Paleozoic mafic rocks of the South China Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Xu, Xisheng; Zeng, Gang

    2017-08-01

    Several recent studies have documented that the silicic rocks (SiO2 > 65 wt.%) comprising Silicic Large Igneous Provinces are derived from partial melting of the crust facilitated by underplating/intraplating of ;hidden; large igneous province-scale basaltic magmas. The early Paleozoic intracontinental magmatic rocks in the South China Block (SCB) are dominantly granitoids, which cover a combined area of 22,000 km2. In contrast, exposures of mafic rocks total only 45 km2. These mafic rocks have extremely heterogeneous isotopic signatures that range from depleted to enriched (whole rock initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7041-0.7102; εNd(t) = - 8.4 to + 1.8; weighted mean zircon εHf(t) = - 7.4 to + 5.2), show low Ce/Pb and Nb/U ratios (0.59-13.1 and 3.5-20.9, respectively), and variable Th/La ratios (0.11-0.51). The high-MgO mafic rocks (MgO > 10 wt.%) tend to have lower εNd(t) values (- 4) and Sm/Nd ratios (> 0.255). The differences in geochemistry between the high-MgO and low-MgO mafic rocks indicate greater modification of the compositions of high-MgO mafic magmas by crustal material. In addition, generally good negative correlations between εNd(t) and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios, MgO, and K2O, along with the presence of inherited zircons in some plutons, indicate that the geochemical and isotopic compositions of the mafic rocks reflect significant crustal contamination, rather than an enriched mantle source. The results show that high-MgO mafic rocks with fertile isotopic compositions may be indicative of crustal contamination in addition to an enriched mantle source, and it is more likely that the lithospheric mantle beneath the SCB during the early Paleozoic was moderately depleted than enriched by ancient subduction processes.

  18. Extremal almost-Kahler metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Lejmi, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the notion of the Futaki invariant and extremal vector field to the general almost-Kahler case and we prove the periodicity of the extremal vector field when the symplectic form represents an integral cohomology class modulo torsion. We give also an explicit formula of the hermitian scalar curvature which allows us to obtain examples of non-integrable extremal almost-Kahler metrics saturating LeBrun's estimates.

  19. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  20. Crustal strain-dependent serpentinisation in the Porcupine Basin, offshore Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Manel; Watremez, Louise; Chen, Chen; O'Reilly, Brian M.; Minshull, Timothy A.; Reston, Tim J.; Shannon, Patrick M.; Klaeschen, Dirk; Wagner, Gerlind; Gaw, Viola

    2017-09-01

    Mantle hydration (serpentinisation) at magma-poor rifted margins is thought to play a key role in controlling the kinematics of low-angle faults and thus, hyperextension and crustal breakup. However, because geophysical data principally provide observations of the final structure of a margin, little is known about the evolution of serpentinisation and how this governs tectonics during hyperextension. Here we present new observational evidence on how crustal strain-dependent serpentinisation influences hyperextension from rifting to possible crustal breakup along the axis of the Porcupine Basin, offshore Ireland. We present three new P-wave seismic velocity models that show the seismic structure of the uppermost lithosphere and the geometry of the Moho across and along the basin axis. We use neighbouring seismic reflection lines to our tomographic models to estimate crustal stretching (βc) of ∼2.5 in the north at 52.5° N and >10 in the south at 51.7° N. These values suggest that no crustal embrittlement occurred in the northernmost region, and that rifting may have progressed to crustal breakup in the southern part of the study area. We observed a decrease in mantle velocities across the basin axis from east to west. These variations occur in a region where βc is within the range at which crustal embrittlement and serpentinisation are possible (βc 3-4). Across the basin axis, the lowest seismic velocity in the mantle spatially coincides with the maximum amount of crustal faulting, indicating fault-controlled mantle hydration. Mantle velocities also suggest that the degree of serpentinisation, together with the amount of crustal faulting, increases southwards along the basin axis. Seismic reflection lines show a major detachment fault surface that grows southwards along the basin axis and is only visible where the inferred degree of serpentinisation is >15%. This observation is consistent with laboratory measurements that show that at this degree of

  1. Rates, Mechanisms, and Implications of Crustal Assimilation in Continental Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, M.; Davidson, J.

    2002-12-01

    Contrary to the limiting constraints postulated by Bowen for the coupled thermal and mass balance implicated in assimilation, many studies [1-6] suggest that multi-stage and multi-component assimilation, abetted by magma mixing, may be volumetrically important and have profound consequences for the chemistry of basaltic and evolved magmas in long-lived continental magmatic systems. The probability of a primitive or evolved basalt arriving at the Earth's surface having undergone perfectly closed-system evolution during passage through 25-60 km of continental crust is vanishingly low. A case-by-case demonstration that the intra-crustal chemical overprint is trivial, or that it can be quantified and subtracted, is an essential step in any evaluation of mantle source-region chemistry and processes based on inversion of continental basalt compositions. In magmatic systems characterized by mafic magma recharge the thermal energy and physical dynamism needed for assimilation are not constrained to come uniquely from one magma batch [7, 8]. Equally important is that assimilation is rarely equivalent to bulk melting of ingested blocks followed by reservoir-wide homogenization. The mechanics of crustal assimilation are governed by grain boundary melting, disaggregation, and dispersal of refractory solids (including xenocryst settling) wherein liberated low-density, incompatible element-enriched partial melts have the capacity to render primitive arc magma batches variably modified, as well as heterogeneous on short length-scales. Evidence that basalts thermally erode surface channels and conduit walls, and new observations constraining the maximum time that some extensively melted xenoliths have resided in their host magmas, indicate that the time required to impose an open-system overprint on a hot basaltic magma (days to yrs) is far shorter than typical repose periods at most arc volcanoes (50-500 yrs). Assimilative recycling of broadly gabbroic arc cumulates has had large

  2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUSTAL MOTION IN THE TIEN SHAN USING INSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, R J

    2011-02-25

    The northern Tien Shan of Central Asia is an area of active mid-continent deformation. Although far from a plate boundary, this region has experienced 5 earthquakes larger than magnitude 7 in the past century and includes one event that may as be as large as Mw 8.0. Previous studies based on GPS measurements indicate on the order of 23 mm/yr of shortening across the entire Tien Shan and up to 15 mm/year in the northern Tien Shan (Figure 1). The seismic moment release rate appears comparable with the geodetic measured slip, at least to first order, suggesting that geodetic rates can be considered a proxy for accumulation rates of stress for seismic hazard estimation. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar may provide a means to make detailed spatial measurements and hence in identifying block boundaries and assisting in seismic hazard. Therefore, we hoped to define block boundaries by direct measurement and by identifying and resolving earthquake slip. Due to political instability in Kyrgzystan, the existing seismic network has not performed as well as required to precisely determine earthquake hypocenters in remote areas and hence InSAR is highly useful. In this paper we present the result of three earthquake studies and show that InSAR is useful for refining locations of teleseismically located earthquakes. ALOS PALSAR data is used to investigate crustal motion in the Tien Shan mountains of Central Asia. As part of the work, considerable software development was undertaken to process PALSAR data. This software has been made freely available. Two damaging earthquakes have been imaged in the Tien Shan and the locations provided by ALOS InSAR have helped to refine seismological velocity models. A third earthquake south of Kyrgyzstan was also imaged. The use of InSAR data and especially L band is therefore very useful in providing groundtruth for earthquake locations.

  3. Crustal Structure of Salton Trough using Deformable Layer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F.

    2012-12-01

    Salton Trough is an important geologic structure to understand the active rift between Imperial Fault and San Andreas Fault. To determine the underground geometry of Salton Trough and its nearby faults, we analyzed seismic phase data recorded by Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC). Both 2-D and 3-D models have been made to refine the velocity model so as to determine the basin and moho geometry beneath Salton Trough region. Here three inline and five cross-line velocity profiles were built by using 2D Deformable Layer Tomography (DLT) method. From these 2D profiles, we can see that the velocity gradient is very small in the low velocity zone. The low velocity anomaly can be detected beneath the axis of the Salton Trough around the depth of 19-21 km, and the relatively high velocity can be seen beneath the San Andreas faults. Within 100*150*40 km3 model volume, 90,180 P-wave and S-wave first arrival picks from 27,663 local events (from 2001 to 2012), which were obtained from 44 stations, were used to build 3D seismic velocity model of the crust. During the iterations of velocity updating, full 3-D ray tracing is implemented. From these 3-D velocity models with different sizes of grids, low velocity anomalies are present under the southwest of Salton Sea, while high velocity zone is present across Southern San Andreas Fault throughout all the depths. Profiles from 2-D velocity models compared to 3-D velocity models show similar geometry. 3-D crustal structure, which is determined from 3-D DLT, helps to better understand the divergent boundary between the North American and the Pacific tectonic plates

  4. Contemporary vertical crustal motion in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdahl, Sandford R.; Faucher, Francois; Dragert, Herb

    A map of recent vertical crustal motion has been compiled for coastal Washington and southwest British Columbia. Average velocities over the past 80 years were determined by least squares adjustment of repeated precise levelings and mean sea-level observations from 21 tide gauges. Annual variations in mean sea level were determined directly within the adjustment model under the assumption that they were identical at all tide gauges in a given year. The derived vertical velocities range from -2.0±0.9 mm/yr near Seattle, to 2.5±0.8 mm/yr at the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula, and over 3 mm/yr in the region to the north of Campbell River on Vancouver Island. Determination of a constant velocity in this latter region is complicated by about 10 cm of coseismic subsidence associated with a magnitude 7.3 earthquake in 1946, and an apparent increase in uplift rate over the past decade. Qualitatively, the regional velocity pattern is consistent with features of the current plate convergence model: 1) the rapid uplift of the region north of central Vancouver Island is consistent with the overriding of the young (Explorer Plate which may be underplating the coastal margin in this area; and 2) the ridge of uplift extending from the Neah Bay area north across Vancouver Island to Campbell River is consistent with a pattern expected from a locked subduction zone underlying this coastal region. The large-scale subsidence to the southwest of Puget Sound is more difficult to explain in the context of plate convergence.

  5. Shallow Crustal Thermal Structures of Central Taiwan Foothills Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Kai Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crustal thermal structures are closely related to metamorphism, rock rheology, exhumation processes, hydrocarbon maturation levels, frictional faulting and other processes. Drilling is the most direct way to access the temperature fields in the shallow crust. However, a regional drilling program for geological investigation is usually very expensive. Recently, a large-scale in-situ investigation program in the Western Foothills of Central Taiwan was carried out, providing a rare opportunity to conduct heat flow measurements in this region where there are debates as to whether previous measured heat flows are representative of the thermal state in this region. We successfully collected 28 geothermal gradients from these wells and converted them into heat flows. The new heat flow dataset is consistent with previous heat flows, which shows that the thermal structures of Central Taiwan are different from that of other subduction accretionary prisms. We then combine all the available heat flow information to analyze the frictional parameters of the Chelungpu fault zone that ruptured during the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake. The heat flow dataset gave consistent results compared with the frictional parameters derived from another independent study that used cores recovered from the Chelungpu fault zone at depth. This study also shows that it is suitable for using heat-flow data obtained from shallow subsurface to constrain thrusting faulting parameters, similar to what had been done for the strike-slip San Andreas Fault in California. Additional fieldworks are planned to study heat flows in other mountainous regions of Taiwan for more advanced geodynamic modeling efforts.

  6. Likelihood estimators for multivariate extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Huser, Raphaël

    2015-11-17

    The main approach to inference for multivariate extremes consists in approximating the joint upper tail of the observations by a parametric family arising in the limit for extreme events. The latter may be expressed in terms of componentwise maxima, high threshold exceedances or point processes, yielding different but related asymptotic characterizations and estimators. The present paper clarifies the connections between the main likelihood estimators, and assesses their practical performance. We investigate their ability to estimate the extremal dependence structure and to predict future extremes, using exact calculations and simulation, in the case of the logistic model.

  7. The crustal structure of continental shelf in northern South China Sea: revealed by joint onshore-offshore wide-angle seismic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinghe; Sun, Jinlong; Xia, Shaohong; Wan, Kuiyuan; Xu, Huilong

    2017-04-01

    Known as a significant region for studying tectonic relationship between South China block and South China Sea (SCS) block and evolution of rifted basin in continental margin, the continental shelf of northern SCS not only preserved the information about intensive tectonic deformation and magmatism generated by the west Pacific subducted to Eurasian Plate in late Mesozoic, but also recorded the process from continental margin rifting to seafloor spreading of SCS in Cenozoic for the same mechanical property. To investigate crustal structure of continental shelf in northern SCS, a wide-angle onshore-offshore seismic experiment and a coincident multi-channel seismic (MCS) profile were carried out across the onshore-offshore transitional zone in northern SCS, 2010. A total of 14 stations consisted of ocean bottom seismometers, portable and permanent land stations were deployed during the survey. The two-dimensional precise crustal structure model of central continental shelf in northern SCS was constructed from onshore to offshore. The model reveals that South China block is a typical continental crust with a 30-32 km Moho depth, and a localized high-velocity anomaly in middle-lower crust under land area near Hong Kong was imaged, which may reflect magma underplating caused by subduction of paleo-Pacific plate in late Mesozoic. The Littoral Fault Zone (LFZ) lies 12 km south of Dangan Island with a width of 18-20 km low-velocity fracture zone from surface to Moho discontinuity. The shelf zone south of LFZ was consisted of a differential thinning upper and lower continental crust, which indicate stretch thinning of passive continent margin during the Cenozoic spreading of the SCS. All these results appear to further confirm that the northern margin of SCS experienced a transition from active margin to passive one during late Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

  8. 'Active' Thin Sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rooij, M.R.; Bijen, J.M.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Optical microscopy using thin sections has become more and more important over the last decade to study concrete. Unfortunately, this technique is not capable of studying actually hydrating cement paste. At Delft University of Technology a new technique has been developed using 'active' thin section

  9. Description of Along Strike Structural Styles and Implications of Deep Crustal Reflections in the Galicia Segment of the Offshore Iberia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, P. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Zelt, C. A.; Henning, A.

    2001-12-01

    The offshore Iberia passive margin is recognized as an ideal location for studying the evolution of rifting because of its thin sedimentary cover, absence of salt and limited magmatism, which often make imaging crustal and sub-crustal reflections difficult. Seismic line ISE 5, which was shot in 1997 as part of the Iberia Seismic Project, images some deep crustal reflection geometries that might have important consequences with regard to understanding the evolution of rifting that broke up Pangea. Based on reflection character, the upper sedimentary section can be divided into two parts: an upper, uniformly dipping, sub-parallel post-rift sedimentary section and an underlying transparent post-rift sedimentary section. Beneath the post-rift sedimentary section, syn- and possible pre-rift, sedimentary rocks are imaged on top of crystalline basement and between apparent "pods" of crystalline basement bounded by faults on all sides. A bright sub-parallel reflection regarded locally as the S reflector images the detachment upon which most of the extension occurred. Refraction modelling results from OBS data suggest Moho velocities below this horizon. Several reflections that splay from S dip northward into the mantle. This geometry is probably related to northward propagation of the rift, which is consistent with radiometric analyses of localized intrusives that finds younger 40Ar-39Ar ages progressing from Gorringe Bank northward to Galicia Bank. Alternatively, these reflections are related to multiphase rifting along the margin. Most interesting are 1 second (~ 3.5 km) thick sub-parallel reflections that might be part of a shear zone associated either with horizontal displacement along the S detachment or from the northward dipping splays. Alternatively, these reflections might represent underplating of upwelling mafics, which rose during decompression as continental crust attenuated along the relatively flat sub-horizontal S reflector. This interpretation supports the

  10. Bulk arc strain, crustal thickening, magma emplacement, and mass balances in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenrong; Paterson, Scott; Saleeby, Jason; Zalunardo, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying crustal deformation is important for evaluating mass balance, material transfer, and the interplay between tectonism and magmatism in continental arcs. We present a dataset of >650 finite strain analyses compiled from published works and our own studies with associated structural, geochronologic, and geobarometric information in central and southern Sierra Nevada, California, to quantify the arc crust deformation. Our results show that Mesozoic tectonism results in 65% arc-perpendicular bulk crust shortening under a more or less plane strain condition. Mesozoic arc magmatism replaced ∼80% of this actively deforming arc crust with plutons requiring significantly greater crustal thickening. We suggest that by ∼85 Ma, the arc crust thickness was ∼80 km with a 30-km-thick arc root, resulting in a ∼5 km elevation. Most tectonic shortening and magma emplacement must be accommodated by downward displacements of crustal materials into growing crustal roots at the estimated downward transfer rate of 2-13 km/Myr. The downward transfer of crustal materials must occur in active magma channels, or in "escape channels" in between solidified plutons that decrease in size with time and depth resulting in an increase in the intensity of constrictional strain with depth. We argue that both tectonism and magmatism control the thickness of the crust and surface elevation with slight modification by surface erosion. The downward transported crustal materials initially fertilize the MASH zone thus enhancing to the generation of additional magmas. As the crustal root grows it may potentially pinch out and cool the mantle wedge and thus cause reduction of arc magmatism.

  11. Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Field from Low-Altitude Measurements by MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Byrne, P. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Fan, K. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Hauck, S. A., II; Head, J. W., III; Korth, H.; James, P. B.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Philpott, L. C.; Siegler, M. A.; Strauss, B. E.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of a planet's magnetic field, a key constraint for understanding interior evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MESSENGER spacecraft at altitudes below 150 km, we have detected fields indicative of crustal magnetization. Fields from non-crustal sources, which dominate the observations even at low altitudes, were estimated and subtracted from the observations using both magnetospheric models and signal filtering. The resulting high-pass filtered fields have amplitudes of a few to 20 nT. The first low-altitude signals were detected over the Suisei Planitia region and were confirmed by upward continuation to be of crustal origin. At least some contribution from thermoremanent magnetization is required to account for these signals, and we infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7-3.9 Ga on the basis of correlation of crustal magnetic fields with volcanic units of that age range. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust derived from MESSENGER elemental composition data. Here, we extend these initial results with observations obtained at spacecraft altitudes below 60 km at all body-fixed longitudes from ~40°N to ~75°N. The strongest crustal fields occur in the region 120°E to 210°E, and weaker signals characterize the northern volcanic plains. We test the hypothesis that the longest-wavelength crustal field signals in this region reflect magnetization contrasts between the Caloris basin and the surrounding intercrater plains and circum-Caloris plains. We report the spatial distribution of observed crustal fields, together with magnetization models derived from them and the implications of these models, particularly for the depth distribution of sources compatible with the observations.

  12. Crustal-scale magmatism and its control on the longevity of magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ozge; Degruyter, Wim; Bachmann, Olivier; Dufek, Josef

    2017-04-01

    Constraining the duration and evolution of crustal magma reservoirs is crucial to our understanding of the eruptive potential of magmatic systems, as well as the volcanic:plutonic ratios in the crust, but estimates of such parameters vary widely in the current literature. Although no consensus has been reached on the lifetime of magma reservoirs, recent studies have revealed about the presence, location, and melt fraction of multi-level (polybaric) storage zones in the crust. If magma accumulates at different crustal levels, it must redistribute significant enthalpy within the crustal column and therefore must influence the lifetime of magma plumbing systems. However, an evaluation of the mass and heat budget of the entire crustal column is lacking. Here, we use a two-dimensional thermal model to determine the thermal conditions under which both lower and upper crustal magma bodies form. We find that large lower crustal mush zones supply heat to the upper crust and reduce the amount of thermal energy necessary to form subvolcanic reservoirs. This indicates that the crust is thermally viable to sustain partially molten magma reservoirs over long timescales (>10^5-106 yr) for a range of magma fluxes (10^-4 to 10^-2 km^3/yr). Our results reconcile physical models of crustal magma evolution and field-based estimates of intrusion rates in numerous magmatic provinces (which include both volcanic and plutonic lithologies). We also show that young magmatic provinces ( 106 yr) can accumulate magma and build reservoirs capable of triggering supereruptions, even with intrusion rates as low as ≤10^-2 km^3/yr. Hence, the total duration of magmatism is critical in determining the size of the magma reservoirs, and should be combined with the magma intrusions rates to assess the capability of volcanic systems to form the largest eruptions on Earth.

  13. Evaluating Crustal Contamination Effects on the Lithophile Trace Element Budget of Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, A. D.; Ferdous, J.; Peslier, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the incompatible trace element (ITE) enriched compositions of shergottites has been a point of contention for decades [1-2]. Two scenarios have been proposed, the first is that enriched shergottite compositions reflect an ITE-enriched mantle source, whereas in the second, the ITE enrichment reflects crustal contamination of mantle-derived parent magmas. Evidence supporting the first scenario is that the ITE-enriched shergottite compositions are consistent with the outcomes of magma ocean crystallization [3], and that Os-Nd isotope relationships for shergottites cannot be explained by realistic crustal contamination models [4]. In contrast, Cl and S isotopes are consistent with shergottite magmas interacting with Mars crust [5,6], and ITE-enriched olivine-hosted melt inclusions and interstitial glass are found in depleted shergottite Yamato 980459 [7]. These findings indicate that some level of crustal interaction occurred but the question of whether ITE-enrichments in some bulk shergottites reflect crustal contamination remains open. Recently, a Mars crustal breccia meteorite has been found, NWA 7034 and its paired stones, that is our best analogue to an average of Mars ancient crust [8-10]. This allows for better constraints on crustal contamination of shergottite magmas. We modeled magma-crust mixing and assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) using ITE-depleted shergottite compositions and bulk NWA 7034 and its clasts as end-members. The results of these models indicate that crustal contamination can only explain the ITE-enriched compositions of some bulk shergottites under unusual circumstances. It is thus likely that the shergottite range of compositions reflects primarily mantle sources.

  14. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  15. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  16. Attitude extremity, consensus and diagnosticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pligt, J.; Ester, P.; van der Linden, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the effects of attitude extremity on perceived consensus and willingness to ascribe trait terms to others with either pro- or antinuclear attitudes. 611 Ss rated their attitudes toward nuclear energy on a 5-point scale. Results show that attitude extremity affected consensus estimates. Trait

  17. Gender, Education, Extremism and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the complex relationships between gender, education, extremism and security. After defining extremism and fundamentalism, it looks first at the relationship of gender to violence generally, before looking specifically at how this plays out in more extremist violence and terrorism. Religious fundamentalism is also shown to have…

  18. Grassland responses to precipitation extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassland ecosystems are naturally subjected to periods of prolonged drought and sequences of wet years. Climate change is expected to enhance the magnitude and frequency of extreme events at the intraannual and multiyear scales. Are grassland responses to extreme precipitation simply a response to ...

  19. Modeling extreme risks in ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgman, Mark; Franklin, James; Hayes, Keith R; Hosack, Geoffrey R; Peters, Gareth W; Sisson, Scott A

    2012-11-01

    Extreme risks in ecology are typified by circumstances in which data are sporadic or unavailable, understanding is poor, and decisions are urgently needed. Expert judgments are pervasive and disagreements among experts are commonplace. We outline approaches to evaluating extreme risks in ecology that rely on stochastic simulation, with a particular focus on methods to evaluate the likelihood of extinction and quasi-extinction of threatened species, and the likelihood of establishment and spread of invasive pests. We evaluate the importance of assumptions in these assessments and the potential of some new approaches to account for these uncertainties, including hierarchical estimation procedures and generalized extreme value distributions. We conclude by examining the treatment of consequences in extreme risk analysis in ecology and how expert judgment may better be harnessed to evaluate extreme risks.

  20. The Nature of Crustal Seismic Anisotropy: Constraints From Field and Rock Physics Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, N. I.; Okaya, D.; Meltzer, A.

    2006-12-01

    Compared with mantle seismic anisotropy studies, which have been active for almost five decades, anisotropy of the crystalline crust has been only rarely studied. Seismic anisotropy within continental tectonic provinces is however important because it provides earth scientists with a powerful tool for measuring and quantifying deformation within the crust. Preferred mineral alignment observed in metamorphic terranes produced during metamorphism by recrystallization is associated with planar structures such as slaty cleavage, schistosity, and gneissic layering. These structures are often pervasive for tens to hundreds of kilometers in major collision zones and produce significant compressional wave seismic anisotropy as well as shear wave splitting. Observations of crustal anisotropy within (1) slates of the chlorite subzone of the Haast schist terrane of South Island, New Zealand, (2) prehnite-pumpellite to lower greenschist facies slates and phyllites of the Taiwan Slate Belt, (3) greenschist faces phyllites and metagraywackes of the Valdez Group Chugach terrane in southern Alaska, and (4) amphibolite facies quartzofeldspathic gneisses, approaching granulite grade, within the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif demonstrate that crustal anisotropy is not limited to rocks of any particular metamorphic grade and thus can be present at all crustal levels. Laboratory studies of compressional and shear wave velocities provide important constraints on the magnitudes and symmetries of anisotropies at various crustal levels within these orogenic zones. Although compositional layering can produce anisotropy, preferred mineral orientation of highly anisotropic single crystals, resulting from metamorphic recrystallization, is the major contributor. Most metamorphic rocks show significant compressional and shear wave anisotropy. Anisotropy is a particularly important parameter in low grade pelitic rocks such as phyllite and slate and can be as high as 20%. For the medium grade

  1. The Cora Lake Shear Zone, an Exhumed Deep Crustal Lithotectonic Discontinuity, Western Churchill Province, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S.; Leslie, S.; Holland, M. E.; Williams, M. L.; Mahan, K. H.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Deep crustal flow is a fundamental tectonic process that may serve to reduce topographic gradients, especially in overthickened collisional orogens. Recent studies have utilized numerical models and seismic interpretations, but generally in two dimensions. Although useful, two dimensional models can not fully characterize lower crustal flow or coupling of crustal layers because they cannot fully incorporate lateral heterogeneity in the flow field. The Athabasca Granulite terrane, in northern Saskatchewan, is an exposed deep crustal terrane that underwent granulite grade deformation during the Neoarchean (ca. 2.55), then cooled isobarically for 600 m.y., and then was reactivated during the Paleoproterozoic (ca. 1.9 Ga). Regional exhumation occurred at roughly 1.85 Ga. This exposure, is a field laboratory for studying lower crustal flow, stabilization, and reactivation. Recent work suggests that the northwestern domain, dominated by the multiphase, opx-bearing, Mary batholith, underwent top-to-the-east lower crustal flow during the Neoarchean. The Chipman domain, to the SE , is primarily underlain by the 3.2 Ga, Chipman tonalite straight gneiss, which was likely restitic, and rheologically strong during the 2.6 Ga flow event. The Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz), which divides the two domains, is interpreted to represent a lithotectonic, compositional, and rheologic boundary within the deep crust. Recent mapping of the western gradient of the CLsz has provided insight into the role and evolution of the rheologic discontinuity and its relationship to crustal flow. The Mary granite (gneiss) contains excellent assemblages for P-T and pseudosection analysis. Interlayered felsic granulite contain abundant monazite for in-situ geochronology. An intense subhorizontal tectonic fabric (S1), interpreted to be the product of crustal flow, is present in both units. This early fabric was locally crenulated, folded, and transposed, by a sub-vertical S2 fabric. Current work involves

  2. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  3. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  4. Crustal evolution and recycling in a juvenile continent: Oxygen isotope ratio of zircon in the northern Arabian Nubian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'eri-Shlevin, Yaron; Katzir, Yaron; Valley, John W.

    2009-02-01

    lithospheric-mantle, respectively. However, while in the northwestern belt these magmas intruded a thick crustal section and assimilated ~ 15-35%, high- δ18O IAC+CA1 material, magmas in the southeastern region intruded a thinner crust and little or no contamination occurred. The proposed NW-SE variance in crustal thickness during the late Neoproterozoic fits well with the geometry of the fan shaped rifting model proposed by Stern [Stern, R.J., 1985. The Najd Fault System, Saudi Arabia and Egypt: a late Precambrian rift related transform system. Tectonics 4, 497-511.] for this region. Deep parts of the lithosphere were beginning to rift at ~ 630 Ma, allowing the asthenospheric mantle to rise and transfer heat to the lithosphere. This resulted in vast melting of the mafic lower-crust to produce the batholithic CA2 magmas. Later (~ 610 Ma) percolation of lithospheric-mantle melts (possibly along deep seated lithospheric-scale faults) introduced AL magmas to shallow levels of the crust. Intrusion of CA2 and AL mantle-like δ18O parent magmas into the thinned southeastern crust did not involve assimilation of older crust whereas similar intrusion into the thicker northwestern crust resulted in mild assimilation of high- δ18O pre-635 Ma crust. An important implication from our results is that petrogenesis of some high- δ18O AL magmas of the northernmost ANS involved assimilation of supracrustal material. Felsic intrusions of the AL suite were previously described as A-type granites derived solely from mantle melts with no crustal components. Our results contribute to the "A-type petrogenesis debate" by showing that their formation can involve recycling of crustal material.

  5. Millennia of magmatism recorded in crustal xenoliths from Southwest Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Matthijs; Waight, Tod; Nielsen, Troels

    2016-04-01

    Eruption of CO2-rich ultramafic magma involves rapid ascent of mantle-derived magmas loaded with mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts (>30 vol%). The dynamics and duration of such eruptions are increasingly well constrained; the causes are nevertheless largely unclear. To address this issue, we performed a petrological and speedometric analysis of well-preserved crustal xenoliths from aillikite dikes at Sisimiut and Sarfartôq alkaline provinces, W Greenland. The xenoliths represent mafic granulites, scavenged from c. 25-36 km depth within the mid-to-lower crust. The rocks are infiltrated by various types of melt in grain boundaries, cracks and veins. Zirconium-in rutile thermometry and Fe-in-rutile speedometry indicate melt temperature of c. 1,015 °C and melt exposure time of a few hours for the host aillikite, implying an average ascent rate of c. 2 m/s. This is slower than average ascent rates of mantle cargo (4-40 m/s [1]), suggesting a slowing-down of transport at shallow levels. Local diffusive zoning in garnet indicates up to several millenia of melt-assisted mass transport. This demonstrates a two-stage magmatic process of rapid melt ascent preceded by a previously unrecognized long magmatic episode. Melt infiltration at Sismiut lasted 10 times longer than at Sarfartôq, and unlike at Sarfartôq was initially associated with carbonate- and sulfide-rich melt. This contrast reflects a fundamental difference in the devolatilization efficiency of parental carbonatite magma. The rapid development of the Sarfartôq system is ascribed to the local lithospheric mantle being highly depleted [2] and rich in the decarbonation reactant orthopyroxene [3]. A link is also proposed between this feature, and the occurrence of REE-carbonatite and diamond-bearing mantle cargo at that particular location. References [1] Sparks, R.S.J. et al., 2006. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 155, 8-48. [2] Bizzarro, M. and Stevenson, R.K., 2003. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 146, 223-240. [3] Russell

  6. Crustal structure of the western Indian shield: Model based on regional gravity and magnetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kilaru

    2013-11-01

    This study probes the geometry of the different crustal units in terms of density and susceptibility variations in order to decipher the imprints of the major tectonic processes the region has undergone. In order to decipher the crustal geometry of the Gadra–Fatehpur profile, two NW–SE gravity and magnetic profile vertical sections (A–A′ in the south and B–B′ in the north are modelled on the basis of the constraints provided from previous seismic models. The crustal model of the Gadra–Fatehpur profile is composed of alluvium, Tertiary sediments, MIS, Marwar Supergroup, low-density layers (LDLs and the middle–lower crustal layers, with a distinct change in configuration from the southwest to northeast. The Moho dips from SW to NE, the MIS in the SW gives way to the thick pile of the Marwar Supergroup to the NE. The evolution of MIS has been suggested to have occurred as a consequence of delamination of the upper mantle. LDLs are incorporated in Gadra–Fatehpur model. In the SW, LDL (2550 kg/m3 lies below the MIS in the NE, another LDL (2604 kg/m3 is depicted below the mid-crustal layer.

  7. Seismotectonics of Taiwan Shoal region in northeastern SCS: Insights from crustal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiyuan, Wan; Jinlong, Sun; Shaohong, Xia; Xiaoling, Xie; Xiang, Zhang; Huilong, Xu; Jinghe, Cao

    2017-04-01

    A seismicity cluster and a great 16 September 1994 earthquake occur in the Taiwan Shoal region, outer rise of the Manila subduction zone. To understand what mechanisms control and generate the earthquake cluster, it is important to investigate the deep crustal structure of the Taiwan Shoal region. We present a 2-D seismic tomographic image of the crustal structure along the OBS2012 profile based on ocean bottom seismographic (OBS) data. The structure exhibits that a high velocity anomaly in the upper crust beneath the Taiwan Shoal is flanked by lower velocity anomalies. Based on the crustal structure, we study the 765 earthquakes, which occurred in the period 1991-2015. These epicenters, combined with the regional faults, and crustal structure, allow us to better understand the nature of the active tectonics in this region. The high velocity area is interpreted as representing stronger, defining major asperities where stress is concentrated corresponding to the location of the earthquake cluster. The earthquake cluster is influenced by the fault interactions. However, the 16 September 1994 earthquake is independents of the seismic activities but associated with the reactivation of the preexisting fault. In Taiwan region, the slab-pull was resisted by the exposed pre-collision accretionary prism and the resistive force caused the in-plane compressive stress accumulation. This condition may favor the triggering of future damaging earthquakes in this region. Key words: earthquake cluster; crustal structure; fault interactions; outer rise; Taiwan Shoal

  8. Lifetime and size of shallow magma bodies controlled by crustal-scale magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ozge; Degruyter, Wim; Bachmann, Olivier; Dufek, Josef

    2017-06-01

    Magmatic processes on Earth govern the mass, energy and chemical transfer between the mantle, crust and atmosphere. To understand magma storage conditions in the crust that ultimately control volcanic activity and growth of continents, an evaluation of the mass and heat budget of the entire crustal column during magmatic episodes is essential. Here we use a numerical model to constrain the physical conditions under which both lower and upper crustal magma bodies form. We find that over long durations of intrusions (greater than 105 to 106 yr), extensive lower crustal mush zones develop, which modify the thermal budget of the upper crust and reduce the flux of magma required to sustain upper crustal magma reservoirs. Our results reconcile physical models of magma reservoir construction and field-based estimates of intrusion rates in numerous volcanic and plutonic localities. Young igneous provinces (less than a few hundred thousand years old) are unlikely to support large upper crustal reservoirs, whereas longer-lived systems (active for longer than 1 million years) can accumulate magma and build reservoirs capable of producing super-eruptions, even with intrusion rates smaller than 10-3 to 10-2 km3 yr-1. Hence, total duration of magmatism should be combined with the magma intrusion rates to assess the capability of volcanic systems to form the largest explosive eruptions on Earth.

  9. Heat flow, heat production, and crustal dynamics in the Central Alps, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybach, L. (Inst. of Geophysics, Zurich); Werner, D.; Mueller, S.; Berset, G.

    1977-08-03

    Interrelations between temperature field, crustal structure, and crustal dynamics (vertical crustal movements) were investigated along a selected profile: the Swiss Geotraverse which cross-sects in a NW--SE direction the following tectonic units: Rhine-Graben, Jura Mountains, Molasse Basin, Helvetic Nappes, Central Massifs with autochthonous cover, Penninic units, basement and sedimentary units of the Southern Alps (total length: 220 km). The corrected heat flow is slightly elevated along or close to the traverse (approximately equal to 75 mW/m/sup 2/). Thermal effects of Alpine overthrusting and metamorphism on the surface gradient are negligible today. For steady-state calculations of the temperature field heat production was determined experimentally for surface samples; for deep crustal rocks it was inferred from an empirical relationship between heat production and seismic compressional wave velocity or density. The temperature field shows downwarped isotherms where a pronounced inversion of seismic velocity and density occurs in the upper crust. The same area of the Central Alps (Lepontine gneiss region) exhibits the strongest recent crustal movements (vertical uplift approximately equal to 1 mm/yr). The Mohorovicic discontinuity is clearly not an isothermal surface; its asymmetric shape found by seismic and gravimetric measurements is likely to be a result of the early Alpine subduction tectonics.

  10. The role of rheology, crustal structures and lithology in the seismicity distribution of the northern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaraluce, L.; Barchi, M. R.; Carannante, S.; Collettini, C.; Mirabella, F.; Pauselli, C.; Valoroso, L.

    2017-01-01

    The Northern Apennines of Italy is a unique area to study active crustal processes due to the availability of high-resolution subsurface geology (deep borehole and seismic profiles) and seismicity (back-ground and seismic sequences) data. In this work we have investigated the relationship between crustal structures and lithologies, rheological profiles and seismicity cut-off by constructing three integrated profiles across the Umbria-Marche Apennines. At first approximation we observe a good correspondence between the background seismicity cut-off and the modelled brittle ductile transition (BDT): 90% of the seismic activity is located above the transition. In the area characterized by active extension, where the majority of the seismicity is occurring, most of the crustal earthquakes are confined within the brittle layer at depth rheology and therefore the position of the brittle ductile transition exerts a role at regional scale for the occurrence of crustal seismicity, however crustal structures and lithology play the major role at a more local scale and therefore they need to be considered for a better understanding of earthquake distribution within the seismogenic layer.

  11. Calibration of the Regional Crustal Waveguide and the Retrieval of Source Parameters Using Waveform Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, C. K.; Woods, B. B.; Thio, H. K.

    - Regional crustal waveguide calibration is essential to the retrieval of source parameters and the location of smaller (MPnl waves to the surface waves and the interaction of regional sPmP and pPmP phases being good indicators of event depths. We also found that for deep events a seismic phase which follows an S-wave path to the surface and becomes critical, developing a head wave by S to P conversion is also indicative of depth. The detailed characteristic of this phase is controlled by the crustal waveguide. The key to calibrating regionalized crustal velocity structure is to determine depths for a set of master events by applying the above methods and then by modeling characteristic features that are recorded on the regional waveforms. The regionalization scheme can also incorporate mixed-path crustal waveguide models for cases in which seismic waves traverse two or more distinctly different crustal structures. We also demonstrate that once depths are established, we need only two-stations travel-time data to obtain reliable epicentral locations using a new adaptive grid-search technique which yields locations similar to those determined using travel-time data from local seismic networks with better azimuthal coverage.

  12. Qinghai-Tibet Plateau crustal thickness derived from EGM2008 and CRSUT2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Hao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is the most complex region for crustal thickness inversion, while high-resolution earth gravity model (EGM makes it possible to obtain high precision gravity anomaly, which is a key parameter to depict the Earth’s inner structure in geodesy domain. On the basis of this principle, we calculated the Bouguer gravity anomalies in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau with EGM2008 and SRTM6. 0 by efficient high-degree spherical harmonic synthesis algorithm. In order to obtain the gravity anomaly caused by Moho density mutant, the noises caused by the topography was removed by wavelet details. Then, the crustal thickness was corrected on the basis of CRUST 2. 0 with the deep-large-scale single density interface formula. The inversion result indicates that the crustal thickness in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is between 50 km and 75 km, which is in correspondence with the recent science research result. Compared with the 2 degree CRUST 2. 0 model, the spatial resolution of crustal thickness in our research can reach 40 arc minutes. In addition, there is a positive relationship between the inversed crustal thickness and topography, which can prove the effectiveness of Airy-Heiskanen isostatic model in gravity reduction.

  13. Seismological constraints on the crustal structures generated by continental rejuvenation in northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tian-Yu; He, Yu-Mei; Yang, Jin-Hui; Zhao, Liang

    2015-10-07

    Crustal rejuvenation is a key process that has shaped the characteristics of current continental structures and components in tectonic active continental regions. Geological and geochemical observations have provided insights into crustal rejuvenation, although the crustal structural fabrics have not been well constrained. Here, we present a seismic image across the North China Craton (NCC) and Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) using a velocity structure imaging technique for receiver functions from a dense array. The crustal evolution of the eastern NCC was delineated during the Mesozoic by a dominant low seismic wave velocity with velocity inversion, a relatively shallow Moho discontinuity, and a Moho offset beneath the Tanlu Fault Zone. The imaged structures and geochemical evidence, including changes in the components and ages of continental crusts and significant continental crustal growth during the Mesozoic, provide insight into the rejuvenation processes of the evolving crust in the eastern NCC caused by structural, magmatic and metamorphic processes in an extensional setting. The fossil structural fabric of the convergent boundary in the eastern CAOB indicates that the back-arc action of the Paleo-Pacific Plate subduction did not reach the hinterland of Asia.

  14. Crustal radial anisotropy in Northeast China and its implications for the regional tectonic extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Yang, Yingjie; Chen, Y. John

    2016-10-01

    We obtain high-resolution Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocity maps from ambient noise tomography using data recorded by NECESSArray in Northeast China. The resulting radial anisotropic model from the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves reveals strong relationship between the crustal radial anisotropy and tectonic provinces, that is, strong positive anisotropy (Vsh > Vsv) beneath the Songliao Basin and weak radial anisotropy beneath the Xinmeng Belt and Changbaishan Region. The Songliao Basin experienced widespread crustal extension during the late Mesozoic. We interpret the lower crustal anisotropy beneath the Songliao Basin as a result of ductile deformation during the rifting stage, which may lead to the alignment of anisotropic minerals and the observed strong radial anisotropy at present. In the northern Songliao Basin, where thick syn-rift and post-rift sediments (≥4 km) are believed to be present, we observe a broader lateral distribution of anisotropy with stronger amplitude compared with the southern basin. We suggest that the broader distribution of crustal radial anisotropy in the northern basin could be the consequence of outward lower crustal flow driven by the sedimentary loading during the post-rift stage, which is also proposed by previous numerical modeling.

  15. Crustal CO2 liberation during the 2006 eruption and earthquake events at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troll, Valentin R.; Hilton, David R.; Jolis, Ester M.; Chadwick, Jane P.; Blythe, Lara S.; Deegan, Frances M.; Schwarzkopf, Lothar M.; Zimmer, Martin

    2012-06-01

    High-temperature volcanic gas is widely considered to originate from ascending, mantle-derived magma. In volcanic arc systems, crustal inputs to magmatic gases mainly occur via subducted sediments in the mantle source region. Our data from Merapi volcano, Indonesia imply, however, that during the April-October 2006 eruption significant quantities of CO2 were added from shallow crustal sources. We show that prior to the 2006 events, summit fumarole gas δ13C(CO2) is virtually constant (δ13C1994-2005 = -4.1 ± 0.3‰), but during the 2006 eruption and after the shallow Yogyakarta earthquake of late May, 2006 (M6.4; hypocentres at 10-15 km depth), carbon isotope ratios increased to -2.4 ± 0.2‰. This rise in δ13C is consistent with considerable addition of crustal CO2 and coincided with an increase in eruptive intensity by a factor of ˜3 to 5. We postulate that this shallow crustal volatile input supplemented the mantle-derived volatile flux at Merapi, intensifying and sustaining the 2006 eruption. Late-stage volatile additions from crustal contamination may thus provide a trigger for explosive eruptions independently of conventional magmatic processes.

  16. MISSE 5 Thin Films Space Exposure Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Gale A.; Kinard, William H.; Jones, James L.

    2007-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is a set of space exposure experiments using the International Space Station (ISS) as the flight platform. MISSE 5 is a co-operative endeavor by NASA-LaRC, United Stated Naval Academy, Naval Center for Space Technology (NCST), NASA-GRC, NASA-MSFC, Boeing, AZ Technology, MURE, and Team Cooperative. The primary experiment is performance measurement and monitoring of high performance solar cells for U.S. Navy research and development. A secondary experiment is the telemetry of this data to ground stations. A third experiment is the measurement of low-Earth-orbit (LEO) low-Sun-exposure space effects on thin film materials. Thin films can provide extremely efficacious thermal control, designation, and propulsion functions in space to name a few applications. Solar ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen are major degradation mechanisms in LEO. This paper is an engineering report of the MISSE 5 thm films 13 months space exposure experiment.

  17. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotovsky, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D

    2010-03-22

    This thin, MEMS contact-stress (CS) sensor continuously and accurately measures time-varying, solid interface loads in embedded systems over tens of thousands of load cycles. Unlike all other interface load sensors, the CS sensor is extremely thin (< 150 {micro}m), provides accurate, high-speed measurements, and exhibits good stability over time with no loss of calibration with load cycling. The silicon CS sensor, 5 mm{sup 2} and 65 {micro}m thick, has piezoresistive traces doped within a load-sensitive diaphragm. The novel package utilizes several layers of flexible polyimide to mechanically and electrically isolate the sensor from the environment, transmit normal applied loads to the diaphragm, and maintain uniform thickness. The CS sensors have a highly linear output in the load range tested (0-2.4 MPa) with an average accuracy of {+-} 1.5%.

  18. Deep crustal structure and continent-ocean boundary along the Galicia continental margin (NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druet, María; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Carbó, Andrés; Acosta, Juan; Granja Bruña, José Luis; Llanes, Pilar; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Ercilla, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    The Galicia continental margin is a magma-poor rifted margin with an extremely complex structure. Its formation involves several rifting episodes during the Mesozoic in the vicinity of a ridge triple junction, which produces a change in the orientation of the main structures. In addition, there is an overimposed Cenozoic partial tectonic inversion along its northern border. Although this continental margin has been widely studied since the 70's, most studies have focused on its western part in the transition to the Iberia Abyssal Plain, and there is a significant lack of information on the north and northwestern flanks of this margin. This fact, along with its great structural complexity, has resulted in the absence of a previous comprehensive regional geodynamic model integrating all the processes observed. In the present study we integrate a large volume of new geophysical data (gravity, swath bathymetry and 2D multichannel reflection seismic). Data come from the systematic mapping of the Spanish EEZ project which provides a dense grid of gravity data and full seafloor coverage with swath bathymetry, and from the ERGAP project which provides serially-arranged 2D seismic reflection profiles across the NW Iberia margin. The combined interpretation and modelling of this new information has arisen significant constraints on the origin, the deep crustal structure and the physiographic complexity of the margin, as well as on the characterization of the along- and across-strike variation of the ocean-continent transition along NW Iberia margin. The analysis of this information leads us to propose a conceptual model for the initiation of the tectonic inversion of a magma-poor rifted margin. Finally, a framework for the geodynamic evolution of the Galicia margin has been constructed, involving three main stages: A) an early stage from the end of rifting and oceanic drift in the Bay of Biscay (Santonian); B) an intermediate stage with the beginning of tectonic inversion in

  19. Geodetic measurements for monitoring rapid crustal uplift in southeastern Alaska caused by the recent deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A.; Sato, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Ohta, Y.; Larsen, C.; Freymueller, J.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers at high latitudes are considered to be extremely sensitive to climate change and thus monitoring of glaciers is a clue to evaluate the future effect of global warming and the related phenomena. Ice mass changes also produce a time-variable surface load and give us useful data to investigate subsurface structure of the earth, especially to constrain the flow characteristics of the mantle. Larsen et al. [EPSL05] have extensively studied on vertical crustal movement in SE Alaska to reveal the world's fastest glacial isostatic uplifting, which can be attributed to the response associated with deglaciation. Displacement data, however, can only be used to constrain the sum of the elastic response to present-day ice melting (PDIM) and the viscoelastic one to past changes in ice. A Japan-US joint research project, ISEA (International geodetic research project in SouthEast Alaska), was initiated in 2005 to add new geodetic data and to refine the viscoelastic model derived by the previous studies. Absolute gravity data have been acquired at the five sites in the stdudy area using a Micro-g LaCoste absolute gravimeter, FG5#111. At each site data were collected over a 48~62 hour period. The long-term variation in absolute gravity at 2 stations, HNSG and BRM, where the measurements were performed in 1987 by Sasagawa et al. [JGR89] demonstrates rapid gravity decrease with rates of -4.4 micro-gal/yr, and -3.0 micro-gal/yr, respectively, and can be attributed to uplifting and mass-redstribution. ISEA supplements pre-existing continuous GPS (CGPS) stations operated by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the UNAVCO (Plate Boundary Observatory, PBO) and improves the spatial coverage in and around Glacier Bay. The time series of the site coordinates obtained for Queen Inlet (QUIC), which locates close to a zone of maximum uplift, shows obvious uplifting, even though there are long- term gaps because of an antenna cable trouble in 2006 and power outage in 2008 causing rather

  20. Biomimetic thin film synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Gordon, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for forming thin film coatings and to demonstrate that the biomimetic thin film technology developed at PNL is useful for industrial applications. In the biomimetic process, mineral deposition from aqueous solution is controlled by organic functional groups attached to the underlying substrate surface. The coatings process is simple, benign, inexpensive, energy efficient, and particularly suited for temperature sensitive substrate materials (such as polymers). In addition, biomimetic thin films can be deposited uniformly on complex shaped and porous substrates providing a unique capability over more traditional line-of-sight methods.

  1. S-wave crustal and upper mantle’s velocity structure in the eastern Tibetan Plateau——Deep environment of lower crustal flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; SILVER

    2008-01-01

    A teleseismic profile consisting of 26 stations was deployed along 30°N latitude in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. By use of the inversion of P-wave receiver function, the S-wave velocity structures at depth from surface to 80 km beneath the profile have been determined. The inversion results reveal that there is significant lateral variation of the crustal structure between the tectonic blocks on the profile. From Linzhi north of the eastern Himalayan Syntaxis, the crust is gradually thickened in NE direction; the crustal thickness reaches to the maximum value (~72 km) at the Bangong-Nujiang suture, and then decreased to 65 km in the Qiangtang block, to 57―64 km in the Bayan Har block, and to 40―45 km in the Sichuan Basin. The eastern segment of the teleseismic profile (to the east of Batang) coincides geographically with the Zhubalong-Zizhong deep seismic sounding profile carried out in 2000, and the S-wave velocity structure determined from receiver functions is consistent with the P-wave velocity structure obtained by deep seismic sounding in respect of the depths of Moho and major crustal interfaces. In the Qiangtang and the Bayan Har blocks, the lower velocity layer is widespread in the lower crust (at depth of 30―60 km) along the profile, while there is a normal velocity distribution in lower crust in the Sichuan Basin. On an average, the crustal velocity ratio (Poisson ratio) in tectonic blocks on the profile is 1.73 (σ = 0.247) in the Lhasa block, 1.78 (σ = 0.269) in the Banggong-Nujiang suture, 1.80 (σ = 0.275) in the Qiangtang block, 1.86 (σ = 0.294) in the Bayan Har blocks, and 1.77 (σ = 0.265) in the Yangtze block, respectively. The Qiangtang and the Bayan Har blocks are characterized by lower S-wave velocity anomaly in lower crust, complicated Moho transition, and higher crustal Poisson ratio, indicating that there is a hot and weak medium in lower crust. These are considered as the deep environment of lower crustal flow in the eastern

  2. Crustal evolution of South American Platform based on Sm-Nd isotope geochemistry; Evolucao crustal da plataforma sul americana com base na geoquimica isotopica Sm-Nd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kei

    1998-07-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic systematics is relevant to the topics of origin and evolution the of continental crust, where model ages refer to the time when crustal material was differentiated from the upper mantle. Alternative interpretations are due to a lack of adequate information on crustal processes and the variable composition of the mantle sources. The Sm-Nd methods are presented, and applied on rock materials from the South American Platform. The main conclusions indicate juvenile accretion with higher growth rates (peaks), around 3.7-3.5 Ga ({approx} 0.5% in volume), 3.1 - 2.9 Ga ({approx}16%), 2.7 - 2.6 ({approx} 9%), 2.2 - 1.9 (35%) and 1.3-1.0 (7%). The continental growth curve indicates that about 35 % of the crust was formed by 2.5 Ga, 88% by 1.8 Ga and 99% by 1.0 Ga, and the remaining {approx} 1 % was added in the Phanerozoic. Rapid crustal growth occurred between 2.2 and 1.9 Ga. The main period of continental crust formation occurred during the Paleoproterozoic, corresponding to 54 % in volume. Sm-Nd model ages, when compared with the crystallisation ages of granitoid rocks, furnish a rough estimate of juvenile vs. reworked material. Within the South American Platform about 45% of juvenile continental crust is still preserved within tectonic provinces of different ages. The remainder represents continental crust reworked in younger tectono-thermal events. In particular crustal reworking was predominating over juvenile accretion during Meso-Neoproterozoic. The Transbrasiliano Lineament is a megasuture, active in the Neoproterozoic, which separates a large northwestern mass, including the Amazonian and Sao Luis Cratons, from a southeastern mass, formed by a collage of cratonic fragments, of which the Sao Francisco and Rio de La Plata are the largest. The crustal evolutions of these two large continental masses are considered individually, and can be resumed following form: I - Old Archean rocks (>3.4 Ga) are found only within the south-eastern part (Gaviao Block

  3. S-wave crustal and upper mantle's velocity structure in the eastern Tibetan Plateau-Deep environment of lower crustal flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ChunYong; Paul SILVER; L(U) Hai; LOU ZhiYong; WU JianPing; CHANG LiJun; DAI ShiGui; YOU HuiChuan; TANG FangTou; ZHU LuPei

    2008-01-01

    A teleseismic profile consisting of 26 stations was deployed along 30°N latitude in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. By use of the inversion of P-wave receiver function, the S-wave velocity structures at depth from surface to 80 km beneath the profile have been determined. The inversion results reveal that there is significant lateral variation of the crustal structure between the tectonic blocks on the profile. From Linzhi north of the eastern Himalayan Syntaxis, the crust is gradually thickened in NE direction; the crustal thickness reaches to the maximum value (~72 km) at the Bangong-Nujiang suture, and then decreased to 65 km in the Qiangtang block, to 57-64 km in the Bayan Har block, and to 40-45 km in the Sichuan Basin. The eastern segment of the teleseismic profile (to the east of Batang) coincides geographically with the Zhubalong-Zizhong deep seismic sounding profile carried out in 2000, and the S-wave velocity structure determined from receiver functions is consistent with the P-wave velocity structure obtained by deep seismic sounding in respect of the depths of Mono and major crustal interfaces. In the Qiangtang and the Bayan Har blocks, the lower velocity layer is widespread in the lower crust (at depth of 30-60 km) along the profile, while there is a normal velocity distribution in lower crust in the Sichuan Basin. On an average, the crustal velocity ratio (Poisson ratio) in tectonic blocks on the profile is 1.73 (σ= 0.247) in the Lhasa block, 1.78 (σ= 0.269) in the Banggong-Nujiang suture, 1.80 (σ = 0.275) in the Qiangtang block, 1.86 (σ= 0.294) in the Bayan Har blocks, and 1.77 (σ=0.265) in the Yangtze block, respectively. The Qiangtang and the Bayan Har blocks are characterized by lower S-wave velocity anomaly in lower crust, complicated Moho transition, and higher crustal Poisson ratio,indicating that there is a hot and weak medium in lower crust. These are considered as the deep environment of lower crustal flow in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

  4. Antibacterial Properties of Titanate Nanofiber Thin Films Formed on a Titanium Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Yada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sodium titanate nanofiber thin film and a silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nanofiber thin film formed on the surface of a titanium plate exhibited strong antibacterial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is one of the major bacteria causing in-hospital infections. Exposure of the sodium titanate nanofiber thin film to ultraviolet rays generated a high antibacterial activity due to photocatalysis and the sodium titanate nanofiber thin film immediately after its synthesis possessed a high antibacterial activity even without exposure to ultraviolet rays. Elution of silver from the silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nanofiber thin film caused by the silver ion exchange reaction was considered to contribute substantially to the strong antibacterial activity. The titanate nanofiber thin films adhered firmly to titanium. Therefore, these titanate nanofiber thin film/titanium composites will be extremely useful as implant materials that have excellent antibacterial activities.

  5. Spatial dependence of extreme rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Noor Fadhilah Ahmad; Zakaria, Roslinazairimah; Satari, Siti Zanariah; Azman, Muhammad Az-zuhri

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to model the spatial extreme daily rainfall process using the max-stable model. The max-stable model is used to capture the dependence structure of spatial properties of extreme rainfall. Three models from max-stable are considered namely Smith, Schlather and Brown-Resnick models. The methods are applied on 12 selected rainfall stations in Kelantan, Malaysia. Most of the extreme rainfall data occur during wet season from October to December of 1971 to 2012. This period is chosen to assure the available data is enough to satisfy the assumption of stationarity. The dependence parameters including the range and smoothness, are estimated using composite likelihood approach. Then, the bootstrap approach is applied to generate synthetic extreme rainfall data for all models using the estimated dependence parameters. The goodness of fit between the observed extreme rainfall and the synthetic data is assessed using the composite likelihood information criterion (CLIC). Results show that Schlather model is the best followed by Brown-Resnick and Smith models based on the smallest CLIC's value. Thus, the max-stable model is suitable to be used to model extreme rainfall in Kelantan. The study on spatial dependence in extreme rainfall modelling is important to reduce the uncertainties of the point estimates for the tail index. If the spatial dependency is estimated individually, the uncertainties will be large. Furthermore, in the case of joint return level is of interest, taking into accounts the spatial dependence properties will improve the estimation process.

  6. Extreme Thrombocytosis and Cardiovascular Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natelson, Ethan A.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme thrombocytosis is a major risk factor for excessive bleeding and for thrombosis, either of which can complicate cardiovascular surgical and interventional procedures. Extreme thrombocytosis can also cause an unusual syndrome, erythromelalgia, that results in a type of chronic microvascular occlusive arterial disease. We present the differential diagnosis of conditions that may lead to extreme thrombocytosis, 3 cases (each of which illustrates a different potential complication), and a review of the pertinent medical literature. Correcting excessive thrombocytosis is typically not difficult, whether electively or acutely, and effective therapy usually controls thrombosis and excessive hemorrhage postprocedurally. PMID:23304015

  7. Crustal thickening in an active margin setting (Philippines): The whys and the hows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.B.Dimalanta; G.P.Yumul,Jr.

    2004-01-01

    A synthesis of crustal thickness estimates was made recently utilizing available field, geochemical, seismicity, shear wave velocity and gravity data in the Philippines. The results show that a significant portion of the Philippine archipelago is generally characterized by crust with a thickness of around 25 to 30 kilometers. However, two zones, which are made up of a thicker crust (from 30 to 65 km) have also been delineated. The Luzon Central Cordillera region is characterized by thick crust. Another belt of thickened crust is observed in the Bicol-Negros-Panay-Central Mindanao region. This paper examines the interplay of tectonic and magmatic processes and their role in modifying Philippine arc crust. The processes, which could account for the observed crustal thicknesses, are presented. The contributions of magmatic arcs as compared to the contribution of the emplacement and accretion of ophiolite complexes to crustal thickness are also discussed.

  8. Crustal Flows beneath the Eastern Tibetan Plateau Revealed by Magnetotelluric Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Denghai; TENG Jiwen; MA Xiaobing; KONG Xiangru

    2011-01-01

    @@ The ongoing collision of the Indian and Asian continents has created the Himalayan and Tibetan plateau through a range of deformation processes that include crustal thickening, delamination, lateral extrusion and crustal flow.A debate continues as to which of these processes are most significant in terms of the overall mass balance of this continent-continent collision.In eastern Tibet GPS data show large-scale motion of the surface has been occurring around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis (EHS), but the nature of deformation at depth remains unresolved.A large-scale crustal flow has been proposed as an explanation for regional uplift in eastern Tibet, but existing geophysical data do not constrain the pattern of flow.

  9. Anisotropic Solar Wind Sputtering of the Lunar Surface Induced by Crustal Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Sarantos, M.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Saito, Y.; Nishino, M.

    2014-01-01

    The lunar exosphere is generated by several processes each of which generates neutral distributions with different spatial and temporal variability. Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface is a major process for many regolith-derived species and typically generates neutral distributions with a cosine dependence on solar zenith angle. Complicating this picture are remanent crustal magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, which decelerate and partially reflect the solar wind before it strikes the surface. We use Kaguya maps of solar wind reflection efficiencies, Lunar Prospector maps of crustal field strengths, and published neutral sputtering yields to calculate anisotropic solar wind sputtering maps. We feed these maps to a Monte Carlo neutral exospheric model to explore three-dimensional exospheric anisotropies and find that significant anisotropies should be present in the neutral exosphere depending on selenographic location and solar wind conditions. Better understanding of solar wind/crustal anomaly interactions could potentially improve our results.

  10. Fast crustal deformation computing method for multiple computations accelerated by a graphics processing unit cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takuma; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Yagi, Yuji; Agata, Ryoichiro; Hori, Takane; Hori, Muneo

    2017-08-01

    As high-resolution observational data become more common, the demand for numerical simulations of crustal deformation using 3-D high-fidelity modelling is increasing. To increase the efficiency of performing numerical simulations with high computation costs, we developed a fast solver using heterogeneous computing, with graphics processing units (GPUs) and central processing units, and then used the solver in crustal deformation computations. The solver was based on an iterative solver and was devised so that a large proportion of the computation was calculated more quickly using GPUs. To confirm the utility of the proposed solver, we demonstrated a numerical simulation of the coseismic slip distribution estimation, which requires 360 000 crustal deformation computations with 82 196 106 degrees of freedom.

  11. Isotopic disequilibrium and lower crustal contamination in slowly ascending magmas: Insights from Proterozoic anorthosites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, G. M.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-10-01

    Many Proterozoic anorthosite massifs show crustal isotopic signatures that have, for decades, fuelled debate regarding the source of these temporally-restricted magmas. Are these signatures indicative of lower crustal melting or of significant assimilation of crustal material into mantle-derived magmas? Traditional whole rock isotopic tracers (Sr, Nd, Pb and Os), like other geochemical, petrological and experimental tools, have failed to identify unambiguously the origins of the crust-like signature and resolve the source controversies for these feldspathic, cumulate intrusives. We make use of high precision Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of mineral phases (plag, opx, mag) and comagmatic, high-pressure orthopyroxene megacrysts as well as whole rock anorthosites/leuconorites from the Mealy Mountains Intrusive Suite (MMIS) and the Nain Plutonic Suite (NPS) to probe the origin of the crustal isotopic signatures and assess the importance of differentiation at lower crustal depths. This selection of samples represents fragments from various stages of the polybaric ascent of the magmas, while the study of the Mealy Mountains Intrusive Suite and the Nain Plutonic Suite is instructive as each is intruded into crust of significantly different age and isotopic composition. We observe marked differences in the whole-rock isotopic composition of Proterozoic anorthosites and high-pressure megacrysts (e.g. εNd;T = +2 to -10) intruded into crustal terranes of different ages and isotopic compositions. Evidence for varying degrees of internal isotopic disequilibrium (ΔNd, ΔSr, ΔPb) in anorthosites from these different terranes reinforces the notion that crustal contamination, and more importantly, the nature of the crustal assimilant, has a profound influence on the chemical signature of Proterozoic anorthosites. While most samples from the MMIS and NPS show significant and measurable ΔNd and ΔPb disequilibrium, ΔSr compositions cluster around zero. This decoupling in

  12. Variations of the crustal thickness in Nepal Himalayas based on tomographic inversion of regional earthquake data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koulakov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We estimate variations of the crustal thickness beneath the Nepal Himalayas based on tomographic inversion of regional earthquake data. We have obtained a low-velocity anomaly in the upper part of the model down to depths of 40 to 80 km and proposed that the lower limit of this anomaly represents variations of the Moho depth. This statement was supported by results of synthetic modeling. The obtained variations of crustal thickness match fairly well with the free-air gravity anomalies: thinner crust patterns correspond to lower gravity values and vice versa. There is also some correlation with magnetic field: higher magnetic values correspond to the major areas of thicker crust. We propose that elevated magnetic values can be associated with more rigid segments of the incoming Indian crust which cause more compression in the thrust zone and leads to stronger crustal thickening.

  13. The crustal structure beneath Mauritius from teleseismic P-receiver functions - oceanic or continental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvendra; Kaviani, Ayoub; Rümpker, Georg

    2016-09-01

    It has recently been suggested that the volcanic island of Mauritius may be underlain by a remnant of continental origin termed "Mauritia". To constrain the crustal thickness beneath Mauritius, we analyzed data from 11 land stations, 10 of which were deployed recently by the RHUM-RUM project. From the recordings, we obtained 382 P-receiver functions (RFs). By applying the H-κ stacking technique, we derive crustal thicknesses of approximately 10-15 km. We observe a considerable variation in the Vp/Vs-ratio caused by a lack of clear multiples. Using forward modeling of RFs, we show that the lack of clear multiples can be explained by a transitional Moho, where the velocity increases gradually. The modeling further indicates that the thickness of this gradient zone is estimated to be approximately 10 km. We argue that our findings suggest oceanic crust thickened by crustal underplating due the mantle plume currently located beneath the La Réunion.

  14. Do crustal deformations observed by GPS in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina reflect glacial-isostatic adjustment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mendoza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Vertical site velocities determined by geodetic GPS observations in the Lago Fagnano area, Tierra del Fuego main island, are interpreted with respect to their potential relation with the glacial-isostatic crustal response to ice mass changes. The spatial pattern of the uplift rates, in combination with the horizontal crustal deformation pattern, point towards a fault-tectonic rather than glacial-isostatic origin of the determined vertical crustal deformations. This implies rather small GIA effects pointing towards relatively small Holocene ice-mass changes in Tierra del Fuego. However, these findings are considered to be preliminary. They should be confirmed by additional observations covering an extended area with GPS sites.

  15. Contemporary velocity field of crustal movement of Chinese mainland from Global Positioning System measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Zhijun; WANG Yongqing; WANG Yongxiang; LI Bai; WANG Min; SUN Hanrong; SUN Jianzhong; YOU Xinzhao; GAN Weijun; XUE Guijiang; HAO Jinxin; XIN Shaohua

    2005-01-01

    @@ Significant advancement for the monitoring of crustal deformation in the Chinese mainland was accomplished in 1998 when the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) was established. This National Key Scientific Infrastructural Project provides important information on present-day crustal deformation that can be used for many aspects of earth sciences such as navigation, positioning, and surveying. The principal GPS data used for this study come from the CMONOC collected from 1998 to 2004, including 27 fiducial stations which operate continuously since 1988, 56 basic stations observed annually with an occupation of at least 7 days (~168 hours' data collection) in each survey, and 961 regional stations observed in 1999, 2001, and 2004 with an occupation of at least 3 days (~72 hours' data collection) in each survey[1,2].

  16. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  17. Inferring regional vertical crustal velocities from averaged relative sea level trends: A proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâki Iz, H.; Shum, C. K.; Zhang, C.; Kuo, C. Y.

    2017-02-01

    This study demonstrates that relative sea level trends calculated from long-term tide gauge records can be used to estimate relative vertical crustal velocities in a region with high accuracy. A comparison of the weighted averages of the relative sea level trends estimated at six tide gauge stations in two clusters along the Eastern coast of United States, in Florida and in Maryland, reveals a statistically significant regional vertical crustal motion of Maryland with respect to Florida with a subsidence rate of -1.15±0.15 mm/yr identified predominantly due to the ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment process. The estimate is a consilience value to validate vertical crustal velocities calculated from GPS time series as well as towards constraining predictive GIA models in these regions.

  18. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  19. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  20. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  1. A Graphical Approach to Quality Checking Crustal Thickness Point Data Using Isostacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallet, B.; Okure, M. S.; Keller, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    Constructing crustal models requires the aggregation of considerable amounts of data from multiple data sources. Unfortunately, such data often are noisy and outliers within the data may produce large errors in the resulting model. However, despite what are clearly large errors, verification and cleaning of the data is complicated by the fact that true crustal thicknesses can vary greatly over a distances of 10’s of kilometers. Thus, it is impossible to select a single threshold that is capable of filtering outliers. In this work, we were attempting to form an estimate of the crustal thickness for North America using 1845 observations from the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program integrated with the receiver function-based crustal thickness estimates that are an EarthScope data product. Our initial efforts demonstrated that a large number of the observed depths were greater than expected. To improve our data, we employed an Airy-Heiskanen local compensation model to estimate crustal thickness based upon elevation. We then calculate the residuals of the crustal thickness. Examination of these residuals revealed a bimodal structure with a smaller upper tail cluster corresponding to observations we believed to be too thick to be reliable. We then adjusted our estimate of the depth of compensation at sea level such that the lower tail cluster had an approximately zero mean residual, which occurred at a value of 37 km. We then recalculated the residuals and estimated a threshold graphical. By then using this new set of filtered data, we were able to obtain better maps than previously obtainable. Our goal is to set up a database than be expanded and revised via community input and new results.

  2. Multifunctional thin film surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  3. Nanometric thin film membranes manufactured on square meter scale: ultra-thin films for CO 2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Yave, Wilfredo

    2010-09-01

    Miniaturization and manipulation of materials at nanometer scale are key challenges in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In membrane science and technology, the fabrication of ultra-thin polymer films (defect-free) on square meter scale with uniform thickness (<100 nm) is crucial. By using a tailor-made polymer and by controlling the nanofabrication conditions, we developed and manufactured defect-free ultra-thin film membranes with unmatched carbon dioxide permeances, i.e. >5 m3 (STP) m-2 h -1 bar-1. The permeances are extremely high, because the membranes are made from a CO2 philic polymer material and they are only a few tens of nanometers thin. Thus, these thin film membranes have potential application in the treatment of large gas streams under low pressure like, e.g., carbon dioxide separation from flue gas. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Nanometric thin film membranes manufactured on square meter scale: ultra-thin films for CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yave, Wilfredo; Car, Anja; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor [Institute of Materials Research, GKSS-Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Wind, Jan, E-mail: klausviktor.peinemann@kaust.edu.sa [Institute of Polymer Research, GKSS-Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    Miniaturization and manipulation of materials at nanometer scale are key challenges in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In membrane science and technology, the fabrication of ultra-thin polymer films (defect-free) on square meter scale with uniform thickness (<100 nm) is crucial. By using a tailor-made polymer and by controlling the nanofabrication conditions, we developed and manufactured defect-free ultra-thin film membranes with unmatched carbon dioxide permeances, i.e. > 5 m{sup 3} (STP) m{sup -2} h{sup -1}bar{sup -1}. The permeances are extremely high, because the membranes are made from a CO{sub 2} philic polymer material and they are only a few tens of nanometers thin. Thus, these thin film membranes have potential application in the treatment of large gas streams under low pressure like, e.g., carbon dioxide separation from flue gas.

  5. Extreme hypertriglyceridemia managed with insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuzar, Moe; Shenoy, Vasant V; Malabu, Usman H; Schrale, Ryan; Sangla, Kunwarjit S

    2014-01-01

    Extreme hypertriglyceridemia can lead to acute pancreatitis and rapid lowering of serum triglycerides (TG) is necessary for preventing such life-threatening complications. However, there is no established consensus on the acute management of extreme hypertriglyceridemia. We retrospectively reviewed 10 cases of extreme hypertriglyceridemia with mean serum TG on presentation of 101.5 ± 23.4 mmol/L (8982 ± 2070 mg/dL) managed with insulin. Serum TG decreased by 87 ± 4% in 24 hours in those patients managed with intravenous insulin and fasting and 40 ± 8.4% in those managed with intravenous insulin alone (P = .0003). The clinical course was uncomplicated in all except 1 patient who subsequently developed a pancreatic pseudocyst. Thus, combination of intravenous insulin with fasting appears to be an effective, simple, and safe treatment strategy in immediate management of extreme hypertriglyceridemia. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Moment methods in extremal geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laat, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop techniques for solving problems in extremal geometry. We give an infinite dimensional generalization of moment techniques from polynomial optimization. We use this to construct semidefinite programming hierarchies for approximating optimal packing densities and ground state

  7. Moment methods in extremal geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laat, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop techniques for solving problems in extremal geometry. We give an infinite dimensional generalization of moment techniques from polynomial optimization. We use this to construct semidefinite programming hierarchies for approximating optimal packing densities and ground state

  8. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2004-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continously increase the knowledge on wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describe the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of high-sampled full-scale time series measurements...... are consistent, given the inevitabel uncertainties associated with model as well as with the extreme value data analysis. Keywords: Statistical model, extreme wind conditions, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, wind shear, wind turbines....

  9. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  10. Mercury's lithospheric thickness and crustal density, as inferred from MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P. B.; Mazarico, E.; Genova, A.; Smith, D. E.; Neumann, G. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The gravity field and topography of Mercury measured by the MESSENGER spacecraft have provided insights into the thickness of the planet's elastic lithosphere, Te. We localized the HgM006 free-air gravity anomaly and gtmes_125v03 shape datasets to search for theoretical elastic thickness solutions that best fit a variety of localized coherence spectra between Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. We adopted a crustal density of ρcrust =2700 kg m-3 for the Bouguer gravity correction, but density uncertainty did not markedly affect the elastic thickness estimates. A best-fit solution in the northern smooth plains (NSP) gives an elastic thickness of Te =30-60 km at the time of formation of topography for a range of ratios of top to bottom loading from 1 to 5. For a mechanical lithosphere with a thickness of ~2Te and a temperature of 1600 °C at the base, this solution is consistent with a geothermal gradient of 9-18 K km-1. A similar coherence analysis exterior to the NSP produces an elastic thickness estimate of Te =20-50 km, albeit with a poorer fit. Coherence in the northern hemisphere as a whole does not approach zero at any wavelength, because of the presence of variations in crustal thickness that are unassociated with elastic loading. The ratios and correlations of gravity and topography at intermediate wavelengths (harmonic degree l between 30 and 50) also constrain regional crustal densities. We localized gravity and topography with a moving Slepian taper and calculated regionally averaged crustal densities with the approximation ρcrust=Zl/(2πG), where Zl is the localized admittance and G is the gravitational constant. The only regional density estimates greater than 2000 kg m-3 for l=30 correspond to the NSP. Density estimates outside of the NSP were unreasonably low, even for highly porous crust. We attribute these low densities to the confounding effects of crustal thickness variations and Kaula filtering of the gravity dataset at the highest harmonic

  11. Crustal structure of western Hispaniola (Haiti) from a teleseismic receiver function study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S.; Guerrier, K.; Keir, D.; Stuart, G.; Clouard, V.; Gallacher, R.; Ulysse, S.; Boisson, D.; Bien-aimé Momplaisir, R.; Saint Preux, F.; Prépetit, C.; Saurel, J.-M.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Meyer, B.

    2017-07-01

    Haiti, located at the northern Caribbean plate boundary, records a geological history of terrane accretion from Cretaceous island arc formations to the Eocene to Recent oblique collision with the Bahamas platform. Little is presently known about the underlying crustal structure of the island. We analyze P-waveforms arriving at 27 temporary broadband seismic stations deployed over a distance of 200 km across the major terrane boundaries in Haiti to determine the crustal structure of western Hispaniola. We compute teleseismic receiver functions using the Extended-Time Multi-Taper method and determine crustal thickness and bulk composition (Vp/Vs) using the H-k stacking method. Three distinctive and fault-bounded crustal domains, defined by their characteristic Moho depth distributions and bulk crustal Vp/Vs, are imaged across Haiti. We relate these domains to three crustal terranes that have been accreted along the plate boundary during the northeastwards displacement of the Caribbean plate and are presently being deformed in a localized fold and thrust belt. In the northern domain, made up of volcanic arc facies, the crust has a thickness of 23 km and Vp/Vs of 1.75 ± 0.1 typical of average continental crust. The crust in the southern domain is part of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (Caribbean LIP), and is 22 km thick with Vp/Vs of 1.80 ± 0.03 consistent with plume-related rocks of late Cretaceous age. Significantly thicker, the crust in central Haiti has values of Moho depths averaging 41 km and with Vp/Vs of 1.80 ± 0.05. We propose that the central domain is likely constructed of an island arc upper crust with fragments of dense material originating from mafic lavas or LIP material. We produce a crustal profile along a N-S transect across Haiti accounting for the surface geology, shallow structural history, and new seismological constraints provided by variations of crustal thickness and bulk composition.

  12. Crustal Structure Across the Three Gorges Dam from Wide-Angle Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Bai, Z.; Mooney, W. D.; Wang, C.; Chen, X.; Wang, E.; Teng, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Three Gorges Dam (TGD) is one of the biggest engineering projects in the world. In order to understand the crustal structure across the TGD, a wide-angle seismic profile was acquired from Fengjie, Sichuan Province, to Guanyindang, Hubei Province. The crustal velocity and reflectivity cross-section across the TGD shows lateral velocity variation and a northward-slipping, crustal-scale, strong reflector. The TGD is located at a transition in crustal thickness from about 45 km in the northwest to about 35 km in the southeast. The topography of China is characterized by three terraces. The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is the first terrace with a surface elevation above sea level of >4500 m; the second terrace lies north and east of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau at an elevation of 1000-2000 m; the third terrace is in the eastern part of China with an elevation of named after the three gorges of Xiling Xia, Wu Xia, and Qutang Xia (Xia means "gorge" in Chinese), is located at the middle segmentations of the Yangtze River, extending from Fengjie, Sichuan Province, to Yichang, Hubei Province, with a total length of about 200 km. Due to the abrupt relief from the second to third topographic terrace of China, the unstopping, huge amounts of river stream provide the best place for the construction of the largest hydro power plant ever in the world. In order to provide a background of the crustal environment for the dam project, a wide-angle seismic profile along the Yangtze River was carried out. Tectonically, the studied area belongs to the Yangtze block and cut several sub-tectonic units: the Wanxian depression fold belt, the Zigui platform fold belt, the southwestern Hubei province complex fold belt, the Huangling Faulted Dome (HLFD), and the Jiangling Depression (JLD). We present the interpretation results of the crustal structure along the Three Gorges extension which shows: there are strong lateral variations both of crustal thickness and P-wave velocity, the Jiangling

  13. Crustal Structure And Magmatism, Coast Mountains Orogen, Latitude 52-53 degrees North, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmore, M. E.; Gehrels, G.; Woodsworth, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    New geologic data and U-Pb ages reveal complex history of arc accretion, crustal thickening and migration of magmatic fronts during deformation. Plutonic ages define distinct western and eastern Jurassic - mid Cretaceous arcs that share a common history after ~90 Ma. Juxtaposition of these arcs occurred during mid- Cretaceous crustal shortening in a dominantly SW-vergent crustal-scale thrust belt. Significant crustal thickening buried 151 Ma granitic clasts to pressures > 6 kb, and mid-Cretaceous plutons were emplaced at this depth along the axis of the orogen. Thrusting continued after establishment of the 90 Ma arc; a regional SW-verging thrust emplaced high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Yukon-Tanana terrane and deep-seated plutons over low- grade rocks of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes. The shear zone is coincident with the western boundary of 82-89 Ma plutons and a regionally extensive, late-kinematic, sill-like pluton. Dextral shear zones preserved on the flanks of the orogen suggest a component of Late Cretaceous transpression. By 75 Ma, metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism had migrated central portions of the orogen and there is no evidence of ductile deformation and syn-kinematic metarmorphism younger than ~70 - 65 along the western flank of the orogen. The Coast shear zone localized 62-58 Ma synkinematic plutons during NE-side up displacement, creating a sharp western magmatic front. Sparse cooling ages suggest plutons and metamorphic rocks adjacent to the CSZ cooled through 500-600 deg between 54-58 Ma during exhumation along the shear zone. Voluminous granitic plutons were emplaced from ~55-50 Ma, but significant crustal extension that affected the eastern side of the orogen farther north is not evident along this transect. This history supports previous models of crustal subcretion and the generation of arc magmas in thickened crust. Definition of two pre-90 Ma arcs negates models calling for simple Andean-style orogen prior to mid

  14. The Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Monitor for MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Thiemann, E. M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) monitor is an instrument on the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission, designed to measure the variability of the solar soft x-rays and EUV irradiance at Mars. The solar output in this wavelength range is a primary energy input to the Mars atmosphere and a driver for the processes leading to atmospheric escape. The MAVEN EUV monitor consists of three broadband radiometers. The radiometers consist of silicon photodiodes with different bandpass-limiting filters for each channel. The filters for the radiometers are: Channel A: thin foil C/Al/Nb/C for 0.1-3 nm and 17-22 nm, Channel B: thin foil C/Al/Ti/C for 0.1-7 nm, and Channel C: interference filter for 121-122 nm. A fourth, covered photodiode is used to monitor variations in dark signal due to temperature and radiation background changes. The three science channels will monitor emissions from the highly variable corona and transition region of the solar atmosphere. The EUV monitor is mounted on the top deck of the MAVEN spacecraft and is pointed at the Sun for most of its orbit around Mars. The measurement cadence is 1-second. The broadband irradiances can be used to monitor the most rapid changes in solar irradiance due to flares. In combination with time-interpolated observations at Earth of slower varying solar spectral emissions, the broadband MAVEN EUV monitor measurements will also be used in a spectral irradiance model to generate the full EUV spectrum at Mars from 0 to 190 nm in 1-nm bins on a time cadence of 1-minute and daily averages.

  15. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  16. Deformations of extremal toric manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Rollin, Yann

    2012-01-01

    Let $X$ be a compact toric extremal K\\"ahler manifold. Using the work of Sz\\'ekelyhidi, we provide a simple criterion on the fan describing $X$ to ensure the existence of complex deformations of $X$ that carry extremal metrics. As an example, we find new CSC metrics on 4-points blow-ups of $\\C\\P^1\\times\\C\\P^1$.

  17. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    IL, Kochevar IE, Redmond RW. Large extremity peripheral nerve repair. Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) Fort Lauderdale, FL. August...some notable discoveries that may impact military health care in the near future. There is a clear need in military medicine to improve outcomes in...membranes or “caul” intact was considered extremely lucky. Children were gifted with life-long happiness , the ability to see spirits, and protection

  18. Observed Statistics of Extreme Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    9 Figure 5. An energy stealing wave as a solution to the NLS equation . (From: Dysthe and...shown that nonlinear interaction between four colliding waves can produce extreme wave behavior. He utilized the NLS equation in his numerical ...2000) demonstrated the formation of extreme waves using the Korteweg de Vries ( KdV ) equation , which is valid in shallow water. It was shown in the

  19. Weather Extremes Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-04-01

    or ever has occurred. According to M. A. Arkin, "... record extremes must be taken with a grain of salt .... Ř He explains that news of an extreme...the edge of the Danakil Depression, a salt desert. By averaging the annual mean daily maximum temperature of 106°F36 atid the annual mean daily...increased by orographic lifting.1" Asa result of these monsoon disturbances, which are still not fully understood, the eastern Himalayan 105 106

  20. Irrigation mitigates against heat extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Fischer, Erich; Visser, Auke; Hirsch, Annette L.; Davin, Edouard L.; Lawrence, Dave; Hauser, Mathias; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation is an essential practice for sustaining global food production and many regional economies. Emerging scientific evidence indicates that irrigation substantially affects mean climate conditions in different regions of the world. Yet how this practice influences climate extremes is currently unknown. Here we use gridded observations and ensemble simulations with the Community Earth System Model to assess the impacts of irrigation on climate extremes. While the influence of irrigation on annual mean temperatures is limited, we find a large impact on temperature extremes, with a particularly strong cooling during the hottest day of the year (-0.78 K averaged over irrigated land). The strong influence on hot extremes stems from the timing of irrigation and its influence on land-atmosphere coupling strength. Together these effects result in asymmetric temperature responses, with a more pronounced cooling during hot and/or dry periods. The influence of irrigation is even more pronounced when considering subgrid-scale model output, suggesting that local effects of land management are far more important than previously thought. Finally we find that present-day irrigation is partly masking GHG-induced warming of extreme temperatures, with particularly strong effects in South Asia. Our results overall underline that irrigation substantially reduces our exposure to hot temperature extremes and highlight the need to account for irrigation in future climate projections.

  1. Kinematic analysis and analogue modelling of the Passeier- and Jaufen faults: Implications for crustal indentation in the Eastern Alps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luth, S.; Willingshofer, E.; ter Borgh, M.; Sokoutis, D.; van Otterloo, J.; Versteeg, A.

    2013-01-01

    Crustal deformation in front of an indenter is often affected by the indenter's geometry, rheology, and motion path. In this context, the kinematics of the Jaufen- and Passeier faults have been studied by carrying out paleostress analysis in combination with crustal-scale analogue modelling to infer

  2. Mechanism of crustal deformation in the Sichuan-Yunnan region, southeastern Tibetan Plateau: Insights from numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujiang; Liu, Shaofeng; Chen, Lianwang; Du, Yi; Li, Hong; Liu, Dongying

    2017-09-01

    The characteristics of crustal deformation and its dynamical mechanisms in the Sichuan-Yunnan region are of interest to many researchers because they can help explain the deformation pattern of the eastern Tibetan Plateau. In this paper, we employ a precise three-dimensional viscoelastic finite element model to simulate the crustal deformation in the Sichuan-Yunnan region, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. We investigate the influence of lower crustal flow and rheological variations by comparing the modeled results with GPS observations. The results demonstrate that lower crustal flow plays an important role in crustal deformation in the Sichuan-Yunnan region. The best fitting is achieved when the flow velocity of the lower crust is approximately 10-11 mm/a faster than that of the upper crust. Additionally, crustal rheological properties affect regional crustal deformation. When the viscosity of the middle and lower crust in the South China block reaches 1022 and 1023 Pa·s, respectively, the modeled results match observations well, especially for the magnitude of crustal motion within the South China block. Finally, our dynamic model shows that the maximum principal stress field of the Sichuan-Yunnan region exhibits clear zoning, gradually shifting from an approximately east-west orientation in the northern Bayan Har block to southeast in the South China block, southwest in the western Yunnan block, and a radially divergent distribution in the Middle Yunnan and Southern Yunnan blocks.