WorldWideScience

Sample records for extraterrestrial radio waves

  1. Radio communications with extra-terrestrial civilizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Communications between civilizations within our galaxy at the present level of radio engineering is possible, although civilizations must begin to search for each other to achieve this. If an extra-terrestrial civilization possessing a technology at our level wishes to make itself known and will transmit special radio signals to do this, then it can be picked up by us at a distance of several hundreds of light years using already existing radio telescopes and specially built radio receivers. If it wishes, this civilization can also send us information without awaiting our answer.

  2. Radio Searches for Signatures of Advanced Extraterrestrial Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemion, Andrew

    Over the last several decades, observational astronomy has produced a flood of discoveries that suggest that the building blocks and circumstances that gave rise to life on Earth may be the rule rather than the exception. It has now been conclusively shown that planets are common and that some 5-15% of FGKM stars host planets existing in their host star's habitable zone. Further, terrestrial biology has demonstrated that life on our own planet can thrive in extraordinarily extreme environments, dramatically extending our notion of what constitutes habitability. The deeper question, yet unanswered, is whether or not life in any form has ever existed in an environment outside of the Earth. As humans, we are drawn to an even more profound question, that of whether or not extraterrestrial life may have evolved a curiosity about the universe similar to our own and the technology with which to explore it. Radio astronomy has long played a prominent role in searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), beginning with the first suggestions by Cocconi and Morrison (1959) that narrow-band radio signals near 1420 MHz might be effective tracers of advanced technology and early experiments along these lines by Frank Drake in 1961, continuing through to more recent investigations searching for several types of coherent radio signals indicative of technology at a wider range of frequencies. The motivations for radio searches for extraterrestrial intelligence have been throughly discussed in the literature, but the salient arguments are the following: 1. coherent radio emission is commonly produced by advanced technology (judging by Earth’s technological development), 2. electromagnetic radiation can convey information at the maximum velocity currently known to be possible, 3. radio photons are energetically cheap to produce, 4. certain types of coherent radio emissions are easily distinguished from astrophysical background sources, especially within the so

  3. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* MERCURY ( PLANET ), (*RADIO ASTRONOMY, EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, SKY BRIGHTNESS, ANTENNAS...EPHEMERIDES, ASTROPHYSICS, JUPITER( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), BRIGHTNESS, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, INTENSITY, MEASUREMENT.

  4. Studies on different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events within the Earth-ionosphere cavity in terms of ULF/ELF/VLF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfui, Minu; Haldar, D. K.; Biswas, Debasish

    2016-10-01

    The space between the two spherical conducting shells, Earth surface and the lower boundary of the ionosphere, behaves as a spherical cavity in which some electromagnetic signals can propagate a long distance and is called Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Through this waveguide ultra low frequency (ULF), extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) signals can propagate efficiently with low attenuation. Resonances which occur for ELF waves due to round-the-world propagation interfering with 2n π phase difference are called Schumann resonances. Lightnings are the main sources of energy continuously producing these electromagnetic radiations from the troposphere. Some fixed frequency signals are also transmitted through the waveguide from different stations for navigation purposes. The intensity and phase of these signals at a particular position depend on the waveguide characteristics which are highly influenced by different natural events. Thus the signatures of different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events may be investigated by studying these signals through proper monitoring of the time series data using suitable techniques. In this article, we provide a review on ULF, ELF and VLF signals within the waveguide in terms of different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events like lightning, earthquakes, Leonid meteor shower, solar flares, solar eclipse, geomagnetic storms, and TLEs etc.

  5. ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM,

    Science.gov (United States)

    MERCURY ( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), PERIODIC VARIATIONS, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES...EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SOURCES), GALAXIES, BLACKBODY RADIATION, BRIGHTNESS, TEMPERATURE, MARS( PLANET ), JUPITER( PLANET ), SATURN( PLANET

  6. OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* PLANETS , STARS, VENUS( PLANET ), MARS( PLANET ), MERCURY ( PLANET ), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, GALAXIES, ASTROPHYSICS, TEMPERATURE, MEASUREMENT, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, ASTRONOMY, RADIO ASTRONOMY.

  7. The Berkeley piggyback SETI program - SERENDIP II. [Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emission from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Lindsay, V.

    1988-01-01

    The SERENDIP (Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emission from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations) II system is currently operating at NRAO's 300-ft telescope in Greenbank, WV. The paper reports on the characteristics of this system in combination with this telescope, as well as elements of an off-line analysis program which are intended to identify signals of special interest. The sensitivity and relative probability of acquisition are evaluated.

  8. ELF and VLF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R.; Jones, D. L.; Rodger, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    This review covers developments in ELF and VLF radio-wave propagation research over the last 50 years of the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. A review of such a large field, over such a long period, cannot be fully comprehensive and the authors have therefore covered important areas which have they themselves have found interesting. The survey begins with a review of work on natural and man made sources of ELF and VLF radiation. This is followed by sections on experimental and theoretical studies of unperturbed (ambient) ELF and VLF radio propagation. Schumann resonance research, which is currently undergoing a renaissance, is then reviewed. A review of research into transient perturbations of ELF and VLF propagation follows, extending from the early work on nuclear explosions up to the current work on sprites. The review concludes with a brief summary of the VLF navigation systems of the USSR and USA, (Alpha and Omega) whose development and life-span covered most of the last 50 years.

  9. Sampling the Radio Transient Universe: Studies of Pulsars and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    The transient radio universe is a relatively unexplored area of astronomy, offering a variety of phenomena, from solar and Jovian bursts, to flare stars, pulsars, and bursts of Galactic and potentially even cosmological origin. Among these, perhaps the most widely studied radio transients, pulsars are fast-spinning neutron stars that emit radio beams from their magnetic poles. In spite of over 40 years of research on pulsars, we have more questions than answers on these exotic compact objects, chief among them the nature of their emission mechanism. Nevertheless, the wealth of phenomena exhibited by pulsars make them one of the most useful astrophysical tools. With their high densities, pulsars are probes of the nature of ultra-dense matter. Characterized by their high timing stability, pulsars can be used to verify the predictions of general relativity, discover planets around them, study bodies in the solar system, and even serve as an interplanetary (and possibly some day, interstellar) navigation aid. Pulsars are also used to study the nature of the interstellar medium, much like a flashlight illuminating airborne dust in a dark room. Studies of pulsars in the Galactic center can help answer questions about the massive black hole in the region and the star formation history in its vicinity. Millisecond pulsars in globular clusters are long-lived tracers of their progenitors, low-mass X-ray binaries, and can be used to study the dynamical history of those clusters. Another source of interest in radio transient astronomy is the hitherto undetected engineered signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is an ongoing attempt at discovering the presence of technological life elsewhere in the Galaxy. In this work, I present my forays into two aspects of the study of the radio transient universe---pulsars and SETI. Firstly, I describe my work on the luminosity function and population size of pulsars in the globular

  10. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  11. Gravitational wave astronomy with radio galaxy surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise

    2016-01-01

    In the next decade, new astrophysical instruments will deliver the first large-scale maps of gravitational waves and radio sources. Therefore, it is timely to investigate the possibility to combine them to provide new and complementary ways to study the Universe. Using simulated catalogues appropriate to the planned surveys, it is possible to predict measurements of the cross-correlation between radio sources and GW maps and the effects of a stochastic gravitational wave background on galaxy ...

  12. Five years of Project META - An all-sky narrow-band radio search for extraterrestrial signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Paul; Sagan, Carl

    1993-01-01

    We have conducted a five-year search of the northern sky (delta between 30 and 60 deg) for narrow-band radio signals near the 1420 MHz line of neutral hydrogen, and its second harmonic, using an 8.4 x 10 exp 6 channel Fourier spectrometer of 0.05 Hz resolution and 400 kHz instantaneous bandwidth. The observing frequency was corrected both for motions with respect to three astronomical inertial frames, and for the effect of Earth's rotation, which provides a characteristic changing Doppler signature for narrow-band signals of extraterrestrial origin. Among the 6 x 10 exp 13 spectral channels searched, we have found 37 candidate events exceeding the average detection threshold of 1.7 x 10 exp -23 W/sq m, none of which was detected upon reobservation. The strongest of these appear to be dominated by rare processor errors. However, the strongest signals that survive culling for terrestrial interference lie in or near the Galactic plane. We describe the search and candidate events, and set limits on the prevalence of supercivilizations transmitting Doppler-precompensated beacons at H I or its second harmonic. We conclude with recommendations for future searches, based upon these findings, and a description of our next-generation search system.

  13. Gravitational wave astronomy with radio galaxy surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Raccanelli, Alvise

    2016-01-01

    In the next decade, new astrophysical instruments will deliver the first large-scale maps of gravitational waves and radio sources. Therefore, it is timely to investigate the possibility to combine them to provide new and complementary ways to study the Universe. Using simulated catalogues appropriate to the planned surveys, it is possible to predict measurements of the cross-correlation between radio sources and GW maps and the effects of a stochastic gravitational wave background on galaxy maps. Effects of GWs on the large scale structure of the Universe can be used to investigate the nature of the progenitors of merging BHs, the validity of Einstein's General Relativity, models for dark energy, and detect a stochastic background of GW. The results obtained show that the galaxy-GW cross-correlation can provide useful information in the near future, while the detection of tensor perturbation effects on the LSS will require instruments with capabilities beyond the currently planned next generation of radio ar...

  14. Full-Wave Radio Characterization of Ionospheric Modification at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-26

    Full-Wave Radio Characterization of Ionospheric Modification at HAARP We have studied electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence stimulated by...radio receivers at HAARP in Alaska, and ground-based radio receivers, incoherent scatter radars, and in-situ measurements from Canadian, ESA, and Polish...363255 San Juan, PR 00936 -3255 31-May-2015 ABSTRACT Final Report: Full-Wave Radio Characterization of Ionospheric Modification at HAARP Report Title We

  15. A tale of two analogues: learning at a distance from the ancient greeks and maya and the problem of deciphering extraterrestrial radio transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Ben; Bentley, Jerry

    The transmission of ancient Greek learning and science to medieval western Europe via the translation of Greek and Arab texts is often cited as a terrestrial example of "learning at a distance" that could occur by means of the decipherment of radio messages from advanced extraterrestrial civilizations. However, the translation between such closely related languages as Greek, Latin and Arabic and the decipherment of radio messages from an extraterrestrial civilization to the point where humans could understand them are only nominally analogous tasks. A terrestrial example of such "learning at a distance" from an ancient civilization that perhaps better prepares us for thinking about the immense task inherent in any interstellar knowledge transmission is provided by the lengthy and troubled efforts of western scholars to decipher the inscriptions left by the ancient Maya and to learn from them about this ancient civilization. Only recently, with the rejection of the ideographic fallacy that Maya glyphs symbolized ideas directly without the mediation of language and with the application of linguistic knowledge of Maya languages has it been possible to decipher the Maya inscriptions and learn from them about their science and culture. This experience suggests that without any knowledge of languages in which extraterrestrial messages might be composed, their decipherment could be most problematic. The Maya case is also relevant to the common suggestion that advanced extraterrestrials would deliberately compose messages not in their own natural languages but in artificial ones using logic, numbers, and scientific constants presumably shared among all intelligent civilizations, or at least those in their radio-communicative phases. Numbers and calendrical dating system were the first parts of the Mayan inscriptions to be translated, albeit with the aid of partial "Rosetta stones" left by the Spanish conquerors. This success served, however, to reinforce the ideographic

  16. Wave Optics Based LEO-LEO Radio Occultation Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the theory for performing retrieval of radio occultations that use probing frequencies in the XK and KM band. Normally radio occultations use frequencies in the L band and GPS satellites are used as the transmitting source and the occultation signals are received by a GPS...... in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some...... chain is therefore a wave optics based retrieval chain and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on 5 different frequencies are used. The 5 frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave...

  17. Refraction of VHF radio waves in artificial plasma formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashirin, A. I.; Kliueva, N. M.; Mikhailik, P. P.; Chkalov, V. G.

    1991-09-01

    The defocusing refraction of VHF waves during the radio occultation of artificial plasma clouds in the ionosphere is calculated in the framework of the geometrical-optics approximation. The possibility of determining the main cloud parameters from characteristic power variations of the received radio waves in the case of a monotonic change in the sighting parameter during the experiment is demonstrated. Results of a rocket experiment implementing this method are presented.

  18. Wave Optics Based LEO-LEO Radio Occultation Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-01-01

    in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some...... of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing...... chain is therefore a wave optics based retrieval chain and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on 5 different frequencies are used. The 5 frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave...

  19. Optical and millimeter-wave radio seamless MIMO transmission based on a radio over fiber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kuri, Toshiaki; Hosako, Iwao; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuki; Yasumura, Yoshihiro; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-31

    Multi-input multi-output (MIMO) transmission of two millimeter-wave radio signals seamlessly converted from polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature-phase-shift-keying optical signals is successfully demonstrated, where a radio access unit basically consisting of only optical-to-electrical converters and a radio receiver performs total signal equalization of both the optical and the radio paths and demodulation with digital signal processing (DSP). Orthogonally polarized optical components that are directly converted to two-channel radio components can be demultiplexed and demodulated with high-speed DSP as in optical digital coherent detection. 20-Gbaud optical and radio seamless MIMO transmission provides a total capacity of 74.4 Gb/s with a forward error correction overhead of 7%.

  20. Radio Wave Propagation and the Provenance of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Spitler, L G; Chatterjee, S; Wasserman, I

    2016-01-01

    We analyze plasma dispersion and scattering of fast radio bursts (FRBs) to identify the dominant locations of free electrons along their lines of sight and thus constrain the distances of the burst sources themselves. We establish the average $\\tau$-DM relation for Galactic pulsars and use it as a benchmark for discussing FRB scattering. Though scattering times $\\tau$ for FRBs are large in the majority of the 17 events we analyze, they are systematically smaller than those of Galactic pulsars that have similar dispersion measures (DMs). The lack of any correlation between $\\tau$ and DM for FRBs suggests that the intergalactic medium (IGM) cannot account for both $\\tau$ and DM. We therefore consider mixed models involving the IGM and host galaxies. If the IGM contributes significantly to DM while host galaxies dominate $\\tau$, the scattering deficit with respect to the mean Galactic trend can be explained with a $\\tau$-DM relation in the host that matches that for the Milky Way. However, it is possible that ho...

  1. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  2. 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation Through Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Abreu, Renato; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth was exam......This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth...

  3. Spatial Stationarity of Ultrawideband and Millimeter Wave Radio Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Tan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    For radio channels with broad bandwidth resource, such as those often used for ultrawideband (UWB) and millimeter wave (mmwave) systems, the Wide-Sense Stationary Uncorrelated Scattering (WSSUS) and spatial stationary assumptions are more critical than typical cellular channels with very limited...

  4. Side transmission of radio waves on the Dushanbe-Leninabad radio-meteor path (Preliminary results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, A. V.; Kodirov, A.; Mirdzhamolov, K.; Rubtsov, L. N.

    Radio-wave propagation on the Dushanbe-Leninabad meteor path was studied experimentally in 1982, indicating that this path is suitable for ultrashort-wave communications. The selection of the optimal orientation of the antenna systems with respect to the path is examined, and it is shown that a maximum volume of data can be transmitted when the antennas are inclined at an angle of 70 deg from the path axis.

  5. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  6. Twisted radio waves and twisted thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B; Nevels, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyze a gedanken experiment and show that the assumption that an antenna operating at a single frequency can transmit more than two independent information channels to the far field violates the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Transmission of a large number of channels, each associated with an angular momenta 'twisted wave' mode, to the far field in free space is therefore not possible.

  7. Application of the mid-IR radio correlation to the Ĝ sample and the search for advanced extraterrestrial civilisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Wright et al. (2014, ApJ, 792, 26) have embarked on a search for advanced Karadashev Type III civilisations via the compilation of a sample of sources with extreme mid-IR emission and colours. The aim is to furnish a list of candidate galaxies that might harbour an advanced Kardashev Type III civilisation; in this scenario, the mid-IR emission is then primarily associated with waste heat energy by-products. I apply the mid-IR radio correlation to this Glimpsing Heat from Alien Technology (Ĝ) sample, a catalogue of 93 candidate galaxies compiled by Griffith et al. (2015, ApJS, 217, 25). I demonstrate that the mid-IR and radio luminosities are correlated for the sample, determining a k-corrected value of q22 = 1.35 ± 0.42. By comparison, a similar measurement for 124 galaxies drawn from the First Look Survey (FLS) has q22 = 0.87 ± 0.27. The statistically significant difference of the mean value of q22 for these two samples, taken together with their more comparable far-IR properties, suggests that the Ĝ sample shows excessive emission in the mid-IR. The fact that the Ĝ sample largely follows the mid-IR radio correlation strongly suggests that the vast majority of these sources are associated with galaxies in which natural astrophysical processes are dominant. This simple application of the mid-IR radio correlation can substantially reduce the number of false positives in the Ĝ catalogue since galaxies occupied by advanced Kardashev Type III civilisations would be expected to exhibit very high values of q. I identify nine outliers in the sample with q22> 2 of which at least three have properties that are relatively well explained via standard astrophysical interpretations e.g. dust emission associated with nascent star formation and/or nuclear activity from a heavily obscured AGN. The other outliers have not been studied in any great detail, and are deserving of further observation. I also note that the comparison of resolved mid-IR and radio images of galaxies

  8. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    2003-01-01

    Traces the efforts of Searching for Extraterrestrial Technological Intelligence (SETI) since 1960 when a radio-telescope was used to see if any messages were being sent from the vicinity of two nearby stars. Describes attempts to detect microwave/optical signals and technological modification of the cosmic environment. (Author/KHR)

  9. Electron Acceleration by High Power Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul

    2012-10-01

    At the highest ERP of the High Altitude Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, high frequency (HF) electromagnetic (EM) waves in the ionosphere produce artificial aurora and electron-ion plasma layers. Using HAARP, electrons are accelerated by high power electrostatic (ES) waves to energies >100 times the thermal temperature of the ambient plasma. These ES waves are driven by decay of the pump EM wave tuned to plasma resonances. The most efficient acceleration process occurs near the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency in earth's magnetic field. Mode conversion plays a role in transforming the ES waves into EM signals that are recorded with ground receivers. These diagnostic waves, called stimulated EM emissions (SEE), show unique resonant signatures of the strongest electron acceleration. This SEE also provides clues about the ES waves responsible for electron acceleration. The electron gas is accelerated by high frequency modes including Langmuir (electron plasma), upper hybrid, and electron Bernstein waves. All of these waves have been identified in the scattered EM spectra as downshifted sidebands of the EM pump frequency. Parametric decay is responsible low frequency companion modes such as ion acoustic, lower hybrid, and ion Bernstein waves. The temporal evolution of the scattered EM spectrum indicates development of field aligned irregularities that aid the mode conversion process. The onset of certain spectral features is strongly correlated with glow plasma discharge structures that are both visible with the unaided eye and detectable using radio backscatter techniques at HF and UHF frequencies. The primary goals are to understand natural plasma layers, to study basic plasma physics in a unique ``laboratory with walls,'' and to create artificial plasma structures that can aid radio communications.

  10. Remote personal health monitoring with radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We present several techniques utilizing radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology for personal health monitoring. One technique involves using RFID sensors external to the human body, while another technique uses both internal and external RFID sensors. Simultaneous monitoring of many patients in a hospital setting can also be done using networks of RFID sensors. All the monitoring are done wirelessly, either continuously or periodically in any interval, in which the sensors collect information on human parts such as the lungs or heart and transmit this information to a router, PC or PDA device connected to the internet, from which patient's condition can be diagnosed and viewed by authorized medical professionals in remote locations. Instantaneous information allows medical professionals to intervene properly and timely to prevent possible catastrophic effects to patients. The continuously monitored information provides medical professionals more complete and long-term studies of patients. All of these result in not only enhancement of the health treatment quality but also significant reduction of medical expenditure. These techniques demonstrate that health monitoring of patients can be done wirelessly at any time and any place without interfering with the patients' normal activities. Implementing the RFID technology would not only help reduce the enormous and significantly growing medical costs in the U.S.A., but also help improve the health treatment capability as well as enhance the understanding of long-term personal health and illness.

  11. Gravitational Wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Callister, Thomas; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, fast radio bursts are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements rule out binary black holes as FRB progenitors, and results from Advanced LIGO's O1 and O2 observing runs will either confirm or strongly rule out binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors.

  12. Physics of the Geospace Response to Powerful HF Radio Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    studies of the response of the Earth’s space plasma to high-power HF radio waves from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ...of HF heating and explored to simulate artificial ducts. DMSP- HAARP experiments revealed that HF-created ion outflows and artificial density ducts...in the topside ionosphere appeared faster than predicted by the models, pointing to kinetic (suprathermal) effects. CHAMP/GRACE- HAARP experiments

  13. Waves on Seas of Mars and Titan: Wind-Tunnel Experiments on Wind-Wave Generation in Extraterrestrial Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Kraal, E. R.; Eddlemon, E. E.; Cheney, J.; Greeley, R.

    2004-01-01

    The generation of waves by winds across Earth's water oceans is a topic of enduring fascination. However, the physics of the problem are rather forbidding and thus the relationships between real-world windspeed and sea state tend to be empirical. Such empirical relations are of limited utility in environments where the physical parameters are different, such as the surfaces of other planets. These environments have only recently come to oceanographers attention, with the discovery of ancient shorelines and lakes on Mars, and the prospects for and recent evidence of lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons on Saturn's moon Titan. We are aware of only one other published experimental wind-water tunnel study where the fluid parameters have been varied. This used artificially-generated mm-scale waves at 3.8-7.6 Hz in water, glycerol solutions (higher viscosity) and surfactant solutions (lower surface tension). Lower viscosity solutions had higher wave growth rates: surprisingly, higher surface tension led to more rapid wave growth. The liquid density was not appreciably varied, and 1 bar air was used throughout.We used the MARSWIT (Mars Wind Tunnel) operated by ASU at NASA Ames. A fiberglass tray (5 cm x 120 cm x 75 cm) was installed in the tunnel, with an approx. 1:5 ramp to prevent strong flow separation. The tray was filled to a depth of about 4 cm. Sensors were clamped to the tray itself or held by a steel and aluminium frame just above the water level. A towel was draped on the water surface at the downwind end of the tray to act as a damper to suppress wave reflection. Position-sensitive infrared (IR) reflection sensors (Sharp GP12D02) and ultrasonic rangers (Devantech DF-04) used in mobile robotics were used as water level sensors. The tray was observed with a video camera, whose output could be viewed on a monitor and recorded on VHS tape.

  14. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  15. Radio fiber bursts and fast magnetoacoustic wave trains

    CERN Document Server

    Karlický, M; Jelínek, P

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for dm-fiber bursts that is based on assuming fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave trains that propagate along a dense vertical filament or current sheet. Eight groups of dm-fiber bursts that were observed during solar flares were selected and analyzed by the wavelet analysis method. To model these fiber bursts we built a semi-empirical model. We also did magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a propagation of the magnetoacoustic wave train in a vertical and gravitationally stratified current sheet. In the wavelet spectra of the fiber bursts computed at different radio frequencies we found the wavelet tadpoles, whose head maxima have the same frequency drift as the drift of fiber bursts. It indicates that the drift of these fiber bursts can be explained by the propagating fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave train. Using new semi-empirical and magnetohydrodynamic models with a simple radio emission model we generated the artificial radio spectra of the fiber bursts, which are similar to the observed ...

  16. Wave optics-based LEO-LEO radio occultation retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the theory for performing retrieval of radio occultations that use probing frequencies in the XK and KM band. Normally, radio occultations use frequencies in the L band, and GPS satellites are used as the transmitting source, and the occultation signals are received by a GPS receiver on board a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite. The technique is based on the Doppler shift imposed, by the atmosphere, on the signal emitted from the GPS satellite. Two LEO satellites are assumed in the occultations discussed in this paper, and the retrieval is also dependent on the decrease in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites, while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS-based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high-frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing the retrieval of the water vapor content. Selecting the correct probing frequencies would make it possible to retrieve other information such as the content of ozone. The retrieval is performed through a number of processing steps which are based on the Full Spectrum Inversion (FSI) technique. The retrieval chain is therefore a wave optics-based retrieval chain, and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on five different frequencies are used. The five frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave optics-based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples, and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global European Centre for Medium

  17. Scattering of radio frequency waves by turbulence in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2016-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments and incoherent fluctuations due to turbulence are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, there are telltale signs, arising from differences between results from simulations and from experiments, that fluctuations can modify the spectrum of RF waves. Any effect on RF waves in the scrape-off layer can have important experimental consequences. For example, electron cyclotron waves are expected to stabilize the deleterious neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in ITER. Spectral and polarization changes due to scattering will modify the spatial location and profile of the current driven by the RF waves, thereby affecting the control of NTMs. Pioneering theoretical studies and complementary computer simulations have been pursued to elucidate the impact of fluctuations on RF waves. From the full complement of Maxwell's equations for cold, magnetized plasmas, it is shown that the Poynting flux in the wake of filaments develops spatial structure due to diffraction and shadowing. The uniformity of power flow into the plasma is affected by side-scattering, modifications to the wave spectrum, and coupling to plasma waves other than the incident RF wave. The Snell's law and the Fresnel equations have been reformulated within the context of magnetized plasmas. They are distinctly different from their counterparts in scalar dielectric media, and reveal new and important physical insight into the scattering of RF waves. The Snell's law and Fresnel equations are the basis for the Kirchhoff approximation necessary to determine properties of the scattered waves. Furthermore, this theory is also relevant for studying back

  18. Radio and Plasma Waves Synergistic Science Opportunities with EJSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; André, Nicolas; Bougeret, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    The radio and plasma wave (RPW) diagnostics provide a unique access to critical parameters of space plasma, in particular in planetary and satellite environments. Concerning giant planets, this has been demonstrated by major results obtained by the radio investigation on the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, but also during the Ulysses, Voyager, and Pioneer flybys of Jupiter. Several other missions, past or in flight, demonstrate the uniqueness and relevance of RPW diagnostics to basic problems of astrophysics. The EJSM mission consists of two platforms operating in the Jupiter environment: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO will execute a choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. The EJSM mission architecture hence offers unique opportunities for synergistic and complementary observations that significantly enhance the overall science return of the mission. In this paper, we will first review new and unique science aspects of the Jupiter system that may benefit from different capabilities of RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO: spectral and polarization information, mapping of radio sources, measurements of in situ plasma waves, currents, thermal noise, dust and nano-particle detection and characterization. We will then illustrate unique synergistic and complementary science opportunities offered by RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO, both in terms of Satellite science and in terms of Magnetospheric Science.

  19. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, Tolga; Simonsen, A; Schmid, Silvan;

    2013-01-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency (rf) and microwave signals is an ubiquitous technological challenge, crucial in fields as diverse as radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation and communication, including those of quantum states. Efficient upconversion of rf-signals...... to an optical carrier would allow transmitting them via optical fibers instead of copper wires dramatically reducing losses, and give access to the mature toolbox of quantum optical techniques, routinely enabling quantum-limited signal detection. Research in the field of cavity optomechanics [1, 2] has shown...... reflected off its metallized surface. The circuit acts as an antenna; the voltage signals it induces are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude below that of standard optical modulators...

  20. Wave propagation simulation of radio occultations based on ECMWF refractivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a complete radio occultation simulation environment, including realistic refractivity profiles, wave propagation modeling, instrument modeling, and bending angle retrieval. The wave propagator is used to simulate radio occultation measurements. The radio waves are propagated...... of radio occultations. The output from the wave propagator simulator is used as input to a Full Spectrum Inversion retrieval module which calculates geophysical parameters. These parameters can be compared to the ECMWF atmospheric profiles. The comparison can be used to reveal system errors and get...... a better understanding of the physics. The wave propagation simulations will in this paper also be compared to real measurements. These radio occultations have been exposed to the same atmospheric conditions as the radio occultations simulated by the wave propagator. This comparison reveals that precise...

  1. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  2. Hertz and the Discovery of Radio Waves and the Photoelectric Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the discoveries by Hertz historically, such as photoelectric effect, radio waves, their impact on modern physics and some applications. Presents several diagrams and two chronological tables. (YP)

  3. Probing the sky with radio waves from wireless technology to the development of atmospheric science

    CERN Document Server

    Yeang, Chen-Pang

    2013-01-01

    By the late nineteenth century, engineers and experimental scientists generally knew how radio waves behaved, and by 1901 scientists were able to manipulate them to transmit messages across long distances. What no one could understand, however, was why radio waves followed the curvature of the Earth. Theorists puzzled over this for nearly twenty years before physicists confirmed the zig-zag theory, a solution that led to the discovery of a layer in the Earth's upper atmosphere that bounces radio waves earthward-the ionosphere. In Probing the Sky with Radio Waves,

  4. Nonlinear scattering of radio waves by metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynshleyger, V. B.

    1984-07-01

    Nonlinear scattering of radio waves by metal structures with resulting harmonic and intermodulation interference is analyzed from both theoretical and empirical standpoints, disregarding nonlinear effects associated with the nonlinear dependence of the electric or magnetic polarization vector on respectively the electric or magnetic field intensity in the wave propagating medium. Nonlinear characteristics of metal-oxide-metal contacts where the thin oxide film separation two metal surfaces has properties approximately those of a dielectric or a high-resistivity semiconductor are discussed. Tunneling was found to be the principal mechanism of charge carrier transfer through such a contact with a sufficiently thin film, the contact having usually a cubic or sometimes an integral sign current-voltage characteristic at 300 K and usually S-form or sometimes a cubic current-voltage characteristic at 77 K.

  5. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; D'Ambrosio, E; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; DeSalvo, R; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Dickson, J; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Díaz, M; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R E; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Gustafson, R; Günther, M; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Krämer, M; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyne, A G; MacInnis, M; Machenschalk, B; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Müller, G; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Rüdiger, A; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C

    2007-01-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 3.2e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10e-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only three times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  6. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  7. Solar Corona and plasma effects on Radio Frequency waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkono, C.; Rosenblatt, P.; Dehant, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    Solar corona (plasma) effects on radio signal waves for three different frequency bands S (2.3 GHz), X (8.4 GHz), and Ka (32 GHz), currently used to track probes in the solar system, have been computed using different models of the total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path between the Earth and Mars. The Earth-Mars-Sun configuration has been obtained from the planetary ephemerides DE421 (using SPICE kernels) for the period from September 2004 to September 2006. This configuration is expressed as a function of the Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles (the probe being in close orbit to Mars). We used the TEC values provided by the different models proposed in the literature in order to estimate the TEC along the propagation path (STEC, for Slant TEC). From these model-dependent STEC estimates, the time delay on the wave propagation as well as the associated frequency shift with a 10 seconds sampling time have been obtained for each of the three frequency bands. For the X-band mostly used in radio science, we have obtained estimates differing by up to several orders of magnitude due to the different STEC values derived from different models of TEC. For example, if the propagation path passes near the Sun such that SEP angle is 1.55° the STEC is ranging from 4.6x1020 electron/m2 to 6.07x1016 electron/m2, which corresponds to a time delay range between 0.87 μs and 1.15x10-4 μs, respectively. For SEP angles between 2° and 8°, the range of the different time delay values reduces to 2.8x10-1 μs and becomes as small as 1.6x10-2 μs for SEP angles larger than 8° (1x10-2 μs is about the order of magnitude of the radioscience instrument precision). These results show that the correction of the solar corona effect on radio frequency waves can be reliably done on usual X-band tracking data of spacecraft for SEP angles >12°, but should be use with caution for lower SEP angles, especially lower than 2°.

  8. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE ON DISTRIBUTION OF RADIO WAVES IN CITY OF PROFILE OF HIS BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zatuchny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N this article influence is investigated on distribution of radio waves in the municipal terms of height and building closeness. A model over of distribution of radio waves is brought from an aircraft side. Charts over of dependence of probability of arrival of signal are brought from airship from the height of flight and middle number of building.

  9. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  10. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  11. Waves in the Martian Atmosphere: Results from MGS Radio Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.

    1999-09-01

    Temperatures retrieved from Mars Global Surveyor radio occultations have been searched for evidence of waves. Emphasis has been on the initial series of occultations between 29(deg) N and 64(deg) S, obtained during the early martian southern summer, L_s=264(deg-308^deg) . The profiles exhibit an undulatory behavior that is suggestive of vertically propagating waves. Wavelengths ~ 10 km are often dominant, but structure on smaller scales is evident. The undulatory structure is most pronounced between latitudes 29(deg) N and 10(deg) S, usually in regions of ``interesting'' topography, e.g., in the Tharsis region and near the edge of Syrtis Major. Several temperature profiles, particularly within 30(deg) of the equator, exhibit lapse rates that locally become superadiabatic near the 0.4--mbar level or at higher altitudes. This implies that the waves are ``breaking'' and depositing horizontal momentum into the atmosphere. Such a deposition may play an important role in modulating the atmospheric winds, and characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of these momentum transfers can provide important clues to understanding how the global circulation is maintained.

  12. Annual report 1992/93, FOA 38. Radio systems and wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildh, I. M.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation is to carry out research and development in the field of secure and robust radio communications for Sweden's national defense. This is the Annual Report for fiscal year 1992/93 of the Division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation. The division is responsible for research and development of secure radio communication for information transmission. We are also responsible for wave propagation research within a frequency range from LF to SHF. We carry out applied research in fields like antijamming systems, modulation, error correcting codes, wave propagation and digital signal processing. The wave propagation research is carried out by basic research so the demands from new techniques and new radio systems for accurate propagation models can be achieved.

  13. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Sazonov, A.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van Putten, M.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiley, S.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2007-08-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO 600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximize sensitivity. For the first time, pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6×10-25 for PSR J1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSR J2124 3358 is less than 10-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  14. Radio wave phase scintillation and precision Doppler tracking of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    Phase scintillation caused by propagation through solar wind, ionospheric, and tropospheric irregularities is a noise process for many spacecraft radio science experiments. In precision Doppler tracking observations, scintillation can be the dominant noise process. Scintillation statistics are necessary for experiment planning and in design of signal processing procedures. Here high-precision tracking data taken with operational spacecraft (Mars Observer, Galileo, and Mars Global Surveyor) and ground systems are used to produce temporal statistics of tropospheric and plasma phase scintillation. The variance of Doppler frequency fluctuations is approximately decomposed into two propagation processes. The first, associated with distributed scattering along the sight line in the solar wind, has a smooth spectrum. The second, associated principally with localized tropospheric scattering for X-band experiments, has a marked autocorrelation peak at the two-way light time between the Earth and the spacecraft (thus a cosine-squared modulation of the fluctuation power spectrum). For X-band data taken in the antisolar hemisphere the average noise levels of this process are in good agreement with average tropospheric noise levels determined independently from water vapor radiometer observations and radio interferometic data. The variance of the process having a smooth spectrum is consistent with plasma noise levels determined independently from dual-frequency observations of the Viking spacecraft made at comparable Sun-Earth-spacecraft angles. The observations reported here are used to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes. In particular, they can be used to predict propagation noise levels for high-precision X- and Ka-band tracking observations (e.g., atmosphere/ionosphere/ring occultations, celestial mechanics experiments, and gravitational wave experiments) to be done using the Cassini spacecraft.

  15. Ulysses Observations of Nonlinear Wave-wave Interactions in the Source Regions of Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Thejappa; R. J. MacDowall

    2000-09-01

    The Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) has observed Langmuir, ion-acoustic and associated solar type III radio emissions in the interplanetary medium. Bursts of 50-300 Hz (in the spacecraft frame) electric field signals, corresponding to long-wavelength ion-acoustic waves are often observed coincident in time with the most intense Langmuir wave spikes, providing evidence for the electrostatic decay instability. Langmuir waves often occur as envelope solitons, suggesting that strong turbulence processes, such as modulational instability and soliton formation, often coexist with weak turbulence processes, such as electrostatic decay, in a few type III burst source regions.

  16. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Fact, not Fiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarter, Jill (SETI Institute, Director)

    2009-03-11

    Jill Tarter, director of the Center for SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Research, will discuss the new Allen Telescope Array being developed for SETI that will provide the first systematic look at the transient radio universe.

  17. Low Frequency Radio-wave System for subsurface investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Kudelya, Anatoliy; Denisov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Low frequency radio-wave methods (RWM) allow subsurface investigations in terms of lithological structure characterization, detection of filtration flows of ground water, anthropogenic and natural cavities. In this contribution, we present a RWM that exploits two coils working at frequencies of few MHz as transmitting and receiving antennas. The basic principle of this inductive method is as follows. The primary alternating electromagnetic field radiated by the transmitting coil induces eddy currents in the subsurface mainly due to the conductivity anomalies. These eddy currents generate a secondary (scattered) magnetic field which overlaps to the incident magnetic field and is detected by the receiving coil. Despite the simple operation of the system, the complexity of the electromagnetic scattering phenomenon at hand must be properly modeled to achieve adequate performance. Therefore, an advanced data processing technique, belonging to the class of the inverse scattering approaches, has been developed by the authors in a full 3D geometry. The proposed method allows to deal with data collected on a scanning surface under a dipole inductive profiling (DIP) modality, where the transmitting/receiving coils are moved simultaneously with fixed offset (multi-bistatic configuration). The hardware, called Dipole Inductive Radio-wave System (DIRS), is composed by an electronic unit and transmitting and receiving loop antennas radiating at frequencies of few MHz (2-4 MHz), which are installed on theodolite supports. The compactness of DIRS and its robustness to external electromagnetic interference offers the possibility to perform geophysical research up to the depth of some tens of meters and under several types of ground and water surfaces, vegetation, and weather conditions. The light weight and small size of system (the single antenna with support weights about 5 kg and has a diameter of 0.5m) allows two operators to perform geophysical research without disturbing the

  18. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  19. Effectiveness of radio waves application in modern general dental procedures: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Arslan; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Pikos, Michael A; Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to review indexed literature and provide an update on the effectiveness of high-frequency radio waves (HRW) application in modern general dentistry procedures. Indexed databases were searched to identify articles that assessed the efficacy of radio waves in dental procedures. Radiosurgery is a refined form of electrosurgery that uses waves of electrons at a radiofrequency ranging between 2 and 4 MHz. Radio waves have also been reported to cause much less thermal damage to peripheral tissues compared with electrosurgery or carbon dioxide laser-assisted surgery. Formation of reparative dentin in direct pulp capping procedures is also significantly higher when HRW are used to achieve hemostasis in teeth with minimally exposed dental pulps compared with traditional techniques for achieving hemostasis. A few case reports have reported that radiosurgery is useful for procedures such as gingivectomy and gingivoplasty, stage-two surgery for implant exposure, operculectomy, oral biopsy, and frenectomy. Radiosurgery is a relatively modern therapeutic methodology for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia; however, its long-term efficacy is unclear. Radio waves can also be used for periodontal procedures, such as gingivectomies, coronal flap advancement, harvesting palatal grafts for periodontal soft tissue grafting, and crown lengthening. Although there are a limited number of studies in indexed literature regarding the efficacy of radio waves in modern dentistry, the available evidence shows that use of radio waves is a modernization in clinical dentistry that might be a contemporary substitute for traditional clinical dental procedures.

  20. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Hallinan, Gregg; Lazio, T Joseph W; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation of accelerated electrons in shocks formed with the circum-merger medium. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produces radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produces $\\gamma$-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of a week to a month. The intensity and duration of these radio counterparts depend on the kinetic energies of the outflows and on circum-merger densities. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts ...

  1. Lattice Wave of Magnetized Spherical Dust in Radio-Frequency Sheath with Negative Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lattice wave of magnetized spherical dust in radio-frequency sheath with negative ions is investigated. The dispersion relation of two-dimensional hexagonal lattice horizontal wave and the influence of negative ions and magnetic field intensity on the wave are also investigated. The results show that for two-dimensional hexagonal horizontal lattice wave, negative ions reduce the wave frequency at the range of long-wavelength, whereas raising the wave frequency at the range of short-wavelength and magnetic held contributes to dropping the wave frequency a little.

  2. Radio Frequency Radiation of Millimeter Wave Length: An Evaluation of Potential Occupational Safety Issues Relating to Surface Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Radio frequency radiation of millimeter wave length: An evaluation of potential occupational safety issues. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Paper------------------------------- RADIO FREQUENCY RADIATION OF MILLIMETER WAVE LENGTH: POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL...cancer. Health Phys. 78(2):170-181; 2000 Key words: cancer; radiation , nonionizing; occupational safety; radiofrequency INTRODUCTION THE RADIO

  3. Sensory illusions: Common mistakes in physics regarding sound, light and radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briles, T. M.; Tabor-Morris, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    Optical illusions are well known as effects that we see that are not representative of reality. Sensory illusions are similar but can involve other senses than sight, such as hearing or touch. One mistake commonly noted among instructors is that students often mis-identify radio signals as sound waves and not as part of the electromagnetic spectrum. A survey of physics students from multiple high schools highlights the frequency of this common misconception, as well as other nuances on this misunderstanding. Many students appear to conclude that, since they experience radio broadcasts as sound, then sound waves are the actual transmission of radio signals and not, as is actually true, a representation of those waves as produced by the translator box, the radio. Steps to help students identify and correct sensory illusion misconceptions are discussed. School of Education

  4. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation: Data compression and scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  6. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation - Data compression and scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  7. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  8. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    CERN Document Server

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Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calderón; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, K N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Pereira, R; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stiles, D; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Archibald, A M; Banaszak, S; Berndsen, A; Boyles, J; Cardoso, R F; Chawla, P; Cherry, A; Dartez, L P; Day, D; Epstein, C R; Ford, A J; Flanigan, J; Garcia, A; Hessels, J W T; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Keane, E F; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Leake, S; Lorimer, D; Lunsford, G; Lynch, R S; Martinez, J G; Mata, A; McLaughlin, M A; McPhee, C A; Penucci, T; Ransom, S; Roberts, M S E; Rohr, M D W; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; van Leeuwen, J; Walker, A N; Wells, B L

    2016-01-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational wave signals in coincidence with Parkes Fast Radio Bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short duration radio signals andtransient gravitational wave emission include starquakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second generation interferometers.

  9. Social Responsibility through the Spanish University Radio Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Pinto Zúñiga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available College radio is built with mechanisms through which students can approach to the labor market, but it is also built as a media in which civil society can take an active part. The objective that we plant is to analyze the need to introduce and preserve the concept of social responsibility in the Spanish university radio stations for attaining the integration between the social system and the university. We designed a methodology based on interviews with those responsible for the Spanish college radio stations that broadcast regularly. Somehow, most of the radio stations analyzed have been incorporating this way of working to their daily basis, making the future professionals in the communication field to contemplate as usual and needed the citizens’ cooperation in order to build the radiophonic speeches, which will revert into a more conciliatory future between people and media.

  10. Simultaneous observations of periodic non-Io decametric radio emission by ground radio telescope URAN-2 and STEREO/WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantzusenko, A.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Periodic bursts of the non-Io component of Jovian decametric radio emission (non-Io DAM) is observed as (1) series of arc-like radio bursts with negative frequency drift which reoccur with 1.5% longer period than the Jovian magnetosphere rotation rate, (2) series of bursts with positive frequency drift which reoccur with Jupiter's rotation period and (3) periodic non-arc like radio features [1, 2]. These bursts are typically detected during several Jupiter rotations in decametric frequency range from 4 MHz to 12 - 16 MHz between 300° and 60° of CML. We present simultaneous observations of the periodic non-Io controlled DAM performed by the WAVES radio experiment onboard the two STEREO spacecraft and the groundbased radio telescope URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. URAN-2 with an effective area of about 30000 m2 consists of 512 broadband crossed dipoles and equipped with the high performance digital radio spectrometer with polarization measurement capability. During the observation campaign Sep., 2012 - Apr., 2013 URAN-2 recorded a large amount of Jovian DAM events with the high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100 ms) in a frequency range 8-32 MHz. In the same time the two spatially separated STEREO spacecraft was able to observe DAM in the frequency range up to 16 MHz. The first analysis of the acquired stereoscopic observations is presented. In particular, we show one episode when the periodic non-arc DAM was recorded together with long lasting Jovian narrow band (NB) emissions. These NB emission was observed at the high frequency cutoff of DAM and can be interpreted as propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jovian ionosphere [3]. We discuss the possible relations between the observed NB events and the periodic non-Io controlled Jovian decametric radio emission.

  11. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers Detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Nissanke, S.; Hallinan, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2016-11-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron-generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produce radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produce γ-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan-radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of weeks. Based on the derived light curves, we suggest an optimized survey at 1.4 GHz with five epochs separated by a logarithmic time interval. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts of simulated GW-merger events to be detected by advanced LIGO and Virgo by current and future radio facilities. The detectable distances for these GW merger events could be as high as 1 Gpc. Around 20%-60% of the long-lasting radio remnants will be detectable in the case of the moderate kinetic energy of 3\\cdot {10}50 erg and a circum-merger density of 0.1 {{cm}}-3 or larger, while 5%-20% of the orphan-radio afterglows with kinetic energy of 1048 erg will be detectable. The detection likelihood increases if one focuses on the well-localizable GW events. We discuss the background noise due to radio fluxes of host galaxies and false positives arising from extragalactic radio transients and variable active galactic nuclei, and we show that the quiet radio transient sky is of great advantage when searching for the radio counterparts.

  12. The application of the Mid-IR radio correlation to the $\\hat{G}$ sample and the search for advanced extraterrestrial civilisations

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Wright et al. 2014 have embarked on a search for advanced Karadashev Type III civilisations via the compilation of a sample of sources with extreme mid-IR emission and colours. In this scenario, the mid-IR emission is then primarily associated with waste heat energy by-products. I apply the Mid-IR radio correlation to this $\\hat{G}$ sample (Griffith et al. 2015). I demonstrate that the mid-IR and radio luminosities are correlated for the sample with $q_{22}=1.35\\pm0.42 $. By comparison, the First Look Survey (FLS) has $q_{22}=0.87\\pm0.27$. The fact that the G-HAT sample largely follows the Mid-IR radio correlation, strongly suggests the vast majority of these sources are associated with galaxies in which natural astrophysical processes are dominant. This simple application of the mid-IR radio correlation can substantially reduce the number of false positives in the $\\hat{G}$ catalogue, since galaxies occupied by advanced Kardashev Type III civilisations would be expected to exhibit very high values of $q$. In...

  13. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Schmid, Silvan

    2014-01-01

    by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to all-optical, ultralow-noise detection of classical electronic signals sets the stage for coherent up-conversion of low-frequency quantum......Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would...... enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown...

  14. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    CERN Document Server

    Bagci, T; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2013-01-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency (rf) and microwave signals is an ubiquitous technological challenge, crucial in fields as diverse as radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation and communication, including those of quantum states. Efficient upconversion of rf-signals to an optical carrier would allow transmitting them via optical fibers dramatically reducing losses, and give access to the mature toolbox of quantum optical techniques, routinely enabling quantum-limited signal detection. Research in the field of cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple very strongly to either microwave or optical fields. An oscillator accommodating both functionalities would bear great promise as the intermediate platform in a radio-to-optical transduction cascade. Here, we demonstrate such an opto-electro-mechanical transducer utilizing a high-Q nanomembrane. A moderate voltage bias (<10V) is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluct...

  15. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  16. The Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) onboard the BepiColombo/MMO: First measurement of electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and radio waves around Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Y.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Kojima, H.; Yagitani, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Chanteur, G.; Kumamoto, A.; Kasahara, Y.; Lichtenberger, J.; Omura, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    The BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) spacecraft includes the plasma and radio wave observation system called Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). Since the receivers for electric field, plasma waves, and radio waves are not installed in any of the preceding spacecraft to Mercury, the PWI will provide the first opportunity for conducting in-situ and remote-sensing observations of electric fields, plasma waves, and radio waves in the Hermean magnetosphere and exosphere. These observations are valuable in studying structure, dynamics, and energy exchange processes in the unique magnetosphere of Mercury. They are characterized by the key words of the non-MHD environment and the peculiar interaction between the relatively large planet without ionosphere and the solar wind with high dynamic pressure. The PWI consists of three sets of receivers (EWO, SORBET, and AM 2P), connected to two sets of electric field sensors (MEFISTO and WPT) and two kinds of magnetic field sensors (LF-SC and DB-SC). The PWI will observe both waveforms and frequency spectra in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz for the electric field and from 0.3 Hz to 640 kHz for the magnetic field. From 2008, we will start the development of the engineering model, which is conceptually consistent with the flight model design. The present paper discusses the significance and objectives of plasma/radio wave observations in the Hermean magnetosphere, and describes the PWI sensors, receivers and their performance as well as the onboard data processing.

  17. Generation of OAM Radio Waves Using Circular Vivaldi Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a feasible and simple solution of generating OAM-carrying radio beams. Eight Vivaldi antenna elements connect sequentially and fold into a hollow cylinder. The circular Vivaldi antenna array is fed with unit amplitude but with a successive phase difference from element to element. By changing the phase difference at the steps of 0, ±45°, ±90°, ±135°, and 180°, the OAM radio beam can be generated with mode numbers 0, ±1, ±2, ±3, and 4. Simulations show that the OAM states of ±2 and ±3 are the same as the traditional states, while the OAM states of 0, ±1, and 4 differ at the boresight. This phenomenon can be explained by the radiation pattern difference between Vivaldi antenna and tripole antenna. A solution of distinguishing OAM states is also proposed. The mode number of OAM can be distinguished with only 2 receivers.

  18. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, C R; Nakariakov, V M; Zimovets, I V; White, S M

    2016-01-01

    Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio \\lq sparks\\rq (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emissi...

  19. Radio wave emitted by an extensive air showers in 10KHz to 1MHz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichimura, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of radio waves in a frequency range of less than 1MHz in an EAS shower is discussed. Estimates of radio intensities at 10KHz, 100KHz and 1MHz in EAS showers made on the basis of the Kahn-Lerche theory. Negative charge excess in a shower is the main source of low frequency radio emission, in spite of the importance of the contribution of transverse current in the geomagnetic field in a higher frequency range. An estimate is also made for radio intensity produced when the shower hits the ground. The contribution of this process seems to be important at a large distance, i.e., beyond 1km from the shower axis.

  20. Dust Detection Using Radio and Plasma Wave Instruments in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, S.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.; Morooka, M. W.; Sakai, S.; Wahlund, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nanometer to micrometer sized dust particles pervade our solar system. The origins of these dust particles include asteroid collisions, cometary activity, and geothermal activity of the planetary moons, for example, the water dust cloud ejected from Saturn's moon Enceladus. Radio and plasma wave instruments have been used to detect such dust particles via voltage pulses induced by impacts on the spacecraft body and antennas. The first detection of such dust impacts occurred when Voyager 1 passed through Saturn's ring plane. Since then, dust impacts have been detected by radio and plasma wave instruments on many spacecraft, including ISEE-3, Cassini, and STEREO. In this presentation, we review the detection of dust particles in the solar system using radio and plasma wave instruments aboard various spacecraft since the Voyager era. We also show characteristics of the dust particles derived from recent observations by Cassini RPWS in Saturn's magnetosphere. The dust size distribution and density are consistent with those measured by the conventional dust detectors. A new method of measuring the electron density inside the Enceladus plume based on plasma oscillations observed after dust impacts will also be discussed. The dust measurement by radio and plasma wave instruments complements that by conventional dust detectors and provide important information about the spatial distribution of dust particles due to less pointing constraints and the larger detection area.

  1. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  2. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  3. A simple demonstration for exploring the radio waves generated by a mobile phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-09-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones.

  4. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  5. An Improved Split-Step Wavelet Transform Method for Anomalous Radio Wave Propagation Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iqbal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous tropospheric propagation caused by ducting phenomenon is a major problem in wireless communication. Thus, it is important to study the behavior of radio wave propagation in tropospheric ducts. The Parabolic Wave Equation (PWE method is considered most reliable to model anomalous radio wave propagation. In this work, an improved Split Step Wavelet transform Method (SSWM is presented to solve PWE for the modeling of tropospheric propagation over finite and infinite conductive surfaces. A large number of numerical experiments are carried out to validate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Developed algorithm is compared with previously published techniques; Wavelet Galerkin Method (WGM and Split-Step Fourier transform Method (SSFM. A very good agreement is found between SSWM and published techniques. It is also observed that the proposed algorithm is about 18 times faster than WGM and provide more details of propagation effects as compared to SSFM.

  6. On physical limit of wireless digital transmission from radio wave propagation perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Under a time-invariant condition with thermal noise, the physical limit of digital transmission ability is governed by Shannon's channel capacity. However, in this formula, it does not contain factors on radio wave propagation environments. In other words, for the ultimate information transmission, a sufficiently long time for the coding and signal processing is expected. However, since wave propagation prevents its premise, there is another physical limit for digital transmission in a different perspective with Shannon's channel capacity. Even if the S/N ratio is sufficiently high, there is the limit for information transmission. This paper deals with this matter concerning physical limit of wireless transmission from a radio wave propagation viewpoint.

  7. Tomography of seismo-radio wave source regions for predicting imminent earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kozo

    1989-10-01

    To detect a seismo-electromagnetic effect in a noisy land area or a deep-sea area, two methods are proposed. In the land area, a steel casing pipe inserted in a deep borehole has been used as the linear element of a monopole antenna. This method is shown to be very effective in rejecting atmospherics. In the deep-sea area, man-made noise and atmospherics can be attenuated by using insulated cables extended along the seabed as a dipole antenna or a loop antenna. Taking advantage of the seismo-radio wave propagating directly through the Earth's crust, a tomography is proposed to describe a three-dimensional intensity distribution of seismo-radio wave sources by receiving the wave at four or more points simultaneously, to predict precisely an earthquake of magnitude seven or more.

  8. 64-GHz millimeter-wave photonic generation with a feasible radio over fiber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Rasha K.; Al-Raweshidy, Hamed S.

    2017-02-01

    A full-duplex radio over fiber (RoF) link with the generation of a 64-GHz millimeter wave (mm-wave) is investigated. This system is proposed as a solution to cope with the demands of a multi-Gb/s data transmission in the fifth generation (5G) and beyond for small cell networks. Cost reduction and performance improvement are achieved by simplifying the mm-wave generation method with an RoF technique. High-frequency radio signals are considered challenging in the electrical generation domain; therefore, our photonic generation method is introduced and examined. RoF design is proposed for mm-wave generation using both phase modulation and the effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering in the optical fiber for the first time. RoF system with transmission rates of 5 Gb/s is successfully achieved. In our scheme, one laser source is utilized and a fiber Bragg grating is used for wavelength reuse for the uplink connection. Stable mm-wave RoF link is successfully achieved in up to a 100-km fiber link length with high quality carrier. Simulation results show a reduction in fiber nonlinearity effects and the mm-wave signal has low noise equal to -75 dBm. This study ensures a practical mm-wave RoF link, and it could be appropriate for small cell 5G networks by reducing the installation cost.

  9. The Dynamic Radio Sky: An Opportunity for Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Lazio, J; Bower, G C; Cordes, J; Croft, S; Hyman, S; Law, C; McLaughlin, M

    2009-01-01

    The time domain of the sky has been only sparsely explored. Nevertheless, recent discoveries from limited surveys and serendipitous discoveries indicate that there is much to be found on timescales from nanoseconds to years and at wavelengths from meters to millimeters. These observations have revealed unexpected phenomena such as rotating radio transients and coherent pulses from brown dwarfs. Additionally, archival studies have found not-yet identified radio transients without optical or high-energy hosts. In addition to the known classes of radio transients, possible other classes of objects include extrapolations from known classes and exotica such as orphan gamma-ray burst afterglows, radio supernovae, tidally-disrupted stars, flare stars, magnetars, and transmissions from extraterrestrial civilizations. Over the next decade, meter- and centimeter-wave radio telescopes with improved sensitivity, wider fields of view, and flexible digital signal processing will be able to explore radio transient parameter...

  10. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J L; Fainberg, J; Stone, R G

    1983-11-04

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  11. Excitation of small-scale waves in the F region of the ionosphere by powerful HF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Chernyshev, M. Y.; Kornienko, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Ionospheric small-scale waves in the F region, initiated by heating facilities in Nizhniy Novgorod, have been studied by the method of field-aligned scattering of diagnostic HF radio signals. Experimental data have been obtained on the radio path Kiev-N. Novgorod-St. Petersburg during heating campaigns with heater radiated power ERP = 20 MW and 100 MW. Observations of scattered HF signals have been made by a Doppler spectrum device with high temporal resolution. Analysis of the experimental data shows a relation between the heater power level and the parameters of ionospheric small-scale oscillations falling within the range of Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations. It is found that the periods of wave processes in the F region of the ionosphere, induced by the heating facility, decrease with increasing heating power. The level of heating power also has an impact on the horizontal east-west component of the electric field E, the vertical component of the Doppler velocity Vd and the amplitude of the vertical displacements M of the heated region. Typical magnitudes of these parameters are the following: E = 1.25 mVm, Vd = 6 ms, M = 600-1500 m for ERP = 20 MW and E = 2.5-4.5 mVm, Vd = 11-25 ms, M = 1000-5000 m for ERP = 100 MW. The results obtained confirm the hypothesis of excitation of the Alfvén resonator by powerful HF radio waves which leads to the generation of magnetic field oscillations in the heated region giving rise to artificial Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations and ionospheric small-scale wave processes. In this situation an increase of the heater power would lead to a growth of the electric field of hydromagnetic waves propagating in the ionosphere as well as the amplitude of the vertical displacements of the heated region.

  12. Stratospheric gravity wave activities inferred through the GPS radio occultation technique; Ondas de gravidade na estratosfera terrestre inferida atraves da tecnica de radio ocultacao de GPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IPeD), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Takahashi, Hisao; Fechine, Joaquim; Denardini, Clezio Marcos [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Wickert, Jens, E-mail: cmw@univap.br, E-mail: hisaotak@laser.inpe.br, E-mail: joaquim@laser.inpe.br, E-mail: denardin@dae.inpe.br, E-mail: jens.wickert@gfz-potsdam.de [GeoForschungsZentrum, Potsdam (GFZ), Department of Geodesy and Remote Sensing (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Stratospheric gravity wave activities were deduced from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles obtained by CHAMP satellite between 2001 and 2005. Potential energy profiles are used to analyze the gravity wave activity over South America. The results showed an inter-annual variation of the potential energy integrated between 24 and 34 km of altitude. The gravity wave activity is more concentrated around the equatorial region. In order to evaluate the seasonal variation of the gravity wave activity, a mean potential energy was determined over (10 deg N-10 deg S) and (100 deg W-20 deg W). The results showed a lower gravity wave activity during winter time, while during spring time the mean potential energy showed an increase in the wave activity. The results of the mean potential energy also showed that the gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere exhibits a higher wave activity during 2002 and 2004 and a lower wave activity during 2003 and 2005. (author)

  13. Antenna Construction & Propagation of Radio Waves, 5-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of five individualized, self-paced chapters dealing with antenna construction and propagation of radio waves. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: basic electricity; antenna transmission-line fundamentals; quarter-wave antennas, half-wave antennas, and associated radio…

  14. Experimental Probes of Radio Wave Propagation near Dielectric Boundaries and Implications for Neutrino Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, R; Hanson, J C; Johannesen, A M; Macy, J; Prohira, S; Stockham, J; Stockham, M; Zheng, Al; Zheng, Am

    2015-01-01

    Experimental efforts to measure neutrinos by radio-frequency (RF) signals resulting from neutrino interactions in-ice have intensified over the last decade. Recent calculations indicate that one may dramatically improve the sensitivity of ultra-high energy ("UHE"; >EeV) neutrino experiments via detection of radio waves trapped along the air-ice surface. Detectors designed to observe the "Askaryan effect" currently search for RF electromagnetic pulses propagating through bulk ice, and could therefore gain sensitivity if signals are confined to the ice-air boundary. To test the feasibilty of this scenario, measurements of the complex radio-frequency properties of several air-dielectric interfaces were performed for a variety of materials. Two-dimensional surfaces of granulated fused silica (sand), both in the lab as well as occurring naturally, water doped with varying concentrations of salt, natural rock salt formations, granulated salt and ice itself were studied, both in North America and also Antarctica. In...

  15. Integrated Coherent Radio-over-Fiber Units for Millimeter-Wave Wireless Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, A.; Babiel, S.; Chuenchom, M.

    2015-01-01

    For providing wireless access as a complementary access technology to direct optical access, supporting 1–10 Gb/s per client, we propose a novel scheme based upon the transparent integration of coherent Radio-over-Fiber (CRoF) units with next generation optical access (NGOA) networks using dense...... WDM and a centralized electronic signal processing in the optical line termination to mitigate distortions and to achieve low costs. This paper will concentrate on recent key technological developments that were achieved within the European IPHOBAC-NG project for constructing such CRoF units capable......-dense WDM. We propose and demonstrate novel radio access units (RAU) using coherent optical heterodyne detection for the generation of the millimeter-wave radio signals in the RAUs. The proposed CRoF concept supports the provision of multiple services over a single optical distribution network including...

  16. Nonextensivity effect on radio-wave transmission in plasma sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new theoretical findings on the application of magnetic field in effective transmission of electromagnetic (EM) waves through a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle are reported. The results are obtained by assuming the plasma sheath to consist of nonextensive electrons and thermal ions. The expressions for the electric field and effective collision frequency are derived analytically in the framework of nonextensive statistics. Examination of the reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients regarding the strength of the ambient magnetic field shows the significance of q-nonextensive parameter effect on these entities. For small values of the magnetic field, the transmission coefficient increases to unity only in the range of - 1 hypersonic flights.

  17. Modeling Human Blockers in Millimeter Wave Radio Links

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan S. Lu; Daniel Steinbach; Patrick Cabrol; Philip Pietraski

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the loss caused by multiple humans blocking millimeter wave frequencies. We model human blockers as absorbing screens of infinite height with two knife-edges, We take a physical optics approach to computing the diffraction around the absorbing screens, This approach differs to the geometric optics approach described in much of the literature. The blocking model is validated by measuring the gain from multiple-human blocking configurations on an indoor link. The blocking gains predicted using Piazzi ' s numerical integration method (a physical optics method) agree well with measurements taken from approximately 2.7 dB to -50 dB. Thereofre, this model is suitable for real human blockers, The mean prediction error for the method is approximately -1.2 dB, and the standard deviation is approximately 5 dB.

  18. Gravitational-wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Thomas; Kanner, Jonah; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-07-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors.

  19. Software Radio Implementation of RF Short-Wave Wideband Channel Simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DINGYahui; GANLiangcai; XIELing

    2005-01-01

    A novel radio frequency short-wave wideband channel simulator which can be used to evaluate wideband SW communication system performance over shortwave channel with time-variant and dispersive property, is proposed in this paper. The channel simulator consists of RF transmitting, receiving module and baseband digital signal processing module. In particular, a wideband channel model is introduced into this project that can exhibit various short-wave characteristic such as delay spread, Doppler shift, Doppler spread and all kinds of noise and interference. At the same time, this paper makes a great improvement on SW wideband channel model proposed in Ref.[2] and utilizes some idea of software radio to design the channel simulator's RF part. Therefore, the channel simulator described in the paper can be applicable to not only theoretical research, but also practical application.

  20. An Overview of Observations by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Zarka, P.; Tokarev, Y.

    2001-01-01

    On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew by Earth at an altitude of 1186 km on its way to Saturn. Although the flyby was performed exclusively to provide the spacecraft with sufficient velocity to get to Saturn, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument, along with several others, was operated to gain valuable calibration data and to validate the operation of a number of capabilities. In addition, an opportunity to study the terrestrial radio and plasma wave environment with a highly capable instrument on a swift fly-through of the magnetosphere was afforded by the encounter. This paper provides an overview of the RPWS observations, at Earth, including the identification of a number of magnetospheric plasma wave modes, an accurate measurement of the plasma density over a significant portion of the trajectory using the natural wave spectrum in addition to a relaxation sounder and Langmuir probe, the detection of natural and human-produced radio emissions, and the validation of the capability to measure the wave normal angle and Poynting flux of whistler-mode chorus emissions. The results include the observation of a double-banded structure at closest' approach including a band of Cerenkov emission bounded by electron plasma and upper hybrid frequencies and an electron cyclotron harmonic band just above the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. In the near-Earth plasma sheet, evidence for electron phase space holes is observed, similar to those first reported by Geotail in the magnetotail. The wave normal analysis confirms the Polar result that chorus is generated very close to the magnetic equator and propagates to higher latitudes. The integrated power flux of auroral kilometric radiation is also used to identify a series of substorms observed during the outbound passage through the magnetotail.

  1. Evidence for four- and three-wave interactions in solar type III radio emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The high time resolution observations obtained by the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in the source regions of solar type III radio bursts, Langmuir waves often occur as intense localized wave packets with short durations of only few ms. One of these wave packets shows that it is a three-dimensional field structure with WLneTe ~ 10−3, where WL is the peak energy density, and ne and Te are the electron density and temperature, respectively. For this wave packet, the conditions of the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI and supersonic collapse are satisfied within the error range of determination of main parameters. The density cavity, observed during this wave packet indicates that its depth, width and temporal coincidence are consistent with those of a caviton, generated by the ponderomotive force of the collapsing wave packet. The spectrum of each of the parallel and perpendicular components of the wave packet contains a primary peak at fpe, two secondary peaks at fpe ± fS and a low-frequency enhancement below fS, which, as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the fast Fourier transform (FFT-based tricoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, fpe + fS, fpe − fS, are coupled to each other by the OTSI type of four-wave interaction (fpe is the local electron plasma frequency and fS is the frequency of ion sound waves. In addition to the primary peak at fpe, each of these spectra also contains a peak at 2fpe, which as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the wavelet-based bicoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, appears to correspond to the second harmonic electromagnetic waves generated as a result of coalescence of oppositely propagating sidebands excited by the OTSI. Thus, these observations for the first time provide combined evidence that (1 the OTSI and related strong turbulence processes play a significant role in the stabilization of the electron beam, (2 the coalescence

  2. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  3. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati, E-mail: dhakal@jlab.org; Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  4. The effect of disturbances of lower ionospheric parameters by powerful radio waves on partially reflected signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, S. I.; Chernogor, L. F.

    The interaction of intense pulsed short-wave radiation with ionospheric plasma in the D region is studied. Also considered is the effect of the disturbances caused by this radiation on the characteristics of the partially reflected radio signals used in the method of partial reflections. Calculations are carried out showing that present installations designed for the method of partial reflections can have a significant effect on the parameters of the lower ionosphere. Recommendations are made for the maximum power of these installations.

  5. Radio-Frequency Characteristics of a Printed Rectangular Helix Slow-Wave Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Cheng-Fang; WEI Yan-Yu; WANG Wen-Xiang; GONG Yu-Bin

    2008-01-01

    A new type of printed rectangular he/ix slow-wave structure (SWS) is investigated using the field-matching method and the electromagnetic integral equations at the boundaries. The radio-frequency characteristics including the dispersion equation and the coupling impedance for transverse antisymmetric (odd) modes of this structure are analysed. The numerical results agree well with the results obtained by the EM simulation software HFSS. It is shown that the dispersion of the rectangular helix circuit is weakened, the phase velocity is reduced after filling the dielectric materials in the rectangular helix SWS. As a planar slow-wave structure, this structure has potential applications in compact TWTs.

  6. Strategies for Finding Prompt Radio Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Transients with the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Murphy, T.; Rowlinson, A.; Croft, S. D.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Wepresent and evaluate several strategies to search for prompt, low-frequency radio emission associated with gravitational wave transients using the Murchison Widefield Array. As we are able to repoint the Murchison Widefield Array on timescales of tens of seconds, we can search for the dispersed radio signal that has been predicted to originate along with or shortly after a neutron star-neutron star merger. We find that given the large, 600 deg2 instantaneous field of view of the Murchison Widefield Array, we can cover a significant fraction of the predicted gravitational wave error region, although due to the complicated geometry of the latter, we only cover > 50% of the error region for approximately 5% of events, and roughly 15% of events will be located < 10° from the Murchison Widefield Array pointing centre such that they will be covered in the radio images. For optimal conditions, our limiting flux density for a 10-s long transient would be 0.1 Jy, increasing to about 1 Jy for a wider range of events. This corresponds to luminosity limits of 1038-39 erg s-1 based on expectations for the distances of the gravitational wave transients, which should be sufficient to detect or significantly constrain a range of models for prompt emission.

  7. Treatment of simple snoring using radio waves for ablation of uvula and soft palate : A day-case surgery procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedman, Jan; Miljeteig, H

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Uvulopalatoplasty, performed with high-frequency radio waves, was evaluated as a treatment for social snoring. Methods: Forty male social snorers were included in this prospective, nonrandomized study. Patients' subjective complaints before, during, and 3 months after radio-assisted uvulo

  8. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  9. Safety Aspect Analysis of Helmet Mounted Millimeter Wave Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nageswari

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of millimetric wave (MMW power density from two-helmet-mounted MMW radiating horn antennas were made at various distances on the three axes. These three axes are representing three planes: (i in the direction of propagation (Z-axis, (ii horizontal axis perpendicular to the direction of propagation (Y-axis, i.e., 15 cm to the left or right of Z-axis, and (iii vertical axis (X-axis also perpendicular to the direction of propagation and extending up and down an imaginary central reference line passing through the centre of the horn and the centre of the microwave measuring probe. Measurements were also made inside the helmet close to the metallic plate at 17 locations and 10 cm away from it. The Narda-8723 broadband isotropic microwave probe [frequency of operation (0.3-40 GHz power density range 0.05-100 mW/cm1 was placed at various distance points marked at 15 nm intervals and also at distances of relevance on Z-axis. For each of the distance points on Z-axis, measurements were taken at 7 probe locations on X-axis. For Y-axis measurements, 4 probe locations were selected (on vertical or X-axis. The results revealed no leakage of microwave power inside the helmets. In the transmitting mode of operation, there was a great variability of microwave power emitted closest to the horn antennas (2.5-5.0 mW / 2 and 6.0-105 mW /cm2 for helmet Nos.11 and2, respectively. As the distance from the antenna increased in the direction of propagation, the power density dropped to 0.04 m W / cm2 or 0.075 m W / cm{ maximum value at 1 m. As the values recorded are within American National Standards Institute (ANSI safety guidelines (10mW/cm2 at 35 GHz.

  10. Global particle in cell simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak ∖fs20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Lau, C.; Sun, G. Y.

    2016-10-01

    We are looking into a new nonlinear kinetic simulation model to study the radio frequency heating and current drive of fusion plasmas using toroidal code GTC. In this model ions are considered as fully kinetic (FK) particles using Vlasov equation and the electrons are treated as drift kinetic (DK) particles using drift kinetic equation. We have benchmarked this numerical model to verify the linear physics of normal modes, conversion of slow and fast waves and its propagation in the core region of the tokamak using the Boozer coordinates. In the nonlinear simulation of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) in a tokamak, parametric decay instability (PDI) is observed where a large amplitude pump wave decays into an IBW sideband and an ion cyclotron quasi-mode (ICQM). The ICQM induces an ion perpendicular heating, with a heating rate proportional to the pump wave intensity. Finally, in the electromagnetic LH simulation, nonlinear wave trapping of electrons is verified and plasma current is nonlinearly driven. Presently we are working on the development of new PIC simulation model using cylindrical coordinates to address the RF wave propagation from the edge of the tokamak to the core region and the parametric instabilities associated with this RF waves. We have verified the cyclotron integrator using Boris push method.

  11. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Mayu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 484-8601 (Japan); Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Häusler, Bernd [Institut für Raumfahrttechnik, Universität der Bundeswehr München, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Pätzold, Martin [Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Department Planetenforschung, Universität zu Köln, Aachener Str. 209, D-50931 Köln (Germany); Nabatov, Alexander [The Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Chervonoprapornaya, Str. 4, Kharkov 61002 (Ukraine)

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  12. Estimation of emission cone wall thickness of Jupiter's decametric radio emission using stereoscopic STEREO/WAVES observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Stereoscopic observations by the WAVES instrument onboard two STEREO spacecraft have been used with the aim of estimating wall thickness of an emission cone of Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). Methods: Stereoscopic observations provided by STEREO-A and -B facilitate unambiguous recognition of the Jovian DAM in observed dynamic spectra as well as identification of its components (Io DAM or non-Io DAM). The dynamic spectra of radio emissions recorded by STEREO/WAVES have been analyzed using the method of cross-correlation of the radio dynamic spectra. Results: Altogether, 139 radio events, in particular 91 Io- and 48 non-Io-related radio events were observed. The averaged width of the emission cone wall for Io-DAM as well as for non-Io DAM is about 1.1° ± 0.2°. These results are in agreement with previous findings.

  13. Strategies for Finding Prompt Radio Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Transients with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Rowlinson, A; Croft, S D; Wayth, R B; Trott, C M

    2016-01-01

    We present and evaluate several strategies to search for prompt, low-frequency radio emission associated with gravitational wave transients using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). As we are able to repoint the MWA on timescales of tens of seconds, we can search for the dispersed radio signal that has been predicted to originate along with or shortly after a neutron star-neutron star merger. We find that given the large, 600 deg^2 instantaneous field-of-view of the MWA we can cover a significant fraction of the predicted gravitational wave error region, although due to the complicated geometry of the latter we only cover >50% of the error region for approximately 5% of events, and roughly 15% of events will be located <10 deg from the MWA pointing center such that they will be covered in the radio images. For optimal conditions our limiting flux density for a 10-s long transient would be 0.1 Jy, increasing to about 1 Jy for a wider range of events. This corresponds to luminosity limits of 1e38-1e39 erg/s...

  14. Involuntary human hand movements due to FM radio waves in a moving van.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, P; Savinainen, A; Hänninen, Osmo; Myllylä, R

    2011-06-01

    Finland TRACT Involuntary movements of hands in a moving van on a public road were studied to clarify the possible role of frequency modulated radio waves on driving. The signals were measured in a direct 2 km test segment of an international road during repeated drives to both directions. Test subjects (n=4) had an ability to sense radio frequency field intensity variations of the environment. They were sitting in a minivan with arm movement detectors in their hands. A potentiometer was used to register the hand movements to a computer which simultaneously collected data on the amplitude of the RF signal of the local FM tower 30 km distance at a frequency of about 100 MHz. Involuntary hand movements of the test subjects correlated with electromagnetic field, i.e. FM radio wave intensity measured. They reacted also on the place of a geomagnetic anomaly crossing the road, which was found on the basis of these recordings and confirmed by the public geological maps of the area.In conclusion, RF irradiation seems to affect the human hand reflexes of sensitive persons in a moving van along a normal public road which may have significance in traffic safety.

  15. Some characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed by radio-interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Mercier

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs are considered through their effect on the horizontal gradient G of the slant total electron content (slant TEC, which can be directly obtained from two-dimensional radio-interferometric observations of cosmic radio-sources with the Nançay radioheligraph (2.2°E, 47.3°N. Azimuths of propagation can be deduced (modulo 180°. The total database amounts to about 800 h of observations at various elevations, local time and seasons. The main results are:

    a AGWs are partially directive, confirming our previous results.

    b The propagation azimuths considered globally are widely scattered with a preference towards the south.

    c They show a bimodal time distribution with preferential directions towards the SE during daytime and towards the SW during night-time (rather than a clockwise rotation as reported by previous authors.

    d The periods are scattered but are larger during night-time than during daytime by about 60%.

    e The effects observed with the solar radio-sources are significantly stronger than with other radio-sources (particularly at higher elevations, showing the role of the geometry in line of sight-integrated observations.

  16. Discovery of Millimeter-Wave Excess Emission in Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Horesh, Assaf; Stevens, Jamie; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2015-01-01

    The physical origin of radio emission in Radio Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei (RQ AGN) remains unclear, whether it is a downscaled version of the relativistic jets typical of Radio Loud (RL) AGN, or whether it originates from the accretion disk. The correlation between 5 GHz and X-ray luminosities of RQ AGN, which follows $L_R = 10^{-5}L_X$ observed also in stellar coronae, suggests an association of both X-ray and radio sources with the accretion disk corona. Observing RQ AGN at higher (mm-wave) frequencies, where synchrotron self absorption is diminished, and smaller regions can be probed, is key to exploring this association. Eight RQ AGN, selected based on their high X-ray brightness and variability, were observed at 95 GHz with the CARMA and ATCA telescopes. All targets were detected at the $1-10$ mJy level. Emission excess at 95~GHz of up to $\\times 7$ is found with respect to archival low-frequency steep spectra, suggesting a compact, optically-thick core superimposed on the more extended structures that...

  17. Review of radio wave for power transmission in medical applications with safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Geddis, Demetris; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Song, Kyo D.

    2015-04-01

    The integration of biosensors with radio frequency (RF) wireless power transmission devices is becoming popular, but there are challenges for implantable devices in medical applications. Integration and at the same time miniaturization of medical devices in a single embodiment are not trivial. The research reported herein, seeks to review possible effects of RF signals ranging from 900 MHz to 100 GHz on the human tissues and environment. Preliminary evaluation shows that radio waves selected for test have substantial influence on human tissues based on their dielectric properties. In the advancement of RF based biosensors, it is imperative to set up necessary guidelines that specify how to use RF power safely. In this paper, the dielectric properties of various human tissues will be used for estimation of influence within the selected RF frequency ranges.

  18. Folded Fields as the Source of Extreme Radio-Wave Scattering in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Goldreich, P; Goldreich, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A strong case has been made that radio waves from sources within about half a degree of the Galactic Center undergo extreme diffractive scattering. However, problems arise when standard (``Kolmogorov'') models of electron density fluctuations are employed to interpret the observations of scattering in conjunction with those of free-free radio emission. Specifically, the outer scale of a Kolmogorov spectrum of electron density fluctuations is constrained to be so small that it is difficult to identify an appropriate astronomical setting. Moreover, an unacceptably high turbulent heating rate results if the outer scale of the velocity field coincides with that of the density fluctuations. We propose an alternative model based on folded magnetic field structures that have been reported in numerical simulations of small-scale dynamos. Nearly isothermal density variations across thin current sheets suffice to account for the scattering. There is no problem of excess turbulent heating because the outer scale for the...

  19. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: application to gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Tinto, Massimo; Prestage, John D; Armstrong, J W

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently-leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multi-link CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would ...

  20. Beat-type Langmuir wave emissions associated with a type III solar radio burst: Evidence of parametric decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent measurements from the plasma wave instrument on the Galileo spacecraft have shown that Langmuir waves observed in conjunction with a type III solar radio burst contain many beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from about 150 to 650 Hz. Strong evidence exists that the beat pattern is produced by two closely spaced narrowband components. The most likely candidates for these two waves are a beam-generated Langmuir wave and an oppositely propagating Langmuir wave produced by parametric decay. In the parametric decay process, nonlinear interactions cause the beam-driven Langmuir wave to decay into a Langmuir wave and a low-frequency ion sound wave. Comparisons of the observed beat frequency are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a three-wave parametric decay process. Weak low-frequency emissions are also sometimes observed at the predicted frequency of the ion sound wave.

  1. Radio follow-up of gravitational wave triggers during Advanced LIGO O1

    CERN Document Server

    Palliyaguru, N T; Kasliwal, M M; Cenko, S B; Frail, D A; Perley, D A; Mishra, N; Singer, L P; Gal-Yam, A; Nugent, P E; Surace, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present radio follow-up observations carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array during the first observing run (O1) of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). A total of three gravitational wave triggers were followed up during the ~4 months of O1, from September 2015 to January 2016. Two of these triggers, GW150914 and GW151226, are binary black hole merger events of high significance. A third trigger, G194575, was subsequently declared as an event of no interest (i.e., a false alarm). Our observations targeted selected optical transients identified by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) in the Advanced LIGO error regions of the three triggers, and a limited region of the gravitational wave localization area of G194575 not accessible to optical telescopes due to Sun constraints, where a possible high-energy transient was identified. No plausible radio counterparts to GW150914 and GW151226 were found, in agreement with expectations for binary black h...

  2. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.

    2016-06-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast radio bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include starquakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second-generation interferometers.

  3. Radio Wave Propagation for Communication on and around Mars. Part 1; Highlights: Propagation Through Mars Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser

    1999-01-01

    We recommend to use the dayside Martian ionosphere as a reflector for global communication, because the dayside ionosphere has stable density peak and usable critic frequency. This is very crucial for the future Mars ground to around communication. The dayside ionosphere has been well modeled as a Chapman layer. We suggest to perform the Martian nightside ionospheric modeling study. Because the nightside ionosphere has very little measurements available, we propose to drop a digital ionosond instrument into the Mars surface for data collection. Even though the Martian tropospheric radio refractivity has small value, it still can cause the ray bending and multipath effects. We recommend to perform an accurate calculation on excess phase and group delays (range and time delays). Other effects, such as range rate errors, appearance angle deviation, defocusing loss on Mars, etc. are also needed to be estimated. Ice depolarization effects due to Martian clouds on radio waves is unknown yet, which is expected to be small, because lower optical depth and thinner layer of cloud: Total Martian atmospheric gaseous attenuation is expected to be less than 1 dB on microwaves band, because the Martian atmosphere has very low concentration in uncondensed H2O and O2. An accurate calculation for zenith opacity requires the information about scale heights of H2O and O2 distribution. An accurate water vapor altitude profile at Mars is not available yet. Under the normal condition, CO2 and N2 gases do not have electric or magnetic dipoles and do not absorb electromagnetic energy from the waves. However, they may generate the dipoles through a collision and interact with waves under a high density condition and absorb electromagnetic waves in the infrared and visible band. Dust storm is most dominant factor to the radio wave attenuation. Large Martian dust storm can cause at least 3 dB or higher loss to Ka band wave. For a normal dust storm, the attenuation is about 1 dB. The

  4. Opto-Electromechanical Devices for Low-Noise Detection of Radio Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, Tolga

    , the vibrations of which are monitored as phase fluctuations via optical interferometry. At the first stage of the experiment, we have tested several bare, metal (aluminum)-coated and graphene-coated SiN (silicon nitride) membranes in terms of their capacitive interaction strength. Our findings support...... of our device for optical detection of radio waves. We demonstrate an actual Johnson noise-limited voltage sensitivity of ≈ 800 pV/√Hz and beyond that, we infer a sensitivity of 60 pV/√Hz both for the thermal noise of the membrane and shot noise (quantum) of the optical readout, at the optimal...

  5. Programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics using Very Low Frequency Radio Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Pal, Sujay; Kanta Maji, Surya; Ray, Suman

    Indian Centre for Space Physics conducted two major VLF campaigns all over Indian Sub-continent to study the propagation effects of VLF radio waves. It made multi-receiver observations during solar eclipse. ICSP not only recorded multitudes of solar flares, it also reproduced VLF observation from ab initio calculation. ICSP extended its study to the field of earthquake predictions using signal anomalies and using case by case studies as well as statistical analysis, showed that anomalies are real and more studies are required to understand them. Using earth as a gigantic detector, it detected ionospheric perturbations due to soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts.

  6. Relativistic jet with shock waves like model of superluminal radio source. Jet relativista con ondas de choque como modelo de radio fuentes superluminales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A.; Gomez, J.L.; Marcaide, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the compact radio sources at milliarcsecond angular resolution can be explained in terms of shock waves propagating along bent jets. These jets consist of narrow-angle cones of plasma flowing at bulk relativistic velocities, within tangled magnetic fields, emitting synchrotron radiation. We have developed a numerical code which solves the synchrotron radiation transfer equations to compute the total and polarized emission of bent shocked relativistic jets, and we have applied it to reproduce the compact structure, kenimatic evolution and time flux density evolution of the superluminal radio source 4C 39.25 and to obtain its jet physical parameters. (Author) 23 ref.

  7. High Power Radio Wave Interactions within the D-Region Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper highlights the best results obtained during D-region modification experiments performed by the University of Florida at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory between 2007 and 2014. Over this period, we have seen a tremendous improvement in ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency. We have identified methods to characterize ambient and modified ionospheric properties and to discern and quantify specific types of interactions. We have demonstrated several important implications of HF cross-modulation effects, including "Doppler Spoofing" on HF radio waves. Throughout this talk, observations are compared with the predictions of an ionospheric HF heating model to provide context and guidance for future D-region modification experiments.

  8. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Davanço, Marcelo I; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-05-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains.

  9. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  10. Recollections of Tucson Operations The Millimeter-Wave Observatory of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, M A

    2005-01-01

    This book is a personal account of the evolution of millimeter-wave astronomy at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. It begins with the construction of the hugely successful, but flawed, 36 ft radio telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, and continues through the funding of its ultimate successor, the Atacama Large Millimeter-wave Array (ALMA), being constructed on a 5.000 m (16.500 ft) site in northern Chile. The book describes the behind-the-scene activities of the NRAO Tucson staff. These include the identification and solution of technical problems, the scheduling and support of visiting astronomers, and the preparations and the politics of the proposal to replace the 36 ft telescope with a 25 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The book also describes the installation of a new 12 m surface and the involvement of the Tucson staff in the ALMA project. Finally, it describes events leading to the closing of the 36 ft telescope and, eventually, of the NRAO offices in Tucson.

  11. Development of data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave for implantable artificial hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Hiroto; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize infection risks of patients with artificial hearts, wireless data transmission methods with electromagnetic induction or light have been developed. However, these methods tend to become difficult to transmit data if the external data transmission unit moves from its proper position. To resolve this serious problem, the purpose of this study is to develop a prototype wireless data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave and confirm its performance. Due to its high-speed communication rate, low power consumption, high tolerance to electromagnetic disturbances, and secure wireless communication, we adopted Bluetooth radio wave technology for our system. The system consists of an internal data transmission unit and an external data transmission unit (53 by 64 by 16 mm, each), and each has a Bluetooth module (radio field intensity: 4 dBm, receiver sensitivity: -80 dBm). The internal unit also has a micro controller with an 8-channel 10-bit A/D converter, and the external unit also has a RS-232C converter. We experimented with the internal unit implanted into pig meat, and carried out data transmission tests to evaluate the performance of this system in tissue thickness of up to 3 mm. As a result, data transfer speeds of about 20 kbps were achieved within the communication distance of 10 m. In conclusion, we confirmed that the system can wirelessly transmit the data from the inside of the body to the outside, and it promises to resolve unstable data transmission due to accidental movements of an external data transmission unit.

  12. Nonlinear phenomena arising from radio wave heating of the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, A. A.

    1981-08-01

    This document describes a theoretical and experimental study of the interaction of high power, high frequency radio waves with the lower ionosphere. The theoretical calculations presented here show that the electron temperature of the ionospheric plasma can be greatly enhanced when the plasma is irradiated by a powerful groundbased HF transmitter with an effective radiated power of the order of 100 MW. If this plasma heating is maintained for times exceeding a few seconds, the composition of the plasma can also be altered. These temperature and composition modifications cause significant changes in the plasma conductivity and wave absorption in the medium. Two experiments were conducted in order to test for the predicted absorption and conductivity modifications: a vertical incidence plus absorption experiment and a nonlinear demodulation experiment. Data from the absorption experiment clearly show a large (9 dB) increase in wave absorption at 2.4 MHz due to a high power (60 MW ERP) HF heating of the ionosphere. The nonlinear demodulation experiment generated strong VLF radiation when the ionosphere was irradiated by a powerful modulated HF wave. These VLF signals are believed to be due to HF heating induced conductivity modulation of the dynamo current system.

  13. Solar type II radio bursts associated with CME expansions as shown by EUV waves

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha-Silva, R D; Selhorst, C L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the physical conditions of the sources of two metric Type-II bursts associated with CME expansions with the aim of verifying the relationship between the shocks and the CMEs, comparing the heights of the radio sources and the heights of the EUV waves associated with the CMEs. The heights of the EUV waves associated with the events were determined in relation to the wave fronts. The heights of the shocks were estimated by applying two different density models to the frequencies of the Type-II emissions and compared with the heights of the EUV waves. For the 13 June 2010 event, with band-splitting, the shock speed was estimated from the frequency drifts of the upper and lower branches of the harmonic lane, taking into account the H/F frequency ratio fH/fF = 2. Exponential fits on the intensity maxima of the branches revealed to be more consistent with the morphology of the spectrum of this event. For the 6 June 2012 event, with no band-splitting and with a clear fundamental lane on the spectrum, ...

  14. SDN based millimetre wave radio over fiber (RoF) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amate, Ahmed; Milosavljevic, Milos; Kourtessis, Pandelis; Robinson, Matthew; Senior, John M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces software-defined, millimeter Wave (mm-Wave) networks with Radio over Fiber (RoF) for the delivery of gigabit connectivity required to develop fifth generation (5G) mobile. This network will enable an effective open access system allowing providers to manage and lease the infrastructure to service providers through unbundling new business models. Exploiting the inherited benefits of RoF, complete base station functionalities are centralized at the edges of the metro and aggregation network, leaving remote radio heads (RRHs) with only tunable filtering and amplification. A Software Defined Network (SDN) Central Controller (SCC) is responsible for managing the resource across several mm-Wave Radio Access Networks (RANs) providing a global view of the several network segments. This ensures flexible resource allocation for reduced overall latency and increased throughput. The SDN based mm-Wave RAN also allows for inter edge node communication. Therefore, certain packets can be routed between different RANs supported by the same edge node, reducing latency. System level simulations of the complete network have shown significant improvement of the overall throughput and SINR for wireless users by providing effective resource allocation and coordination among interfering cells. A new Coordinated Multipoint (CoMP) algorithm exploiting the benefits of the SCC global network view for reduced delay in control message exchange is presented, accounting for a minimum packet delay and limited Channel State Information (CSI) in a Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A), Cloud RAN (CRAN) configuration. The algorithm does not require detailed CSI feedback from UEs but it rather considers UE location (determined by the eNB) as the required parameter. UE throughput in the target sector is represented using a Cumulative Distributive Function (CDF). The drawn characteristics suggest that there is a significant 60% improvement in UE cell edge throughput following the

  15. Polyphase-discrete Fourier transform spectrum analysis for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, G. A.; Gulkis, S.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of a matched filter-detection system to a finite-duration continuous wave (CW) tone is compared with the sensitivities of a windowed discrete Fourier transform (DFT) system and an ideal bandpass filter-bank system. These comparisons are made in the context of the NASA Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) microwave observing project (MOP) sky survey. A review of the theory of polyphase-DFT filter banks and its relationship to the well-known windowed-DFT process is presented. The polyphase-DFT system approximates the ideal bandpass filter bank by using as few as eight filter taps per polyphase branch. An improvement in sensitivity of approx. 3 dB over a windowed-DFT system can be obtained by using the polyphase-DFT approach. Sidelobe rejection of the polyphase-DFT system is vastly superior to the windowed-DFT system, thereby improving its performance in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI).

  16. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc, could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  17. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc., could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  18. Extraterrestrial Solar Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2010-01-01

    We examine the scope of extraterrestrial solar neutrino physics, i.e. solar neutrino physics that could be carried out outside the Earth. We find that, among others, the reactions induced by the ^8B solar neutrinos, in view of the sole high energy nature (E_nu^max=14.03MeV), are most interesting in the solar environment. Two types of experiments are considered - the chemical compositions of the geology type and the matter-enhanced oscillations when the Sun-Venus-Earth eclipse, or the Sun-Mercury-Earth eclipse, occurs or the Satellite experiments (likely to be different from the "day-night" effect on the Earth). These experiments are not beyond current technology limits. In view of the weak-interaction nature, they are likely to be the precision experiments of the next generation or even beyond.

  19. Characteristics of layers, waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and ionosphere as estimated by GPS space radio-holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, Alexander; Gubenko, Vladimir; Matyugov, Stanislav; Pavelyev, Alexey

    The spatial, seasonal and geographical distrubutions of the intensity of layers, turbulence and internal waves at different altitudes in the atmosphere and ionosphere of the Earth are presented. The results have been obtained on the base of locality principle using a new phase acceleration-intensity method for analysis of the GPS radio occultation signals. This methodology has been applied to mesearements of the inclination and altitude of ionospheric layers. Obtained information has been used for estimation of the front orientation, internal frequency and phase speed of the internal waves in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A new index of the ionospheric activity as measured from the phase of radio waves passed through the ionosphere is introduced and its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the significant influence of ionospheric layers on variations of characteristics of radio waves in transionospheric communication links. Specially for the troposphere the geographical distribution of the weak total absorption (about of 1-2 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies in the Earth atmosphere corresponding to influence of the oxygen and water vapor in the troposphere is measured with accuracy better than 0.1 db. Obtained results expanded the applicable domain of the GPS space radio-holography for global investigation of the natural processes in the atmosphere and ionosphere as function of solar activity and space weather effects. The new phase acceleration-intensity method is also a basic tool which can be applied for data analysis of future planetary radio occultation missions

  20. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  1. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Balram, Krishna C; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of optical and mechanical modes in nanoscale optomechanical systems has been widely studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for cavity optomechanical circuits in which localized and interacting 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency field through the piezo-electric effect, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. We use this to demonstrate a novel acoustic wave interference effect, analogous to coherent population trapping in atomic systems, in which the coherent mechanical motion induced by the electrical drive can be completely cancelled out by the optically-driven motion. The ability to manipulate cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through either photonic or phononic channels enables new device and system architectures for signal transduction betwee...

  2. Measurements of Antenna Surface for Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Doi, Akihiro; Sato, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    In the construction of a space radio telescope, it is essential to use materials with a low noise factor and high mechanical robustness for the antenna surface. We present the results of measurements of the reflection performance of two candidates for antenna surface materials for use in a radio telescope installed in a new millimeter-wave astronomical satellite, ASTRO-G. To estimate the amount of degradation caused by fluctuations in the thermal environment in the projected orbit of the satellite, a thermal cycle test was carried out for two candidates, namely, copper foil carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and aluminum-coated CFRP. At certain points during the thermal cycle test, the reflection loss of the surfaces was measured precisely by using a radiometer in the 41-45 GHz band. In both candidates, cracks appeared on the surface after the thermal cycle test, where the number density of the cracks increased as the thermal cycle progressed. The reflection loss also increased in proportion to the number...

  3. Instant Radio Spectra of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar Over Decimeter to Decameter Wave Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. V.; Kuzmin, A. D.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ershov, A. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kostyuk, S. V.; Losovsky, B. Ya.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    We present results of simultaneous multi-frequency observations of giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar PSR B0531+21 at frequencies of 23, 111 and 600 MHz. For the first time GPs were detected at such low frequency as 23 MHz. Among 45 GPs detected in the overall observations time with 600 MHz, 12 GPs were identified as simultaneous ones at 600 and 23 MHz. At 111 MHz among 128 GPs detected in the overall observations time with 600 MHz, 21 GPs were identified as simultaneous ones at 600 and 111 MHz. Spectral indexes for the power-law frequency dependence of GPs energy were enclosed between -3.1 and -1.6. Mean spectral index equals to -2.7 ± 0.1 and is the same for both frequency combinations 600-111 MHz and 600-23 MHz. A big scatter in values of the individual spectral indexes and a large number of unidentified giant pulses, indicate that a real form of spectra of individual giant pulses does not follow a simple power law. The shape of giant pulses at all three frequencies is governed by the scattering of radio waves on the inhomogeneities of the interstellar plasma. The pulse scatter broadening and their frequency dependence was measured as τ[SC]=20(ν/100)^-3.5^±^0.1 ms, where frequency ν is in MHz. The main results of these observations are present on the figure bellow.

  4. Practical demonstration of spectrally efficient FDM millimeter-wave radio over fiber systems for 5G cellular networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroulis, Spiros; Xu, Tongyang; Darwazeh, Izzat

    2016-02-01

    This work reports the first demonstration of spectrally efficient frequency division multiplexed (SEFDM) signal transmission based on mm-wave radio over fiber (RoF) technology. Such systems aim to satisfy the beyond 4G (5G) demands of low cost, low energy, millimeter-wave carrier frequencies and high spectral efficiency. The proposed radio over fiber topology, using passive optical network (PON) infrastructure and low-cost multimode fiber (MMF), is analyzed and a proof-of-concept SEFDM radio over 250m OM-1 MMF transmission with a 3m 60GHz wireless link is successfully demonstrated. Different systems are demonstrated, at raw data rates up to 3.7 Gb/s, showing SEFDM spectrum saving up to 40% relative to OFDM.

  5. Electron density profiles in the nighttime high-latitude lower ionosphere, artificially disturbed by high-power radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokov, A. M.; Martynenko, S. I.; Misiura, V. A.; Piven, L. A.; Somov, V. G.; Fedorenko, Iu. P.; Chernogor, L. F.; Shemet, A. S.

    1982-10-01

    The method of partial reflections detected increases of electron temperature to 50% at heights of 67-71 km. The electron density decreased under the effect of high-power radio waves (9 MW effective pulse power) by 30-40% at 68-72 km, while it increased by several tens of percent at 76-85 km.

  6. Fungicidal Effects of Plasma and Radio-Wave Pre-treatments on Seeds of Grain Crops and Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Irina; Azharonok, Viktor; Shik, Alexander; Antoniuk, Alexandra; Terletskaya, Natalia

    An influence of RF plasma and RF electromagnetic field pre-treatments on level of fungal infection of some important agricultural plants has been studied. It is shown that pre-sowing plasma and radio-wave seeds treatments contribute to their germination enhancement and plant productivity improvement owing to stimulative and fungicidal effect of plasma and RF electromagnetic field irradiation.

  7. Astrophysics with Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, Larry R.; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-09-01

    Extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust, and spacecraft-returned asteroidal and cometary samples, provide a record of the starting materials and early evolution of the Solar System. We review how laboratory analyses of these materials provide unique information, complementary to astronomical observations, about a wide variety of stellar, interstellar and protoplanetary processes. Presolar stardust grains retain the isotopic compositions of their stellar sources, mainly asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II supernovae. They serve as direct probes of nucleosynthetic and dust formation processes in stars, galactic chemical evolution, and interstellar dust processing. Extinct radioactivities suggest that the Sun's birth environment was decoupled from average galactic nucleosynthesis for some tens to hundreds of Myr but was enriched in short-lived isotopes from massive stellar winds or explosions shortly before or during formation of the Solar System. Radiometric dating of meteorite components tells us about the timing and duration over which solar nebula solids were assembled into the building blocks of the planets. Components of the most primitive meteoritical materials provide further detailed constraints on the formation, processing, and transport of material and associated timescales in the Sun's protoplanetary disk as well as in other forming planetary systems.

  8. Extraterrestrial magnetic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Markov, G. P.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Sharonova, Z. V.

    2012-07-01

    Thermomagnetic and microprobe analyses are carried out and a set of magnetic characteristics are measured for 25 meteorites and 3 tektites from the collections of the Vernadsky Geological Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Museum of Natural History of the North-East Interdisciplinary Science Research Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It is found that, notwithstanding their type, all the meteorites contain the same magnetic minerals and only differ by concentrations of these minerals. Kamacite with less than 10% nickel is the main magnetic mineral in the studied samples. Pure iron, taenite, and schreibersite are less frequent; nickel, various iron spinels, Fe-Al alloys, etc., are very rare. These minerals are normally absent in the crusts of the Earth and other planets. The studied meteorites are more likely parts of the cores and lower mantles of the meteoritic parent bodies (the planets). Uniformity in the magnetic properties of the meteorites and the types of their thermomagnetic (MT) curves is violated by secondary alterations of the meteorites in the terrestrial environment. The sediments demonstrate the same monotony as the meteorites: kamacite is likely the only extraterrestrial magnetic mineral, which is abundant in sediments and associated with cosmic dust. The compositional similarity of kamacite in iron meteorites and in cosmic dust is due to their common source; the degree of fragmentation of the material of the parent body is the only difference.

  9. Multi-Band (K- Q- and E-Band) Multi-Tone Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer for Radio Wave Propagation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a space-borne transmitter for radio wave atmospheric studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). These studies would enable the design of robust multi-Gbps data rate space-to-ground satellite communication links. Lastly, the architecture for a compact multi-tone beacon transmitter, which includes a high frequency synthesizer, a polarizer, and a conical horn antenna, has been investigated for a notional CubeSat based space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment.

  10. Radio-frequency sheath voltages and slow wave electric field spatial structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colas, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.colas@cea.fr; Lu, Ling-Feng [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Křivská, Alena [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Jacquot, Jonathan [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    We investigate theoretically how sheath radio-frequency (RF) oscillations relate to the spatial structure of the RF parallel electric field emitted by Ion Cyclotron (IC) wave launchers, using a simple model of Slow Wave (SW) evanescence coupled with Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via sheath boundary conditions in a plasma-filled 2-dimensional (parallel, radial) rectangle. Within a “wide sheaths” asymptotic regime, valid for large-amplitude near RF fields, our model becomes partly linear: the sheath oscillating voltage at open field line boundaries is a linear combination of elementary contributions by every source point of the radiated RF field map. These individual contributions are all the more intense as the SW emission point is toroidally nearer to the sheath walls. A limit formula is given for a source infinitely close to the sheaths. The decay of sheath RF voltages with the sheath/source parallel distance is quantified as a function of two characteristic SW evanescence lengths. Decay lengths are smaller than antenna parallel extensions. The sheath RF voltages at an IC antenna side limiter are therefore mainly sensitive to SW emission near this limiter, as recent observations suggest. Toroidal proximity effects could also explain why sheath oscillations persist with antisymmetric strap toroidal phasing, despite the parallel anti-symmetry of the radiated field map. They could also justify current attempts at reducing the RF fields induced near antenna boxes to attenuate sheath oscillations in their vicinity.

  11. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  12. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Chen, Kevin [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628 (United States); Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM, 87131 (United States); Gough, Jonathan D. [Department of Chemistry, Lehman College, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Kanner, Jonah [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California CA 91125 (United States); Kavic, Michael [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  13. Real-time dual-band wireless videos in millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Liu, Cheng; Dong, Ze; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Ming; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2013-12-01

    A dual-band converged radio-over-fiber (RoF) access system at 60-GHz and 100-GHz millimeter-wave (mm-wave) is proposed. Real-time end-to-end delivery of two channels of independent high-definition (HD) video services simultaneously carried on 60-GHz and 100-GHz radios is demonstrated for the first time. PRBS data transmission with equivalent data rate and format is also tested to characterize the system performance. The analysis of the spectrum from the beating signal indicates the entire 60-GHz band and the W-band can be retrieved without interference. The real-time HD video display and error-free (BER < 10-9) data transmission demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed wireless access system using converged fiber-optic and mm-wave RoF techniques.

  14. The radio waves and thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BEPICOLOMBO/MMO/PWI: Scientific objectives and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Issautier, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    2006-01-01

    SORBET ( Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio and du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5-640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500 kHz-10.2 MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and in the Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O, …) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in most highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ˜10 MHz in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We especially discuss the capabilities of SORBET for performing the QTN spectroscopy in Mercury's magnetosphere, using the two electric dipole antennas equipping MMO, called MEFISTO and WPT.

  15. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ. While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS. Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O^{5+} ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  16. Solar Plasma Radio Emission in the Presence of Imbalanced Turbulence of Kinetic-Scale Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubchyk, O.; Kontar, E. P.; Voitenko, Y. M.; Bian, N. H.; Melrose, D. B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the influence of kinetic-scale Alfvénic turbulence on the generation of plasma radio emission in the solar coronal regions where the ratio β of plasma to magnetic pressure is lower than the electron-to-ion mass ratio me/mi. The present study is motivated by the phenomenon of solar type I radio storms that are associated with the strong magnetic field of active regions. The measured brightness temperature of the type I storms can be up to 10^{10} K for continuum emission, and can exceed 10^{11} K for type I bursts. At present, there is no generally accepted theory explaining such high brightness temperatures and some other properties of the type I storms. We propose a model with an imbalanced turbulence of kinetic-scale Alfvén waves that produce an asymmetric quasi-linear plateau on the upper half of the electron velocity distribution. The Landau damping of resonant Langmuir waves is suppressed and their amplitudes grow spontaneously above the thermal level. The estimated saturation level of Langmuir waves is high enough to generate observed type I radio emission at the fundamental plasma frequency. Harmonic emission does not appear in our model because the backward-propagating Langmuir waves undergo strong Landau damping. Our model predicts 100% polarization in the sense of the ordinary (o-) mode of type I emission.

  17. How likely is extraterrestrial life?

    CERN Document Server

    Halley, J Woods

    2012-01-01

    What does existing scientific knowledge about physics, chemistry, meteorology and biology tell us about the likelihood of extraterrestrial life and civilizations? And what does the fact that there is currently no credible scientific evidence for the existence of extraterrestrial biospheres or civilizations teach  us? This book reviews the various scientific issues that arise in considering the question of how common extraterrestrial life is likely to be in our galaxy and whether humans are likely to detect it. The book stands out because of its very systematic organization and relatively unbiased treatment of the main open question. It covers all relevant aspects of many disciplines required to present the different   possible answers. It has and will provide undergraduates with a stimulating introduction to many of these fields at an early stage in their university careers, when they are still choosing a specialty. The difficulties and the range of possible answers to the title question are carefully addr...

  18. Universalist ethics in extraterrestrial encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Seth D.

    2010-02-01

    If humanity encounters an extraterrestrial civilization, or if two extraterrestrial civilizations encounter each other, then the outcome may depend not only on the civilizations' relative strength to destroy each other but also on what ethics are held by one or both civilizations. This paper explores outcomes of encounter scenarios in which one or both civilizations hold a universalist ethical framework. Several outcomes are possible in such scenarios, ranging from one civilization destroying the other to both civilizations racing to be the first to commit suicide. Thus, attention to the ethics of both humanity and extraterrestrials is warranted in human planning for such an encounter. Additionally, the possibility of such an encounter raises profound questions for contemporary human ethics, even if such an encounter never occurs.

  19. Christian Soteriology and Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, C.

    The paper presents an argument for the incompatibility of classical Christian soteriology (doctrine of salvation) with belief in numerous extraterrestrial intelligent life forms (ETI). Four popular answers to the problem are discussed and rejected: a) unlike humanity, extraterrestrial intelligent species are not in need of salvation; b) Jesus of Nazareth has reconciled the entire cosmos to God; c) God or the second person of the Trinity has incarnated (or will incarnate) himself multiple times; d) alien sinners have been or are going to be saved by means different from a divine incarnation. The final section deals with remaining options for rational Christian believers and speculates briefly about consequences for interstellar space flight.

  20. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T L

    2001-02-22

    As far as we know, humanity is alone in the Universe: there is no definite evidence for the existence of extraterrestrial life, let alone extraterrestrial civilizations (ETCs) capable of communicating or travelling over interstellar distances. Yet popular speculation about the existence of ETCs abounds, including reports of alien visitations either now or in the past. But there is a middle way. It is now possible to put limits on the existence of ETCs of varying capabilities, within arbitrary distances from the Solar System, and conceive of real-world strategies whereby we might communicate with ETCs, or they with us.

  1. A theory for narrow-banded radio bursts at Uranus - MHD surface waves as an energy driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A possible scenario for the generation of the narrow-banded radio bursts detected at Uranus by the Voyager 2 planetary radio astronomy experiment is described. In order to account for the emission burstiness which occurs on time scales of hundreds of milliseconds, it is proposed that ULF magnetic surface turbulence generated at the frontside magnetopause propagates down the open/closed field line boundary and mode-converts to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) deep within the polar cusp. The oscillating KAW potentials then drive a transient electron stream that creates the bursty radio emission. To substantiate these ideas, Voyager 2 magnetometer measurements of enhanced ULF magnetic activity at the frontside magnetopause are shown. It is demonstrated analytically that such magnetic turbulence should mode-convert deep in the cusp at a radial distance of 3 RU.

  2. Early Steps Toward the Development of a Wireless Neurostimulator Powered and Controlled by Radio Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Dale

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces communicate data from the brain to external devices to monitor patient health during procedures, such as deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease and in medical research. The lack of safe and long lasting implantable devices hampers the improvement of brain-machine interfaces and deep brain stimulation for research and patient therapies. In this paper, we describe the first steps towards a wirelessly-powered and controlled neural and motor tissue stimulator. We constructed a wireless, external-stimulation device using a tank circuit and stimulation leads. We quantified the relationship between radio-frequency (RF source-distance and strength-of-voltage-output to determine if the stimulator was powered and controlled by Ultra High Frequency (UHF and far-field coupling or Very High Frequency (VHF and near-field coupling. We then implanted the stimulation leads in a cricket leg and tracked the physical motion of a cricket leg in response to stimulation from the device. Our findings suggest the device used VHF to induce near-field inductive coupling to power the circuit and stimulate excitable tissue. Given that our device is powered by VHF waves, the stimulator requires relatively large antennas, which limit the miniaturization of the device. Additionally, VHF waves power and control the voltage emitted from all stimulation leads connected to one device. This prohibits emission of different voltages from different stimulations leads. The lack of voltage specificity hinders clinical and research uses. Future studies should further the miniaturizing of the device, creating a frequency-discriminatory system to stimulate one stimulation lead at a consistent determinable voltage, and determining the efficacy of VHF transmission through biological tissue.

  3. Atmospheric anomalies over Mt.Etna using GPS signal delays and tomography of radio wave velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Puglisi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent topography of Mt. Etna, the use of satellite geodetic techniques may significantly suffer from atmospheric heterogeneities. This problem mainly affects the DInSAR technique. To overcome these drawbacks the present study attempts to make headway in measuring and interpreting atmospheric anomalies. We used the GAMIT software to obtain the ZTD (Zenith Total Delay values for the GPS sessions performed on 1996-97, during ERS-2 passes at Mt. Etna. GAMIT software also allows to characterize the statistical behaviour of the tropospheric effects, by using residuals for each station-satellite pair, and to locate the atmospheric anomalies, present mostly at low altitudes. The attempt at using these results to produce a tomography of radio waves velocity of the troposphere suggests that the number of GPS stations used to investigate atmosphere is a critical point in such a study. The three stations are too few to invert anomalies eventually existing in the lower atmosphere. This result is a good starting point for better direct future study to verify the applicability of this tomographic technique to a geodetic network with a higher number of stations, with the aim of characterizing the lower atmosphere of Mt. Etna for a more accurate monitoring of ground deformations.

  4. Comparison of Antarctic riometer radio wave absorption and THEMIS mission energetic electron fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Elías M.; Vidal, Sergio E.; Foppiano, Alberto J.; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Stepanova, Marina V.

    2012-06-01

    Simultaneous observations of in situ plasma properties in the tail of the Earth's magnetosphere and of ground based instruments, lying on the same geomagnetic field lines, have recently proved to yield significant new results. In most cases magnetosphere ionosphere interactions during the night-time northern hemisphere conditions are studied. Here, observations of energetic electrons in the tail of the Earth's magnetosphere made by the THEMIS mission satellites are compared with auroral radio wave absorption determined by riometers in the Antarctic for sunlit conditions. Days for which satellites and riometers are connected by the same geomagnetic field line are selected using a geomagnetic field model. The six days analysed show clear associations between fluxes and absorptions in some cases. However, these do not necessarily correspond to conjugacy intervals. Hours of positive associations are 1.65 times those for negative associations, all hours and days considered (1.42-3.6 on five days and 0.58 on the other day). These computations are assumed appropriate since the footprints of the satellites used approximately follow corrected geomagnetic parallels for all six days studied. The use of a finer parameterization of geomagnetic models to determine conjugacy may be needed.

  5. Production and Control of Ion Cyclotron Instabilities in the High Latitude Ionosphere by High Power Radio Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-30

    14 DTIC. .. .... ,-.---:T’JAN 1 3 198 _1. V , -’• ""iii . . . PRODUCTION AND CONTROL OF ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITIES IN...tri,;gered in the collioionaa bottomse ionosphere m.Chaturvedi, 1976; Satyanarayana et al., ?35; 7eJer er. ai., 1984] by a radio-wave at the .ocal...equatzed the zero-order current to an equilibrium electron drift V ~ and have used the so-called dipole approxiation for the pump wave which is valid when

  6. The puzzling radio-loud QSO 3C 186: a gravitational wave recoiling black hole in a young radio source?

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaberge, M; Meyer, E T; Georganopoulos, M; Marinucci, A; Bianchi, S; Tremblay, G R; Hilbert, B; Kotyla, J P; Capetti, A; Baum, S A; Macchetto, F D; Miley, G; O'Dea, C P; Perlman, E S; Sparks, W B; Norman, C

    2016-01-01

    Context. Radio-loud AGNs with powerful relativistic jets are thought to be associated with rapidly spinning black holes (BHs). BH spin-up may result from a number of processes, including accretion of matter onto the BH itself, and catastrophic events such as BH-BH mergers. Aims. We study the intriguing properties of the powerful (L_bol ~ 10^47 erg/s) radio-loud quasar 3C 186. This object shows peculiar features both in the images and in the spectra. Methods. We utilize near-IR Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to study the properties of the host galaxy, and HST UV and SDSS optical spectra to study the kinematics of the source. Chandra X-ray data are also used to better constrain the physical interpretation. Results. HST imaging shows that the active nucleus is offset by 1.3 +- 0.1 arcsec (i.e. ~11 kpc) with respect to the center of the host galaxy. Spectroscopic data show that the broad emission lines are offset by -2140 +-390 km/s with respect to the narrow lines. Velocity shifts are often seen in QSO spec...

  7. Generation of Acoustic Gravity Waves by Periodic Radio Transmissions from a High-Power Ionospheric Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Chernogor, Leonid; Rozumenko, Victor

    The Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) and Kharkiv V. N. Karazin National University (Kharkiv, Ukraine) have studied opportunities for the effective generation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in 3 - 180-min period range. The excitation of such waves was conducted for the last several years using the SURA heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod). The detection of the HF-induced AGWs was carried out in the Radiophysical Observatory located near Kharkiv City at a distance of about 960 km from the SURA. A coherent radar for vertical sounding, an ionosonde, and magnetometer chains were used in our measurements. The main results are the following (see [1-5]): 1. Infrasound oscillation trains with a period of 6 min are detected during periodic SURA heater turn-on and -off. Similar oscillation trains are detected after long time pumping, during periodic transmissions with a period of 20 s, as well as after pumping turn-off. The train recordings begin 28 - 54 min after the heater turn-on or -off, and the train propagation speeds are about 300 - 570 m/s, the value of which is close to the sound speed at upper atmospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the Doppler shift frequency is of 10 - 40 mHz, which fits to the 0.1 - 0.3% electron density disturbances at ionospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the infrasound oscillations depends on the SURA mode of operation and the state of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. 2. High-power radio transmissions stimulate the generation (or enhancement) of waves at ionospheric altitudes in the range of internal gravity wave periods. The HF-induced waves propagate with speeds of 360 - 460 m/s and produce changes in electron density with amplitudes of 2 - 3%. The generation of such periodic perturbations is more preferable with periods of 10 - 60 minutes. Their features depend significantly on the heater mode of operation. It should be stressed that perturbation intensity increases when a pumping wave frequency approaches

  8. Solar Radio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists monitor the structure of the solar corona, the outer most regions of the Sun's atmosphere, using radio waves (100?s of MHz to 10?s of GHz). Variations in...

  9. A passive low frequency instrument for radio wave sounding the subsurface oceans of the Jovian icy moons: An instrument concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartogh, P.; Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2016-10-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jovian icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Electromagnetic wave propagation is the only way to probe their icy mantles from the orbit. In the present paper, a principal concept of a passive interferometric instrument for deep sounding of the icy moons' crust is proposed. Its working principle is measuring and correlating Jupiter's radio wave emissions with reflections from the deep sub-surface of the icy moons. A number of the functional aspects of the proposed experiment are studied, in particular, impact of the wave scattering on the surface terrain on the instrument performance and digital sampling of the noisy signal. Results of the test of the laboratory prototype of the instrument are also presented in the paper.

  10. On the Brightness and Waiting-time Distributions of a Type III Radio Storm observed by STEREO/WAVES

    CERN Document Server

    Eastwood, J P; Hudson, H S; Krucker, S; Bale, S D; Maksimovic, M; Goetz, K; Bougeret, J -L

    2009-01-01

    Type III solar radio storms, observed at frequencies below approximately 16 MHz by space borne radio experiments, correspond to the quasi-continuous, bursty emission of electron beams onto open field lines above active regions. The mechanisms by which a storm can persist in some cases for more than a solar rotation whilst exhibiting considerable radio activity are poorly understood. To address this issue, the statistical properties of a type III storm observed by the STEREO/WAVES radio experiment are presented, examining both the brightness distribution and (for the first time) the waiting-time distribution. Single power law behavior is observed in the number distribution as a function of brightness; the power law index is approximately 2.1 and is largely independent of frequency. The waiting-time distribution is found to be consistent with a piecewise-constant Poisson process. This indicates that during the storm individual type III bursts occur independently and suggests that the storm dynamics are consiste...

  11. Measurements of Antenna Surface for a Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope II; Metal Mesh Surface for Large Deployable Reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Large deployable antennas with a mesh surface woven by fine metal wires are an important technology for communications satellites and space radio telescopes. However, it is difficult to make metal mesh surfaces with sufficient radio-frequency (RF) performance for frequencies higher than millimeter waves. In this paper, we present the RF performance of metal mesh surfaces at 43 GHz. For this purpose, we developed an apparatus to measure the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and radiative coefficient of the mesh surface. The reflection coefficient increases as a function of metal mesh surface tension, whereas the radiative coefficient decreases. The anisotropic aspects of the reflection coefficient and the radiative coefficient are also clearly seen. They depend on the front and back sides of the metal mesh surface and the rotation angle. The transmission coefficient was measured to be almost constant. The measured radiative coefficients and transmission coefficients would cause significant degr...

  12. 60-GHz Millimeter-Wave Radio: Principle, Technology, and New Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide opening of a massive amount of unlicensed spectra around 60 GHz has triggered great interest in developing affordable 60-GHz radios. This interest has been catalyzed by recent advance of 60-GHz front-end technologies. This paper briefly reports recent work in the 60-GHz radio. Aspects addressed in this paper include global regulatory and standardization, justification of using the 60-GHz bands, 60-GHz consumer electronics applications, radio system concept, 60-GHz propagation and antennas, and key issues in system design. Some new simulation results are also given. Potentials and problems are explained in detail.

  13. Electro-opto-mechanical radio-frequency oscillator driven by guided acoustic waves in standard single-mode fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef London

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An opto-electronic radio-frequency oscillator that is based on forward scattering by the guided acoustic modes of a standard single-mode optical fiber is proposed and demonstrated. An optical pump wave is used to stimulate narrowband, resonant guided acoustic modes, which introduce phase modulation to a co-propagating optical probe wave. The phase modulation is converted to an intensity signal at the output of a Sagnac interferometer loop. The intensity waveform is detected, amplified, and driven back to modulate the optical pump. Oscillations are achieved at a frequency of 319 MHz, which matches the resonance of the acoustic mode that provides the largest phase modulation of the probe wave. Oscillations at the frequencies of competing acoustic modes are suppressed by at least 40 dB. The linewidth of the acoustic resonance is sufficiently narrow to provide oscillations at a single longitudinal mode of the hybrid cavity. Competing longitudinal modes are suppressed by at least 38 dB as well. Unlike other opto-electronic oscillators, no radio-frequency filtering is required within the hybrid cavity. The frequency of oscillations is entirely determined by the fiber opto-mechanics.

  14. Electro-opto-mechanical radio-frequency oscillator driven by guided acoustic waves in standard single-mode fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Yosef; Diamandi, Hilel Hagai; Zadok, Avi

    2017-04-01

    An opto-electronic radio-frequency oscillator that is based on forward scattering by the guided acoustic modes of a standard single-mode optical fiber is proposed and demonstrated. An optical pump wave is used to stimulate narrowband, resonant guided acoustic modes, which introduce phase modulation to a co-propagating optical probe wave. The phase modulation is converted to an intensity signal at the output of a Sagnac interferometer loop. The intensity waveform is detected, amplified, and driven back to modulate the optical pump. Oscillations are achieved at a frequency of 319 MHz, which matches the resonance of the acoustic mode that provides the largest phase modulation of the probe wave. Oscillations at the frequencies of competing acoustic modes are suppressed by at least 40 dB. The linewidth of the acoustic resonance is sufficiently narrow to provide oscillations at a single longitudinal mode of the hybrid cavity. Competing longitudinal modes are suppressed by at least 38 dB as well. Unlike other opto-electronic oscillators, no radio-frequency filtering is required within the hybrid cavity. The frequency of oscillations is entirely determined by the fiber opto-mechanics.

  15. Low frequency modulation of transionospheric radio wave amplitude at low-latitudes: possible role of field line oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillations of radio waves at low-latitudes are associated with electron density irregularities. These irregularities are field-aligned and can provide excitation energy all along the field line to non-local field-aligned oscillations, such as the local field line oscillations. Eigen-periods of toroidal field line oscillations at low-latitudes, computed by using the dipole magnetic field and ion distributions obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI for typical nighttime conditions, fall in the range of 20–25 s. When subjected to spectral analysis, signal strength of the radio waves recorded on the 250 MHz beacon at Pondicherry (4.5° N dip, Mumbai (13.4° N dip and Ujjain (18.6° N dip exhibit periodicities in the same range. For the single event for which simultaneous ground magnetic data were available, the geomagnetic field also oscillated at the same periodicity. The systematic presence of a significant peak in the 20–25 s range during periods of strong radio wave scintillations, and its absence otherwise suggests the possibility that field line oscillations are endogenously excited by the irregularities, and the oscillations associated with the excited field line generate the modulation characteristics of the radio waves received on the ground. The frequency of modulation is found to be much lower than the characteristic frequencies that define the main body of scintillations, and they probably correspond to scales that are much larger than the typical Fresnel scale. It is possible that the refractive mechanism associated with larger scale long-lived irregularities could be responsible for the observed phenomenon. Results of a preliminary numerical experiment that uses a sinusoidal phase irregularity in the ionosphere as a refracting media are presented. The results show that phase variations which are large enough to produce a focal plane close to the ground can reproduce features that are not

  16. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mickelson, W, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-20

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  17. SiOx Ink-Repellent Layer Deposited by Radio Frequency(RF) Plasmas in Continuous Wave and Pulse Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; FU Ya-bo; PANG Hua; ZHANG Yue-fei; ZHANG Guang-qiu

    2007-01-01

    Low surface energy layers,proposed application for non-water printing in computer to plate (CTP) technology,are deposited in both continuous wave and pulse radio frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as precursor.It is found that the plasma mode dominates the polymer growth rate and the surface composition.Derived from the spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and combined with printable test it is concluded that concentration of Si in coatings plays an important role for the ink printability and the ink does not adhere on the surface with high silicon concentration.

  18. Radio identification of decameter-wave sources. II: The 30deg

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhodanov, O V; Andernach, H; 10.1134/S1990341309010052

    2009-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the identification of decameter-wave sources of the UTR catalog within declination interval 30degradio spectra. The spectra of 876 sources are derived and fitted by standard analytical functions. Of these sources, 221 objects have straight-line spectra with spectral indices alpha<-1.0. All objects are catalogued and stored in the CATS database.

  19. The moral status of extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Erik

    2012-10-01

    If we eventually discover extraterrestrial life, do we have any moral obligations for how to treat the life-forms we find; does it matter whether they are intelligent, sentient, or just microbial-and does it matter that they are extraterrestrial? In this paper, I examine these questions by looking at two of the basic questions in moral philosophy: What does it take to be a moral object? and What has value of what kind? I will start with the first of these questions by looking at the most important attempts to answer this question on our own planet and by asking whether and how they could be applied to extraterrestrial life. The results range from a very strong protection of all extraterrestrial life and all extraterrestrial environments, whether inhabited or not, to total exclusion of extraterrestrial life. Subsequently, I also examine whether extraterrestrial life that lacks moral status can have value to human or alien life with moral status, and if that could generate any obligations for how to treat extraterrestrial life. Based on this analysis, I conclude that extraterrestrial life-forms can have both instrumental value and end value to moral objects, which has strong implications for how to treat them.

  20. The Search for Extraterrestrials Intercepting Alien Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Monte

    2009-01-01

    In The Search for Extraterrestrials, Monte Ross explores in detail the key problems in starting a search, the programs that have failed and those that continue. He includes the fundamental considerations and the physics of the necessary laser, UV, IR and RF technologies, as well as coding and information theory considerations. The author explores future possibilities providing the reader with a comprehensive view of the many ways signals from aliens could be sent and explains why the search using RF leaves more than 99% of the electromagnetic spectrum unexamined. He also demonstrates the many parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, considering the next likely steps in this unique enterprise. Given man’s intrinsic nature to explore, the search will continue in one form or many, until success is achieved, which may be tomorrow or a millennium away. In summary, Monte Ross proposes to get around the failure of a fruitless search at radio frequencies by developing, in a precise way, the argument for searching for...

  1. Radio Capacity Estimation for Millimeter Wave 5G Cellular Networks Using Narrow Beamwidth Antennas at the Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlMuthanna Turki Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents radio frequency (RF capacity estimation for millimeter wave (mm-wave based fifth-generation (5G cellular networks using field-level simulations. It is shown that, by reducing antenna beamwidth from 65° to 30°, we can enhance the capacity of mm-wave cellular networks roughly by 3.0 times at a distance of 220 m from the base station (BS. This enhancement is far much higher than the corresponding enhancement of 1.2 times observed for 900 MHz and 2.6 GHz microwave networks at the same distance from the BS. Thus the use of narrow beamwidth transmitting antennas has more pronounced benefits in mm-wave networks. Deployment trials performed on an LTE TDD site operating on 2.6 GHz show that 6-sector site with 27° antenna beamwidth enhances the quality of service (QoS roughly by 40% and more than doubles the overall BS throughput (while enhancing the per sector throughput 1.1 times on average compared to a 3-sector site using 65° antenna beamwidth. This agrees well with our capacity simulations. Since mm-wave 5G networks will use arbitrary number of beams, with beamwidth much less than 30°, the capacity enhancement expected in 5G system when using narrow beamwidth antennas would be much more than three times observed in our simulations.

  2. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    TSUDA, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10–100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50–90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10–50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  3. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Chertok, I M; Kuzmenko, I V; Afanasyev, A N; Meshalkina, N S; Kalashnikov, S S; Kubo, Y

    2011-01-01

    We show examples of excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few known events.

  4. Adiabatic radio-frequency potentials for the coherent manipulation of matter waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Schumm, Thorsten; Hofferberth, S.

    2006-01-01

    Adiabatic dressed state potentials are created when magnetic substates of trapped atoms are coupled by a radio-frequency field. We discuss their theoretical foundations and point out fundamental advantages over potentials purely based on static fields. The enhanced flexibility enables one...

  5. Making waves the story of Ruby Payne-Scott : Australian pioneer radio astronomer

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, M

    2013-01-01

    This book is an abbreviated, partly re-written version of "Under the Radar - The First Woman in Radio Astronomy: Ruby Payne-Scott." It addresses a general readership interested in historical and sociological aspects of astronomy and presents the biography of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912 – 1981). As the first female radio astronomer (and one of the first people in the world to consider radio astronomy), she made classic contributions to solar radio physics. She also played a major role in the design of the Australian government's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research radars, which were in turn of vital importance in the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II. These radars were used by military personnel from Australia, the United States and New Zealand. From a sociological perspective, her career offers many examples of the perils of being a female academic in the first half of the 20th century. Written in an engaging style and complemented by many historical photographs, this book offers fascinating...

  6. Revealing the Hidden Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael; Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and teachers have worked together to produce teaching materials for the Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT), an easy-to-use, low-cost apparatus that can be used in multiple laboratory experiments in high school and university physics and astronomy classes. In this article, we describe the motivation for the VSRT and several of the…

  7. Millimeter-wave and Terahertz Reconfigurable Radio-over-Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    when deploying fiber is not an option. Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) technologies have evolved from a blue sky academic topic in the 90s to a main driver within the current quest for the 5th generation mobile systems (5G). A twist in RoF technologies is that it has found along the way niches in areas non...

  8. Dynamic of Langmuir and Ion-Sound Waves in Type 3 Solar Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type 3 sources is investigated, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. The resulting prediction for the electrostatic decay threshold is consistent with the observed high-field cutoff in the Langmuir field distribution. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; rather, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be fast enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The resulting levels of product Langmuir and ion-sound waves are estimated theoretically and shown to be consistent with in situ ISEE 3 observations of type 3 events at 1 AU. Nonlinear interactions slave the growth and decay of product sound waves to that of the product Langmuir waves. The resulting probability distribution of ion-sound field strengths is predicted to have a flat tail extending to a high-field cutoff. This prediction is consistent with statistics derived here from ISEE 3 observations. Agreement is also found between the frequencies of the observed waves and predictions for the product S waves. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasilinear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth. When wave and beam inhomogeneities are accounted for, arguments from quasi-linear relaxation yield an upper bound on the Langmuir fields that is too high to be relevant. Nor are the criteria for direct wave collapse of the beam-driven waves met, consistent with earlier simulation results that imply that this process is not responsible for saturation of the beam instability. Indeed, even

  9. Investigation on Radio Wave Propagation in Shallow Seawater: Simulations and Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Eugenio; Mena, Pablo; Dorta, Pablo; Perez-Alvarez, Ivan; Zazo, Santiago; Perez, Marina; Quevedo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The authors present full wave simulations and experimental results of propagation of electromagnetic waves in shallow seawaters. Transmitter and receiver antennas are ten-turns loops placed on the seabed. Some propagation frameworks are presented and simulated. Finally, simulation results are compared with experimental ones.

  10. Dynamics of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III solar radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The study traces the evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III sources, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; instead, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be rapid enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasi-linear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth.

  11. Interplanetary Radio Transmission Through Serial Ionospheric and Material Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, David [ORNL; Kennedy, Robert G [ORNL; Roy, Kenneth I [ORNL; Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A usual first principle in planning radio astronomy observations from the earth is that monitoring must be carried out well above the ionospheric plasma cutoff frequency (~5 MHz). Before space probes existed, radio astronomy was almost entirely done above 6 MHz, and this value is considered a practical lower limit by most radio astronomers. Furthermore, daytime ionization (especially D-layer formation) places additional constraints on wave propagation, and waves of frequency below 10-20 MHz suffer significant attenuation. More careful calculations of wave propagation through the earth s ionosphere suggest that for certain conditions (primarily the presence of a magnetic field) there may be a transmission window well below this assumed limit. Indeed, for receiving extraterrestrial radiation below the ionospheric plasma cutoff frequency, a choice of VLF frequency appears optimal to minimize loss. The calculation, experimental validation, and conclusions are presented here. This work demonstrates the possibility of VLF transmission through the ionosphere and various subsequent material barriers. Implications include development of a new robust communications channel, communications with submerged or subterranean receivers / instruments on or offworld, and a new approach to SETI.

  12. Simplification of millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber system employing heterodyning of uncorrelated optical carriers and self-homodyning of RF signal at the receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A H M Razibul; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Town, Graham E

    2012-02-27

    A simplified millimeter-wave (mm-wave) radio-over-fiber (RoF) system employing a combination of optical heterodyning in signal generation and radio frequency (RF) self-homodyning in data recovery process is proposed and demonstrated. Three variants of the system are considered in which two independent uncorrelated lasers with a frequency offset equal to the desired mm-wave carrier frequency are used to generate the transmitted signal. Uncorrelated phase noise in the resulting mm-wave signal after photodetection was overcome by using RF self-homodyning in the data recovery process. Theoretical analyses followed by experimental results and simulated characterizations confirm the system's performance. A key advantage of the system is that it avoids the need for high-speed electro-optic and electronic devices operating at the RF carrier frequency at both the central station and base stations.

  13. Revisiting ISEE-3-Voyager Observations of Back-Side Type III Radio Bursts in View of the Stereo/Waves observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J.; Lecacheux, A.; Hoang, S.; Maksimovic, M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we revisit old observations of interplanetary type III radio bursts made simultaneously by the radio instruments on the ISEE-3 spacecraft and on the Voyager spacecraft, in view of the new opportunities offered by the Stereo mission.. Type III radio emission is produced by beams of supra-thermal electrons believed to be accelerated during the flare process and traveling along open interplanetary field lines. Their observation can help trace the large scale structure of the interplanetary medium. Lecacheux et al. (1989) analyzed the properties of such radio bursts originating behind the Sun as viewed from the Earth and still also observed by the ISEE-3 spacecraft located at the L1 libration point. Information on the beaming of the radiation can be deduced from these observations. Lecacheux et al. also measured anomalous delays in burst arrival time at one spacecraft relative to the other. These anomalous delays could be explained by the presence of both the fundamental and harmonic radiation modes with different beaming properties. Such an hypothesis can be checked by the Stereo/Waves observations. Finally, we discuss previous radio wave propagation models in the interplanetary medium and emphasize their importance for the interpretation of the radio observations. Lecacheux, A., J.-L. Steinberg, S. Hoang, and G. A. Dulk, Characteristics of type III bursts in the solar wind from simultaneous observations on board ISEE-3 and Voyager, Astron. Astrophys. 217, 237-250, 1989.

  14. Enabling technologies for millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber systems in next generation heterogeneous mobile access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Wang, Jing; Xu, Mu; Cheng, Lin; Lu, Feng; Shen, Shuyi; Yan, Yan; Cho, Hyunwoo; Guidotti, Daniel; Chang, Gee-kung

    2017-01-01

    Fifth-generation (5G) wireless access network promises to support higher access data rate with more than 1,000 times capacity with respect to current long-term evolution (LTE) systems. New radio-access-technologies (RATs) based on higher carrier frequencies to millimeter-wave (MMW) radio-over-fiber, and carrier-aggregation (CA) using multi-band resources are intensively studied to support the high data rate access and effectively use of frequency resources in heterogeneous mobile network (Het-Net). In this paper, we investigate several enabling technologies for MMW RoF systems in 5G Het-Net. Efficient mobile fronthaul (MFH) solutions for 5G centralized radio access network (C-RAN) and beyond are proposed, analyzed and experimentally demonstrated based on the analog scheme. Digital predistortion based on memory polynomial for analog MFH linearization are presented with improved EVM performances and receiver sensitivity. We also propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel inter-/intra- RAT CA scheme for 5G Het- Net. The real-time standard 4G-LTE signal is carrier-aggregated with three broadband 60GHz MMW signals based on proposed optical-domain band-mapping method. RATs based on new waveforms have also been studied here to achieve higher spectral-efficiency (SE) in asynchronous environments. Full-duplex asynchronous quasi-gapless carrier aggregation scheme for MMW ROF inter-/intra-RAT based on the FBMC is also presented with 4G-LTE signals. Compared with OFDM-based signals with large guard-bands, FBMC achieves higher spectral-efficiency with better EVM performance at less received power and smaller guard-bands.

  15. The incoherent scattering of radio waves in a non-Maxwellian plasma: The effects of Coulomb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, V.D.; Tereshchanko, E.D. (Polar Geophysical Inst., Murmansk (USSR)); Kohl, H. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (West Germany))

    1991-10-01

    In this paper the formulas for the ion distribution as well as the spectrum of radio waves scattered in a magnetized plasma with a strong electric field are derived. It is shown that the presence of the electric field in the ionosphere leads to an anisotropic ion velocity distribution and, therefore, to untypical incoherent scatter spectra for the F region of the polar ionosphere which are caused by ion-neutral together with ion-ion collisions. The effect of ion-ion collisions, which has not been taken into account so far, is to reduce the anisotropy of the ion velocity distribution. Estimates of the ion-ion collision frequency derived from EISCAT measurements show that this may happen above about 300 km.

  16. Detection of Transionospheric SuperDARN HF Waves by the Radio Receiver Instrument on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, R. G.; Yau, A. W.; James, H. G.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) Canadian small-satellite was launched in September 2013. Included in this suite of eight scientific instruments is the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI). The RRI has been used to measure VLF and HF radio waves from various ground and spontaneous ionospheric sources. The first dedicated ground transmission that was detected by RRI was from the Saskatoon Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar on Nov. 7, 2013 at 14 MHz. Several other passes over the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar have been recorded since then. Ground transmissions have also been observed from other radars, such as the SPEAR, HAARP, and SURA ionospheric heaters. However, the focus of this study will be on the results obtained from the SuperDARN passes. An analysis of the signal recorded by the RRI provides estimates of signal power, Doppler shift, polarization, absolute time delay, differential mode delay, and angle of arrival. By comparing these parameters to similar parameters derived from ray tracing simulations, ionospheric electron density structures may be detected and measured. Further analysis of the results from the other ground transmitters and future SuperDARN passes will be used to refine these results.

  17. Phenomena in the ionosphere-magnetosphere system induced by injection of powerful HF radio waves into nightside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Blagoveshchenskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results from three ionospheric HF pumping experiments in overdense E or F regions are summarized. The experiments were conducted by the use of the EISCAT HF Heating facility located near Tromsø, Norway, allowing HF pumping the ionosphere in a near geomagnetic field-aligned direction. Distinctive features related to auroral activations in the course of the experiments are identified. Typical features observed in all experiments are the following: generation of scattered components in dynamic HF radio scatter Doppler spectra; strong increase of ion temperatures Ti and local ionospheric electric field E0; modification of the auroral arc and local spiral-like formation. However, some effects were observed only when the HF pump wave was reflected from the F2 layer. Among them are the generation of intense field-aligned ion outflows, and a strong increase in the electron temperature Te with altitude. A possible scenario for the substorm triggering due to HF pumping into an auroral ionosphere is discussed. The authors present their interpretation of the data as follows. It is suggested that two populations of charged particles are at play. One of them is the runaway population of electrons and ions from the ionosphere caused by the effects of the powerful HF radio wave. The other is the population of electrons that precipitate from the magnetosphere. It is shown that the hydrodynamical equilibrium was disrupted due to the effects of the HF pumping. We estimate that the parallel electric field can reach values of the order of 30mV/m during substorm triggering.

  18. Temporal evolution of radar echoes associated with mesospheric dust clouds after turn-on of radio wave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2012-03-01

    The initial perturbation of polar mesospheric summer echoes PMSEs during radio wave heating provides significant diagnostic information about the charged dust layer associated with the irregularity source region. Comparison between the results of computational models and the observation data can be used as a tool to estimate charged dust layer parameters. An analytical model is developed and compared to a more accurate computational model as a reference to investigate the possibilities for diagnostic information as well as insight into the physical processes after heater turn-on. During radio wave heating of the mesosphere, which modifies the background electron temperature, various temporal evolution characteristics of irregularity amplitude may be observed which depend on the background plasma parameters and the characteristics of the dust layer. Turn-on overshoot due to the dominant electron charging process and turn-on undershoot resulting from the dominant ambipolar diffusion process, that can occur simultaneously at different radar frequencies, have been studied. The maximum and minimum of the electron density irregularity amplitude and the time at which this amplitude has been achieved as well as the decay time of irregularity amplitude after the maximum amplitude are unique observables that can shed light on the physical processes after the turn-on of the pump heating and to diagnose the charged dust layer. The agreement between the computational and analytical results are good and indicate the simplified analytical model may be used to provide considerable insight into the heating process and serve as the basis for a diagnostic model after heater turn-on. Moreover, the work proposes that conducting PMSE active experiments in the HF and VHF band simultaneously may allow estimation of the dust density altitude profile, dust charge state variation during pump heating, and ratio of electron temperature enhancement in the irregularity source region.

  19. Measurement of a Phase of a Radio Wave Reflected from Rock Salt and Ice Irradiated by an Electron Beam for Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, Masami; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Watanabe, Souichirou; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have found a radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for the detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos which are expected to be generated in Greisen, Zatsepin, and Kuzmin (GZK) processes in the universe. When an UHE neutrino interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, a shower is generated. That shower is formed by hadronic and electromagnetic avalanche processes. The energy of the UHE neutrino shower converts to thermal energy through ionization processes. Consequently, the temperature rises along the shower produced by the UHE neutrino. The refractive index of the medium rises with temperature. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium leads to a reflection of radio waves. This reflection effect combined with the long attenuation length of radio waves in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE neutrinos. We measured the phase of the reflected radio wave under irradiation with an electron beam on ice and rock salt powder. The measured phase showed excellent consis...

  20. Types of propagation of radio waves of the decameter range, according to observations by the OBS method on Cuba--Soviet Union paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdeyans, D.; Bocharov, V.I.; Lobachevskii, L.A.; Martinez, R.; Suares, H.; Tushentsova, I.A.

    1974-01-01

    Ionosphere observations by the OBS method were performed to study ionospheric conditions under which radio waves in the decameter range propagate on Cuba--Soviet Union paths. The results of observations in the summer of 1973 are reported. The distance--frequency and distance--time characteristics of back-scattered signals in the sounding direction for each day of observation are discussed. (JFP)

  1. Determination of area averaged water vapour fluxes with large aperture and radio wave scintillometers over a heterogeneous surface - Flevoland field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijninger, W.M.L.; Green, A.E.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Kohsiek, W.; Hoedjes, J.C.B.; Zuurbier, R.M.; DeBruin, H.A.R.

    2002-01-01

    A large aperture scintillometer (LAS) and radio wave scintillometer (RWS) were installed over a heterogeneous area to test the applicability of the scintillation method. The heterogeneity in the area, which consisted of many plots, was mainly caused by differences in thermal properties of the crops;

  2. Ionospheric Modification by High Power, Obliquely Propagated HF Radio Wave Transmissions. Part 1. Experimental

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    frequency of the disturbing transmitter is greater than the i.. asma frequency in the ionospheric interaction region. In fact, with many practical radio...NY) lay in the Gulf of Mexico and it was not possible to use an oblique probe system similar to- the technique used by the Soviets in their...using a vertical incidence sounder at Albuquerque, New Mexico (35.11N, 106.8 0W) at the midpoint of the 2400 km path. This technique insures that the

  3. High power continuous wave atomic Xe laser with radio frequency excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitruk, P. P.; Morley, R. J.; Baker, H. J.; Hall, D. R.

    1995-09-01

    Radio frequency discharges in Ar/He/Xe gas mixtures have been studied in the range 5-150 MHz, and the importance of the ion sheaths in Xe laser excitation has been recognized. The discharge data have been used to improve the cw Xe laser performance, and efficiencies up to 0.8% observed. Area scaling in the slab geometry has been studied for α discharge excitation at 49 MHz, and multimode cw laser power up to 5.5 W has been observed. High quality beams have been produced at 4.9 W using a hybrid waveguide/unstable resonator.

  4. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence in the 1960s: Science in Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sierra

    2012-01-01

    Building upon the advancement of technology during the Second World War and the important scientific discoveries which have been made about the structure and components of the universe, scientists, especially in radio astronomy and physics, began seriously addressing the possibility of extraterrestrial intelligence in the 1960s. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) quickly became one of the most controversial scientific issues in the post Second World War period. The controversy played out, not only in scientific and technical journals, but in newspapers and in popular literature. Proponents for SETI, including Frank Drake, Carl Sagan, and Philip Morrison, actively used a strategy of engagement with the public by using popular media to lobby for exposure and funding. This paper will examine the use of popular media by scientists interested in SETI to popularize and heighten public awareness and also to examine the effects of popularization on SETI's early development. My research has been generously supported by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  5. Clumpy Langmuir waves in type III radio sources - Comparison of stochastic-growth theory with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed comparisons are made between the Langmuir-wave properties predicted by the recently developed stochastic-growth theory of type III sources and those observed by the plasma wave experiment on ISEE 3, after correcting for the main instrumental and selection effects. Analysis of the observed field-strength distribution confirms the theoretically predicted form and implies that wave growth fluctuates both spatially and temporally in sign and magnitude, leading to an extremely clumpy distribution of fields. A cutoff in the field-strength distribution is seen at a few mV/m, corresponding to saturation via nonlinear effects. Analysis of the size distribution of Langmuir clumps yields results in accord with those obtained in earlier work and with the size distribution of ambient density fluctuations in the solar wind. This confirms that the inhomogeneities in the Langmuir growth rate are determined by the density fluctuations and that these fluctuations persist during type III events.

  6. Unidentified flying objects and extraterrestrial life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Carole

    Discusses efforts to find intelligent life on other planets and theories on this topic and describes UFO sightings and other phenomena that are given as evidence of extraterrestrial visitors among us.

  7. A new global model for the ionospheric F2 peak height for radio wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Hoque

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The F2-layer peak density height hmF2 is one of the most important ionospheric parameters characterizing HF propagation conditions. Therefore, the ability to model and predict the spatial and temporal variations of the peak electron density height is of great use for both ionospheric research and radio frequency planning and operation. For global hmF2 modelling we present a nonlinear model approach with 13 model coefficients and a few empirically fixed parameters. The model approach describes the temporal and spatial dependencies of hmF2 on global scale. For determining the 13 model coefficients, we apply this model approach to a large quantity of global hmF2 observational data obtained from GNSS radio occultation measurements onboard CHAMP, GRACE and COSMIC satellites and data from 69 worldwide ionosonde stations. We have found that the model fits to these input data with the same root mean squared (RMS and standard deviations of 10%. In comparison with the electron density NeQuick model, the proposed Neustrelitz global hmF2 model (Neustrelitz Peak Height Model – NPHM shows percentage RMS deviations of about 13% and 12% from the observational data during high and low solar activity conditions, respectively, whereas the corresponding deviations for the NeQuick model are found 18% and 16%, respectively.

  8. Numerical modelling of VLF radio wave propagation through earth-ionosphere waveguide and its application to sudden ionospheric disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically predict the normal characteristics of Very Low Frequency (3~30 kHz) radio wave propagation through Earth-ionosphere waveguide corresponding to normal behavior of the D-region ionosphere. We took the VLF narrow band data from the receivers of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) to validate our models. Detection of sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) are common to all the measurements. We apply our theoretical models to infer the D-region characteristics and to reproduce the observed VLF signal behavior corresponding to such SIDs. We develop a code based on ray theory to simulate the diurnal behavior of VLF signals over short propagation paths (2000~3000 km). The diurnal variation from this code are comparable to the variation obtained from a more general Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code which is based on mode theory approach. We simulate the observational results obtained during the Total Solar Eclipse of July 22, 2009 in India. We also report and simulate a h...

  9. Effect of radio frequency waves of electromagnetic field on the tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghi, Mousavi; Gholamhosein, Riazi; Saeed, Rezayi-Zarchi

    2013-09-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are macromolecular structures consisting of tubulin heterodimers and present in almost every eukaryotic cell. MTs fulfill all conditions for generation of electromagnetic field and are electrically polar due to the electrical polarity of a tubulin heterodimer. The calculated static electric dipole moment of about 1000 Debye makes them capable of being aligned parallel to the applied electromagnetic field direction. In the present study, the tubulin heterodimers were extracted and purified from the rat brains. MTs were obtained by polymerization in vitro. Samples of microtubules were adsorbed in the absence and in the presence of electromagnetic fields with radio frequency of 900 Hz. Our results demonstrate the effect of electromagnetic field with 900 Hz frequency to change the structure of MTs. In this paper, a related patent was used that will help to better understand the studied subject.

  10. The effect of plasma density structure on HF radio wave propagation at auroral and polar latitudes measured by e-POP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G. W.; James, H. G.; Gillies, R.; McWilliams, K. A.; St-Maurice, J. P.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    One of the scientific objectives of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) is to study ionospheric density structure and its impact on High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation. We present a survey of several ePOP RRI transits through isolated beams of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) Saskatoon and Rankin Inlet radars. It reveals that the spreading of a SuperDARN beam beyond its nominal azimuthal beam width of 3.24° is a common occurrence at auroral and polar latitudes. Furthermore, on multiple occasions, lateral deviations of a beam's power peak by several beam widths was measured, indicating the presence of significant plasma density gradients along the ray path. The e-POP RRI measurements illustrate that our understanding and recognition of plasma density gradients and their influence on HF radio wave propagation is limited. We report on the results of employing HF ray tracing techniques to quantify the impact of ionospheric structuring on HF radio wave propagation, and consider the source of the gradients contributing to the spreading of the SuperDARN beams.

  11. Raman imaging of extraterrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alian; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Ling, Zongcheng

    2015-07-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been proposed and is under extensive development for surface exploration missions to planetary bodies of our Solar System. It reveals information on molecular structure and chemistry. The spatial distribution of molecular species in natural geological samples and planetary materials has significance for the geological processes by which they formed. Raman imaging is the best way to combine the molecular identification and characterization of geologic materials with their spatial distribution. This paper reports Raman imaging studies of five types of extraterrestrial materials and three terrestrial samples using a state-of-the-art Raman imaging system. The Raman spectral features of major, minor, and trace species in these samples, together with their spatial correlations revealed by these Raman imaging studies indicate the genetic relationships and the geological processes that these materials have been experienced. For robotic planetary surface exploration mission, a simple yet very useful molecular map of a sample can be generated by using line-scan or grid-scan of an in situ Raman system with tightly focused laser beam.

  12. Calculating the probability of detecting radio signals from alien civilizations

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Although it might not be self-evident, it is in fact entirely possible to calculate the probability of detecting alien radio signals by understanding what types of extraterrestrial radio emissions can be expected and what properties these emissions can have. Using the Drake equation as the obvious starting point, and logically identifying and enumerating constraints of interstellar radio communications can yield the probability of detecting a genuine alien radio signal.

  13. Potential Spacecraft-to-Spacecraft Radio Observations with EJSM: Wave of the Future? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, E. A.; Tortora, P.; Asmar, S. W.; Folkner, W. M.; Hinson, D.; Iess, L.; Linscott, I. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C.

    2010-12-01

    Future active radio observations of planetary and satellite atmospheres and surfaces could significantly benefit form the presence of two or more spacecraft in orbit around a target object. Traditionally, radio occultation and bistatic surface scattering experiments have been conducted using a single spacecraft operating in the Downlink (DL) configuration, with the spacecraft transmitting and at least one Earth-based station receiving. The configuration has the advantage of using powerful ground-based receivers for down-conversion, digitization, and digital recording of large bandwidth data for later off-line processing and analysis. It has the disadvantage of an available free-space signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limited by the relatively small carrier power (10-20 W) a spacecraft can practically transmit. Recent technological advances in designing small-mass and small-power spacecraft-based digital receivers capable of on-board signal processing could open the door for significant performance improvement compared with the DL configuration. For example, with two spacecraft in orbit instead of one, the smaller distance D between the two spacecraft compared with the distance to Earth can boost achievable free-space SNR by one to three orders of magnitude, depending on D. In addition, richer variability in observation geometry can be captured using spacecraft-to-spacecraft (SC-to-SC) radio occultations and surface scattering. By their nature, traditional DL occultations are confined to the morning and evening terminators. Availability of on-board processing capability also opens the door for conducting Uplink (UL) occultation and bistatic observations, where very large power (> 20 kW) can be transmitted from an Earth-based station, potentially boasting achievable free-space SNR by orders of magnitude, comparable to the SC-to-SC case and much higher than the DL case. The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will likely be the first planetary mission to benefit from the

  14. Radiation hazards of radio frequency waves on the early embryonic development of Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkless, Ryan; Al-Quraishi, Muntather; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    With the growing use of wireless devices in almost all day-to-day activities, exposure to radio-frequency radiation has become an immediate health concern. It is imperative that the effects of such radiation not only on humans, but also on other organisms be well understood. In particular, it is critical to understand if RF radiation has any bearing on the gene expression during embryonic development, as this is a crucial and delicate phase for any organism. Owing to possible effects that RF radiation may have on gene expression, it is essential to explore the carcinogenic or teratogenic properties that it may show. This study observed the effects of RF radiation emitted from a cellular telephone on the embryonic development of zebra fish. The expression of the gene shha plays a key role in the early development of the fish. This gene has homologs in humans as well as in other model organisms. Additionally, several biomarkers indicative of cell stress were examined: including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Results show a significant decrease in the expression of shha, a significant decrease in LDH activity. There was no significant increase in SOD and LPO activity. No morphological abnormalities were observed in the developing embryos. At present, these results indicate that exposure to cell phone radiation may have a suppressive effect on expression of shha in D. rerio, though such exposure does not appear to cause morphological detriments. More trials are underway to corroborate these results.

  15. The Standing Wave Phenomenon in Radio Telescopes; Frequency Modulation of the WSRT Primary Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Inadequacies in the knowledge of the primary beam response of current interferometric arrays often form a limitation to the image fidelity. We hope to overcome these limitations by constructing a frequency-resolved, full-polarization empirical model for the primary beam of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). Holographic observations, sampling angular scales between about 5 arcmin and 11 degrees, were obtained of a bright compact source (3C147). These permitted measurement of voltage response patterns for seven of the fourteen telescopes in the array and allowed calculation of the mean cross-correlated power beam. Good sampling of the main-lobe, near-in, and far-side-lobes out to a radius of more than 5 degrees was obtained. A robust empirical beam model was detemined in all polarization products and at frequencies between 1322 and 1457 MHz with 1 MHz resolution. Substantial departures from axi-symmetry are apparent in the main-lobe as well as systematic differences between the polarization proper...

  16. From falling bodies to radio waves classical physicists and their discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Segrè, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Meet a diverse group of highly original thinkers and learn about their lives and achievements: Galileo, a founding father of astronomy and physics; Christiaan Huygens, a seventeenth-century pioneer of wave-particle duality; and Isaac Newton, the English mathematician and physicist who laid the groundwork for a scientific revolution and promoted radical investigation as the means to reveal nature's hidden workings.This chronicle of physics and physicists traces the development of scientific thought from these originators to their successors, among them Faraday, Watts, Helmholtz, Maxwell, Boltzm

  17. Analysis and Comparison of 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation in Urban and Suburban Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Abreu, Renato

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based comparison of cm-wave propagation in urban and suburban scenarios at 24 GHz with transmitter antennas located above rooftop level. Different sets of directional measurements, exploring the full azimuth and the range from -30 to +30 degrees in elevation, were...... performed with horn antennas located close to street level, in order to explore the spatial characteristics of the channel in both LOS and NLOS conditions. The statistical analysis of different directional indicators shows how, at 24 GHz, outdoor propagation is quite different in the suburban scenario...

  18. 146-GHz millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber photonic wireless transmission system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fice, M J; Rouvalis, E; van Dijk, F; Accard, A; Lelarge, F; Renaud, C C; Carpintero, G; Seeds, A J

    2012-01-16

    We report the experimental implementation of a wireless transmission system with a 146-GHz carrier frequency which is generated by optical heterodyning the two modes from a monolithically integrated quantum dash dual-DFB source. The monolithic structure of the device and the inherent low noise characteristics of quantum dash gain material allow us to demonstrate the transmission of a 1 Gbps ON-OFF keyed data signal with the two wavelengths in a free-running state at 146-GHz carrier wave frequency. The tuning range of the device fully covers the W-band (75 - 110 GHz) and the F-band (90 - 140 GHz).

  19. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  20. Extraterrestrial Nucleobases in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Z.; Botta, O.; Fogel, M.; Sephton, M.; Glavin, D.; Watson, J.; Dworkin, J.; Schwartz, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    . Our stable carbon isotope measurements clearly demonstrate that the nucleobases in the Murchison meteorite are indigenous to the meteorite, and clearly differ from the values determined for the terrestrial nucleobases measured in the soil collected at the impact site. These results support the hypothesis that nucleobases were exogenously delivered to the early Earth, and may have been important for the prebiotic chemistry on our young planet. With regard to the detection of traces of life on other planets such as Mars it is essential to characterize organic materials that have been exogenously delivered to the early planets. The analysis of the composition and isotopic fractionation of extraterrestrial material using complementary techniques can provide crucial insights into the formation of our Solar System, extraterrestrial delivery processes and subsequent addition and incorporation into the carbonaceous material available on the young planets. Ultimately, these parameters form an essential reference point for interpreting biosignatures that may be left in the ancient rock record on a planetary body. References: [1] Hayatsu R. et al. 1975. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 39: 471- 488. [2] Folsome C. E. et al. 1971. Nature 232: 108-109. [3] Stoks P. G. & Schwartz A. W. 1979. Nature 282: 709-710. [4] Stoks P.G. & Schwartz A. W. 1981. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 563-569. [5] Shimoyama A. et al. 1990. Geochemical Journal 24: 343-348. [6] Martins Z. et al. 2004. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 39: A5145. 2

  1. The large adaptive reflector: a 200-m diameter wideband centimeter- to meter-wave radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Brent; Bauwens, Luc; Belostotski, Leonid; Cannon, Elizabeth; Chang, Ya-Ying; Deng, Xiaohui; Dewdney, Peter E.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff T.; Halliday, David; Kuerschner, Kai; Lachapelle, Gerard; Lo, David; Mousavi, Pedram; Nahon, Meyer; Shafai, Lot; Stiemer, Sigfried F.; Taylor, Russell; Veidt, Bruce

    2000-07-01

    The Large Adaptive Reflector (LAR) is a concept for a low- cost, large aperture, wideband, radio telescope, designed to operate over the wavelength range from 2 m to 1.4 cm. It consists of a 200-m diameter actuated-surface parabolic reflector with a focal length of 500 m, mounted flat on the ground. The feed is held in place by a tension-structure, consisting of three or more tethers tensioned by the lift of a large, helium-filled aerostat -- a stiff structure that effectively resists wind forces. The telescope is steered by simultaneously changing the lengths of the tethers with winches (thus the position of the feed) and by modifying the shape of the reflector. At all times the reflector configuration is that of an offset parabolic antenna, with the capability to point anywhere in the sky above approximately 15 degree Elevation Angle. At mid-range wavelengths, the feed is a multi-beam prime-focus phased array, about 5 m diameter; at meter wavelengths, it is a single-beam phased array of up to 10 m diameter. Simulations have shown that in operating wind conditions (10 m/s average speed with 2.5 m/s gusts), the position of the feed platform can be stabilized to within a few cm over time scales of approximately 20 s. Research indicates that the telescope concept is feasible and that an order of magnitude improvement in cost per m2 of collecting area over traditional designs of large parabolic antennas can be achieved.

  2. Remote sensing of mesospheric dust layers using active modulation of PMWE by high-power radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Mohebalhojeh, A. R.; Farahani, M. M.; Scales, W. A.; Kosch, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the first study of the modulation of polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) by artificial radio wave heating using computational modeling and experimental observation in different radar frequency bands. The temporal behavior of PMWE response to HF pump heating can be employed to diagnose the charged dust layer associated with mesospheric smoke particles. Specifically, the rise and fall time of radar echo strength as well as relaxation and recovery time after heater turn-on and turnoff are distinct parameters that are a function of radar frequency. The variation of PMWE strength with PMWE source region parameters such as electron-neutral collision frequency, photodetachment current, electron temperature enhancement ratio, dust density, and radius is considered. The comparison of recent PMWE measurements at 56 MHz and 224 MHz with computational results is discussed, and dust parameters in the PMWE generation regime are estimated. Predictions for HF PMWE modification and its connection to the dust charging process by free electrons is investigated. The possibility for remote sensing of dust and plasma parameters in artificially modified PMWE regions using simultaneous measurements in multiple frequency bands are discussed.

  3. Study of effects of radio-wave frequency radiation emitted from cellular telephones on embryonic development of danio rerio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagula, Mary; Harkless, Ryan

    2013-05-01

    Radio wave frequency (RF) radiation emitted from cellular telephones has become increasingly ubiquitous as a result of the popularity of these phones. With the increasing and unavoidable exposure to RF radiation a reality, it is imperative that the effects of such radiation on living tissue be well understood. In particular, it is critical to understand any effects that RF radiation may have as a carcinogen and on embryonic development, as pregnant women are not exempt from such exposure. As a model organism, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been studied extensively, and their value in studies of gene expression cannot be overstated. This study observed the effects of RF radiation on the embryonic development of zebrafish. The expression of two genes, shha and hoxb9a, that are key to the early development of the fish was examined. Both genes have homologs in humans as well as in other model organisms. Preliminary results suggest that exposure to cell phone radiation might have an effect on the expression of shha in zebrafish embryos, causing under expression. More trials are necessary to validate these results.

  4. Design of an 81.25 MHz continuous-wave radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator for Low Energy Accelerator Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Lu, Liang; Xu, Xianbo; Sun, Liepeng; Zhang, Zhouli; Dou, Weiping; Li, Chenxing; Shi, Longbo; He, Yuan; Zhao, Hongwei

    2017-03-01

    An 81.25 MHz continuous wave (CW) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed for the Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). In the CW operating mode, the proposed RFQ design adopted the conventional four-vane structure. The main design goals are providing high shunt impendence with low power losses. In the electromagnetic (EM) design, the π-mode stabilizing loops (PISLs) were optimized to produce a good mode separation. The tuners were also designed and optimized to tune the frequency and field flatness of the operating mode. The vane undercuts were optimized to provide a flat field along the RFQ cavity. Additionally, a full length model with modulations was set up for the final EM simulations. Following the EM design, thermal analysis of the structure was carried out. In this paper, detailed EM design and thermal simulations of the LEAF-RFQ will be presented and discussed. Structure error analysis was also studied.

  5. Electron-ion temperature ratio estimations in the summer polar mesosphere when subject to HF radio wave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M.

    2014-10-01

    We have inferred the electron temperature enhancements above mesospheric altitudes under Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) conditions when the ionosphere is exposed to artificial HF radio wave heating. The proposed method uses the dependence of the radar cross section on the electron-to-ion temperature ratio to infer the heating factor from incoherent scatter radar (ISR) power measurements above 90 km. Model heating temperatures match our ISR estimations between 90 and 130 km with 0.94 Pearson correlation index. The PMSE strength measured by the MORRO MST radar is about 50% weaker during the heater-on period when the modeled electron-to-ion mesospheric temperature is approximately 10 times greater than the unperturbed value. No PMSE weakening is found when the mesospheric temperature enhancement is by a factor of three or less. The PMSE weakening and its absence are consistent with the modeled mesospheric electron temperatures. This consistency supports to the proposed method for estimating mesospheric electron temperatures achieved by independent MST and ISR radar measurements.

  6. Design and multiphysics analysis of a 176Â MHz continuous-wave radio-frequency quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, S. V.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Schrage, D.; Rodnizki, J.; Berkovits, D.

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a new design for a 176 MHz cw radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the SARAF upgrade project. At this frequency, the proposed design is a conventional four-vane structure. The main design goals are to provide the highest possible shunt impedance while limiting the required rf power to about 120 kW for reliable cw operation, and the length to about 4 meters. If built as designed, the proposed RFQ will be the first four-vane cw RFQ built as a single cavity (no resonant coupling required) that does not require π-mode stabilizing loops or dipole rods. For this, we rely on very detailed 3D simulations of all aspects of the structure and the level of machining precision achieved on the recently developed ATLAS upgrade RFQ. A full 3D model of the structure including vane modulation was developed. The design was optimized using electromagnetic and multiphysics simulations. Following the choice of the vane type and geometry, the vane undercuts were optimized to produce a flat field along the structure. The final design has good mode separation and should not need dipole rods if built as designed, but their effect was studied in the case of manufacturing errors. The tuners were also designed and optimized to tune the main mode without affecting the field flatness. Following the electromagnetic (EM) design optimization, a multiphysics engineering analysis of the structure was performed. The multiphysics analysis is a coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical analysis. The cooling channels, including their paths and sizes, were optimized based on the limiting temperature and deformation requirements. The frequency sensitivity to the RFQ body and vane cooling water temperatures was carefully studied in order to use it for frequency fine-tuning. Finally, an inductive rf power coupler design based on the ATLAS RFQ coupler was developed and simulated. The EM design optimization was performed using cst Microwave Studio and the results were verified using

  7. Advances in Composite Reflectors: From X-Ray to Radio Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, S. J.; Abusafieh, A. A.; Mehle, G. V.; Sheikh, D. A.; Giles, D. C.

    2000-12-01

    In recent years, Composite Optics, Inc. (COI) has made significant advances in the use of graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) materials for astronomical instrument applications. The inherent low density, high stiffness, and thermal stability makes GFRC a natural candidate for many astronomy applications. In order to reap these inherent benefits in astronomical applications, basic research has focused on material and process improvement. This has been accompanied by the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype reflectors that cover a broad wavelength spectrum of astronomical interests. The results of, and applications for, these efforts are summarized in the following list. X-Ray Carrier Shell: Innovative composite process yields accuracy and moisture stability. Demonstrated by vacuum optical test of 6" Wolter-I shell. Applicable to Con-X, etc. Lightweight Mirror Substrate for Visible Astronomy: Composite/glass hybrid design. Areal density Glass-like coating applied to composite. Polishable by conventional methods. Multiple six-inch substrates polished to 20 angstroms. Technology will enable future 5 kg/m2 visible to UV optics. 10 kg/m2 Submillimeter Reflector: Apertures to 5m possible with economical, all-composite mirror design, diffraction limited at 80 microns. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test (to 70K) of FIRST 2-meter prototype mirror. Applicable to FIRST and other IR astronomy. Large, Ultra-Stable Optical Support Structure: Uniform and near-zero CTE over broad dimensions. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test of 2-meter FIRST prototype. Applicable to NGST, SIM, LISSA. Ground Based Radio Telescope Reflector: Low-cost, accurate, stable, durable all-composite design for support structure & reflective surface. Demonstrated via fab & test of 3m adjustable and 5m static prototypes. Applicable to LMT, ALMA, etc. These recent accomplishments represent new enabling technologies to meet the needs of numerous astronomical instrument concepts. COI will

  8. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  9. Design of a radio-linked implantable cochlear prosthesis using surface acoustic wave devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeutter, D C; Josse, F

    1993-01-01

    Cochlear prosthesis systems for postlingually deaf individuals (those who have become deaf due to disease or injury after having developed mature speech capability) are considered. These systems require the surgical implantation of an array of electrodes within the cochlea and are driven by processed sound signals from outside the body. A system that uses an analog signal approach for transcutaneous transfer of six processed speech data channels using frequency multiplexing is described. The system utilizes a filterbank of six narrowband surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters in the range 72-78 MHz with a 1.2-MHz channel spacing to multiplex the six carrier signals, frequency modulated, by the processed speech signals, onto a composite signal. The same SAW filters are used in the receiver filterbank for signal separation, but are housed in a miniaturized package. The system includes a portable transmitter and a receiver package which is to be implanted in the patient. The implanted circuits are supplied exclusively from power transferred from outside the body via a separate 10-MHz transcutaneous link.

  10. Application of the nudged elastic band method to the point-to-point radio wave ray tracing in IRI modeled ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosikov, I. A.; Klimenko, M. V.; Bessarab, P. F.; Zhbankov, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    Point-to-point ray tracing is an important problem in many fields of science. While direct variational methods where some trajectory is transformed to an optimal one are routinely used in calculations of pathways of seismic waves, chemical reactions, diffusion processes, etc., this approach is not widely known in ionospheric point-to-point ray tracing. We apply the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method to a radio wave propagation problem. In the NEB method, a chain of points which gives a discrete representation of the radio wave ray is adjusted iteratively to an optimal configuration satisfying the Fermat's principle, while the endpoints of the trajectory are kept fixed according to the boundary conditions. Transverse displacements define the radio ray trajectory, while springs between the points control their distribution along the ray. The method is applied to a study of point-to-point ionospheric ray tracing, where the propagation medium is obtained with the International Reference Ionosphere model taking into account traveling ionospheric disturbances. A 2-dimensional representation of the optical path functional is developed and used to gain insight into the fundamental difference between high and low rays. We conclude that high and low rays are minima and saddle points of the optical path functional, respectively.

  11. Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Siemion, Andrew P V; Cheng-Jin, Jin; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Cordes, James; DeBoer, David R; Falcke, Heino; Garrett, Mike; Garrington, Simon; Gurvits, Leonid; Hoare, Melvin; Korpela, Eric J; Lazio, Joseph; Messerschmitt, David; Morrison, Ian S; O'Brien, Tim; Paragi, Zsolt; Penny, Alan; Spitler, Laura; Tarter, Jill; Werthimer, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. air route surveillance or ballistic missile warning radars, EIRP (EIRP = equivalent isotropic radiated power, ~10^17 erg sec^-1) at 10 pc in less than 15 minutes, and with a modest four beam SETI observing system could, in one minute, search every star in the primary beam out to ~100 pc for radio emission comparable to that emitted by the Arecibo Planetary Radar (EIRP ~2 x 10^20 erg sec^-1). The flexibility of the signal detection systems used for SETI searches with the SKA will allow new algorithms to be employed that will provide sensitivity to a much wider variety of si...

  12. Hegel, Analogy, and Extraterrestrial Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph T.

    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel rejected the possibility of life outside of the Earth, according to several scholars of extraterrestrial life. Their position is that the solar system and specifically the planet Earth is the unique place in the cosmos where life, intelligence, and rationality can be. The present study offers a very different interpretation of Hegel's statements about the place of life on Earth by suggesting that, although Hegel did not believe that there were other solar systems where rationality is present, he did in fact suggest that planets in general, not the Earth exclusively, have life and possibly also intelligent inhabitants. Analogical syllogisms are superficial, according to Hegel, insofar as they try to conclude that there is life on the Moon even though there is no evidence of water or air on that body. Similar analogical arguments for life on the Sun made by Johann Elert Bode and William Herschel were considered by Hegel to be equally superficial. Analogical arguments were also used by astronomers and philosophers to suggest that life could be found on other planets in our solar system. Hegel offers no critique of analogical arguments for life on other planets, and in fact Hegel believed that life would be found on other planets. Planets, after all, have meteorological processes and therefore are "living" according to his philosophical account, unlike the Moon, Sun, and comets. Whereas William Herschel was already finding great similarities between the Sun and the stars and had extended these similarities to the property of having planets or being themselves inhabitable worlds, Hegel rejected this analogy. The Sun and stars have some properties in common, but for Hegel one cannot conclude from these similarities to the necessity that stars have planets. Hegel's arguments against the presence of life in the solar system were not directed against other planets, but rather against the Sun and Moon, both of which he said have a different

  13. Alien Mindscapes—A Perspective on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.

    2016-09-01

    Advances in planetary and space sciences, astrobiology, and life and cognitive sciences, combined with developments in communication theory, bioneural computing, machine learning, and big data analysis, create new opportunities to explore the probabilistic nature of alien life. Brought together in a multidisciplinary approach, they have the potential to support an integrated and expanded Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI1), a search that includes looking for life as we do not know it. This approach will augment the odds of detecting a signal by broadening our understanding of the evolutionary and systemic components in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI), provide more targets for radio and optical SETI, and identify new ways of decoding and coding messages using universal markers.

  14. Extraterrestrial Life: Processes, Implications, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyson, Joseph T.

    Provided are background materials relating the study of extraterrestrial life to common biological principles. A history of the creation of the sun and earth is included, as well as a summary of one current theory regarding the origin of life on earth. Relationships are identified regarding possible origins of life on other planets. Factors…

  15. A Measurement Method of Time Jitter of a Laser Pulse with Respect to the Radio-Frequency Wave Phase in a Photocathode Radio-Frequency Gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘圣广; 李永贵; 王鸣凯

    2002-01-01

    In a photo-cathode radio-frequency (rf) gun, the micro-bunched charge output from the gun is dependent linearly on the laser injection phase, due to the Scottay effect in the process of photoemission and the procedure of the electron longitudinal acceleration. Based on this principle, a new method is proposed, which should be utilized to measure the time jitter between the driving laser pulse and the rf phase with a very high resolution of a few tens of femtoseconds.

  16. Experimental demonstration of 24-Gb/s CAP-64QAM radio-over-fiber system over 40-GHz mm-wave fiber-wireless transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Li, Fan; Li, Xinying

    2013-11-04

    We propose and demonstrate a novel CAP-ROF system based on multi-level carrier-less amplitude and phase modulation (CAP) 64QAM with high spectrum efficiency for mm-wave fiber-wireless transmission. The performance of novel CAP modulation with high order QAM, for the first time, is investigated in the mm-wave fiber-wireless transmission system. One I/Q modulator is used for mm-wave generation and base-band signal modulation based on optical carrier suppression (OCS) and intensity modulation. Finally, we demonstrated a 24-Gb/s CAP-64QAM radio-over-fiber (ROF) system over 40-km stand single-mode-fiber (SMMF) and 1.5-m 38-GHz wireless transmission. The system operation factors are also experimentally investigated.

  17. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. II. CMEs, Shock Waves, and Drifting Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Filippov, B. P.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Prestage, N. P.; Temmer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our study (Grechnev et al., 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0316-6; Paper I) on the 18 November 2003 geoffective event. To understand possible impact on geospace of coronal transients observed on that day, we investigated their properties from solar near-surface manifestations in extreme ultraviolet, LASCO white-light images, and dynamic radio spectra. We reconcile near-surface activity with the expansion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and determine their orientation relative to the earthward direction. The kinematic measurements, dynamic radio spectra, and microwave and X-ray light curves all contribute to the overall picture of the complex event and confirm an additional eruption at 08:07 - 08:20 UT close to the solar disk center presumed in Paper I. Unusual characteristics of the ejection appear to match those expected for a source of the 20 November superstorm but make its detection in LASCO images hopeless. On the other hand, none of the CMEs observed by LASCO seem to be a promising candidate for a source of the superstorm being able to produce, at most, a glancing blow on the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis confirms free propagation of shock waves revealed in the event and reconciles their kinematics with "EUV waves" and dynamic radio spectra up to decameters.

  18. A multi-year study of radio-wave refractivity profiles above the Adriatic Sea up to an altitude of 40 km

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viher, Mladen [Croatian Air Force HQ, Zagreb (Croatia); Telisman Prtenjak, Maja [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Andrija Mohorovicic Geophysical Inst.

    2012-08-15

    Radio-wave refractivity conditions in the atmosphere are determined by the vertical gradient of the refractive index, which can be computed from regular aerological balloon probe measurements. This study is focused on the refractivity conditions over the Adriatic Sea using a multiannual series of data from four aerological stations. According to the refractive profiles computed from the aerological probes, two models are proposed: a polynomial model for both the troposphere and the stratosphere up to an altitude of 40 km and a much simpler linear model for the stratosphere alone. By confirming a discontinuity in the refractive conditions between the troposphere and stratosphere, both models exhibited a good fit and superior characteristics over a range of heights from the surface up to 40 km compared with the widely used simple exponential model. New recommended regular refractive profiles can be used as a guide for any type of long-range radio system design. (orig.)

  19. Psycholinguistics and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Krotenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article reveals the possibilities of psycholinguistics in the identifi cation and interpretation of languages and texts of Alien Civilizations. The author combines modern interdisciplinary research in psycholinguistics with the theory “Evolving Matter” proposed by Oleg Bazaluk and concludes that the identifi cation of languages and texts of Alien Civilizations, as well as the communication of terrestrial civilization with Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is in principle possible. To that end, it is necessary to achieve the required level of the modeling of neurophilosophy and to include these achievements of modern psycholinguistics studies: а language acquisition; b language comprehension; c language production; d second language acquisition. On the one hand, the possibilities of neurophilosophy to accumulate and model advanced neuroscience research; on the other hand, highly specialized psycholinguistic studies in language evolution are able to provide the communication of terrestrial civilization with Extraterrestrial Intelligence.

  20. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus. Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Andre, M.; Bolton, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bowen, T. A.; Burgess, D.; Cattell, C. A.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Chaston, C. C.; Chen, C. H. K.; Choi, M. K.; Connerney, J. E.; Cranmer, S.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Donakowski, W.; Drake, J. F.; Farrell, W. M.; Fergeau, P.; Fermin, J.; Fischer, J.; Fox, N.; Glaser, D.; Goldstein, M.; Gordon, D.; Hanson, E.; Harris, S. E.; Hayes, L. M.; Hinze, J. J.; Hollweg, J. V.; Horbury, T. S.; Howard, R. A.; Hoxie, V.; Jannet, G.; Karlsson, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kien, M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Krucker, S.; Lynch, J. J.; Maksimovic, M.; Malaspina, D. M.; Marker, S.; Martin, P.; Martinez-Oliveros, J.; McCauley, J.; McComas, D. J.; McDonald, T.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Moncuquet, M.; Monson, S. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Murphy, S. D.; Odom, J.; Oliverson, R.; Olson, J.; Parker, E. N.; Pankow, D.; Phan, T.; Quataert, E.; Quinn, T.; Ruplin, S. W.; Salem, C.; Seitz, D.; Sheppard, D. A.; Siy, A.; Stevens, K.; Summers, D.; Szabo, A.; Timofeeva, M.; Vaivads, A.; Velli, M.; Yehle, A.; Werthimer, D.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  1. Extraterrestrial altruism evolution and ethics in the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Extraterrestrial Altruism examines a basic assumption of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI): that extraterrestrials will be transmitting messages to us for our benefit. This question of whether extraterrestrials will be altruistic has become increasingly important in recent years as SETI scientists have begun contemplating transmissions from Earth to make contact. Should we expect altruism to evolve throughout the cosmos, or is this only wishful thinking? Would this make biological sense? Is it dangerous to send messages to other worlds, as Stephen Hawking has suggested? Would extraterrestrial societies be based on different ethical principles? Extraterrestrial Altruism explores these and related questions about the motivations of civilizations beyond Earth, providing new insights that are critical for SETI. Chapters are authored by leading scholars from diverse disciplines—anthropology, astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, cosmology, engineering, history of science, law, philos...

  2. Adaptive photonic-assisted M²-QAM millimeter-wave synthesis in multi-antenna radio-over-fiber system using M-ASK modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying; Xin, Xiangjun

    2014-11-01

    A novel method for generating an adaptive photonic-assisted M2-quadrature amplitude modulation (M2-QAM) millimeter-wave signal in a multiantenna radio-over-fiber system using M-ray amplitude-shift keying (M-ASK) modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. It takes full advantage of high-density small cells without introducing additional complexity into remote antenna units (RAUs) or mobile users. The 4, 8, and 12 Gb/s 4QAM millimeter-wave signals are obtained from two independent 2, 4, and 6 Gb/s on-off-keying 40 GHz channels, respectively. The experimental results show that a double bit rate can be received without additional digital signal processing in RAUs and mobile users. The results, including the constellation diagrams and bit error rate, show that the transmitted signals are received successfully.

  3. Some preliminary investigations on the propagation of V.H.F. radio-waves at 126Mc/s in Mountainous terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.L.N. Rao

    1963-04-01

    Full Text Available This Paper deals with the propagation of VHF radio waves at 126Mc/s within a distance of 2km, on six different paths. Practically observed field strengths have been considered and compared with those theoretically calculated. The observations indicate a difference of about 10-12db on average from the predicated figures for vertically polarized waves which is expected to arise due to absorption by vegetation and the effect of hillocks close by. The differences tend to zero in simpler cases of diffraction not complicated by vegetation etc. An extreme difference of even 25db was observed to be accounted by absorption due to surroundings of vegetation, and buildings.

  4. 基于射频数字化的中短波广播监测系统探究%Exploration on Medium Short Wave Radio Monitoring System Based on RF Digitalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵静; 杨苏卫

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the rapid development of communication and broadcast, etc, make the medium short wave spectrum occupied, channel interference problem is increasingly serious, medium-wave radio in transmission, construction, use and other aspects, it is dififcult to give full play to the advantages of for intermediate frequency spectrum efifciency, reduce the interference between channels, people try to establish medium-wave radio monitoring system and application of radio frequency digital correlation technology, make long-distance medium-wave radio signal receiving, storage, reduction, etc. Articles on medium-wave radio monitoring system based on rf digitalization of cognition, the theoretical basis of medium short wave radio signal rf digitalization in and the present stage medium short wave radio monitoring system architecture on the basis of system analysis, the medium short wave radio monitoring system based on radio frequency digital architecture study.%近年来通信和广播等方面的快速发展,使中短波频谱被占用、频道受干扰的问题日益严重,中短波广播在传播、建设、使用等方面的优势难以充分发挥,为有效利用中短波频谱,降低频道之间的干扰,人们尝试建立中短波广播监测系统并应用射频数字化相关技术,使中短波广播信号异地接收、存储、还原等成为可能。文章对基于射频数字化的中短波广播监测系统产生较全面的认知,在对中短波广播信号射频数字化理论基础和现阶段中短波广播监测系统架构进行系统分析的基础上,对基于射频数字化的中短波广播监测系统架构展开研究。

  5. The SERENDIP III 70 cm Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Bowyer, Stuart; Korpela, Eric; Cobb, Jeff; Lebofsky, Matt; Werthimer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We employed the SERENDIP III system with the Arecibo radio telescope to search for possible artificial extraterrestrial signals. Over the four years of this search we covered 93% of the sky observable at Arecibo at least once and 44% of the sky five times or more with a sensitivity of ~3E-25 W/m2. The data were sent to a 4 million channel spectrum analyzer. Information was obtained from over 1E+14 independent data points and the results were then analyzed via a suite of pattern detection algorithms to identify narrow band spectral power peaks that were not readily identifiable as the product of human activity. We separately selected data coincident with interesting nearby G dwarf stars that were encountered by chance in our sky survey for suggestions of excess power peaks. The peak power distributions in both these data sets were consistent with random noise. We report upper limits on possible signals from the stars investigated and provide examples of the most interesting candidates identified in the sky sur...

  6. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  7. Radio propagation measurement and channel modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Salous, Sana

    2013-01-01

    While there are numerous books describing modern wireless communication systems that contain overviews of radio propagation and radio channel modelling, there are none that contain detailed information on the design, implementation and calibration of radio channel measurement equipment, the planning of experiments and the in depth analysis of measured data. The book would begin with an explanation of the fundamentals of radio wave propagation and progress through a series of topics, including the measurement of radio channel characteristics, radio channel sounders, measurement strategies

  8. Musical Structures and Search for Extraterrestrials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Vladimir A.

    Recent findings in cognitive phsychology indicate connections between human feelings and musical scales, on the one hand, and the laws of thermodynamics, on the other. The existence of such a deep correlations allows us to suggest the hypothesis that music is inherent not only to the human beings but to other sapient creatures as well. It is worth, thus, in our search for extraterrestrial civilizations to conduct a "musical" analysis of the spectra of "suspicious" objects. The results of such analysis of the Doppler spectrum of SS 433 will be presented in this paper.

  9. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  10. Wideband spectrum analysis of ultra-high frequency radio-wave signals due to advanced one-phonon non-collinear anomalous light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S; Arellanes, Adan Omar

    2017-04-20

    We present a principally new acousto-optical cell providing an advanced wideband spectrum analysis of ultra-high frequency radio-wave signals. For the first time, we apply a recently developed approach with the tilt angle to a one-phonon non-collinear anomalous light scattering. In contrast to earlier cases, now one can exploit a regime with the fixed optical wavelength for processing a great number of acoustic frequencies simultaneously in the linear regime. The chosen rutile-crystal combines a moderate acoustic velocity with low acoustic attenuation and allows us wide-band data processing within GHz-frequency acoustic waves. We have created and experimentally tested a 6-cm aperture rutile-made acousto-optical cell providing the central frequency 2.0 GHz, frequency bandwidth ∼0.52  GHz with the frequency resolution about 68.3 kHz, and ∼7620 resolvable spots. A similar cell permits designing an advanced ultra-high-frequency arm within a recently developed multi-band radio-wave acousto-optical spectrometer for astrophysical studies. This spectrometer is intended to operate with a few parallel optical arms for processing the multi-frequency data flows within astrophysical observations. Keeping all the instrument's advantages of the previous schematic arrangement, now one can create the highest-frequency arm using the developed rutile-based acousto-optical cell. It permits optimizing the performances inherent in that arm via regulation of both the central frequency and the frequency bandwidth for spectrum analysis.

  11. A new empirical approach in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Astrobiological nonlocality at the cosmological level

    CERN Document Server

    Thaheld, F H

    2006-01-01

    Over a period of several decades a concerted effort has been made to determine whether intelligent life exists outside of our solar system, known as the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence or SETI. This has been based primarily upon attempting to intercept possible radio transmissions at different frequencies with arrays of radio telescopes. In addition, astrophysical observations have also been undertaken to see if other worlds or solar systems exist with similar conditions such as ours, which might be conducive to life. And, numerous papers have been written exploring different possibilities for the existence of life or why we have not observed it as of yet, since none of these approaches have been successful. It may now be possible to explore this issue from another standpoint. Recent theoretical and experimental results in the field of biophysics appear to indicate the possibility of quantum entanglement and nonlocality at the biological level, between spatially separated pairs of human subjects and ...

  12. International law implications of the detection of extraterrestrial intelligent signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopal, Vladimir

    This paper first considers whether the present law of outer space, as it has been enshrined in five United Nations treaties and other legal documents concerning outer space, provides a satisfactory basis for SETI/CETI activities. In the author's opinion, these activities may serve "the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes," as recognized in the 1967 Outer Space Treaty. The use of the radio frequency spectrum for SETI/CETI purposes should be in conformity with the legal principles governing this valuable natural resource, as expressed in the International Telecommunication Convention and related documents, and with allocations of the relevant segments of the spectrum by the competent bodies of the International Telecommunication Union. In the second part the author examines the impact that the detection of extraterrestrial intelligent signals may have on the present body of space law. A possible role for the United Nations in this respect is also explored and a timely interest of the world body in discussing questions relating to this subject is recommended. Consideration of these questions could become a tool helping to concentrate the attention of the world community on problems of common concern and thus to strengthen international cooperation. However, the author believes that a law-making process that would aim at elaborating a special regulation of activities in this field would be premature at this stage. It should be initiated only when the boundary between possibilities and realities is crossed. Finally, the paper outlines some likely transformation in our space law thinking that would be the consequence of the detection of extraterrestrial intelligent signals. Elaboration of the principles and norms to govern relations between the international community of our own planet and other intelligent communities in the universe would add a new dimension to the present body of outer space

  13. Gaussian/non-Gaussian distributions and the identification of terrestrial and extraterrestrial intelligence objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Haitun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statistical criteria used today in the analysis of radio signals suspected on reasonable extraterrestrial origin, are based on the assumption that all the radio signals of natural origin are described by a Gaussian distribution, which is traditionally understood as the Gauss distribution. Usually the normal (Gauss distribution is opposed to all the others. However, this is difficult to recognize the reasonable, because in nature there are many different distributions. The article offers a more realistic dichotomy: the Gaussian distributions, obeying the central limiting theorem, dominate in nature, while non-Gaussian ones, obeying the Gnedenko-Doeblin limiting theorem, are generated by intelligent beings. When identifying objects belonging to an extraterrestrial civilization described by a non-Gaussian distribution is preferable to use the rank form distributions. Using this criterion is associated with certain difficulties: (1 in nature there are also non-Gaussian distributions; (2 in their activities animals generate non-Gaussian distributions like humans; (3 the identification of non-Gaussian distributions in the rank form is hampered sometimes by the rank distortion effect of mathematical nature.

  14. Cost-Efficient DWDM-PON / Mm-Wave Wireless Integration using Coherent Radio-over-Fiber (CRoF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Manoj P.; Mikroulis, S.; Renaud, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the performance of millimetre wave (mm-wave) broadband wireless access for seamless integration with the (ultra-dense) WDM infrastructure. By using two uncorrelated lasers, this system concept allows simple implementation that can additionally be improved, if thermal...

  15. Theology after contact: religion and extraterrestrial intelligent life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, J F

    2001-12-01

    The prospect of encountering extraterrestrial intelligent life raises important questions for religion and theology. Even if an actual encounter with extraterrestrials never actually takes place, or proves impractical, terrestrial religious thought already has resources that can render intelligible and allow us theologically to appreciate such an eventuality.

  16. Extraterrestrial Radiation Chemistry and Molecular Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations of both solar system and interstellar regions have revealed a rich chemical inventory that includes most classes of organic molecules and selected inorganics. For example, gas-phase ethylene glycol and SOz have been observed by astronomers, while solidphase detections include OCS, H2O2 , and the cyanate anion.' All of these are found in environments that are, by earthly standards, exceedingly hostile: temperatures of 10 - 100 K, miniscule densities, and near-ubiquitous ionizing-radiation fields. Beyond the simplest chemical species, these conditions have made it difficult-to-impassible to account for the observed molecular abundances using gas-phase chemistry, suggesting solid-phase reactions play an important role. In extraterrestrial environments, cosmic rays, UV photons, and magnetospheric radiation all drive chemical reactions, even at cryogenic temperatures. To study this chemistry, radiation astrochemists conduct experiments on icy materials, frozen under vacuum and exposed to sources such as keV electrons and MeV protons. Compositional changes usually are followed with IR spectroscopy and, in selected cases, more-sensitive mass-spectral techniques. This talk will review some recent results on known and suspected extraterrestrial molecules and ions. Spectra and reaction pathways will be presented, and predictions made for interstellar chemistry and the chemistry of selected solar system objects. Some past radiation-chemical contributions, and future needs, will be explored.

  17. Is Your Gut Conscious? Is an Extraterrestrial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos Post, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    This paper speculates on questions intending to be taken scientifically rather than metaphysically: "Can the human gut (enteric nervous system) be conscious?"; "Can your immune system think?"; "Could consciousness be coded in DNA?"; "What do we mean when asserting that an Extraterrestrial is Thinking, or is Conscious? We explore through reference to theory, experiment, and computational models by Christof Koch (Caltech), Barbara Wold (Caltech), and Stuart Kauffman (University of Calgary, Tampere University of Technology, Santa Fe Institute). We use a tentative new definition of thinking, designed to be applicable for humans, cetecea, corvids, artificial intelligences, and extraterrestrial intelligences of any substrate (i.e. Life as We Do Not Know It): "Thinking is the occurrence, transformation, and storage in a mind or brain (or simulation thereof) of information-bearing structures (representations) of one kind or another, such as thoughts, concept, percepts, ideas, impressions, notions, rules, schemas, images, phantasms, or subpersonal representations." We use the framework for Consciousness developed by Francis Crick and Christof Koch. We try to describe scientific goals, but discuss Philosophy sufficient to avoid naïve philosophical category errors (thus are careful not to conflate thought, consciousness, and language) Penrose, Hameroff, and Kauffman speculate (differently) that CNS consciousness is a macroscopic quantum phenomenon. Might intestinal, immune system, or genetic regulatory network dynamics exhibit emergent cooperative quantum effects? The speculations are in the context of Evolution by Natural Selection, presumed to operate throughout the Cosmos, and recent work in the foundations of Computational Biology and Quantum Mechanics.

  18. Extraterrestrial Radiation Chemistry and Molecular Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations of both solar system and interstellar regions have revealed a rich chemical inventory that includes most classes of organic molecules and selected inorganics. For example, gas-phase ethylene glycol and SOz have been observed by astronomers, while solidphase detections include OCS, H2O2 , and the cyanate anion.' All of these are found in environments that are, by earthly standards, exceedingly hostile: temperatures of 10 - 100 K, miniscule densities, and near-ubiquitous ionizing-radiation fields. Beyond the simplest chemical species, these conditions have made it difficult-to-impassible to account for the observed molecular abundances using gas-phase chemistry, suggesting solid-phase reactions play an important role. In extraterrestrial environments, cosmic rays, UV photons, and magnetospheric radiation all drive chemical reactions, even at cryogenic temperatures. To study this chemistry, radiation astrochemists conduct experiments on icy materials, frozen under vacuum and exposed to sources such as keV electrons and MeV protons. Compositional changes usually are followed with IR spectroscopy and, in selected cases, more-sensitive mass-spectral techniques. This talk will review some recent results on known and suspected extraterrestrial molecules and ions. Spectra and reaction pathways will be presented, and predictions made for interstellar chemistry and the chemistry of selected solar system objects. Some past radiation-chemical contributions, and future needs, will be explored.

  19. Extraterrestrial Intelligence: What Would it Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Results from NASA's Kepler mission imply a hundred million Earth-like habitable worlds in the Milky Way galaxy, many of which formed billions of years before the Earth. Each of these worlds is likely to have all of the ingredients needed for biology. The real estate of time and space for the evolution of intelligent life is formidable, begging the question of whether or not we are alone in the universe. The implications of making contact have been explored extensively in science fiction and the popular culture, but less frequently in the serious scientific literature. Astronomers have carried out searches for extraterrestrial intelligence for over half a century, with no success so far. In practice, it is easier to search for alien technology than to discern intelligence of unknown function and form. In this talk, the modes of technology that can currently be detected are summarized, along with the implications of a timing argument than any detected civilization is likely to be much more advanced than ours. Fermi's famous question ``Where Are They?'' is as well posed now as it was sixty years ago. The existence of extraterrestrial intelligence would have profound practical, cultural, and religious implications for humanity.

  20. Cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier for radio-astronomical observations and centimeter-wave deep-space communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, V. F.; Grachev, V. G.; Dryagin, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. I.; Kamaletdinov, R. K.; Korotaev, D. V.; Lesnov, I. V.; Mansfeld, M. A.; Pevzner, E. L.; Perminov, V. G.; Pilipenko, A. M.; Sapozhnikov, B. D.; Saurin, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design solution for a highly reliable, low-noise and extremely efficient cryogenically cooled transmit/receive unit for a large antenna system meant for radio-astronomical observations and deep-space communications in the X band. We describe our design solution and the results of a series of laboratory and antenna tests carried out in order to investigate the properties of the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier developed. The transmit/receive unit designed for deep-space communications (Mars missions, radio observatories located at Lagrangian point L2, etc.) was used in practice for communication with live satellites including "Radioastron" observatory, which moves in a highly elliptical orbit.

  1. A deep Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope 610-MHz survey of the 1H XMM-Newton/Chandra survey field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, D.; Seymour, N.; McHardy, I. M.; Dwelly, T.; Page, M. J.; Loaring, N. S.

    2007-07-01

    We present the results of a deep 610-MHz survey of the 1H XMM-Newton/Chandra survey area with the Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope. The resulting maps have a resolution of ~7 arcsec and an rms noise limit of 60 μJy. To a 5σ detection limit of 300 μJy, we detect 223 sources within a survey area of 64 arcmin in diameter. We compute the 610-MHz source counts and compare them to those measured at other radio wavelengths. The well-known flattening of the Euclidean-normalized 1.4-GHz source counts below ~2 mJy, usually explained by a population of starburst galaxies undergoing luminosity evolution, is seen at 610 MHz. The 610-MHz source counts can be modelled by the same populations that explain the 1.4-GHz source counts, assuming a spectral index of -0.7 for the starburst galaxies and the steep spectrum active galactic nucleus (AGN) population. We find a similar dependence of luminosity evolution on redshift for the starburst galaxies at 610 MHz as is found at 1.4 GHz (i.e. `Q' = 2.45+0.3-0.4).

  2. All-optical frequency downconversion technique utilizing a four-wave mixing effect in a single semiconductor optical amplifier for wavelength division multiplexing radio-over-fiber applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jong-In

    2012-03-26

    An all-optical frequency downconversion utilizing a four-wave mixing effect in a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was experimentally demonstrated for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) radio-over-fiber (RoF) applications. Two WDM optical radio frequency (RF) signals having 155 Mbps differential phase shift keying (DPSK) data at 28.5 GHz were simultaneously down-converted to two WDM optical intermediate frequency (IF) signals having an IF frequency of 4.5 GHz by mixing with an optical local oscillator (LO) signal having a LO frequency of 24 GHz in the SOA. The bit-error-rate (BER) performance of the RoF up-links with different optical fiber lengths employing all-optical frequency downconversion was investigated. The receiver sensitivity of the RoF up-link with a 6 km single mode fiber and an optical IF signal in an optical double-sideband format was approximately -8.5 dBm and the power penalty for simultaneous frequency downconversion was approximately 0.63 dB. The BER performance showed a strong dependence on the fiber length due to the fiber dispersion. The receiver sensitivity of the RoF up-link with the optical IF signal in the optical single-sideband format was reduced to approximately -17.4 dBm and showed negligible dependence on the fiber length.

  3. Analysis of Radio Wave Propagation for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks in Inhomogeneous Vegetation Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leire Azpilicueta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of wireless networks has experienced exponential growth due to the improvements in terms of battery life and low consumption of the devices. However, it is compulsory to conduct previous radio propagation analysis when deploying a wireless sensor network. These studies are necessary to perform an estimation of the range coverage, in order to optimize the distance between devices in an actual network deployment. In this work, the radio channel characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs in an inhomogeneous vegetation environment has been analyzed. This analysis allows designing environment monitoring tools based on ZigBee and WiFi where WSN and smartphones cooperate, providing rich and customized monitoring information to users in a friendly manner. The impact of topology as well as morphology of the environment is assessed by means of an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching code, to emulate the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. Experimental results gathered from a measurement campaign conducted by deploying a ZigBee Wireless Sensor Network, are analyzed and compared with simulations in this paper. The scenario where this network is intended to operate is a combination of buildings and diverse vegetation species. To gain insight in the effects of radio propagation, a simplified vegetation model has been developed, considering the material parameters and simplified geometry embedded in the simulation scenario. An initial location-based application has been implemented in a real scenario, to test the functionality within a context aware scenario. The use of deterministic tools can aid to know the impact of the topological influence in the deployment of the optimal Wireless Sensor Network in terms of capacity, coverage and energy consumption, making the use of these systems attractive for multiple applications in inhomogeneous vegetation environments.

  4. Analysis of radio wave propagation for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks in inhomogeneous vegetation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpilicueta, Leire; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Mateo, Ignacio; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2014-12-10

    The use of wireless networks has experienced exponential growth due to the improvements in terms of battery life and low consumption of the devices. However, it is compulsory to conduct previous radio propagation analysis when deploying a wireless sensor network. These studies are necessary to perform an estimation of the range coverage, in order to optimize the distance between devices in an actual network deployment. In this work, the radio channel characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an inhomogeneous vegetation environment has been analyzed. This analysis allows designing environment monitoring tools based on ZigBee and WiFi where WSN and smartphones cooperate, providing rich and customized monitoring information to users in a friendly manner. The impact of topology as well as morphology of the environment is assessed by means of an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching code, to emulate the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. Experimental results gathered from a measurement campaign conducted by deploying a ZigBee Wireless Sensor Network, are analyzed and compared with simulations in this paper. The scenario where this network is intended to operate is a combination of buildings and diverse vegetation species. To gain insight in the effects of radio propagation, a simplified vegetation model has been developed, considering the material parameters and simplified geometry embedded in the simulation scenario. An initial location-based application has been implemented in a real scenario, to test the functionality within a context aware scenario. The use of deterministic tools can aid to know the impact of the topological influence in the deployment of the optimal Wireless Sensor Network in terms of capacity, coverage and energy consumption, making the use of these systems attractive for multiple applications in inhomogeneous vegetation environments.

  5. The role of extraterrestrial phenomena in extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D M

    1988-01-01

    In the several years since the Alvarez report of anomalously high iridium concentrations at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, evidence for the involvement of meteorite impacts in biological extinction has increased dramatically. Much more research will be needed, however, before meteorite impact is established as a general causal factor in extinction. Of ever greater long-term interest is the possibility that other extraterrestrial forces have had important influences on the evolution of life. To recognize the effects of such forces, it will be necessary to coordinate the research of astronomy and paleontology so that testable predictions can be formulated. It is possible that known, systematic changes in the Solar System or Galaxy have had effects on global biology and that these effects have been preserved in the paleontological record.

  6. Can Collimated Extraterrestrial Signals be Intercepted?

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan H

    2014-01-01

    The Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (OSETI) attempts to detect collimated, narrowband pulses of electromagnetic radiation. These pulses may either consist of signals intentionally directed at the Earth, or signals between two star systems with a vector that unintentionally intersects the Solar System, allowing Earth to intercept the communication. But should we expect to be able to intercept these unintentional signals? And what constraints can we place upon the frequency of intelligent civilisations if we do? We carry out Monte Carlo Realisation simulations of interstellar communications between civilisations in the Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) using collimated beams. We measure the frequency with which beams between two stars are intercepted by a third. The interception rate increases linearly with the fraction of communicating civilisations, and as the cube of the beam opening angle, which is somewhat stronger than theoretical expectations, which we argue is due to the geometry of the GHZ...

  7. Stellivore extraterrestrials? Binary stars as living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Clément

    2016-11-01

    We lack signs of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) despite decades of observation in the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Could evidence be buried in existing data? To recognize ETI, we first propose criteria discerning life from non-life based on thermodynamics and living systems theory. Then we extrapolate civilizational development to both external and internal growth. Taken together, these two trends lead to an argument that some existing binary stars might actually be ETI. Since these hypothetical beings feed actively on stars, we call them "stellivores". I present an independent thermodynamic argument for their existence, with a metabolic interpretation of interacting binary stars. The jury is still out, but the hypothesis is empirically testable with existing astrophysical data. article>

  8. The Prophylactic Effect of Vitamin C on Oxidative Stress Indexes Following Exposure to Radio Frequency Wave Generated by a BTS Antenna Model in Rat Liver and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Jelodar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency wave (RFW generated by base transceiver station (BTS has been reported to make deleterious effects on liver and kidney, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency wave (RFW-induced oxidative stress in the liver and kidney and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on this organs by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity including: glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups and treated daily for 45 days as follows: control, vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid 200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage, test (exposed to 900MHz RFW and the treated group (received vitamin C in addition to exposure to RFW. At the end of the experiment all animals were sacrificed and their liver and kidney were removed and were used for measurement of antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity. Results: The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p<0.05. In the treated group vitamin C improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared to the test group (p<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in liver and kidney, and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  9. Remote beating of parallel or orthogonally polarized dual-wavelength optical carriers for 5G millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-Yung; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-08-08

    A novel millimeter-wave radio over fiber (MMW-RoF) link at carrier frequency of 35-GHz is proposed with the use of remotely beating MMW generation from reference master and injected slave colorless laser diode (LD) carriers at orthogonally polarized dual-wavelength injection-locking. The slave colorless LD supports lasing one of the dual-wavelength master modes with orthogonal polarizations, which facilitates the single-mode direct modulation of the quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) data. Such an injected single-carrier encoding and coupled dual-carrier transmission with orthogonal polarization effectively suppresses the cross-heterodyne mode-beating intensity noise, the nonlinear modulation (NLM) and four-wave mixing (FWM) sidemodes during injection locking and fiber transmission. In 25-km single-mode fiber (SMF) based wireline system, the dual-carrier under single-mode encoding provides baseband 24-Gbit/s 64-QAM OFDM transmission with an error vector magnitude (EVM) of 8.8%, a bit error rate (BER) of 3.7 × 10-3, a power penalty of wireless transmission, the beat MMW carrier at 35 GHz can deliver the passband 16-QAM OFDM at 4 Gbit/s to show corresponding EVM and BER of 15.5% and 1.4 × 10-3, respectively, after 25-km SMF and 1.6-m free-space transmission.

  10. Ionosphere and Radio Communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saradi Bora

    2017-02-01

    The Earth's ionosphere consists of plasma produced by thephotoionization of thin upper atmospheric gases by UV raysand photons of short wavelength from the sun. The upperionosphere is used for radio communication and navigationas it reflects long, medium, as well as short radio waves. Sincesolar radiation is the main cause of the existence of ionosphere,any variation in the radiations can affect the entireradio communication system. This article attempts to brieflyintroduce the readers to the study of ionosphere in the contextof its use as a radio reflector, with particular reference toIndia.

  11. 电波折射误差快速修正方法%A Rapid Method for Correction of Radio Wave Refraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史水娥; 杨豪强

    2012-01-01

    With the higher level requirements for a real-time positioning of targets, a highly accurate and rapid method for refractive error correction of radio wave has become one of the key technologies to improve the positioning accuracy of radar. Given the low speed of generally used methods and their inefficiency for radar's real-time positioning, a refractive error correction method of high-speed radio wave is introduced based on calculus of differences. In light of the theory of ray tracing of radar wave, difference equation is used to process the ray tracing data aiming to avoid slow speed of the use of integral equation and acquire a higher computed speed on the premise of high accuracy. Simulation experiments show that the computed speed of the refractive error correction method that uses difference equation is more than 94% higher than the one that uses integral e-quation. This method can be directly applied to the online refractive error correction of the radar system to improve the accuracy of the real-time positioning furthermore.%针对常用电波折射误差修正方法速度慢,无法适应雷达系统实时性要求的现状,提出了一种利用差分方法的高速电波折射误差修正方法.根据雷达电波射线描迹理论,避开积分方程带来的计算速度慢的不足,采用射线差分方程进行电波射线追踪处理,从而在保证高精度的前提下,有效提高了计算速度.仿真实验证明,利用差分方程进行电波折射误差修正的方法与利用积分方程相比,计算速度可提高94%以上.该方法可以直接应用于雷达系统的在线折射误差修正,进一步提高雷达实时定位精度.

  12. Unseen cosmos the universe in radio

    CERN Document Server

    Graham-Smith, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Radio telescopes have transformed our understanding of the Universe. Pulsars, quasars, Big Bang cosmology: all are discoveries of the new science of radio astronomy. Here, Francis Graham-Smith describes the birth, development, and maturity of radio astronomy, from the first discovery of cosmic radio waves to its present role as a major part of modern astronomy. Radio is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, covering infra-red, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma-rays, and Graham-Smith explains why it is that radio waves give us a unique view of the Universe. Tracing the development o

  13. Advanced Curation For Current and Future Extraterrestrial Sample Collections Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a planned three-year project to develop  extraterrestrial sample curation techniques and equipment to prepare for future human and robotic sample return...

  14. Radio signal propagation effects in a nonstationary ionosphere based on the numerical solution of the one-dimensional wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laryunin, O. A.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to solve Maxwell equations analytically and numerically in a one-dimensional case under the conditions of a nonstationary medium. Analytical solutions to the Maxwell equations have been obtained in two partial cases of the linear and quadratic time dependence of medium permittivity. Since the number of models for which the wave equation can be solved analytically is limited, it becomes also necessary to apply numerical methods, specifically the method of finite differences, in a time domain Finite Difference Time Domain method. The effects of the decameter wave dynamic reflection from structures with considerable spatial gradients (the scales of which are comparable with the sounding pulse wavelength) have been studied based on this method. It has been shown that the spectrum can broaden and a Doppler frequency shift of a reflected signal can originate can take place.

  15. Over the horizon Ka Band Radio Wave Propagation Studies in the Coastal South Australian Spencer Gulf Region (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    of four vertically distributed 35 GHz continuous wave (CW) carrier transmitters and four vertically distributed receivers at a distance of 26 km. An...transmissions, each of ~45 dBm effective radiated power ( ERP ) at 35.002, 35.004 and 35.006 GHz, were directed towards the receiver site at Point Lowly...Equivalent Radiated Powers ( ERP ) of these sources are similar as are the distributed receiver sensitivities. Invariant of the height location of each

  16. Radio Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  17. A search for dispersed radio bursts in archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari; McLaughlin, Maura

    2012-01-01

    A number of different classes of potentially extra-terrestrial bursts of radio emission have been observed in surveys with the Parkes 64m radio telescope, including "Rotating Radio Transients", the "Lorimer burst" and "perytons". Rotating Radio Transients are radio pulsars which are best detectable in single-pulse searches. The Lorimer burst is a highly dispersed isolated radio burst with properties suggestive of extragalactic origin. Perytons share the frequency-swept nature of the Rotating Radio Transients and Lorimer burst, but unlike these events appear in all thirteen beams of the Parkes Multibeam receiver and are probably a form of peculiar radio frequency interference. In order to constrain these and other radio source populations further, we searched the archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data for events similar to any of these. We did not find any new Rotating Radio Transients or bursts like the Lorimer burst. We did, however, discover four peryton-like events. Similar to the perytons, these fou...

  18. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH-BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH-BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  19. The Development of Politics in Extraterrestrial Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivier, D. J.

    The existence of feudal or totalitarian interplanetary empires has been a favourite theme in Science Fiction. Although the vast distances between the stars make the emergence of an interstellar empire impossible without the creation of a faster than light drive, this is not necessarily true for the other worlds within our solar system. Environmental constraints on the off-world colonies themselves, and repressive, hierarchical and feudalistic social and commercial institutions and customs inherited from the parent cultures on Earth and a tradition of military rule descending from the foundation of these colonies may all work to bring about a new feudal or totalitarian social order on humanity's extraterrestrial colonies. There are encouraging signs that this may not be the case, however. Already the debate over the projected colonisation of Mars is a factor influencing present controversies over repressive institutions and customs. Nevertheless, those wishing for a free, democratic, and politically, socially and technologically innovative and vigorous human society spreading throughout the solar system should not become complacent.

  20. Inflation-Theory Implications for Extraterrestrial Visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardoff, J.; Haisch, B.; Maccabee, B.; Puthoff, H. E.

    It has recently been argued that anthropic reasoning applied to inflation theory reinforces the prediction that we should find ourselves part of a large, galaxy-sized civilisation, thus strengthening Fermi's paradox concerning `Where are they?' Furthermore, superstring and M-brane theory allow for the possibility of parallel universes, some of which in principle could be habitable. In addition, discussion of such exotic transport concepts as `traversable wormholes' now appears in the rigorous physics literature. As a result, the `We are alone' solution to Fermi's paradox, based on the constraints of earlier 20th century viewpoints, appears today to be inconsistent with new developments in our best current physics and astrophysics theories. Therefore we reexamine and reevaluate the present assumption that extraterrestrials or their probes are not in the vicinity of Earth, and argue instead that some evidence of their presence might be found in certain high-quality UFO reports. This study follows up on previous arguments that (1) interstellar travel for advanced civilizations is not a priori ruled out by physical principles and therefore may be practicable, and (2) such advanced civilisations may value the search for knowledge from uncontaminated species more than direct, interspecies communication, thereby accounting for apparent covertness regarding their presence.

  1. Investigation on possible risks to human health by exposure to the radiation of electromagnetic waves produced by the radio communications; Investigacion sobre posibles riesgos a la salud humana por exposicion a la radiacion de ondas electromagneticas producidas por las radiocomunicaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, Carlos Felipe; Ibarguengoytia Gonzalez, Pablo Hector; Flores Garcia, Andres; Franco Campos, Laura Elena [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-06-13

    This verification procedure is based on a research work on the possible risks to human health by exposure to the radiation of electromagnetic waves produced by the radio communications, cases of study: cellular telephony, radio digital troncalized and wireless telephony IP of Voice on IP (wireless local area network). The revision of all the international standards and the applicable national standardization was included, as well as the verification of fulfillment. [Spanish] Este procedimiento de verificacion esta basado en un trabajo de investigacion sobre posibles riesgos a la salud humana por exposicion a la radiacion de ondas electromagneticas producidas por la radiocomunicaciones, casos de estudio: telefonia celular, radio troncalizado digital y telefonia IP inalambrica de Voz sobre IP (red de area local inalambrica). Se incluyo la revision de todos los estandares internacionales y de la normatividad nacional aplicable, asi como la verificacion de cumplimiento.

  2. Classics in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Woodruff Turner

    1982-01-01

    Radio techniques were the nrst to lead astronomy away from the quiescent and limited Universe revealed by traditional observations at optical wave­ lengths. In the earliest days of radio astronomy, a handful of radio physicists and engineers made one startling discovery after another as they opened up the radio sky. With this collection of classic papers and the extensive intro­ ductory material, the reader can experience these exciting discoveries, as well as understand the developing techniques and follow the motivations which prompted the various lines of inquiry. For instance he or she will follow in detail the several attempts to detect radio waves from the sun at the turn of the century; the unravelling by Jansky of a "steady hiss type static"; the incredible story of Reber who built a 9 meter dish in his backyard in 1937 and then mapped the Milky Way; the vital discoveries by Hey and colleagues of radio bursts from the Sun and of a discrete source in the constellation of Cygnus; the development of re...

  3. Interstellar Medium Effects on Radio Pulsars PSR B1937+21 and PSR B2224+65, and Implications for Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Timothy; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Paul, Demorest; Halmrast, Daniel; Jessup, Cody; Jones, Glenn; Lam, Michael T.; Lyne, Andrew; McLaughlin, Maura; Ramette, Joshua; Stinebring, Dan; Stappers, Benjamin; Stovall, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Noise in pulsar timing residuals due to the ionized interstellar medium (IISM) is a critical limiting factor for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) as gravitational wave detectors. PSR B1937+21 is the brightest millisecond pulsar in the northern sky and serves as a laboratory for studying uncertainties and systematic changes in pulse times-of-arrival. Its high flux, its high degree of scattering along the line-of-sight, and its giant pulses interact in a dynamic way to affect individual times-of-arrival on different timescales. Noise budget results on this pulsar are relevant to understanding the timing of other millisecond pulsars. We present data from an Arecibo Observatory campaign on PSR B1937+21 at 1.4GHz, the standard radio frequency at which the times-of-arrival of PSR B1937+21 and other PTA pulsars are routinely measured for the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). The campaign was strategized to probe the pulsar’s noise budget, particularly with respect to the IISM from high S/N dynamic spectra that show flux distributed irregularly across the bandwidth from interstellar scintillation. Similarly, PSR B2224+65, while not a NANOGrav pulsar, is associated with the Guitar Nebula, a region with significant ISM density fluctuations. We also present data from a Green Bank Telescope monitoring campaign on PSR B2224+65 at 342MHz and 1.4GHz, which uses dispersion measure (DM) variations to constrain the influence of the IISM on the pulsar’s times-of-arrival. By utilizing the dynamic spectra, single pulse, and DM data from these campaigns, we analyze the noise budgets of these pulsars on very short and very long timescales due to the changing intervening IISM.

  4. ANTENNA OF RADIO CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Ilnytskyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to current issues in the field of radio monitoring. In this article was considered the antenna of radio control, which represents a grid from three vibrators. Threelement antenna array provides simultaneous control of two radio electronic devices that radiates at frequencies that are close to each other. Antenna system using simple technical means provides noise suppression, even if noise will have the same frequency as useful signal. This makes it possible to use the antenna system in conditions of multibeam wave propagation under the adjustment on the most intense by the power beam. Antenna system makes it possible to measure the electromagnetic field intensity, congestion of the frequency spectrum, direction of noise electromagnetic waves incidence, noise electric field intensity.

  5. Features of the Electromagnetic and Plasma Disturbances Induced at the Altitudes of the Earth's Outer Ionosphere by Modification of the Ionospheric F 2 Region Using High-Power Radio Waves Radiated by the SURA Heating Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, V. L.; Rapoport, V. O.; Schorokhova, E. A.; Belov, A. S.; Parrot, M.; Rauch, J.-L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we systematize the results of studying the characteristics of the plasma-density ducts, which was conducted in 2005-2010 during the DEMETER-satellite operation. The ducts are formed at altitudes of about 700 km as a result of the ionospheric F 2 region modification by high-power high-frequency radio waves radiated by the midlatitude SURA heating facility. All the performed measurements are used as the basis for determining the formation conditions for such ducts, the duct characteristics are studied, and the opportunities for the duct influence on the ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and propagation of radio waves of various frequency ranges are demonstrated. The results of numerical simulation of the formation of such ducts are presented.

  6. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  7. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  8. Design and multiphysics analysis of a 176 MHz continuous-wave radio-frequency quadrupole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kutsaev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new design for a 176 MHz cw radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ for the SARAF upgrade project. At this frequency, the proposed design is a conventional four-vane structure. The main design goals are to provide the highest possible shunt impedance while limiting the required rf power to about 120 kW for reliable cw operation, and the length to about 4 meters. If built as designed, the proposed RFQ will be the first four-vane cw RFQ built as a single cavity (no resonant coupling required that does not require π-mode stabilizing loops or dipole rods. For this, we rely on very detailed 3D simulations of all aspects of the structure and the level of machining precision achieved on the recently developed ATLAS upgrade RFQ. A full 3D model of the structure including vane modulation was developed. The design was optimized using electromagnetic and multiphysics simulations. Following the choice of the vane type and geometry, the vane undercuts were optimized to produce a flat field along the structure. The final design has good mode separation and should not need dipole rods if built as designed, but their effect was studied in the case of manufacturing errors. The tuners were also designed and optimized to tune the main mode without affecting the field flatness. Following the electromagnetic (EM design optimization, a multiphysics engineering analysis of the structure was performed. The multiphysics analysis is a coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical analysis. The cooling channels, including their paths and sizes, were optimized based on the limiting temperature and deformation requirements. The frequency sensitivity to the RFQ body and vane cooling water temperatures was carefully studied in order to use it for frequency fine-tuning. Finally, an inductive rf power coupler design based on the ATLAS RFQ coupler was developed and simulated. The EM design optimization was performed using cst Microwave Studio and the results

  9. Nature of microstructure in pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Machabeli, G Z; Melikidze, G I; Shapakidze, D; Machabeli, George; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Shapakidze, David

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for microstructure in pulsar radio emission. We propose that micropulses result from the alteration of the radio wave generation region by nearly transverse drift waves propagating across the pulsar magnetic field and encircling the bundle of the open magnetic field lines. It is demonstrated that such waves can modify significantly curvature of these dipolar field lines. This in turn affects strongly fulfillment of the resonance conditions necessary for the excitation of radio waves. The time-scale of micropulses is therefore determined by the wavelength of drift waves. Main features of the microstructure are naturally explained in the frame of this model.

  10. Drilling Systems for Extraterrestrial Subsurface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Brennan, M.; Briggs, G.; Cooper, G.; Davis, K.; Dolgin, B.; Glaser, D.; Glass, B.; Gorevan, S.; Guerrero, J.; McKay, C.; Paulsen, G.; Stanley, S.; Stoker, C.

    2008-06-01

    Drilling consists of 2 processes: breaking the formation with a bit and removing the drilled cuttings. In rotary drilling, rotational speed and weight on bit are used to control drilling, and the optimization of these parameters can markedly improve drilling performance. Although fluids are used for cuttings removal in terrestrial drilling, most planetary drilling systems conduct dry drilling with an auger. Chip removal via water-ice sublimation (when excavating water-ice bound formations at pressure below the triple point of water) and pneumatic systems are also possible. Pneumatic systems use the gas or vaporization products of a high-density liquid brought from Earth, gas provided by an in situ compressor, or combustion products of a monopropellant. Drill bits can be divided into coring bits, which excavate an annular shaped hole, and full-faced bits. While cylindrical cores are generally superior as scientific samples, and coring drills have better performance characteristics, full-faced bits are simpler systems because the handling of a core requires a very complex robotic mechanism. The greatest constraints to extraterrestrial drilling are (1) the extreme environmental conditions, such as temperature, dust, and pressure; (2) the light-time communications delay, which necessitates highly autonomous systems; and (3) the mission and science constraints, such as mass and power budgets and the types of drilled samples needed for scientific analysis. A classification scheme based on drilling depth is proposed. Each of the 4 depth categories (surface drills, 1-meter class drills, 10-meter class drills, and deep drills) has distinct technological profiles and scientific ramifications.

  11. The Extraterrestrial Life Debate from Antiquity to 1900

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Michael J.; Dowd, Matthew F.

    This chapter provides an overview of the Western historical debate regarding extraterrestrial life from antiquity to the beginning of the twentieth century. Though schools of thought in antiquity differed on whether extraterrestrial life existed, by the Middle Ages, the Aristotelian worldview of a unified, finite cosmos without extraterrestrials was most influential, though there were such dissenters as Nicholas of Cusa. That would change as the Copernican revolution progressed. Scholars such as Bruno, Kepler, Galileo, and Descartes would argue for a Copernican system of a moving Earth. Cartesian and Newtonian physics would eventually lead to a view of the universe in which the Earth was one of many planets in one of many solar systems extended in space. As this cosmological model was developing, so too were notions of extraterrestrial life. Popular and scientific writings, such as those by Fontenelle and Huygens, led to a reversal of fortunes for extraterrestrials, who by the end of the century were gaining recognition. From 1700 to 1800, many leading thinkers discussed extraterrestrial intelligent beings. In doing so, they relied heavily on arguments from analogy and such broad principles and ideas as the Copernican Principle, the Principle of Plenitude, and the Great Chain of Being. Physical evidence for the existence of extraterrestrials was minimal, and was always indirect, such as the sighting of polar caps on Mars, suggesting similarities between Earth and other places in the universe. Nonetheless, the eighteenth century saw writers from a wide variety of genres—science, philosophy, theology, literature—speculate widely on extraterrestrials. In the latter half of the century, increasing research in stellar astronomy would be carried out, heavily overlapping with an interest in extraterrestrial life. By the end of the eighteenth century, belief in intelligent beings on solar system planets was nearly universal and certainly more common than it would be by

  12. Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Zaitsev, A

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the entire history of terrestrial civilization, only four projects involving transmitting of interstellar radio messages (IRMs) have yet been fully developed and realized. Nevertheless, we should understand a simple thing -- if all civilizations in the Universe are only recipients, and not message-sending civilizations, than no SETI searches make any sense. We present the theory and methodology of composing and transmitting of future IRMs.

  13. The Scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence: a Sociological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romesberg, Daniel Ray

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, as it has been conducted by scientists over the past century. The following questions are explored: (1) What are the historical patterns of American scientific interest in extraterrestrial intelligence? From a sociology of science perspective, how can these patterns of interest be explained? (2) Who are the most prominent scientists involved in SETI? What are their academic backgrounds? (3) How has the rather exotic idea of extraterrestrial intelligence managed to penetrate the realm of respectable science?. In order to measure the historical fluctuations of scientific interest in extraterrestrial intelligence, a frequency distribution of relevant articles published in American scientific journals over the past century has been constructed. The core scholars of the "extraterrestrial" field have been determined via citation analysis, in a selected portion of the scientific literature. An analysis of recent scientific literature on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has revealed a number of tactics of legitimation and de-legitimation used by SETI proponents, as well as opponents. This study has generated the following findings: (1) Historically, there are three factors which tend to stimulate general scientific interest in extraterrestrial intelligence: First, the strong demonstration of the plausibility of extraterrestrial intelligence, or life, especially in a tangible, and therefore studiable location. Scientific laboratories are primary agents of plausibility here. Second, the organized political activity of SETI scientists. Third, the availability of government funding for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence, or life. (2) Statistically, the leading scholars of modern SETI are Sagan, Drake and Morrison. The field itself tends to be dominated by astronomers and physicists. (3) Because SETI has no concrete data, and is easily stigmatized as an illegitimate scientific activity

  14. Analysis on Radio Wave Refractive Error Correction for Ship-borne Equipment%船载雷达电波折射修正方法误差影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉芬; 朱伟康; 戴正旭; 薛国虎; 徐先春

    2012-01-01

    The Gaussian quadrature method based on atmospheric sphere sublayer model used by TT&C ship is accurate, but it is too complex to be used in real - time calculation. To satisfy radio wave refractive correction accuracy requirements under the mode of high -precision TT&C, a new radio wave refractive correction method is proposed, which can calculate the range refractive error by multiplying zenith path delay and elevation formula. This method solves the problem that radio wave refractive correction accuracy is unsatisfied with real - time calculation, which can be used for space tracking ship' s data processing as needed.%为满足测量船高精度测控模式下对电波折射修正精度的需求,针对测量船采用的高斯分层积分法具有较高精度、但存在计算复杂且不具有实时性的缺陷,提出了一种电波折射误差修正的新方法,将距离折射表示成天顶距离误差和仰角因子的函数关系,解决了测量船实时电波折射误差修正精度差的问题,满足了测量船数据处理的精度需求。

  15. Science, religion, and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, David

    2013-01-01

    If the discovery of life elsewhere in the universe is just around the corner, what would be the consequences for religion? Would it represent another major conflict between science and religion, even leading to the death of faith? Some would suggest that the discovery of any suggestion of extraterrestrial life would have a greater impact than even the Copernican and Darwinian revolutions. It is now over 50 years since the first modern scientific papers were published on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). Yet the religious implications of this search and possible discovery have never been systematically addressed in the scientific or theological arena. SETI is now entering its most important era of scientific development. New observation techniques are leading to the discovery of extra-solar planets daily, and the Kepler mission has already collected over 1000 planetary candidates. This deluge of data is transforming the scientific and popular view of the existence of extraterrestrial intel...

  16. Remote sensing of mesospheric dust layers using active modulation of PMWE by high-power radio-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Zhang, X.; Cohen, M.; Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W.; Kosch, M. J.; M Farahani, M.; Mohebalhojeh, A.

    2016-12-01

    So-called polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are radar echoes observed during winter at altitudes around 50-80 km and are much weaker than their PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes) counterpart. Unlike PMSE, PMWE are less studied and understood. Breaking of gravity waves and the associated turbulence are proposed as the major source for PMWE echoes. The action of neutral turbulence alone does not appear to give a good explanation for PMWE. PMWE is also attributed to Bragg scatter from electron irregularities which result from charging of free electrons onto sub-visible particles. The temporal behavior of PMWE response to HF pump heating can be employed to diagnose the charged dust layer. Specifically, the rise and fall time of radar echo strength as well as relaxation and recovery time after heater turn-on and off are distinct parameters that are a function of radar frequency. This work presents the first study of the modulation of PMWE by artificial radiowave heating using computational modeling and experimental observation in different radar frequency bands. Variation of dust plasma parameters associated with PMWE such as dust radius, dust density, recombination rate, electron- and dust-neutral collision frequencies, photo-detachment current and electron temperature enhancement ratio are included. Computational results derived from different sets of parameters are considered and compared with recent observations at EISCAT using 224 MHz and 56 MHz radars. The agreement between the model results and the observations show the high potential of remote sensing of dust and plasma parameters associated with PMWE. Measurement of Te/Ti using ISR and simultaneous observations in two frequency bands may lead to a more accurate estimation of dust density and radius. The enhancement of backscattered signal in the HF band during PMWE heating is predicted for the first time. The required background dust-plasma parameters as well as heater power (Te/Ti) for the observation

  17. Software Design for Refraction Correction of Radio Wave Based on Estimation of Geoclimatic Parameters%基于地面参数预测的电波折射修正软件设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨豪强; 史水娥

    2012-01-01

    受大气折射效应的影响,电渡传播路径发生弯曲,传播速度小于光速,给无线电定位系统带来了一定的误差,因此需利用电波折射误差计算软件进行修正.首先通过对常用大气折射误差修正方法的分析,结合实际应用需求,选取了基于地面参数预测的电波折射修正模型.然后进行折射软件修正算法设计,给出了流程图及主要功能实现方法.最后通过模拟数据对该软件修正效果进行检验.结果表明,该软件能够准确、快速显示大气引起的电波折射误差,且能够将误差控制在1%以内.%Propagation path of radio wave curves due to the effect of atmospheric refraction, thus its velocity is less than light and a certain error is seen in the system of radio wave positioning. Therefore, software for refraction correction of radio wave is needed. Model for refraction correction of radio wave based on estimation of geoclimatic parameters is discussed first following the analysis of several methods of atmospheric refraction correction that are in common use and in the demands of practice application. Then the design of algorithm of refraction correction software is given with the flow chart and the methods for realizing its main functions. Finally? a correction experiment is carried out based on tentative data to verify the efficiency of the software. The result shows that the software responses accurately and rapidly to the refraction of radio wave and the error is confined to 1%.

  18. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  19. A Probe of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling using Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Signal from North-West Cape (Australia) to Kolkata (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    Very low frequency (VLF) radio waves has been employed for the detection and study of various terrestrial and extra-terrestrial high energy phenomena such as solar flares, solar eclipse, gamma ray burst, lightning induced electron precipitation etc., and the subsequent variations in the lower ionosphere driven by these events. In this study, we exploit the propagation characteristics of VLF signal through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, to probe changes in ionospheric signatures, induced by solar driven variations in magnetospheric conditions. Our study is based on the VLF signal (amplitude and phase) received at the Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre (IERC), Sitapur, under Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP), which is transmitted by the Australian NWC station at about 19.8kHz.

  20. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  1. An Opportunistic Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, S. J.; Tremblay, C.; Walsh, A.; Urquhart, R.

    2016-08-01

    A spectral line image cube generated from 115 minutes of MWA data that covers a field of view of 400 sq, deg. around the Galactic Center is used to perform the first Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Our work constitutes the first modern SETI experiment at low radio frequencies, here between 103 and 133 MHz, paving the way for large-scale searches with the MWA and, in the future, the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array. Limits of a few hundred mJy beam-1 for narrowband emission (10 kHz) are derived from our data, across our 400 sq. deg. field of view. Within this field, 45 exoplanets in 38 planetary systems are known. We extract spectra at the locations of these systems from our image cube to place limits on the presence of narrow line emission from these systems. We then derive minimum isotropic transmitter powers for these exoplanets; a small handful of the closest objects (10 s of pc) yield our best limits of order 1014 W (Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power). These limits lie above the highest power directional transmitters near these frequencies currently operational on Earth. A SETI experiment with the MWA covering the full accessible sky and its full frequency range would require approximately one month of observing time. The MWA frequency range, its southern hemisphere location on an extraordinarily radio quiet site, its very large field of view, and its high sensitivity make it a unique facility for SETI.

  2. Liberty and the Limits to the Extraterrestrial State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.

    The physical conditions that inhere in extraterrestrial environments have a tendency to drive society toward collectivist mechanisms of political and economic order to successfully cope with, and prevent possible disaster caused by, the lethal external conditions. Liberty will therefore be eroded by deliberate human action, through extraterrestrial authorities, and through a natural restriction in concepts of liberty that will attend the development and behaviour of people in confined environments. The emergence of extraterrestrial governance that nurtures liberty in outer space will require the formation of many institutions that encourage competition and reduce political and economic monopolies - with the legal system to sustain them. This problem is most clearly manifest in oxygen production. These considerations allow the purpose and limits of the extraterrestrial state and precursor forms of governance to be circumscribed. Far from being a purely speculative enquiry, this discussion allows requirements in physical architecture and social organisation to be identified that can be considered from the earliest stages of space exploration and settlement.

  3. Radio archive

    OpenAIRE

    Street, Sean

    2008-01-01

    The Centre for Broadcasting History Research, in association with the\\ud British Universities Film and Video Council, is developing an online\\ud audio archive of UK commercial radio, from 1973 to 1992. Work produced\\ud before the Broadcasting Act 1990 represents a different ethos to the role\\ud commercial radio played, and subsequently,continues to play, in the UK.\\ud The change in commercial radio since this period is extraordinary. It is\\ud impossible for the young student of radio, born si...

  4. Galactic radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    This book is a concise primer on galactic radio astronomy for undergraduate and graduate students, and provides wide coverage of galactic astronomy and astrophysics such as the physics of interstellar matter and the dynamics and structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and galaxies. Radio astronomy and its technological development have led to significant progress in galactic astronomy and contributed to understanding interstellar matter and galactic structures. The book begins with the fundamental physics of radio-wave radiation, i.e., black body radiation, thermal emission, synchrotron radiation, and HI and molecular line emissions. The author then gives overviews of ingredients of galactic physics, including interstellar matter such as the neutral (HI), molecular hydrogen, and ionized gases, as well as magnetic fields in galaxies. In addition, more advanced topics relevant to the Galaxy and galaxies are also contained here: star formation, supernova remnants, the Galactic Center and black holes, galactic dynamics...

  5. The Gˆ Mid-Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Power Supplies: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, M. S.; Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R.; Sigurdsson, S.; Maldonado, J. T.; Mullan, B.

    2014-03-01

    We present initial results from the Glimpsing Heat from Alien Technologies ("G-HAT" or Gˆ), in which we use the WISE all-sky mid-infrared (MIR) Source Catalog to search for and place constraints on the abundance of extraterrestrial civilizations with large power supplies. A civilization consuming a significant fraction of the luminous power of their host star (Kardashev type II civilization or K2; Kardashev 1964) or galaxy (K3) and operating at a temperature similar to the equilibrium temperatures in or near stellar habitable zones will produce MIR excess emission in the form of waste heat. Searches for such MIR excesses from K2s have been performed in the past, notably by Carrigan (2009) using the IRAS source catalog. Taking advantage of the 103 improvement in sensitivity over IRAS provided by WISE, Gˆ has enabled the first systematic search for waste heat from galaxy-spanning K3 civilizations and will search for K2s throughout a significant fraction of the Milky Way's volume. We find that a galaxy-spanning (K III) civilization with an power supply of more than about one percent of its stellar luminosity will have detectable mid-infrared excess. We have produced a catalog of 32,000 WISE extended sources and visually reviewed the data and literature on the reddest 4000 of them, identifying several hundred candidates worthy of detailed observational follow-up. Mid-infrared spectra, far-infrared photometry, and radio emission from CO could be used to distinguish extraterrestrial mid-infrared radiation from dust. We will extend this analysis to WISE point sources to search for K2s.

  6. In the search for extraterrestrial life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study of stellar, planetary and galactic evolution leads to the conclusion that the phenomenon of life must be coursing through the universe. It is estimated, by means of telescopic sampling, that there are billions of stars capable of having those photochemical reactions necessary for the origin of life. One approach in the search for other life would be to deploy men and instruments in spacecraft. Radio contact with other civilizations is another approach. Finally, the question might be approached by considering life as an inevitable consequence of the evolution of matter. A survey of Martian characteristics shows the possibility of life there to be dubious. The possibility of life in other parts of the galaxy is supported by a fundamental conclusion of living matter that all organisms have a common chemical ancestry. The experiment of Urey and Miller, wherein four amino acids were obtained by subjecting a mixture of methane, ammonia, and water to an electric arc, is believed to duplicate the initial organic syntheses which led to the emergence of life on earth.

  7. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This 6th edition of “Tools of Radio Astronomy”, the most used introductory text in radio astronomy, has been revised to reflect the current state of this important branch of astronomy. This includes the use of satellites, low radio frequencies, the millimeter/sub-mm universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background and the increased importance of mm/sub-mm dust emission. Several derivations and presentations of technical aspects of radio astronomy and receivers, such as receiver noise, the Hertz dipole and  beam forming have been updated, expanded, re-worked or complemented by alternative derivations. These reflect advances in technology. The wider bandwidths of the Jansky-VLA and long wave arrays such as LOFAR and mm/sub-mm arrays such as ALMA required an expansion of the discussion of interferometers and aperture synthesis. Developments in data reduction algorithms have been included. As a result of the large amount of data collected in the past 20 years, the discussion of solar system radio astronomy, dust em...

  8. Radio and line transmission 2

    CERN Document Server

    Roddy, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Radio and Line Transmission, Volume 2 gives a detailed treatment of the subject as well as an introduction to additional advanced subject matter. Organized into 14 chapters, this book begins by explaining the radio wave propagation, signal frequencies, and bandwidth. Subsequent chapters describe the transmission lines and cables; the aerials; tuned and coupled circuits; bipolar transistor amplifiers; field-effect transistors and circuits; thermionic valve amplifiers; LC oscillators; the diode detectors and modulators; and the superheterodyne receiver. Other chapters explore noise and interfere

  9. On the potential of seismic rotational motion measurements for extraterrestrial seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Sollberger, David; Khan, Amir; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Van Renterghem, Cederic; Robertsson, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Classically, seismological recordings consist of measurements of translational ground motion only. However, in addition to three vector components of translation there are three components of rotation to consider, leading to six degrees of freedom. Of particular interest is thereby the fact that measuring rotational motion means isolating shear (S) waves. Recording the rotational motion requires dedicated rotational sensors. Alternatively, since the rotational motion is given by the curl of the vectorial displacements, the rotational motion around the two horizontal axes can be computed from the horizontal spatial gradients of vertical translational recordings if standard translational seismometers are placed in an areal array at the free surface. This follows from the zero stress free surface condition. Combining rotational and translational motion measurements opens up new ways of analyzing seismic data, such as facilitating much improved arrival identification and wavefield separation (e.g., P-/S-wave separation), and local slowness (arrival direction and velocity) determination. Such combined measurements maximize the seismic information content that a single six-component station or a small station array can provide, and are of particular interest for sparse or single-station measurements such as in extraterrestrial seismology. We demonstrate the value of the analysis of combined translational and rotational recordings by re-evaluating data from the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE). The LSPE setup consisted of four vertical-component geophones arranged in a star-like geometry. This areal receiver layout enables computing the horizontal spatial gradients by spatial finite differencing of the vertical-component data for two perpendicular directions and, hence, the estimation of rotational motion around two horizontal axes. Specifically, the recorded seismic waveform data originated from eight explosive packages as well as from continuously

  10. K. C. Yeh: Radio Science Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in satellite technology and computer science have had the greatest impact on radio science in the last quarter century, according to Kung Chie Yeh, the new editor of Radio Science. Yeh, whose term began July 1 (Eos, April 12, 1983, p. 137, February 22, 1983, p. 73), is a professor in the electrical engineering department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.An international authority on ionospheric radio physics, Yeh also is known for his work on trans-ionospheric radio wave propagation as it affects earth-space communications and satellite navigation. Hehas been studying radio science for nearly 30 years.

  11. Radio Eska Lodz, Commercial Radio As a Local Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Szews, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses aspects of network-based local radio using the example of Radio Eska Lodz. The author responds to questions about whether a commercial network radio station can fulfill the functions of local radio and on what this locality is actually based. In this respect, Radio Eska Lodz is characterized as part of the most popular commercial radio network in Poland. The introduction focuses on the process of transformation that local radio stations are undergoing, along with its gen...

  12. The Problem of Extraterrestrial Civilizations and Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    The problem of extraterrestrial intelligence is the best example of multidisciplinary science. Here philosophy and religion, astronomy, radiophysics, spectrography, space flights and astronautics, geology and planetology, astroecology, chemistry and biology, history and archaeology, psychology, sociology, linguistics, diplomacy, UFOs and peculiar phenomena are involved. Among these many-sided studies, astronomers have probably displayed the most progress by discovering thousands of extrasolar planets. At present, a number of search programs are being accomplished, including those with space telescopes, and planets in so-called "habitable zone" are considered as most important ones, for which various orbital and physical parameters are being calculated. As the discovery of extraterrestrial life is the final goal, a special attention is given to Earth-like planets, for the discovery of which most sensitive technical means are necessary.

  13. Philosophical issues in the search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jean

    2013-07-01

    In the search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence, it is essential to clarify what is to be meant by `life' and `intelligence'. I first analyse what it means to `define' these words. I will show that some philosophical prejudice is unavoidable. As a working hypothesis, I consider two types of philosophy: `natural philosophy', seeking for some essence of things, and `critical (or analytical) philosophy', devoted to the analysis of the procedures by which we claim to construct a reality. An extension of critical philosophy, epistemo-analysis (i.e. the psycho-analysis of concepts) is presented and applied to the definition of exolife and to extraterrestrial `intelligence'. Some pragmatic conclusions are finally drawn for future search strategies.

  14. Scattering and Depolarization of Electromagnetic Waves--Full Wave Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Analysis," Proceedings of the International Union of Radio Science URSI Conference at Ciudad Universitaria , Madrid, August 1983, in press. . . 13...rough land and seat3 J. The full wave approach was also used to determine the scattering and depolarization of radio waves in irregular spheroidal struc...Full Wave Solutions," Radio Science, Vol. 17, No. 5, September-October 1982, pp. 1055-1066. 4. "Scattering and Depolarization by Rough Surfaces: Full

  15. Extrasolar Asteroid Mining as Forensic Evidence for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Forgan, Duncan; Elvis, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The development of civilisations like ours into spacefaring, multi-planet entities requires significant raw materials to construct vehicles and habitats. Interplanetary debris, including asteroids and comets, may provide such a source of raw materials. In this article we present the hypothesis that extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) engaged in asteroid mining may be detectable from Earth. Considering the detected disc of debris around Vega as a template, we explore the observational signat...

  16. HYDROGEN-OXYGEN PRIMARY EXTRATERRESTRIAL (HOPE) FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The HOPE (Hydrogen-Oxygen Primary Extraterrestrial) Fuel Cell Program is a multi-phase effort to advance the state-of-the-art of fuel cells by...configuration fuel cell module. The HOPE spacecraft, fuel supply tanks, pneumatics, and thermal systems were designed and fabricated to provide...verify water removal, thermal design, and 30-day shelf-life of the fuel cell . The 35-cell module was subjected to a series of performance tests

  17. Information theory, animal communication, and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Laurance R.; McCowan, Brenda; Johnston, Simon; Hanser, Sean F.

    2011-02-01

    We present ongoing research in the application of information theory to animal communication systems with the goal of developing additional detectors and estimators for possible extraterrestrial intelligent signals. Regardless of the species, for intelligence (i.e., complex knowledge) to be transmitted certain rules of information theory must still be obeyed. We demonstrate some preliminary results of applying information theory to socially complex marine mammal species (bottlenose dolphins and humpback whales) as well as arboreal squirrel monkeys, because they almost exclusively rely on vocal signals for their communications, producing signals which can be readily characterized by signal analysis. Metrics such as Zipf's Law and higher-order information-entropic structure are emerging as indicators of the communicative complexity characteristic of an "intelligent message" content within these animals' signals, perhaps not surprising given these species' social complexity. In addition to human languages, for comparison we also apply these metrics to pulsar signals—perhaps (arguably) the most "organized" of stellar systems—as an example of astrophysical systems that would have to be distinguished from an extraterrestrial intelligence message by such information theoretic filters. We also look at a message transmitted from Earth (Arecibo Observatory) that contains a lot of meaning but little information in the mathematical sense we define it here. We conclude that the study of non-human communication systems on our own planet can make a valuable contribution to the detection of extraterrestrial intelligence by providing quantitative general measures of communicative complexity. Studying the complex communication systems of other intelligent species on our own planet may also be one of the best ways to deprovincialize our thinking about extraterrestrial communication systems in general.

  18. Radio-quiet Fast Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shocks in the interplanetary medium that produce type II radio emission. These CMEs are faster and wider on the average, than the general population of CMEs. However, when we start from fast (speed > 900 km/s) and wide (angular width > 60 degrees), more than half of them are not associated with radio bursts. In order to understand why these CMEs are radio quiet, we collected all the fast and wide (FW) CMEs detected by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and isolated those without associated type II radio bursts. The radio bursts were identified in the dynamic spectra of the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) Experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We also checked the list against metric type II radio bursts reported in Solar Geophysical Data and isolated those without any radio emission. This exercise resulted in about 140 radio-quiet FW CMEs. We identified the source regions of these CMEs using the Solar Geophysical Data listings, cross-checked against the eruption regions in the SOHO/EIT movies. We explored a number of possibilities for the radio-quietness: (i) Source region being too far behind the limb, (ii) flare size, (iii) brightness of the CME, and (iv) the density of the ambient medium. We suggest that a combination of CME energy and the Alfven speed profile of the ambient medium is primarily responsible for the radio-quietness of these FW CMEs.

  19. Need a Classroom Stimulus? Introduce Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Silently, invisibly, ceaselessly, our planet Earth is showered by radio waves from every direction and from every region of space. This radio energy originates in our solar system, throughout the Milky Way galaxy, and far beyond, out to the remotest reaches of the universe. Detecting and unraveling the origins of these invisible signals is what…

  20. An Opportunistic Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Tingay, S J; Walsh, A; Urquhart, R

    2016-01-01

    A spectral line image cube generated from 115 minutes of MWA data that covers a field of view of 400 sq. deg. around the Galactic Centre is used to perform the first Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array. Our work constitutes the first modern SETI experiment at low radio frequencies, here between 103 and 133 MHz, paving the way for large-scale searches with the MWA and, in the future, the low frequency Square Kilometre Array. Limits of a few hundred mJy/beam for narrow band emission (10 kHz) are derived from our data, across our 400 sq. deg. field of view. Within this field, 45 exoplanets in 38 planetary systems are known. We extract spectra at the locations of these systems from our image cube, to place limits on the presence of narrow line emission from these systems. We then derive minimum isotropic transmitter powers for these exoplanets; a small handful of the closest objects (10s of pc) yield our best limits of order $10^{14}$ W (Equivalent Isotropic Radiated...

  1. CURIE: Cubesat Radio Interferometry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundkvist, D. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H. M.; Bale, S. D.; Bonnell, J. W.; Hurford, G. J.; Maruca, B.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Pulupa, M.

    2016-12-01

    The CUbesat Radio Interferometry Experiment (CURIE) is a proposed two-element radio interferometer, based on proven and developed digital radio receivers and designed to fit within a Cubesat platform. CURIE will launch as a 6U Cubesat and then separate into two 3U Cubesats once in orbit. CURIE measures radio waves from 0.1-19MHz, which must be measured from space, as those frequencies fall below the cutoff imposed by Earth's ionosphere. The principal science objective for CURIE is to use radio interferometry to study radio burst emissions from solar eruptive events such as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the inner heliosphere, providing observations important for our understanding of the heliospheric space weather environment. The influence of space weather can be felt at Earth and other planets, as radiation levels increase and lead to auroral activity and geomagnetic effects. CURIE will be able to determine the location and size of radio burst source regions and then to track their movement outward from the Sun. In addition to the primary objective CURIE will measure the gradients of the local ionospheric density and electron temperature on the spatial scale of a few kilometers, as well as create an improved map of the radio sky at these unexplored frequencies. A space based radio interferometry observatory has long been envisioned, in orbit around the Earth or the Moon, or on the far side of the Moon. Beyond its important science objectives, CURIE will prove that the concept of a dedicated space-based interferometer can be realized by using relatively cheap Cubesats. CURIE will therefore not only provide new important science results but also serve as a pathfinder in the development of new space-based radio observation techniques for helio- and astro-physics.

  2. Radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Alder, Berni

    1975-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 14: Radio Astronomy is devoted to the role of the digital computer both as a control device and as a calculator in addressing problems related to galactic radio noise. This volume contains four chapters and begins with a technical description of the hardware and the special data-handling problems of using radioheliography, with an emphasis on a selection of observational results obtained with the Culgoora radioheliograph and their significance to solar physics and to astrophysics in general. The subsequent chapter examines interstellar dispersion, i

  3. INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and…

  4. A Simple Radio Receiver Aids Understanding of Wireless Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, S.; Orlando, A.

    2012-01-01

    The basic theory of radio broadcasting is discussed from an experimental point of view. First, concepts like wave modulation and tuning are explained with the use of instruments in the physics laboratory. Then, a very basic radio receiver is described and assembled, whose most important feature, like in the old "crystal radios", is the absence of…

  5. Cultural aspects of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, J.

    SETI is an acronym which stands for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. The NASA SETI High Resolution Microwave Survey Project is a new and comprehensive search for evidence of microwave signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. It will formally begin on October 12, 1992, and last to the end of the century. The discovery of another form of intelligent life would be an important milestone for our civilization. In addition to the new scientific knowledge that we might acquire on the chemistry, physiology, behavior and evolutionary history of extraterrestrial life forms, we may also learn of the cultural achievements of another civilization, or indeed of many other civilizations. It is likely that the society that we detect will be much in advance of our own, so that they may long ago have passed through the evolutionary stage we are at now. The implications of such a discovery would have important consequences for our own future. This paper presents an analysis of some of the important areas which will require study as we approach the beginning of the NASA search. There are significant questions about the ease or difficulty of incorporating the new knowledge into the belief structures of different religions. Sociological and educational changes over time may equal or exceed those of the Copernican revolution. The status of the other civilization relative to ours is a challenging question for international space law. There are institutional and international questions on who will represent Earth in any future interstellar communication endeavors that we may attempt. There may be challenges in how we absorb the knowledge of an advanced technology. In political science we may have much to learn from their history, and what influence it may have on our own future. Last but not least, there is the effect of the discovery on individual and group psychology. These are the cultural aspects of SETI. Each area warrants further study, and recommendations are made

  6. Investigation of Supercritical Water Phenomena for Space and Extraterrestrial Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Fisher, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The cost of carrying or resupplying life support resources for long duration manned space exploration missions such as a mission to Mars is prohibitive and requires the development of suitable recycling technologies. Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) has been identified as an attractive candidate for these extended missions because (i) pre-drying of wet waste streams is not required, (ii) product streams are relatively benign, microbially inert, and easily reclaimed, (iii) waste conversion is complete and relatively fast, and (iv) with proper design and operation, reactions can be self-sustaining. Initial work in this area at NASA was carried out at the Ames Research Center in the 1990 s with a focus on understanding the linkages between feed stock preparation (i.e., particle size and distribution) of cellulosic based waste streams and destruction rates under a range of operating temperatures and pressures. More recently, work in SCWO research for space and extra-terrestrial application has been performed at NASA s Glenn Research Center where various investigations, with a particular focus in the gravitational effects on the thermo-physical processes occurring in the bulk medium, have been pursued. In 2010 a collaborative NASA/CNES (the French Space Agency) experiment on the critical transition of pure water was conducted in the long duration microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS). A follow-on experiment, to study the precipitation of salt in sub-critical, trans-critical and supercritical water is scheduled to be conducted on the ISS in 2013. This paper provides a brief history of NASA s earlier work in SCWO, discusses the potential for application of SCWO technology in extended space and extraterrestrial missions, describes related research conducted on the ISS, and provides a list of future research activities to advance this technology in both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial applications.

  7. The Role of Extraterrestrial Materials in the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been well established for some time now that C-rich organic materials are relatively common in a number of environments in space. This is known through the telescopic detection of these materials using spectroscopy techniques in the infrared and sub-millimeter wavelength ranges and through the identification of organics in extraterrestrial materials. Extraterrestrial materials in which organics have been found include collected meteorites and interplanetary dust particles, and samples returned by NASA spacecraft from comets. These organics are produced by a variety of astrochemical processes. Despite their abiotic origins, these organic materials of are considerable interest to astrobiology for several reasons. First, organic materials of any composition are important as a means of delivering the elements C, H, O, and N to the surfaces of newly formed planets, and these elements are likely critical to the origin and subsequent evolution of life (certainly for life as we know it). In addition, it is clear that at least a portion of the organics found in space are in the form of molecules that play important roles in modern biology - for example, molecules like amino acids, amphiphiles, quinones, etc. Thus, the delivery of extraterrestrial organics to planetary surfaces brings not only bulk C, H, O, and N, but also molecular complexity in forms that are potentially useful for the origin and early evolution of life. This suggests that the production and delivery of cosmic organic compounds may have played key roles in the origin of life on Earth and, by extension, on other planets in the universe.

  8. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  9. The Recognition of Extraterrestrial Intelligence - Are Humans up to it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, D.

    SETI strategies tend to overlook the uncertain nature of intelligence. How can we search for intelligence when we do not really know what it is? This paper explores the nature of intelligence and tries to identify its essence. It questions the validity of the human model of intelligence that is used to measure intelligence in terrestrial animals and underpins SETI projects. It concludes that we may only be able to recognise intelligence in an extraterrestrial animal from its behaviour and proposes several patterns of behaviour that could be used.

  10. Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions: Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret S. (Editor); Johnson, James E. (Editor); Spry, James A. (Editor); Siegel, Bette; Conley, Catharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This report on Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions summarizes the presentations, deliberations and findings of a workshop at NASA Ames Research Center, March 24-26, 2015, which was attended by more than 100 participants representing a diverse mix of science, engineering, technology, and policy areas. The main objective of the three-day workshop was to identify specific knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to make incremental progress towards the development of NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for Planetary Protection during human missions to Mars.

  11. Digitale radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst, Roel; Zondervan, L.

    2007-01-01

    Als eerste in Europa heeft Nederland begin december 2006 de omschakeling van analoge naar digitale ethertelevisie gemaakt. Voor de analoge FM-radio is er ook een digitale variant, T-DAB. T-DAB staat voor 'Terrestrial Digital Audio Broadcasting'. Dit artikel gaat verder in op deze techniek en de veld

  12. 双源正弦波对某无线电引信的辐照效应预测方法%Prediction Method of Irradiation Effects of Dual Sine Waves on Certain Radio Fuze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国梁; 魏光辉; 卢新福; 潘晓东; 刘东平

    2014-01-01

    以某连续波多普勒无线电引信为受试设备,在电波暗室内,分别开展了单源和双源正弦连续波对引信的电磁辐照实验。实验结果表明:在双源正弦连续波辐照下可以得到一系列引信的临界发火场强组合,场强组合并不呈现规律性,且2个正弦连续波的差频不同,其场强组合的总场强相差很大,因此不能直接通过单源正弦连续波的临界发火场强曲线对双源正弦连续波的辐照效应做预测。通过对实验结果进行对比分析,提出了双源正弦连续波的电磁辐照效应预测方法,验证结果显示该预测方法具有较高的准确性。%A continuous wave Doppler radio fuze is taken as equipment under test,a single source contin-uous sine wave and dual continuous sine waves electromagnetic irradiation experiments are conducted on fuze in EMC anechoic room.The results indicate that a series of critical firing field intensity combination are obtained under the dual sine waves’irradiation,no regularity is found from the combination,when the frequency difference of two continuous sine waves differs,the total field intensity has a big difference. Therefore,the irradiation effects of dual continuous sine waves can’t be predicted through the critical fir-ing field intensity curve of the single sine continuous wave.Through comparison and analysis of the ex-perimental results,it puts forward a method to predicate the electromagnetic irradiation effects of dual sine continuous waves.The experiment indicates the prediction method has a reliable accuracy.

  13. Application of Radio Wave Penetration Method in Detecting the Cryptic Structure of Wangzhuang Coal Mine%无线电波透视法在王庄煤矿隐伏地质探测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the principle and method of radio wave penetration method Based on radio wave penetration method widely used in geological exploration. Taking 8103 working face in the South Central of Wangzhuang mine as an example, in the roadway to avoid the interference of artificial conductor arrangement Observing System. There are two geological anomalies in working face based on the detection result of inference and interpretation, 1 # anomalies is fault and sink hole affected zone away from the cut in the range of 150 ~ 350m, and 2 # is sink hole affected zone in the range of 150 ~ 350m fault.%本文基于无线电波透视法在煤矿地质勘探中的广泛应用, 介绍了无线电波透视法的基本原理及使用方法.并以8103工作面煤层地质勘探为例,在避免巷道人工导体干扰情况下布置观测系统,通过对探测结果的推断和解释,工作面存在两个地质异常区,1号异常区在距切眼150~350m范围断层和陷落柱影响区,2号异常区距切眼350~550m范围断层影响区.

  14. Anthropological Contributions to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Three recent annual conferences of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) have included symposia on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). This paper reviews these symposia, which dealt with themes associated with the overarching AAA conference themes for each year: in 2004, the SETI session addressed Anthropology, Archaeology, and Interstellar Communication: Science and the Knowledge of Distant Worlds; in 2005, it dealt with Historical Perspectives on Anthropology and SETI; and in 2006, the session examined Culture, Anthropology, and SETI. Among the topics considered in these symposia were analogues for contact with extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI), examining anthropologists’ experience in the field encountering other cultures-past and present. Similarly, the methodologies of archaeologists provide analogies for making contact with temporally distant civilizations, based on reconstructions from fragmentary information. Case studies helped make such analogies concrete in the symposia. The challenges of comprehending intelligences with different mental worlds was explored through a study of the meetings of Neanderthals and Homo sapiens, for example, while the decryption of Mayan hieroglyphics provided lessons on understanding others of own species.

  15. Funding the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with a Lottery Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Haqq-Misra, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    I propose the establishment of a SETI Lottery Bond to provide a continued source of funding for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). The SETI Lottery Bond is a fixed rate perpetual bond with a lottery at maturity, where maturity occurs only upon discovery and confirmation of extraterrestrial intelligent life. Investors in the SETI Lottery Bond purchase shares that yield a fixed rate of interest that continues indefinitely until SETI succeeds---at which point a random subset of shares will be awarded a prize from a lottery pool. SETI Lottery Bond shares also are transferable, so that investors can benefact their shares to kin or trade them in secondary markets. The total capital raised this way will provide a fund to be managed by a financial institution, with annual payments from this fund to support SETI research, pay investor interest, and contribute to the lottery fund. Such a plan could generate several to tens of millions of dollars for SETI research each year, which would help to revital...

  16. Religions and extraterrestrial life how will we deal with it?

    CERN Document Server

    Weintraub, David A

    2014-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, the debate about life on other worlds is quickly changing from the realm of speculation to the domain of hard science. Within a few years, as a consequence of the rapid discovery by astronomers of planets around other stars, astronomers very likely will have discovered clear evidence of life beyond the Earth. Such a discovery of extraterrestrial life will change everything.  Knowing the answer as to whether humanity has company in the universe will trigger one of the greatest intellectual revolutions in history, not the least of which will be a challenge for at least some terrestrial religions. Which religions will handle the discovery of extraterrestrial life with ease and which will struggle to assimilate this new knowledge about our place in the universe? Some religions as currently practiced appear to only be viable on Earth. Other religions could be practiced on distant worlds but nevertheless identify both Earth as a place and humankind as a species of singular spiritual re...

  17. Extrasolar asteroid mining as forensic evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, Duncan H.; Elvis, Martin

    2011-10-01

    The development of civilisations like ours into spacefaring, multi-planet entities requires significant raw materials to construct vehicles and habitats. Interplanetary debris, including asteroids and comets, may provide such a source of raw materials. In this article we present the hypothesis that extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) engaged in asteroid mining may be detectable from Earth. Considering the detected disc of debris around Vega as a template, we explore the observational signatures of targeted asteroid mining (TAM), such as unexplained deficits in chemical species, changes in the size distribution of debris and other thermal signatures which may be detectable in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a debris disc. We find that individual observational signatures of asteroid mining can be explained by natural phenomena, and as such they cannot provide conclusive detections of ETIs. But, it may be the case that several signatures appearing in the same system will prove harder to model without extraterrestrial involvement. Therefore signatures of TAM are not detections of ETI in their own right, but as part of "piggy-back" studies carried out in tandem with conventional debris disc research, they could provide a means of identifying unusual candidate systems for further study using other SETI techniques.

  18. Physical and Chemical Aspects of Fire Suppression in Extraterrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F.; Linteris, G. T.; Katta, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    A fire, whether in a spacecraft or in occupied spaces on extraterrestrial bases, can lead to mission termination or loss of life. While the fire-safety record of US space missions has been excellent, the advent of longer duration missions to Mars, the moon, or aboard the International Space Station (ISS) increases the likelihood of fire events, with more limited mission termination options. The fire safety program of NASA's manned space flight program is based largely upon the principles of controlling the flammability of on-board materials and greatly eliminating sources of ignition. As a result, very little research has been conducted on fire suppression in the microgravity or reduced-gravity environment. The objectives of this study are: to obtain fundamental knowledge of physical and chemical processes of fire suppression, using gravity and oxygen concentration as independent variables to simulate various extraterrestrial environments, including spacecraft and surface bases in Mars and moon missions; to provide rigorous testing of analytical models, which include comprehensive descriptions of combustion and suppression chemistry; and to provide basic research results useful for technological advances in fire safety, including the development of new fire-extinguishing agents and approaches, in the microgravity environment associated with ISS and in the partial-gravity Martian and lunar environments.

  19. The Log Log Prior for the Frequency of Extraterrestrial Intelligences

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how frequently life and intelligence arise on planets. I consider a Bayesian prior for the probability P(ETI) that intelligence evolves at a suitable site, with weight distributed evenly over ln(1 - ln P(ETI)). This log log prior can handle a very wide range of P(ETI) values, from 1 to 10^(-10^122), while remaining responsive to evidence about extraterrestrial societies. It is motivated by our uncertainty in the number of conditions that must be fulfilled for intelligence to arise, and it is related to considerations of information, entropy, and state space dimensionality. After setting a lower limit to P(ETI) from the number of possible genome sequences, I calculate a Bayesian confidence of 18% that aliens exist within the observable Universe. With different assumptions about the minimum P(ETI) and the number of times intelligence can appear on a planet, this value falls between 1.4% and 47%. Overall, the prior leans towards our being isolated from extraterrestrial intelligences, but indicates ...

  20. Radiation environment effects of amplitude modulation wave on a certain radio fuze%无线电引信调幅波电磁辐射环境效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚洲; 程二威; 费支强; 高磊

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the elecromagnetic environment effects of the amplitude modulation wave on radio fuze,the mixing theory and the output signal character of high frequency circuit are analyzed,and the problems of waveform modulate are resolved.The modulate waveform expression and the radio fuze radiation electromagnetic environment is established.The experiment is done to find out the threshold field intensity for accidental explosion and the variable rules of the radio fuze.The conclusions show that when radiation frequency is appressed with the vibration frequency,the threshold field intensity is less than 10V/m.With the frequency deviation increasing,the threshold field intensity becomes larger.The electronic components of the radio fuze is not destroyed.%为了研究调幅波对无线电引信的电磁环境效应,分析了无线电引信混频原理及高频电路输出信号特征,解决了调幅波的波形调制问题,建立了辐照调幅波的波形表达式,形成了无线电引信辐照电磁环境,探索了不同频率调幅波对引信的意外发火场强干扰阈值及其变化规律。结果表明:辐照频率在引信本振频率外一定范围内引信误炸干扰阈值低于10V/m,随着辐照频率与引信本振频率偏移量增加误炸干扰阈值呈增大趋势;调幅波辐照不会对引信电子部件产生硬损伤,也不会导致引信瞎火。

  1. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. II. CMEs, Shock Waves, and Drifting Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Chertok, I M; Slemzin, V A; Filippov, B P; Egorov, Ya I; Fainshtein, V G; Afanasyev, A N; Prestage, N P; Temmer, M

    2013-01-01

    We continue our study (Grechnev et al. (2013), doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0316-6; Paper I) on the 18 November 2003 geoffective event. To understand possible impact on geospace of coronal transients observed on that day, we investigated their properties from solar near-surface manifestations in extreme ultraviolet, LASCO white-light images, and dynamic radio spectra. We reconcile near-surface activity with the expansion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and determine their orientation relative to the earthward direction. The kinematic measurements, dynamic radio spectra, and microwave and X-ray light curves all contribute to the overall picture of the complex event and confirm an additional eruption at 08:07 - 08:20 UT close to the solar disk center presumed in Paper I. Unusual characteristics of the ejection appear to match those expected for a source of the 20 November superstorm but make its detection in LASCO images hopeless. On the other hand, none of the CMEs observed by LASCO seem to be a promising candidate...

  2. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  3. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  4. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  5. Siderophilic Cyanobacteria for the Development of Extraterrestrial Photoautotrophic Biotechnologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; McKay, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    In-situ production of consumables (mainly oxygen) using local resources (In-Situ Resource Utilization-ISRU) will significantly facilitate current plans for human exploration and settlement of the solar system, starting with the Moon. With few exceptions, nearly all technologies developed to date have employed an approach based on inorganic chemistry. None of these technologies include concepts for integrating the ISRU system with a bioregenerative life support system and a food production system. Therefore, a new concept based on the cultivation of cyanobacteria (CB) in semi-closed biogeoreactor, linking ISRU, a biological life support system, and food production, has been proposed. The key feature of the biogeoreactor is to use lithotrophic CB to extract many needed elements such as Fe directly from the dissolved regolith and direct them to any technological loop at an extraterrestrial outpost. Our studies showed that siderophilic (Fe-loving) CB are capable to corrode lunar regolith stimulants because they secrete chelating agents and can tolerate [Fe] up to 1 mM. However, lunar and Martian environments are very hostile (very high UV and gamma-radiation, extreme temperatures, deficit of water). Thus, the selection of CB species with high potential for extraterrestrial biotechnologies that may be utilized in 15 years must be sponsored by NASA as soon as possible. The study of the genomes of candidate CB species and the metagenomes of the terrestrial environments which they inhabit is critical to make this decision. Here we provide preliminary results about peculiarities of the genomes of siderophilic CB revealed by analyzing the genome of siderophilic cyanobacterium JSC-1 and the metagenome of iron depositing hot spring (IDHS) Chocolate Pots (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA). It has been found that IDHS are richer with ferrous iron than the majority of hot springs around the world. Fe2+ is known to increase the magnitude of oxidative stress in prokaryotes

  6. COSMIC NEWS - NEW DISCOVERIES IN CELESTIAL BODIES IN 1965,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASTRONOMY, REPORTS), COMETS, GALAXIES, STARS, X RAYS, EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES, PLUTO( PLANET ), MARS( PLANET ), MERCURY ( PLANET ), MOON, PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, CHINA

  7. Extrasolar Asteroid Mining as Forensic Evidence for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    The development of civilisations like ours into spacefaring, multi-planet entities requires significant raw materials to construct vehicles and habitats. Interplanetary debris, including asteroids and comets, may provide such a source of raw materials. In this article we present the hypothesis that extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) engaged in asteroid mining may be detectable from Earth. Considering the detected disc of debris around Vega as a template, we explore the observational signatures of targeted asteroid mining (TAM), such as unexplained deficits in chemical species, changes in the size distribution of debris and other thermal signatures which may be detectable in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a debris disc. We find that individual observational signatures of asteroid mining can be explained by natural phenomena, and as such they cannot provide conclusive detections of ETIs. But, it may be the case that several signatures appearing in the same system will prove harder to model without...

  8. IR Spectroscopy and Photo-Chemistry of Extraterrestrial Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Mastrapa, Rachel; Elsila, Jamie; Sandford, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Dense molecular clouds from which planetary systems form and the outer Solar System are both cold environments dominated by ices. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is used to probe these ices, but the IR absorptions of molecules depend on the conditions. As a result appropriate lab data is needed to correctly fit spectra of extraterrestrial ices. Such fits have shown that most of these ices are composed primarily of H2O, but also contain 1-10 percent of other simple molecules such as CO2, CO, CH4, & NH3;. We shall present near IR spectra of ice mixtures of relevance to icy outer Solar System bodies and show that they still hold surprises, such as the Cheshire cat-like CO2 (2v3) overtone near 2.134 micrometers (4685 cm-1) that is absent from spectra of pure CO2 but present in H2O-CO2 mixtures.

  9. A Numerical Testbed for Hypotheses of Extraterrestrial Life and Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has been heavily influenced by solutions to the Drake Equation, which returns an integer value for the number of communicating civilisations resident in the Milky Way, and by the Fermi Paradox, glibly stated as: "If they are there, where are they?". Both rely on using average values of key parameters, such as the mean signal lifetime of a communicating civilisation. A more accurate answer must take into account the distribution of stellar, planetary and biological attributes in the galaxy, as well as the stochastic nature of evolution itself. This paper outlines a method of Monte Carlo realisation which does this, and hence allows an estimation of the distribution of key parameters in SETI, as well as allowing a quantification of their errors (and the level of ignorance therein). Furthermore, it provides a means for competing theories of life and intelligence to be compared quantitatively.

  10. Arsenic in the evolution of earth and extraterrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Saltikov, C.W.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    If you were asked to speculate about the form extra-terrestrial life on Mars might take, which geomicrobial phenomenon might you select as a model system, assuming that life on Mars would be 'primitive'? Give your reasons. At the end of my senior year at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1968, I took Professor Ehrlich's final for his Geomicrobiology course. The above question beckoned to me like the Sirens to Odysseus, for if I answered, it would take so much time and thought that I would never get around to the exam's other essay questions and consequently, would be "shipwrecked" by flunking the course. So, I passed it up. With this 41-year perspective in mind, this manuscript is now submitted to Professor Ehrlich for (belated) "extra-credit." R.S. Oremland ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  11. At the frontiers of knowledge: some issues of extraterrestrial research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Jacques

    In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn demonstrates why scientific development is not an essentially cumulative process and how the major transformations of science are the result of “scientific revolutions”. At the origin of these changes is the discovery of an anomaly that, at a time of history, basically highlights failure science that Kuhn says 'normal', that is built around a “paradigm” that provides methods, standardized, efficient but obtuse scientific tools, as well as socio-economic biases. "The discovery, wrote Kuhn, starts with the consciousness of an anomaly, i.e. the impression that nature, one way or another, contradicts the expected results of the paradigm that governs normal science." Research of a life and an extraterrestrial intelligence has the singular character to include the anomaly as one of its main goals: what are its results in the future, they will contradict or at least jostle the results of scientific works, sometimes too quickly transformed into evidence.

  12. Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence SETI Past, Present, and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Shuch, H Paul

    2011-01-01

    This book is a collection of essays written by the very scientists and engineers who have led, and continue to lead, the scientific quest known as SETI, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Divided into three parts, the first section, ‘The Spirit of SETI Past’, written by the surviving pioneers of this then emerging discipline, reviews the major projects undertaken during the first 50 years of SETI science and the results of that research. In the second section, ‘The Spirit of SETI Present’, the present-day science and technology is discussed in detail, providing the technical background to contemporary SETI instruments, experiments, and analytical techniques, including the processing of the received signals to extract potential alien communications. In the third and final section, ‘The Spirit of SETI Future’, the book looks ahead to the possible directions that SETI will take in the next 50 years, addressing such important topics as interstellar message construction, the risks and assump...

  13. Detecting extraterrestrial life with the Colossus telescope using photosynthetic biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, S.; Kuhn, J.; Harrington, D.; Moretto, G.; Langlois, M.; Halliday, D.; Harlingten, C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose to search for life on Earth-like planets in habitable zones using photosynthesis biosignatures. Many life forms on Earth process the solar light and utilize it to support their own activity and to provide a valuable energy source for other life forms. We expect therefore that photosynthesis is very likely to arise on another planet and can produce conspicuous biosignatures. We have recently identified biological polarization effects, e.g., selective light absorption or scattering by photosynthetic molecules which can be used for remote detection of extraterrestrial life. Here we present synthetic spectra and polarization of Earth-like planets with photosynthetic life and evaluate the sensitivity of the Colossus telescope for their remote detection in the solar neighborhood.

  14. New SETI Sky Surveys for Radio Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Siemion, Andrew; McMahon, Peter; Korpela, Eric; Werthimer, Dan; Anderson, David; Bower, Geoff; Cobb, Jeff; Foster, Griffin; Lebofsky, Matt; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Mallard, William; Wagner, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley conducts 7 SETI programs at IR, visible and radio wavelengths. Here we review two of the newest efforts, Astropulse and Fly's Eye. A variety of possible sources of microsecond to millisecond radio pulses have been suggested in the last several decades, among them such exotic events as evaporating primordial black holes, hyper-flares from neutron stars, emissions from cosmic strings or perhaps extraterrestrial civilizations, but to-date few searches have been conducted capable of detecting them. We are carrying out two searches in hopes of finding and characterizing these uS to mS time scale dispersed radio pulses. These two observing programs are orthogonal in search space; the Allen Telescope Array's (ATA) "Fly's Eye" experiment observes a 100 square degree field by pointing each 6m ATA antenna in a different direction; by contrast, the Astropulse sky survey at Arecibo is extremely sensitive but has 1/3,000 of the instantaneous sky coverage. Astropulse's multibeam data is transferred via the interne...

  15. Analytical SuperSTEM for extraterrestrial materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R

    2009-09-08

    Electron-beam studies of extraterrestrial materials with significantly improved spatial resolution, energy resolution and sensitivity are enabled using a 300 keV SuperSTEM scanning transmission electron microscope with a monochromator and two spherical aberration correctors. The improved technical capabilities enable analyses previously not possible. Mineral structures can be directly imaged and analyzed with single-atomic-column resolution, liquids and implanted gases can be detected, and UV-VIS optical properties can be measured. Detection limits for minor/trace elements in thin (<100 nm thick) specimens are improved such that quantitative measurements of some extend to the sub-500 ppm level. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be carried out with 0.10-0.20 eV energy resolution and atomic-scale spatial resolution such that variations in oxidation state from one atomic column to another can be detected. Petrographic mapping is extended down to the atomic scale using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) imaging. Technical capabilities and examples of the applications of SuperSTEM to extraterrestrial materials are presented, including the UV spectral properties and organic carbon K-edge fine structure of carbonaceous matter in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), x-ray elemental maps showing the nanometer-scale distribution of carbon within GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides), the first detection and quantification of trace Ti in GEMS using EDS, and detection of molecular H{sub 2}O in vesicles and implanted H{sub 2} and He in irradiated mineral and glass grains.

  16. Implications of extraterrestrial material on the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Stanley Miller's discovery of an abiotic organic synthesis relevant to the early earth provided a route to the scientific consideration of the origin of life. Since the 1950s, several thousands of experiments have shown that the precursor molecules to living biochemical systems could come about naturally. That these processes are active in the universe has been demonstrated by the detection of organic molecules in chondritic meteorites. Indeed, the very delivery of organics by extraterrestrial material may have been a viable source of important prebiotic molecules on the early earth. In this talk I will review the delivery of organics and other elements to the early earth, and will attempt to quantify the mass of material that might have been present from extraterrestrial sources on the early earth.The flux of prebiotic material on the early earth was influenced by the increase in delivery in the early history of the solar system, and by the sources available in the early solar system. Carbonaceous asteroids, comets, stony chondritic bodies, and differentiated asteroids each would have provided different materials to the early earth. The atmosphere would have provided a filter for some of this material, and the amount that reached the earth's surface would have depended on material strength, angle of entry, and atmospheric composition.Previously I reported that carbonaceous chondrites and micrometeorites would have provided a diffuse source of organic molecules on the early earth, whereas differentiated asteroids would have provided concentrated point sources for other materials, such as phosphorus (Pasek and Lauretta, Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres 2008). These results are reconsidered in the light of new ideas on the bombardment history of the early solar system, and with new considerations of the composition of source material that reached the earth.

  17. Satellite Radiotomography of Ionospheric Responces to Extra-Terrestrial Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav; Padokhin, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeny; Nesterov, Ivan; Vorontsov, Artem

    Our work addresses the study of the response of the atmosphere and ionosphere to a variety of external forcing such as solar flares and particle precipitation. Particle precipitation plays important role in the system of magnetosphere-ionosphere- atmosphere coupling during geomagnetic storms. Using radio tomographic imaging of the ionosphere based on navigational satellite systems (Parus/Transit and GPS/GLONASS) we present and discuss the examples illustrating ionospheric effects caused by particle precipitations detected by DMSP satellites. It is shown that the spatial structure of corpuscular ionization in the tomographic images is qualitatively close to latitudinal distribution of the precipitating particles. The distributions of ionospheric plasma observed during strong geomagnetic disturbances and particle precipitations have multiple extrema and wave-like structures with a spatial scale ranging from a few dozens to a few hundreds of kilometers; the characteristic sizes of latitudinal variations in the corresponding corpuscular flows widely vary from a few degrees to a few dozens degrees latitude. The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with the results of the numeric modelling of the AGW generation by volumetric sources. We also present the comparison of the effects of ionization of the ionosphere by a series of intense X-class solar flares during the 23rd and 24th solar cycles based on the data of satellite navigation and augumentation systems (GPS/GLONASS and SBAS). The analysis shows that the intensity of the ionospheric effects estimated from the variations in total electron content is barely related to the intensity of the X-ray flare for the X-class events. The amplitude of variations in the ionization of the upper atmosphere is mainly controlled by the intensity of variations in solar EUV radiation, which is not always correlated to the X-Ray radiation during flares. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for

  18. The game of active search for extra-terrestrial intelligence: breaking the `Great Silence'

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P.

    2013-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) has been performed principally as a one-way survey, listening of radio frequencies across the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, scientists have engaged in an active messaging only rarely. This suggests the simple rationale that if other civilizations exist and take a similar approach to ours, namely listening but not broadcasting, the result is a silent universe. A simple game theoretical model, the prisoner's dilemma, explains this situation: each player (civilization) can passively search (defect), or actively search and broadcast (cooperate). In order to maximize the payoff (or, equivalently, minimize the risks) the best strategy is not to broadcast. In fact, the active search has been opposed on the basis that it might be dangerous to expose ourselves. However, most of these ideas have not been based on objective arguments, and ignore accounting of the possible gains and losses. Thus, the question stands: should we perform an active search? I develop a game-theoretical framework where civilizations can be of different types, and explicitly apply it to a situation where societies are either interested in establishing a two-way communication or belligerent and in urge to exploit ours. The framework gives a quantitative solution (a mixed-strategy), which is how frequent we should perform the active SETI. This frequency is roughly proportional to the inverse of the risk, and can be extremely small. However, given the immense amount of stars being scanned, it supports active SETI. The model is compared with simulations, and the possible actions are evaluated through the San Marino scale, measuring the risks of messaging.

  19. Curating NASA's Future Extraterrestrial Sample Collections: How Do We Achieve Maximum Proficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis; Evans, Cynthia; Zeigler, Ryan; Allton, Judith; Fries, Marc; Righter, Kevin; Zolensky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (henceforth referred to herein as NASA Curation Office) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10E "Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials", JSC is charged with "The curation of all extraterrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions." The Directive goes on to define Curation as including "... documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach." Here we describe some of the ongoing efforts to ensure that the future activities of the NASA Curation Office are working towards a state of maximum proficiency.

  20. Wave scattering from statistically rough surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, F G; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Wave Scattering from Statistically Rough Surfaces discusses the complications in radio physics and hydro-acoustics in relation to wave transmission under settings seen in nature. Some of the topics that are covered include radar and sonar, the effect of variations in topographic relief or ocean waves on the transmission of radio and sound waves, the reproduction of radio waves from the lower layers of the ionosphere, and the oscillations of signals within the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The book begins with some fundamental idea of wave transmission theory and the theory of random processes a

  1. Phenomenology of Dark Matter from radio to gamma ray frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmann, Martin

    2015-07-15

    Multiwavelength astronomical observations have been proven to be of crucial relevance in understanding the most fundamental questions in physics. One of the biggest mysteries of nature is the existence of a (still) unidentified type of matter that makes up most of the material universe. Although little is known about its nature, it is very likely that this exotic Dark Matter (DM) is made of so-called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). In this thesis we investigate which strategies can best address the fundamental question: What is Dark Matter? Specifically, by following the ''WIMP'' paradigm as our guiding principle, we comprehensively discuss the phenomenology of prospective ''indirect'' detection scenarios of such WIMPs. Special consideration is given to extraterrestrial gamma rays and radio waves produced around the center of the Milky Way. In light of two recently highly debated claims of WIMP Dark Matter discovery, namely the 130 GeV gamma-ray line and the GeV gamma-ray excess, we invoke our methods to confront those hypotheses. In addition our study contains antiparticle cosmic-ray (antiproton and positron) data analyses. The phenomenology for indirect DM detection with these ''messengers'' is briefly discussed as well. By exploiting the high degree of symmetry of typical annihilating 2-WIMP initial states, we are able to employ a very powerful tool in theoretical particle physics: the generalized optical theorem. This theorem relates the amplitude of loop-suppressed processes, such as the 130 GeV line if interpreted as product of WIMP annihilations, with tree-level process which are constrained in the same way as with the GeV excess. Unprecedentedly reported analytical computations of partial-wave (and helicity) cross sections with general applicability are calculated and applied. The possibility that a non-trivial effect in the particle model for DM might enhance the strength of a gamma

  2. Envelope Soliton in Solar Radio Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Yu; Wangde; G. P. Chernov

    2000-01-01

    Several envelope soliton fine structures have been observed in solar radio metric-wave emission. We present amodel of 1ongitudinal modulational instability to explain these fine structures. It is found that this instability canonly occur in the condition of sound velocity being larger than Alfven velocity in corona. Therefore, the envelopesoliton fine structures should display in the coronal region with high temperature and low magnetic field, whichcorresponds to the solar radio emission in the region of meter and decameter wavelength.

  3. Miniature Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Space and Extraterrestrial Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PI has developed a miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), which can be op-timized for space and extraterrestrial applications, by using a...

  4. Galactic extraterrestrial intelligence. I - The constraint on search strategies imposed by the possibility of interstellar travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, C. E.

    1982-03-01

    The possibility that extraterrestrial intelligence might settle the Galaxy by interstellar travel is investigated. The existence of this possibility is shown to be incompatible with the existence of a large number of potential sources of communication from extraterrestrial intelligences in the Galaxy. A detailed examination of suggested resolutions of this contradiction is presented. These include physical, temporal and sociological explanations. The sociological explanations include the so-called disinterest, self-destruction, fizzle, ZPG, taboo, and private zoo hypotheses. Each of these is carefully shown to require incredible universal ad hoc assumptions about the nature of extraterrestrial intelligence. It is concluded that proposed serial search modes for communication from extraterrestrial intelligence have negligible chance of success. A mathematical formalism for evaluating other search modes is also developed.

  5. Signal coverage approach to the detection probability of hypothetical extraterrestrial emitters in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    The lack of evidence for the existence of extraterrestrial life, even the simplest forms of animal life, makes it is difficult to decide whether the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is more a high-risk, high-payoff endeavor than a futile attempt. Here we insist that even if extraterrestrial civilizations do exist and communicate, the likelihood of detecting their signals crucially depends on whether the Earth lies within a region of the galaxy covered by such signals. By considering possible populations of independent emitters in the galaxy, we build a statistical model of the domain covered by hypothetical extraterrestrial signals to derive the detection probability that the Earth is within such a domain. We show that for general distributions of the signal longevity and directionality, the mean number of detectable emitters is less than one even for detection probabilities as large as 50%, regardless of the number of emitters in the galaxy.

  6. Defining a Need for Assessing the Extraterrestrial Environmental Impacts of Lunar Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, W. R.

    2016-11-01

    Protocols guiding an extraterrestrial environmental impact assessment process are warranted. Industry-developed and -managed standards and an environmental code of conduct based, in part, on best management practices are proposed.

  7. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  8. Radio Pulsating Structures with Coronal Loop Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallunki, J.; Pohjolainen, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a solar eruption event on 20 July 2004, comprising observations in Hα, EUV, soft X-rays, and in radio waves with a wide frequency range. The analyzed data show both oscillatory patterns and shock wave signatures during the impulsive phase of the flare. At the same time, large-scale EUV loops located above the active region were observed to contract. Quasi-periodic pulsations with ˜ 10 and ˜ 15 s oscillation periods were detected both in microwave - millimeter waves and in decimeter - meter waves. Our calculations show that MHD oscillations in the large EUV loops - but not likely in the largest contracting loops - could have produced the observed periodicity in radio emission, by triggering periodic magnetic reconnection and accelerating particles. As the plasma emission in decimeter - meter waves traces the accelerated particle beams and the microwave emission shows a typical gyrosynchrotron flux spectrum (emission created by trapped electrons within the flare loop), we find that the particles responsible for the two different types of emission could have been accelerated in the same process. Radio imaging of the pulsed decimetric - metric emission and the shock-generated radio type II burst in the same wavelength range suggest a rather complex scenario for the emission processes and locations. The observed locations cannot be explained by the standard model of flare loops with an erupting plasmoid located above them, driving a shock wave at the CME front.

  9. The radio wave as a source of free energy for the synthesis of organic molecules into the droplets of thunderstorm cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Victor

    This paper advances the hypothesis stating that low-molecular-weight organic compounds, precursors of living cell components, may be synthesized from inorganic oxides in the presence of alternating electromagnetic field as an energy source. This synthesis can be implemented in the water droplets hovering in a thunderstorm cloud of the Earth or another planet prebiotic atmosphere. A stroke of lightning is known to excite a broad spectrum of electromagnetic waves. These, in turn, can excite the Langmuir vibrations of protons in water droplets. The molecular mechanism of this process has been described in detail [1, 2]. For the convenience of simulation, we will consider the ideal case, namely, that the Langmuir proton vibrations possess, on average, a spherical symmetry. This idealization does not contradict the physics of the process: since the object is spherically symmetrical, the geometry of stationary vibration processes taking place in this object should also possess a spherical symmetry. We will assume that the form of the Langmuir vibrations is represented by periodic thickening and thinning of protons in the central area of the droplet. We will discuss processes in droplets whose radius Ro=510-5 cm, which corresponds to the average microbe size. The activation energies of most homogeneous chemical reactions fall in the 1-3 eV range; therefore, in the central area with the radius R=Ro/2, the energy of protons is sufficient both for activating the reactions and for the synthesis itself to proceed. The calculations carried out in [1, 2] allow one to estimate the required amplitude E 700 V/m) and frequency 6109 Hz) for an electromagnetic wave able to excite the Langmuir vibrations of protons with an energy of about 3 eV. The time spent for the whole process of synthesis of primary organic matter is much shorter than geological periods; under conditions formulated above, this time is only 1 s. An advantage of this model is the possibility of its real

  10. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence in Earth's Solar Transit Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph E

    2016-04-01

    Over the past few years, astronomers have detected thousands of planets and candidate planets by observing their periodic transits in front of their host stars. A related method, called transit spectroscopy, might soon allow studies of the chemical imprints of life in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Here, we address the reciprocal question, namely, from where is Earth detectable by extrasolar observers using similar methods. We explore Earth's transit zone (ETZ), the projection of a band around Earth's ecliptic onto the celestial plane, where observers can detect Earth transits across the Sun. ETZ is between 0.520° and 0.537° wide due to the noncircular Earth orbit. The restricted Earth transit zone (rETZ), where Earth transits the Sun less than 0.5 solar radii from its center, is about 0.262° wide. We first compile a target list of 45 K and 37 G dwarf stars inside the rETZ and within 1 kpc (about 3260 light-years) using the Hipparcos catalogue. We then greatly enlarge the number of potential targets by constructing an analytic galactic disk model and find that about 10(5) K and G dwarf stars should reside within the rETZ. The ongoing Gaia space mission can potentially discover all G dwarfs among them (several 10(4)) within the next 5 years. Many more potentially habitable planets orbit dim, unknown M stars in ETZ and other stars that traversed ETZ thousands of years ago. If any of these planets host intelligent observers, they could have identified Earth as a habitable, or even as a living, world long ago, and we could be receiving their broadcasts today. The K2 mission, the Allen Telescope Array, the upcoming Square Kilometer Array, or the Green Bank Telescope might detect such deliberate extraterrestrial messages. Ultimately, ETZ would be an ideal region to be monitored by the Breakthrough Listen Initiatives, an upcoming survey that will constitute the most comprehensive search for extraterrestrial intelligence so far.

  11. The Correction Model Studyon Radio Wave Refraction in Troposphere%测控站对流层电波折射修正模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李高; 许文波

    2015-01-01

    This study makes full use of the TT & C data,meteorological data,space environment monitoring and high precision spacecraft orbit data to carry out the study correction ofradio wave refraction in troposphere according to refraction waves in the tropo⁃sphere of the specific control stations.The analysis of the relationship between meteorological data and refractive index profile modelin the troposphere is made first,then the troposphericrefraction index profile model of control stations in each quarterare established.A sim⁃ulation analysis has been executed onHopfield correction model and the Ray⁃tracing method in detail. The simulation results show the correctionprecision is low when the elevation angle is below 30 degrees and some defects of Hopfield model have been found.%针对具体测控站的对流层电波折射,充分利用了测控数据、气象数据、空间环境监测和高精度航天器轨道数据,开展针对测控站的对流层折射修正模型的研究。分析了对流层中的气象数据与折射率剖面的模型的关系,建立了测控站各季度的折射率剖面模型;对Hopfield修正模型和射线描迹法进行详细阐述并进行了仿真分析,发现在仰角为30°以下时修正精度较低,以及Hopfield模型的一些缺陷。

  12. A Method for Correction of Radio Wave Refraction Error in Real-time Data Processing%电波折射误差实时修正方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄家贵; 赵华; 刘元

    2011-01-01

    目前的实时弹道处理过程中,由于获得探空气象数据比较困难,电波折射误差均采用各种简化方法进行计算,因而大气折射误差计算的精度不高,修正效果不佳.针对这种现状,本文提出了基于双指数模型的射线瞄迹法计算大气折射误差.试算结果表明,该方法的计算精度与事后数据处理所采用的电波折射误差修正方法相当,且能够满足实时处理的时间要求.%Simplified methods are often used to compute radio wave refraction errors in the course of real-time data processing as it is difficult to obtain real weather data acquired by sounding rockets. As a result, the accuracy of atmospheric refraction error computation is not high and the correction effect is not desirable. To solve this problem, improved radial track method based on dual-exponential model is presented in this paper. Trial computation shows that the method is feasible for real-time data processing in speed and its accuracy is commensurate with that of postprocessing method.

  13. INDUCED SCATTERING LIMITS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM STELLAR CORONAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubarsky, Yuri [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, P.O.B. 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Ostrovska, Sofiya [Department of Mathematics, Atilim University, Incek 06836, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-02-10

    The origin of fast radio bursts remains a puzzle. Suggestions have been made that they are produced within the Earth’s atmosphere, in stellar coronae, in other galaxies, or at cosmological distances. If they are extraterrestrial, the implied brightness temperature is very high, and therefore the induced scattering places constraints on possible models. In this paper, constraints are obtained on flares from coronae of nearby stars. It is shown that the radio pulses with the observed power could not be generated if the plasma density within and in the nearest vicinity of the source is as high as is necessary to provide the observed dispersion measure. However, one cannot exclude the possibility that the pulses are generated within a bubble with a very low density and pass through the dense plasma only in the outer corona.

  14. A Radio SETI Campaign for microsec-sec Periodic Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Harp, G R; Astorga, Alfredo; Arbunich, Jack; Hightower, Kristin; Meitzner, Seth; Barott, W C; Nolan, Michael C; Messerschmitt, D G; Vakoch, Douglas A; Shostak, Seth; Tarter, J C

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel radio autocorrelation (AC) search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). For selected frequencies across the terrestrial microwave window (1-10 GHz) observations were conducted at the Allen Telescope Array to identify artificial non-sinusoidal periodic signals with radio bandwidths greater than 1 kHz, which are capable of carrying substantial messages with symbol-rates from 10-10e6 Hz. Out of 243 observations, about half (101) were directed toward sources with known continuum flux greater than 1 Jy (quasars, pulsars, supernova remnants and masers), based on the hypothesis that they might harbor heretofore undiscovered natural or artificial, repetitive, phase or frequency modulation. The rest of the targets were mostly toward exoplanet stars and similarly interesting targets from the standpoint of SETI. This campaign rules out several previously untested hypotheses relating to the number of artificially modulated "natural" sources. Since we are using a phase sensitive detector, these obser...

  15. Extraterrestrial microspherules from Bajada del Diablo, Chubut, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Orgeira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Quaternary infilling of a circular structure located in Bajada del Diablo, Chubut Province, Argentina has been proposed as a crater strewn field in previous studies. Here we report the finding of about 65 microspherules collected in a trench excavated in the center of the structure. The majority of hand-picked specimens are single, but some of them exhibit compound forms. The single specimens are spherical with a mean size of 137 μm, whereas the more complex samples show peduncles and drop shapes. Dendritic crystal growth is recognized in the internal structure of some broken microspherules. Preliminary chemical composition from the surface and center of microspherules was determined by energy dispersive spectrometry employing EDS. Quantitative EMPA and XRD analysis indicate that the microspherules are mainly composed of Fe and O with magnetite, Fe0 with subordinate wüstite. Following consideration of possible anthropogenic and volcanic origins, these spherulites are ascribed to an extraterrestrial input. An accumulation rate of 47 microspherules per m2/yr is estimated for the studied sediments. This value is two orders of magnitude higher than the reference flux for cosmic dust estimated for the last 1 Ma in the Transantarctic Mountains. The microspherules might have been generated as a byproduct of asteroid entry in the atmosphere.

  16. Carbonaceous Meteorites Contain a Wide Range of Extraterrestrial Nucleobases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, H. James, II; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nuc1eobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nuc1eobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs; purine, 2,6-diminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analoge were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  17. Extraterrestrial materials examined by mean of nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodja, H., E-mail: hicham.khodja@cea.fr [CEA/IRAMIS/SIS2M/LEEL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS/UMR 3299/SIS2M/LEEL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Smith, T. [CEA/IRAMIS/SIS2M/LEEL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS/UMR 3299/SIS2M/LEEL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Engrand, C. [CSNSM, Bat 104, F-91405, Orsay Campus (France); Herzog, G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8087 (United States); Raepsaet, C. [CEA/IRAMIS/SIS2M/LEEL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS/UMR 3299/SIS2M/LEEL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-07-01

    Comet fragments, micrometeorites, and Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are small objects (<1 mm) of high scientific interest in cosmochemistry. More particularly, the determination of light element concentrations, such as C and N, in cometary samples is of interest since it gives information on the regions where such materials formed. Analyses of such objects should be performed so as to extract as much information as possible while preserving sample integrity. For this purpose, we need instruments and methods that provide both microanalysis and detailed imaging. In these respects, the nuclear microprobe offers many potential advantages: (i) the spatial resolution, ∼1 μm is well-matched to the typical object dimensions, (ii) with some reservations, it is non-destructive when carefully conducted, (iii) it is quantitative, and especially sensitive for light elements. At the Saclay nuclear microprobe, we have been performing analyses of extraterrestrial objects for many years. We review some of these studies, emphasizing the specific requirements for successful analyses. We also discuss the potential pitfalls that may be encountered.

  18. "Gulliver", an experiment for extraterrestrial life detection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, G V; Heim, A H; Thompson, M F; Beem, D R; Horowitz, N H

    1964-01-01

    Based on the probability that extraterrestrial life is biochemically somewhat similar to life on Earth, a life detection experiment is being prepared to explore Mars. The experiment will be performed by an automated device which will carry a microbiological medium being developed to support a wide range of earth microorganisms. Selected ingredients of the medium will be labeled with radioactive isotopes. A sticky string, shot out from and reeled back into the device, will gather a sample of the Martian soil. It is hoped the radioactive atoms in the compounds will be metabolized by the unknown organisms in the soil and evolved in a labelled gas. The gas will be collected by a chemical "getter" and the radioactivity measured for transmission to Earth. A positive response from the test unit and a negative, or lesser, response from a poisoned control unit would constitute evidence of life. The device can also differentiate between photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic metabolic activity. Data from field tests on Earth are presented.

  19. Designing Extraterrestrial Plant Growth Habitats with Low Pressure Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    In-situ resource utilization, provision of human life support requirements by bioregenerative methods, and engineering constraints for construction and deployment of plant growth structures on the surface of Mars all suggest the need for plant growth studies at hypobaric pressures. Past work demonstrated that plants will likely tolerate and grow at pressures at or below 10 kPa. Based upon this premise, concepts are developed for the design of reduced pressure atmospheres in lightweight, inflatable structures for plant growth systems on Mars with the goals of maximizing design simplicity and the use of local resources. A modular pod design is proposed as it could be integrated with large-scale production systems. Atmospheric modification of pod clusters would be based upon a pulse and scrub system using mass flow methods for atmospheric transport. A specific modification and control scenario is developed for a lettuce pod to illustrate the dynamics of carbon dioxide and oxygen exchange within a pod. Considerations of minimal atmospheric crop requirements will aid in the development of engineering designs and strategies for extraterrestrial plant growth structures that employ rarefied atmospheres.

  20. Philosophy and problems of the definition of Extraterrestrial Life

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Jean

    2011-01-01

    When we try to search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence, we have to follow some guidelines. The first step is to clarify what is to be meant by "Life" and "intelligence", i.e. an attempt to define these words. The word "definition" refers to two different situations. First, it means an arbitrary convention. On the other hand it also often designates an attempt to clarify the content of a pre-existing word for which we have some spontaneous preconceptions, whatever their grounds, and to catch an (illusory) "essence" of what is defined. It is then made use of pre-existing plain language words which carry an a priori pre-scientific content likely to introduce some confusion in the reader's mind. The complexity of the problem will be analyzed and we will show that some philosophical prejudice is unavoidable. There are two types of philosophy: "Natural Philosophy", seeking for some essence of things, and "Critical (or analytical) Philosophy", devoted to the analysis of the procedures by which we claim to ...

  1. The quest for extraterrestrial life: what about the viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale Warren

    2013-08-01

    Recently, viruses have been recognized as the most numerous entities and the primary drivers of evolution on Earth. Historically, viruses have been mostly ignored in the field of astrobiology due to the view that they are not alive in the classical sense and if encountered would not present risk due to their host-specific nature. What we currently know of viruses is that we are most likely to encounter them on other life-bearing planets; that while some are exquisitely host-specific, many viruses can utilize hundreds of different host species; that viruses are known to exist in our planet's most extreme environments; and that while many do not survive long outside their hosts, some can survive for extended periods, especially in the cold. In our quest for extraterrestrial life, we should be looking for viruses; and while any encountered may pose no risk, the possibility of an encounter with a virus capable of accessing multiple cell types exists, and any prospective contact with such an organism should be treated accordingly.

  2. Carbonaceous meteorites contain a wide range of extraterrestrial nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P; Smith, Karen E; Cleaves, H James; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C; Glavin, Daniel P; House, Christopher H; Dworkin, Jason P

    2011-08-23

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nucleobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nucleobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs: purine, 2,6-diaminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analogs were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  3. Factors affecting production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C., E-mail: reedy@psi.edu

    2015-10-15

    Good production rates are needed for cosmic-ray-produced nuclides to interpret their measurements. Rates depend on many factors, especially the pre-atmospheric object’s size, the location of the sample in that object (such as near surface or deep inside), and the object’s bulk composition. The bulk composition affects rates, especially in objects with very low and very high iron contents. Extraterrestrial materials with high iron contents usually have higher rates for making nuclides made by reactions with energetic particles and lower rates for the capture of thermal neutrons. In small objects and near the surface of objects, the cascade of secondary neutrons is being developed as primary particles are being removed. Deep in large objects, that secondary cascade is fully developed and the fluxes of primary particles are low. Recent work shows that even the shape of an object in space has a small but measureable effect. Work has been done and continues to be done on better understanding those and other factors. More good sets of measurements in meteorites with known exposure geometries in space are needed. With the use of modern Monte Carlo codes for the production and transport of particles, the nature of these effects have been and is being studied. Work needs to be done to improve the results of these calculations, especially the cross sections for making spallogenic nuclides.

  4. Astrobiology in culture: the search for extraterrestrial life as "science".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Linda

    2012-10-01

    This analysis examines the social construction of authority, credibility, and legitimacy for exobiology/astrobiology and, in comparison, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), considering English-language conceptions of these endeavors in scientific culture and popular culture primarily in the United States. The questions that define astrobiology as a scientific endeavor are multidisciplinary in nature, and this endeavor is broadly appealing to public audiences as well as to the scientific community. Thus, it is useful to examine astrobiology in culture-in scientific culture, official culture, and popular culture. A researcher may explore science in culture, science as culture, by analyzing its rhetoric, the primary means that people use to construct their social realities-their cultural environment, as it were. This analysis follows this path, considering scientific and public interest in astrobiology and SETI and focusing on scientific and official constructions of the two endeavors. This analysis will also consider whether and how scientific and public conceptions of astrobiology and SETI, which are related but at the same time separate endeavors, converge or diverge and whether and how these convergences or divergences affect the scientific authority, credibility, and legitimacy of these endeavors.

  5. Online-monitoring of MO-surge arresters with passive surface acoustic wave radio sensors; Online-Temperaturmessung an MO-Ueberspannungsableitern mit funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichsen, V. [Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Energieuebertragung und -verteilung; Scholl, G. [Siemens AG, Muenchen (Germany). Fachzentrum Oberflaechenwellentechnik und Funksensorik

    1998-08-24

    Today no practicable and economical solutions are available for an overall online-monitoring of high-voltage metal oxide surge arresters, which should comprise a surge counter function, an energy monitor and the monitoring of electrical aging if required. A permanent measurement of the arrester temperature on high potential, which basically could provide all these functions, has not yet been realized due to the related technical problems. However, newly developed high-frequency temperature measuring systems based on wireless passive surface acoustic wave temperature sensors are now offering this possibility for the first time. They are actually being field-tested in a 420-kV-arrester and have shown a good performance so far. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zu einem geschlossenen Online-Monitoringkonzept von Hochspannungs-Metalloxid-Ableitern, das eine Ansprechzaehlerfunktion, einen Energiemonitor and gegebenenfalls eine Ueberwachung elektrischer Kennlinienalterung enthalten sollte, fehlen bis heute geeignete, wirtschaftlich vertretbare Loesungen. Eine dauernde Messung der Ableitertemperatur auf Hochspannungspotential, mit der an sich alle genannten Funktionen einfach realisiert werden koennten, scheiterte bisher an der technischen Umsetzbarkeit. Neuentwickelte funkabfragbare Oberflaechenwellen-Temperatursensoren eroeffenen nun erstmalig diese Moeglichkeit. Eingebaut in einem 420-kV-Ableiter, befinden sie sich zur Zeit in einem Feldversuch in praktischer Erprobung und erfuellen dort alle in sie gesetzten Erwartungen. (orig.)

  6. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  7. The beginnings of radio astronomy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woerden, Hugo; Strom, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    The birth of Dutch radio astronomy can be rather precisely dated to 15 April 1944, when H.C. van de Hulst presented the results of his theoretical research into the origin of radio waves from space. We have investigated the events leading up to the momentous suggestion that hydrogen emission at 21 c

  8. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horandel, J.R.; Apel, W.D.; Arteaga, J.C.; Asch, T.; Badea, F.; Bahren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P.L.; Blumer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Bruggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; Souza, V. de; Pierro, F. di; Doll, P.; Ender, M.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P.L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P.G.; Kampert, K.H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Kromer, O.; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S.J.; Link, K.; Luczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H.J.; Mayer, H.J.; Melissas, M.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschlager, J.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schroder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequ

  9. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  10. Search for Extraterrestrial Osmium at the Allerod - Younger Dryas Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, C.; Sharma, M.; Kasse, K.; Bohncke, S.

    2008-12-01

    Ir and Os are excellent markers of extraterrestrial impact events, due to their high abundance in ET objects (Alvarez et al., 1980 Science; Turekian, 1982 Geol. Bull. Am. Spec. Pap.). Os has the advantage over Ir, in that the 187Os/188Os ratio also greatly differs between meteorites and upper continental crust (UCC). The combination of [Os] and 187Os/188Os analyses would be superior in detecting any ET contribution. Firestone et al (2007 PNAS) attributed a widespread 12.9 ka Ir containing black carbon layer to a potential extraterrestrial impact at the Allerød-Younger Dryas (A-YD) boundary. In order to test this inference, we measured [Os] and 187Os/188Os on a radiocarbon dated A-YD record (13.210 to 12.788 cal years BP) from the Netherlands. This location is close to Lommel, a Belgian site studied by Firestone et al.(2007). The organic-rich sequence was sampled continuously over a 12 cm interval at 2 cm resolution (~70 years). About 10 g samples were freeze-dried, ground and homogenized in a zirconia ball-mill. The samples mixed with 190Os tracer solutions were dissolved in carius tubes and Os extracted in liquid bromine. Os was further purified using micro-distillation. Os isotopes were measured using N-TIMS on Dartmouth Triton. The procedural blank was 7 fg/g Os with an isotopic composition of 0.41±0.01 The Allerød samples have an order of magnitude higher abundance than UCC (200 vs. 30 pg/g), but similar 187Os/188Os ratios, >1.1. The sample at the base of the YD (12.893±75 cal years BP) contains a similar amount of Os, but has a distinctly lower isotopic signature, 0.53±0.002. The high [Os] in the A-YD section possibly reflects enrichment by preferential partitioning into organic matter. The Os isotope composition of 0.53, sandwiched between values >1.1, implies contribution of a significant amount of non-radiogenic Os. Since the pollen spectra show no reworking, the non-radiogenic Os could only have been delivered as a discrete pulse at 12.893 cal yr BP

  11. FeltRadio: Sensing and Making Sense of Wireless Traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronvall, Erik; Fritsch, Jonas; Vallgårda, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Radio waves surround us but still they remain largely undetected by our senses. Unless we use specifically tuned hardware, such as FM radios, cell phones or WiFi modems, human beings cannot perceive wirelessly transmitted data. This paper presents FeltRadio, a portable and wireless technology...... that makes it possible to turn radio signals into visual and tactile stimuli as a form of sensorial augmentation. FeltRadio explores and makes us reflect upon what it would be like if we could sense, and feel, wireless traffic such as WiFi or Bluetooth. We present the technological design behind Felt......Radio and the outcome of two exploratory studies with the technology focused on people's experience of being able to suddenly sense and make sense of wireless traffic. We discuss the possible qualities of this embodied experience of FeltRadio and point to future experiments with the technology....

  12. The forthcoming EISCAT 3D as an extraterrestrial matter monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellinen-Wannberg, A.; Kero, J.; Mann, I.; Tjulin, A.

    2014-07-01

    High Power Large Aperture (HPLA) radars such as the tristatic EISCAT UHF combined with the EISCAT VHF have been versatile instruments for studying many properties of the meteoroid population even though not designed for the purpose. The future EISCAT 3D facility can become in many aspects orders of magnitude better for observing the extra-terrestrial matter. Whereas the overall science theme with atmospheric radars is to study how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space, meeting the requirements for meteor studies is one of the design goals phrased from the user community. The radar will comprise a phased-array transmitter and several phased-array receivers around Northern Scandinavia. It will work at 233 MHz centre frequency with a power of up to 10 MW and run an advanced signal-processing system. Its measurement techniques have never been combined in one radar system: volumetric-, aperture synthesis- and multistatic imaging and adaptive experiments. The volumetric imaging will increase the observing volumes, the interferometry improve the spatial resolution and orbit determinations. These are important issues for studying filaments in the meteor showers, to compute the dust flux in the Earth's vicinity and to estimate the ejection time of meteoroids accurately for theoretical evolution modelling. Investigations using the 233 MHz VHF frequency will provide higher rates than for example the earlier EISCAT UHF. In addition, the new system will observe a larger volume in space and offers the opportunity for longer observation runs up to continuous monitoring. We give a review of how all these new functions will improve the HPLA radar meteor observations.

  13. Applying Biomimetic Algorithms for Extra-Terrestrial Habitat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to simulate and optimize distributed cooperation among a network of robots tasked with cooperative excavation on an extra-terrestrial surface. Additionally to examine the concept of directed Emergence among a group of limited artificially intelligent agents. Emergence is the concept of achieving complex results from very simple rules or interactions. For example, in a termite mound each individual termite does not carry a blueprint of how to make their home in a global sense, but their interactions based strictly on local desires create a complex superstructure. Leveraging this Emergence concept applied to a simulation of cooperative agents (robots) will allow an examination of the success of non-directed group strategy achieving specific results. Specifically the simulation will be a testbed to evaluate population based robotic exploration and cooperative strategies while leveraging the evolutionary teamwork approach in the face of uncertainty about the environment and partial loss of sensors. Checking against a cost function and 'social' constraints will optimize cooperation when excavating a simulated tunnel. Agents will act locally with non-local results. The rules by which the simulated robots interact will be optimized to the simplest possible for the desired result, leveraging Emergence. Sensor malfunction and line of sight issues will be incorporated into the simulation. This approach falls under Swarm Robotics, a subset of robot control concerned with finding ways to control large groups of robots. Swarm Robotics often contains biologically inspired approaches, research comes from social insect observation but also data from among groups of herding, schooling, and flocking animals. Biomimetic algorithms applied to manned space exploration is the method under consideration for further study.

  14. The role of extraterrestrial particles in the formation of the ozone hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, J. [Ferrara Univ., Ferrara (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Kerrigan, T.C. [Intel Corporation, EY2-E3, Hillsboro, OR (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The object of Part I of this paper is to estimate the concentration of extraterrestrial particles in the ozone layer over South Pole, Antarctica, during zone hole formation. This estimate is based on an analysis of microscopic magnetic spherules collected in an extended program of atmospheric sampling. Spherules are shown to be of extraterrestrial origin and serve as markers for the larger class of less distinguished extraterrestrial particles. These particles settle to ground level as aggregates formed in a stratospheric ice crystal coalescence process. Specific spherules arrivals at ground level are strongly associated with apparent ozone depletion episodes during formation of the ozone hole. The origin of these spherules is a major stream of extraterrestrial particles independent of known meteor showers. The variability in its intensity from year to year corresponds to the variability in ozone depletion in the ozone hole itself. A quantitative theory based on these spherules arrivals and this coalescence process implies that the concentration of extraterrestrial particles at ozone hole formation lies between 500 and 2000/m{sup 3}. A mechanism is proposed in Part II of this paper by which particle concentrations in this range are sufficient to produce the ozone hole.

  15. No evidence of extraterrestrial noble metal and helium anomalies at Marinoan glacial termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Waters, Christine A.; Kurz, Mark D.; Hoffman, Paul F.

    2016-03-01

    High concentrations of extraterrestrial iridium have been reported in terminal Sturtian and Marinoan glacial marine sediments and are used to argue for long (likely 3-12 Myr) durations of these Cryogenian glaciations. Reanalysis of the Marinoan sedimentary rocks used in the original study, supplemented by sedimentary rocks from additional terminal Marinoan sections, however, does not confirm the initial report. New platinum group element concentrations, and 187Os/188Os and 3He/4He signatures are consistent with crustal origin and minimal extraterrestrial contributions. The discrepancy is likely caused by different sample masses used in the two studies, with this study being based on much larger samples that better capture the stochastic distribution of extraterrestrial particles in marine sediments. Strong enrichment of redox-sensitive elements, particularly rhenium, up-section in the basal postglacial cap carbonates, may indicate a return to more fully oxygenated seawater in the aftermath of the Marinoan snowball earth. Sections dominated by hydrogenous osmium indicate increasing submarine hydrothermal sources and/or continental inputs that are increasingly dominated by young mantle-derived rocks after deglaciation. Sedimentation rate estimates for the basal cap carbonates yield surprisingly slow rates of a few centimeters per thousand years. This study highlights the importance of using sedimentary rock samples that represent sufficiently large area-time products to properly sample extraterrestrial particles representatively, and demonstrates the value of using multiple tracers of extraterrestrial matter.

  16. 中德亚毫米波望远镜的伺服系统设计%Servo System Design for Sino-German Sub-millimeter Wave Radio Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑万章

    2014-01-01

    According to the high performance specification requirement of Sino-German Sub-millimeter Wave Radio Telescope,after a mass of research and simulation analysis,the two axes design schemebased on German Rexroth AC servo is selected for antenna servo system. The main framework of this system is based on motion logical controller and full digital AC drive,and reinforced by security protection device. Azimuth and elevation axis both adopt PID controlled force moment difference anti-backlash technique, improving antenna motion accuracy and stability. This design utilizes the powerful performance of the motion logical controller to realize trajectory tracking function,which solvesa key technical problem of antenna software.%针对中德亚毫米波望远镜的高性能指标要求,经过大量的调研和仿真分析,天线伺服系统采用了基于德国Rexroth交流伺服的两轴设计方案。系统以运动逻辑控制器和全数字交流驱动器为主体框架,并附加了安全保护措施装置。方位轴和俯仰轴均采用对力矩差值进行PID控制的双电机消隙技术,提高了天线运动的精度和天线转向时的平稳性。利用运动逻辑控制器强大的性能设计了轨迹跟踪功能,解决了天线软件部分的关键技术难题。

  17. Computational Techniques in Radio Neutrino Event Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydler, M.; ARA Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is a high-energy cosmic neutrino detector constructed with stations of radio antennas buried in the ice at the South Pole. Event reconstruction relies on the analysis of the arrival times of the transient radio signals generated by neutrinos interacting within a few kilometers of the detector. Because of its depth dependence, the index of refraction in the ice complicates the interferometric directional reconstruction of possible neutrino events. Currently, there is an ongoing endeavor to enhance the programs used for the time-consuming computations of the curved paths of the transient wave signals in the ice as well as the interferometric beamforming. We have implemented a fast, multi-dimensional spline table lookup of the wave arrival times in order to enable raytrace-based directional reconstructions. Additionally, we have applied parallel computing across multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in order to perform the beamforming calculations quickly.

  18. The Juno Waves Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kirchner, D. L.; Mokrzycki, B. T.; Averkamp, T. F.; Robison, W. T.; Piker, C. W.; Sampl, M.; Zarka, P.

    2017-07-01

    Jupiter is the source of the strongest planetary radio emissions in the solar system. Variations in these emissions are symptomatic of the dynamics of Jupiter's magnetosphere and some have been directly associated with Jupiter's auroras. The strongest radio emissions are associated with Io's interaction with Jupiter's magnetic field. In addition, plasma waves are thought to play important roles in the acceleration of energetic particles in the magnetosphere, some of which impact Jupiter's upper atmosphere generating the auroras. Since the exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere is a major objective of the Juno mission, it is appropriate that a radio and plasma wave investigation is included in Juno's payload. This paper describes the Waves instrument and the science it is to pursue as part of the Juno mission.

  19. Radio imaging of launch vehicles and payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Harrison E.

    1988-01-01

    The detection and tracing of rockets and payloads by microwave or millimeter-wave passive radio temperature measurements is analytically studied using radio astronomical techniques. Radio image reconstruction is performed by spatial filtering of multiple, simultaneous, equally-spaced radio brightness measurements. Both Wiener filtering for complex images and matched filtering for separated, point targets are considered. Output SNR is found to improve as receiver integration time increases, but blurring due to image motion places a limit on receiver integration time with fixed spatial filters. Little difference is found between an antenna with tapered illumination and low sidelobes and a maximum gain antenna with high sidelobes for interpolation. Several numerical examples are presented in order to give a preliminary indication of the magnitudes of system parameters.

  20. Radio Astronomical Polarimetry and the Lorentz Group

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, M C

    1999-01-01

    In radio astronomy the polarimetric properties of radiation are often modified during propagation and reception. Effects such as Faraday rotation, receiver cross-talk, and differential amplification act to change the state of polarized radiation. A general description of such transformations is useful for the investigation of these effects and for the interpretation and calibration of polarimetric observations. Such a description is provided by the Lorentz group, which is intimately related to the transformation properties of polarized radiation. In this paper the transformations that commonly arise in radio astronomy are analyzed in the context of this group. This analysis is then used to construct a model for the propagation and reception of radio waves. The implications of this model for radio astronomical polarimetry are discussed.

  1. Radio Supernovae in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kamble, Atish; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, Ashley; Chakraborti, Sayan; Williams, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In the last three decades, about 50 radio supernovae have been detected as a result of targeted searches of optically discovered supernovae in the local universe. Despite this relatively small number some diversity among them has already been identified which is an indication of the underlying richness of radio supernovae waiting to be discovered. For example, comparison of star formation and supernova discovery rate imply that as many as half of the supernovae remain undetected in the traditional optical searches, either because of intrinsic dimness or due to dust obscuration. This has far reaching consequences to the models of stellar and galaxy evolution. A radio sky survey would be ideal to uncover larger supernova population. Transient radio sky would benefit significantly from such a survey. With the advent of advanced gravitational wave detectors a new window is set to open on the local Universe. Localization of these gravitational detectors is poor to identify electromagnetic counterparts of the gravi...

  2. Radio Channel Modelling Using Stochastic Propagation Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution the radio channel model proposed in [1] is extended to include multiple transmitters and receivers. The propagation environment is modelled using random graphs where vertices of a graph represent scatterers and edges model the wave propagation between scatterers. Furthermore...

  3. Radio requestable passive SAW water content sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reindl, L.; Ruppel, C.C.W.; Kirmayr, A.; Stockhausen, N.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Balendonk, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new passive sensor for remote measurement of water content in sandy soil was designed, using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line. Information from this sensor can be obtained by an interrogation device via a radio link operating in the European 434-MHz industrial-scientific-medical

  4. Astronomy: Radio burst caught red-handed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, Heino

    2017-01-01

    For almost a decade, astronomers have observed intense bursts of radio waves from the distant cosmos whose origins were unknown. The source of one such burst has now been identified, but this has only deepened the mystery. See Letter p.58

  5. Radio requestable passive SAW water content sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reindl, L.; Ruppel, C.C.W.; Kirmayr, A.; Stockhausen, N.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Balendonk, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new passive sensor for remote measurement of water content in sandy soil was designed, using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line. Information from this sensor can be obtained by an interrogation device via a radio link operating in the European 434-MHz industrial-scientific-medical

  6. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  7. Newnes short wave listening handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Short Wave Listening Handbook is a guide for starting up in short wave listening (SWL). The book is comprised of 15 chapters that discuss the basics and fundamental concepts of short wave radio listening. The coverage of the text includes electrical principles; types of signals that can be heard in the radio spectrum; and using computers in SWL. The book also covers SWL equipment, such as receivers, converters, and circuits. The text will be of great use to individuals who want to get into short wave listening.

  8. Evidence for a Massive Extraterrestrial Airburst over North America 12.9 ka Ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, R. B.; West, A.; Revay, Z.; Belgya, T.; Smith, A.; Que Hee, S. S.

    2007-05-01

    and SIO2, Na2O, K2O, Cr2O3, Ni, Co, Ir, Th, U, and other trace element abundances that are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources except for Lunar Procellarum KREEP terrain (PKT). We propose that the YDB layer is the ejecta layer from an airburst over the Laurentide Ice Sheet that deposited local, low-speed terrestrial material near the airburst site and KREEP-like, high-speed projectile material farther away, leaving little or no permanent crater. The associated blast wave and thermal pulse would have contributed to the megafaunal extinctions and destabilized the Laurentide Ice Sheet, loading the atmosphere with dust, soot, NOx, and water vapor and triggered the YD cooling. 1 Haynes, C. V., Jr. in Murray Springs: a Clovis site with multiple activity areas in the San Pedro Valley, Arizona. C. V. Haynes, Jr. and Bruce B. Huckell, eds. Tucson: Univ. of Arizona Press, in press, 2007.

  9. Who owns the Moon? extraterrestrial aspects of land and mineral resources ownership

    CERN Document Server

    Pop, Virgiliu

    2008-01-01

    This work investigates the permissibility and viability of property rights on the celestial bodies, particularly the extraterrestrial aspects of land and mineral resources ownership. In lay terms, it aims to find an answer to the question "Who owns the Moon?" After critically analyzing and dismantling with legal arguments the trivial issue of sale of extraterrestrial real estate, the book addresses the apparent silence of the law in the field of landed property in outer space, scrutinizing whether the factual situation on the extraterrestrial realms calls for legal regulations. The legal status of asteroids and the relationship between appropriation under international law and civil law appropriation are duly examined, as well as different property patterns – such as the commons regime, the Common Heritage of the Mankind, and the Frontier paradigm. Virgiliu Pop is one of world's specialists in the area of space property rights. A member of the International Institute of Space Law, Virgiliu has authored seve...

  10. The Societal Impact of Extraterrestrial Life: The Relevance of History and the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    This chapter reviews past studies on the societal impact of extraterrestrial life and offers four related ways in which history is relevant to the subject: the history of impact thus far, analogical reasoning, impact studies in other areas of science and technology, and studies on the nature of discovery and exploration. We focus particularly on the promise and peril of analogical arguments, since they are by necessity widespread in the field. This chapter also summarizes the relevance of the social sciences, particularly anthropology and sociology, and concludes by taking a closer look at the possible impact of the discovery of extraterrestrial life on theology and philosophy. In undertaking this study we emphasize three bedrock principles: (1) we cannot predict the future; (2) society is not monolithic, implying many impacts depending on religion, culture and worldview; (3) the impact of any discovery of extraterrestrial life is scenario-dependent.

  11. The biological universe. The twentieth century extraterrestrial life debate and the limits of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, S. J.

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. Does 'biological law' reign throughout the universe? Are there other histories, religions, and philosophies outside of those on Earth? Do extraterrestrial minds ponder the mysteries of the universe? The attempts to answer these often asked questions form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of science and culture, and this is the first book to provide a rich and colorful history of those attempts during the twentieth century. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, the author shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a 'biophysical cosmology' that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe.

  12. The biological universe: the twentieth-century extraterrestrial life debate and the limits of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. Does `biological law' reign throughout the universe? Are there other histories, religions, and philosophies outside of those on Earth? Do extraterrestrial minds ponder the mysteries of the universe? The attempts toanswer these often asked questions form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of science and culture, and The Biological Universe is the first book to provide a rich and colorful history of those attempts during the twentieth century. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a `biophysical cosmology' that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe.

  13. Fear, pandemonium, equanimity and delight: human responses to extra-terrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Albert A

    2011-02-13

    How will people respond to the discovery of extra-terrestrial life? Potentially useful resources for addressing this question include historical prototypes, disaster studies and survey research. Reactions will depend on the interplay of the characteristics of the newly found life, the unfolding of the discovery, the context and content of the message and human information processing as shaped by biology, culture and psychology. Pre-existing images of extra-terrestrials as god-like, demonic, or artificial will influence first impressions that may prove highly resistant to change. Most probably people will develop comprehensive images based on minimal information and assess extra-terrestrials in the same ways that they assess one another. Although it is easy to develop frightening scenarios, finding microbial life in our Solar System or intercepting a microwave transmission from many light years away are less likely to be met with adverse reactions such as fear and pandemonium than with positive reactions such as equanimity and delight.

  14. Impact of cognitive radio on radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, M.J.; Boonstra, A.J.; Baan, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of new communication techniques requires an increase in the efficiency of spectrum usage. Cognitive radio is one of the new techniques that fosters spectrum efficiency by using unoccupied frequency spectrum for communications. However, cognitive radio will increase the transmission

  15. SETI reloaded, Next Generation Radio Telescopes, Transients and Cognitive Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) using radio telescopes is an area of research that is now more than 50 years old. Thus far, both targeted and wide-area surveys have yet to detect artificial signals from intelligent civilisations. In this paper, I argue that the incidence of co-existing intelligent and communicating civilisations is probably small in the Milky Way. While this makes successful SETI searches a very difficult pursuit indeed, the huge impact of even a single detection requires us to continue the search. A substantial increase in the overall performance of radio telescopes (and in particular future wide-field instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array, SKA), provide renewed optimism in the field. Evidence for this is already to be seen in the success of SETI researchers in acquiring observations on some of the world's most sensitive radio telescope facilities via open, peer-reviewed processes. The increasing interest in the dynamic radio sky, and our ability to detect new a...

  16. Resonance and Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  17. The effect of multiple scattering on the aspect sensitivity and polarization of radio auroral echoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, E.F.; Moorcroft, D.R. (Western Ontario, University, London (Canada))

    1992-04-01

    A Monte Carlo model of radio wave scattering in the auroral electrojet has been developed to investigate multiple scattering of radio auroral echoes. Using this model, predictions of the aspect angle behavior of first-, second-, and third-order scattered power have been made. The results indicate that multiple scattering may be an important effect for VHF radars which observe the auroral E region at large magnetic aspect angles. The model shows that linearly polarized radio waves can become depolarized because of multiple scattering if the radio transmitter is horizontally polarized but not if the radio transmitter is vertically polarized. 52 refs.

  18. GEOLOGICAL MARKS OF A POSSIBLE EXTRATERRESTRIAL IMPACT EVENT ON THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN SINIAN/CAMBRIAN IN TIANMENSHAN IN WESTERN HUNAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huaiyong; WANG Daojing; CHEN Guanghao; YIN Hanhui

    2004-01-01

    Geologic marks related to extraterrestrial impact events, such as impact split gravels, impact brecciate layers, impact dikes, microirghizites, microtektites, especially meteoritic residues, were discovered on the boundary between Sinian/Cambrian at Tianmenshan of Western Hunan, which may possibly demonstrate that an extraterrestrial impact event has ever occurred there on the S/C boundary.

  19. Optimum conditions for prebiotic evolution in extraterrestrial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ousama H.

    The overall goal of the dissertation was to devise synthetic pathways leading to the production of peptides and amino acids from smaller organic precursors. To this end, eight different zeolites were tested in order to determine their catalytic potential in the conversion of amino acids to peptides. The zeolites tested were either synthetic or naturally occurring. Acidic solutions of amino acids were prepared with or without zeolites and their reactivity was monitored over a four-week time interval. The kinetics and feasibility of peptide synthesis from selected amino acid combinations was investigated via the paper chromatography technique. Nine different amino acids were tested. The nature and extent of product were measured at constant time intervals. It was found that two ZSM-5 synthetic zeolites as well as the Fisher Scientific zeolite mix without alumina salts may have a catalytic potential in the conversion of amino acids to peptides. The conversion was verified by matching the paper chromatogram of the experimental product with that of a known peptide. The experimental results demonstrate that the optimum solvent system for paper chromatographic analysis of the zeolite-catalyzed self-assembly of the amino acids L-aspartic acid, L- asparagine, L-histidine, and L-serine is a 50:50 mixture of 1-butanol and acetone by volume. For the amino acids L-alanine, L-glycine, and L-valine, the optimum solvent was found to be a 30:70 mixture of ammonia and propanol by volume. A mathematical model describing the distance traveled (spot position) versus reaction time was constructed for the zeolite-catalyzed conversion of L- leucine and L-tyrosine and was found to approximately follow the function f(t) = 25 ln t. Two case studies for prebiotic synthesis leading to the production of amino acids or peptides in extraterrestrial environments were discussed: one involving Saturn's moon Titan, and the other involving Jupiter's moon Europa. In the Titan study, it was determined

  20. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Jason; Mueller, Robert; Smith, Drew; Nick, Andrew; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    reduction of as much as 72%. This paper will examine the effects of impact energy, frequency, scaling and their effect on excavation forces in a dry granular material such as lunar regolith. The past several years have shown an increasing interest in mining space resources both for exploration and commercial enterprises. This work studied the benefits and risks of percussive excavation and preliminry results indicate that this technique may become an enabling technology for extra-terrestrial excavation of regolith and ice.

  1. Educational Radio in India

    OpenAIRE

    VYAS, R. V.; R. C. Sharma; Kumar, Ashwini

    2002-01-01

    There are a good number of research studies, which indicate that radio has been a good medium of education delivery. Many experiments have been conducted in different countries on the use of radio in education. Radio has been used in conventional education, non-formal education, for agricultural education, for community development, in distance education, so on and so forth. This paper explains various educational radio projects undertaken in India

  2. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence: Listening for life in the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Thomas R.

    The reasons for and the activities of SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) are discussed. The history of the notion of intelligent life existing on other worlds is reviewed, and ideas of aliens in modern popular culture are examined. Arguments for and against the existence of intelligent life elsewhere are considered. Reports of extraterrestrial intelligence that turned out to be false are described, as are the messages sent out from earth to any aliens that may find them. The fight to maintain SETI funding and the related efforts in other countries are discussed. The arguments about UFOs are reviewed.

  3. Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy applied to extraterrestrial particles returned from the asteroid Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, U.; Maiwald, M.; Hanke, F.; Braune, M.; Pavlov, S. G.; Schröder, S.; Weber, I.; Busemann, H.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2017-09-01

    Two extraterrestrial particles from the asteroid Itokawa are investigated applying Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy (SERDS). These particles were returned by the Hayabusa mission of the Japanese Space Agency JAXA. For SERDS a diode laser based microsystem light source at 488 nm is used for excitation. It has been found that fluorescence signals masking the Raman spectral features of interest can be substantially separated by applying SERDS. Therefore, SERDS improves the information obtained from the Raman spectra and enables a reliable analysis for investigations on extraterrestrial samples.

  4. Automatic Analog Beamforming Transceiver for 60 GHz Radios

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Shalabh

    2009-01-01

    We propose a transceiver architecture for automatic beamforming and instantaneous setup of a multigigabit-per-second wireless link between two millimeter wave radios. The retro-directive architecture eliminates necessity of slow and complex digital algorithms required for searching and tracking the directions of opposite end radios. Simulations predict <5 micro-seconds setup time for a 2-Gbps bidirectional 60-GHz communication link between two 10-meters apart radios. The radios have 4-element arrayed antennas, and use QPSK modulation with 1.5 GHz analog bandwidth.

  5. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerandel, J.R., E-mail: j.horandel@astro.ru.n [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplan etario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-02-21

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES{sup star} and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  6. Measurement of Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Hoerandel, J R

    2009-01-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES-Star and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  7. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  8. Altitudinal dependence of meteor radio afterglows measured via optical counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Obenberger, K S; Dowell, J D; Schinzel, F K; Stovall, K; Sutton, E K; Taylor, G B

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the all-sky imaging capabilities of the LWA1 radio telescope along with a host of all-sky optical cameras, we have now observed 44 optical meteor counterparts to radio afterglows. Combining these observations we have determined the geographic positions of all 44 afterglows. Comparing the number of radio detections as a function of altitude above sea level to the number of expected bright meteors we find a strong altitudinal dependence characterized by a cutoff below $\\sim$ 90 km, below which no radio emission occurs, despite the fact that many of the observed optical meteors penetrated well below this altitude. This cutoff suggests that wave damping from electron collisions is an important factor for the evolution of radio afterglows, which agrees with the hypothesis that the emission is the result of electron plasma wave emission.

  9. LBRIG Newsletter (Newsletter of the Language by Radio Interest Group). Vol. 4, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Alan, Ed.; And Others

    One new French course taught by short wave radio is described here, and the remainder of the issue is devoted to schedules of major language programs (French, Spanish, Russian, German and Hebrew) given on short wave radio in North America. Frequencies are given in kilohertz, wavebands in meters. Approximate reception quality under normal…

  10. Ham radio for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Silver, H Ward

    2013-01-01

    An ideal first step for learning about ham radio Beyond operating wirelessly, today's ham radio operators can transmit data and pictures; use the Internet, laser, and microwave transmitters; and travel to places high and low to make contact. This hands-on beginner guide reflects the operational and technical changes to amateur radio over the past decade and provides you with updated licensing requirements and information, changes in digital communication (such as the Internet, social media, and GPS), and how to use e-mail via radio. Addresses the critical use of ham radio for replacing downe

  11. Radio occultation measurements of the lunar ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Maccaferri, G.; Cassaro, P.

    Radio occultation measurements by using interplanetary probes is a well known technique to obtain information on planetary atmospheres. To further understand the morphology of the lunar ionosphere we performed radio occultation experiments by using the radio sounding technique. This method mainly consists in the analisys of the effects produced on the radio wave transmitted from the spacecraft to the Earth when it crosses the atmosphere. The wave amplitude and phase undergo modifications that are correlated to the physical parameters - i.e. electron density - of the crossed medium. The first data set was obtained during the lunar occultations of the European probe SMART-1 shortly before impacting the lunar soil on September 3rd, 2006. During this experiment several radio occultation measurements of the signal transmitted by the spacecraft were performed in S and X band by using the 32 meters radiotelescopes (at Medicina and Noto) of the Istituto di Radioastronomia - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica. Further experiments were performed during lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus. On May 22nd and June 18th 2007 the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting Saturn, and the Venus Express spacecraft, orbiting Venus, respectively were occulted by the Moon. The variation of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by our instruments (˜ 1013 el/m2) on this occasion is in agreement with values of the electron number density acquired by in situ measuments of the US Apollo missions and the USSR Luna 19 and 22 probes.

  12. Millimeter Wave Radio Frequency Propagation Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-28

    assume that no excess attenuation or obstacles are present, and the signal propagates along a clear signal path directly between the transmitter and...performed by simple trigonometry . The angle is determined by: θ sin | |, (103) where CL is the channel length, hTX is the height of the

  13. Radiography of Spanish Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Emma Rodero Antón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In its eighty years of existence, radio has been always characterized to adapt to the social, cultural and technological transformations. Thus it has been until this moment. Nevertheless, some years ago, the authors and professionals of this medium have been detecting a stagnation that affects to its structure. At a time in continuous technological evolution, radio demands a deep transformation. For that reason, from the conviction of which the future radio, public and commercial, will necessarily have to renew itself, in this paper we establish ten problems and their possible solutions to the radio crisis in order to draw an x-ray of radio in Spain. Radio has future, but it is necessary to work actively by it. That the radio continues being part of sound of our life, it will depend on the work of all: companies, advertisers, professionals, students, investigators and listeners.

  14. Radio Detection of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Falcke, Heino

    2008-01-01

    The radio technique for the detection of cosmic particles has seen a major revival in recent years. New and planned experiments in the lab and the field, such as GLUE, Anita, LUNASKA, Codalema, LOPES as well as sophisticated Monte Carlo experiments have produced a wealth of new information and I review here briefly some of the main results with the main focus on air showers. Radio emission of ultra-high energy cosmic particles offers a number of interesting advantages. Since radio waves suffer no attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers, can be used day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. The LOPES experiment has detected the radio emission from cosmic rays, confirmed the geosynchrotron effect for extensive air showers, and provided a good calibration fomula to convert the radio signal into primary particle energy. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that also the shower maximum and the particle composition c...

  15. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the ...

  16. Extracting Spectral Index of Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Radio Polarizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    We explain the large scale correlations in radio polarization in terms of the correlations of primordial/source magnetic field. The radio waves are dominantly produced by the synchrotron mechanism and hence their polarization angle is deemed to be correlated with the magnetic field of the radio source. The primordial intergalactic magnetic field seeds the source magnetic field and hence it is possible that during the source evolution the correlations of primordial magnetic field survived. We model the intergalactic magnetic field in all $3D$ space and fit its correlations with JVAS/CLASS radio polarization alignments. We find that the radio polarization alignments are best fitted with the magnetic field spectral index given by $-2.43\\pm 0.02$. We show that primordial magnetic field correlation provides a good explanation of the observed radio polarization alignment.

  17. Radio emissions from pulsar companions : a refutable explanation for galactic transients and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The six known highly dispersed fast radio bursts are attributed to extragalactic radio sources, of unknown origin but extremely energetic. We propose here a new explanation - not requiring an extreme release of energy - involving a body (planet, asteroid, white dwarf) orbiting an extragalactic pulsar. We investigate a theory of radio waves associated to such pulsar-orbiting bodies. We focus our analysis on the waves emitted from the magnetic wake of the body in the pulsar wind. After deriving their properties, we compare them with the observations of various transient radio signals in order to see if they could originate from pulsar-orbiting bodies. The analysis is based on the theory of Alfv\\'en wings: for a body immersed in a pulsar wind, a system of two stationary Alfv\\'en waves is attached to the body, provided that the wind is highly magnetized. When destabilized through plasma instabilities, Alfv\\'en wings can be the locus of strong radio sources convected with the pulsar wind. Assuming a cyclotron mase...

  18. Multiplication of microbes below 0.690 water activity : implications for terrestrial and extraterrestrial life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Andrew; Burkhardt, Jürgen; Cockell, Charles S; Cray, Jonathan A; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Fox-Powell, Mark; Kee, Terence P; Kminek, Gerhard; McGenity, Terry J; Timmis, Kenneth N; Timson, David J; Voytek, Mary A; Westall, Frances; Yakimov, Michail M; Hallsworth, John E

    2015-01-01

    Since a key requirement of known life forms is available water (water activity; aw ), recent searches for signatures of past life in terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments have targeted places known to have contained significant quantities of biologically available water. However, early life

  19. Abundances of lanthanoids, Th and U in extraterrestrial matters and their cosmochemical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebihara, M. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Lanthanoid and actinoid abundances in the extraterrestrial materials are highly informative in discussing differentiation of planetary materials and cosmochronology at the early solar system. After briefly explaining analytical methods applicable to their determination, three research themes, two of which have been already in progress, are introduced and the significance of lanthanoids and actinoids in cosmochemical materials is emphasized. (author)

  20. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  1. Search for extraterrestrial antineutrino sources with the KamLAND detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abe, S.; et al., [Unknown; Decowski, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for extraterrestrial electron antineutrinos ( 's) in the energy range 8.3 MeV < Eve < 31.8 MeV using the KamLAND detector. In an exposure of 4.53 kton-year, we identify 25 candidate events. All of the candidate events can be attributed to background, most important

  2. Analisis Kendala Perizinan Spektrum Frekuensi Radio untuk Radio Komunitas

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Wahyuningsih

    2014-01-01

    Izin penggunaan spektrum frekuensi radio diatur dalam Undang-undang No.36 tahun 1999 tentang Telekomunikasi. Saat ini masih ditemukan Radio Komunitas yang belum memiliki Izin Stasiun Radio (ISR). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menemu kenali kendala-kendala yang dihadapi Radio Komunitas pada proses pengajuan Izin Stasiun Radio (ISR). Teknik pengumpulan data melalui wawancara dengan penanggungjawab Radio Komunitas dan pejabat di lingkungan Balai Monitor Frekuensi Radio (Balmon) di Jakarta, Sema...

  3. Analisis Kendala Perizinan Spektrum Frekuensi Radio untuk Radio Komunitas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Izin penggunaan spektrum frekuensi radio diatur dalam Undang-undang No.36 tahun 1999 tentang Telekomunikasi. Saat ini masih ditemukan Radio Komunitas yang belum memiliki Izin Stasiun Radio (ISR). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menemu kenali kendala-kendala yang dihadapi Radio Komunitas pada proses pengajuan Izin Stasiun Radio (ISR). Teknik pengumpulan data melalui wawancara dengan penanggungjawab Radio Komunitas dan pejabat di lingkungan Balai Monitor Frekuensi Radio (Balmon) di Jakarta, Sema...

  4. Variational Symplectic Particle-in-cell Simulation of Nonlinear Mode Conversion from Extraordinary waves to Bernstein Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Xiang, Nong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear mode conversion of extraordinary waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied using the variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation. The accuracy of the nonlinear simulation is guaranteed by the long-term accuracy and conservativeness of the symplectic algorithm. The spectra of the electromagnetic wave, the evolution of the wave reflectivity, the energy deposition profile, and the parameter-dependent properties of radio-frequency waves during the nonlinear mode conversion are investigated. It is illustrated that nonlinear effects significantly modify the physics of the radio-frequency injection in magnetized plasmas. The evolutions of the radio-frequency wave reflectivity and the energy deposition are observed, as well as the self-interaction of the Bernstein waves and mode excitations. Even for waves with small magnitude, nonlinear effects can also become important after continuous wave injections, which are common in the realistic radio-frequency wave heating and cur...

  5. Tracers of the Extraterrestrial Component in Sediments and Inferences for Earth's Accretion History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    The study of extraterrestrial matter in sediments began with the discovery of cosmic spherules during the HMS Challenger Expedition (1873-1876), but has evolved into a multidisciplinary study of the chemical, physical, and isotopic study of sediments. Extraterrestrial matter in sediments comes mainly from dust and large impactors from the asteroid belt and comets. What we know of the nature of these source materials comes from the study of stratospheric dust particles, cosmic spherules, micrometeorites, meteorites, and astronomical observations. The most common chemical tracers of extraterrestrial matter in sediments are the siderophile elements, most commonly iridium and other platinum group elements. Physical tracers include cosmic and impact spherules, Ni-rich spinels, meteorites, fossil meteorites, and ocean-impact melt debris. Three types of isotopic systems have been used to trace extraterrestrial matter. Osmium isotopes cannot distinguish chondritic from mantle sources, but provide a useful tool in modeling long-term accretion rates. Helium isotopes can be used to trace the long-term flux of the fine fraction of the interplanetary dust complex. Chromium isotopes can provide unequivocal evidence of an extraterrestrial source for sediments with high concentrations of meteoritic Cr. The terrestrial history of impacts, as recorded in sediments, is still poorly understood. Helium isotopes, multiple Ir anomalies, spherule beds, and craters all indicate a comet shower in the late Eocene. The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary impact event appears to have been caused by a single carbonaceous chondrite projectile, most likely of asteroid origin. Little is known of the impact record in sediments from the rest of the Phanerozoic. Several impact deposits are known in the Precambrian, including several possible mega-impacts in the Early Archean.

  6. Harmonization based on regulatory science between scientific and commercial radio uses in a case of ultrawideband radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryuji; Iinatti, Jari; Sameshima, Keiko

    2016-12-01

    Harmonization for scientific and commercial radio uses is one of the unsolved problems in academia, industry, and regulatory bodies. The demands for commercial radio, mobile communications, and broadcasting have significantly increased over the past few decades; therefore, interference has become a major concern. There is an increasing need to prevent such interferences, for example, between commercial radio systems and other potentially sensitive radio systems such as those used for radio astronomy or studies. When discussing the fairness in resolving such conflicts, regulatory science may be a useful multidisciplinary approach as it scientifically investigates the advantages and disadvantages of a new application or technology for conflicts between different stakeholders through a mathematical analysis of risks versus benefits of the given technology. Such an analysis enables fair rules or regulations to be made. In this study, we apply the above-mentioned concept to harmonize the scientific and commercial uses of radio. After a brief introduction to regulatory science, a case study about the coexistence between ultrawideband commercial radio systems and radio astronomy is considered. Finally, a proposal by International Union of Radio Science, Japan, to the Science Council of Japan in the Cabinet Office to establish a "Center for Coexistence and Harmonization of Scientific and Commercial Uses of Radio Waves" is explained.

  7. Provocative radio transients and base rate bias: a Bayesian argument for conservatism

    CERN Document Server

    Hair, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Most searches for alien radio transmission have focused on finding omni-directional or purposefully earth-directed beams of enduring duration. However, most of the interesting signals so far detected have been transient and non-repeatable in nature. These signals could very well be the first data points in an ever-growing data base of such signals used to construct a probabilistic argument for the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. This paper looks at the effect base rate bias could have on deciding which signals to include in such an archive based upon the likely assumption that our ability to discern natural from artificial signals will be less than perfect.

  8. Gravity-gradient dynamics experiments performed in orbit utilizing the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE-1) spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, H.

    1973-01-01

    Six dynamic experiments were performed in earth orbit utilizing the RAE spacecraft in order to test the accuracy of the mathematical model of RAE dynamics. The spacecraft consisted of four flexible antenna booms, mounted on a rigid cylindrical spacecraft hub at center, for measuring radio emissions from extraterrestrial sources. Attitude control of the gravity stabilized spacecraft was tested by using damper clamping, single lower leading boom operations, and double lower boom operations. Results and conclusions of the in-orbit dynamic experiments proved the accuracy of the analytic techniques used to model RAE dynamical behavior.

  9. Senior radio listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora

    Radiobroadcasting and the hardware materialization of radio have during the 20th century changed significantly, which means that senior radio listeners have travelled along with this evolution from large, impressive radio furnitures to DAB and small, wireless, mobile devices, and from grave...... and solemn radio voices to lightharted, laughing and chatting speakers. Senior radio listerners have experienced the development and refinements of technique, content and genres. It is now expected of all media users that they are capable of crossing media, combining, juggling and jumping between various...... media platforms, not the least when listening to radio. The elder generation is no exception from this. Recently, for instance, the Danish public broadcast DR has carried out an exodus of programmes targeted for the senior segment. These programmes are removed from regular FM and sent to DAB receivers...

  10. Biomedical Monitoring By A Novel Noncontact Radio Frequency Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The area of Space Health and Medicine is one of the NASA's Space Technology Grand Challenges. Space is an extreme environment which is not conducive to human life. The extraterrestrial environment can result in the deconditioning of various human physiological systems and thus require easy to use physiological monitoring technologies in order to better monitor space crews for appropriate health management and successful space missions and space operations. Furthermore, the Space Technology Roadmap's Technology Area Breakdown Structure calls for improvements in research to support human health and performance (Technology Area 06). To address these needs, this project investigated a potential noncontact and noninvasive radio frequency-based technique of monitoring central hemodynamic function in human research subjects in response to orthostatic stress.

  11. Communicating radio astronomy with the public: Another point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, S.

    2008-06-01

    Radio waves cannot be sensed directly, but they are used in daily life by almost everybody. Even so, the majority of the general public do not even know that celestial bodies emit radio waves. Presenting invisible radiation to a general audience with little or no background knowledge in physics is a difficult task. In addition, much important technology now commonplace in many other scientific fields was pioneered by radio observatories in their efforts to detect and process radio signals from the Universe. Radio astronomy outreach does not have such a well-established background as optical astronomy outreach. In order to make radio astronomy accessible to the public, it is necessary either to add more scientific detail or to find a different way of communicating. In this paper we present examples from our work at the Visitor Centre "Marcello Ceccarelli", which is part of the Medicina Radio Observatory, operated by the Institute of Radio Astronomy (IRA) in Bologna, which in turn is part of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF).

  12. Fast Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshaya Rane; Duncan Lorimer

    2017-09-01

    We summarize our current state of knowledge of fast radio bursts (FRBs) which were first discovered a decade ago. Following an introduction to radio transients in general, including pulsars and rotating radio transients, we discuss the discovery of FRBs. We then discuss FRB follow-up observations in the context of repeat bursts before moving on to review propagation effects on FRB signals, FRB progenitor models and an outlook on FRBs as potential cosmological tools.

  13. How far are extraterrestrial life and intelligence after Kepler?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Amri

    2017-08-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that a significant fraction of all stars may have an Earth-size habitable planet. A dramatic support was the recent detection of Proxima Centauri b. Using a Drake-equation like formalism I derive an equation for the abundance of biotic planets as a function of the relatively modest uncertainty in the astronomical data and of the (yet unknown) probability for the evolution of biotic life, Fb. I suggest that Fb may be estimated by future spectral observations of exoplanet biomarkers. It follows that if Fb is not very small, then a biotic planet may be expected within about 10 light years from Earth. Extending this analyses to advanced life, I derive expressions for the distance to putative civilizations in terms of two additional Drake parameters - the probability for evolution of a civilization, Fc, and its average longevity. Assuming "optimistic" values for the Drake parameters, (Fb Fc 1), and a broadcasting duration of a few thousand years, the likely distance to the nearest civilizations detectable by SETI is of the order of a few thousand light years. Finally I calculate the distance and probability of detecting intelligent signals with present and future radio telescopes such as Arecibo and SKA and how it could constrain the Drake parameters.

  14. A Zynq-based Cluster Cognitive Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Rooks, Kurtis M.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional hardware radios provide very rigid solutions to radio problems. Intelligent software defined radios, also known as cognitive radios, provide flexibility and agility compared to hardware radio systems. Cognitive radios are well suited for radio applications in a changing radio frequency environment, such as dynamic spectrum access. In this thesis, a cognitive radio is demonstrated where the system self reconfigures to dem...

  15. Transformations of Radio Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Stachyra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some remarks upon the nature of contemporary radio communications in the context of the terms “aesthetics” and “aesthetisation”. The latter, denoting a process of turning aesthetic phenomena into unaesthetic ones, becomes the dominant strategy of formatted radio. The “surface aesthetisation,” which provides mainly pleasure and entertainment, transcends the simple styling of objects or environment and appears to be a more significant strand of contemporary culture. The article shows several examples of “surface” modelling of radio programming and explains their purpose in radio communication.

  16. STEM on the radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  17. Studying the evolution of a type III radio from the Sun up to 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Gottfried; Breitling, Frank; Vocks, Christian; Fallows, Richard; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    On March 16, 2016, a type III burst was observed with the ground-based radio telescopes LOFAR and URAN-2 as well as with the radiospectrometer aboard the spacecraft WIND.It started at 80 MHz at 06:37 UT and reached 50 kHz after 23 minutes. A type III burst are considered as the radio signature of an electron beam travelling from the corona into the interplanetary space. The energetic electrons carrying the beam excites Langmuir waves, which convert into radio waves by wave-particle interaction. The relationship between the drift rate and the frequency as derived from the dynamic radio spectra reveals that the velocity of the electrons generating the radio waves of the type III burst is increasing with increasing distance from the center of the Sun.

  18. Enhancing GNU Radio for Hardware Accelerated Radio Design

    OpenAIRE

    Irick, Charles Robert

    2010-01-01

    As technology evolves and new methods for designing radios arise, it becomes necessary to continue the search for fast and flexible development environments. Some of these new technologies include software defined radio (SDR), Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and the open source project GNU Radio. Software defined radio is a concept that GNU Radio has harnessed to allow developers to quickly create flexible radio designs. In terms of hardware, the maturity of FPGAs give ...

  19. Beyond the Drake Equation: On the Probability of the Nature of Extraterrestrial Life Forms in Our Galaxy Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Harold A.

    2014-01-01

    I will discuss my research into the issues associated with the nature of any extraterrestrials that may be encountered in the future in our galaxy. This research was sparked by statements made by Stephen Hawking in 2010 regarding his fear of emitting radiation from our Earth so that an extraterrestrial intelligent civilization may be alerted to our existence in the galaxy today. While addressing issues of extraterrestrial altruism, a probabilistic equation was developed which addresses the number of extraterrestrial intelligent life forms that may exist in our galaxy today, who could use our bodies for nourishment or reproductive purposes. The equation begins with the results from a Drake Equation calculation, and proceeds by addressing such biochemical parameters as the fraction of ETIs with: dextro sugar stereo-isomers; levo amino acid stereo-isomers; similar codon interpretation; chromosomal length and, similar cell membrane structure to allow egg penetration.

  20. Analisis Kendala Perizinan Spektrum Frekuensi Radio untuk Radio Komunitas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wahyuningsih

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Izin penggunaan spektrum frekuensi radio diatur dalam Undang-undang No.36 tahun 1999 tentang Telekomunikasi. Saat ini masih ditemukan Radio Komunitas yang belum memiliki Izin Stasiun Radio (ISR. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menemu kenali kendala-kendala yang dihadapi Radio Komunitas pada proses pengajuan Izin Stasiun Radio (ISR. Teknik pengumpulan data melalui wawancara dengan penanggungjawab Radio Komunitas dan pejabat di lingkungan Balai Monitor Frekuensi Radio (Balmon di Jakarta, Semarang dan Yogyakarta. Analisis data mengacu pada model Matthew B Miles dan A Michael Huberman. Hasil penelitian menyatakan kendala yang dihadapi terutama pada sertifikasi perangkat Radio Komunitas.

  1. Radio Graceful Hamming Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedzialomski Amanda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For k ∈ ℤ+ and G a simple, connected graph, a k-radio labeling f : V (G → ℤ+ of G requires all pairs of distinct vertices u and v to satisfy |f(u − f(v| ≥ k + 1 − d(u, v. We consider k-radio labelings of G when k = diam(G. In this setting, f is injective; if f is also surjective onto {1, 2, . . . , |V (G|}, then f is a consecutive radio labeling. Graphs that can be labeled with such a labeling are called radio graceful. In this paper, we give two results on the existence of radio graceful Hamming graphs. The main result shows that the Cartesian product of t copies of a complete graph is radio graceful for certain t. Graphs of this form provide infinitely many examples of radio graceful graphs of arbitrary diameter. We also show that these graphs are not radio graceful for large t.

  2. Radio Emission from Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    George, Samuel J.; Stevens, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from new low frequency observations of two extrasolar planetary systems (Epsilon Eridani and HD128311) taken at 150 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We do not detect either system, but are able to place tight upper limits on their low frequency radio emission.

  3. Valuing commercial radio licences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerste, M.; Poort, J.; van Eijk, N.

    2015-01-01

    Within the EU regulatory framework, licensees for commercial radio broadcasting may be charged a fee to ensure optimal allocation of scarce resources but not to maximize public revenues. While radio licence renewal occurs in many EU countries, an objective, model-based approach for setting licence f

  4. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric and Ionospheric Disturbances using Radio Science Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. M.; Paik, M.; Oudrhiri, K.; Buccino, D.; Kahan, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheres and ionospheres can have significant impacts on radio frequency signal propagation such as Deep Space Network and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS, including Global Position System (GPS)) measurements. Previous studies indicate that Earth's atmospheric, surface, and interior processes, such as seismic activities, tsunamis, meteor impacts, and volcanic eruptions, are able to trigger atmospheric acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs), which potentially induce traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the upper atmosphere. These perturbations are relatively small to the background of atmospheric and ionospheric profiles but detectable to radio frequency signals. In this research, we will demonstrate the ability of using ground- and space-based radio science techniques to detect and characterize atmospheric and ionospheric wave propagation from solid earth events including seismic activities and tsunamis. The detected wave trains with wave characteristics such as propagation speeds and wavelengths are classified through analysis of the line of sight (LOS) and radio occultation measurements made by different frequency radio waves. Dominant and different physical characteristics of AGW and TID propagations are found to be associated with specific surface wave propagations. In this research, we compare observations made by different frequency radio signals, corresponding model simulations, and other geophysical measurements of surface wave propagation such as seismometers, infrasound arrays and DART buoys. Results are shown to improve our understanding of the interactions between surface, atmosphere, and ionosphere. The better understanding of the coupling between planetary interior, surface, atmosphere, and ionosphere will benefit from innovative radio science techniques.

  5. Faint Radio Sources and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Haarsma, D B; Windhorst, R A; Richards, E A; 10.1086/317225

    2010-01-01

    The centimeter-wave luminosity of local radio galaxies correlates well with their star formation rate. We extend this correlation to surveys of high-redshift radio sources to estimate the global star formation history. The star formation rate found from radio observations needs no correction for dust obscuration, unlike the values calculated from optical and ultraviolet data. Three deep radio surveys have provided catalogs of sources with nearly complete optical identifications and nearly 60% complete spectroscopic redshifts: the Hubble Deep Field and Flanking Fields at 12h+62d, the SSA13 field at 13h+42d, and the V15 field at 14h+52d. We use the redshift distribution of these radio sources to constrain the evolution of their luminosity function. The epoch dependent luminosity function is then used to estimate the evolving global star formation density. At redshifts less than one, our calculated star formation rates are significantly larger than even the dust-corrected optically-selected star formation rates;...

  6. Search For Evidence Of Extraterrestrial Life: Societal Issues And Concerns A Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, M.; Schwehm, G.; Horneck, G.

    2003-04-01

    The search for evidence of extraterrestrial life is an important scientific theme that fascinates the public and encourages interest in space exploration, both within the solar system and beyond. The rapid pace of mass media communication allows the public to share mission results and new discoveries almost simultaneously with the scientific community. As the science community continues its multi-pronged efforts to detect evidence of extraterrestrial life, it must be mindful of more than just science and technology. It is important to understand public perceptions, misperceptions, beliefs, concerns, and potential legal complications associated with the search for life beyond our home planet. This session with invited panelists is designed to provide brief overviews of some important non-scientific areas with the potential to impact future missions and astrobiological exploration. The brief presentations will be followed by open discussion and audience participation.

  7. First search for extraterrestrial neutrino-induced cascades with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Kiryluk, J

    2009-01-01

    We report on the first search for extra-terrestrial neutrino-induced cascades in IceCube. The analyzed data were collected in the year 2007 when 22 detector strings were installed and operated. We will discuss the analysis methods used to reconstruct cascades and to suppress backgrounds. Simulated neutrino signal events with a E-2 energy spectrum, which pass the background rejection criteria, are reconstructed with a resolution dlogE ~ 0.27 in the energy range from ~20 TeV to a few PeV. We present the range of the diffuse flux of extra-terrestrial neutrinos in the cascade channel in IceCube within which we expect to be able to put a limit.

  8. Limits on diffuse fluxes of high energy extraterrestrial neutrinos with the AMANDA-B10 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Doksus, P.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K.; Ganugapati, R.; Gaug, M.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hughey, B.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kim, J.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Mandli, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Messarius, T.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, P.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schinarakis, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Tilav, S.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2003-03-11

    Data from the AMANDA-B10 detector taken during the austral winter of 1997 have been searched for a diffuse flux of high energy extraterrestrial muon-neutrinos, as predicted from, e.g., the sum of all active galaxies in the universe. This search yielded no excess events above those expected from the background atmospheric neutrinos, leading to upper limits on the extraterrestrial neutrino flux. For an assumed E{sup -2} spectrum, a 90 percent classical confidence level upper limit has been placed at a level E{sup 2} Phi(E) = 8.4 x 10{sup -7} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}1 sr{sup -1} (for a predominant neutrino energy range 6-1000 TeV) which is the most restrictive bound placed by any neutrino detector. When specific predicted spectral forms are considered, it is found that some are excluded.

  9. First search for extraterrestrial neutrino-induced cascades with IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Kiryluk, Joanna

    2009-05-22

    We report on the first search for extraterrestrial neutrino-induced cascades in IceCube.The analyzed data were collected in the year 2007 when 22 detector strings were installed and operated. We will discuss the analysis methods used to reconstruct cascades and to suppress backgrounds. Simulated neutrino signal events with a E-2 energy spectrum, which pass the background rejection criteria, are reconstructed with a resolution Delta(log E) ~;; 0.27 in the energy range from ~;; 20 TeV to a few PeV. We present the range of the diffuse flux of extra-terrestrial neutrinos in the cascade channel in IceCube within which we expect to be able to put a limit.

  10. Basic elements of an international terrestrial reply following the detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnen, G. C. M.

    One of the most tantalizing questions human intelligence has posed itself since the beginnings of time is whether we are alone in the Universe. And if not, where are "the others," and is it possible that these "others" may contact us, with or without our knowledge? Scientific literature abounds with theories pro and con, and if any subject ever lent itself to make-believe it is this one. Connected with the scientific theories on the subject, which are so often misunderstood, popular belief has led to a steady stream of publications which have done nothing if they have not greatly hampered the real issue. In legal circles the subject of possible contacts with extraterrestrial intelligence was first discussed in the literature in the early 1960's when, among others, Andrew Haley wrote, in 1965, about "Space Law and Government." This publication appeared in the midst of the United Nations preparations for what was to become, in 1967, the Outer Space Treaty. Though the idea of an international protocol governing actions after the detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence has never been on the agenda of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, space lawyers continue to think and to write about that subject. Recent advances in spaceflight, in particular the Voyager missions to the outer planets of our solar system, give the subject a new impetus. The present paper is intended to dwell upon present scientific thoughts about the likelihood that a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence will be detected in the near future. Although this likelihood appears to be remote, it seems, nevertheless, worthwhile that discussion continues in space legal circles regarding the formulation of an international protocol for activities following the detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. Since the confirmed detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence could well be of crucial importance for the continuing existence of

  11. Searching for extraterrestrial intelligence signals in astronomical spectra, including existing data

    CERN Document Server

    Borra, Ermanno F

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to make Astronomers aware that Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence can be carried out by analyzing standard astronomical spectra, including those they already have taken. Simplicity is the outstanding advantage of a search in spectra. The spectra can be analyzed by simple eye inspection or a few lines of code that uses Fourier transform software. Theory, confirmed by published experiments, shows that periodic signals in spectra can be easily generated by sending light pulses separated by constant time intervals. While part of this article, like all articles on searches for ETI, is highly speculative the basic physics is sound. In particular, technology now available on Earth could be used to send signals having the required energy to be detected at a target located 1000 light years away. Extraterrestrial Intelligence (ETI) could use these signals to make us aware of their existence. For an ETI, the technique would also have the advantage that the signals could be det...

  12. The Use of Extraterrestrial Resources to Facilitate Space Science and Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Ian A; Carpenter, James

    2016-01-01

    To-date, all human economic activity has depended on the resources of a single planet, and it has long been recognized that developments in space exploration could in principle open our closed planetary economy to external resources of energy and raw materials. Recently, there has been renewed interest in these possibilities, with several private companies established with the stated aim of exploiting extraterrestrial resources. Space science and exploration are among the potential beneficiaries of space resources because their use may permit the construction and operation of scientific facilities in space that will be unaffordable if all the required material and energy resources have to be lifted out of Earth's gravity. Examples may include the next generation of large space telescopes, sample return missions to the outer Solar System, and human research stations on the Moon and Mars. These potential scientific benefits of extraterrestrial resource utilisation were the topic of a Royal Astronomical Society ...

  13. Finding extraterrestrial life using ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Snellen, Ignas; Poole, Rudolf Le; Brogi, Matteo; Birkby, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor 3 smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter tau Bootis b, albeit such...

  14. Origin of spherule samples recovered from antarctic ice sheet-Terrestrial or extraterrestrial?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, Shun; Takamiya, Koichi; Shibata, Seiichi [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Kobayashi, Takayuki [College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan); Ebihara, Mitsuru [Dept. of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Thirty-eight spherules from the Antarctic ice sheet were analyzed using neutron activation analysis under two different conditions to investigate their origin. In almost all of these spherules, the contents of iron, cobalt, and manganese were determined to be 31% to 88%, 17 mg/kg to 810 mg/kg, and 0.017% to 7%, respectively. A detectable iridium content of 0.84 mg/kg was found in only one spherule, which was judged to be extraterrestrial in origin. A comparison of elemental compositions of the Antarctic spherules analyzed in this study with those of deep-sea sediment spherules and those of terrestrial materials revealed that most of the Antarctic spherules except for the sample in which iridium was detected could not be identified as extraterrestrial in origin.

  15. A Deep Space Network Portable Radio Science Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeling, Andre P.; Sigman, Elliott H.; Chandra, Kumar; Trinh, Joseph T.; Navarro, Robert; Rogstad, Stephen P.; Goodhart, Charles E.; Proctor, Robert C.; Finley, Susan G.; White, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    The Radio Science Receiver (RSR) is an open-loop receiver installed in NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN), which digitally filters and records intermediate-frequency (IF) analog signals. The RSR is an important tool for the Cassini Project, which uses it to measure perturbations of the radio-frequency wave as it travels between the spacecraft and the ground stations, allowing highly detailed study of the composition of the rings, atmosphere, and surface of Saturn and its satellites.

  16. The School of Galactic Radio Astronomy: An Internet Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Cline, J. D.; Osborne, C. S.; Moffett, D. A.; Case, J.

    2001-12-01

    The School of Galactic Radio Astronomy (SGRA) takes its name from the source SGR-A, the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. SGRA is based at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) as an experience-based school room for use by middle and high school teachers and their students. Their scientific educational experience at SGRA relies on Internet access to PARI's remote-controlled 4.6-m radio telescope which is equipped with a 1420 MHz receiver. The 1420 MHz signal may either be recorded as a spectrum over a 4 MHz bandpass, or mapped over extended regions. Teachers, classes, and Independent Study students access the 4.6-m radio telescope via the SGRA webpage. The SGRA webpage has four components: Radio Astronomy Basics, Observing, Guides, and Logbook. The Radio Astronomy Basics section summarizes the concepts of electromagnetic waves, detection of electromagnetic waves, sources of astronomical radio waves, and how astronomers use radio telescopes. The Observing section is the link to controlling the radio telescope and receiver. The Observing page is designed in the same way a control room at an observatory is designed. Controls include options of source selection, coordinate entry, slew, set, and guide selection, and tracking. Also within the Observing section is the curriculum which presents eight modules based on relevant radio astronomy topics and objects. The Guides webpage contains atlases of the astronomical sky, catalogs, examples of observing sessions, and data reduction software that can be downloaded for analysis offline. The LOGBOOK page is primarily a guestbook, and evaluation form. We acknowledge support from the Space Telescope Science Institute IDEAS Program, and the South Carolina State University PAIR Program.

  17. Fast Radio Bursts and Radio Transients from Black Hole Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, Chiara; Levin, Janna; Lazio, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Most black holes (BHs) will absorb a neutron star (NS) companion fully intact, without tidal disruption, suggesting the pair will remain dark to telescopes. Even without tidal disruption, electromagnetic (EM) luminosity is generated from the battery phase of the binary when the BH interacts with the NS magnetic field. Originally the luminosity was expected in high-energy X-rays or gamma-rays, however we conjecture that some of the battery power is emitted in the radio bandwidth. While the luminosity and timescale are suggestive of fast radio bursts (FRBs), NS-BH coalescence rates are too low to make these a primary FRB source. Instead, we propose the transients form a FRB sub-population, distinguishable by a double peak. The main burst is from the peak luminosity before merger, while the post-merger burst follows from the NS magnetic field migration to the BH, causing a shock. NS-BH pairs are desirable for ground-based gravitational wave (GW) observatories since the pair might not be detected any other way, with EM counterparts augmenting the scientific leverage beyond the GW signal. Valuably, EM signal can break degeneracies in the parameters encoded in the GW as well as probe the NS magnetic field strength, yielding insights into open problems in NS magnetic field decay.

  18. Deep Radio Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Röttgering, H.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; de Gasperin, F.; Bonafede, A.; Pizzo, R.; Ferrari, C.; Orrù, E.; Ogrean, G. A.; LOFAR Busyweek Team; surveys KSP, LOFAR

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR and JVLA radio observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster. The Toothbrush cluster hosts diffuse 2 Mpc extended radio emission in the form of a radio relic and halo. XMM-Newton X-ray observations show that the cluster is undergoing a major merger event. Both the radio relic and halo are likely related to this ongoing merger. Radio relics are proposed to be direct tracers of shock waves in the intracluster medium. The XMM observations indeed reveal a shock, but there is a puzzling 200 kpc spatial offset between the shock position and relic. Our deep LOFAR and JVLA observations allow a detailed spectral study to test the shock origin of the relic and underlying particle acceleration mechanisms. Finally, the LOFAR observations highlight the science that could be obtained from a deep low-frequency all-sky survey.

  19. The nations united in the scientific and political debate of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnen, Bess

    Since 1959 (Cocconi and Morrison), the item of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) has continuously been debated in scientific fora. Since the 1970's (Fasan, 1970; Reijnen 1976), political and legal experts have regularly written on the subject while, in 1977, the UNCOPUOS published a review on SETI (UN Doc. A/AC. 105/206, of 18.10.77) entitled: 'Messages to extraterrestrial Civilizations'. In the mid-1980 s, international agreements as well as legal principles relating to contact and communication with ETI were proposed (Acta Astronautica, 1990). Though there is, as yet, no confirmed evidence of an extra-terrestrial contact with Earth ever having been established, the search continues. The international political and legal framework as well as the contents of a potential terrestrial reply also remains an issue of continuous discussions (Acta Astronautica, 1990). The time seems ripe for a concerted effort by humankind to address the societal and, principally, political decisions to be taken in international governmental bodies equipped to deal with the multitude of scientific and political questions and implications to be solved. The political/legal questions will be investigated, the main remaining issues addressed, and suggestions presented for implementation of the issue in intergovernmental and non-governmental bodies. 'SETI essentially is a philosophical venture and, perhaps, the most important man has ever contemplated'. (Coffey, 1980).

  20. Extraterrestrial Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Extraterrestrially delivered organics in the origin of cellular life. Various processes leading to the emergence of cellular life from organics delivered from space to earth or other planetary bodies in the solar system will be reviewed. The focus will be on: (1) self-assembly of amphiphilic material to vesicles and other structures, such as micelles and multilayers, and its role in creating environments suitable for chemical catalysis, (2) a possible role of extraterrestrial delivery of organics in the formation of the simplest bioenergetics (3) mechanisms leading from amino acids or their precursors to simple peptides and, subsequently, to the evolution of metabolism. These issues will be discussed from two opposite points of view: (1) Which molecules could have been particularly useful in the protobiological evolution; this may provide focus for searching for these molecules in interstellar media. (2) Assuming that a considerable part of the inventory of organic matter on the early earth was delivered extraterrestrially, what does relative abundance of different organics in space tell us about the scenario leading to the origin of life.

  1. The Nomad Explorer assembly assist vehicle: An architecture for rapid global extraterrestrial base infrastructure establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelu, Madhu

    1994-01-01

    Traditional concepts of lunar bases describe scenarios where components of the bases are landed on the lunar surface, one at a time, and then put together to form a complete stationary lunar habitat. Recently, some concepts have described the advantages of operating a mobile or 'roving' lunar base. Such a base vastly improves the exploration range from a primary lunar base. Roving bases would also allow the crew to first deploy, test, operationally certify, and then regularly maintain, service, and evolve long life-cycle facilities like observatories or other science payload platforms that are operated far apart from each other across the extraterrestrial surface. The Nomad Explorer is such a mobile lunar base. This paper describes the architectural program of the Nomad Explorer, its advantages over a stationary lunar base, and some of the embedded system concepts which help the roving base to speedily establish a global extraterrestrial infrastructure. A number of modular autonomous logistics landers will carry deployable or erectable payloads, service, and logistically resupply the Nomad Explorer at regular intercepts along the traverse. Starting with the deployment of science experiments and telecommunication networks, and the manned emplacement of a variety of remote outposts using a unique EVA Bell system that enhances manned EVA, the Nomad Explorer architecture suggests the capability for a rapid global development of the extraterrestrial body. The Moon and Mars are candidates for this 'mission oriented' strategy. The lunar case is emphasized in this paper.

  2. Coherent detection of orbital angular momentum in radio

    CERN Document Server

    Daldorff, L K S; Bergman, J E S; Isham, B; Al-Nuaimi, M K T; Forozesh, K; Carozzi, T D

    2015-01-01

    The angular momentum propagated by a beam of radiation has two contributions: spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM). SAM corresponds to wave polarisation, while OAM-carrying beams are characterized by a phase which is a function of azimuth. We demonstrate experimentally that radio beams propagating OAM can be generated and coherently detected using ordinary electric dipole antennas. The results presented here could pave the way for novel radio OAM applications in technology and science, including radio communication, passive remote sensing, and new types of active (continuous or pulsed transmission) electromagnetic measurements.

  3. Estimation of Potential Interference Immunity of Radio Reception with Spatial Signal Processing in Mutipath Radio-Communication Channels. Part II. Meter and Decimeter Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvov, A. V.; Metelev, S. L.

    2016-11-01

    We propose simulation models for estimating the interference immunity of radio reception using the spatial processing of signals in the airborne and ground-based communication channels of the meter and decimeter wavelength ranges. The ultimate achievable interference immunity under various radio-wave propagation conditions is studied.

  4. ON THE ORIGIN OF RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz, E-mail: aszary@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [Kepler Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Góra, Lubuska 2, 65-265 Zielona Góra (Poland)

    2015-02-10

    Magnetars are the most magnetized objects in the known universe. Powered by the magnetic energy, and not by the rotational energy as in the case of radio pulsars, they have long been regarded as a completely different class of neutron stars. The discovery of pulsed radio emission from a few magnetars weakened the idea of a clean separation between magnetars and normal pulsars. We use the partially screened gap (PSG) model to explain radio emission of magnetars. The PSG model requires that the temperature of the polar cap is equal to the so-called critical value, i.e., the temperature at which the thermal ions outflowing from the stellar surface screen the acceleration gap. We show that a magnetar has to fulfill the temperature, power, and visibility conditions in order to emit radio waves. First, in order to form PSG, the residual temperature of the surface has to be lower than the critical value. Second, since the radio emission is powered by the rotational energy, it has to be high enough to enable heating of the polar cap by backstreaming particles to the critical temperature. Finally, the structure of the magnetic field has to be altered by magnetospheric currents in order to widen a radio beam and increase the probability of detection. Our approach allows us to predict whether a magnetar can emit radio waves using only its rotational period, period derivative, and surface temperature in the quiescent mode.

  5. Radio source evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Baldwin (1982) wrote that "the distribution of sources in the radio luminosity, P, overall physical size, D, diagram" could be considered as "the radio astronomer's H-R diagram". However, unlike the case of stars, not only the intrinsic properties of the jets, but also those of the host galaxy and the intergalactic medium are relevant to explain the evolutionary tracks of radio radio sources. In this contribution I review the current status of our understanding of the evolution of radio sources from a theoretical and numerical perspective, using the P-D diagram as a framework. An excess of compact (linear size < 10 kpc) sources could be explained by low-power jets being decelerated within the host galaxy, as shown by recent numerical simulations. These decelerated jets could also explain the population of the radio sources that have been recently classified as FR0. I will discuss the possible tracks that radio sources may follow within this diagram, and some of the physical processes that can explain the d...

  6. Temperature Effect on the Tropospheric Radio Signal Strength for UHF Band at Terengganu, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshidah Mat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In tropospheric layer, radio waves can propagate in a number of different physical mechanisms such as free-space propagation or line-of-sight propagation, reflection, transmission, diffraction, scattering and wave guiding. The constituents in weather such as the wind, air temperature and atmospheric water content may combine in many ways. Certain combinations can cause radio signals to be heard hundreds of miles beyond the ordinary range of radio communications. This study investigates the effect of weather (temperature on radio wave propagation up to 9GHz. Continuous-wave (CW envelope fading waveforms were recorded over a period of the one-hour using patch antenna. The observations were conducted at KUSZA Observatory, East Coast Environmental Research Institute (ESERI, UniSZA which is situated in Merang, Terengganu. Spectrum Analyser was used for RFI measurement and weather station for weather effect. The graphs of radio signal attenuation for weather parameter (temperature against time were plotted. The findings indicate that there is a relationship between radio signals with the change of temperature. The correlation between RFI frequencies and temperature give negative effect for frequency 945 MHz, was r = -0.085, while for 383 MHz (r = 0.249, 1800 MHz (r = 0.268 and 2160 MHz (r = 0.134. These findings will benefit radio wave propagation research field which includes radio astronomy observations, space science, wireless communication, satellite, antenna and mobile communication and also electromagnetic radiation (EMR research for health.

  7. Using Multiple Beams to Distinguish Radio Frequency Interference from SETI Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Harp, G R

    2013-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array is a multi-user instrument and will perform simultaneous radio astronomy and radio SETI (search for extra-terrestrial intelligence) observations. It is a multi-beam instrument, with 16 independently steerable dual-polarization beams at 4 different tunings. Given 4 beams at one tuning, it is possible to distinguish RFI from true ETI signals by pointing the beams in different directions. Any signal that appears in more than one beam can be identified as RFI and ignored during SETI. We discuss the effectiveness of this approach for RFI rejection using realistic simulations of the fully populated 350 element configuration of the ATA as well as the interim 32 element configuration. Over a 5 minute integration period, we find RFI rejection ratios exceeding 50 dB over most of the sky.

  8. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  9. Boom Booom Net Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Yong, Louisa; Dobie, Ian

    1999-01-01

    of an existing Internet radio station; Boom Booom Net Radio. Whilst necessity dictates some use of technology-related terminology, wherever possible we have endeavoured to keep such jargon to a minimum and to either explain it in the text or to provide further explanation in the appended glossary.......Internet radio is one of the growth areas of the Internet but, as this article will show, is fraught with difficulties and frustration for both the modestly-funded broadcaster (bitcaster) and the listener. The article will illustrate some of these problems by means of a short case study...

  10. Shoestring Budget Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, John E.

    2017-06-01

    The commercial exploitation of microwave frequencies for cellular, WiFi, Bluetooth, HDTV, and satellite digital media transmission has brought down the cost of the components required to build an effective radio telescope to the point where, for the cost of a good eyepiece, you can construct and operate a radio telescope. This paper sets forth a family of designs for 1421 MHz telescopes. It also proposes a method by which operators of such instruments can aggregate and archive data via the Internet. With 90 or so instruments it will be possible to survey the entire radio sky for transients with a 24 hour cadence.

  11. Unlocking radio broadcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Skov, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This poster reports the preliminary results of a user study uncovering the information seeking behaviour of humanities scholars dedicated to radio research. The study is part of an interdisciplinary research project on radio culture and auditory resources. The purpose of the study is to inform...... the design of information architecture and interaction design of a research infrastructure that will enable future radio and audio based research. Results from a questionnaire survey on humanities scholars’ research interest and information needs, preferred access points, and indexing levels are reported...

  12. Radio y elecciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Rosa Alva de la Selva

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analiza el comportamiento de la radio en México ante la contienda electoral de julio de 2000. Se examina el papel de la radio como espacio para la discusión política, así como el tratamiento informativo que hizo del tema. Asimismo, se analiza la posible repercusión de factores de reciente surgimiento en el panorama radiofónico para un manejo más autónomo de la información política en la radio

  13. Unlocking radio broadcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette; Lykke, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    This poster reports the preliminary results of a user study uncovering the information seeking behaviour of humanities scholars dedicated to radio research. The study is part of an interdisciplinary research project on radio culture and auditory resources. The purpose of the study is to inform...... the design of information architecture and interaction design of a research infrastructure that will enable future radio and audio based research. Results from a questionnaire survey on humanities scholars‟ research interest and information needs, preferred access points, and indexing levels are reported...

  14. The digital sport radio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilario José ROMERO BEJARANO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Radio has been immersed in recent years in a phase of technological integration and business of multimedia, as well as diversification of systems and channels for broadcasting. In addition, Internet has been consolidated as the platform of digital radio that more has evolved as a result of its continued expansion. However, the merger radio-Internet must be understood as a new form of communication, and not solely as a new complementary medium. In this context, it is of great interest to analyze that transformations in the way of reception, contents, languages, programs and schedules, has brought with it for the radio that integration. To this end is taken as main reference the sports areas, a key aspect and broadly representative of the current broadcasting landscape.

  15. Music, Radio, and Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Mads; Michelsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Mediatization has become a key concept for understanding the relations between media and other cultural and social fields. Contributing to the discussions related to the concept of mediatization, this article discusses how practices of radio and music(al life) influence each other. We follow Deacon......’s and Stanyer’s advice to supplement the concept of mediatization with ‘a series of additional concepts at lower levels of abstraction’ and suggest, in this respect, the notion of heterogeneous milieus of music– radio. Hereby, we turn away from the all-encompassing perspectives related to the concept...... of mediatization where media as such seem to be ascribed agency. Instead, we consider historical accounts of music–radio in order to address the complex non- linearity of concrete processes of mediatization as they take place in the multiple meetings between a decentred notion of radio and musical life....

  16. Unveiling the radio cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinde, Keith

    2017-02-01

    Using a radio telescope with no moving parts, the dark energy speeding up the expansion of the Universe can be probed in unprecedented detail, says Keith Vanderlinde, on behalf of the CHIME collaboration.

  17. Everyday Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Pranshu; Kumar, Pratik; Yelikar, Anjali; Soni, Kanchan; T, Vineeth Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an affordable, portable college level radio telescope for amateur radio astronomy which can be used to provide hands-on experience with the fundamentals of a radio telescope and an insight into the realm of radio astronomy. With our set-up one can measure brightness temperature and flux of the Sun at 11.2 GHz and calculate the beam width of the antenna. The set-up uses commercially available satellite television receiving system and parabolic dish antenna. We report the detection of point sources like Saturn and extended sources like the galactic arm of the Milky way. We have also developed python pipeline, which are available for free download, for data acquisition and visualization.

  18. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  19. Boom Booom Net Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Yong, Louisa; Dobie, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Internet radio is one of the growth areas of the Internet but, as this article will show, is fraught with difficulties and frustration for both the modestly-funded broadcaster (bitcaster) and the listener. The article will illustrate some of these problems by means of a short case study of an exi......Internet radio is one of the growth areas of the Internet but, as this article will show, is fraught with difficulties and frustration for both the modestly-funded broadcaster (bitcaster) and the listener. The article will illustrate some of these problems by means of a short case study...... of an existing Internet radio station; Boom Booom Net Radio. Whilst necessity dictates some use of technology-related terminology, wherever possible we have endeavoured to keep such jargon to a minimum and to either explain it in the text or to provide further explanation in the appended glossary....

  20. Social cognitive radio networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents research results on social cognitive radio networks, a transformational and innovative networking paradigm that promotes the nexus between social interactions and cognitive radio networks. Along with a review of the research literature, the text examines the key motivation and challenges of social cognitive radio network design. Three socially inspired distributed spectrum sharing mechanisms are introduced: adaptive channel recommendation mechanism, imitation-based social spectrum sharing mechanism, and evolutionarily stable spectrum access mechanism. The brief concludes with a discussion of future research directions which ascertains that exploiting social interactions for distributed spectrum sharing will advance the state-of-the-art of cognitive radio network design, spur a new line of thinking for future wireless networks, and enable novel wireless service and applications.