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Sample records for extrapyramidal symptoms eps

  1. Diphenhydramine for Acute Extrapyramidal Symptoms After Propofol Administration.

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    Sherer, James; Salazar, Tomas; Schesing, Kevin B; McPartland, Shannon; Kornitzer, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms are an uncommon but well-recognized side effect after the administration of general anesthesia in patients without a significant neurologic history. Several case reports implicate propofol as the likely causative agent producing these symptoms, which include ballismus, dystonia, choreoathetosis, and opisthotonus. Currently, there is no clear consensus on first-line treatment of these symptoms. In each of the published cases, anticholinergic medications and benzodiazepines were central to initial management, although the speed and extent of symptom resolution were variable. Here we present a case of a 17-year-old boy with ulcerative colitis who presented with ballismus, torticollis, tongue thrusting, and oculogyric movements after colonoscopy under general anesthesia with propofol. The patient responded promptly to treatment with diphenhydramine. This is the first reported case in which diphenhydramine was successfully used as the primary treatment of severe extrapyramidal symptoms in a pediatric patient after propofol administration. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Adding metoclopramide to paroxetine induced extrapyramidal symptoms and hyperprolactinemia in a depressed woman: a case report

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    Igata R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ryohei Igata, Hikaru Hori, Kiyokazu Atake, Asuka Katsuki, Jun Nakamura Department of Psychiatry, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan Abstract: A 54-year-old Japanese woman was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and prescribed paroxetine 20 mg/day. In around May 2013, the patient experienced gastric discomfort, so metoclopramide was prescribed. Beginning on June 4, 2013, the patient was given metoclopramide, 10 mg intravenously, twice per week. On the seventh day after beginning metoclopramide, facial hot flushes, increased sweating, muscle rigidity, and galactorrhea were noted. Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS rapidly subsided in response to an intramuscular injection of biperiden. Blood biochemical tests revealed an elevated serum prolactin level of 44 ng/mL. After stopping metoclopramide, EPS disappeared. Serum prolactin level decreased to 15 ng/mL after 4 weeks. In our case, although no adverse reactions had previously occurred following the administration of metoclopramide, the patient developed EPS and hyperprolactinemia following the administration of this antiemetic in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine and metoclopramide are mainly metabolized by CYP2D6, and they are inhibitors for CYP2D6. We report a case with EPS and hyperprolactinemia whose plasma paroxetine and metoclopramide level rapidly increased after the addition of metoclopramide. Our experience warrants the issuing of a precaution that adverse reactions may arise following the coadministration of metoclopramide and paroxetine even at their respective standard dose levels. Keywords: metoclopramide, paroxetine, extrapyramidal symptoms, SSRI, hyperprolactinemia, depression

  3. Changes in extrapyramidal symptoms following anticholinergic drug withdrawal.

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    Perenyi, A; Gardos, G; Samu, I; Kallos, M; Cole, J O

    1983-03-01

    An antiparkinson drug (APK) withdrawal study was carried out in 34 schizophrenic outpatients on maintenance neuroleptics. Sixty-five percent of patients were without major complaints after 2 weeks of APK discontinuation, while 35% reported adverse effects including extrapyramidal, autonomic, and behavioral symptoms. Male patients and those on higher diethazine doses before withdrawal reported more complaints. Ratings showed significant increases of parkinsonism, as well as dyskinesia following APK withdrawal. No clinical evidence was obtained in support of the notion of cholinergic hypersensitivity in patients showing "tremors" at baseline.

  4. Pharmacogenetic predictor of extrapyramidal symptoms induced by antipsychotics: multilocus interaction in the mTOR pathway.

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    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Ritter, M A; Malagelada, C; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotic (AP) treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) are acute adverse reactions of APs. The aim of the present study is to analyze gene-gene interactions in nine genes related to the mTOR pathway, in order to develop genetic predictors of the appearance of EPS. 243 subjects (78 presenting EPS: 165 not) from three cohorts participated in the present study: Cohort 1, patients treated with risperidone, (n=114); Cohort 2, patients treated with APs other than risperidone (n=102); Cohort 3, AP-naïve patients with first-episode psychosis treated with risperidone, paliperidone or amisulpride, n=27. We analyzed gene-gene interactions by multifactor dimensionality reduction assay (MDR). In Cohort 1, we identified a four-way interaction, including the rs1130214 (AKT1), rs456998 (FCHSD1), rs7211818 (Raptor) and rs1053639 (DDIT4), that correctly predicted 97 of the 114 patients (85% accuracy). We validated the predictive power of the four-way interaction in Cohort 2 and in Cohort 3 with 86% and 88% accuracy respectively. We develop and validate a powerful pharmacogenetic predictor of AP-induced EPS. For the first time, the mTOR pathway has been related to EPS susceptibility and AP response. However, validation in larger and independent populations will be necessary for optimal generalization.

  5. Adding metoclopramide to paroxetine induced extrapyramidal symptoms and hyperprolactinemia in a depressed woman: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igata, Ryohei; Hori, Hikaru; Atake, Kiyokazu; Katsuki, Asuka; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese woman was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and prescribed paroxetine 20 mg/day. In around May 2013, the patient experienced gastric discomfort, so metoclopramide was prescribed. Beginning on June 4, 2013, the patient was given metoclopramide, 10 mg intravenously, twice per week. On the seventh day after beginning metoclopramide, facial hot flushes, increased sweating, muscle rigidity, and galactorrhea were noted. Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) rapidly subsided in response to an intramuscular injection of biperiden. Blood biochemical tests revealed an elevated serum prolactin level of 44 ng/mL. After stopping metoclopramide, EPS disappeared. Serum prolactin level decreased to 15 ng/mL after 4 weeks. In our case, although no adverse reactions had previously occurred following the administration of metoclopramide, the patient developed EPS and hyperprolactinemia following the administration of this antiemetic in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine and metoclopramide are mainly metabolized by CYP2D6, and they are inhibitors for CYP2D6. We report a case with EPS and hyperprolactinemia whose plasma paroxetine and metoclopramide level rapidly increased after the addition of metoclopramide. Our experience warrants the issuing of a precaution that adverse reactions may arise following the coadministration of metoclopramide and paroxetine even at their respective standard dose levels. PMID:27621638

  6. Rare presentation of a common disease: Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism presenting with extrapyramidal symptoms and status epilepticus

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    Kaushik Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report of an 18-year-old male who presented with an epileptiform disorder, features of hypocalcemia, and an extrapyramidal symptom in the form of choreoathetosis. On evaluation he had idiopathic hypoparathyroidism with extensive calcifications in the extrapyramidal system of the brain; basal ganglion, as well as in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, which is a rare entity. We report the rare presentation of a common disorder, which requires to be considered in evaluating hypoparathyroidism.

  7. Treatment with diazepam of children with drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

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    Rainier-Pope, C R

    1979-03-03

    Thirteen patients with acute dystonia and extrapyramidal symptoms as a result of drug intoxication are reported. In a number of instances, the symptoms were due to more than one drug being given to the patient, among which were phenothiazine derivatives, non-phenothiazine tranquilizers and metoclopramide. Diazepam (Valium) given intravenously caused the patients to fall asleep immediately and to wake within an hour, free from all symptoms. It is felt that in patients with drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms, diazepam should be considered as the possible drug of choice.

  8. Evaluation of the Expression Profile of Extrapyramidal Symptoms Due to Antipsychotics by Data Mining of Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

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    Kose, Eiji; Uno, Kana; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

     Typical antipsychotics are easily expressed as adverse events such as extrapyramidal symptom (EPS). On the other hand, incidence of adverse events due to atypical antipsychotics is low. Therefore, currently, atypical antipsychotics are widely used to treat schizophrenia. However, it has been reported that there is no difference in the frequency of EPS in atypical and typical antipsychotics. This study aimed to evaluate the expression profile of EPS in atypical and typical antipsychotics treatment using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. We analyzed reports of EPS in the JADER database and calculated the reporting odds ratio (ROR) of antipsychotics potentially associated with EPS. We applied the Weibull shape parameter to time-to-event data in the JADER database. Consequently, there was little information to distinguish between the ROR of atypical and typical antipsychotics. A significant difference related to the time of onset of EPS in both antipsychotics was not recognized. However, when comparing each drug, Paliperidone, Perospirone, Blonanserin, and Aripiprazole were relatively developed as EPS in the early stage. On the other hand, Risperidone, Clozapine, Olanzapine, and Quetiapine were developed as EPS not only at an early stage but also after long-term use. In addition, this finding was suggested from the result of the cumulative incidence of EPS in each drug and of the time-to-onset analysis using Weibull distribution. These findings may contribute to future clinical practice because we revealed the expression profile of EPS in treatment with atypical and typical antipsychotics.

  9. Incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenia: thirty-six-month results from the European schizophrenia outpatient health outcomes study.

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    Novick, Diego; Haro, Josep Maria; Bertsch, Jordan; Haddad, Peter M

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs) and tardive dyskinesia (TD) in schizophrenic patients, and the clinical characteristics associated with an increased risk of developing EPSs and TD were examined. Patients (N = 7728) in the 3-year, prospective, observational Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes study were examined according to baseline antipsychotic drug exposure. At baseline, 4893 patients (63.3%) had no EPS, and 6921 (89.6%) had no TD. Extrapyramidal symptoms and TD were assessed separately during follow-up: frequency and time to appearance from Kaplan-Meier survival curves and factors associated with time to appearance using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The cumulative incidence of EPS ranged from 7.7% (olanzapine) to 32.8% (depot typical drugs). Compared with olanzapine, patients taking depot typical drugs, oral typical drugs, risperidone, and amisulpride had a significantly higher risk of developing EPS. Differences from clozapine were marginally significant. High baseline clinical severity was associated with a significantly higher risk of developing EPS. The incidence of TD ranged from 2.8% (olanzapine) to 11.1% (depot typical agent). Compared with olanzapine, patients taking depot typical agents, oral typical agents, and risperidone had a significantly higher risk of developing TD. Baseline factors associated with a significantly higher risk of developing TD were age, EPS, a higher negative Clinical Global Impression score, and presence of gynecomastia. In summary, patients treated with typical antipsychotic agents (oral and depot) and risperidone had a higher risk of developing EPS and TD than patients treated with olanzapine. Higher baseline clinical severity was associated with EPS development, whereas age, presence of EPS, a higher negative Clinical Global Impression score, and presence of gynecomastia were associated with TD development.

  10. The impact of neuroleptic dosage and extrapyramidal side effects on schizophrenic basic symptoms.

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    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Andresen, B

    2000-01-01

    The impact of neuroleptic medication and extrapyramidal symptoms on abnormal subjective experiences in schizophrenia, also termed basic symptoms, as assessed with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) was investigated in 40 schizophrenic patients medicated with conventional neuroleptics. Basic symptoms are thought to reflect the subjective side of schizophrenic vulnerability and to underlie schizophrenic symptomatology. It was expected that basic symptoms would inversely correlate with chlorpromazine equivalents, since neuroleptics not only improve acute schizophrenic symptoms but also have prophylactic properties. However, a significant positive correlation with neuroleptic dosage and extrapyramidal symptoms emerged, suggesting that basic symptoms as operationalized in the FCQ partly reflect neuroleptic-induced deficits. The results remained unchanged when global psychopathology was controlled for. In line with previous research, basic symptoms correlated with thought disorder but not with positive symptoms. However, when the effects of neuroleptic-induced disturbances were controlled for, thought disorder also insignificantly correlated with basic symptoms. Our findings confirm previous results that question the construct validity of the FCQ. Moreover, the need to control for confounding variables (such as medication) is emphasized by comparing different psychiatric groups.

  11. Incidence and time course of extrapyramidal symptoms with oral and long-acting injectable paliperidone: a posthoc pooled analysis of seven randomized controlled studies

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    Gopal S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Srihari Gopal,1 Yanning Liu,1 Larry Alphs,2 Adam Savitz,1 Isaac Nuamah,1 David Hough1 1Janssen Research and Development, LLC, Raritan, 2Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to compare incidence rates and time course of extrapyramidal symptom (EPS-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs between oral and long-acting injectable (LAI paliperidone. Methods: The analysis included pooled data (safety analysis set, 2,256 antipsychotic-treated and 865 placebo-treated patients with schizophrenia from seven randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled paliperidone studies (three oral [6 weeks each] and four LAI [9–13 weeks] and assessed comparable doses (oral, 3–15 mg; LAI, 25–150 mg eq. [US doses 39–234 mg]. We summarized incidence rates and time of onset for EPS-related TEAE, categorized by EPS group terms, ie, tremor, dystonia, hyperkinesia, parkinsonism, and dyskinesia, and use of anti-EPS medication. Mean scores over time for the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS, for dyskinesia, Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS, for akathisia, and Simpson Angus Rating Scale (SAS, for parkinsonism were graphed. Results: Incidence rates for all categories of spontaneously reported EPS-related TEAEs except for hyperkinesia, were numerically lower in pooled LAI studies than in pooled oral studies. Highest rates were observed in the first week of paliperidone-LAI (for all EPS symptoms except dyskinesia and oral paliperidone treatment (except parkinsonism and tremor. Anti-EPS medication use was significantly lower in LAI (12% versus oral studies (17%, P = 0.0035. Mean values for EPS scale scores were similar between LAI and oral treatment at endpoint, and no dose response was evident. Mean reductions (standard deviation from baseline to endpoint in EPS scale scores were larger for LAI (AIMS, −0.10 [1.27]; BARS, −0.09 [1.06]; SAS, −0.04 [0.20] versus oral studies (AIMS, −0.08 [1

  12. Network analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood identifies mTOR and NF-κB pathways involved in antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

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    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Parellada, E; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A

    2015-10-01

    To identify the candidate genes for pharmacogenetic studies of antipsychotic (AP)-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), we propose a systems biology analytical approach, based on protein-protein interaction network construction and functional annotation analysis, of changes in gene expression (Human Genome U219 Array Plate) induced by treatment with risperidone or paliperidone in peripheral blood. 12 AP-naïve patients with first-episode psychosis participated in the present study. Our analysis revealed that, in response to AP treatment, constructed networks were enriched for different biological processes in patients without EPS (ubiquitination, protein folding and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism) compared with those presenting EPS (insulin receptor signaling, lipid modification, regulation of autophagy and immune response). Moreover, the observed differences also involved specific pathways, such as anaphase promoting complex /cdc20, prefoldin/CCT/triC and ATP synthesis in no-EPS patients, and mammalian target of rapamycin and NF-κB kinases in patients with EPS. Our results showing different patterns of gene expression in EPS patients, offer new and valuable markers for pharmacogenetic studies.

  13. Network analysis of gene expression in mice provides new evidence of involvement of the mTOR pathway in antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

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    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Boloc, D; Rodriguez, N; Mármol, F; Sánchez, J; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A

    2016-06-01

    To identify potential candidate genes for future pharmacogenetic studies of antipsychotic (AP)-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), we used gene expression arrays to analyze changes induced by risperidone in mice strains with different susceptibility to EPS. We proposed a systems biology analytical approach that combined the identification of gene co-expression modules related to AP treatment, the construction of protein-protein interaction networks with genes included in identified modules and finally, gene set enrichment analysis of constructed networks. In response to risperidone, mice strain with susceptibility to develop EPS showed downregulation of genes involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and biological processes related to this pathway. Moreover, we also showed differences in the phosphorylation pattern of the ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), which is a major downstream effector of mTOR. The present study provides new evidence of the involvement of the mTOR pathway in AP-induced EPS and offers new and valuable markers for pharmacogenetic studies.

  14. Rice bran oil prevents neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in rats: Possible antioxidant mechanisms

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    Noreen Samad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD is one of the serious side effects of long-term antipsychotic treatment. Chronic treatment with neuroleptic leads to the development of abnormal oral movements called vacuous chewing movements (VCMs. The oxidative stress hypothesis of TD is one of the possible pathophysiologic models for TD. Preclinical and clinical studies of this hypothesis indicate that neurotoxic free radical production is likely to be a consequence of antipsychotic medication and is related to occurrence of TD. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathophysiology of TD. Rats chronically treated with haloperidol orally at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day for a period of 5 weeks developed VCMs, which increased in a time-dependent manner as the treatment continued for 5 weeks. Motor coordination impairment started after the 1st week and was maximally impaired after 3 weeks and gradually returned to the 1st week value. Motor activity in an open field or home cage (activity box not altered. Administration of rice bran oil (antioxidant by oral tubes at a dose of 0.4 mL/day prevented the induction of haloperidol-elicited VCMs as well impairment of motor coordination. The results are discussed in the context of a protective role of antioxidant of rice bran oil in the prevention of haloperidol-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

  15. TARDIVE DYSKINESIA AND OTHER EXTRAPYRAMIDAL SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED WITH ARIPIPRAZOLE: A CASE SERIES

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    Nayana Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    dyskinesia, three with akathisia and two with Parkinsonism. Patient with tardive dyskinesia showed partial improvement in symptoms after necessary intervention. Patients with akathisia improved completely after stopping ARP, whereas one patient presented with Parkinsonism was diagnosed as Parkinson’s disease, improved completely with antiparkinsonian drugs. CONCLUSIONS Off label use of Aripiprazole is on the rise due to its potency and better side effect profile as compared to first generation antipsychotics. However, it is not free from extrapyramidal side effect as thought earlier. Clinician needs to be vigilant about emerging side effect of movement disorder, especially potentially irreversible like Tardive dyskinesia when prescribing the drug.

  16. The relationship between the plasma concentration of blonanserin, and its plasma anti-serotonin 5-HT(2A) activity/anti-dopamine D₂ activity ratio and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

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    Suzuki, Hidenobu; Gen, Keishi

    2012-03-01

     Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic that was developed in Japan. We investigated the relationships between plasma concentration, the plasma anti-5-HT(2A) activity/anti-D₂ activity (S/D) ratio and extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in blonanserin dosing.  The subjects were 29 outpatients with schizophrenia. We assessed EPS using the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). The plasma concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography, and the plasma anti-D₂ and anti-5-HT(2A) activities were measured by [³H]-spiperone and [³H]-ketanserin radioreceptor assays. The results revealed that there were significant correlations between both the plasma concentration and the DIEPSS total score (Pblonanserin is mainly determined by plasma concentration, but the incidence of EPS may be inhibited when anti-5HT(2A) activity is predominant over anti-D₂ activity. © 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  17. Augmentation of antipsychotics with glycine may ameliorate depressive and extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenic patients – a preliminary 10-week open-label study

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    Strzelecki, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The objective of this study was to analyze the changes in depressive and extrapyramidal symptomatology during glycine augmentation of antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia.Materials and methods. Twenty-nine schizophrenic patients (ICD-10 with predominant negative symptoms in stable mental state participated in a 10-week open-label prospective study. Patients received stable doses of antipsychotic drugs for at least 3 months before glycine application. During the next 6 weeks patients received augmentation of antipsychotic treatment with glycine (up to 60 g per day. The first and last two weeks of observation were used to assess stability of mental state. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, and the Simpson-Angus Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (SASResults. In the studied group after 6 weeks of administration of glycine a significant improvement in depressive symptoms (reduced scores by 25.8% in HDRS, p <0.001 and reduced scoring in mood symptoms of PANSS were observed. In SAS a reduction of extrapyramidal symptoms’ severity (p <0.05 was also noted. Two weeks after the glycine augmentation the symptom severity in the HDRS, PANSS, and SAS remained at similar levels.Conclusions. Glycine augmentation of antipsychotic treatment may reduce the severity of depressive and extrapyramidal symptoms. Glycine use was safe and well tolerated.

  18. Applicability of gene expression and systems biology to develop pharmacogenetic predictors; antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms as an example.

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    Mas, Sergi; Gassó, Patricia; Lafuente, Amelia

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacogenetics has been driven by a candidate gene approach. The disadvantage of this approach is that is limited by our current understanding of the mechanisms by which drugs act. Gene expression could help to elucidate the molecular signatures of antipsychotic treatments searching for dysregulated molecular pathways and the relationships between gene products, especially protein-protein interactions. To embrace the complexity of drug response, machine learning methods could help to identify gene-gene interactions and develop pharmacogenetic predictors of drug response. The present review summarizes the applicability of the topics presented here (gene expression, network analysis and gene-gene interactions) in pharmacogenetics. In order to achieve this, we present an example of identifying genetic predictors of extrapyramidal symptoms induced by antipsychotic.

  19. Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice

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    Mark B. Detweiler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates (OPs are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined.

  20. Rome III functional dyspepsia subdivision in PDS and EPS: recognizing postprandial symptoms reduces overlap.

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    Carbone, F; Holvoet, L; Tack, J

    2015-08-01

    The Rome III consensus proposed to subdivide functional dyspepsia (FD) into two groups: meal-related dyspepsia or postprandial distress syndrome (PDS), and meal-unrelated dyspepsia or epigastric pain syndrome (EPS). However, in clinical practice, overlap between both has been reported to be as high as 50%, thereby hampering clinical applicability. Although EPS is referred to as meal-unrelated dyspepsia, relationship of symptoms to meal ingestion in this category is not formally addressed in the Rome III criteria. The aim of our study was to investigate whether taking into account the relationship of epigastric pain and nausea to meal ingestion may help to improve separation between EPS and PDS. Consecutive ambulatory tertiary-care patients with epigastric symptoms filled out Rome III gastro-duodenal questionnaires with supplementary questions. Those fulfilling Rome III FD criteria and a negative endoscopy were identified and subdivided into 'pure' PDS patients (i.e., meeting criteria for PDS without EPS symptoms), 'pure' EPS (i.e., meeting criteria for EPS without PDS symptoms), and overlapping PDS-EPS (i.e., symptoms of both PDS and EPS). Out of 1029 patients coming to endoscopy, 199 patients (73% females, 45.9 ± 1.0 years, BMI: 23.7 ± 0.35) fulfilled Rome III FD diagnostic criteria, and could be subdivided into pure PDS (69% females, 49 ± 2 years, BMI: 24.2 ± 0.61), pure EPS (59% females, 47.4 ± 2 years, BMI: 23.2 ± 0.97) and overlapping PDS-EPS (64% females, age 43 ± 5 years, BMI: 26 ± 0.46). Compared with pure EPS patients, the overlap PDS-EPS patients were characterized by a higher occurrence of postprandial epigastric pain (70% vs 31%, p < 0.0001), while the occurrence of epigastric pain in between meals was borderline (48% vs 38%, p = 0.05). In addition, the overlap PDS-EPS patients reported a higher occurrence of postprandial nausea (23% vs 0%, p < 0.0001), and bloating (79% vs 28%, p = 0.0001). When postprandial epigastric pain and postprandial

  1. Analysis of clinical symptomatology, extrapyramidal symptoms and neurocognitive dysfunction following dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration in olanzapine treated schizophrenia patients: a randomized, double-blind placebo controlled trial.

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    Strous, Rael D; Stryjer, Rafael; Maayan, Rachel; Gal, Gilad; Viglin, Dina; Katz, Elena; Eisner, Dana; Weizman, Abraham

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the effective use of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in the management of mood, however studies of its use in psychosis remain limited. The aim of this study was to investigate for the first time efficacy of DHEA augmentation with standardized antipsychotic medication (olanzapine) and to explore effects of DHEA augmentation on side-effect profiles including weight gain, glucose tolerance, aggression, quality of life and neurocognitive function. Finally, we aimed to analyze any relationship between plasma levels and clinical response to DHEA administration. Forty patients with chronic schizophrenia stabilized on olanzapine were randomized in double-blind fashion to receive either DHEA (titrated up to 150mg) or placebo augmentation for a period of 12-weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline, mid-study and study completion. Results indicated improvement of negative symptoms (SANS scale) even when baseline scores were controlled as a covariate. Some improvement in Parkinsonism and akathisia compared to baseline was seen in patients receiving DHEA. No change in psychosis as reflected by the PANSS was noted. Patients receiving DHEA appeared to demonstrate relatively stable glucose levels compared to controls at the end of the study. An improvement in cognitive performance (most notably memory), which did not reach significance due to low sample number, was observed following DHEA administration. Results further suggest preliminary evidence of involvement of the neurosteroid system in schizophrenia pathophysiology, and confirm initial "cautious" findings identifying an agent capable of improving negative symptoms and certain features of extrapyramidal side effects.

  2. Risk of extrapyramidal syndromes with haloperidol, risperidone, or olanzapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; de Boer, A; Herings, R M; Roos, R A; Jansen, P A; Leufkens, H G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) between risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol, taking into account patients' past antipsychotic drug use and past EPS. METHODS: Data were obtained from the PHARMO-database, containing filled prescriptions of 450,000

  3. Risk of extrapyramidal syndromes with haloperidol, risperidone, or olanzapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; de Boer, A; Herings, R M; Roos, R A; Jansen, P A; Leufkens, H G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) between risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol, taking into account patients' past antipsychotic drug use and past EPS. METHODS: Data were obtained from the PHARMO-database, containing filled prescriptions of 450,000 community-dwellin

  4. 1 Cases of Extrapyramidal Symptoms Caused by Comound Paracetamol and Amantadine Hydrochloride Tablets%复方氨酚烷胺片致锥体外系症状1例

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    张良芬; 赵韵超

    2014-01-01

    复方氨酚烷胺片不良反应为白细胞或血小板减少、食欲缺乏、恶心、呕吐、皮疹等。本文介绍因感冒自行服用"复方氨酚烷胺片(新秀)2片"后外出活动时突发全身不自主抖动,实属罕见,给予停服复方氨酚烷胺片,加用银杏达莫注射液(杏丁)输注5d后症状逐渐减轻,直至消失。出现的锥体外系症状副反应可能与特异体质或体敏感性有关。一旦有该症状,应立即停用药物,避免锥体外系等不良反应的发生。%The adverse reactions Comound Paracetamol and Amantadine Hydrochloride Tablets white cellor platelet reduction, lack of appetite, nausea, vomiting, skin rash. In this paper because of cold to take"Comound Paracetamol and Amantadine Hydrochloride Tablets (Rookie) 2"after traveling burst body involuntary jit er, rare, give of Comound Paracetamol and Amantadine Hydrochloride Tablets, plus Ginkgo Leaf Extract and Dipyridamole Injection (Xing Ding) infusion of 5 days after the symptoms gradual y reduced, until it disappeared. Extrapyramidal side ef ects may be related to the special physique or body sensitivity. Once the symptoms, should immediately stop using the drug, avoid adverse reaction of extrapyramidal system etc.

  5. Extrapyramidal side effects and suicidal ideation under fluoxetine treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douzenis Athanassios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with depression who developed extrapyramidal symptoms (mainly parkinsonism and suicidal ideation while on fluoxetine. Methods The patient underwent neurological and neuroimaging examination. Results The patient's neurological and neuroimaging examinations were normal and there was no other cause of extrapyramidal symptoms. The patient showed remission of the aforementioned symptomatology when fluoxetine was discontinued. Conclusions This case shows that fluoxetine can be associated with extrapyramidal symptoms, and this may have an aggravating affect on clinical depression progress and the emergence of suicidal ideation.

  6. Extrapyramidal syndromes associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors : a case-control study using spontaneous reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; van Puijenbroek, E P; de Boer, Anthonius; Roos, R A C; Jansen, Paul A F; Leufkens, H G M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS). We analysed the spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected by The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb in the period 198

  7. Extrapyramidal syndromes associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors : a case-control study using spontaneous reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; van Puijenbroek, E P; de Boer, Anthonius; Roos, R A C; Jansen, Paul A F; Leufkens, H G M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS). We analysed the spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected by The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb in the period 198

  8. Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes - Risperidone compared with low- and high-potency conventional antipsychotic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, [No Value; de Boer, A; Herings, RMC; Roos, RAC; Jansen, PAF; Leufkens, HGM

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To compare the risk of extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) between patients using risperidone and those using low-potency conventional antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in outpatient clinical practice, as measured by the use of anticholinergic medication. We tried to replicate results from previous clinica

  9. Possible sertraline-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang LF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lian-fang Wang,1 Jin-wen Huang,1 Si-yang Shan,2 Jia-hong Ding,3 Jian-bo Lai,1,2 Yi Xu,1,4 Shao-hua Hu1,4 1Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 2Faculty of Clinical Medicine, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong; 4The Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder’s Management in Zhejiang Province, National Clinical Research Center for Mental Health Disorders, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Sertraline has been considered to be a relatively safe selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for adolescents for a long time. We report herein a case of a 16-year-old Chinese boy with depression who experienced extrapyramidal-like effects, for example, facial spasm, upper limb dystonia, akathisia, and other disturbed behaviors, while being treated with sertraline 200 mg per day. His movement symptoms were significantly alleviated after the discontinuation of sertraline and the administration of scopolamine. This finding indicates that albeit infrequent, sertraline may cause severe extrapyramidal symptoms in adolescent patients, suggesting that clinicians should be alert to the neurological side effects of sertraline in young patients. Keywords: adolescents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, sertraline, extrapyramidal symptoms

  10. Extrapyramidal side effects with low doses of amisulpride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nikhiles; Singh, Om P; Sen, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    Amisulpride, the newly introduced antipsychotic in India, is claimed to be effective in both positive and negative symptom schizophrenia and related disorders, though it has little or no action on serotonergic receptors. Limbic selectivity and lower striatal dopaminergic receptor binding capacity causes very low incidence of EPS. But, in clinical practice, we are getting EPS with this drug even at lower doses. We have reported three cases of akathisia, acute dystonia, and drug-induced Parkinsonism with low doses of amisulpride. So, we should keep this side effect in mind when using amisulpride. In fact, more studies are required in our country to find out the incidence of EPS and other associated mechanism.

  11. The unbearable lightness of the extrapyramidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2012-07-01

    The concept of the extrapyramidal system comprises an amalgam of disparate and often conflicting ideas with a tortuous history. To the theoretical neuroscientist or practicing clinician, it promptly evokes semantic associations that are hardly reminiscent of its original meaning. The purpose of this article is to revisit the sources of the extrapyramidal concept and to examine the transformations that it went through from its inception, in the late 1890s, up to the neuroimaging revolution of the 1980s. Our review shows that the use of "extrapyramidal" as a surrogate for the basal ganglia, disorders of movement, or certain manifestations of spastic hemiplegia does not apply to humans; rather, it represents the historical product of the unwarranted translation of results of animal experimentation into the interpretation of clinical findings on human patients, misguided clinico-anatomic deductions, and fanciful phylogenetic notions. We conclude that the extrapyramidal concept is a valid and robust anatomic concept as long as it strictly refers to the collection of descending fibers originating in a few discrete brainstem tegmental motor nuclei that project to the spinal cord.

  12. Risk of extrapyramidal syndrome in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotics: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S-Y; Kao Yang, Y-H; Chong, M-Y; Yang, Y-H; Chang, W-H; Lai, C-S

    2007-04-01

    To compare the prevalence of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) between the first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), the co-prescribing rate of anti-Parkinson drugs (APDs) of each antipsychotic drug was analyzed using population database. Fourteen antipsychotics had been prescribed during the 5-year study period. Among the SGAs, quetiapine had the lowest crude co-prescribing rate of APDs (27.09%), whereas risperidone had the highest rate (66.50%). Among the FGAs, thioridazine and loxapine had the lowest (60.99%) and highest rates (96.35%), respectively. The rankings of the co-prescribing rate of APDs among antipsychotics, in increasing order, were quetiapine, clozapine, olanzapine, thioridazine, zotepine, chlorpromazine, risperidone, sulpiride, clotiapine, flupentixol, haloperidol, zuclopentixol, trifluoperazine, and loxapine. The results indicate that the risk of EPS appears to be lower in SGAs than in FGAs; however, the considerably high rate of EPS in some of the newer generation of antipsychotics warrants clinical attention.

  13. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the relationship between D2 receptor occupancy and catalepsy in rats : Predicting extrapyramidal side effects in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Martin; Kozielska, Magdalena; Pilla Reddy, Venkatesh; Vermeulen, An; Barton, Hugh A.; Grimwood, Sarah; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Genoveva; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Dopamine D2 receptor occupancy (D2RO) is the major determinant of efficacy and safety in schizophrenia drug therapy (1,2). Excessive D2RO (>80 %) is known to cause catalepsy (CAT) in rats and extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) in human(3). The relationship between CAT scores in rats and E

  14. The association study of polymorphisms in DAT, DRD2, and COMT genes and acute extrapyramidal adverse effects in male schizophrenic patients treated with haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivković, Maja; Mihaljević-Peles, Alma; Bozina, Nada; Sagud, Marina; Nikolac-Perkovic, Matea; Vuksan-Cusa, Bjanka; Muck-Seler, Dorotea

    2013-10-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs) are common adverse effects of antipsychotics. The development of acute EPSs could depend on the activity of dopaminergic system and its gene variants. The aim of this study was to determine the association between dopaminergic type 2 receptor (DRD2) dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms and acute EPSs in 240 male schizophrenic patients treated with haloperidol (15-mg/d) over a period of 2 weeks. Acute EPSs were assessed with Simpson-Angus Scale. Three dopaminergic gene polymorphisms, the DRD2 Taq1A, the SLC6A3 VNTR, and the COMT Val158Met, were determined. Extrapyramidal symptoms occurred in 116 (48.3%) of patients. Statistically significant associations were found for SLC6A3 VNTR and COMT Val158Met polymorphisms and EPS susceptibility. Patients with SLC6A3 9/10 genotype had almost twice the odds to develop EPSs compared with those with all other SLC6A3 genotypes (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-3.30), and patients with COMT Val/Met genotype had 1.7 times greater odds to develop EPSs than those with all other COMT genotypes (odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.88). There was no statistically significant association between genotype and allele frequencies of DRD2, SLC6A3, or COMT polymorphisms and the development of particular EPSs.In conclusion, the results of the present study showed for the first time the association between acute haloperidol-induced EPSs and SLC6A3 VNTR and COMT Val158Met polymorphisms. Although the precise biological mechanisms underlying these findings are not yet understood, the results suggest that the dopaminergic gene variations could predict the vulnerability to the development of the acute EPSs in haloperidol-treated schizophrenic patients.

  15. Reliability of EP3OS symptom criteria and nasal endoscopy in the assessment of chronic rhinosinusitis - a GA(2) LEN study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomassen, P; Newson, R B; Hoffmans, R;

    2011-01-01

    endoscopy in the assessment of chronic rhinosinusitis - a GA(2) LEN study. Allergy 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2010.02503.x. ABSTRACT: Background:  The European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) incorporates symptomatic, endoscopic, and radiologic criteria in the clinical...... diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), while in epidemiological studies, the definition is based on symptoms only. We aimed to assess the reliability and validity of a symptom-based definition of CRS using data from the GA(2) LEN European survey. Methods:  On two separate occasions, 1700 subjects from...... determined. In two centers, 342 participants underwent nasal endoscopy. The association of symptom-based CRS with endoscopy and self-reported doctor-diagnosed CRS was assessed. Results:  There was a decrease in prevalence of CRS between the two study phases, and this was consistent across all centers (-3...

  16. Cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders in extrapyramidal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Levin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The affliction of basal ganglia and their associations, which underlies extrapyramidal diseases, leads not only to diverse movements, but also to a broad spectrum of neuropsychological disorders, including cognitive, emotional-personality, and psychotic ones. The basis for these disorders are most commonly dysfunction of one or a few parallel frontostriatal circuits combining the basal ganglia with the thalamus, limbic structures, frontal and other cortical regions into the uniform functional system. The pattern of neuropsychological disorders has both specific and common features, the discussion of which is the subject matter of this paper. Analysis of the specific features of neuropsychological and behavioral disorders allows one to specify the localization of a pathological process and its extent, which may be of important differential diagnostic value. Cognitive and emotional-personality impairments sometimes develop earlier than motor disorders and their detection may be of significance for the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease or Huntington’s disease in persons who are predisposed to these diseases. Moreover, to establish the nature of mental disorders and the degree of their disadapting effect and to identify the affected and preserved components in the psychic processes are important for the choice of adequate pharmacotherapy and the elaboration of neuropsychological rehabilitation programs.

  17. Association of DRD2 polymorphisms and chlorpromazine-induced extrapyramidal syndrome in Chinese schizophrenic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-nan WU; Rui GAO; Qing-he XING; Hua-fang LI; Yi-feng SHEN; Niu-fan GU; Guo-yin FENG; Lin HE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) is most commonly affected by typical antipsychotic drugs that have a high affinity with the D2 receptor. Recently, many research groups have reported on the positive relationship between the genetic variations in the DRD2 gene and the therapeutic response in schizophrenia patients as a result of the role of variations in the receptor in modulating receptor expression. In this study, we evaluate the role DRD2 plays in chlorpromazineinduced EPS in schizophrenic patients. Methods: We identified seven SNP(single nucleotide polymorphism) (-141Cins>del, TaqIB, TaqID, Ser311Cys, rs6275, rs6277 and TaqIA) in the DRD2 gene in 146 schizophrenic inpatients (59 with EPS and 87 without EPS according to the Simpson-Angus Scale) treated with chlorpromazine after 8 weeks. The alleles of all loci were determined by PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Results: Polymorphisms TaqID, Ser311 Cys and rs6277 were not polymorphic in the population recruited in the present study. No statistical significance was found in the allele distribution of -141Cins>del, TaqIB, rs6275 and TaqIA. or in the estimated haplotypes (constituted by TaqIB, rs6275 and TaqIA) in linkage disequilibrium between the two groups. Conclusion: Our results did not lend strong support to the view that the genetic variation of the DRD2 gene plays a major role in the individually variable adverse effect induced by chlorpromazine, at least in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. Our results confirmed a previous study on the relationship between DRD2 and EPS in Caucasians.

  18. Acute extrapyramidal dysfunction in two HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Regan; Slogrove, Amy; Schoeman, Johan; Marais, Ben; van Zyl, Gert; Maritz, Jean; van Toorn, Ronald

    2011-06-01

    Involvement of the basal ganglia is well documented in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy, often with calcification. High concentrations of HIV protein have been detected in affected basal ganglia, although extrapyramidal dysfunction, in contrast to adults, is infrequently encountered in HIV-infected children. We describe the clinical course, magnetic resonance imaging appearance and outcome of two HIV-infected children who presented with acute debilitating extrapyramidal dysfunction. The cases highlight the importance of immune competence, co-existence of opportunistic infections, HIV testing of all children of HIV-infected mothers and magnetic resonance imaging when assessing the severity and anticipating outcomes of movement disorders in HIV-infected children.

  19. EPS profiles: the atypical antipsychotics are not all the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiden, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Within the first few years after chlorpromazine began to be used to treat psychosis, it was observed that it could cause many kinds of neurologic reactions that resembled those seen in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. These reactions were termed "extrapyramidal side effects" (EPS) because of their resemblance to the signs of Parkinson's disease, which were associated with degeneration of the dopamine nerve tracks located in the extrapyramidal region of the central nervous system. Eventually this association of dopamine loss, antipsychotics, and parkinsonism became a central part of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia. Unfortunately, this association was also used to support the hypothesis that EPS were absolutely necessary for antipsychotic efficacy--hence the term "neuroleptic" rather than "antipsychotic." This theory, now discredited, was used to justify the practice of inducing EPS as a means to gauge whether an antipsychotic would be effective. The demonstration that clozapine, an antipsychotic virtually devoid of EPS, has better efficacy for psychosis than any other "neuroleptic" disproved the theory that EPS were fundamentally linked to efficacy. Because the idea of a relationship between EPS and efficacy was so ingrained in clinical practice, clozapine was called "atypical." Our understanding of the relationship between EPS and antipsychotic response has come full circle. With the introduction of clozapine and other newer antipsychotics, it has become clear that EPS are harmful and serve no beneficial purpose. The availability of newer antipsychotics with a lower EPS burden means that, at least in theory, it is now possible to treat psychosis without EPS in the vast majority of patients. In practice, however, EPS remain a significant problem even in the era of atypical or second generation antipsychotics (SGAs). One limitation is that the concept of "atypicality," when used to denote antipsychotic efficacy without EPS, is a relative not an absolute

  20. The analysis of extrapyramidal side effects caused by artane in the treatment of mental sickness%安坦治疗精神疾病所致锥体外系副反应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉英; 蒋龙; 高顺卿

    2002-01-01

    Background: Inequality in degree of extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) caused by antipsychotic drugs is due to that nigrostriate dopamine(DA) system is blocked by drugs,then the activity of acetylcholine(Ach) is relatively stimulated.The application of Anticholinergic agent can keep the relative equilibration between DA and Ach,then relieves or obliterates EPS.When part of patients are undertaking the antipsychotic drugs of antipsychotic drugs,they offen use artane simultaneously.Especially chronically sick persons, whether they need necessarily the application of anticholinergic agent long term or not,and we do some relatetive analysis on that.

  1. Statistic rCBF study of extrapyramidal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Fukuhara, Nobuyoshi [National Saigata Hospital, Ogata, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    We studied regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 16 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 2 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 2 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 2 patients with striatonigral degeneration, and 16 normal volunteers, using Three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP). Decreased rCBF in PD patients was shown in the posterior parietal and occipital cortex. Decreased rCBF in DLB was shown in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex with relative sparing of the sensorimotor cortex.. Decreased rCBF in PSP was shown in the frontal cortex. Decreased rCBF in SND was shown in the frontal cortex and cerebellum. Statistic rCBF analysis using 3D-SSP was a useful measure for the early differential diagnosis of extrapyramidal disorders. (author)

  2. Psychosis, Treatment Emergent Extrapyramidal Events, and Subsequent Onset of Huntington's Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changqing; Yogaratnam, Jegan; Tan, Nigel; Sim, Kang

    2016-08-31

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by a triad of progressive motor dysfunction, cognitive decline and psychiatric disturbances. The hallmark of HD is the distinctive choreiform movement disorder that typically has a subtle, insidious onset in the fourth to fifth decade of life and gradually worsens over 10 to 20 years until death. Notably, two-thirds of HD patients present with chorea and one third with mental changes. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms is significantly higher than in the general population, and is estimated to be around 66-73%. Here, we report a unique case of subsequent onset of HD in a patient previously treated for schizophrenia and complicated by the extrapyramidal side effects to antipsychotics.

  3. Extrapyramidal Motor Dysfunction and Resultant Orofacial Dystonia Post-Cocaine Abuse: A Clinical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigated the consequences of cocaine use and resultant extrapyramidal motor dysfunction. The study focused on a female client, post-long-term drug abuse with concomitant untreated head trauma, experiencing extraneous motor movements of the lips, tongue, jaw, and upper and lower extremities. The goals of this study were to (a)…

  4. Extrapyramidal Motor Dysfunction and Resultant Orofacial Dystonia Post-Cocaine Abuse: A Clinical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigated the consequences of cocaine use and resultant extrapyramidal motor dysfunction. The study focused on a female client, post-long-term drug abuse with concomitant untreated head trauma, experiencing extraneous motor movements of the lips, tongue, jaw, and upper and lower extremities. The goals of this study were to (a)…

  5. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  6. Haloperidol-induced extra pyramidal symptoms attenuated by imipramine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Noreen; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2014-09-01

    Effects of administration of imipramine (IMI) are determined on haloperidol-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). Haloperidol is administered orally at a dose of 0.2 mg/rat/day in rats for a period of 5 weeks, by this treatment rats developed vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) after 2 weeks, which increased in a time dependent manner as the treatment continued for 5 weeks. Motor coordination (assess on rota rod activity) impaired maximally after 3 weeks and tolerance was developed in the haloperidol induced motor impairment after 5 weeks of treatment. Motor activity in an open field or activity box was not altered. The administration of IMI (intraperitoneally, for 5 weeks) did not affect motor activity or motor coordination. Co-administration of IMI at a dose of 5 mg/ml/kg/day attenuated the induction of haloperidol elicited VCMs (Quantitative orofacial dyskinesia) as well impairment of motor coordination. Results are discussed in the context of the mechanism involved by which imipramine attenuated haloperidol-induced EPS.

  7. Enhanced Polar System (EPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    integrated onto a classified host), the User Terminals (acquired separately by the users), the Gateway (a fixed installation), and the Control and...The Gateway segment is acquired through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) Systems Center- Pacific (SC- PAC ). The Gateway also...for the Gateway is the responsibility of SSC- PAC . For CAPS, the EPS depots are as follows: • Ogden Air Logistics Center, Hill Air Force Base (AFB

  8. THE SYNDROME OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA, MICROCEPHALY, AND EXTRAPYRAMIDAL DYSKINESIA (PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA TYPE-2) - COMPILED DATA FROM 10 PEDIGREES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARTH, PG; BLENNOW, G; LENARD, HG; BEGEER, JH; VANDERKLEY, JM; HANEFELD, F; PETERS, ACB; Valk, J.

    1995-01-01

    The syndrome of autosomal recessive pontocerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, severely impaired mental and motor development, and extrapyramidal dyskinesia is a distinct system degeneration, previously designated pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2). To further characterize its clinical and neu

  9. Electrophysiology Studies (EPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  10. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008119 Therapeutic effect of neuropeptide PACAP27 on Parkinson′s disease in mice. WANG Gang(王刚), et al.Dept Neurol & Neurol Instit, Ruijin Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Med Sch, Shanghai 200025. Chin J Neurol 2007;40(12):837-841. Objective To investigate the effects of different doses of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on the functional and morphological outcome in a mice model of Parkinson′s disease (PD) re

  11. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008486 Neuropsychiatric problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease. ZHOU Mingzhu(周明珠), et al. Dept Neurol, Xinhua Hosp Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Sch Med, Shanghai 200092.Natl Med J China 2008;88(21):1442-1445. Objective To survey the prevalence and distribution of neuropsychiatric problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and to investigate their effects on life quality and the interactions among different neuropsychiatric problems.

  12. Natural and nosocomial infection in a patient with West Nile encephalitis and extrapyramidal movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Tom; Fisher, Ann F; Beasley, David W C; Mandava, Pitchaiah; Granwehr, Bruno P; Langsjoen, Hans; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P; Barrett, Alan D T; Tesh, Robert B

    2003-06-01

    Since its first recognition in North America in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread rapidly across the continent, but in many communities, rapid diagnostic tests for detection of WNV infection are not fully available. We describe a patient with extrapyramidal movement disorders and changes in the basal ganglia noted on magnetic resonance images that are characteristic of other flavivirus encephalitides and may help in the recognition of patients with West Nile encephalitis. Detailed molecular analysis suggested that, although our patient received a blood transfusion infected with WNV, the virus that caused his initial infection and encephalitis was probably acquired naturally from a mosquito.

  13. G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} ratio by polarization transfer in ep {yields} ep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark K. Jones; Konrad A. Aniol; F.T. Baker; J. Berthot; Pierre Bertin; William Bertozzi; A. Besson; Louis Bimbot; Werner Boeglin; Ed Brash; D. Brown; John Calarco, Larry S. Cardman; C.-C. Chang; Jian-ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; Evaristo Cisbani; Dan Dale; R. De Leo; Alexandre Deur; Brian Diederich; John Domingo; Martin B. Epstein; Lars Ewell; Kevin Fissum; A. Fleck; Helene Fonvieille; Salvatore Frullani; J. Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G. Gerstner; Shalev Gilad; Ron Gilman.; Alexander Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Javier Gomez; V. Gorbenko; A. Green; Jens-Ole Hansen; Howell, C.R.; Huber, G.M.; Mauro Iodice; Kees de Jager; Stephanie Jaminion; Xiangdong Jiang; William Kahl; James J. Kelly; M. Khayat; Laird H. Kramer; G. Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; E. Lakuriki; G. Lavessiere; John J. LeRose; Meme Liang; Richard Lindgren; Nilanga Liyanage; George Lolos; R. Macri; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Dimitri Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; R.L. van der Meer; R. Michaels; B.D. Milbrath; Jean Mougey; S.K. Nanda; E.A.J.M. Offerman; Z. Papandreou; Charles F. Perdrisat; Gerassimos G. Petratos; N.M. Piskunov; R.I. Pomatsalyuk; David Prout; Vina Punjabi; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; Brian Raue; Yves Roblin; Rikki Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Arun Saha; Teijiro Saito; Adam Sarty; Timothy Smith; P. Sorokin; Steffen Strauch; R. Suleiman; K. Takahashi; Jeff Templon; Luminita Todor; Paul E. Ulmer; Guido M. Urciuoli; Pascal Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan, H.; Krishni Wijesooriya; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; R.J. Woo; F. Xiong; George Dan Zainea; Z.-L. Zhou

    2000-02-14

    The ratio of the proton's elastic electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{ell}, the transverse and the longitudinal recoil proton polarization, respectively. For elastic ep {yields} ep, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} is proportional to P{sub t}/P{ell}. Simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{ell} in a polarimeter provides good control of the systematic uncertainty. The results for the ratio G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} show a systematic decrease as Q{sup 2} increases from 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}, indicating for the first time a definite difference in the spatial distribution of charge and magnetization currents in the proton.

  14. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  15. Citicoline in treating neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effect%胞磷胆碱治疗药源性锥外系副作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘和祥; 成平; 黄世勋; 王以云

    2001-01-01

    AIM:To study the effects of citicoline in treating neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effect (EPS). METHODS:Seventy-five patients were divided into two groups:citicoline group of 38 patients ( M25,F13;age 28 a±s 9 a) received citicoline injection 0.5 g.d-1,in 5 % glucose injection 500 mL,iv,drip,qd ,for 14 d and control group of 37 patients ( M23,F14;age 27 a±6 a) received 5 % glucose injection 500 mL,iv, drip, qd,for 14 d. RESULTS: The total efficacy of citicoline or control group was 92 % and 11 % (P<0.05 ), respectively.The tremour, muscular rigidity, gait and muscle dystonia were better in citicoline group than in control group. No side effects were found.  CONCLUSION: Citicoline is effective for neuroleptic-induced EPS.%目的:探讨胞磷胆碱对药源性锥外系副作用(EPS)的疗效。方法:75例病人分为2组。胞磷胆碱组38例(男性25例,女性13例,年龄28 a±s 9 a),用胞磷胆碱0.5 g加入5 %葡萄糖注射液500 mL中iv, gtt, qd;对照组37例(男性23例,女性14例,年龄27 a±7 a),用5 %葡萄糖注射液500 mL,iv, gtt, qd,疗程均2 wk。治疗期间禁用抗胆碱能等与EPS有关的药物。结果:胞磷胆碱组和对照组总有效率分别为92%和11%,经Ridit分析,P<0.05。胞磷胆碱组对震颤、肌强直、步态和肌张力障碍效果较好。治疗期间未出现副作用。结论:胞磷胆碱对药源性EPS具有较好的治疗作用。

  16. Motor hemiplegia and the cerebral organization of movement in man: II. The myth of the human extrapyramidal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Oliveira-Souza

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Following a brief review of the concept of extrapyramidal system, clinical and anatomic evidence is presented against its relative prominence in man. It is proposed that the greatest part of those structures traditionally labeled as extrapyramidal effects its respective functional activities by way of the pyramidal tracts themselves. Such structures, centered around the basal nuclei, the cerebellum and possibly, the limbic areas of the prosencephalon are, according to the present suggestion, indeed, pre pyramidal. This model is based upon the clinical analysis of patients and agrees with more than one century of anatomic verifications in human brains, favoring the notion of the singularity of the human brain.

  17. ROLE OF PREVENTION IN PHYSIOTHERAPY TO INTEGRATE CHILDREN WITH EXTRAPYRAMIDAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcu Vasile

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in physical therapy is an integral part of therapy that aims prevention and not treating certain diseases.On the extrapyramidal syndrome, methods and techniques of physical therapy are a preamble of the therapy that has as purpose in the achievement of tangible engrams as close to that of healthy children. Physical therapy with all its aspects of prevention, therapy and rehabilitation achieved by its essence, have an holistic approach to the individual, in this case, of the inexperienced and frightened child by the syndrome pathology. Medical recovery is designed to study neuromuscular and joint mechanisms that will provide to the pacient an normal vigilance activity while driving to recording, analyzing and correcting the deficit. The objectives of physical therapy are subject to a constant process of analysis and synthesis based on the child’s mental and physical condition. Methods: Prevention in physical therapy, is studying the optimization of health and prevention for this disability, aggravation of the normal functioning of the body, using techniques and neuro-motor methods. On disabled children the prevention of physical aims to promote: relaxation, sensitivity rehabilitation, correct posture and body alignment with its segments, education / rehabilitation / restoration of control, coordination and balance, respiratory rehabilitation, increased training effort, recovery of joint mobility by handling, increased muscle strength in children aged 3 years and increase muscle strength over 7 years. Results: The assessment results have responded immediately validating that the methods and techniques used helped on extrapyramidal syndrome child. Prevention of physical therapy is therefore an accumulation of information, tools and conclusions, which however will not prevent disability, but prepare the children for integration into society.

  18. Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes and cytochrome P-450 2D6 genotype : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, [No Value; de Boer, A; van der Weide, J; Steijns, LSW; Roos, RAC; Jansen, PAF; Leufkens, HGM

    2002-01-01

    To study the association between polymorphism of the cytochrome P-450 2D6 gene (CYP2D6) and the risk of antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes, as measured by the use of anti parkinsonian medication. Data for this case-control study were obtained from a psychiatric hospital where newly admit

  19. Growth regulation of primary human keratinocytes by prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP3 subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konger, R L; Malaviya, R; Pentland, A P

    1998-02-04

    We examined the contribution of specific EP receptors in regulating cell growth. By RT-PCR and northern hybridization, adult human keratinocytes express mRNA for three PGE2 receptor subtypes associated with cAMP signaling (EP2, EP3, and small amounts of EP4). In actively growing, non-confluent primary keratinocyte cultures, the EP2 and EP4 selective agonists, 11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1, caused complete reversal of indomethacin-induced growth inhibition. The EP3/EP2 agonist (misoprostol), and the EP1/EP2 agonist (17-phenyl trinor PGE2), showed less activity. Similar results were obtained with agonist-induced cAMP formation. The ability of exogenous dibutyryl cAMP to completely reverse indomethacin-induced growth inhibition support the conclusion that growth stimulation occurs via an EP2 and/or EP4 receptor-adenylyl cyclase coupled response. In contrast, activation of EP3 receptors by sulprostone, which is virtually devoid of agonist activity at EP2 or EP4 receptors, inhibited bromodeoxyuridine uptake in indomethacin-treated cells up to 30%. Although human EP3 receptor variants have been shown in other cell types to markedly inhibit cAMP formation via a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanisms, EP3 receptor activation and presumably growth inhibition was independent of adenylyl cyclase, suggesting activation of other signaling pathways.

  20. The detection of EpCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, De Sanne; Dalum, Van Guus; Lenferink, Aufried T.M.; Tibbe, Arjan G.J.; Hiltermann, T.J.N.; Groen, Harry J.M.; Rijn, Van C.J.M.; Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    EpCAM expressing circulating tumor cells, detected by CellSearch, are predictive of short survival in several cancers and may serve as a liquid biopsy to guide therapy. Here we investigate the presence of EpCAM+ CTC detected by CellSearch and EpCAM- CTC discarded by CellSear

  1. Susceptibility-weighted MRI of extrapyramidal brain structures in Parkinsonian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eva; Ng, Kia-Min; Yeoh, Chooi-Sum; Rumpel, Helmut; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Li, Hui-Hua; Tan, Eng-King; Chan, Ling-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Susceptibility-weighted MRI (SWI) is sensitive to T2 effects and mineralization.We investigated differences in the extrapyramidal brain structures on SWI between Parkinson disease (PD) and postural instability gait disorder (PIGD) patients and correlated the SWI values with the degree of gait dysfunction.Forty patients diagnosed with PD and PIGD underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain study. An SWI sequence (TE/TR/FA 20/33/15) was used. Ten regions of interest were placed in the midbrain and basal ganglia by 2 independent raters blinded to subject data and quantitatively evaluated.The inter-rater reliability between the raters was excellent (interclass correlation coefficient >0.8). The SWI intensity values in all regions were on average lower in PIGD than in PD patients, with the lowest results found in globus pallidus.Multivariate analysis showed a lower SWI hypointensity in the putamen and globus pallidus in PIGD compared with PD patients, with a similar trend for the other basal ganglia nuclei. Pearson correlation analysis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between SWI putaminal hypointensity and the Tinetti total score (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) in both PD and PIGD.SWI putaminal hypointensity may be a useful imaging marker in prospective evaluation for clinical progression for Parkinsonian disorders.

  2. Susceptibility-weighted MRI of extrapyramidal brain structures in Parkinsonian disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eva; Ng, Kia-Min; Yeoh, Chooi-Sum; Rumpel, Helmut; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Li, Hui-Hua; Tan, Eng-King; Chan, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Susceptibility-weighted MRI (SWI) is sensitive to T2∗ effects and mineralization. We investigated differences in the extrapyramidal brain structures on SWI between Parkinson disease (PD) and postural instability gait disorder (PIGD) patients and correlated the SWI values with the degree of gait dysfunction. Forty patients diagnosed with PD and PIGD underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain study. An SWI sequence (TE/TR/FA 20/33/15) was used. Ten regions of interest were placed in the midbrain and basal ganglia by 2 independent raters blinded to subject data and quantitatively evaluated. The inter-rater reliability between the raters was excellent (interclass correlation coefficient >0.8). The SWI intensity values in all regions were on average lower in PIGD than in PD patients, with the lowest results found in globus pallidus. Multivariate analysis showed a lower SWI hypointensity in the putamen and globus pallidus in PIGD compared with PD patients, with a similar trend for the other basal ganglia nuclei. Pearson correlation analysis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between SWI putaminal hypointensity and the Tinetti total score (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) in both PD and PIGD. SWI putaminal hypointensity may be a useful imaging marker in prospective evaluation for clinical progression for Parkinsonian disorders. PMID:27367979

  3. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  4. EPS-Then and Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2016-11-18

    "Slime" played a brief and spectacular role in the 19th century founded by the theory of primordial slime by Ernst Haeckel. However, that substance was never found and eventually abandoned. Further scientific attention slowly began in the 1930s referring to slime as a microbial product and then was inspired by "How bacteria stick" by Costerton et al. in 1978, and the matrix material was considered to be polysaccharides. Later, it turned out that proteins, nucleic acids and lipids were major other constituents of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), an acronym which was highly discussed. The role of the EPS matrix turns out to be fundamental for biofilms, in terms of keeping cells in proximity and allowing for extended interaction, resource capture, mechanical strength and other properties, which emerge from the life of biofilm organisms, including enhanced tolerance to antimicrobials and other stress. The EPS components are extremely complex and dynamic and fulfil many functional roles, turning biofilms into the most ubiquitous and successful form of life on Earth.

  5. Pyramidal and extrapyramidal scale (PEPS): a new scale for the assessment of motor impairment in vascular cognitive impairment associated with small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook Hui; Seo, Sang Won; Go, Seok Min; Chin, Juhee; Lee, Byung Hwa; Lee, Jae-Hong; Han, Seol-Heui; Na, Duk L

    2011-04-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment associated with small vessel disease (sVCI) may manifest as both cognitive and motor dysfunctions. However, few instruments exist for systematically assessing motor symptoms in sVCI, even though many neuropsychological tests exist to evaluate cognitive function. We developed a new scale for assessing motor impairments and evaluated the reliability and validity of the scale in patients with sVCI. A new motor scale, called the PEPS (Pyramidal and Extra Pyramidal Scale for sVCI), consisted of 34 items (for 60 total points) with 5 subdomains: corticospinal, corticobulbar, extrapyramidal signs, gait abnormalities, and gait severity. The PEPS was compared between 75 patients with sVCI and 73 control patients who had dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) without ischemia. The PEPS had good interrater and test-retest reliability, and it was moderately to highly correlated with the UPDRS, NIHSS, MMSE, CDR, and ADL scales. An optimal cut-off score of PEPS to discriminate dementia or MCI patients with ischemia from those without ischemia was 6.5 with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 100%. The PEPS is a reliable and valid scale that can be used to assess and monitor motor impairment in patients with vascular cognitive impairment due to small vessel disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. QCD studies in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  7. Localization of prostaglandin E(2) EP2 and EP4 receptors in the rat kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Stubbe, J; Hansen, P B

    2001-01-01

    -selective agonist, dose dependently raised cAMP levels in microdissected DTL and outer medullary vasa recta specimens but had no effect in EP2-negative outer medullary collecting duct segments. Dietary salt intake did not alter EP2 expression in the kidney medulla. These results suggest that PGE(2) may act......We investigated the localization of cAMP-coupled prostaglandin E(2) EP2 and EP4 receptor expression in the rat kidney. EP2 mRNA was restricted to the outer and inner medulla in rat kidney, as determined by RNase protection assay. RT-PCR analysis of microdissected resistance vessels and nephron...... segments showed EP2 expression in descending thin limb of Henle's loop (DTL) and in vasa recta of the outer medulla. The EP4 receptor was expressed in distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and cortical collecting duct (CCD) in preglomerular vessels, and in outer medullary vasa recta. Butaprost, an EP2 receptor...

  8. Wilson's disease with cognitive impairment and without extrapyramidal signs: improvement of neuropsychological performance and reduction of MRI abnormalities with trientine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Joo; Kim, Eung Gyu; Kim, Sang Jin; Ji, Ki-Hwan; Seo, Jung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Extrapyramidal signs are neurological dysfunction commonly associated with Wilson's disease (WD). In addition, cognitive dysfunction has been reported in the early stages of WD. In this report, we describe a 49-year-old woman presenting with memory impairments and without Parkinsonian or extrapyramidal signs. She was diagnosed with WD based on the presence of Kayser-Fleischer rings around the irises of her eyes and two ATP7B gene mutations, R778L at exon 8 and A874V at exdyon 11. Serial magnetic resonance imaging analysis and neuropsychological tests showed improvements following treatment with trientine.

  9. NF-κB-dependent IL-8 induction by prostaglandin E2 receptors EP1 and EP4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuschäfer-Rube, F; Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, A; Hippenstiel, S; Kracht, M; Püschel, GP

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent studies suggested a role for PGE2 in the expression of the chemokine IL-8. PGE2 signals via four different GPCRs, EP1-EP4. The role of EP1 and EP4 receptors for IL-8 induction was studied in HEK293 cells, overexpressing EP1 (HEK-EP1), EP4 (HEK-EP4) or both receptors (HEK-EP1 + EP4). Experimental Approach IL-8 mRNA and protein induction and IL-8 promoter and NF-κB activation were assessed in EP expressing HEK cells. Key Results In HEK-EP1 and HEK-EP1 + EP4 but not HEK or HEK-EP4 cells, PGE2 activated the IL-8 promoter and induced IL-8 mRNA and protein synthesis. Stimulation of HEK-EP1 + EP4 cells with an EP1-specific agonist activated IL-8 promoter and induced IL-8 mRNA and protein, whereas a specific EP4 agonist neither activated the IL-8 promoter nor induced IL-8 mRNA and protein synthesis. Simultaneous stimulation of HEK- EP1 + EP4 cells with both agonists activated IL-8 promoter and induced IL-8 mRNA to the same extent as PGE2. In HEK-EP1 + EP4 cells, PGE2-mediated IL-8 promoter activation and IL-8 mRNA induction were blunted by inhibition of IκB kinase. PGE2 activated NF-κB in HEK-EP1, HEK-EP4 and HEK-EP1 + EP4 cells. In HEK-EP1 + EP4 cells, simultaneous activation of both receptors was needed for maximal PGE2-induced NF-κB activation. PGE2-stimulated NF-κB activation by EP1 was blocked by inhibitors of PLC, calcium-signalling and Src-kinase, whereas that induced by EP4 was only blunted by Src-kinase inhibition. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggest that PGE2-mediated NF-κB activation by simultaneous stimulation of EP1 and EP4 receptors induces maximal IL-8 promoter activation and IL-8 mRNA and protein induction. PMID:22924768

  10. PrEP: controversy, agency and ownership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cairns, Gus P; Race, Kane; Goicochea, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Pre‐exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been and continues to be an intervention that causes controversy and debate between stakeholders involved in providing or advocating for it, and within communities in need...

  11. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sites Podcasts QR Codes RSS Feeds Social Bookmarking Social Network Sites Text Messaging Twitter Video Games Video Sharing ... PrEP be considered for people who are HIV-negative and at very high risk for HIV infection . ...

  12. PGE2 decreases reactivity of human platelets by activating EP2 and EP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James P; Haddad, Elias V; Downey, Jason D; Breyer, Richard M; Boutaud, Olivier

    2010-07-01

    Platelet hyperreactivity associates with cardiovascular events in humans. Studies in mice and humans suggest that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) regulates platelet activation. In mice, activation of the PGE2 receptor subtype 3 (EP3) promotes thrombosis, but the significance of EP3 in humans is less well understood. To characterize the regulation of thromboxane-dependent human platelet activation by PGE2. Platelets collected from nineteen healthy adults were studied using an agonist of the thromboxane receptor (U46,619), PGE2, and selective agonists and/or antagonists of the EP receptor subtypes. Platelet activation was assayed by (1) optical aggregometry, (2) measurement of dense granule release, and (3) single-platelet counting. Healthy volunteers demonstrated significant interindividual variation in platelet response to PGE2. PGE2 completely inhibited U46,619-induced platelet aggregation and ATP release in 26% of subjects; the remaining 74% had partial or no response to PGE2. Antagonism of EP4 abolished the inhibitory effect of PGE2. In all volunteers, a selective EP2 agonist inhibited U46,619-induced aggregation. Furthermore, the selective EP3 antagonist DG-041 converted all PGE2 nonresponders to full responders. There is significant interindividual variation of platelet response to PGE2 in humans. The balance between EP2, EP3, and EP4 activation determines its net effect. PGE2 can prevent thromboxane-induced platelet aggregation in an EP4-dependent manner. EP3 antagonism converts platelets of nonresponders to a PGE2-responsive phenotype. These data suggest that therapeutic targeting of EP pathways may have cardiovascular benefit by decreasing platelet reactivity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NS/EP Implications of Electronic Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    THE PRESIDENT’S NATIONAL SECURITY TELECOMMUNICATIONS ADVISORY COMMITTEE NS/EP IMPLICATIONS OF ELECTRONIC COMMERCE JUNE 1999 Form SF298 Citation Data... Electronic Commerce Procedures Contract or Grant Number Program Element Number Authors Project Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization...99 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NS/EP Implications of Electronic Commerce 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) President’s

  14. PrEP: controversy, agency and ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, Gus P; Kane Race; Pedro Goicochea

    2016-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been and continues to be an intervention that causes controversy and debate between stakeholders involved in providing or advocating for it, and within communities in need of it. These controversies extend beyond the intrinsically complex issues of making it available. In this commentary, some of the possible roots of the air of dissent and drama that accompanies PrEP are explored. The similarities between the controversies that dogged the earliest human tr...

  15. SPECT imaging using [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]IBF in extrapyramidal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Amano, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Jun; Itoh, Yoshiaki; Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Kubo, Atsushi; Fukuuchi, Yasuo [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-01-01

    Imaging of dopaminergic function is useful in the investigation of patients with Parkinson disease (iPD) and other extrapyramidal diseases. Using agents that bind to dopamine transporters ([{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT) and receptors ([{sup 123}I]IBF SPECT), we investigated SPECT in 9 healthy volunteers and 24 patients for dopamine transporters as well as 15 patients for dopamine receptors. In {beta}-CIT SPECT studies, we examined 17 iPD patients (63.3{+-}9.9 y/o), 3 multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients (olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type) (64.0{+-}8.0 y/o), 2 vascular parkinsonism (VP) patients (71.0{+-}0.0 y/o), 1 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) patient (69 y/o), 1 cortico-basal degeneration (CBD) patient (50 y/o) and nine healthy controls (39.1{+-}9.3 y/o). For IBF SPECT studies 11 iPD patients (60.6{+-}10.9 y/o), 3 MSA patients (2 OPCA type (50.5{+-}3.5 y/o) and 1 striatonigral degeneration (SND) type (65 y/o)) and 1 PSP patient (60 y/o) underwent SPECT scans after the injection of [{sup 123}I]IBF. The specific to nonspecific striatal ratio (St/Oc-1), ratio of putaminal uptake to caudatal uptake (Pu/Ca), and asymmetry indices (AI) were estimated. {beta}-CIT studies showed ST/Oc-1 as follows; iPD: 2.66{+-}1.09 (n=17), VP: 5.73 and 7.39, MSA: 1.84{+-}0.46 (n=3), PSP: 2.34, CBD: 2.16. In all extrapyramidal diseases except VP, St/Oc-1 ratios were significantly lower than those in normal volunteers (6.46{+-}1.08) (p<0.01). Also in early-phase iPD patients (Yahr I-II), St/Oc-1 (3.16{+-}1.49: n=4) was significantly lower than those in normal volunteers (p<0.01). In IBF studies, St/Oc-1 ratios were significantly higher in early-phase (Yahr I-II) iPD patients (1.82{+-}0.25: n=5) than those in late-phase (Yahr III-IV) iPD patients (1.38{+-}0.32: n=6) (p<0.05). The Pu/Ca ratios in iPD patients (1.12{+-}0.13) and MSA (OPCA type) patients (0.95{+-}0.05) were higher than that in MSA (SND type) patient (0.78) and were lower than that in PSP patient (1.55). In conclusion

  16. Fluid flow shear stress upregulates prostanoid receptor EP2 but not EP4 in murine podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tarak; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Kats, Alexander; Carlton, Carol G; Alon, Uri S; Cudmore, Patricia A; El-Meanawy, Ashraf; Sharma, Mukut

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes in the glomerular filtration barrier regulate the passage of plasma proteins into urine. Capillary pressure and ultrafiltration impact the structure and function of podocytes. The mechanism of podocyte injury by fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) from hyperfiltration in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not completely understood. Recently, we demonstrated increased synthesis of prostaglandin E2 in podocytes exposed to FFSS. Here, we determine the effect of FFSS on prostanoid receptors EP1-EP4 in cultured podocytes and in Os/+ mouse kidney, a model of hyperfiltration. Results of RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies indicate that cultured podocytes express EP1, EP2 and EP4 but not EP3. FFSS resulted in upregulated expression of only EP2 in podocytes. Kidney immunostaining showed significantly increased expression of EP2 in Os/+ mice compared with littermate controls. These novel results suggest that EP2 may be responsible for mediating podocyte injury from hyperfiltration-induced augmented FFSS in CKD.

  17. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  18. Nanobody-aided structure determination of the EpsI:EpsJ pseudopilin heterodimer from Vibrio vulnificus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Hol, Wim G.J.; Steyaert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Pseudopilins form the central pseudopilus of the sophisticated bacterial type 2 secretion systems. The crystallization of the EpsI:EpsJ pseudopilin heterodimer from Vibrio vulnificus was greatly accelerated by the use of nanobodies, which are the smallest antigen-binding fragments derived from heavy-chain only camelid antibodies. Seven anti-EpsI:EpsJ nanobodies were generated and co-crystallization of EpsI:EpsJ nano-body complexes yielded several crystal forms very rapidly. In the structure solved, the nanobodies are arranged in planes throughout the crystal lattice, linking layers of EpsI:EpsJ heterodimers. The EpsI:EpsJ dimer observed confirms a right-handed architecture of the pseudopilus, but, compared to a previous structure of the EpsI:EpsJ heterodimer, EpsI differs 6° in orientation with respect to EpsJ; one loop of EpsJ is shifted by ~5 Å due to interactions with the nanobody; and a second loop of EpsJ underwent a major change of 17 Å without contacts with the nanobody. Clearly, nanobodies accelerate dramatically the crystallization of recalcitrant protein complexes and can reveal conformational flexibility not observed before. PMID:19118632

  19. Localization of prostaglandin E(2) EP2 and EP4 receptors in the rat kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Stubbe, J; Hansen, P B

    2001-01-01

    -selective agonist, dose dependently raised cAMP levels in microdissected DTL and outer medullary vasa recta specimens but had no effect in EP2-negative outer medullary collecting duct segments. Dietary salt intake did not alter EP2 expression in the kidney medulla. These results suggest that PGE(2) may act...

  20. Highlights from e-EPS: EPS and EuChems are joining forces

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   On the occasion of the EPS Council 2013 in Strasbourg, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Societies (EuCheMS) and the European Physical Society (EPS) by presidents Ulrich Schubert and Luisa Cifarelli. EuCheMS and EPS share many objectives, such as community building, scientific excellence, communication and representation of their respective members to European policy makers. The two societies recognise that issues in many fields such as education, publication, support for basic sciences and frontier research are similar in their respective disciplines. They wish to combine efforts in developing and presenting common standpoints to their mutual benefit as European representatives in chemistry ...

  1. eP physics at the CBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiss, J.E.; White, D.H.; Morse, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    In this report we have tried to demonstrate how a 20 x 400 GeV eP facility at the CBA will complement the future physics of high energy e+e/sup -/ and hadron-hadron colliders. By offering the first glimpse of the physics of 17 TeV muon and neutrino beams, an eP collider will extend tests of the standard model by about an order of magnitude in spacelike momentum transfer, and thus close the final kinematic gap of knowledge about electro-weak processes. It will be especially interesting to test whether the lefthanded nature of the charged current observed at low spacelike momentum transfers persists to large, spacelike momentum transfers. A high energy eP collider also enables unique tests of QCD such as a study of high Q/sup 2/ scale breaking and the high P/sub t/ QCD Compton process. In addition to probing small distance behavior in kinematic regions orthogonal to other collider facilities, an eP facility will generate data useful to understanding the physics of e+e/sup -/ and hadron-hadron collisions. The current jet produced in the high energy eP neutral current process is produced against a single electron which can be used to predict the momentum of the quark which gives rise to the jet. Hence the central problem in jet physics of deducing the kinematics of a quark by measurement of its hadronization jet can be studied under uniquely controlled circumstances. Finally the high Q/sup 2/ structure functions of the proton which are essential in understanding hard process in hadron-hadron scattering can only be cleanly measured in an eP collider.

  2. eP physics at the CBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiss, J.E.; White, D.H.; Morse, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    In this report we have tried to demonstrate how a 20 x 400 GeV ep facility at the CBA will complement the physics of high energy e/sup -/e/sup +/ and hadron-hadron colliders. An ep collider will extend tests of the standard model by about an order of magnitude in spacelike momentum transfer, and extend our knowledge of electro-weak processes to a remarkable degree. It will be especially interesting to see if the lefthanded nature of the charged current observed at low spacelike momentum transfers persists to large, space momentum transfers. A high energy ep collider is unique in the opportunity to investigate QCD through the scale breaking at high Q/sup 2/ the high P/sub t/ QCD Compton process. In addition to probing small distance behavior in kinematic regions orthogonal to other collider facilities, an ep facility will generate data ultimately crucial to the understanding of the physics of e/sup +/e/sup -/ and hadron-hadron collisions. The current jet that is produced in the high energy ep neutral current process recoils against a single electron which can be used to predict the momentum of the quark which gives rise to the jet. The central problem in jet physics of deducing the kinematics of a quark by measurement of its hadronization jet can be studied under uniquely controlled circumstances. Finally the high Q/sup 2/ structure functions of the proton which are essential in understanding hard processes in hadron-hadron scattering can only be cleanly measured in an ep collider.

  3. In vivo intra-luteal implants of prostaglandin (PG) E1 or E2 (PGE1, PGE2) prevent luteolysis in cows. II: mRNA for PGF2α, EP1, EP2, EP3 (A-D), EP3A, EP3B, EP3C, EP3D, and EP4 prostanoid receptors in luteal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Yoshie S; Bridges, Phillip J; Jeoung, Myoungkun; Arreguin-Arevalo, J Alejandro; Nett, Torrance M; Vann, Rhonda C; Ford, Stephen P; Lewis, Andrew W; Neuendorff, Don A; Welsh, Thomas H; Randel, Ronald D; Weems, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it was reported that chronic intra-uterine infusion of PGE(1) or PGE(2) every 4h inhibited luteolysis in ewes by altering luteal mRNA for luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors and unoccupied and occupied luteal LH receptors. However, estradiol-17β or PGE(2) given intra-uterine every 8h did not inhibit luteolysis in cows, but infusion of estradiol+PGE(2) inhibited luteolysis. In contrast, intra-luteal implants containing PGE(1) or PGE(2) in Angus or Brahman cows also inhibited the decline in circulating progesterone, mRNA for LH receptors, and loss of unoccupied and occupied receptors for LH to prevent luteolysis. The objective of this experiment was to determine how intra-luteal implants of PGE(1) or PGE(2) alter mRNA for prostanoid receptors and how this could influence luteolysis in Brahman or Angus cows. On day-13 Angus cows received no intra-luteal implant and corpora lutea were retrieved or Angus and Brahman cows received intra-luteal silastic implants containing Vehicle, PGE(1), or PGE(2) and corpora lutea were retrieved on day-19. Corpora lutea slices were analyzed for mRNA for prostanoid receptors (FP, EP1, EP2, EP3 (A-D), EP3A, EP3B, EP3C, EP3D, and EP4) by RT-PCR. Day-13 Angus cow luteal tissue served as pre-luteolytic controls. mRNA for FP receptors decreased in day-19 Vehicle controls compared to day-13 Vehicle controls regardless of breed. PGE(1) and PGE(2) up-regulated FP gene expression on day-19 compared to day-19 Vehicle controls regardless of breed. EP1 mRNA was not altered by any treatment. PGE(1) and PGE(2) down-regulated EP2 and EP4 mRNA compared to day-19 Vehicle controls regardless of breed. PGE(1) or PGE(2) up-regulated mRNA EP3B receptor subtype compared to day-19 Vehicle control cows regardless of breed. The similarities in relative gene expression profiles induced by PGE(1) and PGE(2) support their agonistic effects. We conclude that both PGE(1) and PGE(2) may prevent luteolysis by altering expression of mRNA for prostanoid

  4. EpCAM-targeted induction of apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, Edwin; Helfrich, Wijnand

    2008-01-01

    EpCAM is a well-established pancarcinoma-associated target antigen that has been used in a variety of therapeutic approaches. Of particular appeal are those strategies that aim to retarget and locally activate immune effector mechanisms involving apoptosis. Cancer cells typically employ various stra

  5. PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 70%. Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms and other prevention methods. Expand All Collapse All Video Introductions to PrEP What is PrEP? A Brief ...

  6. Extraction and Analysis of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS): Comparison of Methods and EPS Levels in Salmonella pullorum SA 1685

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production and composition for Salmonella pullorum SA 1685 exposed to artificial groundwater (AGW) has been examined utilizing three EPS extraction methods: lyophilization, ethanol, and sonication. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the robustness...

  7. Premorbid Negative Symptoms in First-Episode Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Cuesta

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Negative symptoms emerge in many patients with psychotic disorders long before the onset of the acute illness. These symptoms are often impossible to differentiate from certain Cluster A personality traits. Methods: The current study examines the extent to which premorbid negative symptoms are contributing factors to the development of primary and secondary negative symptomatology. Participants were 84 neuroleptic-naïve patients experiencing the occurrence of their first acute psychotic episode. Symptoms of psychopathology were assessed at two points: at admission and after remission of the acute episode. The Spanish version of the PANSS scale was administered. Premorbid personality assessment was considered as a proxy measure to evaluate each participant's negative symptomatology prior to the onset of the illness. Potential causes of secondary negative symptomatology, such as depression and extrapyramidal symptoms, were also examined. Results: 'Non-respondent' or 'residual' negative symptoms at discharge were significantly predicted by primary negative symptoms. To a lesser extent, disorganization and depressive symptoms at discharge and the Schizoid dimension of premorbid personality predicted residual negative symptoms. Conclusions: The severity of negative symptoms at the onset of the psychotic episode varied across patients. After controlling for 'respondent' and 'non-respondent' primary negative symptoms and other potential causes of negative symptoms, premorbid negative symptoms had a slight, but significant predictive relationship with residual negative symptoms.

  8. Efficacy and tolerability of EPs 7630 in patients (aged 6–18 years old) with acute bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, W; Maydannik, VG; Malek, FA; Kieser, M

    2010-01-01

    Aim: For EPs-7630, a herbal drug preparation from Pelargonium sidoides roots, therapeutic effects in respiratory tract infections outside the strict indication for antibiotics have already been demonstrated in adults. Now, a dose-finding study for EPs-7630 was performed in children and adolescents. Methods: A total of 400 patients (aged 6–18 years) were randomized to receive either 30 mg, 60 mg or 90 mg EPs-7630 or placebo daily. Primary outcome criterion was the change in the Bronchitis Severity Score (BSS) from day 0 to day 7. Results: After 7 days of treatment, the change in the BSS total score was significantly better in the 60 mg and 90 mg groups compared with placebo that of the without relevant differences between these two dosages. Especially ‘coughing’, ‘sputum’ and ‘rales at auscultation’ improved under EPs-7630. Onset of effect was faster, time of bed rest shorter and treatment outcome and satisfaction with treatment were rated better. Tolerability was comparable with placebo in all treatment groups. Conclusion: EPs-7630 is effective in acute bronchitis outside the strict indication for antibiotics in 6–18 years old patients, with a dose of 60 mg or 90 mg daily offering the best benefit/risk ratio. EPs-7630 significantly reduces the severity of symptoms, leads to a more favourable course of the disease and a faster recovery from acute bronchitis compared with the placebo, and is well tolerated. PMID:20070280

  9. Pathogenicity of EPS-deficient mutants (gumB-, gumD and gumE - ) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Three extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) -deficient mutants of the pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, gumB - , gumD - and gumE- were constructed by Tn5 gusA5 mutagenesis in this study. The results of pathogenicity bioassay showed that three mutants had the obviously decreased pathogenicity on radish ( Raphanus sativus L. ) leaves. Because dead body of the bacteria still caused symptoms, it seemed that some unknown factors on the bac terial cell surface might play certain roles in the pathogenicity of the pathogen. The extracted raw EPS could lead to the chlorotic symptom on radish leaves, and its virulence was increased with the increase of EPS dosage, which suggested that EPS was a main component that caused the danage on radish leaves.

  10. e-EPS News: Light for Development

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   A central goal of the EPS International Year of Light project will be to promote optical technologies and optics education to improve the quality of life in the developing world – under the theme of ‘Light for Development’. Light plays a central role in human activities in science, technology and culture. On a fundamental scientific level, light is necessary for the existence of life itself, whilst on a more technical level, light-based technologies will underpin the future development of human society. The systematic study of the physics of light and electromagnetic waves has been central to the evolution of modern science and – in the 20th century alone – there have been many fundamental ...

  11. EpCAM-targeted induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Edwin; Helfrich, Wijnand

    2008-05-01

    EpCAM is a well-established pancarcinoma-associated target antigen that has been used in a variety of therapeutic approaches. Of particular appeal are those strategies that aim to retarget and locally activate immune effector mechanisms involving apoptosis. Cancer cells typically employ various strategies to evade recognition and elimination by immune effector cells, including low or absent expression of MHCI molecules and active elimination of tumor infiltrating immune cells. In addition, cancer cells show an increased resistance towards endogenous pro-apoptotic stimuli due to aberrancies in their apoptotic machinery. However, compelling evidence indicates that cancer cells are often reliant on these molecular aberrations for continued cell survival. This pivotal role of immune evasion and apoptosis resistance has fueled the quest for therapeutic strategies that can selectively retarget and reactivate immune effector cells or molecules, whereby the balance of cellular fate of cancer cells is selectively tipped towards apoptosis. Here we review and discuss the perspectives for EpCAM-targeted apoptosis induction in cancer by EpCAM-selective bispecific antibodies and TRAIL fusion proteins.

  12. EP2 and EP4 receptors mediate PGE2 induced relaxation in murine colonic circular muscle: pharmacological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cutillas, M; Mañé, N; Gallego, D; Jimenez, M; Martin, M T

    2014-12-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a regulator of gastrointestinal motility that might be involved in impaired motor function associated to gut inflammation. The aim of the present work is to pharmacologically characterize responses to exogenous and endogenous PGE2 in the mouse colon targeting EP2 and EP4 receptors. Wild type (WT) and EP2 receptor knockout (EP2-KO) mice were used to characterize PGE2 and butaprost (EP2 receptor agonist) effects on smooth muscle resting membrane potential and myogenic contractility in circularly oriented colonic preparations. In WT animals, PGE2 and butaprost concentration-dependently inhibited spontaneous contractions and hyperpolarized smooth muscle cells. Combination of both EP2 (PF-04418948 0.1μM) and EP4 receptor antagonists (L-161,982 10μM) was needed to block both electrical and mechanical PGE2 responses. Butaprost inhibitory responses (both electrical and mechanical) were totally abolished by PF-04418948 0.1μM. In EP2-KO mice, PGE2 (but not butaprost) concentration-dependently inhibited spontaneous contractions and hyperpolarized smooth muscle cells. In EP2-KO mice, PGE2 inhibition of spontaneous contractility and hyperpolarization was fully antagonized by L-161,982 10μM. In WT animals, EP2 and EP4 receptor antagonists caused a smooth muscle depolarization and an increase in spontaneous mechanical activity. PGE2 responses in murine circular colonic layer are mediated by post-junctional EP2 and EP4 receptors. PF-04418948 and L-161,982 are selective EP2 and EP4 receptor antagonists that inhibit PGE2 responses. These antagonists might be useful pharmacological tools to limit prostaglandin effects associated to dismotility in gut inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role.

  14. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  15. Analysis list: EP300 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tem cell,Prostate,Uterus + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/EP300.1.tsv http://db...archive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/EP300.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/EP300.10.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/EP300.Blood.tsv,http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/EP300.Bone.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/...kyushu-u/hg19/colo/EP300.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/EP300.Digestive_tract.tsv,http:

  16. Analysis list: Ep300 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g,Muscle,Neural,Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ep300.1.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ep300.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu...-u/mm9/target/Ep300.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ep300.Blood.tsv,http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ep300.Bone.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ep300.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ep300.Cardiovascular.tsv,http:

  17. The Expression of Lactoferrin in BPH-EPS, BPH-free EPS and Prostate Cancer Secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Kexin; Wang Xiaofeng; Hou Shukun; Wang Yunchun

    2003-01-01

    To examine the expression of lactoferrin(Lf) in both the expressed prostatic secretion(EPS)of BPHpatients,normal males and the secretion of prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145.The potential correlation of Lf with prostaticcarcinogenesis was also investigated.Methods:Forty EPS samples obtained from 20 BPH patients and 20 normal males as well as thesecretions of prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145 were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis(2-DE).Massspectrometry was performed to confirm the nature of the expressed proteins in EPS and prostatic cancer secretion. Results:Based on theresulting electrophoretograms and the followed mass spectrometry analysis,several differentially expressed proteins were detected andthe up-regulation of Lf (MW 35KDa,pI 7-7.5)in BPH-EPS,compared with BPH-free EPS,was also observed. More importantly, Lf wasabsent in prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145.Conclusion:The results indicate Lf may be produced specifically by benignprostatic epithelium and prostate lost its Lf secretion during the process of carcinogenesis.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 Reduces Cardiac Contractility via EP3 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaosong; Xu, Jiang; Zhu, Liping; Bryson, Timothy; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) EP receptors EP3 and EP4 signal via decreased and increased cAMP production, respectively. Previously, we reported that cardiomyocyte-specific EP4 knockout mice develop dilated cardiomyopathy with reduced ejection fraction. Thus, we hypothesized that PGE2 increases contractility via EP4 but decreases contractility via EP3. The effects of PGE2 and the EP1/EP3 agonist sulprostone on contractility were examined in the mouse Langendorff preparation and in adult mouse cardiomyocytes. Isolated hearts of adult male C57Bl/6 mice were perfused with PGE2 (10(-6) M) or sulprostone (10(-6) M) and compared with vehicle. Both PGE2 and sulprostone decreased +dp/dt (PEP3 antagonist. In contrast, the EP4 agonist had the opposite effect. Adult mouse cardiomyocytes contractility was also reduced after treatment with either PGE2 or sulprostone for 10 minutes. We then examined the acute effects of PGE2, sulprostone, and the EP4 agonist on expression of phosphorylated phospholamban and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2a in adult mouse cardiomyocytes using Western blot. Treatment with either PGE2 or sulprostone decreased expression of phosphorylated phospholamban corrected to total phospholamban, whereas treatment with the EP4 agonist had the opposite effect. Sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2a expression was unaffected. Finally, we examined the effect of these compounds in vivo using pressure-volume loops. Both PGE2 and sulprostone decreased +dp/dt, whereas the EP4 agonist increased +dp/dt. Contractility is reduced via the EP3 receptor but increased via EP4. These effects may be mediated through changes in phospholamban phosphorylation and has relevance to detrimental effects of inflammation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Improvement of negative symptoms: Concepts, definition and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, N C

    1997-05-01

    The development of new medications for the treatment of schizophrenia is closely tied to the concept of the disorder and its characteristic symptoms. In recent years, the symptoms have been divided into two broad categories: positive and negative. Positive symptoms tend to command clinical attention and to be treatment-responsive, which negative symptoms are more insidious and disabling, but less spectacular. Negative symptoms, which are similar to the core symptoms of schizophrenia defined by Krapaelin and Bleuler, have not received much attention until recently because of concern about reliability. However, rating scales with good reliability are now available for use in clinical and neurobiological studies. Clinical drug trials are also meeting the challenge of documenting the response to carefully rated negative symptoms. In addition, they are exploring the effects of medication on negative symptoms that are primary rather than secondary to reduced extrapyramidal side effects, or of medication that lowers levels of depression or decreases the demoralizing effects of positive symptoms. One ideal strategy for identifying the effects of medication on primary negative symptoms is to study patients with high levels of negative symptoms and low levels of positive symptoms, who are in the early stages of the illness and have been given minimal treatment with classical neuroleptics. Such samples are highly informative, but difficult to collect. Alternatively, when all confounders cannot be eliminated, the effects of medication can be explored using statistical techniques to examine covariance.

  20. Rooting gene trees without outgroups: EP rooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Janet S; Little, Roderick J A; Lake, James A

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167-181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301-316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60-76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489-493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763-766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255-260).

  1. Association of typical versus atypical antipsychotics with symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Fujimaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several reports on patients with chronic schizophrenia suggest that atypical versus typical antipsychotics are expected to lead to better quality of life (QOL and cognitive function. Our aim was to examine the association of chronic treatment with typical or atypical antipsychotics with cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, QOL, and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in long-hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised (HDS-R, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale, translated into Japanese (JSQLS, and the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS were used to evaluate cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, QOL, and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. We examined the correlation between the dose of antipsychotics and each measure derived from these psychometric tests. The student t-test was used to compare scores obtained from psychometric tests between patients receiving typical and atypical antipsychotics. Results showed significant correlations between chlorpromazine (CPZ-equivalent doses of typical antipsychotics and atypical antipsychotics, and the total BPRS score and BPRS subscale scores for positive symptoms. CPZ-equivalent doses of typical antipsychotics were correlated with the JSQLS subscale score for dysfunction of psycho-social activity and DIEPSS score. Furthermore, the total BPRS scores, BPRS subscale score for positive symptoms, the JSQLS subscale score for dysfunction of psycho-social activity, and the DIEPSS score were significantly higher in patients receiving typical antipsychotics than atypical antipsychotics. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that long-term administration of typical antipsychotics has an unfavorable association with feelings of difficulties mixing in social situations in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

  2. SPECT and {sup 123}I-Iodolisuride ({sup 123}-I-ILIS) in extra-pyramidal syndromes. The use of different models of {gamma}-cameras; TEMP a l'{sup 123}I-Iodolisuride chez des patients presentant un syndrome extrapyramidal. Utilisation de differents modeles {gamma}-camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.J.; Jannuario, C.; Santos, A.C.; Cunha, L.; Pedroso de Lima, J.J. [FMC Coimbra (Portugal); Prunier-Levilion, C.; Autret, A.; Guilloteau, D.; Besnard, J.C.; Baulieu, J.L. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 37 - Tours (France); Chassat, F.; Bekhechi, D.; Marchand, J.; Mauclaire, L. [CIS bio international, CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Catela, L. [ITN, Sacavem (Portugal)

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate {sup 123}I-ILIS as a radioligand of dopamine receptors in patients with extra-pyramidal diseases by using different cameras in two different centers. 45 patients were included and divided in 2 groups: group I (n=28): idiopathic Parkinson disease, group II (n=17): other extra-pyramidal syndrome. {sup 123}I-ILIS, 1.7 to 2.8 MBq/kg, was injected after informed consent. Imaging was performed with a single head camera, a dual head camera, a triple head camera and a brain dedicated annular detector. The pattern of the transverse slices containing the basal ganglia was classified according to 3 types: type 1: visible basal ganglia and invisible cortex, type 2: invisible basal ganglia and visible cortex, type 3: visible basal ganglia and cortex. Striatal/frontal cortex ratio (S/FC) was calculated from standardized, geometrical ROI's. No patient showed any undesirable effect. All SPECT images were interpretable. In group 1, 45/45 scintigraphic pattern were type 1 or 3, in group II 18/23 scintigraphic patterns were type 2 or 3. S/FC was significantly lower in group II than in group I patients. We conclude that {sup 123}I-ILIS SPECT can be performed with any conventional {gamma}-camera. It provides functional informations about the striatal dopaminergic synapse in patients with extra-pyramidal degenerative disease, and could be useful in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson disease and other extra-pyramidal syndromes. (author)

  3. EP4 and EP2 receptor subtypes involved in colonic secretion in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosa, A.S.; Hansen, M.B.; Tilotta, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the prostaglandin EP receptor subtypes functionally involved in electrogenic ion secretion in rat colon. With 30 rats, measurements of short circuit current (SCC) and slope conductance were obtained by Ussing chamber technique. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) and other...

  4. AKTIVITAS ANTITUMOR DARI EKSOPOLISAKARIDA (EPS) Lactobacillus bulgaricus SECARAN IN VITRO

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Nama eksopolisakarida (EPS) adalah nama umum untuk semua bentuk polisakarida bakteri yang ditemukan di luar dinding sel dan merupakan salah satu produk bioaktif yang dihasilkan oleh mikroorganisme. Salah satu mikrooorganisme yang menghasilkan EPS adalah bakteri asam laknat, diantaranya Lactobacillus bulgaricus strain ropy yang diisolasi dari susu fermentasi secara in vitro. EPS yang telah diektrasksi dengan berbagai konsentrasi mmenggunakan sel tumor K-562 (sel leukemia) ( jumlah sel x 10 4)....

  5. Effect of Deletion of the Prostaglandin EP2 Receptor on the Anabolic Response to Prostaglandin E2 and a Selective EP2 Receptor Agonist

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Shilpa; Alander, Cynthia; Zhan, Peili; Gao, Qi; Pilbeam, Carol; Raisz, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Studies using prostaglandin E receptor (EP) agonists indicate that prostaglandin (PG) E2 can have anabolic effects through both EP4 and EP2 receptors. We previously found that the anabolic response to a selective EP4 receptor agonist (EP4A, Ono Pharmaceutical) was substantially greater than to a selective EP2 receptor agonist (EP2A) in cultured murine calvarial osteoblastic cells. To further define the role of the EP2 receptor in PG-mediated effects on bone cells, we examined the effects of E...

  6. Cloning and expression of the rabbit prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Youfei; Stillman, Brett A.; Zhang, Yahua; Schneider, André; Saito, Osamu; Davis, Linda S.; Redha, Reyadh; Breyer, Richard M.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2002-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has multiple physiologic roles mediated by G protein coupled receptors designated E-prostanoid, or "EP" receptors. Evidence supports an important role for the EP2 receptor in regulating fertility, vascular tone and renal function. Results The full-length rabbit EP2 receptor cDNA was cloned. The encoded polypeptide contains 361 amino acid residues with seven hydrophobic domains. COS-1 cells expressing the cloned rabbit EP2 exhibited specific [3H]PGE2 binding ...

  7. Sero-prevalence and cross-reactivity of chikungunya virus specific anti-E2EP3 antibodies in arbovirus-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu-Wing Kam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and clinically-related arboviruses cause large epidemics with serious economic and social impact. As clinical symptoms of CHIKV infections are similar to several flavivirus infections, good detection methods to identify CHIKV infection are desired for improved treatment and clinical management. The strength of anti-E2EP3 antibody responses was explored in a longitudinal study on 38 CHIKV-infected patients. We compared their anti-E2EP3 responses with those of patients infected with non-CHIKV alphaviruses, or flaviviruses. E2EP3 cross-reactive samples from patients infected with non-CHIKV viruses were further analyzed with an in vitro CHIKV neutralization assay. CHIKV-specific anti-E2EP3 antibody responses were detected in 72% to 100% of patients. Serum samples from patients infected with other non-CHIKV alphaviruses were cross-reactive to E2EP3. Interestingly, some of these antibodies demonstrated clearly in vitro CHIKV neutralizing activity. Contrastingly, serum samples from flaviviruses-infected patients showed a low level of cross-reactivity against E2EP3. Using CHIKV E2EP3 as a serology marker not only allows early detection of CHIKV specific antibodies, but would also allow the differentiation between CHIKV infections and flavivirus infections with 93% accuracy, thereby allowing precise acute febrile diagnosis and improving clinical management in regions newly suffering from CHIKV outbreaks including the Americas.

  8. Neurocognition and symptoms identify links between facial recognition and emotion processing in schizophrenia: meta-analytic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Joseph; Wood, Rachel C; Jimenez, Amy M; Hellemann, Gerhard S

    2013-12-01

    In schizophrenia patients, one of the most commonly studied deficits of social cognition is emotion processing (EP), which has documented links to facial recognition (FR). But, how are deficits in facial recognition linked to emotion processing deficits? Can neurocognitive and symptom correlates of FR and EP help differentiate the unique contribution of FR to the domain of social cognition? A meta-analysis of 102 studies (combined n=4826) in schizophrenia patients was conducted to determine the magnitude and pattern of relationships between facial recognition, emotion processing, neurocognition, and type of symptom. Meta-analytic results indicated that facial recognition and emotion processing are strongly interrelated (r=.51). In addition, the relationship between FR and EP through voice prosody (r=.58) is as strong as the relationship between FR and EP based on facial stimuli (r=.53). Further, the relationship between emotion recognition, neurocognition, and symptoms is independent of the emotion processing modality - facial stimuli and voice prosody. The association between FR and EP that occurs through voice prosody suggests that FR is a fundamental cognitive process. The observed links between FR and EP might be due to bottom-up associations between neurocognition and EP, and not simply because most emotion recognition tasks use visual facial stimuli. In addition, links with symptoms, especially negative symptoms and disorganization, suggest possible symptom mechanisms that contribute to FR and EP deficits. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preon Model and a Possible New Physics in ep Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, H.

    1993-03-01

    The properties of predicted new particles in a preon-subpreon model are discussed. The model contains several new particles which could be detected in the near future. It is shown that ep colliders are especially adequate to study properties of a few of them. Production cross sections and signatures in ep collisions are discussed.

  10. Preon model and a possible new physics in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senju, Hirofumi (Nagoya Municipal Women' s Coll. (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    The properties of predicted new particles in a preon-subpreon model are discussed. The model contains several new particles which could be detected in the near future. It is shown that ep colliders are especially adequate to study properties of a few of them. Production cross sections and signatures in ep collisions are discussed. (author).

  11. Spacecraft Electrical Power System (EPS) generic analysis tools and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gladys M.; Sheppard, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of the analysis tools and techiques used in modeling the Space Station Freedom electrical power system, as well as future space vehicle power systems. The analysis capabilities of the Electrical Power System (EPS) are described and the EPS analysis tools are surveyed.

  12. EpCAM : Structure and function in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, Ulrike; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of tumor cells in mice more than 30 years ago resulted in the discovery of an epithelial antigen, later defined as a cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). Although EpCAM has since evoked significant interest as a target in cancer therapy, mechanistic insights on the functions of this glycoprotei

  13. Editorial Statement of the Economic and Political Studies (EPS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulu; Chen

    2013-01-01

    <正>The Economic and Political Studies(EPS)was founded in 2012 by Renmin University of China and is published by the Renmin University of China Press.The very first issue of this journal appears now in January 2013.The EPS focuses on academic research explicitly or implicitly related to China

  14. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  15. Recognizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bowel habits. Learn More About Pain in IBS Symptoms Won’t Stop Everyone suffers from bowel changes ... They can be constant or keep coming back. Symptoms Change Some or all of IBS symptoms can ...

  16. Discovery and characterization of carbamothioylacrylamides as EP2 selective antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-07-11

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 is emerging as a novel target for development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative and peripheral diseases; however, the availability of EP2 antagonist probes for exploration of peripheral disease models is very limited. We now report identification and characterization of a novel chemical class of compounds that show nanomolar potency and competitive antagonism of the EP2 receptor. A compound in this class, TG6-129, showed prolonged plasma half-life and did not cross the blood brain barrier. This compound also suppressed the induction of inflammatory mRNA markers in a macrophage cell line upon activation of EP2. Thus, this compound could be useful as a probe for a variety of peripheral chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in which EP2 appears to play a pathogenic role.

  17. Uniaxial tension and tensile creep behaviors of EPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康颖安; 李显方; 谭加才

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of EPS(Expanded polystyrene) with three densities at room temperature and under tension loading was studied.The results show that EPS material is characterized by brittle behavior in the tension tests,and tensile properties of EPS increase with the increase of density.Volume fraction has no a significant effect on the modulus of these foams.The tensile creep strain increases with stress for EPS with same density,indicating that the creep behavior is of the stress dependency.And the creep behavior of EPS exhibits density dependency,which the creep strain decreases with densities for a fixed stress value.Moreover the creep behavior under the constant tension load is well in coincidence with the three-parameter solid model.

  18. Highlights from e-EPS: Hetland to receive EPS-PED Award for Secondary School Teaching

    CERN Multimedia

    Urbaan Titulaer

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The EPS Physics Education Division selected Karl Thorstein Hetland, West Telemark Secondary School, Norway, as this year’s recipient of its Secondary School Teaching Award. K.T. Hetland developed the Energy Network, which aims to make students energy conscious and focus on renewable energy. The Energy Network, created in 2005, consists of 15 local networks, each involving an upper secondary school and several lower secondary schools, 55 schools in all. Material from the Network is used in physics classes in a large number of schools at national level and plays a major role in recruiting university physics students. K.T. Hetland will receive his award at the International Physics Education Conference, held together with the European Physics Educati...

  19. Highlights from e-EPS: Jean-Michel Raimond wins EPS Edison-Volta Prize 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Martina Knoop, e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The European Physical Society has the pleasure to announce that the 2014 EPS Edison-Volta Prize is awarded to Jean-Michel Raimond for “seminal contribution to physics (that) have paved the way for novel explorations of quantum mechanics and have opened new routes in quantum information processing”. J.-M. Raimond’s PhD thesis was supervised by Serge Haroche at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, in the early 1980′s, and together S. Haroche, M. Brune and J.-M. Raimond have built an extremely successful research group since then. J.-M. Raimond has made seminal contributions to the development of cavity QED experiments, in particular involving circular Rydberg atoms interacting with very high-Q superc...

  20. Activation of prostaglandin E2-receptor EP2 and EP4 pathways induces growth inhibition in human gastric carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, T; Ishihara, S; Sato, H; Rumi, M A K; Kawashima, K; Miyaoka, Y; Suetsugu, H; Kazumori, H; Cava, C F Ortega; Kadowaki, Y; Fukuda, R; Kinoshita, Y

    2002-08-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells is still unclear. PGE2 receptors are divided into four subtypes - EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 - which are coupled to three different intracellular signal-transduction systems. Stimulation of EP2 and EP4 is linked with cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In some human gastric cancer cells, PGE2 has been suggested to have an antiproliferative effect by way of increased cAMP production. Expression of EP2 and EP4 in human gastric carcinoma cells, however, has not been examined. We examined the expression of EP2 and EP4 and the antiproliferative effects of specific EP2 and EP4 agonists on four different human gastric cancer cell lines. Our data clarified that all the cell lines investigated in this study expressed EP2 and EP4 and that the specific agonists of these receptors induced growth inhibition with an accompanying increase in cAMP production. In summary, gastric cancer cells have EP2 and EP4 receptors, and their selective activation is linked with the decreased cell proliferation.

  1. Anorexia and cachexia in prostaglandin EP1 and EP3 subtype receptor knockout mice bearing a tumor with high intrinsic PGE2 production and prostaglandin related cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Andersson, M; Lönnroth, C; Svanberg, E; Lundholm, K

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have suggested that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. However, the role of COX pathways in the pathogenesis of cancer anorexia/cachexia is not fully resolved. In the present study, we investigated the role of PGE receptors subtype EP1 and EP3 on the development of anorexia in MCG 101-bearing mice. Our results show that the absence of host EP1 or EP3 receptors did not alter the magnitude of anorexia in tumor-bearers. However, anorexia in tumor-bearing EP1 and EP3 knockouts was not improved by indomethacin treatment as observed in wild type tumor-bearers. By contrast, indomethacin improved body composition similar in EP1 and EP3 knockouts as well as in wild type tumor-bearing animals and tumor growth was retarded in EP1 and promoted in EP3 knock outs. Our results demonstrate that host EP1 and EP3 receptors are involved in the control of local tumor growth, which translates into anorexia, this being the main cause of metabolic adaptive alterations to explain weight loss in this model. Brain EP1 and EP3 subtype receptors do not seem to directly control anorexia, which leaves EP2 and EP4 as potential candidates.

  2. Review of HIV Pre exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and example of HIV PrEP Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    Interventions Aim: to reduce the efficiency of transmission or to shorten the duration of infectiousness Usexual Partners U Sharing Needles Older Age...Program HIV PrEP Portfolio - DoD-wide PrEP experience to date (Beckett, Okulicz, Blaylock/Garges, MHRP/WRAIR*) • Analysis of all DoD beneficiaries

  3. The production-influencing factors of extracellular polysacchadde(EPS) from a Strain of lactic acid bacteria and EPS extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; SUN Liping; ZENG Yong; WANG Lei; AN Liguo

    2006-01-01

    The influencing factors of extracellular polysaccharide(EPS)produced from a strain of lactic acid bacteria(LAB L15)were studied by using the phenol-H2SO4 method.It was demonstrated that the strain produced EPS at the most amount when it was incubated for 40-48 h and when the pH value was 4 under 30℃.Glucose was the most suitable carbon source for LAB-producing EPS.The rough EPS was obtained from L15 culture after centrifugation,dialysis,deprotein,decoloration,and ethanol-precipitation.The sample was at least composed of two polysaccharides mat were completely different in molecular weight and the amount.The purified EPS was passed through the SephadexG-200 colunm and it showed that it was a sample purified by thin layer chromatography.

  4. Inhibition of EP4 signaling attenuates aortic aneurysm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utako Yokoyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aortic aneurysm is a common but life-threatening disease among the elderly, for which no effective medical therapy is currently available. Activation of prostaglandin E(2 (PGE(2 is known to increase the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP and the release of inflammatory cytokines, and may thus exacerbate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA formation. We hypothesized that selective blocking of PGE(2, in particular, EP4 prostanoid receptor signaling, would attenuate the development of AAA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical analysis of human AAA tissues demonstrated that EP4 expression was greater in AAA areas than that in non-diseased areas. Interestingly, EP4 expression was proportional to the degree of elastic fiber degradation. In cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (ASMCs, PGE(2 stimulation increased EP4 protein expression (1.4 ± 0.08-fold, and EP4 stimulation with ONO-AE1-329 increased MMP-2 activity and interleukin-6 (IL-6 production (1.4 ± 0.03- and 1.7 ± 0.14-fold, respectively, P<0.05. Accordingly, we examined the effect of EP4 inhibition in an ApoE(-/- mouse model of AAA infused with angiotensin II. Oral administration of ONO-AE3-208 (0.01-0.5 mg/kg/day, an EP4 antagonist, for 4 weeks significantly decreased the formation of AAA (45-87% reduction, P<0.05. Similarly, EP4(+/-/ApoE(-/- mice exhibited significantly less AAA formation than EP4(+/+/ApoE(-/- mice (76% reduction, P<0.01. AAA formation induced by periaortic CaCl(2 application was also reduced in EP4(+/- mice compared with wild-type mice (73% reduction, P<0.001. Furthermore, in human AAA tissue organ cultures containing SMCs and macrophages, doses of the EP4 antagonist at 10-100 nM decreased MMP-2 activation and IL-6 production (0.6 ± 0.06- and 0.7 ± 0.06-fold, respectively, P<0.05 without increasing MMP-9 activity or MCP-1 secretion. Thus, either pharmacological or genetic EP4 inhibition attenuated AAA formation in multiple mouse and human models

  5. Modulation of host natural killer cell functions in breast cancer via prostaglandin E2 receptors EP2 and EP4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Dawn; Ma, Xinrong; Kundu, Namita; Collin, Peter D; Fulton, Amy M

    2013-01-01

    Breast malignancies often have high levels of COX-2. The COX-2 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contributes to the high metastatic capacity of breast tumors. Our published data indicates that inhibiting either PGE2 production or PGE2-mediated signaling through the PGE2 receptor EP4 (one of four EP expressed on the malignant cell) reduces metastasis by a mechanism that requires Natural Killer (NK) cells. Tumor derived PGE2 and exogenous PGE2 are known to have direct inhibitory effects on NK cell functions, but less is known regarding which EP receptors mediate these effects. We now show that several NK functions (lysis, migration, cytokine production) are compromised in tumor-bearing mice and that tumor produced PGE2 interferes with NK cell functions. PGE2 inhibits the potential of NK cells to migrate, exert cytotoxic effects, and secrete IFNγ. The ability of PGE2 to inhibit NK cells from tumor bearing mice is by acting on EP2 and EP4 receptors. NK cells from tumor-bearing mice were more sensitive to inhibition by EP4 and EP2 agonists compared to endogenous NK cells from healthy mice. PGE2 was inhibitory to most NK functions of either normal or tumor-bearing mice. In contrast, there was a trend for enhanced TNFα production in response to PGE2 by NK cells from tumor-bearing mice. We also report that a recently described EP4 antagonist, frondoside A, inhibits breast tumor metastasis in an NK-dependent manner and protects IFNγ production by NK cells from PGE2 mediated suppression. Taken together these data show that NK functions are depressed in tumor-bearing hosts relative to normal NK cells and that PGE2 suppresses NK functions by acting on EP2 and EP4 receptors. PMID:22306906

  6. EpCAM expression in normal, non-pathological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Reid, Lola M

    2008-01-01

    Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is associated with various cancers. Most normal, non-pathological epithelial tissue is EpCAM positive with the exception of epidermal keratinocytes, gastric parietal cells, myoepithelial cells, thymic cortical epithelial, and hepatocytes. However, during early liver development EpCAM expression is also observed. In our studies, we have demonstrated that EpCAM is expressed in non-pathological human livers on hepatic progenitors in livers of all donor ages, from 16 weeks gestation fetal livers to adult. Hepatic progenitors of the liver consist of the stem cells and their descendants, the hepatoblasts, that give rise to the hepatocytic and biliary lineages. Both hepatic stem cells and most hepatoblasts express EpCAM, but only hepatoblasts are alpha-fetoprotein positive. The percentage of EpCAM positive progenitors in human livers varies with donor age and is about 2.5% in the adult and 12.1% in fetuses. In vivo, hepatic stem cells have been found associated with the canals of Hering. Xeno-transplantation experiments with EpCAM positive human liver cells have revealed their potential for proliferation and differentiation to mature liver parenchymal cells.

  7. Menopausal symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Rymer, Janice; Morris, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Symptoms associated with the menopause include vasomotor symptoms, sleeplessness, mood changes, reduced energy levels, loss of libido, vaginal dryness, and urinary symptoms.Many symptoms, such as hot flushes, are temporary, but those resulting from reduced hormone levels, such as genital atrophy, may be permanent.

  8. Overview of microalgal extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Zheng, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Microalgae have been studied as natural resources for a number of applications, most particularly food, animal feed, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In addition to the intracellular compounds of interest, microalgae can also excrete various extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) into their immediate living environment during their life cycle to form a hydrated biofilm matrix. These microalgal EPS mainly consist of polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Most notably, EPS retain their stable matrix structure and form a 3-D polymer network for cells to interact with each other, and mediate their adhesion to surfaces. EPS also play a role as extracellular energy and carbon sinks. They are also abundant source of structurally and compositionally diverse biopolymers which possess unique bioactivities for special high-value applications, specifically as antivirals, antitumor agents, antioxidants, anticoagulants and anti-inflammatories. Their superior rheological properties also make microalgal EPS particularly useful in mechanical engineering (e.g., biolubricants and drag reducers) and food science/engineering (e.g., thickener and preservatives) applications. The chemical composition and structure of EPS appear to correlate with their applications, but the fundamentals of such relationship are not well understood. This article summarizes previous research on microalgal EPS derived from green algae, diatoms and red algae, including compositions/functions/structure, production, and potential applications. The importance of exopolysaccharides and EPS proteins, with their particular metabolic characteristics, are also described because of their potential high-value applications. This review concludes with potential future research areas of microalgal EPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rome III functional dyspepsia symptoms classification: Severity vs frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, F; Holvoet, L; Vanuytsel, T; Tack, J

    2017-06-01

    The Rome III criteria subdivide functional dyspepsia (FD) in the epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) and the postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) based on the frequency of the symptoms to optimize the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. However, it is unclear to which extent the frequency of the symptoms is related to their severity. Our aim was to explore the frequency and severity of dyspeptic symptoms and their relationship in FD patients. Functional dyspepsia patients fulfilling the Rome III diagnostic completed a questionnaire that evaluated the frequency and severity of FD symptoms. The concordance between the severity and frequency categories was analyzed by means of spearman correlation and the concordance correlation coefficient (ρc ). In the entire patient cohort (n=421), the classification of symptoms severity and frequency showed good concordance for all symptoms. In the EPS subgroup (n=….), the symptom severity and frequency score of epigastric pain showed a poor correlation (r=.28; ρc =0.07). The PDS subgroup (n=…) showed a good correlation for most of the symptoms. Due to its limited occurrence in this group, the correlation of the severity and frequency scores for epigastric pain is of little relevance (r=.79; ρc =0.58). The overlap EPS-PDS group showed good correlation for most of the symptoms, except for epigastric pain (pain r=.24; ρc =0.09). We conclude that the information given by the assessment of frequency and severity of PDS symptoms is comparable and hence one of the scores sufficiently identifies symptom pattern in PDS patients. In EPS patients, both the symptom frequency and severity should be taken into account as two separate entities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. At last, a truly selective EP2 receptor antagonist

    OpenAIRE

    Birrell, Mark A.; Nials, Anthony T.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), this lipid mediator has been the focus of intense research. The diverse biological effects of PGE2 are due, at least in part, to the existence of four distinct receptors (EP1–4). This can complicate the analysis of the biological effects produced by PGE2. While there are currently selective pharmacological tools to explore the roles of the EP1,3,4 receptors in cellular and tissue responses, analysis of EP2 receptor-induced responses has bee...

  11. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by Serratia sp.1 using wastewater sludge as raw material and flocculation activity of the EPS produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, J; Hoang, N V; More, T T; Yan, S; Tyagi, N; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2013-10-15

    Growth profile and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production of Serratia sp.1 was studied in shake flask fermentation for 72 h using wastewater sludge as raw material. Maximum cell concentration of 6.7 × 10(9) cfu/mL was obtained at 48 h fermentation time. EPS dry weight, flocculation activity and dewaterability of different EPS (tightly bound or TB-EPS, loosely bound or LB-EPS and broth-EPS or B-EPS) were also measured. The highest concentration of LB-EPS (2.45 g/L) and TB-EPS (0.99 g/L) were attained at 48 h of fermentation. Maximum flocculation activity and dewaterability (ΔCST) of TB-EPS (76.4%, 14.5s and 76.5%, 15.5s), LB-EPS (67.8%, 8.1s and 64.7%, 7.6s) and broth EPS (61%, 6.1s and 70.4%, 6.8s) were obtained at 36 and 48 h of growth. Higher flocculation activity and dewaterability were achieved with TB-EPS than with the two other EPS. Characterization of TB-EPS and LB-EPS was done in terms of their protein and carbohydrate content. Protein content was much higher in TB-EPS where as carbohydrate content was only slightly higher in TB-EPS than LB-EPS. Morphology of the Serratia strain after fermentation in sludge and TSB was observed under a scanning electron microscope and the cell size was found to be bigger in the sludge medium than the TSB medium.

  12. Primary and persistent negative symptoms: Concepts, assessments and neurobiological bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucci, Armida; Merlotti, Eleonora; Üçok, Alp; Aleman, André; Galderisi, Silvana

    2016-05-27

    Primary and persistent negative symptoms (PPNS) represent an unmet need in the care of people with schizophrenia. They have an unfavourable impact on real-life functioning and do not respond to available treatments. Underlying etiopathogenetic mechanisms of PPNS are still unknown. The presence of primary and enduring negative symptoms characterizes deficit schizophrenia (DS), proposed as a separate disease entity with respect to non-deficit schizophrenia (NDS). More recently, to reduce the heterogeneity of negative symptoms by using criteria easily applicable in the context of clinical trials, the concept of persistent negative symptoms (PNS) was developed. Both PNS and DS constructs include enduring negative symptoms (at least 6months for PNS and 12months for DS) that do not respond to available treatments. PNS exclude secondary negative symptoms based on a cross-sectional evaluation of severity thresholds on commonly used rating scales for positive symptoms, depression and extrapyramidal side effects; the DS diagnosis, instead, excludes all potential sources of secondary negative symptoms based on a clinical longitudinal assessment. In this paper we review the evolution of concepts and assessment modalities relevant to PPNS, data on prevalence of DS and PNS, as well as studies on clinical, neuropsychological, brain imaging electrophysiological and psychosocial functioning aspects of DS and PNS.

  13. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Christina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. Methods EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. Results The anaplastic (ATC and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p Conclusion We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC.

  14. 前列腺素E2受体亚型EP2和EP4的最新研究进展%The Latest Progress in E-Prostanoid (EP) Receptor Subtypes EP2 and EP4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱森; 杨吉春; 管又飞

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin(PG)E2 exerts its physiological actions via four functionally antagonistic E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, which are designated as subtypes EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4 respectively. The subtype EP3 has multiple mRNA splicing isoforms. All of these receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The EP receptor subtypes exhibit different tissue distribution and expressional regulation, and mediate various signaling pathway and physiological functions. Among the 4 EP receptors, EP2 and EP4 are coupled to the same Goprotein (stimulate G-protein, Gs), and increase cellular cAMP level upon activation. EP2 and EP4 function redundantly in some physiological processes, while they play distinct roles in some other processes. In the current paper, the latest advances in study of EP2 and EP4 receptors will be summarized and discussed.%前列腺素E2(PGE2)通过作用于4种功能相互拮抗的受体广泛地参与了机体及细胞代谢过程.这4种PGE2受体分别被命名为EP1、EP2、EP3和E4,其中EP3又因mRNA的不同剪切方式分为多种亚型.所有的这些PGE2受体均是G-蛋白偶联受体,但具有不同的组织定位和表达调控方式,并介导不同的信号传导通路和生理学作用.在这4种受体中,EP2和EP4与同一种类型的G蛋白(激活型G蛋白,Gs)偶联,激活后都能增加细胞内的cAMP,因此它们的功能具有一定的重叠性,但在某些生理过程中它们又发挥着截然不同的作用.本文将就这两型受体及其生理学功能进行分析和总结,并重点讨论有关其研究的最新进展.

  15. Epidermal growth factor pathway substrate 15, Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Chen, H; Iannolo, G

    1999-01-01

    Eps15 was originally identified as a substrate for the kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Eps15 has a tripartite structure comprising a NH2-terminal portion, which contains three EH domains, a central putative coiled-coil region, and a COOH-terminal domain containing...... of EGF and transferrin, demonstrating that both proteins are components of the endocytic machinery. Since the family of EH-containing proteins is implicated in various aspects of intracellular sorting, biomolecular strategies aimed at interfering with these processes can now be envisioned....... These strategies have potentially far reaching implications extending to the control of cell proliferation. In this regard, it is of note that Eps15 has the potential of transforming NIH-3T3 cells and that the eps15 gene is rearranged with the HRX/ALL/MLL gene in acute myelogeneous leukemias, thus implicating...

  16. PrEP implementation research in Africa: what is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances M Cowan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Of the two million new HIV infections in adults in 2014, 70% occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. Several African countries have already approved guidelines for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for individuals at substantial risk of HIV as part of combination HIV prevention but key questions remain about how to identify and deliver PrEP to those at greatest need. Throughout the continent, individuals in sero-discordant relationships, and members of key populations (sex workers, men who have sex with men (MSM, transgender women and injection drug users are likely to benefit from the availability of PrEP. In addition, adolescent girls and young women (AGYW are at substantial risk in some parts of the continent. It has been estimated that at least three million individuals in Africa are likely to be eligible for PrEP according to WHO's criteria. Tens of demonstration projects are planned or underway across the continent among a range of countries, populations and delivery settings. Discussion: In each of the target populations, there are overarching issues related to (i creating demand for PrEP, (ii addressing supply-side issues and (iii providing appropriate and tailored adherence support. Critical for creating demand for PrEP is the normalization of HIV prevention. Community-level interventions which engage opinion leaders as well as empowerment interventions for those at highest risk will be key. Critical to supply of PrEP is that services are accessible for all, including for stigmatized populations. Establishing accessible integrated services provides the opportunity to address other public health priorities including the unmet need for HIV testing, contraception and sexually transmitted infections treatment. National policies need to include minimum standards for training and quality assurance for PrEP implementation and to address supply chain issues. Adherence support needs to recognize that social and structural factors are likely

  17. Design issues of an IPM motor for EPS

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C-F; Shen, Jian-Xin; Luk, Patrick Chi-Kwong; Fei, Wei-Zhong; Jin, Meng-Jia

    2011-01-01

    In electric power steering (EPS), permanent magnet (PM) brushless ac (BLAC) motors offer distinct advantages over other electric motor types in terms torque smoothness, reliability and efficiency. The design procedure of an interior permanent magnet (IPM) motor used in EPS is presented in this paper. The requirements of the steering system are first introduced, and the machine's specifications are then derived. Critical issues which have considerable impacts on the machine's...

  18. Anthrax: Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EID Journal Articles Anthrax-Related MMWRs Medscape Commentaries Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cause severe illness and even death. Cutaneous anthrax symptoms can include: A group of small blisters or ...

  19. Structures and Logic of EP Implementation and Administration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Grunow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes empirical observations gathered during a research project on the implementation of environmental protection (EP policies in China. The project focused on local EP in both urban and rural areas. Policy field analysis was used as a conceptual framework for structuring the observations. The paper develops in three main steps discussing the following topics: 1 Collective problems within the policy field of EP show that EP issues in general are unlike those of other policy fields. Official EP policies in China today resemble those of other countries – but they are separating issues and responsibilities, making local implementation very demanding. 2 China lags behind in its willingness and ability to implement these policies – leading to implementation gaps. To explore the causes and consequences, specific sites in China are described in an extended look at local implementation structures. It was found that although policies in China are basically the same everywhere, the structures for implementing them and the quality of their implementation vary widely with regard to resources, organization, coordination, staff qualifications, personnel placement, and other aspects. 3 Not all of the challenges hampering local implementation of environmental policies were China-specific; however, some of those which are can be described as the macro-context: an ineffective rule of law, insufficient involvement of civil society, and complicated macro-structures of public administration prevent a generally high level of successful EP implementation in China.

  20. Role of EP2 and EP4 receptors in airway microvascular leak induced by prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Victoria C; Birrell, Mark A; Maher, Sarah A; Griffiths, Mark; Grace, Megan; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Clark, Stephen R; Belvisi, Maria G

    2016-03-01

    Airway microvascular leak (MVL) involves the extravasation of proteins from post-capillary venules into surrounding tissue. MVL is a cardinal sign of inflammation and an important feature of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PGE2, a product of COX-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid, binds to four receptors, termed EP1–4. PGE2 has a wide variety of effects within the airway, including modulation of inflammation, sensory nerve activation and airway tone. However, the effect of PGE2 on airway MVL and the receptor/s that mediate this have not been described. Evans Blue dye was used as a marker of airway MVL, and selective EP receptor agonists and antagonists were used alongside EP receptor-deficient mice to define the receptor subtype involved. PGE2 induced significant airway MVL in mice and guinea pigs. A significant reduction in PGE2-induced MVL was demonstrated in Ptger2−/− and Ptger4−/− mice and in wild-type mice pretreated simultaneously with EP2 (PF-04418948) and EP4 (ER-819762) receptor antagonists. In a model of allergic asthma, an increase in airway levels of PGE2 was associated with a rise in MVL; this change was absent in Ptger2−/− and Ptger4−/− mice. PGE2 is a key mediator produced by the lung and has widespread effects according to the EP receptor activated. Airway MVL represents a response to injury and under ‘disease’ conditions is a prominent feature of airway inflammation. The data presented highlight a key role for EP2 and EP4 receptors in MVL induced by PGE2.

  1. The Crystal Structure of a Binary Complex of Two Pseudopilins: EpsI And EpsJ From the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio Vulnificus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanez, M.E.; Korotkov, K.V.; Abendroth, J.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-28

    Type II secretion systems (T2SS) translocate virulence factors from the periplasmic space of many pathogenic bacteria into the extracellular environment. The T2SS of Vibrio cholerae and related species is called the extracellular protein secretion (Eps) system that consists of a core of multiple copies of 11 different proteins. The pseudopilins, EpsG, EpsH, EpsI, EpsJ and EpsK, are five T2SS proteins that are thought to assemble into a pseudopilus, which is assumed to interact with the outer membrane pore, and may actively participate in the export of proteins. We report here biochemical evidence that the minor pseudopilins EpsI and EpsJ from Vibrio species interact directly with one another. Moreover, the 2.3 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a complex of EspI and EpsJ from Vibrio vulnificus represents the first atomic resolution structure of a complex of two different pseudopilin components from the T2SS. Both EpsI and EpsJ appear to be structural extremes within the family of type 4a pilin structures solved to date, with EpsI having the smallest, and EpsJ the largest, 'variable pilin segment' seen thus far. A high degree of sequence conservation in the EpsI:EpsJ interface indicates that this heterodimer occurs in the T2SS of a large number of bacteria. The arrangement of EpsI and EpsJ in the heterodimer would correspond to a right-handed helical character of proteins assembled into a pseudopilus.

  2. Up-regulation of EP2 and EP3 receptors in human tolerogenic dendritic cells boosts the immunosuppressive activity of PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Cabezón, Raquel; Borgman, Kyra J E; España, Carolina; Lozano, Juan Jose; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are APCs essential in regulating the immune response. PGE2, produced during inflammation, has a pivotal role in the maturation of DCs and, therefore, is vital for the immune response. The large variety of biologic functions governed by PGE2 is mediated by its signaling through 4 distinct E-type prostanoid (EP) receptors. Immunogenic DCs express EP2 and EP4, which mediate the PGE2 signaling. However, the expression and function of EP receptors in human tolerogenic DCs (tol-DCs), which present an inhibitory phenotype, have not yet, to our knowledge, been assessed. To clarify the role of EP receptors in tol-DCs, we examined the expression of different EP receptors and their effect using selective agonists in human cells. We find that EP2 and EP3 expression are up-regulated in in vitro-generated tol-DCs compared with mature DCs (mDCs). Activation of EP2-EP4 has a direct effect on the surface expression of costimulatory molecules and maturation receptors, such as CD80, CD83, and CD86 or MHCII and CCR7 in tol-DCs, the latter being exclusively modulated by PGE2-EP4 signaling. Importantly, we find that EP2 and EP3 receptors are involved in tolerance induction through IL-10 production by tol-DCs. These results are in sharp contrast with the inflammatory role of EP4 Moreover, we show that DCs generated in the presence of agonists for EP receptors, induce naive T cell differentiation toward polarized Th1/Th17 cells. Given the differential effects of EP receptors, our results suggest that EP receptor agonist/antagonists might become relevant novel drug templates to modulate immune response. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. "Support Your Client at the Space That They're in": HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribers' Perspectives on PrEP-Related Risk Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Magnus, Manya; Mayer, Kenneth H; Krakower, Douglas S; Eldahan, Adam I; Hawkins, Lauren A Gaston; Underhill, Kristen; Hansen, Nathan B; Kershaw, Trace S; Betancourt, Joseph R; Dovidio, John F

    2017-04-01

    Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and evidence that most PrEP users do not engage in risk compensation (i.e., increased risk behavior due to a perceived decrease in HIV susceptibility), some healthcare providers report patient risk compensation to be a deterrent to prescribing PrEP. Overcoming this barrier is essential to supporting PrEP access and uptake among people at risk for HIV. To inform such efforts, this qualitative study explored PrEP-related risk compensation attitudes among providers with firsthand experience prescribing PrEP. US-based PrEP providers (n = 18), most of whom were HIV specialists, were recruited through direct outreach and referral from colleagues and other participants. Individual 90-min semistructured interviews were conducted by phone or in person from September 2014 through February 2015, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Three attitudinal themes emerged: (1) providers' role is to support patients in making informed decisions, (2) risk behavior while taking PrEP does not fully offset PrEP's protective benefit (i.e., PrEP confers net protection, even with added behavioral risk), and (3) PrEP-related risk compensation is unduly stigmatized within and beyond the healthcare community. Participants were critical of other healthcare providers' negative judgment of patients and reluctance to prescribe PrEP due to anticipated risk compensation. Several providers also acknowledged an evolution in their thinking from initial ambivalence toward greater acceptance of PrEP and PrEP-related behavior change. PrEP providers' insights about risk compensation may help to address unsubstantiated concerns about PrEP-related risk compensation and challenge the acceptability of withholding PrEP on these grounds.

  4. EPS8 inhibition increases cisplatin sensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija K Gorsic

    Full Text Available Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic, is associated with ototoxicity, renal toxicity and neurotoxicity, thus identifying means to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin may allow for improved outcomes. A SNP (rs4343077 within EPS8, discovered through a genome wide association study of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, provided impetus to further study this gene. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the role of EPS8 in cellular susceptibility to cisplatin in cancerous and non-cancerous cells. We used EPS8 RNA interference to determine the effect of decreased EPS8 expression on LCL and A549 lung cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. EPS8 knockdown in LCLs resulted in a 7.9% increase in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 1.98 × 10(-7 and an 8.7% decrease in apoptosis (P = 0.004 compared to control. In contrast, reduced EPS8 expression in lung cancer cells resulted in a 20.6% decrease in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 5.08 × 10(-5. We then investigated an EPS8 inhibitor, mithramycin A, as a potential agent to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin. Mithramycin A decreased EPS8 expression in LCLs resulting in decreased cellular sensitivity to cisplatin as evidenced by lower caspase 3/7 activation following cisplatin treatment (42.7% ± 6.8% relative to control P = 0.0002. In 5 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cell lines, mithramycin A also resulted in decreased EPS8 expression. Adding mithramycin to 4 NSCLC cell lines and a bladder cancer cell line, resulted in increased sensitivity to cisplatin that was significantly more pronounced in tumor cell lines than in LCL lines (p<0.0001. An EGFR mutant NSCLC cell line (H1975 showed no significant change in sensitivity to cisplatin with the addition of mithramycin treatment. Therefore, an inhibitor of EPS8, such as mithramycin A, could improve cisplatin treatment by increasing sensitivity of tumor relative to normal cells.

  5. Somatic Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Kreiner, Svend; Ebstrup, Jeanette F

    2016-01-01

    ) the associations between the symptoms, and 3) the associations between the somatic symptoms, self-perceived health and limitations due to physical health accounting for the co-occurrence of symptoms. Information on 19 somatic symptoms, self-perceived health and limitations due to physical health was achieved from...... a population-based questionnaire survey of 36,163 randomly selected adults in the Capital Region of Denmark in 2006/07. Chain graph models were used to transparently identify and describe the associations between symptoms, self-perceived health and limitations due to physical health. In total, 94...... all strongly directly associated with both of the outcomes (γ>0.30). Chest pain was strongly associated with self-perceived health, and other musculoskeletal symptoms and urinary retention were strongly associated with limitations due to physical health. Other symptoms were either moderate...

  6. Application Research on Urban Rail Transit EP2002 Brake System%城市轨道交通 EP2002制动系统应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶敏; 张帆; 杨颖; 高亮彰

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,the EP2002 brake control logic and pneumatic principle were analyzed by intro-duced EP2002 brake system structure and the type and function of EP2002 valve.The advantages of EP2002 brake control system in urban rail vehicle applications were given.%介绍 EP2002制动系统构成和 EP2002阀的种类及作用,分析 EP2002制动控制逻辑及其气动原理,说明EP2002制动控制系统在城轨车辆中应用的优势。

  7. PGE2 differentially regulates monocyte-derived dendritic cell cytokine responses depending on receptor usage (EP2/EP4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloso, Neil J; Urquhart, Paula; Nicolaou, Anna; Wang, Jenny; Woodward, David F

    2013-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players in coordinating immune responses, both innate and adaptive. While the role of lipid mediators in the immune response has been the subject of many investigations, the precise role of prostaglandins has often been plagued by contradictory studies. In this study, we examined the role of PGE(2) on human DC function. Although studies have suggested that PGE(2) specifically plays a role in DC motility and cytokine release profile, the precise receptor usage and signaling pathways involved remain unclear. In this report we found that irrespective of the human donor, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) express three of the four PGE(2) receptor subtypes (EP(2-4)), although only EP(2) and EP(4) were active with respect to cytokine production. Using selective EP receptor antagonists and agonists, we demonstrate that PGE(2) coordinates control of IL-23 release (a promoter of Th17, an autoimmune associated T cell subset) in a dose-dependent manner by differential use of EP(2) and EP(4) receptors in LPS-activated MoDCs. This is in contrast to IL-12, which is dose dependently inhibited by PGE(2) through both receptor subtypes. Low concentrations (∼1-10nM) of PGE(2) promoted IL-23 production via EP(4) receptors, while at higher (>50 nM), but still physiologically relevant concentrations, IL-23 is suppressed by an EP(2) dependent mechanism. These results can be explained by differential regulation of the common subunit, IL-12p40, and IL-23p19, by EP(2) and EP(4). By these means, PGE(2) can act as a regulatory switch of immune responses depending on its concentration in the microenvironment. In addition, we believe these results may also explain why seemingly conflicting biological functions assigned to PGE(2) have been reported in the literature, as the concentration of ligand (PGE(2)) fundamentally alters the nature of the response. This finding also highlights the potential of designing therapeutics which differentially target

  8. 奥氮平治疗阿尔茨海默病精神行为症状对照研究%Comparative study of olanzapine in treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴忠海; 王洪娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect and adverse reaction of olanzapine and risperidone in the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.Methods 70 cases with Alzheimer's disease were randomly divided into 2 groups, being treated with olanzapine and risperidone seperately for 8 weeks.The Alzheimer's disease pathology behavioral assessment scale ( BEHAVE-AD) and Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale ( TESS) were used to assess the efficacy and adverse reactions.Results Scores of BEHAV-AD decreased significantly after treatment (P0.05).The incidence of extrapyramidal system reaction ( EPS) and insomnia in risperidone group was higher than that of olanzapine group (P <0.05).Conclusions Olanzapine and risperidone had considerable effect in the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, but olanzapine had better safety.%目的:探讨奥氮平与利培酮治疗老年期痴呆患者的精神行为症状的疗效及不良反应。方法对70例老年痴呆患者随机分为奥氮平组和利培酮组进行治疗,疗程8周。采用阿尔茨海默病病理行为评定表( BEHAVE-AD )及不良反应症状量表( TESS )评定疗效和不良反应。结果治疗后两组BEHAV-AD评分均显著下降(P<0.05或P<0.01);4周时以奥氮平组BEHAV-AD总分及行为紊乱、抑郁、焦虑评分降低明显(P<0.05);奥氮平组有效率91.43%,利培酮组有效率88.57%(P>0.05);在锥体外系反应(EPS)、失眠的发生率利培酮组高于奥氮平组(P<0.05)。结论奥氮平和利培酮用于治疗阿尔茨海默病精神行为症状的临床疗效相当,但奥氮平的安全性更好。

  9. Activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide signaling through the prostaglandin E2-EP1/EP2/EP4 receptor pathway in synovium of knee osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatani, Atsushi; Uchida, Kentaro; Inoue, Gen; Takano, Shotaro; Aikawa, Jun; Miyagi, Masayuki; Fujimaki, Hisako; Iwase, Dai; Onuma, Kenji; Matsumoto, Toshihide; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-10-17

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid vasodilatory neuropeptide that binds to receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) and the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). Clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that CGRP is associated with hip and knee joint pain; however, the regulation mechanisms of CGRP/CGRP receptor signaling in synovial tissue are not fully understood. Synovial tissues were harvested from 43 participants with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA; unilateral Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grades 3-4) during total knee arthroplasty. Correlationships between the mRNA expression levels of CGRP and those of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were evaluated using real-time PCR analysis of total RNA extracted from the collected synovial tissues. To investigate the factors controlling the regulation of CGRP and CGRP receptor expression, cultured synovial cells were stimulated with TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and were also treated with PGE2 receptor (EP) agonist. CGRP and COX-2 localized in the synovial lining layer. Expression of COX-2 positively correlated with CGRP mRNA expression in the synovial tissue of OA patients. The gene expression of CGRP and RAMP1 increased significantly in synovial cells exogenously treated with PGE2 compared to untreated control cells. In cultured synovial cells, CGRP gene expression increased significantly following EP4 agonist treatment, whereas RAMP1 gene expression increased significantly in the presence of exogenously added EP1 and EP2 agonists. PGE2 appears to regulate CGRP/CGRP receptor signaling through the EP receptor in the synovium of knee OA patients.

  10. "I did not want to give birth to a child who has HIV": Experiences using PrEP during pregnancy among HIV-uninfected Kenyan women in HIV-serodiscordant couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintye, Jillian; Beima-Sofie, Kristin M; Kimemia, Grace; Ngure, Kenneth; Trinidad, Susan Brown; Heffron, Renee; Baeten, Jared; Odoyo, Josephine; Mugo, Nelly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kelley, Maureen C; John-Stewart, Grace C

    2017-07-31

    The perceptions, motivations, and beliefs of HIV-uninfected women about PrEP use during pregnancy can influence its uptake and adherence. This study elicited the views of HIV-uninfected women with personal experience taking PrEP during pregnancy. Qualitative interviews were conducted with HIV-uninfected women who had personal experience taking PrEP while pregnant. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 HIV-uninfected Kenyan women in HIV-serodiscordant couples enrolled in an open-label PrEP demonstration project who became pregnant while using PrEP and continued PrEP through their pregnancy. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed into English. A qualitative descriptive analysis was performed, using a constant comparison approach to identify key themes related to PrEP use in pregnancy. Desire to remain HIV-uninfected and have an HIV-free infant were strong motivators influencing continued use of PrEP during pregnancy. Supporting HIV-infected partners and childbearing within an HIV-serodiscordant relationship were also motivators. Women had challenges distinguishing normal pregnancy symptoms from PrEP side effects and were concerned that observed side effects could be signs of danger for the infant related to PrEP exposure. Healthcare providers were important conduits of knowledge about PrEP, and continuity of PrEP providers throughout pregnancy facilitated adherence. HIV-uninfected women in HIV-serodiscordant couples were motivated to use PrEP during pregnancy to remain HIV-uninfected and to have an HIV-free child, but had concerns about side effects. Healthcare providers will be important for PrEP messaging and adherence support in this unique population.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially without

  11. NEXT GENERATION ORAL PrEP: BEYOND TENOFOVIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Bisrat K.; Gulick, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have focused testing on regimens of tenofovir (TDF) with or without emtricitabine (FTC). However, TDF may be associated with toxicities (renal, bone) and FTC may select for drug resistance. In this review, we discuss agents that might serve as alternatives to TDF/FTC for HIV prevention. Recent Findings Several drug characteristics are important to consider when selecting agents for PrEP with the most critical being safety, tolerability, adequate penetration into target tissues, prevention of HIV infection, and long lasting activity with convenient dosing. With these factors in mind, we review several potentially useful agents for PrEP. The first group includes drugs that are already FDA-approved (maraviroc, raltegravir) with attributes that make them attractive for PrEP. The second groups of drugs include investigational agents with long-lasting activities that are being developed in parenteral form (rilpivirine-long acting, S/GSK 1265744, ibalizumab). Summary Current research suggests there will be a broader array of PrEP drugs to choose from in the near future, thereby giving clinicians the flexibility to select agents that best suit the needs of their patient population. PMID:23032733

  12. Functional dyspepsia--symptoms, definitions and validity of the Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jan; Talley, Nicholas J

    2013-03-01

    Dyspepsia refers to a heterogeneous group of symptoms that are localized in the epigastric region. Typical dyspeptic symptoms include postprandial fullness, early satiation, epigastric pain and epigastric burning, but other upper gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, belching or abdominal bloating often occur. Functional dyspepsia is defined as the presence of dyspeptic symptoms in the absence of an organic cause that readily explains them. The Rome III consensus proposed the subdivision of functional dyspepsia into postprandial distress syndrome (PDS), characterized by postprandial fullness and early satiation, and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS), characterized by epigastric pain or burning. Epidemiological studies in the USA and Europe confirmed the presence of both subgroups, with good separation between EPS and PDS. By contrast, other studies have found major overlap between EPS and PDS in patients with functional dyspepsia in specialist care centres in Europe and Asia. Preliminary pathophysiological studies suggest that PDS might be characterized by a higher prevalence of impaired gastric accommodation than EPS and raised duodenal eosinophil counts. Whether different treatment approaches are needed for EPS and PDS is currently unclear; only acotiamide, a new drug for the treatment of functional dyspepsia, has been found to be efficacious in PDS but not in EPS. Further randomized controlled trials testing treatment response by subgroup are urgently needed.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 receptor EP3 regulates both adipogenesis and lipolysis in mouse white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hu; Fu, Jia-Lin; Miao, Yi-Fei; Wang, Chun-Jiong; Han, Qi-Fei; Li, Sha; Huang, Shi-Zheng; Du, Sheng-Nan; Qiu, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Ji-Chun; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Breyer, Richard M; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Nan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Guan, You-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Among the four prostaglandin E2 receptors, EP3 receptor is the one most abundantly expressed in white adipose tissue (WAT). The mouse EP3 gene gives rise to three isoforms, namely EP3α, EP3β, and EP3γ, which differ only at their C-terminal tails. To date, functions of EP3 receptor and its isoforms in WAT remain incompletely characterized. In this study, we found that the expression of all EP3 isoforms were downregulated in WAT of both db/db and high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Genetic ablation of three EP3 receptor isoforms (EP3(-/-) mice) or EP3α and EP3γ isoforms with EP3β intact (EP3β mice) led to an obese phenotype with increased food intake, decreased motor activity, reduced insulin sensitivity, and elevated serum triglycerides. Since the differentiation of preadipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts to adipocytes was markedly facilitated by either pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion/inhibition of EP3 receptor via the cAMP/PKA/PPARγ pathway, increased adipogenesis may contribute to obesity in EP3(-/-) and EP3β mice. Moreover, both EP3(-/-) and EP3β mice had increased lipolysis in WAT mainly due to the activated cAMP/PKA/hormone-sensitive lipase pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that EP3 receptor and its α and γ isoforms are involved in both adipogenesis and lipolysis and influence food intake, serum lipid levels, and insulin sensitivity. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-pt-PGE2 acts as an EP4 receptor agonist on endothelial barrier function and in a model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, Anna; Konya, Viktoria; Pasterk, Lisa; Maric, Jovana; Bärnthaler, Thomas; Lanz, Ilse; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of inflammatory conditions. We recently demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG)E2 enhances the resistance of pulmonary endothelium in vitro and counteracts lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo via EP4 receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-phenyl-trinor-(pt)-PGE2 on acute lung inflammation in a mouse model. In LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice, 17-pt-PGE2 reduced neutrophil infiltration and inhibited vascular leakage. These effects were unaltered by an EP1 antagonist, but reversed by EP4 receptor antagonists. 17-pt-PGE2 increased the resistance of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and prevented thrombin-induced disruption of endothelial junctions. Again, these effects were not mediated via EP1 or EP3 but through activation of the EP4 receptor, as demonstrated by the lack of effect of more selective EP1 and EP3 receptor agonists, prevention of these effects by EP4 antagonists and EP4 receptor knock-down by siRNA. In contrast, the aggregation enhancing effect of 17-pt-PGE2 in human platelets was mediated via EP3 receptors. Our results demonstrate that 17-pt-PGE2 enhances the endothelial barrier in vitro on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, and accordingly ameliorates the recruitment of neutrophils, via EP4 receptors in vivo. This suggests a beneficial effect of 17-pt-PGE2 on pulmonary inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Design Method for EPS Control System Based on KANSEI Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yumi; Itoh, Hideaki; Ozaki, Fuminori; Nakamura, Takenobu; Kawaji, Shigeyasu

    Recently, it has been identified that a KANSEI engineering plays an important role in functional design developing for realizing highly sophisticated products. However, in practical development methods, we design products and optimise the design trial and error, which indecates that we depend on the skill set of experts. In this paper, we focus on an automobile electric power steering (EPS) for which a functional design is required. First, the KANSEI structure is determined on the basis of the steering feeling of an experienced driver, and an EPS control design based on this KANSEI structure is proposed. Then, the EPS control parameters are adjusted in accordance with the KANSEI index. Finally, by assessing the experimental results obtained from the driver, the effectiveness of the proposed design method is verified.

  16. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  17. Searches for excited fermions in ep collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Ahn, S H; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bodmann, B; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Breitweg, J; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Catterall, C D; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Crittenden, J; Cross, R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Engelen, J; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Graciani, R; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G F; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Hughes, V W; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lammers, S; Lane, J B; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Ma, K J; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martens, J; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, A; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Mindur, B; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Ochs, A; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Park, S K; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Raach, H; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Renner, R; Repond, J; Rigby, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sar, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shche-, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Saint-Laurent, M G; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Surrow, B; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Umemori, K; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Wölfle, S; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Za, L; Zakrzewski, J A; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2002-01-01

    Searches in ep collisions for heavy excited fermions have been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Excited states of electrons and quarks have been searched for in e^+p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 300 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 47.7 pb^-1. Excited electrons have been sought via the decays e*->egamma, e*->eZ and e*->nuW. Excited quarks have been sought via the decays q*->qgamma and q*->qW. A search for excited neutrinos decaying via nu*->nugamma, nu*->nuZ and nu*->eW is presented using e^-p collisions at 318 GeV centre-of-mass energy, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 16.7 pb^-1. No evidence for any excited fermion is found, and limits on the characteristic couplings are derived for masses below 250 GeV.

  18. ANALISIS PENGARUH ROA, EPS, FINANCIAL LEVERAGE, PROCEED TERHADAP INITIAL RETURN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andhi Wijayanto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Riset ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh ROA, EPS, Financial Leverage dan Proceed terhadap initial return. Initial return diperoleh dengan mengukur perbedaan harga pada hari pertama perdangangan di pasar sekunder dengan harga saat IPO. Penelitian ini menduga bahwa ROA, EPS, Proceed mempunyai pengaruh negatif dengan initial return, disisi lain, Financial Leverage diduga mempunyai pengaruh yang positif terhadap initial return. Data pada penelitian ini terdapat dalam prospectus perusahaan. Sampel diambil dengan menggunakan metode purposive sampling dengan dua kriteria yaitu terdiri dari perusahaan yang IPO selama periode tahun 2000-2006 dan underpriced. Dengan kriteria tersebut, 67 perusahaan dijadikan sebagai sampel. Metode analisis menggunakan regresi berganda. Hasil penelitian ini adalah Earning Per-Share (EPS, dan Proceed mempunyai pengaruh negatif dan signifikan terhadap initial return, sedangkan Return on Assets Ratio (ROA, dan Financial Leverage tidak berpengaruh signifikan terhadap initial return. This research aimed to examine the influence of ROA, EPS, Financial Leverage, and Proceed on initial return. Initial return was measured by the difference between the firm’s stock price on the first day in the secondary market and it’s IPO. This research expected that return on assets ratio (ROA, earning per-share (EPS, and proceed negatively associated with initial return. On other hand, financial leverage ratio expected to positively associate with initial return. Data in this study were obtained from company prospectus, ICMD. Sample had been taken by using purposive sampling method with two criterions such as conducted IPO during period 2000-2006 and underpriced. With criterions, 67 companies obtains as sample. The analytical methods used multiple regressions, the empirical result of this research indicate that EPS, and proceed significantly associated with initial returns. Whereas ROA, and financial leverage ratio not

  19. Sample EP Flow Analysis of Severely Damaged Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCown, Andrew William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-12

    These are slides for a presentation at the working group meeting of the WESC SREMP Software Product Integration Team on sample EP flow analysis of severely damaged networks. The following topics are covered: ERCOT EP Transmission Model; Zoomed in to Houston and Overlaying StreetAtlas; EMPACT Solve/Dispatch/Shedding Options; QACS BaseCase Power Flow Solution; 3 Substation Contingency; Gen. & Load/100 Optimal Dispatch; Dispatch Results; Shed Load for Low V; Network Damage Summary; Estimated Service Areas (Potential); Estimated Outage Areas (potential).

  20. Polyadenylation site prediction using PolyA-iEP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakiotis, Ioannis; Tzanis, George; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents a method called PolyA-iEP that has been developed for the prediction of polyadenylation sites. More precisely, PolyA-iEP is a method that recognizes mRNA 3'ends which contain polyadenylation sites. It is a modular system which consists of two main components. The first exploits the advantages of emerging patterns and the second is a distance-based scoring method. The outputs of the two components are finally combined by a classifier. The final results reach very high scores of sensitivity and specificity.

  1. Discussion on Respiratory Failure from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases(COPD) and Extrapyramidal System Damage%慢性阻塞性肺病呼吸衰竭并发锥体外路系统损害的初步探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙毅; 刘蓝

    2014-01-01

    44 cases of patients of respiratory failure from COPD withⅡtype arterial blood gas are selected,among whom, 29 cases with severe anoxia and 15 cases with moderate anoxia. All of the 44 cases have compound acid-base unbalance,10 cases with respiratory type triple acid-base unbalance disorders. Clinical symptoms:there are 39 cases with finger static tremor,24 cases with flapping tremor, 18 cases with gear-shaped resistance and 6 cases with head tremor. Madopar experiential treatment for 5-7 days is given to 11 serious patients whose disease has affected their normal life. Conclusion:It is reversible for patients with early COPD hypoxemia,hypercapnia, acid-base unbalance and extrapyramidal system damage. The active treatment of respiratory failure and hypoxemia can prevent extrapy-ramidal system damage.%选取44例COPD动脉血气为Ⅱ型呼吸衰竭患者,其中重度缺氧29例,中度缺氧15例。44例均为复合性酸碱失衡,呼吸型三重酸碱失衡10例。临床表现:手指静止性震颤39例,扑翼样震颤24例,呈“齿轮状”抵抗18例,头部颤动6例。对11例病情严重影响正常生活者给予美多巴试验性治疗5~7天治愈。得出:COPD低氧血症,高碳酸血症及酸碱失衡并发锥体外路系损害早期是可逆性的,积极治疗呼吸衰竭、纠正低氧血症,可防止并发锥体外路系统损害。

  2. Characterization of a Viral EPS-Depolymerase, a Potential Tool for Control of Fire Blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W S; Geider, K

    2000-11-01

    ABSTRACT A 3.3-kb fragment of genomic DNA from bacteriophage Phi-Ea1h encoding an amylovoran-directed depolymerase lyase was sequenced, and three open reading frames (ORFs) were detected. The first ORF could encode a lysozyme and the second a holin that may form a pore supporting cell lysis by the lysozyme. The third ORF encodes a protein of 657 amino acids and deletion mutation in this DNA fragment abolished extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-degrading activity. A putative promoter and a ribosome binding sequence were located in front of the gene. A polymerase chain reaction product spanning the gene was inserted into multi copy plasmids including fusions with a Histidine-tagged sequence to facilitate its purification on a nickel nitrilotriacetic acid column. Maximal activity of the purified protein was observed between pH 4 and 5 at 52 degrees C. Visualized by staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectin from Abrus precatorious, the enzyme degraded the EPS-capsules of Erwina amylovora. In virulence assays, no symptoms were detected for a low inoculum of an E. amylovora strain when pear slices were soaked in a solution of depolymerase in contrast to control slices without addition of the enzyme. Furthermore, gfp- or lux-labeled E. amylovora cells were not propagated, when their amylovoran capsules were removed by the depolymerase. The enzyme could be a tool for biological control of fire blight.

  3. EP3 receptors mediate PGE2-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE2 acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Since PGE2 production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE2 depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE2 remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE2, the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP1, EP3, and EP4. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE2, sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP3 receptor antagonist; the EP1 and EP4 receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE2 or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP3 receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP3 receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE2 or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP3 receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE2 on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge. PMID:21803943

  4. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis and degradation of murine epithelial cell adhesion molecule mEpCAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hachmeister

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation.

  5. Prostaglandin EP2 and EP4 receptors modulate expression of the chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1) in response to LPS-induced renal glomerular inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, Gunther; Schaper, Melanie; Panzer, Ulf; Kluger, Malte; Stahl, Rolf A K; Thaiss, Friedrich; Schneider, André

    2009-08-27

    The pro-inflammatory chemokine CCL2 [chemokine (Cys-Cys motif) ligand 2; also known as MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1)] is up-regulated in the glomerular compartment during the early phase of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced nephritis. This up-regulation also occurs in cultured MCs (mesangial cells) and is more pronounced in MCs lacking the PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) receptor EP2 or in MCs treated with a prostaglandin EP4 receptor antagonist. To examine a possible feedback mechanism of EP receptor stimulation on CCL2 expression, we used an in vitro model of MCs with down-regulated EP receptor expression. Selectively overexpressing the various EP receptors in these cells then allows the effects on the LPS-induced CCL2 expression to be examined. Cells were stimulated with LPS and CCL2 gene expression was examined and compared with LPS-stimulated, mock-transfected PTGS2 [prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, also known as COX-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2)]-positive cells. Overexpression of EP1, as well as EP3, had no effect on LPS-induced Ccl2 mRNA expression. In contrast, overexpression of EP2, as well as EP4, significantly decreased LPS-induced CCL2 expression. These results support the hypothesis that PTGS2-derived prostaglandins, when strongly induced, counter-balance inflammatory processes through the EP2 and EP4 receptors in MCs.

  6. EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimera Targets and Regress Epithelial Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithya Subramanian

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, a cancer stem cell (CSC marker is over expressed in epithelial cancers and in retinoblastoma (RB. We fabricated an EpCAM targeting aptamer-siRNA chimera and investigated its anti-tumor property and EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD mediated signaling in epithelial cancer. The anti-tumor efficacy of EpCAM aptamer-siEpCAM chimera (EpApt-siEp was evaluated by qPCR, northern and Western blotting in WERI-Rb1- RB cell line, primary RB tumor cells and in MCF7- breast cancer cell line. Anti-tumor activity of EpApt-siEp was studied in vivo using epithelial cancer (MCF7 mice xenograft model. The mechanism and pathways involved in the anti-tumor activity was further studied using protein arrays and qPCR. EpApt-siEp chimera was processed in vitro by dicer enzyme. Treatment of the WERI-Rb1 and MCF7 cells with EpApt-siEp revealed statistically significant down regulation of EpCAM expression (P<0.005 and concomitant reduction in cellular proliferation. In primary RB cells cultured from RB tumors, EpApt-siEp silenced EpCAM, significantly inhibited (P<0.01 cell proliferation and induced cytotoxicity. Knockdown of EpICD expressed in RB primary tumors led to repression of pluripotency markers, SOX2, OCT4, NANOG, and CD133. In vivo studies showed complete tumor growth regression without any toxicity in animals (P<0.001 and tumor tissues showed significant downregulation (P<0.05 of EpCAM, MRP1, ABCG2, stathmin, survivin and upregulation of ATM (P<0.05 leading to apoptosis by intrinsic pathway with minor alteration in cytokines. Our results revealed that EpApt-siEp potentially eradicated EpCAM positive cancer cells through CSC marker suppression and apoptosis, while sparing normal EpCAM negative adjacent cells.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 prevents hyperosmolar-induced human mast cell activation through prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Torres-Atencio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cells play a critical role in allergic and inflammatory diseases, including exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB in asthma. The mechanism underlying EIB is probably related to increased airway fluid osmolarity that activates mast cells to the release inflammatory mediators. These mediators then act on bronchial smooth muscle to cause bronchoconstriction. In parallel, protective substances such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 are probably also released and could explain the refractory period observed in patients with EIB. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PGE2 on osmotically activated mast cells, as a model of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. METHODS: We used LAD2, HMC-1, CD34-positive, and human lung mast cell lines. Cells underwent a mannitol challenge, and the effects of PGE2 and prostanoid receptor (EP antagonists for EP(1-4 were assayed on the activated mast cells. Beta-hexosaminidase release, protein phosphorylation, and calcium mobilization were assessed. RESULTS: Mannitol both induced mast cell degranulation and activated phosphatidyl inositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, thereby causing de novo eicosanoid and cytokine synthesis. The addition of PGE2 significantly reduced mannitol-induced degranulation through EP(2 and EP(4 receptors, as measured by beta-hexosaminidase release, and consequently calcium influx. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 phosphorylation were diminished when compared with mannitol activation alone. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show a protective role for the PGE2 receptors EP(2 and EP(4 following osmotic changes, through the reduction of human mast cell activity caused by calcium influx impairment and MAP kinase inhibition.

  8. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 and stimulation of T-cell factor signaling following activation of EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors by prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Hiromichi; West, Kimberly A; Regan, John W

    2002-01-25

    Recently we have shown that the FP(B) prostanoid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor that couples to Galpha(q), activates T-cell factor (Tcf)/lymphoid enhancer factor (Lef)-mediated transcriptional activation (Fujino, H., and Regan, J. W. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 12489-12492). We now report that the EP(2) and EP(4) prostanoid receptors, which couple to Galpha(s), also activate Tcf/Lef signaling. By using a Tcf/Lef-responsive luciferase reporter gene, transcriptional activity was stimulated approximately 10-fold over basal by 1 h of treatment with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in HEK cells that were stably transfected with the human EP(2) and EP(4) receptors. This stimulation of reporter gene activity was accompanied by a PGE(2)-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and Akt kinase. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), completely blocked the agonist-dependent phosphorylation of GSK-3 in both EP(2)- and EP(4)-expressing cells. However, H-89 pretreatment only blocked PGE(2)-stimulated Lef/Tcf reporter gene activity by 20% in EP(4)-expressing cells compared with 65% inhibition in EP(2)-expressing cells. On the other hand wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, had the opposite effect and inhibited PGE(2)-stimulated reporter gene activity to a much greater extent in EP(4)-expressing cells as compared with EP(2)-expressing cells. These findings indicate that the activation of Tcf/Lef signaling by EP(2) receptors occurs primarily through a PKA-dependent pathway, whereas EP(4) receptors activate Tcf/Lef signaling mainly through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway. This is the first indication of a fundamental difference in the signaling potential of EP(2) and EP(4) prostanoid receptors.

  9. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: II. Binding of Cr(III) in EPS/soil system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Cetin; Demiray, Hilal; Dogan, Nazime Mercan

    2011-03-01

    Laboratory batch sorption and column experiments were performed to investigate the effects of microbial EPSs isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 on Cr(III) mobility in heterogeneous subsurface soils. Our batch and column results indicate that microbial EPS may have a pronounced effect on Cr(III) sorption and transport behavior depending on system conditions (e.g., pH, type of EPS). While EPS had no effect on Cr(III) sorption at pH<5, it led to a significant decrease in Cr(III) sorption under slightly acidic to alkaline pH range. Column experiments performed at pH 7.9 suggest that, in the presence of EPS, chromium(III) was significantly mobilized relative to non-EPS containing system due to the formation less sorbing and highly soluble Cr-EPS complexes and competition of EPS against Cr for surface sites. A two-site non-electrostatic surface chemical model incorporating a discrete ligand approach for the description of Cr-EPS interactions accurately predicted Cr(III) sorption and transport behavior in the presence of EPS under variable chemical conditions. Our simulations show that an accurate description of Cr(III) transport in the presence of EPS requires incorporation of proton and Cr(III) binding by EPS, EPS binding by soil minerals, Cr(III) binding by soil minerals, and ternary Cr(III)-EPS surface complexes into the transport equations. Although this approach may not accurately describe the actual mechanisms at the molecular level, it can improve our ability to accurately describe the effects of EPS on Cr(III) mobility in subsurface environment relative to the use of distribution coefficients (K(d)).

  10. The soluble EP2 receptor FuEP2/Ex2 suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth in an orthotopic xenograft model in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke; Uehara, Hisanori

    2011-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies and many factors influence in its growth and development. As in many other types of cancer, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is thought to be an accelerator of cell proliferation and endometrial cancer progression. In this study, we examined the effect of FuEP2/Ex2, a soluble decoy receptor for PGE(2) on growth of endometrial cancer cells. A stable transfectant expressing FuEP2/Ex2 was established from human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells (Ish-FuEP2/Ex2). Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 cells expressed FuEP2/Ex2 mRNA and protein. Expression levels of E-prostanoid receptor 1 (EP1), EP2, EP3, EP4, and F-prostanoid receptor (FP) were almost the same in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 and vector control cells. Growth rates of Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 under normal culture conditions were also similar to vector control cells, although PGE(2)-induced growth stimulation was completely inhibited in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 or by Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 culture medium. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclin D1, and c-fos mRNA by PGE(2) were not observed in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 and Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 culture medium-treated vector control cells, although they were found when treated with prostaglandin F(2α). An orthotopic xenograft model in athymic nude mice revealed that Ish-FuEP2/Ex2-injected mice had significantly decreased mean tumor area. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in the tumor lesion was also significantly lower in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2-injected mice. These findings suggest that an EP-targeting strategy using FuEP2/Ex2 may be of use in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  11. Differential regulation of phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein after activation of EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors by prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Hiromichi; Salvi, Sambhitab; Regan, John W

    2005-07-01

    The EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors whose activation by their endogenous ligand, prostaglandin (PG) E2, stimulates the formation of intracellular cAMP. We have previously reported that the stimulation of cAMP formation in EP4-expressing cells is significantly less than in EP2-expressing cells, despite nearly identical levels of receptor expression (J Biol Chem 277:2614-2619, 2002). In addition, a component of EP4 receptor signaling, but not of EP2 receptor signaling, was found to involve the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). In this study, we report that PGE2 stimulation of cells expressing either the EP2 or EP4 receptor results in the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) at serine-133. Pretreatment of cells with N-[2-(4-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline (H-89), an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), attenuated the PGE2-mediated phosphorylation of CREB in EP2-expressing cells, but not in EP4-expressing cells. Pretreatment of cells with wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, had no effects on the PGE2-mediated phosphorylation of CREB in either EP2- or EP4-expressing cells, although it significantly increased the PGE2-mediated activation of PKA in EP4-expressing cells. However, combined pretreatment with H-89 and wortmannin blocked PGE2-mediated phosphorylation in EP2-expressing cells as well as in EP2-expressing cells. PGE2-mediated intracellular cAMP formation was not affected by pretreatment with wortmannin, or combined treatment with wortmannin and H-89, in either the EP2- or EP4-expressing cells. These findings suggest that PGE2 stimulation of EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors, results in the activation of a PI3K signaling pathway that inhibits the activity of PKA and that the PGE2-mediated phosphorylation of CREB by these receptors occurs through different signaling pathways

  12. Piglet saphenous vein contains multiple relaxatory prostanoid receptors: evidence for EP4, EP2, DP and IP receptor subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Richard J; Giles, Heather

    2005-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 produced endothelium-independent relaxation of phenylephrine- and 5-HT-contracted piglet saphenous vein (PSV; pEC50=8.6±0.2; n=6).The prostanoid EP4 receptor antagonist GW627368X (30–300 nM) produced parallel rightward displacement of PGE2 concentration–effect (E/[A]) curves (pKb=9.2±0.2; slope=1). Higher concentrations of GW627368X did not produce further rightward shifts, revealing the presence of non-EP4 prostanoid receptors.In all, 18 other prostanoid receptor agonists re...

  13. Diphtheria Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  14. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  15. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) as anti-corrosive additives for coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerder, J.; Breur, R.; Slaghek, T.; Holtman, W.; Vennik, M.; Ferrari, G.

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are a class of renewable polymers that show interesting anti-corrosive properties and could potentially be used as an alternative for zinc phosphates. When combined with a waterborne styrene-acrylic polymer dispersion (SA-1), exopolysaccharides were shown to give an improvem

  16. Stratification of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) for aggregated anammox microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fangxu; Yang, Qing; Liu, Xiuhong; Li, Xiyao; Li, Baikun; Zhang, Liang; Peng, Yongzhen

    2017-02-27

    Sludge aggregation and biofilm formation are the most effective approaches to solve the washout of anammox microorganisms. In this study, the structure and composition of EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) were investigated to elucidate the factors for the anammox aggregation property. Anammox sludge taken from 18 lab-scale and pilot-scale reactors treating different types of wastewater was analyzed using EEM-PARAFAC (excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis), FTIR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and real-time PCR combined with multivariate statistical analysis. The results showed that slime and TB-EPS (tightly bound EPS) were closely related with water quality and sludge morphology, and could be used as the indicators for anammox microbial survival ability and microbial aggregate morphology. Furthermore, slime secreted from anammox bacterial cells may be exhibited higher viscosity to the sludge surface and easily formed the gel network to aggregate. Large amounts of hydrophobic groups of protein in TB-EPS promoted the microbial aggregation. The mechanisms of anammox aggregation explored in this study enhanced the understanding of anammox stability in wastewater treatment processes.

  17. 48 CFR 504.570 - Procedures for using the EPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.570 Procedures for using the EPS. (a... that electronic access to a solicitation will result in adequate competition, distribute the... writing the Contracting Officer at the address in . (e) The Electronic Posting System Manual...

  18. 30 CFR 250.211 - What must the EP include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the EP include? 250.211 Section 250.211 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND... exploration drilling, well test flaring, installing a well protection structure, and temporary...

  19. Fire behaviour of EPS ETICS on concrete or masonry facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afipeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In France, fire safety of facades for establishments open to the public has been governed by the Technical Instruction n∘249 since 1982; its current version was made regulatory on May 24th, 2010. Considering this revision, the Ministry of Interior requested industrials firms to revalidate the fire behaviour of their external insulation systems through testing. AFIPEB, SIPEV and SNMI decided therefore to launch a test campaign. After a preliminary analysis of Single Burning Item (SBI data related to EPS ETICS and some full-scale orientation tests, the polyvalent, representative and reliable LEPIR 2 test protocol was implemented. Three EPS ETICS configurations under various renders were tested: one under thick hydraulic renders, another under thin mixed renders and a third under thin organic renders. These tests were successful. For the first 30 minutes of each test: there was no ignition nor vertical spread of fire to the facade at its second level, there was also no lateral spread of fire along the facade width. Moreover, after 60 minutes, the outer skin above the horizontal line at 5.2 m was not damaged. The campaign confirms that EPS ETICS under thin, thick or mixed renders perfectly comply with fire safety regulations. AFIPEB, SIPEV and SNMI wrote a recommendation guide based on approved laboratories assessment. It describes construction solutions limiting fire propagation on a concrete or masonry facade insulated by EPS ETICS. This guide currently supplements IT 249 (2010.

  20. PGE2受体EP2和EP4调节CIA小鼠脾B细胞表面分子和细胞因子表达%Prostaglandin E2 receptors,EP2 and EP4,regulate expression of surface molecules and cytokines in B-cells of collagen-induced arthritic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬各; 陈海英; 秦瑾; 丛斌; 李巧霞; 贾娴娴; 马春玲; 于峰

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨前列腺素E2(PGE2)受体EP2和EP4在胶原诱导性关节炎(CIA)小鼠脾B细胞免疫调节中的作用.方法:建立CIA小鼠模型,用CD19+ 免疫磁珠分选脾B细胞,流式细胞术检测MHCⅡ、CD80和CD86的表达,实时荧光定量PCR技术检测EPs 和细胞因子IFN-γ、TNF-α、IL-6、IL-4、IL-10和TGF-β的表达.结果:小鼠脾B细胞表达EP的4个亚型,CIA模型小鼠EP2和EP4表达增加;EP2阻断剂可以降低MHCⅡ、CD80和CD86的表达,而EP4阻断剂对CD80没有明显影响;EP2和EP4阻断剂均可以降低IFN-γ、TNF-α 和IL-6的表达(P<0.05或P<0.01),促进IL-10的表达(P<0.01或P<0.05),并可以分别促进IL-4和TGF-β的表达(P<0.01).结论:PGE2可通过EP2/EP4调节B细胞表面分子和细胞因子参与CIA发病,EP2/EP4有可能成为类风湿关节炎治疗的新靶点.%AIM : To observe the immunoregulatory effects of prostaglandin E2 receptor ( EP ) subtypes EP2/EP4 on the B - cells of collagen - induced arthritic( CIA )mice.METHODS : DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type Ⅱ collagen emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant to induce arthritis.B - cells were isolated from the splenocyte suspension by positive selection using anti - CD19 monoclonal antihody immunomagnetic heads.The expression of MHC Ⅱ,CD 80 and CD86 was examined by flow cytometry.The mRNA levels of EPs, interferon γ ( IFN -γ ), tumor necrosis factor α ( TNF - α ), IL -6, IL -4, IL - 10 and transforming growth factor - β ( TGF - β ) were detected by real - time RT PCR.RESULTS : The rank of the mRNA levels of EPs was EP2 > EP1 > EP3 > EP4 in B - cells and EP2/EP4 mRNA expression was obviously increased in CIA mice.EP2 antagonists inhihited the expression of MHC Ⅱ.CD80 and CD86.EP4 antagonist had little effect on CD80.EP2/EP4 antagonists inhibited the mRNA expression of IFN - γ , TNF - α , and IL 6 ( P < 0.05 or P <0.01 ) and increased the expression of IL - 10 ( P <0.01 or P <0.05 ).Furthermore, the

  1. Clinical results of neurotransmission SPECT in extra-pyramidal diseases; Resultats cliniques de la TEMP de la neurotransmission en pathologie extra-pyramidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulieu, J.L.; Prunier, C.; Tranquart, F.; Guilloteau, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bretonneau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire in vitro, INSERM U316, 37 - Tours (France)

    1999-12-01

    We present some methodological aspects and clinical applications of dopamine D2 receptor and transporter SPECT using new radiotracers radiolabeled with iodine 123. The gamma camera quality control and standardisation has to be adapted to the small volume and deep location of striata, where receptors and transporters are present. Phantom containing hollow spheres of different diameters which can be filled with different amounts of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 123}I. The semi quantitation of receptor and transporter molecular concentration is based on an equilibrium binding model. According to this model, the binding potential (Bmax. Ka) is equal to the ratio between specific binding in the striatum and circulating activity in a reference region of interest in the occipital cortex. By comparing ECD and ILIS SPECT, it has been shown that striatal ILIS binding does not depend on the local perfusion. The clinical applications mainly concern the extra-pyramidal pathology: ILIS and IBZM SPECT are able to differentiate pre- and post-synaptic lesions. In Parkinson disease the nigrostriatal pathway is damaged and D2 receptors are normal or increased, as shown by normal or elevated IBZM or ILIS uptake. In other extra pyramidal degenerative diseases as progressive supra nuclear palsy or multiple system atrophy striatal D2 receptors are damaged as shown by decreased IBZM or ILIS uptake. In our experience, 88 per cent of patients are correctly classified by ILIS SPECT and 86 per cent with IBZM SPECT. Dopamine transporter SPECT with {beta}CIT and PE2I provides an evaluation of the presynaptic neuronal density in the striatum. One can expect an help for the early diagnosis and the evaluation of Parkinson disease. Another potential application of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT is the evaluation of neuronal loss after hypoxo-ischemia. We conclude that dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT using specific ligands should become a useful diagnosis tool to study a large number of brain

  2. Effects of LPA2R, LPA3R, or EP4R agonists on luteal or endometrial function in vivo or in vitro and sirtuin or EP1R, EP2R, EP3R or EP4R agonists on endometrial secretion of PGE and PGF2αin vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, Magen E; Weems, Yoshie S; Arreguin-Arevalo, Alejandro; Nett, Terry M; Tsutahara, Nicole; Sy, Tracy; Haberman, Jade; Chon, Michel; Randel, Ronald D; Weems, Charles W

    2017-06-01

    In previous work, an EP2 prostanoid receptor (EP2R) agonist in vivo increased mRNA expression of luteal LH receptors (LHR), unoccupied and occupied luteal; LHR, and circulating progesterone, while an EP3R or FPR agonist decreased; mRNA expression of luteal LHR, unoccupied and occupied luteal LHR, and; circulating progesterone. An EP4R and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) LPA2R and LPA3R agonists were reported to inhibit luteal function and sirtuins have been proposed to increase prostaglandin synthesis. The objectives were to determine; whether an EP4R, LPA2R, or LPA3R agonist affect ovine luteal function in vivo or; in vitro. In addition, whether sirtuin (SIRT)-1, 2, or 3; LPA2R or LPA3R; or EP1R, EP2R, EP3R, or EP4R agonists affect caruncular endometrial PGF2α or PGE (PGE1+PGE2) secretion in vitro. Day-10 nonpregnant ewes received a single injection of Vehicle (N = 5); an LPA2R (N = 5); LPA3R (N = 6); or EP4R (N = 5) agonist given into the interstitial tissue of the ovarian vascular pedicle adjacent to the luteal-containing ovary to determine effects on circulating progesterone, mRNA expression of luteal LHR, and luteal unoccupied and occupied LHR. In addition, agonists for LPA2R, LPA3R, EP1R, EP2R, EP3R, or EP4R or SIRT-1, SIRT-2, or SIRT-3 activators were incubated with caruncular endometrial slices in vitro to determine their effect on caruncular endometrial PGF2α, or PGE secretion. LPA2R, LPA3R, or an EP4R agonist in vivo did not affect (P ≥ 0.05) luteal weight, circulating progesterone, or occupied luteal LHR. However, an LPA2R or EP4R agonist, but; not LPA3R agonist, in vivo increased (P ≤ 0.05) mRNA expression of luteal LHR. An; LPA2R, LPA3R, or EP4R agonist increased (P ≤ 0.05) luteal unoccupied LHR, but; not occupied LHR. An LPA2R, LPA3R, or an EP4R agonist did not affect (P ≥ 0.05); luteal progesterone secretion in vitro. An LPA2R or LPA3R agonist did not affect (P ≥ 0.05) luteal PGF2α, or PGE secretion in

  3. PGE2 maintains the tone of the guinea pig trachea through a balance between activation of contractile EP1 receptors and relaxant EP2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säfholm, J; Dahlén, S-E; Delin, I; Maxey, K; Stark, K; Cardell, L-O; Adner, M

    2013-02-01

    The guinea pig trachea (GPT) is commonly used in airway pharmacology. The aim of this study was to define the expression and function of EP receptors for PGE(2) in GPT as there has been ambiguity concerning their role. Expression of mRNA for EP receptors and key enzymes in the PGE(2) pathway were assessed by real-time PCR using species-specific primers. Functional studies of GPT were performed in tissue organ baths. Expression of mRNA for the four EP receptors was found in airway smooth muscle. PGE(2) displayed a bell-shaped concentration-response curve, where the initial contraction was inhibited by the EP(1) receptor antagonist ONO-8130 and the subsequent relaxation by the EP(2) receptor antagonist PF-04418948. Neither EP(3) (ONO-AE5-599) nor EP(4) (ONO-AE3-208) selective receptor antagonists affected the response to PGE(2). Expression of COX-2 was greater than COX-1 in GPT, and the spontaneous tone was most effectively abolished by selective COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, ONO-8130 and a specific PGE(2) antibody eliminated the spontaneous tone, whereas the EP(2) antagonist PF-04418948 increased it. Antagonists of other prostanoid receptors had no effect on basal tension. The relaxant EP(2) response to PGE(2) was maintained after long-term culture, whereas the contractile EP(1) response showed homologous desensitization to PGE(2), which was prevented by COX-inhibitors. Endogenous PGE(2), synthesized predominantly by COX-2, maintains the spontaneous tone of GPT by a balance between contractile EP(1) receptors and relaxant EP(2) receptors. The model may be used to study interactions between EP receptors. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): A carrier of heavy metals in the marine food-chain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    The ecological implications of metal binding properties of bacterial EPS and its possible role in the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the marine food-chain was investigated using a partially purified and chemically characterized microbial EPS...

  5. Functions and behaviors of activated sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): a promising environmental interest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yu; ZHENG Lei; SUN De-zhi

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are the predominant constituents of activated sludge and represent up to 80% of the mass of activated sludge. They play a crucial role in the flocculation, settling and dewatering of activated sludge. Furthermore,EPS also show great efficiency in binding heavy metals. So EPS are key factors influencing reduction in sludge volume and mass, as well as activity and utilization of sludge. EPS are of considerable environmental interest and hundreds of articles on EPS have been published abroad, while information on EPS in China is limited. In this paper, results of over 60 publications related to constituents and characteristics of EPS and their influences on flocculation, settling and dewatering of sludge are compiled and analyzed.Metal-binding ability of EPS is also discussed, together with a brief consideration of possible research interests in the future.

  6. Prostaglandin E2 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and function through cyclic AMP and EP2/EP4 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Katia; Bak-Jensen, Kristian S; Li, Ying; Blumenschein, Wendy M; McGeachy, Mandy J; McClanahan, Terrill K; McKenzie, Brent S; Kastelein, Robert A; Cua, Daniel J; de Waal Malefyt, René

    2009-03-16

    Prostaglandins, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), play an important role during inflammation. This is exemplified by the clinical use of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, which interfere with PGE2 synthesis, as effective antiinflammatory drugs. Here, we show that PGE2 directly promotes differentiation and proinflammatory functions of human and murine IL-17-producing T helper (Th17) cells. In human purified naive T cells, PGE2 acts via prostaglandin receptor EP2- and EP4-mediated signaling and cyclic AMP pathways to up-regulate IL-23 and IL-1 receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 synergizes with IL-1beta and IL-23 to drive retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-gammat, IL-17, IL-17F, CCL20, and CCR6 expression, which is consistent with the reported Th17 phenotype. While enhancing Th17 cytokine expression mainly through EP2, PGE2 differentially regulates interferon (IFN)-gamma production and inhibits production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 in Th17 cells predominantly through EP4. Furthermore, PGE2 is required for IL-17 production in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Hence, the combination of inflammatory cytokines and noncytokine immunomodulators, such as PGE2, during differentiation and activation determines the ultimate phenotype of Th17 cells. These findings, together with the altered IL-12/IL-23 balance induced by PGE2 in dendritic cells, further highlight the crucial role of the inflammatory microenvironment in Th17 cell development and regulation.

  7. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 and Identification of the Exopolysaccharide EPS273 Biosynthesis Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimei Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 is a marine bacterium producing exopolysaccharide 273 (EPS273 with high anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Here, the complete genome of P. stutzeri 273 was sequenced and the genome contained a circular 5.03 Mb chromosome. With extensive analysis of the genome, a genetic locus containing 18 genes was predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of EPS273. In order to confirm this prediction, two adjacent genes (eps273-H and eps273-I encoding glycosyltransferases and one gene (eps273-O encoding tyrosine protein kinase within the genetic locus were deleted and biosynthesis of EPS273 was checked in parallel. The molecular weight profile of EPS purified from the mutant Δeps273-HI was obviously different from that purified from wild-type P. stutzeri 273, while the corresponding EPS was hardly detected from the mutant Δeps273-O, which indicated the involvement of the proposed 18-gene cluster in the biosynthesis of EPS273. Moreover, the mutant Δeps273-HI had the biofilm formed earlier compared with the wild type, and the mutant Δeps273-O almost completely lost the ability of biofilm formation. Therefore, EPS273 might facilitate the biofilm formation for its producing strain P. stutzeri 273 while inhibiting the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study can contribute to better understanding of the biosynthesis of EPS273 and disclose the biological function of EPS273 for its producing strain P. stutzeri 273.

  8. EpCAM and the biology of hepatic stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theise, Neil D.; Schmelzer, Eva; Boulter, Luke; Gires, Olivier; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is frequently and highly expressed on carcinomas, tumor-initiating cells, selected tissue progenitors, and embryonic and adult stem cells. During liver development, EpCAM demonstrates a dynamic expression, since it can be detected in fetal liver, including cells of the parenchyma, whereas mature hepatocytes are devoid of EpCAM. Liver regeneration is associated with a population of EpCAM-positive cells within ductular reactions, which gradually lose the expression of EpCAM along with maturation into hepatocytes. EpCAM can be switched on and off through a wide panel of strategies to fine-tune EpCAM-dependent functional and differentiative traits. EpCAM-associated functions relate to cell–cell adhesion, proliferation, maintenance of a pluripotent state, regulation of differentiation, migration, and invasion. These functions can be conferred by the full-length protein and/or EpCAM-derived fragments, which are generated upon regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Control by EpCAM therefore not only depends on the presence of full-length EpCAM at cellular membranes but also on varying rates of the formation of EpCAM-derived fragments that have their own regulatory properties and on changes in the association of EpCAM with interaction partners. Thus spatiotemporal localization of EpCAM in immature liver progenitors, transit-amplifying cells, and mature liver cells will decisively impact the regulation of EpCAM functions and might be one of the triggers that contributes to the adaptive processes in stem/progenitor cell lineages. This review will summarize EpCAM-related molecular events and how they relate to hepatobiliary differentiation and regeneration. PMID:25477371

  9. Should Earnings per Share (EPS) Be Taught as a Means of Comparing Intercompany Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Charles E.; Clark, Stanley J.; Smith, W. Robert

    2007-01-01

    Accounting standards state that the purpose of presenting earnings per share (EPS) is to provide financial statement users with information on the performance of a single entity. Yet, several textbook authors go further to state that EPS can be used to make comparisons among firms. In this article, the authors show that although EPS comparisons…

  10. Constitutive phosphorylation of eps8 in tumor cell lines: relevance to malignant transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matoskova, B; Wong, W T; Salcini, A E;

    1995-01-01

    eps8, a recently identified tyrosine kinase substrate, has been shown to augment epidermal growth factor (EGF) responsiveness, implicating it in EGF receptor (EGFR)-mediated mitogenic signaling. We investigated the status of eps8 phosphorylation in normal and transformed cells and the role of eps...

  11. 76 FR 52952 - Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... AGENCY Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Student Services Contract EP- 11-D-000403 Yin Gu in accordance with 40 CFR 2.307(h)(3) and 2.308(i)(2). Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu has been awarded multiple contracts to perform work...

  12. 30 CFR 250.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.215 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP? The following H2S information, as applicable, must accompany your EP: (a) Concentration. The estimated...

  13. PrEP in Europe – expectations, opportunities and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Sheena Mary; Noseda, Veronica; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to the global trend showing a decline in new HIV infections, the number reported in the World Health Organization (WHO) region of Europe is increasing. Health systems are disparate, but even countries with free access to screening and treatment observe continuing high rates of new infections in key populations, notably men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is only available in France. This commentary describes the European epidemics and healthcare settings where PrEP could be delivered, how need might be estimated for MSM and the residual barriers to access. Discussion Health systems and government commitment to HIV prevention and care, both financial and political, differ considerably between the countries that make up Europe. A common feature is that funds for prevention are a small fraction of funds for care. Although care is generally good, access is limited in the middle-income countries of Eastern Europe and central Asia, and only 19% of people living with HIV received antiretroviral therapy in 2014. It is challenging to motivate governments or civil society to implement PrEP in the context of this unmet treatment need, which is driven by limited national health budgets and diminishing assistance from foreign aid. The high-income countries of Western Europe have hesitated to embrace PrEP for different reasons, initially due to key gaps in the evidence. Now that PrEP has been shown to be highly effective in European MSM in two randomized controlled trials, it is clear that the major barrier is the cost of the drug which is still on patent, although inadequate health systems and diminishing investment in civil society are also key challenges to overcome. Conclusions The momentum to implement PrEP in European countries is increasing and provides a welcome opportunity to expand and improve clinical services and civil society support focused on HIV and related infections including other sexually transmitted and

  14. A maladaptive role for EP4 receptors in mouse mesangial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-xia Yang

    Full Text Available Roles of the prostaglandin E2 E-prostanoid 4 receptor (EP4 on extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation induced by TGF-β1 in mouse glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs remain unknown. Previously, we have identified that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of FN and Col I in mouse GMCs. Here we asked whether stimulation of EP4 receptors would exacerbate renal fibrosis associated with enhanced glomerular ECM accumulation. We generated EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- mice, cultured primary WT, EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- GMCs, AD-EP4 transfected WT GMCs (EP4 overexpression and AD-Cre transfected EP4(Flox/Flox GMCs (EP4 deleted. We found that TGF-β1-induced cAMP and PGE2 synthesis decreased in EP4 deleted GMCs and increased in EP4 overexpressed GMCs. Elevated EP4 expression in GMCs augmented the coupling of TGF-β1 to FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling, while TGF-β1 induced FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling were down-regulated in EP4 deficiency GMCs. 8 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx, WT and EP4(+/- mice exhibited markedly increased accumulation of ECM compared with sham-operated controls. Albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (BUN and Cr concentrations were significantly increased in WT mice as compared to those of EP4(+/- mice. Urine osmotic pressure was dramatically decreased after 5/6 Nx surgery in WT mice as compared to EP4(+/- mice. The pathological changes in kidney of EP4(+/- mice was markedly alleviated compared with WT mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant reductions of Col I and FN in the kidney of EP4(+/- mice compared with WT mice. Collectively, this investigation established EP4 as a potent mediator of the pro-TGF-β1 activities elicited by COX2/PGE2 in mice GMCs. Our findings suggested that prostaglandin E2, acting via EP4 receptors contributed to accumulation of ECM in GMCs and promoted renal fibrosis.

  15. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  16. 20.9.Extrapyramidal disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920191 Effect of 6-hydroxydopamine oncerebral catecholamines,lipid peroxidationand antioxidant enzymes in rat-concernedwith pathogensis of Parkinson’s disease.LIANG Liping (梁立平),JIANG Dehua (江德华).Dept Neurol,Neurolgic Instit,Tianjing,300052.Chin J Neurol and Psychiat 1991; 24 (4): 223-227.As an animal model of human Parkinson’s

  17. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nagao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EpCAM (CD326 is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts, eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. CONCLUSION: EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  18. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   Conseil de Physique Solvay centenary One hundred years ago the celebrated first Conseil de Physique Solvay took place in Brussels, with the participation of the leading physicists of the time. It marked a profound rupture between the old classical physics and the new quantum physics that described the strange behaviour of Nature at the microscopic level. The conference was one of the most important events in the advent of the quantum revolution; no such physics conference since has acquired the same legendary status. To celebrate the centenary of this unique conference, the International Solvay Institutes are organizing a series of exceptional events that will make Brussels the world capital of physics for ten days in October. For more information, please visit the S...

  19. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   European Physical Society Physics Education Division Since 2000, the European Physical Society’s Physics Education Division has been contributing to awareness of the relevance of physics in everyday culture, to interaction amongst schools and universities and to a better quality of physics teaching at all levels. The Physics Education Division achieves this by addressing and promoting physics, the continued education of teachers, large scale educational changes – such as the Bologna process – and successful new teaching methods, taking into account differences and similarities in the European education systems. Since 2008, their More Understanding with Simple Experiments (MUSE) project has offered teachers and researchers a set of nine research-bas...

  20. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   DESY and INFN physicists win 2011 Enrico Fermi prize The 2011 Enrico Fermi prize of the Italian Physical Society (Società Italiana di Fisica, SIF) has been awarded, for work in the field of experimental particle physics, to Dieter Haidt of the DESY Laboratory at Hamburg and to Antonino Pullia of the University of Milano Bicocca and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, “for their fundamental contribution to the discovery of weak neutral currents with the Gargamelle bubble chamber at CERN”. The Enrico Fermi Prize is awarded yearly to members of the society who especially honour physics by their discoveries. For more information on the prize, please visit the Italian Physical Society website.   Consultation on the future of European Uni...

  1. Search for Leptoquark Bosons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brisson, V; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Demirchyan, R; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, W; Essenov, S; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, Erwin; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Göttlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Goyon, C; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Heuer, R D; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Katzy, J; Keller, N; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kuckens, J; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Milstead, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C B; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D K; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pöschl, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Prideaux, P; Raicevic, N; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S V; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Vujicic, B; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Wigmore, C; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, J; Zohrabyan, H G; Zomer, F

    2005-01-01

    A search for scalar and vector leptoquarks coupling to first generation fermions is performed using the e^+p and e^-p scattering data collected by the H1 experiment between 1994 and 2000. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 117 pb^{-1}. No evidence for the direct or indirect production of such particles is found in data samples with a large transverse momentum final state electron or with large missing transverse momentum. Constraints on leptoquark models are established. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength, leptoquarks with masses up to 275-325 GeV are ruled out. These limits improve and supercede earlier H1 limits based on subsamples of the data used here.

  2. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tufting enteropathy (TE, also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED, is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epithelial diseases, or to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. The authors report a case of a Brazilian child with TE associated with c.556-14A>G mutation in the EpCAM gene (NM_002354.2.

  3. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) floats for surveillance of Ochlerotatus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jamesina J; Crans, Wayne J

    2003-12-01

    Blocks of expanded polystyrene (EPS) were placed in a variety of habitats to investigate their potential as an egg-collection device for container-dwelling Aedes and Ochlerotatus species. Eggs from Ochlerotatus japonicus, Oc. triseriatus, Oc. hendersoni, and Aedes albopictus were collected with EPS floats. The float provides an inexpensive, low-maintenance alternative to the Centers for Disease Control ovitrap for sampling container-dwelling mosquito species that are important vectors of disease. Eggs collected on the floats have many potential applications, including use in routine population surveillance; detection of Oc. japonicus, Ae. albopictus, and other container-dwelling species in new areas; species distribution studies; natural transovarial transmission studies; ovipositional studies; collection of local field populations for insecticide resistance assays; assessment of adulticiding efficacy; and establishment of new laboratory colonies.

  4. Patterns of self-reported depressive symptoms in relation to morningness-eveningness in inpatients with a depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Olschinski, Christiane; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-05-30

    The stable and persisting preference for activities in the late evening (i.e. eveningness) is associated with a higher risk for depression, suicidality, and non-remission in major depression. The present study investigated symptom patterns in hospitalized patients with depressive syndromes in relation to morningness-eveningness (chronotypes). Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II]) and chronotype (German version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire [D-MEQ]) were assessed after admission and before discharge in inpatients with mainly major depression. Group differences of BDI-II single items and three BDI-II factors (cognitive, affective, somatic) between patients divided at the D-MEQ sample median into "morning preference" (MP) and "evening preference" (EP) were calculated. Data from 64 consecutively admitted patients (31MP/33EP) were analyzed. Both groups (MP/EP) were comparable regarding age, sex, diagnosis, length of stay, and subjective sleep quality, BDI-II scores were significantly higher in EP than in MP at admission. At admission and discharge, cognitive symptoms were significantly more pronounced in EP vs. MP; non-significant differences between EP and MP were found for affective and somatic symptoms. The results underline the importance of the trait-like chronotype for severity and symptomatology in patients with depressive disorders. The patients' chronotype should be taken into account in diagnostics and treatment of depressive disorders.

  5. Exclusive diffraction and Pomeron trajectory in ep collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Fazio, S

    2008-01-01

    The exclusive diffractive production of vector mesons and real photons in ep collisions has been studied at HERA in a wide kinematic range. Here we present the most recent experimental results together with a Regge-type model. We deduce the Pomeranchuk trajectory (Pomeron) by analyzing the HERA data on deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS), and then discuss its basic properties, namely its apparent "hardness" and its "non-flat" behavior, different from the claims of some authors.

  6. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Drugakov, V; Fang, S; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Namsoo, T; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Stadie, H; Turcato, M; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Borodin, M; Kozulia, A; Lisovyi, M; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Ferrando, J; Fos-ter, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Oliver, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-Estrada, C; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Smith, O; Stern, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Costa, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Stewart, T P; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2005-01-01

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb-1. The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q^2 7.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5 < eta^jet < 1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton.

  7. PGE2 signal through EP2 promotes the growth of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Liang, Bojian; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Nishijo, Koichi; Ishibe, Tatsuya; Yasura, Ko; Nagayama, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2005-03-01

    EP2 was identified as the major PGE2 receptor expressed in articular cartilage. An EP2 agonist increased intracellular cAMP in articular chondrocytes, stimulating DNA synthesis in both monolayer and 3D cultures. Hence, the EP2 agonist may be a potent therapeutic agent for degenerative cartilage diseases. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exhibits pleiotropic effects in various types of tissue through four types of receptors, EP1-4. We examined the expression of EPs and effects of agonists for each EP on articular chondrocytes. The expression of each EP in articular chondrocytes was examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. A chondrocyte cell line, MMA2, was established from articular cartilage of p53(-/-) mice and used to analyze the effects of agonists for each EP. A search for molecules downstream of the PGE2 signal through the EP2 agonist was made by cDNA microarray analysis. The growth-promoting effect of the EP2 agonist on chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix was examined in an organ culture of rat femora. EP2 was identified as the major EP expressed in articular cartilage. Treatment of MMA2 cells with specific agonists for each EP showed that only the EP2 agonist significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of MMA2 revealed a set of genes upregulated by the EP2 agonist, including several growth-promoting and apoptosis-protecting genes such as the cyclin D1, fibronectin, integrin alpha5, AP2alpha, and 14-3-3gamma genes. The upregulation of these genes by the EP2 agonist was confirmed in human articular chondrocytes by quantitative mRNA analysis. On treatment with the EP2 agonist, human articular chondrocytes showed an increase in the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuracil (BrdU), and the organ culture of rat femora showed an increase of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining in articular chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix, suggesting growth-promoting effects of the PGE2 signal

  8. e-EPS News: Consultation on European Research, Innovation & Gender

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing an article by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a new collaboration between the two publications.   EPS members have been invited to take part in a Public Consultation on the Future of Gender and Innovation in Europe. The consultation, which is intended to complement the EC Green Paper ‘From Challenges to Opportunities: Towards a Common Strategic Framework for EU Research and Innovation Funding’, will be published and discussed during the first European Gender Summit in Brussels on 8-9 November this year. It is hoped that the consultation – which is being coordinated by genSET and the organisers of the European Gender Summit – will create a better understanding of how Europe might benefit from a more effective mainstreaming of the gender dimension in research, innovation and scientific systems. Responses from the co...

  9. A comprehensive photometric study of the eclipsing binary EP Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.-L.; Wei, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-G.; Li, K.; Zhang, X.-B.

    2015-02-01

    We present new observations for the eclipsing binary EP Aurigae, which were performed by using three small telescopes in China from 2003 December to 2014 January. With the updated 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric elements were deduced from three sets of light curves. Based on all available eclipsing times, the orbital period changes were investigated. It is discovered that the (O-C) curve may show an existence of light-time effect due to an unseen third body, which was weakly identified by the photometric solution. The modulated period and amplitude of the cyclic variation are P3=71.2(±8.0) yr and A=0.0101(±0.0008) day, respectively. In the co-planar orbit with the binary system, the mass of the third body is M3=0.18(±0.02) M⊙. The photometric results imply that EP Aur is an Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.831(±0.004). Its primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. Therefore, EP Aur may consist of a normal main-sequence star and a cool Roche-lobe filling subgiant, which may be undergoing rapid mass transfer.

  10. High-Z Coating Experiments on Omega EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Oh, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Schmitt, A. J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Previous experiments on Nike KrF laser (λ=248nm) at NRL found that a thin (400-800 Å) high-Z (Au or Pd) overcoat on the target is effective in suppressing broadband imprint. Implementation of this technique on the tripled Nd:glass (351nm) NIF would enable higher uniformity direct-drive experiments there. To this end, we are carrying out experiments using the NIF-like beams of Omega EP. On Nike, a low-intensity, highly smooth prepulse heats and pre-expands the low thermal mass metallic coating to 100 um scale length. This likely improves imprint reduction for longer spatial scales because of increased distance between laser absorption and the ablation surface. The 3 ω beams of Omega EP do not have this feature due to nonlinear harmonic conversion. We introduced a means of pre-expanding the high-Z coating to similar length scale on Omega EP using a soft x-ray prepulse, generated by irradiating an auxiliary Au foil 1cm in front of the main target tens of ns prior to the main target drive. Coating dynamics are measured using side-on radiography. The effectiveness of pre-expansion on imprint reduction will be assessed by measurements of the RT-amplified imprint using monochromatic curved crystal radiography. Work supported by the Department of Energy/NNSA.

  11. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Andreev, V; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, Roland Paul; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Hussain, S; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovskii, E I; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Mladenov, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Prideaux, P; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zálesák, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, J; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2007-01-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep->mu X and ep -> tau X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e^+ p collisions and 13.7 pb^-1 for e^- p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchm"uller-R"uckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  12. Sylaba w gwarze Moravy e Epërme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Dargiel

    2015-08-01

    • Can sonorants and obstruents be syllabic? Our study has proved, that [NO-] initial clusters have tendency for reduction: [mbyt], [ŋuʃt] instead of [mbyt], [ŋguʃt, whereas sporadic occurence of the two-peak initial clusters lO-, rrO- is phonetically conditioned (it means that this form occurs only after vowels [m‿ka‿ʎʃu:], [mu‿Rʣu:]. Final *[-OS] clusters in Morava e Epërme, as in the standard Albanian, are completely extinct (they are usually split by vowel [ә]: [vetәm ktu], [natәn], [θupәr]. Th same referes to the clusters [-OSO-], which usually occur with the syllabic sonorant or inserted vowel schwa [ә]. Dialect of Morava e Epërme tolerates syllabic sonorants and in some contexts also syllabic obstruents. The vowel [ә] appears very often, but never in unmotivated position. Therefore we can conclude that this sound does not have the phoneme status in this dialect. Dialect of Morava e Epërme neither has the typical one-peak syllable pattern (it tolerates two-peak initial clusters, nor it has a two-peak syllable model (it does not tolerate two-peak final clusters. This local dialect can be classified, the same as standard Albanian, as a one with one-peak syllable pattern, where, however, nasal sonorants should be distributionally classified as obstruents (and not as sonorants.

  13. Knowledge is Power! Increased Provider Knowledge Scores Regarding Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) are Associated with Higher Rates of PrEP Prescription and Future Intent to Prescribe PrEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jill; Jain, Sonia; Krakower, Douglas; Sun, Xiaoying; Young, Jason; Mayer, Kenneth; Haubrich, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The FDA approval of emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in 2012 has raised questions about the delivery of PrEP in a real-world setting. iPad-based questionnaires were given to providers at conferences in California and New York to assess knowledge, experience and attitudes regarding PrEP in HIV and non-HIV providers. HIV provider status was defined either by self-identification or by having greater than 5 years of HIV care experience. Knowledge scores were the sum of correct answers from five PrEP knowledge questions. Univariate analyses used t-test to compare knowledge scores and Fisher's exact test for past or future PrEP prescription between HIV and non-HIV providers. Multivariable linear or logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with the outcomes. Of 233 respondents, the mean age was 40 years, 59 % were White, 59 % were physicians and 52 % were HIV providers. In univariate analysis, mean PrEP knowledge scores (max 5) were significantly higher for HIV providers (2.8 versus 2.2; p 41 (mean 2.8 versus 2.3; p = 0.004), White race (2.7 versus 2.2; p = 0.026) and participants in the New York region (3.0 versus 2.3; p knowledge scores, all but age remained significant. Among 201 potential prescribers, the rate of prior PrEP prescription was higher among HIV providers than non-HIV providers (34 versus 9 %; p knowledge score, but the association with provider status was no longer significant in multivariable analysis that controlled for knowledge. Intent to prescribe PrEP in the future was high for all provider types (64 %) and was associated with knowledge scores in multivariable analysis. The most common concerns about PrEP (>40 % of providers) were drug toxicities, development of resistance and patient adherence to follow-up; 32 % identified risk compensation as a concern. HIV providers had significantly greater PrEP knowledge than non-HIV providers, but differences by provider type in past PrEP

  14. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, A; Sugimoto, Y; Namba, T; Watabe, A; Irie, A; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1993-04-15

    A functional cDNA clone encoding mouse EP2 subtype of prostaglandin (PG) E receptor was isolated from a mouse cDNA library by cross-hybridization with the mouse EP3 subtype PGE receptor cDNA. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 513 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. In contrast to EP3 receptor, this receptor possesses long third intracellular loop and carboxyl-terminal tail. [3H] PGE2 specifically bound to the membrane of mammalian COS cells transfected with the cDNA. The binding to the membrane was displaced with unlabeled PG in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist, and SC-19220, an EP1 antagonist. PGE2 markedly increased cAMP level in COS cells transfected with the cDNA. These results suggest that this receptor is EP2 subtype. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the abundant expression being observed in ileum, thymus, and mastocytoma P-815 cells.

  15. A mathematical model of quorum sensing regulated EPS production in biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Mallory R; Kuttler, Christina; Hense, Burkhard A; Eberl, Hermann J

    2011-04-10

    Biofilms are microbial communities encased in a layer of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS matrix provides several functional purposes for the biofilm, such as protecting bacteria from environmental stresses, and providing mechanical stability. Quorum sensing is a cell-cell communication mechanism used by several bacterial taxa to coordinate gene expression and behaviour in groups, based on population densities. We mathematically model quorum sensing and EPS production in a growing biofilm under various environmental conditions, to study how a developing biofilm impacts quorum sensing, and conversely, how a biofilm is affected by quorum sensing-regulated EPS production. We investigate circumstances when using quorum-sensing regulated EPS production is a beneficial strategy for biofilm cells. We find that biofilms that use quorum sensing to induce increased EPS production do not obtain the high cell populations of low-EPS producers, but can rapidly increase their volume to parallel high-EPS producers. Quorum sensing-induced EPS production allows a biofilm to switch behaviours, from a colonization mode (with an optimized growth rate), to a protection mode. A biofilm will benefit from using quorum sensing-induced EPS production if bacteria cells have the objective of acquiring a thick, protective layer of EPS, or if they wish to clog their environment with biomass as a means of securing nutrient supply and outcompeting other colonies in the channel, of their own or a different species.

  16. HIV-negative male couples' attitudes about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and using PrEP with a sexual agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Lee, Ji-Young; Woodyatt, Cory; Bauermeister, José; Sullivan, Patrick; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-08-01

    One efficacious strategy to help prevent HIV is oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a daily regimen of antiretroviral treatment taken by HIV-negative individuals. Two of the recommendations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for PrEP pertain to being in a relationship (i.e., male couples). Despite the recognition of how primary partners in male couples' relationships shape HIV risk and CDC's PrEP guidelines, there is a paucity of data that examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and using PrEP with a sexual agreement. A sexual agreement is an explicit agreement made between two individuals about what sex and other related behaviors may occur within and outside of their relationship. In this qualitative study, we examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and whether they thought PrEP could be integrated into a sexual agreement. Data for this study are drawn from couple-level interviews conducted in 2014 with 29 HIV-negative male couples who had a sexual agreement and were from Atlanta or Detroit. Both passive (e.g., flyers) and active (e.g., targeted Facebook advertisements) recruitment methods were used; the sample was stratified by agreement type. Thematic analysis was applied to identify the following themes regarding HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use: (1) PrEP and condom use; (2) concerns about PrEP (e.g., effectiveness, side effects, and promoting sexually risky behavior); and (3) accessibility of PrEP. Some thought PrEP could be a part of couples' agreement because it could help reduce sexual anxiety and sexual risk, and would help keep the couple safe. Others described PrEP use with an agreement as something for "others". Some were also concerned that incorporating PrEP could usurp the need for a sexual agreement in a couples' relationship. These themes highlight the need to improve informational messaging and promotion efforts about PrEP among HIV-negative male couples

  17. Eps8 is recruited to lysosomes and subjected to chaperone-mediated autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Thilo; Younsi, Alexander; Disanza, Andrea; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Scita, Giorgio; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-07-15

    Eps8 controls actin dynamics directly through its barbed end capping and actin-bundling activity, and indirectly by regulating Rac-activation when engaged into a trimeric complex with Eps8-Abi1-Sos1. Recently, Eps8 has been associated with promotion of various solid malignancies, but neither its mechanisms of action nor its regulation in cancer cells have been elucidated. Here, we report a novel association of Eps8 with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is independent from actin polymerization and specifically occurs in cancer cells. Endogenous Eps8 localized to large vesicular lysosomal structures in metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as AsPC-1 and Capan-1 that display high Eps8 levels. Additionally, ectopic expression of Eps8 increased the size of lysosomes. Structure-function analysis revealed that the region encompassing the amino acids 184-535 of Eps8 was sufficient to mediate lysosomal recruitment. Notably, this fragment harbors two KFERQ-like motifs required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Furthermore, Eps8 co-immunoprecipitated with Hsc70 and LAMP-2, which are key elements for the CMA degradative pathway. Consistently, in vitro, a significant fraction of Eps8 bound to (11.9+/-5.1%) and was incorporated into (5.3+/-6.5%) lysosomes. Additionally, Eps8 binding to lysosomes was competed by other known CMA-substrates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that Eps8 recruitment to the lysosomal membrane was highly dynamic. Collectively, these results indicate that Eps8 in certain human cancer cells specifically localizes to lysosomes, and is directed to CMA. These results open a new field for the investigation of how Eps8 is regulated and contributes to tumor promotion in human cancers.

  18. Treatment effect and safety of EPs 7630-solution in acute bronchitis in childhood: report of a multicentre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidvogl, M; Heger, M

    2007-01-01

    An open post-marketing surveillance study was conducted to examine the treatment effect and safety of EPs 7630-solution in the treatment of acute bronchitis in children. This study included a total of 742 children (aged between 0 and 12 years) with acute bronchitis (83.4%) or acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (14.3%), who were treated with different doses of the herbal drug for up to 14 days. Five bronchitis specific symptoms (BSS) were summed up to give an overall measure of disease severity. Non-specific disease symptoms (loss of appetite, diarrhoea, headache, vomiting, and fever) were also recorded, together with adverse events and overall ratings of efficacy and tolerability. The overall BSS score decreased during treatment from 6.0+/-3.0 points at baseline to 2.7+/-2.5 points after 7 days and to 1.4+/-2.1 points after 14 days. Remission or improvement in at least 80% of patients was recorded for all the individual component symptoms. The proportion of patients suffering from non-specific symptoms also substantially improved during treatment. For example, loss of appetite was present in 65.8% of patients at study begin, but only in 27.6% at the time point of last observation visit. In 88.3% of cases, the responsible physician rated the treatment as successful. Adverse events were minor and transitory. In conclusion, EPs 7630-solution was shown to be a safe and an effective treatment option for acute bronchitis or acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis in children.

  19. Adult onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease with psychotic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle-López, Pilar; Pérez-García, Rosa; Sanguino-Andrés, Rosa; González-Pablos, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations, dysarthria and dementia. Its onset is usually in childhood and most patients have a fatal outcome in few years. A high percentage of cases are hereditary with a recessive autosomal pattern. In the majority of the patients reported, a mutation of the gene that encodes the pantothenate kinase (PANK2) located in the 20p13-p12.3 chromosome that causes iron storage in the basal ganglia of the brain has been found. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms as well as specific MRI imaging findings. The most common psychiatric features are cognitive impairment as well as depressive symptoms. There are few documented cases with psychotic disorders. We present the case of a patient with late onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease and psychotic symptoms that preceded the development of neurological manifestations. The pathophysiology and the treatment of psychotic symptomatology are presented and discussed. Key words: Psicosis, Hallervorden-Spatz, late onset, Basal ganglia.

  20. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be cA...

  1. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 mediates PGE2 stimulated hypercalcemia in mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Tomita, Masato; Pilbeam, Carol C; Breyer, Richard M; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2002-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can stimulate bone resorption by a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway. Two PGE2 receptors, EP2 and EP4 have been shown to play a role in PGE2 stimulation of osteoclast formation. In primary osteoblastic cell cultures from EP2 wild type (EP2 +/+) mice, PGE2 (0.1 microM) increased cyclic AMP production 3.5-fold, but PGE2 had no effect on cells from mice in which the EP2 receptor had been deleted (EP2 -/-). To examine the role of the EP2 receptor in the resorption response in vivo we injected PGE2 in EP2 -/- mice, and compared them with EP2 +/+ mice. Injection of PGE2 (3 mg/kg, four times daily for three days) in 9- to 12-month-old male mice on a 129 SvEv background increased serum calcium from 9.8 +/- 0.5 to 10.7 +/- 0.3 mg/dl (P < 0.01) in EP2 +/+ mice but not in EP2 -/- mice (10.1 +/- 0.3 vs. 10.2 +/- 0.3 mg/dl). PGE2 injection (6 mg/kg twice a day for three days) in 3-4 month old male mice on a C57 BL/6 X 129 SvEv background increased calcium from 8.2 +/- 0.1 to 9.0 +/- 0.3 mg/dl (P < 0.05) in EP2 +/+ mice but had no effect in EP2-/- mice (8.4 +/- 0.1 vs. 8.3 +/- 0.2 mg/dl). Injection of PGE2 over the calvariae of EP2 +/+ and EP2-/- mice increased the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) both locally and in the tibia, but RANKL responses were lower in EP2 -/- mice. We conclude that EP2 receptor plays a role in the hypercalcemic response to PGE2. This impaired response in EP2 -/- mice may be due to decreased ability to stimulate cyclic AMP and in part, to a smaller increase in the expression of RANKL mRNA.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of the canine prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, T A; Lu, B; Smock, S L; Vestergaard, P; Pan, L C; Owen, T A

    1999-05-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) binds to four G-protein coupled cell surface receptors (EP1-EP4) and has been implicated as a local mediator of bone anabolism via a cyclic AMP mediated pathway following activation of the EP2 and/or EP4 receptor subtype. A canine kidney cDNA library was screened using a human EP2 probe, and a clone with an open reading frame of 1083 bp, potentially encoding a protein of 361 amino acids, was characterized. This open reading frame has 89% identity to the human EP2 cDNA at the nucleotide level and 87% identity at the predicted protein level. Scatchard analysis of a CHO cell line stably transfected with canine EP2 yielded a dissociation constant of 22 nM for PGE2. Competition binding studies, using 3H-PGE2 as ligand, demonstrated specific displacement by PGE2, Prostaglandin E1, Prostaglandin A3, and butaprost (an EP2 selective ligand), but not by ligands with selectivity for the related DP, FP, IP, or TP receptors. Specific ligand binding also resulted in increased levels of cAMP in EP2 transfected cells with no evidence of short-term, ligand-induced desensitization. Northern blot analysis revealed two transcripts of 3300 and 2400 bp in canine lung, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction showed expression in all tissues examined. Southern blot analysis suggests the presence of a single-copy gene for EP2 in the dog.

  3. Expression of PGE2 EP3 receptor subtypes in the mouse preoptic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilache, Ana Maria; Andersson, Josefin; Nilsberth, Camilla

    2007-08-23

    Inflammatory-induced fever is dependent on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) binding to its EP(3) receptor in the thermoregulatory region of the hypothalamus, but it is not known which EP(3) receptor isoform(s) that is/are involved. We identified the EP(3) receptor expression in the mouse preoptic region by in situ hybridization and isolated the corresponding area by laser capture microdissection. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of microdissected tissue revealed a predominant expression of the EP(3alpha) isoform, but there was also considerable expression of EP(3gamma), corresponding to approximately 15% of total EP(3) receptor expression, whereas EP(3beta) was sparsely expressed. This distribution was not changed by immune challenge induced by peripheral administration of LPS, indicating that EP(3) receptor splicing and distribution is not activity dependent. Considering that EP(3alpha) and EP(3gamma) are associated with inhibitory and stimulatory G-proteins, respectively, the present data demonstrate that the PGE(2) response of the target neurons is intricately regulated.

  4. E-type prostanoid receptor 4 (EP4) in disease and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konya, Viktoria; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2013-01-01

    The large variety of biological functions governed by prostaglandin (PG) E2 is mediated by signaling through four distinct E-type prostanoid (EP) receptors. The availability of mouse strains with genetic ablation of each EP receptor subtype and the development of selective EP agonists and antagonists have tremendously advanced our understanding of PGE2 as a physiologically and clinically relevant mediator. Moreover, studies using disease models revealed numerous conditions in which distinct EP receptors might be exploited therapeutically. In this context, the EP4 receptor is currently emerging as most versatile and promising among PGE2 receptors. Anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and vasoprotective effects have been proposed for the EP4 receptor, along with its recently described unfavorable tumor-promoting and pro-angiogenic roles. A possible explanation for the diverse biological functions of EP4 might be the multiple signaling pathways switched on upon EP4 activation. The present review attempts to summarize the EP4 receptor-triggered signaling modules and the possible therapeutic applications of EP4-selective agonists and antagonists. PMID:23523686

  5. Overexpression of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 results in enhanced skin tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Y M; He, G; Hwang, D H; Fischer, S M

    2006-09-07

    We previously showed that the EP2 knockout mice were resistant to chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the overexpression of the EP2 receptor in mouse skin carcinogenesis. To determine the effect of overexpression of EP2, we used EP2 transgenic (TG) mice and wild-type (WT) mice in a DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene)/TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) two-stage carcinogenesis protocol. EP2 TG mice developed significantly more tumors compared with WT mice. Overexpression of the EP2 receptor increased TPA-induced keratinocyte proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the epidermis of EP2 TG mice 48 h after topical TPA treatment was significantly thicker compared to that of WT mice. EP2 TG mice showed significantly increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the epidermis after prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) treatment. The inflammatory response to TPA was increased in EP2 TG mice, as demonstrated by an increased number of macrophages in the dermis. Tumors and 7 x TPA-treated and DMBA-TPA-treated (6 weeks) skins from EP2 TG mice produced more blood vessels than those of WT mice as determined by CD-31 immunostaining. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression was significantly increased in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples from EP2 TG mice compared that of WT mice. There was, however, no difference in the number of apoptotic cells in tumors from WT and EP2 TG mice. Together, our results suggest that the overexpression of the EP2 receptor plays a significant role in the protumorigenic action of PGE2 in mouse skin.

  6. Nuclear Ep-ICD expression is a predictor of poor prognosis in "low risk" prostate adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet Assi

    Full Text Available Molecular markers for predicting prostate cancer (PCa that would have poor prognosis are urgently needed for a more personalized treatment for patients. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule results in shedding of the extracellular domain (EpEx and release of its intracellular domain (Ep-ICD which triggers oncogenic signaling and might correlate to tumor aggressiveness. This study aimed to explore the potential of Ep-ICD and EpEx to identify PCa that have poor prognosis.Immunohistochemical analysis of Ep-ICD and EpEx was carried out in normal prostate tissues (n = 100, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, n = 83, and prostate cancer (n = 249 using domain specific antibodies. The expression of Ep-ICD and EpEx was correlated with clinico- pathological parameters and disease free survival (DFS.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx was observed in PCa in comparison with BPH and normal prostate tissues (p = 0.006, p < 0.001 respectively. For patients who had PCa with Gleason Score less than 7, preserved nuclear Ep-ICD emerged as the most significant marker in multivariate analysis for prolonged DFS, where these patients did not have recurrence during follow up of up to 12 years (p = 0.001.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD was associated with shorter disease free survival in patients with a Gleason Score less than 7 and may be useful in identifying patients likely to have aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Furthermore, nuclear Ep-ICD can differentiate between normal and prostate cancer tissues for ambiguous cases.

  7. EpCAM modulates NF-κB signaling and interleukin-8 expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankpal, Narendra V; Fleming, Timothy P; Gillanders, William E

    2013-04-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a 40-kD type I transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in human epithelial cancers and is currently the target of molecular therapy based on its overexpression at the cell surface. Recently, we and others have shown a role for EpCAM in cell signaling and carcinogenesis, and EpCAM expression seems to promote breast cancer invasion. Interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL-8) is an inflammatory cytokine that has recently been shown to modulate breast cancer invasion and angiogenesis. In preliminary experiments, we identified a correlation between EpCAM and IL-8 expression in primary human breast cancers. Specific ablation of EpCAM in breast cancer cell lines results in decreased IL-8 expression, and IL-8 contributes to EpCAM-dependent breast cancer invasion. Specific ablation of EpCAM is also associated with decreased NF-κB transcription factor activity, decreased phosphorylation of the NF-κB family member RELA, and increased IκBα protein expression. EpCAM modulates IL-8 expression at baseline, and following IL-1β stimulation, which is known to be a potent inducer of NF-κB in breast cancer. In functional rescue experiments, specific ablation of RELA or forced expression of the NF-κB inhibitor protein IκBα prevented EpCAM-dependent rescue of IL-8 promoter activity. These studies show for the first time that EpCAM can modulate NF-κB transcription factor activity and IL-8 expression in breast cancer and confirm the role of EpCAM signaling in modulating breast cancer invasion. Further study is required to define the molecular mechanism(s) of EpCAM signaling in breast cancer and to direct the rational development of molecular therapies targeting EpCAM.

  8. Development of the HyStEP Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A.; Ainscough, Christopher; Terlip, Danny; Meadows, Graham; Quinlan, Liam; Wong, Brad

    2016-04-05

    With the introduction of more fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) on U.S. roadways, especially in California, the need for available hydrogen refueling stations is growing. While funding from the California Energy Commission is helping to solve this problem, solutions need to be developed and implemented to help reduce the time to commission a hydrogen station. The current practice of hydrogen station acceptance can take months because each vehicle manufacturer conducts their own testing and evaluation. This process is not practical or sufficient to support the timely development of a hydrogen fueling station network. To address this issue, as part of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory along with a team of stakeholders and contractor Powertech Labs has developed the Hydrogen Station Equipment Performance (HyStEP) Device. The HyStEP Device is intended to be a surrogate for FCEVs that can be used to collect data on hydrogen station fueling performance. The device includes three Type IV 70 MPa tanks capable of storing a total of 9 kg H2 that are instrumented with pressure and temperature sensors. The tanks can be used individually or in parallel to simulate small, medium, and large fuel systems. The tanks are connected to a 70 MPa receptacle equipped with pressure and temperature sensor as well as infrared communications integrated with a data acquisition, analysis, and control system. The HyStEP Device is capable of performing tests defined in the test method standard CSA HGV 4.3 and providing the data needed to ensure that hydrogen stations meet the fueling protocol standard SAE J2601-2014. These include IrDA communication tests, fault detection tests, and communication and non-communication fueling.

  9. Search for first generation leptoquarks in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-07-15

    A search for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full H1 data sample is used in the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 446 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for the production of leptoquarks is observed in final states with a large transverse momentum electron or with large missing transverse momentum, and constraints on leptoquark models are derived. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength {lambda}=0.3, first generation leptoquarks with masses up to 800 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. (orig.)

  10. Search for First Generation Leptoquarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2011-10-25

    A search for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full H1 data sample is used in the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 446 pb^-1. No evidence for the production of leptoquarks is observed in final states with a large transverse momentum electron or with large missing transverse momentum, and constraints on leptoquark models are derived. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength lambda=0.3, first generation leptoquarks with masses up to 800 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  11. Search for Excited Quarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2009-01-01

    A search for excited quarks is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 475 pb^-1. The electroweak decays of excited quarks q* -> q gamma, q* -> q Z and q* -> q W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for first generation excited quark production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on q* production cross sections and on the ratio f/Lambda of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited quark searches.

  12. Tau Lepton Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Flucke, G; Fomenko, A; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Hussain, S; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marshall, R; Marti, L; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-M, I; Milstead, D; Mladenov, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Papadopoulou, T D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Plaicakyte, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Prideaux, P; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Stoilov, A; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, J; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2006-01-01

    The production of tau leptons in ep collisions is investigated using data recorded by the H1 detector at HERA in the period 1994-2000. Tau leptons are identified by detecting their decay products, using leptonic and hadronic decay modes. The cross section for the production of tau lepton pairs is measured for the first time at HERA. Furthermore, a search for events with an energetic isolated tau lepton and with large missing transverse momentum is performed. The results are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  13. New insights into the proton structure with ep collider HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Z

    2000-01-01

    Since its commissioning in 1991, the ep collider HERA has been running successfully for almost a decade without stopping improving its performance. In this report, the inclusive cross section and structure function measurements for the deep inelastic scattering of neutral and charged current processes in the full HERA kinematic domain are reviewed. The results are compared with the Standard Model expectations for the deep inelastic scattering processes. The new insights into the proton structure and on the underlying strong and electroweak interactions are discussed.

  14. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Zablotska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Discussion: Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion of MSM who are aware of PrEP are willing to use it. Key PrEP implementation barriers include poor knowledge about PrEP, limited access to PrEP, weak or non-existent HIV prevention programmes for MSM and other key populations, high cost of PrEP, stigma and discrimination against key populations and restrictive laws in some countries. Only several clinical trials, demonstration projects and a few larger-scale implementation studies have been implemented so far in Thailand and Australia. However, novel approaches to PrEP implementation have emerged: researcher-, facility- and community-led models of care, with PrEP services for fee and for free. The WHO consolidated guidelines on HIV testing, treatment and prevention call for an expanded access to PrEP worldwide and have provided guidance on PrEP implementation in the region. Some countries like Australia have released national PrEP guidelines. There are growing community leadership and consultation processes to initiate PrEP implementation in Asia and the Pacific. Conclusions: Countries of the Asia-Pacific region will benefit from adding PrEP to their HIV prevention packages, but for many this is a critical step that requires resourcing. Having an impact on the HIV epidemic requires investment. The next years should see the region transitioning from limited PrEP implementation projects to growing access to PrEP and expansion of HIV prevention programmes.

  15. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna; Grulich, Andrew E; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Anand, Tarandeep; Janyam, Surang; Poonkasetwattana, Midnight; Baggaley, Rachel; van Griensven, Frits; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Discussion Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion of MSM who are aware of PrEP are willing to use it. Key PrEP implementation barriers include poor knowledge about PrEP, limited access to PrEP, weak or non-existent HIV prevention programmes for MSM and other key populations, high cost of PrEP, stigma and discrimination against key populations and restrictive laws in some countries. Only several clinical trials, demonstration projects and a few larger-scale implementation studies have been implemented so far in Thailand and Australia. However, novel approaches to PrEP implementation have emerged: researcher-, facility- and community-led models of care, with PrEP services for fee and for free. The WHO consolidated guidelines on HIV testing, treatment and prevention call for an expanded access to PrEP worldwide and have provided guidance on PrEP implementation in the region. Some countries like Australia have released national PrEP guidelines. There are growing community leadership and consultation processes to initiate PrEP implementation in Asia and the Pacific. Conclusions Countries of the Asia-Pacific region will benefit from adding PrEP to their HIV prevention packages, but for many this is a critical step that requires resourcing. Having an impact on the HIV epidemic requires investment. The next years should see the region transitioning from limited PrEP implementation projects to growing access to PrEP and expansion of HIV prevention programmes. PMID:27760688

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of rat prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, T; Usui, T; Tanaka, I; Mori, K; Sasaki, Y; Fukuda, Y; Namba, T; Sugimoto, Y; Ichikawa, A; Narumiya, S

    1994-05-16

    A cDNA clone encoding the rat prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was cloned from a rat lung cDNA library. It encodes 488 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. Specific binding of [3H]PGE2 was found in COS-7 cells transfected with the cDNA and was displaced with unlabeled prostaglandins in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the significant expression being observed in the thymus, lung, spleen, heart stomach, and pancreas.

  17. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  18. Mapping of the molecular determinants involved in the interaction between eps15 and AP-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iannolo, G; Salcini, A E; Gaidarov, I

    1997-01-01

    domain, located in its NH2-terminal region. In addition, a proline-rich region, located in the COOH-terminal portion of eps15, can bind to the Src homology 3 domain of the crk proto-oncogene product in vitro. Recently, coimmunoprecipitation between eps15 and AP-2, a major component of coated pits......, was reported. Here, we characterize the molecular determinants of the eps15/AP-2 interaction. The AP-2 binding region of eps15 is localized in its COOH-terminal region and spans approximately 80 amino acids. At least three molecular determinants, located at residues 650-660, 680-690, and 720-730, are involved...... in the binding. AP-2 binds to eps15 through its alpha subunit (alpha-adaptin); in particular, the COOH-terminal region of alpha-adaptin, the so-called alpha-ear, contains the eps15 binding region....

  19. Differential expression of prostaglandin E receptor subtype EP2 in rat uterus during early pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Shi; Ma, X. H.; Diao, H.L.; Ni, H.; Xu, L.B.; Zhu, H.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China); Yang, Z. M.

    2005-01-01

    PGE2 is essential for mammalian female reproduction. This study was to examine the expression of EP2 gene in the rat uterus during early pregnancy, delayed implantation and artificial decidualization by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. There was no detectable EP2 mRNA expression in the uterus from days 1 to 4 of pregnancy (day 1 = day of vaginal sperm). A low level of EP2 immunostaining was observed in the luminal and glandular epithelium from da...

  20. Integral Benchmark Data for Nuclear Data Testing Through the ICSBEP & IRPhEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2013-10-01

    The status of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was last discussed directly with the nuclear data community at ND2007. Since ND2007, integral benchmark data that are available for nuclear data testing have increased significantly. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP is discussed and selected benchmark configurations that have been added to the ICSBEP and IRPhEP Handbooks since ND2007 are highlighted.

  1. Multiple roles of the PGE2 -EP receptor signal in vascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, K; Kida, T; Hori, M; Ozaki, H; Murata, T

    2014-11-01

    PGE2 is a major prostanoid that regulates inflammation by stimulating EP1-4 receptors. However, how PGE2 induces an initial inflammatory response to vascular hyper-permeability remains unknown. Here we investigated the role of the PGE2 -EP receptor signal in modulating vascular permeability both in vivo and in vitro. We used a modified Miles assay and intravital microscopy to examine vascular permeability in vivo. Endothelial barrier property was assessed by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) in vitro. Local administration of PGE2 , an EP2 or EP4 receptor agonist into FVB/NJcl mouse ear skin caused vascular leakage, indicated by dye extravasation. Intravital microscopy and laser Doppler blood-flow imaging revealed that these treatments dilated peripheral vessels and increased local blood flow. Pretreatment with the vasoconstrictor phenylephrine inhibited the PGE2 -induced blood flow increase and vascular leakage. In contrast to the EP2 and EP4 receptor agonists, administration of an EP3 receptor agonist suppressed vascular leakage without altering vascular diameter or blood flow. In isolated HUVECs, the EP3 receptor agonist elevated TER and blocked thrombin-induced dextran passage. Inhibiting PKA restored the hypo-permeability induced by the EP3 receptor agonist. Activation of the PGE2 -EP2 or -EP4 receptor signal induces vasodilatation in mural cells, resulting in increased local blood flow and hyper-permeability. In contrast, activation of the PGE2 -EP3 receptor signal induces a cAMP-dependent enhancement of the endothelial barrier, leading to hypo-permeability. We provide the first evidence that endothelial cells and mural cells cooperate to modulate vascular permeability. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Evaluation of the Vitek EPS enteric pathogen screen card for detecting Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Imperatrice, C A; Nachamkin, I

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the Vitek EPS card as a screen for the enteric pathogens Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Y. enterocolitica (125, 54, and 5 isolates, respectively) and 81 nonenteric pathogens that might be selected for screening from primary plates (non-lactose fermenters) were tested. The EPS card correctly identified 183 of 184 pathogens tested (sensitivity, 99.5%). Of 81 nonenteric pathogens screened with the EPS card, 8 were ide...

  3. Prostanoid receptor EP2 as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota

    2014-06-12

    Cycoloxygenase-2 (COX-2) induction is prevalent in a variety of (brain and peripheral) injury models where COX-2 levels correlate with disease progression. Thus, COX-2 has been widely explored for anti-inflammatory therapy with COX-2 inhibitors, which proved to be effective in reducing the pain and inflammation in patients with arthritis and menstrual cramps, but they have not provided any benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory neurodegenerative disease. Recently, two COX-2 drugs, rofecoxib and valdecoxib, were withdrawn from the United States market due to cardiovascular side effects. Thus, future anti-inflammatory therapy could be targeted through a specific prostanoid receptor downstream of COX-2. The PGE2 receptor EP2 is emerging as a pro-inflammatory target in a variety of CNS and peripheral diseases. Here we highlight the latest developments on the role of EP2 in diseases, mechanism of activation, and small molecule discovery targeted either to enhance or to block the function of this receptor.

  4. Highlights from e-EPS: Physics for fun

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   For many who measure time according to a university calendar, summer is a time to unwind. My experience, however, is that it is rare to find physics departments empty over the summer break. Many of us use the vacation period without classes to catch up with research, and I imagine that a colleague of mine speaks for many when he says that summer provides him with the freedom to do the physics he wants to do, and this is all the break needed to prepare for the next academic year! This reminds me a little of the Wobbling Plate story in “Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman”? When Richard Feynman had just started at Cornell following his time at Los Alamos, he felt burned out, and was wondering why he did not feel the same enthusiasm for physics t...

  5. The Eclipsing System EP Andromedae and its Circumbinary Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Jang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    We present new long-term CCD photometry for EP And acquired during the period 2007 to 2012. The light curves display total eclipses at primary minima and season-to-season light variability. Our synthesis for all available light curves indicates that the eclipsing pair is a W-type overcontact binary with parameters of q=2.578, i=83.3 deg, $\\Delta T$=27 K, f=28 %, and l3=2~3 %. The asymmetric light curves in 2007 were satisfactorily modeled by a cool spot on either of the eclipsing components from a magnetic dynamo. Including our 95 timing measurements, a total of 414 times of minimum light spanning about 82 yr were used for a period study. A detailed analysis of the eclipse timing diagram revealed that the orbital period of EP And has varied as a combination of an upward-opening parabola and two periodic variations, with cycle lengths of P3=44.6 yr and P4=1.834 yr and semi-amplitudes of K3=0.0100 d and K4=0.0039 d, respectively. The observed period increase at a fractional rate of +1.39x10^{-10} is in excellen...

  6. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2016-10-01

    The creation of an electrostatic shock wave and ensuing ion acceleration is studied on the OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Previous work using a 10- μm CO2 laser in a H2 gas jet shows promising results for obtaining narrow spectral features in the accelerated proton spectra. Scaling the shock-wave acceleration mechanism to the 1- μm-wavelength drive laser makes it possible to use petawatt-scale laser systems such as OMEGA-EP, but involves tailoring of the plasma profile. To accomplish the necessitated sharp rise to near-critical plasma density and a long exponential fall, an 1- μm-thick CH foil is illuminated on the back side by thermal x rays produced from an irradiated gold foil. The plasma density is measured using the fourth-harmonic probe system, the accelerating fields are probed using an orthogonal proton source, and the accelerated protons and ions are detected with a Thomson parabola. These results will be presented and compared with particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and LLNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program under project 15-LW-095.

  7. Creating a Stochastic Magnetic Edge in HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, P. J.; Debono, B.; Levesque, J. P.; Li, B.; Mauel, M.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Rath, N.; Shiraki, D.

    2010-11-01

    The newly-installed control wall in the HBT-EP tokamak (http://www.seas.columbia.edu/apam/hbtep/) are able to apply radial fields more than an order magnitude larger than our previous studies and large enough to allow study of the plasma response associated with driven tearing modes, the onset of island overlap, and the creation of a stochastic edge. Understanding plasma response effects while applying fields able to create vacuum island overlap are particular interest for ELM mitigation.ootnotetextEvans, et al., Nuclear Fusion, 48, 024002 (2008). Control RMP fields will be applied in HBT-EP using both static and rotating fields to study the effects of the relative rotation between the applied field and the plasma frame. Additionally, we have demonstrated the ability to strongly alter the plasma rotation with a biased probe, and we will be installing a ``zero-net-turns'' plasma shaping coil to increase the magnetic shear at the plasma edge. These experimental ``knobs'' will allow a detailed exploration of the magnitude of plasma shielding currents and the impact of stochastic fields on the plasma response and related efforts of mode control.

  8. Symptoms of Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Primary Motor Symptoms Secondary Motor Symptoms Nonmotor Symptoms Causes Progression Medications & Treatments Clinical Trials Statistics on Parkinson's What's New In Parkinson's Research? What's in the ...

  9. Signaling of Prostaglandin E Receptors, EP3 and EP4 Facilitates Wound Healing and Lymphangiogenesis with Enhanced Recruitment of M2 Macrophages in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Kanako; Isonaka, Risa; Kawakami, Tadashi; Narumiya, Shuh; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in homeostasis, metabolism, and immunity, and also occurs during wound-healing. Here, we examined the roles of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP) signaling in enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in wound healing processes. The hole-punch was made in the ears of male C57BL/6 mice using a metal ear punch. Healing process and lymphangiogenesis together with macrophage recruitment were analyzed in EP knockout mice. Lymphangiogenesis was up-regulated in the granulation tissues at the margins of punched-hole wounds in mouse ears, and this increase was accompanied by increased expression levels of COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Administration of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, suppressed lymphangiogenesis in the granulation tissues and reduced the induction of the pro-lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and VEGF-D. Topical applications of selective EP receptor agonists enhanced the expressions of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 and VEGF receptor-3. The wound-healing processes and recruitment of CD11b-positive macrophages, which produced VEGF-C and VEGF-D, were suppressed under COX-2 inhibition. Mice lacking either EP3 or EP4 exhibited reduced wound-healing, lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages, compared with wild type mice. Proliferation of cultured human lymphatic endothelial cells was not detected under PGE2 stimulation. Lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages that produced VEGF-C/D were suppressed in mice treated with a COX-2 inhibitor or lacking either EP3 or EP4 during wound healing. COX-2 and EP3/EP4 signaling may be novel targets to control lymphangiogenesis in vivo.

  10. Signaling of Prostaglandin E Receptors, EP3 and EP4 Facilitates Wound Healing and Lymphangiogenesis with Enhanced Recruitment of M2 Macrophages in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Kanako; Isonaka, Risa; Kawakami, Tadashi; Narumiya, Shuh; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in homeostasis, metabolism, and immunity, and also occurs during wound-healing. Here, we examined the roles of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP) signaling in enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in wound healing processes. The hole-punch was made in the ears of male C57BL/6 mice using a metal ear punch. Healing process and lymphangiogenesis together with macrophage recruitment were analyzed in EP knockout mice. Lymphangiogenesis was up-regulated in the granulation tissues at the margins of punched-hole wounds in mouse ears, and this increase was accompanied by increased expression levels of COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Administration of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, suppressed lymphangiogenesis in the granulation tissues and reduced the induction of the pro-lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and VEGF-D. Topical applications of selective EP receptor agonists enhanced the expressions of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 and VEGF receptor-3. The wound-healing processes and recruitment of CD11b-positive macrophages, which produced VEGF-C and VEGF-D, were suppressed under COX-2 inhibition. Mice lacking either EP3 or EP4 exhibited reduced wound-healing, lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages, compared with wild type mice. Proliferation of cultured human lymphatic endothelial cells was not detected under PGE2 stimulation. Lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages that produced VEGF-C/D were suppressed in mice treated with a COX-2 inhibitor or lacking either EP3 or EP4 during wound healing. COX-2 and EP3/EP4 signaling may be novel targets to control lymphangiogenesis in vivo. PMID:27711210

  11. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) suppresses Natural Killer cell function primarily through the PGE2 receptor EP4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Dawn; Ma, Xinrong; Kundu, Namita; Fulton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The COX-2 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contributes to the high metastatic capacity of breast tumors. Our published data indicate that inhibiting either PGE2 production or PGE2-mediated signaling through the PGE2 receptor EP4 reduces metastasis by a mechanism that requires Natural Killer (NK) cells. It is known that NK cell function is compromised by PGE2, but very little is known about the mechanism by which PGE2 affects NK effector activity. We now report the direct effects of PGE2 on the NK cell. Endogenous murine splenic NK cells express all four PGE2 receptors (EP1-4). We examined the role of EP receptors in three NK cell functions; migration, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release. Like PGE2, the EP4 agonist PGE1-OH blocked NK cell migration to FBS and to four chemokines (ITAC, MIP-1α, SDF-1α, and CCL21). The EP2 agonist, Butaprost, inhibited migration to specific chemokines but not in response to FBS. In contrast to the inhibitory actions of PGE2, the EP1/EP3 agonist Sulprostone increased migration. Unlike the opposing effects of EP4 vs. EP1/EP3 on migration, agonists of each EP receptor were uniformly inhibiting to NK mediated cytotoxicity. The EP4 agonist, PGE1-OH, inhibited IFNγ production from NK cells. Agonists for EP1, 2, and 3 were not as effective at inhibiting IFNγ. Agonists of EP1, EP2, and EP4 all inhibited TNFα; EP4 agonists were the most potent. Thus, the EP4 receptor consistently contributed to loss of function. These results, taken together, support a mechanism whereby inhibiting PGE2 production or preventing signaling through the EP4 receptor may prevent suppression of NK functions that are critical to the control of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:21681369

  12. Identification of major QTLs underlying tomato spotted wilt virus resistance in peanut cultivar Florida-EP(TM) '113'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Chien; Tillman, Barry L; Peng, Ze; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-06

    Spotted wilt caused by tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the major peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) diseases in the southeastern United States. Occurrence, severity, and symptoms of spotted wilt disease are highly variable from season to season, making it difficult to efficiently evaluate breeding populations for resistance. Molecular markers linked to spotted wilt resistance could overcome this problem and allow selection of resistant lines regardless of environmental conditions. Florida-EP(TM) '113' is a spotted wilt resistant cultivar with a significantly lower infection frequency. However, the genetic basis is still unknown. The objective of this study is to map the major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to spotted wilt resistance in Florida-EP(TM) '113'. Among 2,431 SSR markers located across the whole peanut genome screened between the two parental lines, 329 were polymorphic. Those polymorphic markers were used to further genotype a representative set of individuals in a segregating population. Only polymorphic markers on chromosome A01 showed co-segregation between genotype and phenotype. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) of the representative set of individuals in the segregating population also depicted a strong association between several SNPs on chromosome A01 and the trait, indicating a major QTL on chromosome A01. Therefore marker density was enriched on the A01 chromosome. A linkage map with 23 makers on chromosome A01 was constructed, showing collinearity with the physical map. Combined with phenotypic data, a major QTL flanked by marker AHGS4584 and GM672 was identified on chromosome A01, with up to 22.7 % PVE and 9.0 LOD value. A major QTL controlling the spotted wilt resistance in Florida-EP(TM) '113' was identified. The resistance is most likely contributed by PI 576638, a hirsuta botanical-type line, introduced from Mexico with spotted wilt resistance. The flanking markers of this QTL can be used for further fine mapping and marker

  13. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  14. Five Alzheimer's disease cases with refractory behavioural psychological symptoms of dementia treated with blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Atsushi; Saito, Satona

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy, side-effects and tolerability of blonanserin for treating refractory behavioural psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). The present study was a 12-week, prospective, structured clinical trial of blonanserin for the treatment of BPSD. The degree of cognitive function, activities of daily living score, and the degree of BPSD were determined using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and the Rating Scale for Aggressive Behaviour in the Elderly (RAGE). The severity of extrapyramidal symptoms was assessed using the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms scale (DIEEPS). Five patients were enrolled. These patients met the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The patients were prescribed more than two kinds of existing antipsychotic drugs and were considered refractory cases; the drugs were discontinued because they were ineffectual and side-effects appeared. Each drug was prescribed independently for at least 2 weeks. The mean changes (at baseline and at the last week, respectively) in the MMSE (12.25, 9.25), in the DAD (6.5, 6.75), in the RAGE (5.5, 5.3) and in the DIEEPS (0.5, 1.5) were minimal. The mean changes in the NPI were two or fewer points. Some side-effects (one gait abnormality and one pneumonia) were observed. The results of this preliminary study show that blonanserin does not have adequate efficacy for the treatment of refractory BPSD. © 2010 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2010 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP receptors in malignancy: possible therapeutic targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Elevated expression of COX‐2 and increased levels of PGE2 are found in numerous cancers and are associated with tumour development and progression. Although epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have shown that the inhibition of PGE2 synthesis through the use of either non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or specific COX‐2 inhibitors (COXibs) has the potential to prevent and treat malignant disease, toxicities due to inhibition of COX‐2 have limited their use. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of strategies whereby COX‐2 activity may be reduced without inducing any side effects. The biological effects of PGE2 are mediated by signalling through four distinct E‐type prostanoid (EP) receptors – EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4. In recent years, extensive effort has gone into elucidating the function of PGE2 and the EP receptors in health and disease, with the goal of creating selective inhibitors as a means of therapy. In this review, we focus on PGE2, and in particular on the role of the individual EP receptors and their signalling pathways in neoplastic disease. As knowledge concerning the role of the EP receptors in cancer grows, so does the potential for exploiting the EP receptors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer and metastatic disease. PMID:26377664

  16. PGE2 signaling through the EP4 receptor on fibroblasts upregulates RANKL and stimulates osteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Xie, Chao; Wei, Xiaochao; Zhang, Minjie; Zhang, Xinping; Flick, Lisa M; Schwarz, Edward M; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2009-10-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is the most common cause of aseptic loosening in total joint arthroplasty. The role of inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and osteoclast promoting factors including RANKL in the pathogenesis of osteolysis has been well characterized. However, the PGE2 receptor (EP1, EP2, or EP4), and cell type in which it is expressed, which is responsible for PGE2 induction of RANKL during wear debris-induced osteolysis, has yet to be elucidated. To address this, we used mice genetically deficient in these EP receptors to assess PGE2 and wear debris responses in vitro and in vivo. Wear debris-induced osteolysis and RANKL expression were observed at similar levels in WT, EP1(-/-), and EP2(-/-) mice, indicating that these receptors do not mediate PGE2 signals in this process. A conditional knockout approach was used to eliminate EP4 expression in FSP1(+) fibroblasts that are the predominant source of RANKL. In the absence of EP4, fibroblasts do not express RANKL after stimulation with particles or PGE2, nor do they exhibit high levels of osteoclasts and osteolysis. These results show that periprosthetic fibroblasts are important mediators of osteolysis through the expression of RANKL, which is induced after PGE2 signaling through the EP4 receptor.

  17. EP4 agonist alleviates indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and promotes chronic gastric ulcer healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Liang Jiang; Wha Bin Im; Yariv Donde; Larry A Wheeler

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate EP4-selective agonist effect on indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and on the spontaneous healing of chronic gastric ulcers. METHODS: In a mouse model of gastric bleeding with high dose of indomethacin (20 mg/kg), an EP4-selective agonist was administered orally. Stomach lesions and gastric mucous regeneration were monitored. In a mouse model of chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid, EP4 agonist effect on the healing of chronic gastric ulcer was evaluated in the presence or absence of low dose indomethacin (3 mg/kg). In cultured human gastric mucous cells, EP4 agonist effect on indomethacininduced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The EP4-selective agonist reduced high dose indomethacin-induced acute hemorrhagic damage and promoted mucous epithelial regeneration. Low-dose indomethacin aggravated ulcer bleeding and inflammation, and delayed the healing of the established chronic gastric ulcer. The EP4 agonist, when applied locally, not only offset indomethacin-induced gastric bleeding and inflammation, but also accelerated ulcer healing. In the absence of indomethacin, the EP4 agonist even accelerated chronic gastric ulcer healing and suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration in the granulation tissue. In vitro , the EP4 agonist protected human gastric mucous cells from indomethacin-induced apoptosis. CONCLUSION: EP4-selective agonist may prevent indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and promote healing of existing and indomethacin-aggravated gastric ulcers, via promoting proliferation and survival of mucous epithelial cells.

  18. Un caso particular de cita : el epígrafe en Augusto Monterroso

    OpenAIRE

    Hecke, An Van

    2003-01-01

    Un buen epígrafe, escogido con perspicacia, con cierto propósito estético, y que se apoya en el prestigio del autor citado, suele anunciar una lectura prometedora, lo que coincide con las definiciones comunes según las cuales el epígrafe anticipa la idea y el tono de una obra. Sospechamos que en Augusto Monterroso, el uso del epígrafe apunta aún a otros objetivos. Un análisis detallado y en conjunto de todos los epígrafes preliminares en Monterroso nos dice mucho sobre la manera en que el aut...

  19. Influence of the transverse beam sizes on the ep -> ep. gamma. cross section at the HERA and a FUTURE CERN electron-proton collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G.L.; Polityko, S.I.; Serbo, V.G.; Schiller, A.

    1988-06-01

    In the process ep -> ep..gamma.., proposed for luminosity measurements at HERA, impact parameters occur which are larger than the transverse beam sizes in the ep-colliders in HERA and a CERN option (LHC+LEP). This decreases the number of observed photons compared to the standard QED calculation. The difference is larger than 10% at photon energies E/sub ..gamma../ < 0.4E/sub e/ for the CERN option and E/sub ..gamma../ < 0.01E/sub e/ for HERA. (orig.)

  20. PGE2 triggers recovery of transmucosal resistance via EP receptor cross talk in porcine ischemia-injured ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikslager, A T; Pell, S M; Young, K M

    2001-08-01

    16,16-Dimethyl-PGE2 (PGE2) may interact with one of four prostaglandin type E (EP) receptors, which signal via cAMP (via EP2 or EP4 receptors) or intracellular Ca(2+) (via EP1 receptors). Furthermore, EP3 receptors have several splice variants, which may signal via cAMP or intracellular Ca(2+). We sought to determine the PGE2 receptor interactions that mediate recovery of transmucosal resistance (R) in ischemia-injured porcine ileum. Porcine ileum was subjected to 45 min of ischemia, after which the mucosa was mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were pretreated with indomethacin (5 microM). Treatment with the EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 agonist PGE2 (1 microM) elevated R twofold and significantly increased tissue cAMP content, whereas the EP2 and EP4 agonist deoxy-PGE1 (1 microM) or the EP1 and EP3 agonist sulprostone (1 microM) had no effect. However, a combination of deoxy-PGE1 and sulprostone stimulated synergistic elevations in R and tissue cAMP content. Furthermore, treatment of tissues with deoxy-PGE1 and the Ca(2+) ionophore A-23187 stimulated synergistic increases in R and cAMP, indicating that PGE2 triggers recovery of R via EP receptor cross talk mechanisms involving cAMP and intracellular Ca(2+).

  1. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Center Finder Home » About Multiple Myeloma » Symptoms Multiple Myeloma Symptoms Multiple myeloma symptoms may vary by patient, ... to be managed or prevented. The most common multiple myeloma symptoms may include: Bone pain or bone fractures ...

  2. General IC Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IC Symptoms of IC General IC Symptoms General IC Symptoms Symptoms of interstitial cystitis (IC) differ from ... news and events. Please leave this field empty Interstitial Cystitis Association 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300 McLean, ...

  3. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma Each heading slides to reveal more information. Early Symptoms Early Symptoms Early symptoms are easily overlooked, thus making diagnosis ...

  4. The Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Regulates Obesity-Related Inflammation and Insulin Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Yasui

    Full Text Available With increasing body weight, macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue. There, activated macrophages secrete numerous proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, giving rise to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses macrophage activation via EP4; however, the role of EP4 signaling in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unknown. In this study, we treated db/db mice with an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, for 4 weeks to explore the role of EP4 signaling in obesity-related inflammation in vivo. Administration of the EP4 agonist did not affect body weight gain or food intake; however, in the EP4 agonist-treated group, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance were significantly improved over that of the vehicle-treated group. Additionally, administration of the EP4 agonist inhibited the accumulation of F4/80-positive macrophages and the formation of crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, and the adipocytes were significantly smaller. The treatment of the EP4 agonist increased the number of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, and in the stromal vascular fraction of white adipose tissue, which includes macrophages, it markedly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, EP4 activation increased the expression of adiponectin and peroxidase proliferator-activated receptors in white adipose tissue. Next, we examined in vitro M1/M2 polarization assay to investigate the impact of EP4 signaling on determining the functional phenotypes of macrophages. Treatment with EP4 agonist enhanced M2 polarization in wild-type peritoneal macrophages, whereas EP4-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to M2 polarization. Notably, antagonizing peroxidase proliferator-activated receptor δ activity suppressed EP4 signaling-mediated shift toward M2 macrophage polarization. Thus, our results demonstrate that EP4 signaling plays a critical role in obesity-related adipose tissue

  5. The Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Regulates Obesity-Related Inflammation and Insulin Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mika; Tamura, Yukinori; Minami, Manabu; Higuchi, Sei; Fujikawa, Risako; Ikedo, Taichi; Nagata, Manabu; Arai, Hidenori; Murayama, Toshinori; Yokode, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    With increasing body weight, macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue. There, activated macrophages secrete numerous proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, giving rise to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses macrophage activation via EP4; however, the role of EP4 signaling in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unknown. In this study, we treated db/db mice with an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, for 4 weeks to explore the role of EP4 signaling in obesity-related inflammation in vivo. Administration of the EP4 agonist did not affect body weight gain or food intake; however, in the EP4 agonist-treated group, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance were significantly improved over that of the vehicle-treated group. Additionally, administration of the EP4 agonist inhibited the accumulation of F4/80-positive macrophages and the formation of crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, and the adipocytes were significantly smaller. The treatment of the EP4 agonist increased the number of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, and in the stromal vascular fraction of white adipose tissue, which includes macrophages, it markedly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, EP4 activation increased the expression of adiponectin and peroxidase proliferator-activated receptors in white adipose tissue. Next, we examined in vitro M1/M2 polarization assay to investigate the impact of EP4 signaling on determining the functional phenotypes of macrophages. Treatment with EP4 agonist enhanced M2 polarization in wild-type peritoneal macrophages, whereas EP4-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to M2 polarization. Notably, antagonizing peroxidase proliferator-activated receptor δ activity suppressed EP4 signaling-mediated shift toward M2 macrophage polarization. Thus, our results demonstrate that EP4 signaling plays a critical role in obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation and

  6. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-mediated low oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Emilce; Werner, Peter; Casper, Diana

    2008-08-15

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) selectively die in Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is unclear how and why this occurs. Recent findings implicate prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and two of its four receptors, namely EP1 and EP2, as mediators of degenerative and protective events in situations of acute and chronic neuronal death. EP1 activation can exacerbate excitotoxic damage in stroke models and our recent study showed that EP1 activation may explain the selective sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to oxidative stress. Conversely, EP2 activation may be neuroprotective, although toxic effects have also been demonstrated. Here we investigated if and how EP2 activation might alter the survival of dopaminergic neurons following selective low-level oxidative injury evoked by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in primary neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic rat midbrain. We found that cultured dopaminergic neurons displayed EP2 receptors. Butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, significantly reduced 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. EP2 receptors are coupled to stimulatory G-proteins (Gs), which activate adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP synthesis, which then activates protein kinase A (PKA). Both dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin reduced dopaminergic cell loss after 6-OHDA exposure. Conversely, KT5720 and H-89, two structurally distinct high-affinity PKA inhibitors, abolished the protective effect of butaprost, implicating cAMP-dependent PKA activity in the neuroprotection by EP2 activation. Finally, we show that melanized dopaminergic neurons in the human SN express EP2. This pathway warrants consideration as a neuroprotective strategy for PD.

  7. Prognostic role of PGE2 receptor EP2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kuang-Tai; Wang, Hao-Wei; Chou, Teh-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Hsu, Han-Shui; Lin, Chi-Hung; Wang, Liang-Shun

    2009-02-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) product, has been shown to affect numerous tumorigenic processes. PGE2 acts through G-protein-coupled receptors designated as EPs. Recently it has been documented that PGE2 promotes colon cancer cell growth via EP2. However, the expression and the prognostic role of EP2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remained unknown. From January 1995 to January 2001, tissue samples from 226 patients with ESCC who underwent esophagectomies at our institutions were collected and made into tissue core arrays for study. EP2 expression was examined by immunohistochemical staining and confirmed by Western blot. The clinicopathologic data were then analyzed. EP2 overexpression was observed in 43.4% (98/226) of ESCC. Overexpression of EP2 correlated positively with depth of tumor invasion (T status) (P = 0.016) and was associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.047). In patients without regional or distant lymph node metastasis (N0 or M0), EP2 overexpression was associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.033 and P = 0.003, respectively). Using Cox regression analysis, T status, N status, and M status were the independent factors of overall survival, but EP2 expression was not. However, when focusing on patients with T1-3N0M0 status, EP2 expression became an independent factor of overall survival (P = 0.048). Our results show that EP2 overexpression was associated with worse prognosis, and correlated positively with T status in ESCC. Meanwhile, among those patients at earlier stages, EP2 overexpression significantly disclosed patients at high risks for poor prognosis.

  8. Regulation of actin cytoskeleton architecture by Eps8 and Abi1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Jeffrey R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The actin cytoskeleton participates in many fundamental processes including the regulation of cell shape, motility, and adhesion. The remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is dependent on actin binding proteins, which organize actin filaments into specific structures that allow them to perform various specialized functions. The Eps8 family of proteins is implicated in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling during cell migration, yet the precise mechanism by which Eps8 regulates actin organization and remodeling remains elusive. Results Here, we show that Eps8 promotes the assembly of actin rich filopodia-like structures and actin cables in cultured mammalian cells and Xenopus embryos, respectively. The morphology of actin structures induced by Eps8 was modulated by interactions with Abi1, which stimulated formation of actin cables in cultured cells and star-like structures in Xenopus. The actin stars observed in Xenopus animal cap cells assembled at the apical surface of epithelial cells in a Rac-independent manner and their formation was accompanied by recruitment of N-WASP, suggesting that the Eps8/Abi1 complex is capable of regulating the localization and/or activity of actin nucleators. We also found that Eps8 recruits Dishevelled to the plasma membrane and actin filaments suggesting that Eps8 might participate in non-canonical Wnt/Polarity signaling. Consistent with this idea, mis-expression of Eps8 in dorsal regions of Xenopus embryos resulted in gastrulation defects. Conclusion Together, these results suggest that Eps8 plays multiple roles in modulating actin filament organization, possibly through its interaction with distinct sets of actin regulatory complexes. Furthermore, the finding that Eps8 interacts with Dsh and induced gastrulation defects provides evidence that Eps8 might participate in non-canonical Wnt signaling to control cell movements during vertebrate development.

  9. Deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica in monovalent and divalent salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pingting; Long, Guoyu; Ni, Jinren; Tong, Meiping

    2009-08-01

    The deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica surfaces were examined in both monovalent and divalent solutions under a variety of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by employing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (DCM-D). Soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) were extracted from four bacterial strains with different characteristics. Maximum favorable deposition rates (k(fa)) were observed for all EPS at low ionic strengths in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. With the increase of ionic strength, k(fa) decreased due to the simultaneous occurrence of EPS aggregation in solutions. Deposition efficiency (alpha; the ratio of deposition rates obtained under unfavorable versus corresponding favorable conditions) for all EPS increased with increasing ionic strength in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions, which agreed with the trends of zeta potentials and was consistent with the classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Comparison of alpha for SEPS and BEPS extracted from the same strain showed that the trends of alpha did not totally agree with trends of zeta potentials, indicating the deposition kinetics of EPS on silica surfaces were not only controlled by DLVO interactions, but also non-DLVO forces. Close comparison of alpha for EPS extracted from different sources showed alpha increased with increasing proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Subsequent experiments for EPS extracted from the same strain but with different proteins to polysaccharides ratios and from activated sludge also showed that alpha were largest for EPS with greatest proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Additional experiments for pure protein and solutions with different pure proteins to pure saccharides ratios further corroborated that larger proteins to polysaccharides ratio resulted in greater EPS deposition.

  10. Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Iresjö, Britt‐Marie; Wang, Wenhua; Nilsberth, Camilla; Andersson, Marianne; LÖNNROTH, CHRISTINA; Smedh, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor‐bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild‐type (EP2+/+) or EP2‐receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor‐bearing EP2 knockout mice compar...

  11. Loss of EP2 Receptor Subtype in Colonic Cells Compromise Epithelial Barrier Integrity by Altering Claudin-4

    OpenAIRE

    Manigandan Lejeune; France Moreau; Kris Chadee

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid mediator that exerts its biological function through interaction with four different subtypes of E-Prostanoid receptor namely EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4. It has been known that EP2 receptor is differentially over-expressed in the epithelia of inflamed human colonic mucosa. However, the significance of the differential expression in altering epithelial barrier function is not known. In this study, we used Caco-2 cells expressing EP2 receptor, either high...

  12. 奥氮平与利培酮治疗痴呆患者精神行为症状的对照研究%The comparative study of olanzapine and risperidone in the treatment of dementia patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文平; 赵祖安; 白玉红; 曾丽苹

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy and safety of Olanzapine and Risperidone in the treatment of dementia patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms. Methods 80 senile dementia patients were selected and divided into two groups randomly, Olanzapine group (40 cases) and Risperidone group (40 cases). Before the treatment and the treatment for two, four and eight weeks, the two groups were both given the BEHAVE-AD scale to evaluate the efficacy and TESS scale to evaluate the adverse reactions. Results In the treatment of the 8th week, the differences of all the BE-HAVE-AD scales compared with before the treatment in the two groups were statistically significant (P < 0.01). In the treatment of the 2nd week, the difference of total scales compared with before the treatment in the Olanzapine group was statistically significant (P < 0.01), the Risperidone group was not; but at the 8th week the difference of efficiency rate between the two groups was not statistically significant. In security, the difference of total adverse reactions rate was not statistically significant, but the incidence of extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) in the Risperidone group was higher than in the Olanzapine group(P < 0.05). Conclusion The efficacy of Olanzapine and Risperidone in the treatment of dementia patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms are equal, but Olanzapine works faster, side effects are less, so Olanzapine is more suitable to treat dementia patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms.%目的 观察奥氮平和利培酮治疗老年痴呆患者精神行为症状的疗效和安全性.方法 将80例老年痴呆患者随机分为奥氮平组和利培酮组,每组各40例,共观察8周.治疗前及治疗第2、4、8周末分别用BEHAVE-AD量表评定疗效,用TESS量表评定不良反应.结果 奥氮平组和利培酮组在治疗第8周末,BEHAVE-AD量所有项目评分与治疗前比较,差异均有高度统计学意义(均P < 0.01),

  13. Influence of the transverse dimensions of the beams of the HERA accelerator on the cross section for the process ep. -->. ep. gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G.L.; Polityko, S.I.; Serbo, V.G.

    1985-10-01

    It is planned to measure the luminosity in the HERA accelerator by means of the reaction ep..-->..ep..gamma... One notes that in this process an important role is played by impact parameters larger than the transverse dimensions of the beams. This will lead to a decrease of the number of observed photons in comparison with a standard calculation. Calculations performed show that for E/sub ..gamma../< or =0.04E/sub e/ the difference amounts to > or =10%.

  14. Highlights from e-EPS: Coordinated Access to Light sources

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    The CALIPSO project, which runs until May 2015, will contribute to the effective exploitation of European synchrotrons and free electron lasers. CALIPSO (Coordinated Access to Light sources to Promote Standards and Optimisation) includes 20 partners forming one of the largest Research Networks in the world.   e-EPS interviewed M. Bertolo, CALIPSO project manager and his assistant C. Blasetti. Which challenges are addressed by CALIPSO? CALIPSO’s goal is to optimize the exploitation of the European synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers. With respect to previous projects funded by the European Commission, it foresees significant improvements in integration, innovation and user-friendliness in all three areas of networking, transnational access and instrumentation. The Transnational Access program potentially benefits a community of 25,000 estimated users offering free open access to 12 synchrotrons and 5 free electron lasers solely based on scientific merit. In ad...

  15. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}. Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudo- rapidity ranges 45 GeV. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive isolated photon production as functions of Q{sup 2}, x, E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} and {eta}{sup {gamma}}. Leading-logarithm parton-shower Monte Carlo simulations and perturbative QCD predictions give a reasonable description of the data over most of the kinematic range. (orig.)

  16. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania)]|[Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full e{sup {+-}}p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb{sup -1}. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e{sup *} {yields}e{gamma}, e{sup *} {yields}eZ and e{sup *} {yields}{nu}W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e{sup *} production cross sections and on the ratio f/{lambda} of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e{sup *} production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions. (orig.)

  17. The mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype: cloning, expression, and northern blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, M; Nishigaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Morimoto, K; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1995-09-25

    A functional cDNA clone for the mouse prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was isolated from a mouse cDNA library. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 362 amino acid residues with seven putative transmembrane domains. [3H]PGE2 bound specifically to the membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned receptor. This binding was displaced by unlabeled prostanoids in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost, a stable PGI2 agonist > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. Binding was also inhibited by butaprost (an EP2 agonist) and to a lesser extent by M&B 28767 (an EP3 agonist), but not by sulprostone (an EP1 and EP3 agonist) or SC-19220 (an EP1 antagonist). PGE2 and butaprost increased the cAMP level in the Chinese hamster ovary cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis revealed that EP2 mRNA is expressed most abundantly in the uterus, followed by the spleen, lung, thymus, ileum, liver, and stomach.

  18. 30 CFR 250.226 - What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP? 250.226 Section 250.226 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.226 What Coastal Zone Management Act...

  19. Social accountability and the finance sector: the case of Equator Principles (EP) institutionalisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Sullivan, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2003, the Equator Principles (EP) were launched by ten international commercial banks. The EP were designed as a set of voluntary environmental and social risk management guidelines for project finance. Whilst lauded as a revolutionary initiative by the financial sector, the Principles were

  20. The Eps15 C. elegans homologue EHS-1 is implicated in synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Hilliard, M A; Croce, A

    2001-01-01

    implicated Eps15 in endocytosis, its function in the endocytic machinery remains unclear. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, zk1248.3 (ehs-1), is the orthologue of Eps15 in nematodes, and that its product, EHS-1, localizes to synaptic-rich regions. ehs-1-impaired worms showed temperature...

  1. 30 CFR 250.223 - What mitigation measures information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What mitigation measures information must... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.223 What mitigation measures information must accompany the EP?...

  2. Social accountability and the finance sector: the case of Equator Principles (EP) institutionalisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Sullivan, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2003, the Equator Principles (EP) were launched by ten international commercial banks. The EP were designed as a set of voluntary environmental and social risk management guidelines for project finance. Whilst lauded as a revolutionary initiative by the financial sector, the Principles were

  3. Production of Z(0) bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, E.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The production of Z(0) bosons in the reaction ep -> eZ(0)p((*)), where p((*)) stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb(-1) of int

  4. Bidirectional modulation of endogenous EpCAM expression to unravel its function in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; Huisman, C.; Stolzenburg, S.; Kazemier, H. G.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; Blancafort, P.; Rots, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on most carcinomas. Dependent on the tumour type, its overexpression is either associated with improved or worse patient survival. For ovarian cancer, however, the role of EpCAM remains unclear. Methods: Cell survival of ovar

  5. PGE2-EP3 signaling exacerbates intracerebral hemorrhage outcomes in 24-mo-old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jenna L; Lampert, Andrew S; Diller, Matthew A; Doré, Sylvain

    2016-06-01

    With the population aging at an accelerated rate, the prevalence of stroke and financial burden of stroke-related health care costs are expected to continue to increase. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating stroke subtype more commonly affecting the elderly population, who display increased mortality and worse functional outcomes compared with younger patients. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) E prostanoid (EP) receptor subtype 3 in modulating anatomical outcomes and functional recovery following ICH in 24-mo-old mice. EP3 is the most abundant EP receptor in the brain and we have previously shown that signaling through the PGE2-EP3 axis exacerbates ICH outcomes in young mice. Here, we show that EP3 receptor deletion results in 17.9 ± 6.1% less ICH-induced brain injury (P EP3-mediated neurotoxicity. Identified mechanisms include reduced blood accumulation and modulation of angiogenic and astroglial responses. Using this aged cohort of mice, we have confirmed and extended our previous results in young mice demonstrating the deleterious role of the PGE2-EP3 signaling axis in modulating brain injury and functional recovery after ICH, further supporting the notion of the EP3 receptor as a putative therapeutic avenue for the treatment of ICH. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the lactococcal EPS plasmid pNZ4000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, van R.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The complete 42180-bp nucleotide sequence of the mobilization plasmid pNZ4000, coding for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in Lactococcus lactis, was determined. This plasmid contains a region involved in EPS biosynthesis, four functional replicons, a region containing mobilization genes, and thre

  7. Composition of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) produced by Flavobacterium columnare isolated from tropical fish in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alexandre Sebastião, Fernanda; Pilarski, Fabiana; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2013-01-01

    Thirty nine isolates of Flavobacterium columnare from Brazilian fish farms had their carbohydrate composition of EPS evaluated by high efficiency liquid chromatography, using the phenol-sulfuric acid method of EPS. The occurrence of capsules on F. columnare cells was not directly related to biofilm formation, and the predominant monosaccharide is glucose.

  8. EP4 inhibition attenuates the development of diabetic and non-diabetic experimental kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Karina; Majumder, Syamantak; Brijmohan, Angela S; Batchu, Sri N; Bowskill, Bridgit B; Alghamdi, Tamadher A; Advani, Suzanne L; Kabir, M Golam; Liu, Youan; Advani, Andrew

    2017-06-13

    The therapeutic targeting of prostanoid subtype receptors may slow the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) through mechanisms that are distinct from those of upstream COX inhibition. Here, employing multiple experimental models of CKD, we studied the effects of inhibition of the EP4 receptor, one of four receptor subtypes for the prostanoid prostaglandin E2. In streptozotocin-diabetic endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, EP4 inhibition attenuated the development of albuminuria, whereas the COX inhibitor indomethacin did not. In Type 2 diabetic db/db mice, EP4 inhibition lowered albuminuria to a level comparable with that of the ACE inhibitor captopril. However, unlike captopril, EP4 inhibition had no effect on blood pressure or hyperfiltration although it did attenuate mesangial matrix accumulation. Indicating a glucose-independent mechanism of action, EP4 inhibition also attenuated proteinuria development and glomerular scarring in non-diabetic rats subjected to surgical renal mass ablation. Finally, in vitro, EP4 inhibition prevented transforming growth factor-ß1 induced dedifferentiation of glomerular podocytes. In rodent models of diabetic and non-diabetic CKD, EP4 inhibition attenuated renal injury through mechanisms that were distinct from either broadspectrum COX inhibition or "standard of care" renin angiotensin system blockade. EP4 inhibition may represent a viable repurposing opportunity for the treatment of CKD.

  9. Structural elucidation of the EPS of slime producing Brevundimonas vesicularis sp isolated from a paper machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, R.P.; Waard, de P.; Schols, H.A.; Ratto, M.; Siika-aho, M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    The slime forming bacteria Brevundimonas vesicularis sp. was isolated from a paper mill and its EPS was produced on laboratory scale. After production, the exopolysaccharide (EPS) was purified and analysed for its purity and homogeneity, HPSEC revealed one distinct population with a molecular mass o

  10. Transcription factors and molecular epigenetic marks underlying EpCAM overexpression in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; de Groote, M. L.; Kazemier, H. G.; Arendzen, A. J.; Terpstra, P.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; McLaughlin, P. M. J.; Rots, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on carcinomas, and its downregulation inhibits the oncogenic potential of multiple tumour types. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of epcam overexpression in ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Expression of EpCAM and DNA m

  11. Effects of EpCAM overexpression on human breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krobitsch Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, EpCAM has attracted major interest as a target for antibody- and vaccine-based cancer immunotherapies. In breast cancer, the EpCAM antigen is overexpressed in 30-40% of all cases and this increased expression correlates with poor prognosis. The use of EpCAM-specific monoclonal antibodies is a promising treatment approach in these patients. Methods In order to explore molecular changes following EpCAM overexpression, we investigated changes of the transcriptome upon EpCAM gene expression in commercially available human breast cancer cells lines Hs578T and MDA-MB-231. To assess cell proliferation, a tetrazolium salt based assay was performed. A TCF/LEF Reporter Kit was used to measure the transcriptional activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. To evaluate the accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus, a subcellular fractionation assay was performed. Results For the first time we could show that expression profiling data of EpCAM transfected cell lines Hs578TEpCAM and MDA-MB-231EpCAM indicate an association of EpCAM overexpression with the downregulation of the Wnt signaling inhibitors SFRP1 and TCF7L2. Confirmation of increased Wnt signaling was provided by a TCF/LEF reporter kit and by the finding of the nuclear accumulation of ß-catenin for MDA-MB-231EpCAM but not Hs578TEpCAM cells. In Hs578T cells, an increase of proliferation and chemosensitivity to Docetaxel was associated with EpCAM overexpression. Conclusions These data show a cell type dependent modification of Wnt signaling components after EpCAM overexpression in breast cancer cell lines, which results in marginal functional changes. Further investigations on the interaction of EpCAM with SFRP1 and TCF7L2 and on additional factors, which may be causal for changes upon EpCAM overexpression, will help to characterize unique molecular properties of EpCAM-positive breast cancer cells.

  12. Detection and biological activities of carboxyethylpyrrole ethanolamine phospholipids (CEP-EPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Guo, Junhong; West, Xiaoxia Z; Bid, Hemant K; Lu, Liang; Hong, Li; Jang, Geeng-Fu; Zhang, Lei; Crabb, John W; Linetsky, Mikhail; Salomon, Robert G

    2014-12-15

    Oxidation of docosahexaenoate phospholipids produces 4-hydroxy-7-oxo-hept-5-eonyl phospholipids (HOHA-PLs) that react with protein lysyl ε-amino residues to generate 2-ω-carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP) derivatives, endogenous factors that induce angiogenesis in the retina and tumors. It seemed likely, but remained unproven, that HOHA-PLs react with ethanolamine phospholipids (EPs) in vivo to generate CEP-EPs. We now show that CEP-EPs are present in human blood at 4.6-fold higher levels in age-related macular degeneration plasma than in normal plasma. We also show that CEP-EPs are pro-angiogenic, inducing tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells by activating Toll-like receptor 2. CEP-EP levels may be a useful biomarker for clinical assessment of AMD risk and CEP-associated tumor progression and a tool for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

  13. EP2 receptor antagonism reduces peripheral and central hyperalgesia in a preclinical mouse model of endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Erin; Horne, Andrew W.; Jerina, Helen; Mikolajczak, Marta; Hilferty, Lisa; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue M.; Saunders, Philippa T. K.

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is an incurable gynecological disorder characterized by debilitating pain and the establishment of innervated endometriosis lesions outside the uterus. In a preclinical mouse model of endometriosis we demonstrated overexpression of the PGE2-signaling pathway (including COX-2, EP2, EP4) in endometriosis lesions, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, thalamus and forebrain. TRPV1, a PGE2-regulated channel in nociceptive neurons was also increased in the DRG. These findings support the concept that an amplification process occurs along the pain neuroaxis in endometriosis. We then tested TRPV1, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists: The EP2 antagonist was the most efficient analgesic, reducing primary hyperalgesia by 80% and secondary hyperalgesia by 40%. In this study we demonstrate reversible peripheral and central hyperalgesia in mice with induced endometriosis. PMID:28281561

  14. Measurement of GEp/GMp in ep -> ep to Q2 = 5.6 GeV2

    CERN Document Server

    Gayou, O; Jones, M K; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V

    2002-01-01

    The ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, GEp/GMp, was measured at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) using the recoil polarization technique. The ratio of the form factors is directly proportional to the ratio of the transverse to longitudinal components of the polarization of the recoil proton in the elastic $\\vec ep \\to e\\vec p$ reaction. The new data presented in this article span the range 3.5 < Q2 < 5.6 GeV2 and are well described by a linear Q2 fit. Also, the ratio QF2p/F1p reaches a constant value above Q2=2 GeV2.

  15. Cloning, functional expression, and characterization of the human prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, L; Sawyer, N; Grygorczyk, R; Metters, K M; Adam, M

    1994-04-22

    A cDNA clone encoding the human prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor EP2 subtype has been isolated from a human lung cDNA library. The 1.9-kilobase pair cDNA, hEP2, encodes for a 488-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 53,115 and has the seven putative transmembrane domains characteristic of G protein-coupled receptors. The specific binding of [3H]PGE2 to COS cell membranes transfected with the hEP2 cDNA was of high affinity with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 1 nM and the rank order of potency for prostaglandins in competition for [3H]PGE2 specific binding was PGE1 = PGE2 > iloprost > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. In competition studies using more selective prostanoid-receptor agonist and antagonists, the [3H]PGE2 specific binding was competed by MB28767, an EP3 agonist, but not by the EP1-preferring antagonists AH6809 and SC19220, or by the EP2 agonist butaprost. Electrophysiological studies of Xenopus oocytes co-injected with hEP2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (cAMP-activated Cl- channel) cDNAs detected PGE2-specific inward Cl- currents, demonstrating that the hEP2 cDNA encoded a functional receptor which produced an increase in cAMP levels. Thus, we have cloned the human EP2 receptor subtype which is functionally coupled to increase in cAMP. Northern blot analysis showed that hEP2 is expressed as a 3.8-kilobase mRNA in a number of human tissues with the highest expression levels present in the small intestine.

  16. The prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 is required for cyclooxygenase 2-mediated mammary hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung-Hee; Ai, Youxi; Breyer, Richard M; Lane, Timothy F; Hla, Timothy

    2005-06-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis, and COX-2 enzyme inhibitors reduce breast cancer incidence in humans. We recently showed that COX-2 overexpression in the mammary gland of transgenic mice induced mammary cancer. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major eicosanoid and because the EP2 subtype of the PGE2 receptor is highly expressed in the mammary tumors, we tested if this G protein-coupled receptor is required for tumorigenesis. We crossed the MMTV-COX-2 transgenic mice with Ep2-/- mice and studied tumor development in bigenic mice. Lack of EP2 receptor strongly suppressed COX-2-induced effects such as precocious development of the mammary gland in virgins and the development of mammary hyperplasia in multiparous female mice. Interestingly, the expression of amphiregulin, a potent mammary epithelial cell growth factor was down regulated in mammary glands of Ep2-/- mice. Total cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were reduced in Ep2-/- mammary glands suggesting that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptor activates the Gs/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway. In mammary tumor cell lines, expression of the EP2 receptor followed by treatment with CAY10399, an EP2-specific agonist, strongly induced amphiregulin mRNA levels in a protein kinase A-dependent manner. These data suggest that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptor in mammary epithelial cells regulate mammary gland hyperplasia by the cAMP-dependent induction of amphiregulin. Inhibition of the EP2 pathway in the mammary gland may be a novel approach in the prevention and/or treatment of mammary cancer.

  17. Influences of influent carbon source on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and physicochemical properties of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fenxia; Peng, Ge; Li, Ying

    2011-08-01

    It is necessary to understand the bioflocculation, settling and dewatering characteristics in the activated sludge process in order to establish more efficient operational strategies. The influences of carbon source on the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and flocculation, settling and dewatering properties of the activated sludge were investigated. Laboratory-scale completely mixed activated sludge processes were used to grow the activated sludge with different carbon sources of starch, glucose and sodium acetate. The sludge fed with acetate had highest loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and that fed with starch lowest. The amount of tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), protein content in LB-EPS, polysaccharide content and protein contents in TB-EPS, were independent of the influent carbon source. The polysaccharide content in LB-EPS of the activated sludge fed with sodium acetate was lower slightly than those of starch and glucose. The sludge also had a nearly consistent flocs size and the sludge volume index (SVI) value. ESS content of the sludge fed with sodium acetate was higher initially, although it was similar to those fed with glucose and starch finally. However, the specific resistance to filtration and normalized capillary suction time fluctuated first, but finally were stable at around 5.0×10(8)mkg(-1) and 3.5 s Lg(-1) SS, respectively. Only the protein content in LB-EPS weakly correlated with the flocs size and SVI of the activated sludge. But there was no correlation between any other EPS contents or components and the physicochemical properties of the activated sludge.

  18. Microglial inhibition of neuroprotection by antagonists of the EP1 prostaglandin E2 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Monica A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The EP1 receptor for the prostanoid PGE2 is a G-protein coupled receptor that has been shown to contribute to excitotoxic neuronal death. In this study we examined the influence of non-neuronal cells on neuroprotective properties of EP1 receptor antagonists (Ono 8711 and SC 51089. Methods Primary neuronal cultures systems with or without non-neuronal cells were used to examine how the neuroprotective properties of EP1 antagonists were influenced by non-neuronal cells. The influence of astrocytes or microglia were individually tested in excitotoxicity assays using a co-culture system with these cells grown on permeable transwell inserts above the neuronal-enriched cultures. The influence of microglia on PGE2 synthesis and EP1 receptor expression was examined. Results EP1 antagonists were neuroprotective in neuronal-enriched cultures (> 90% neurons but not in mixed cultures (30% neurons plus other non-neuronal cells. Co-cultures of microglia on permeable transwell inserts above neuronal-enriched cultures blocked neuroprotection by EP1 antagonists. Incubation of microglia with neuronal-enriched cultures for 48 hours prior to NMDA challenge was sufficient to block neuroprotection by EP1 antagonists. The loss of neuroprotection by EP1 antagonists was accompanied by a decrease of neuronal EP1 expression in the nucleus in cultures with microglia present. Conclusion These findings demonstrate microglial modulation of neuronal excitotoxicity through interaction with the EP1 receptor and may have important implications in vivo where microglia are associated with neuronal injury.

  19. The receptor EP3 to PGE2: A rational target to prevent atherothrombosis without inducing bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhin, Marie-Anne; Tilly, Peggy; Fabre, Jean-Etienne

    2015-09-01

    The prostanoid E2 (PGE2) is known to modulate the aggregative response of platelets to their conventional agonists such as ADP, TXA2, thrombin or collagen. Through the activation of its receptor EP3, PGE2 sensitizes platelets to their agonists but also inhibits them through its two other receptors, EP2 and EP4. In mice, the net result of these opposed actions is the EP3-mediated potentiation of platelet aggregation and the in vivo aggravation of murine atherothrombosis. Since the pathway PGE2/EP3 is not involved in murine hemostasis, we propose a "platelet EP3 paradigm" to describe this apparently paradoxical association between the facilitating impact on atherothrombosis and the unaltered hemostasis. Consistent with this paradigm, a drug blocking EP3 dramatically decreased atherothrombosis without inducing bleeding in mice. In humans, several studies did not agree on the effect of PGE2 on platelets. Reinterpreting these data with the notion of "potentiation window" and taking the platelet initial cAMP level into account reconciled these inconsistent results. Thereby, the in vitro potentiating effect of PGE2 on human platelets becomes clear. In addition, the EP3 blocking drug DG-041 abrogated the potentiating effect of PGE2 in whole human blood but did not prolong bleeding times in volunteers. Thus, the murine "platelet EP3 paradigm" would apply to humans if the aggravating role of PGE2 on atherothrombosis is shown in patients. Therefore, testing an EP3 blocker in a phase III trial would be of high interest to fulfill the unmet medical need which is to control atherothrombosis without impacting hemostasis and thus to improve the prevention of myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular Polymeric Substances of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (EPS-A) Induced Apoptosis in Astrocytes of Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ying; Xue, Xing; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang; Ren, Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, extracellular polymeric substances of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (EPS-A) were investigated in order to explore their effect on astrocytes of zebrafish and potential risk for environment. Astrocytes were treated with varying concentrations of EPS-A, the results showed that EPS-A inhibited astrocytes growth in a dose-and time-dependent manner. With the concentrations of EPS-A increasing, the adherent ability of astrocytes decreased and the number of astrocytes floating in the culture medium increased. When treated with 2.35 µg/mL EPS-A, EPS-A induced cell cycle arrest and made the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and then led to astrocytes apoptosis. The results suggested that EPS-A could pose a threat to zebrafish and represent risk for environment, so regularly monitoring the presence of EPS-A was very important in nutrient-rich freshwaters when A. flos-aquae blooms broke out.

  1. Functional pharmacological evidence for EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors in immortalized human trabecular meshwork and non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, J Y; Sharif, N A

    2001-02-01

    The aim of these studies was to characterize the molecular pharmacology of the prostanoid receptors positively coupled to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in immortalized human trabecular meshwork (TM-3) cells and to compare these results with that of the receptors in immortalized human nonpigmented epithelial (NPE) cells. In general, the TM-3 and NPE cells showed a similar profile with respect to their responses to various prostaglandin (PG) receptor agonists. The rank order of potency (EC50; means +/- SEM) for these compounds in the TM-3 cells was: PGE2 (124 +/- 21 nM) > 13,14-dihydro-PGE1 (430 +/- 110 nM) = PGE1 (522 +/- 345 nM) > 11-deoxy-PGE1 (1063 +/- 118 nM) = 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 (1776 +/- 460 nM) = butaprost (1920 +/- 527 nM) > PGD2 = PGI2 = PGF2alpha (n = 3 - 12). While the agonist profile indicated the presence of EP2 receptors, the effects of the EP4 receptor antagonists suggested the additional expression of EP4 receptors in both of these cells. Thus, the EP4 receptor antagonist, AH23848B, at a concentration of 30 microM, caused a dextral shift in the PGE2 concentration-response curves in both TM-3 and NPE cells coupled with a 20-28% decrease in the maximal response of PGE2, indicating apparent noncompetitive antagonism profiles. The antagonist potency of AH23848B in these cells was: Kb = 38.4 +/- 14.8 microM and 23.5 +/- 4.5 microM; -log Kb = 4.7. The other EP4 receptor antagonist, AH22921 (-log Kb = 4.1 - 4.7), was weaker than AH23848B. Taken together, these pharmacological studies have shown than TM-3 and NPE cells apparently contain functional EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

  2. 聚苯乙烯泡沫(EPS)的特性及应用分析%Expanded Polystyrene(EPS) Geofoam: An Analysis to Characteristics and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜骋; 杨军

    2001-01-01

    聚苯乙烯泡沫(expanded polystyrene,简称EPS)是一种性能优良的路基轻质填料,具有轻质、高强、较强的化学稳定性和水稳定性、良好的力学性能且施工方便简单等优点,在国外道路工程中有较为广泛的应用.EPS能较圆满地解决软基的过度沉降和差异沉降以及桥台和道路相接处的差异沉降,减少桥台的侧向压力和位移等问题.我国对EPS的研究和应用较少,本文对EPS的物理化学性能、力学性能、EPS作为路基轻质填料的结构设计方法、EPS在道路工程中的应用等方面作了较为全面的介绍和分析,对我国使用EPS有借鉴作用.%Expanded polystyrene(EPS) is an excellent light filled material. EPS has a lot of good properties, such as light mass, high strength, good chemical stability, nice watery stability, wonderful mechanical properties and convenience in construction, which is widely used in road engineering in foreign countries. Utilizing EPS can decrease excessive subsidence and discrepant subsidence of soft subgrade, reduce lateral pressure and displacement of bridge pier, and so on. Less researches and applications of EPS have been carried out in China. Physical and chemical characteristics, mechanical properties, design method as a light filled material in subgrade and applications in road engineering of EPS are introduced and analyzed in the paper,which has consultative function of utilizing EPS in China.

  3. Prostaglandin E2 (EP) receptors mediate PGE2-specific events in ovulation and luteinization within primate ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon Ok; Harris, Siabhon M; Duffy, Diane M

    2014-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a key mediator of ovulation. All 4 PGE2 receptors (EP receptors) are expressed in the primate follicle, but the specific role of each EP receptor in ovulatory events is poorly understood. To examine the ovulatory events mediated via these EP receptors, preovulatory monkey follicles were injected with vehicle, the PG synthesis inhibitor indomethacin, or indomethacin plus PGE2. An ovulatory dose of human chorionic gonadotropin was administered; the injected ovary was collected 48 hours later and serially sectioned. Vehicle-injected follicles showed normal ovulatory events, including follicle rupture, absence of an oocyte, and thickening of the granulosa cell layer. Indomethacin-injected follicles did not rupture and contained oocytes surrounded by unexpanded cumulus; granulosa cell hypertrophy did not occur. Follicles injected with indomethacin plus PGE2 were similar to vehicle-injected ovaries, indicating that PGE2 restored the ovulatory changes inhibited by indomethacin. Additional follicles were injected with indomethacin plus an agonist for each EP receptor. EP1, EP2, and EP4 agonists each promoted aspects of follicle rupture, but no single EP agonist recapitulated normal follicle rupture as seen in follicles injected with either vehicle or indomethacin plus PGE2. Although EP4 agonist-injected follicles contained oocytes in unexpanded cumulus, the absence of oocytes in EP1 agonist- and EP2 agonist-injected follicles suggests that these EP receptors promote cumulus expansion. Surprisingly, the EP3 agonist did not stimulate any of these ovulatory changes, despite the high level of EP3 receptor expression in the monkey follicle. Therefore, agonists and antagonists selective for EP1 and EP2 receptors hold the most promise for control of ovulatory events in women.

  4. THE ECLIPSING SYSTEM EP ANDROMEDAE AND ITS CIRCUMBINARY COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius; Park, Jang-Ho, E-mail: jwlee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: tchinse@gmail.com, E-mail: pooh107162@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We present new long-term CCD photometry for EP And acquired during the period 2007-2012. The light curves display total eclipses at primary minima and season-to-season light variability. Our synthesis for all available light curves indicates that the eclipsing pair is a W-type overcontact binary with parameters of q = 2.578, i = 83. Degree-Sign 3, {Delta}T = 27 K, f = 28%, and l{sub 3} = 2%-3%. The asymmetric light curves in 2007 were satisfactorily modeled by a cool spot on either of the eclipsing components from a magnetic dynamo. Including our 95 timing measurements, a total of 414 times of minimum light spanning about 82 yr was used for a period study. A detailed analysis of the eclipse timing diagram revealed that the orbital period of EP And has varied as a combination of an upward-opening parabola and two periodic variations, with cycle lengths of P{sub 3} = 44.6 yr and P{sub 4} = 1.834 yr and semi-amplitudes of K{sub 3} = 0.0100 days and K{sub 4} = 0.0039 days, respectively. The observed period increase at a fractional rate of +1.39 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} is in excellent agreement with that calculated from the W-D code and can be plausibly explained by some combination of mass transfer from the primary to the secondary star and angular momentum loss due to magnetic braking. The most reasonable explanation for both cycles is a pair of light-travel-time effects driven by the possible existence of a third and fourth component with projected masses of M{sub 3} = 0.25 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 4} = 0.90 M{sub Sun }. The more massive companion could be revealed using high-resolution spectroscopic data extending over the course of a few years and could also be a binary itself. It is possible that the circumbinary objects may have played an important role in the formation and evolution of the eclipsing pair, which would cause it to have a short initial orbital period and thus evolve into an overcontact configuration by angular momentum loss.

  5. [A case report of early-onset Alzheimer's disease with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed as APPV717I mutation by genetic testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Takashi; Ochi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Yoshida, Taku; Abe, Masao; Toyota, Yasutaka; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to confirm a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) because patients sometimes have non-specific cortical features, such as psychiatric symptoms, executive functional impairment, and pyramidal symptoms, along with typical symptoms, such as recent memory impairment and disorientation. We encountered a patient with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed with EOAD on genetic testing. A right-handed sixty-year-old man, whose mother was suspected of having dementia, developed memory impairment at the age of fifty, disorientation at the age of fifty-six, and both visual hallucination and dressing apraxia at the age of fifty-nine. After admission to a psychiatric hospital for treatment, his symptoms disappeared with antipsychotic medication. However, his ADL were declining and so he was referred to our university hospital. He had frontal lobe symptoms, pyramidal signs, and extrapyramidal signs with severe dementia. Neuropsychological examinations were not possible because of sedation. On brain MRI, he showed diffuse atrophy of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. HMPO-SPECT showed hypoperfusion of cerebral cortices diffusely. We decided to perform genetic testing because he had both family and alcohol abuse histories. He showed EOAD with V717I mutation of the amyloid precursor protein gene. After the discontinuation of antipsychotics, excessive sedation and extrapyramidal signs disappeared. A dose of 10 mg of donepezil was effective to improve motivation and activity, and his mini mental examination score was calculable after recovery. The case supports usefulness of applying genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease to patients with early onset dementia, even when they do not have a family history.

  6. EpCAM-selective elimination of carcinoma cells by a novel MAP-based cytolytic fusion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Amoury, Manal; Mladenov, Radoslav; Niesen, Judith; Arens, Katharina; Berges, Nina; Hein, Lea; di Fiore, Stefano; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Huhn, Michael; Helfrich, Wijnand; Fischer, Rainer; Thepen, Theo; Barth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In normal epithelia, the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression is relatively low and only present at the basolateral cell surface. In contrast, EpCAM is aberrantly overexpressed in various human carcinomas. Therefore, EpCAM is considered to be a highly promising target for antibody-ba

  7. Decreased RORC-dependent silencing of prostaglandin receptor EP2 induces autoimmune Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, David M; Marson, Alexander; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Xiao, Sheng; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Hafler, David A

    2014-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes Th17 expansion while otherwise inhibiting other CD4+ T cell subsets. Here, we identified a PGE2-dependent pathway that induces pathogenic Th17 cells in autoimmune disease and is regulated by the transcription factor RORC. Compared with other CD4+ cell types from healthy subjects, there is a surprising lack of the prostaglandin receptor EP2 on Th17 cells; therefore, we examined the hypothesis that RORγt, which is highly expressed in Th17 cells, mediates EP2 downregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing revealed that RORγt binds directly to Ptger2 (the gene encoding EP2 receptor) in Th17 cells isolated from WT mice. In Th17 cells isolated from humans, RORC repressed EP2 by directly silencing PTGER2 transcription, and knock down of RORC restored EP2 expression in Th17 cells. Compared with Th17 cells from healthy individuals, Th17 cells from patients with MS exhibited reduced RORC binding to the PTGER2 promoter region, resulting in higher EP2 levels and increased expression of IFN-γ and GM-CSF. Finally, overexpression of EP2 in Th17 cells from healthy individuals induced a specific program of inflammatory gene transcription that produced a pathogenic Th17 cell phenotype. These findings reveal that RORC directly regulates the effects of PGE2 on Th17 cells, and dysfunction of this pathway induces a pathogenic Th17 cell phenotype.

  8. The role of PGE2 receptor EP4 in pathologic ocular angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanni, Susan E; Barnett, Joshua M; Clark, Monika L; Penn, John S

    2009-11-01

    PGE(2) binds to PGE(2) receptors (EP(1-4)). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of the EP(4) receptor in angiogenic cell behaviors of retinal Müller cells and retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) and to assess the efficacy of an EP(4) antagonist in rat models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (LCNV). Müller cells derived from COX-2-null mice were treated with increasing concentrations of the EP(4) agonist PGE(1)-OH, and wild-type Müller cells were treated with increasing concentrations of the EP(4) antagonist L-161982; VEGF production was assessed. Human RMECs (HRMECs) were treated with increasing concentrations of L-161982, and cell proliferation and tube formation were assessed. Rats subjected to OIR or LCNV were administered L-161982, and the neovascular area was measured. COX-2-null mouse Müller cells treated with increasing concentrations of PGE(1)-OH demonstrated a significant increase in VEGF production (P EP(4) activation or inhibition influences the behaviors of two retinal cell types known to play roles in pathologic ocular angiogenesis. These findings suggest that the EP(4) receptor may be a valuable therapeutic target in neovascular eye disease.

  9. PGE2 promotes angiogenesis through EP4 and PKA Cγ pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yushan

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is increasingly recognized as a critical mediator of angiogenesis, and unregulated angiogenic response is involved in human diseases, including cancer. Proinflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is secreted by many cell types and plays important roles in the process of angiogenesis via activation of cognate EP1-4 receptors. Here, we provide evidence that PGE2 promotes the in vitro tube formation of human microvascular endothelial cells, ex vivo vessel outgrowth of aortic rings, and actual in vivo angiogenesis. Use of EP subtype-selective agonists and antagonists suggested EP4 mediates the prostaglandin-induced tube formation, and this conclusion was substantiated with small interfering RNA to specifically knockdown the EP4 expression. EP4 couples to Gαs, leading to activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of PKA activity or knockdown of PKA catalytic subunit γ with RNAi attenuates the PGE2-induced tube formation. Further, knocking down the expression of Rap1A, HSPB6, or endothelial NO synthase, which serve as PKA-activatable substrates, inhibits the tube formation, whereas knockdown of RhoA or glycogen synthase kinase 3β that are inactivated after phosphorylation by PKA increases the tube formation. These results support the existence of EP4-to-PKA angiogenic signal and provide rationale for use of selective EP4 signal inhibitors as a probable strategy to control pathologic angiogenesis. PMID:21926356

  10. Cloning and expression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 1 (ep 1 ) in Bostrichthys sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiao Jian; Hong, Wan Shu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yu Ting; Chen, Shi Xi

    2014-08-01

    Our previous studies suggested that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a putative sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. We found immunoreactivities of PGE2 receptor subtypes (Ep1-3) expressed in the olfactory sac, but only Ep1 presented higher density of immunoreactivity in mature fish than that in immature fish in both sexes. To gain a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism for the detection of PGE2 in the olfactory system, we cloned an ep 1 cDNA from the adult olfactory sac. The open-reading frame of the ep 1 consisted of 1,134-bp nucleotides that encoded a 378-amino acid-long protein with a seven-transmembrane domain, typical for the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily. Expression of ep 1 mRNA was observed in all tissues examined, with higher levels obtained in the olfactory sacs and testes. The expression of ep 1 mRNA in the olfactory sacs and gonads was significantly higher in both sexes of mature fish than in those of immature ones. Taken together, our results suggested that Ep1, which is highly expressed in the olfactory sacs and gonads of mature fish, is important for the control of reproduction and may be involved in PGE2-initiated spawning behavior in B. sinensis.

  11. STXM and NanoSIMS investigations on EPS fractions before and after adsorption to goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinran; Eusterhues, Karin; Thieme, Jürgen; Ciobota, Valerian; Höschen, Carmen; Mueller, Carsten W; Küsel, Kirsten; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Totsche, Kai U

    2013-04-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are expected to be an important source for the formation of mineral-organic associations in soil. Because such formations affect the composition of mobile and immobile organic matter as well as the reactivity of minerals, we investigated the composition of EPS before and after adsorption to goethite. Raman measurements on EPS extracted from Bacillus subtilis distinguished four fractions rich in proteins, polysaccharides, lipids, or lipids and proteins. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy identified three different EPS-fractions that varied in their composition in proteins, nonaromatic proteins, and polysaccharides. Reaction of EPS with goethite led to a preferential adsorption of lipids and proteins. The organic coverage was heterogeneous, consisting of ~100 × 200 nm large patches of either lipid-rich or protein-rich material. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry showed a strong S enrichment in aggregates of ~400 nm in the goethite adsorbed EPS. From our simplified model system, we learned that only a small portion (<10%) of EPS was immobilized via adsorption to goethite. This fraction formed a coating of subμm spaced protein-rich and lipid-rich domains, i.e., of two materials which will strongly differ in their reactive sites. This will finally affect further adsorption, the particle mobility and eventually also colloidal stability.

  12. Endogenous prostaglandin E2 amplifies IL-33 production by macrophages through an E prostanoid (EP)2/EP4-cAMP-EPAC-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuchiwal, Sachin K; Balestrieri, Barbara; Raff, Hannah; Boyce, Joshua A

    2017-05-19

    When activated through toll-like receptors (TLRs), macrophages generate IL-33, an IL-1 family member that induces innate immune responses through ST2 signaling. LPS, a TLR4 ligand, induces macrophages to generate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) through inducible COX-2 and microsomal PGE2 synthase 1 (mPGES-1) (1). We demonstrate that IL-33 production by bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (bmMFs) requires the generation of endogenous PGE2 and the intrinsic expression of EP2 receptors to amplify NF-κB-dependent, LPS-induced IL-33 expression via exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC). Compared with WT cells, bmMFs lacking either mPGES-1 or EP2 receptors displayed reduced LPS-induced IL-33 levels. A selective EP2 agonist and, to a lesser extent, EP4 receptor agonist potentiated LPS-induced IL-33 generation from both mPGES-1-null and WT bmMFs, whereas EP1 and EP3 receptor agonists were inactive. The effects of PGE2 depended on cAMP, were mimicked by an EPAC-selective agonist, and were attenuated by EPAC-selective antagonism and knockdown. LPS-induced p38 MAPK and NF-κB activations were necessary for both IL-33 production and PGE2 generation, and exogenous PGE2 partly reversed the suppression of IL-33 production caused by p38 MAPK and NF-κB inhibition. Mice lacking mPGES-1 showed lower IL-33 levels and attenuated lung inflammation in response to repetitive Alternaria inhalation challenges. Cumulatively, our data demonstrate that endogenous PGE2, EP2 receptors, and EPAC are prerequisites for maximal LPS-induced IL-33 expression and that exogenous PGE2 can amplify IL-33 production via EP2 and EP4 receptors. The ubiquitous induction of mPGES-1-dependent PGE2 may be crucial for innate immune system activation during various IL-33 driven pathologic disorders. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Symptoms, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... without any pain. Photo courtesy of NEI Glaucoma Symptoms At first, open-angle glaucoma has no symptoms. ...

  14. Symptoms and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Differential Disorders Frequently Asked Questions Glossary Downloadable Publications Symptoms and Diagnosis If you are new to dystonia, it can ... be accounted for: ► The age at which the symptoms started. The age at which symptoms begin is ...

  15. The Prostaglandin EP3 Receptor Is an Independent Negative Prognostic Factor for Cervical Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Helene; Dietlmeier, Sebastian; Kuhn, Christina; Vattai, Aurelia; Aberl, Caroline; Mahner, Sven; Kost, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    We know that one of the main risk factors for cervical cancer is an infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Prostaglandins and their receptors are very important for the tumour growth and tumour-associated angiogenesis. Little is known about the expression of the Prostaglandin E receptor type 3 (EP3) or the Prostaglandin (PG)E2-EP3 signalling in cervical cancer, so the aim of the study was to analyse the expression of the EP3 receptor in cervical cancer and find prognostic factors in relation to survival; EP3 immunohistological staining of 250 cervical cancer slides was performed and analysed with a semi-quantitative score. The statistical evaluation was performed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to evaluate the staining results and the survival analyses of the cervical cancer cases. A significant difference was observed in EP3 expression in Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d’Obstétrique (FIGO) stadium I versus FIGO stadium II–IV cases. High expression of EP3 (IRS ≥ 1.5) in cervical cancer patients was correlated with poor prognosis in overall survival rates. Survival in adenocarcinoma (AC) of the cervix was lower than in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Cox regression analysis shows that EP3 is an independent prognosticator. In this study we could show that the membrane-bound prostaglandin receptor EP3 is an independent prognosticator for cervical cancer patient survival. Targeting the EP3 receptor seems to be an interesting candidate for endocrine therapy. Therefore, more research is needed on the influence of the receptor system and its influence on cervical cancer growth. PMID:28753926

  16. EP2 receptor mediates PGE2-induced cystogenesis of human renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberg, Gerard; Elberg, Dorit; Lewis, Teresa V; Guruswamy, Suresh; Chen, Lijuan; Logan, Charlotte J; Chan, Michael D; Turman, Martin A

    2007-11-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by formation of cysts from tubular epithelial cells. Previous studies indicate that secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into cyst fluid and production of cAMP underlie cyst expansion. However, the mechanism by which PGE2 directly stimulates cAMP formation and modulates cystogenesis is still unclear, because the particular E-prostanoid (EP) receptor mediating the PGE2 effect has not been characterized. Our goal is to define the PGE2 receptor subtype involved in ADPKD. We used a three-dimensional cell-culture system of human epithelial cells from normal and ADPKD kidneys in primary cultures to demonstrate that PGE2 induces cyst formation. Biochemical evidence gathered by using real-time RT-PCR mRNA analysis and immunodetection indicate the presence of EP2 receptor in cystic epithelial cells in ADPKD kidney. Pharmacological evidence obtained by using PGE2-selective analogs further demonstrates that EP2 mediates cAMP formation and cystogenesis. Functional evidence for a role of EP2 receptor in mediating cAMP signaling was also provided by inhibiting EP2 receptor expression with transfection of small interfering RNA in cystic epithelial cells. Our results indicate that PGE2 produced in cyst fluid binds to adjacent EP2 receptors located on the apical side of cysts and stimulates EP2 receptor expression. PGE2 binding to EP2 receptor leads to cAMP signaling and cystogenesis by a mechanism that involves protection of cystic epithelial cells from apoptosis. The role of EP2 receptor in mediating the PGE2 effect on stimulating cyst formation may have direct pharmacological implications for the treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  17. Human mast cells express multiple EP receptors for prostaglandin E2 that differentially modulate activation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunli; Beller, Elizabeth M; Bagga, Savita; Boyce, Joshua A

    2006-04-15

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) blocks mast-cell (MC)-dependent allergic responses in humans but activates MCs in vitro. We assessed the functions of the EP receptors for PGE2 on cultured human MCs (hMCs). hMCs expressed the EP3, EP2, and EP4 receptors. PGE2 stimulated the accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and suppressed both Fc epsilonRI-mediated eicosanoid production and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generation. PGE2 also caused phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), exocytosis, and production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), as well as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) when protein kinase A (PKA) was inhibited. An EP3 receptor-selective agonist, AE-248, mimicked PGE2-mediated ERK phosphorylation, exocytosis, and eicosanoid formation. Selective agonists of both EP2 and EP4 receptors (AE1-259-01 and AE-329, respectively) stimulated cAMP accumulation. No selective agonist, alone or in combination, was as effective as PGE2. AE-248, AE1-259-01, and AE-329 all inhibited Fc epsilonRI-mediated TNF-alpha generation, while AE1-259-01 blocked eicosanoid production. PGE2 caused the expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) by a pathway involving PKA and ERK. Thus, while PGE2 activates MCs through EP3 receptors, it also counteracts Fc epsilonRI-mediated eicosanoid production through EP2 receptors and PKA, and blocks cytokine transcription. These functions explain the potency of PGE2 as a suppressor of early- and late-phase allergic responses.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 promotes proliferation of skeletal muscle myoblasts via EP4 receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chenglin; Zhao, Ruonan; Vallejo, Julian; Igwe, Orisa; Bonewald, Lynda; Wetmore, Lori; Brotto, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that conditioned media (CM) from osteocytes enhances myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, suggesting that signaling from bone may be important for skeletal muscle myogenesis. The effect of CM was closely mimicked by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a bioactive lipid mediator in various physiological or pathological conditions. PGE2 is secreted at high levels by osteocytes and such secretion is further enhanced under loading conditions. Although four types of receptors, EP1 to EP4, mediate PGE2 signaling, it is unknown whether these receptors play a role in myogenesis. Therefore, in this study, the expression of EPs in mouse primary myoblasts was characterized, followed by examination of their roles in myoblast proliferation by treating myoblasts with PGE2 or specific agonists. All four PGE2 receptor mRNAs were detectable by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but only PGE2 and EP4 agonist CAY 10598 significantly enhance myoblast proliferation. EP1/EP3 agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (17-PT PGE2) and EP2 agonist butaprost did not have any significant effects. Moreover, treatment with EP4 antagonist L161,982 dose-dependently inhibited myoblast proliferation. These results were confirmed by cell cycle analysis and the gene expression of cell cycle regulators. Concomitant with the inhibition of myoblast proliferation, treatment with L161,982 significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Cotreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or sodium ascorbate (SA) successfully reversed the inhibition of myoblast proliferation and ROS overproduction caused by L161,982. Therefore, PGE2 signaling via the EP4 receptor regulates myogenesis by promoting myoblast proliferation and blocking this receptor results in increased ROS production in myoblasts. PMID:25785867

  19. Heavy flavor production at high energy ep colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, M.; Godbole; Reya, E.

    1988-09-01

    The total production rates for heavy quark pairs due to gauge boson fusion processes at high energy ep colliders are evaluated. At HERA, b bar t production dominates over t bar t production for m t ≧60 GeV and is observable up to m t ≃80(90)GeV where the number of expected b bar t events is about 15(10) for ∝ L=200pb-1. Including the contributions from ep→ WX→ btX the total number of expected bt events amounts to about 50 events for m t ≃80GeV. The influence of thresholds for heavy quark pair production is also studied for the relevant structure functions F i (x,Q 2) and shown to contribute to the measured scaling violations. All these effects are sensitive to the heavy quark masses and to the shape of the gluon distribution which can thus be tested experimentally by analyzing heavy quark pair signals.

  20. Diffractive Dijet Photoproduction in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb^-1. The events are of the type ep -> eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x_gamma of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models.

  1. GRB cosmology through the Ep,i-intensity correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, L.; Sawant, D. S.; Della Valle, M.

    Despite they are not standard candles, the investigation of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) as a tool for measuring the geometry and expansion rate of the Universe is strongly motivated by their unique combination of huge luminosity, up to more than 10/53 erg/s, with a redshift distribution extending up to more than z = 9. In recent years, several attempts to exploit the correlation between the photon energy at which the vFv spec- trum peaks (peak energy) and the radiated energy (or luminosity) for standardizing GRBs and using them to estimate cosmological parameters have been made. These studies show that already with the present data-set, GRBs can provide a significant and independent confirmation of ΛM ˜ 0.3 for a flat ΛCDM. The investigation of the correlation of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion of and accuracy for estimating ΛM further confirms its reliability and effectiveness for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology. Current (e.g., Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming GRB experiments (e.g., CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO) will allow us to constrain ΛM with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.

  2. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-09-15

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb{sup -1}. The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}, 0.207.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<{eta}{sup jet}<1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton. (orig.)

  3. Leading neutron production in $e^{+}p$ collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Pellegrino, A; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Crittenden, J; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kerger, R; Kind, O; Paul, E; Rautenberg, J; Renner, R; Schnurbusch, H; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Weber, A; Bailey, D S; Brook, N H; Cole, J E; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Wing, M; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Helbich, M; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Paganis, S; Schmidke, W B; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Olkiewicz, K; Przybycien, M B; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Bednarek, B; Grabowska-Bold, I; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, T; Mindur, B; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Chiochia, V; Dannheim, D; Derrick, M; Drews, G; Fourletova, J; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Geiser, A; Göbel, F; Göttlicher, P; Gutsche, O; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hillert, S; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labes, H; Lelas, D; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Martínez, M; Moritz, M; Notz, D; Pellmann, I A; Petrucci, M C; Polini, A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Surrow, B; Wessoleck, H; Wichmann, R; Wolf, G; Young--, C; Zeuner, W; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Benen, A; Coppola, N; Markun, P; Raach, H; Wölfle, S; Bell, M; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Glasman, C; Hanlon, S; Lee, S W; Lupi, A; McCance, G J; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Bodmann, B; Carli, T; Holm, U; Klimek, K; Krumnack, N; Lohrmann, E; Milite, M; Salehi, H; Stonjek, S; Wick, K; Ziegler, A; Collins-Tooth, C; Foudas, C; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Metlica, F; Miller, D B; Tapper, A D; Walker, R; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Kuze, M; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Lim, H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Redondo, I; Terron, J; Vázquez, M; Barbi, M; Bertolin, A; Corriveau, F; Ochs, A; Padhi, S; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Bashkirov, V; Danilov, P; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Bokel, C; Engelen, J; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Maddox, E; Schagen, S; Tassi, E; Tiecke, H G; Tuning, N; Velthuis, J J; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Kim, C L; Ling, T Y; Boogert, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Ferrando, J; Grzelak, G; Matsushita, T; Rigby, M; Ruske, O; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Parenti, A; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Adamczyk, L; Heaphy, E A; Oh, B Y; Saull, P R B; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cormack, C; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Heusch, C A; Park, I H; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Dagan, S; Gabareen, A; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Kohno, T; Umemori, K; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Matsuzawa, K; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Cartiglia, N; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Maselli, S; Monaco, V; Peroni, C; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Fagerstroem, C P; Galea, R; Koop, T; Martin, J F; Mirea, A; Sabetfakhri, A; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Hall-Wilton, R; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; Lightwood, M S; Loizides, J H; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Smalska, B; Sztuk, J; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Zakrzewski, J A; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Gladilin, L K; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Kcira, D; Lammers, S; Li, L; Reeder, D D; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Deshpande, Abhay A; Dhawan, S; Hughes, V W; Straub, P B; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Fourletov, S; Khakzad, M; Menary, S R; Soares, M; Standage, J

    2002-01-01

    The production of neutrons carrying at least 20% of the proton beam energy ($\\xl > 0.2$) in $e^+p$ collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for a wide range of $Q^2$, the photon virtuality, from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. The neutron-tagged cross section, $e p\\to e' X n$, is measured relative to the inclusive cross section, $e p\\to e' X$, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties. For $\\xl >$ 0.3, the rate of neutrons in photoproduction is about half of that measured in hadroproduction, which constitutes a clear breaking of factorisation. There is about a 20% rise in the neutron rate between photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering, which may be attributed to absorptive rescattering in the $\\gamma p$ system. For $0.64 < \\xl < 0.82$, the rate of neutrons is almost independent of the Bjorken scaling variable $x$ and $Q^2$. However, at lower and higher $\\xl$ values, there is a clear but weak dependence on these variables, thus demonstrating the breaking of limi...

  4. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-03-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  5. The axisymmetric envelopes of RS Cnc and EP Aqr

    CERN Document Server

    Bertre, T Le; Nhung, P T; Winters, J M

    2016-01-01

    We report on observations obtained at IRAM on two semi-regular variable Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, RS Cnc and EP Aqr, undergoing mass loss at an intermediate rate of ~ 10^-7 solar mass per year. Interferometric data obtained with the Plateau-de-Bure interferometer (NOEMA) have been combined with On-The-Fly maps obtained with the 30-m telescope in the CO(1-0) and (2-1) rotational lines. The spectral maps of spatially resolved sources reveal an axisymmetric morphology in which matter is flowing out at a low velocity (~ 2 km/s) in the equatorial planes, and at a larger velocity (~ 8 km/s) along the polar axes. There are indications that this kind of morpho-kinematics is relatively frequent among stars at the beginning of their evolution on the Thermally-Pulsing AGB, in particular among those that show composite CO line profiles, and that it might be caused by the presence of a companion. We discuss the progress that could be expected for our understanding of the mass loss mechanisms in this kind of sou...

  6. Cancer-associated immunodeficiency and dendritic cell abnormalities mediated by the prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Li YANG; Yamagata, Noboru; Yadav, Rajwardhan; Brandon, Suzanne; Courtney, Regina L.; Morrow, Jason D.; Shyr, Yu; Boothby, Mark; Joyce,Sebastian; Carbone, David P.; Breyer, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major COX metabolite, plays important roles in several facets of tumor biology. We characterized the contribution of the PGE2 EP2 receptor to cancer-associated immune deficiency using EP2–/– mice. EP2–/– mice exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth and longer survival times when challenged with MC26 or Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines as compared with their wild-type littermates. While no differences in T cell function were observed, PGE2 suppressed different...

  7. Contributions to integral nuclear data in ICSBEP and IRPhEP since ND2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bess John D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP was last discussed directly with the international nuclear data community at ND2013. Since ND2013, integral benchmark data that are available for nuclear data testing has continued to increase. The status of the international benchmark efforts and the latest contributions to integral nuclear data for testing is discussed. Measurements found in the IRPhEP Handbook offer additional means to support integral nuclear data validation. Select benchmark configurations that have been added to the ICSBEP and IRPhEP Handbooks since ND2013 are highlighted.

  8. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  9. A Preliminary Measurement of the Left-Right Parity-Violating ep Asymmetry at E158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesiada, J.

    2005-04-11

    This thesis investigates the parity-violating ep asymmetry based on the Run I data produced in Spring of 2002 by the E158 experiment, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main scientific objective of the experiment is the precision measurement of the weak mixing angle of the Standard Model. The ep asymmetry is an important background in the experiment and theoretically interesting in its own right, providing insights into the structure of the proton. The analysis centers upon identifying systematic error and consistency. The definite measurement of the ep asymmetry will await the final reprocessing of the data set during the Fall of 2002.

  10. The anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 on human lung macrophages are mediated by the EP4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Yao, Yiwen; Kay, Linda J; Bewley, Martin A; Marriott, Helen M; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-11-01

    PGE2 inhibits cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. However, the EP receptor that mediates this beneficial anti-inflammatory effect of PGE2 has not been defined. The aim of this study was to identify the EP receptor by which PGE2 inhibits cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. This was determined by using recently developed EP receptor ligands. The effects of PGE2 and EP-selective agonists on LPS-induced generation of TNF-α and IL-6 from macrophages were evaluated. The effects of EP2 -selective (PF-04852946, PF-04418948) and EP4 -selective (L-161,982, CJ-042794) receptor antagonists on PGE2 responses were studied. The expression of EP receptor subtypes by human lung macrophages was determined by RT-PCR. PGE2 inhibited LPS-induced and Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. Analysis of mRNA levels indicated that macrophages expressed EP2 and EP4 receptors. L-902,688 (EP4 receptor-selective agonist) was considerably more potent than butaprost (EP2 receptor-selective agonist) as an inhibitor of TNF-α generation from macrophages. EP2 receptor-selective antagonists had marginal effects on the PGE2 inhibition of TNF-α generation, whereas EP4 receptor-selective antagonists caused rightward shifts in the PGE2 concentration-response curves. These studies demonstrate that the EP4 receptor is the principal receptor that mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 on human lung macrophages. This suggests that EP4 receptor agonists could be effective anti-inflammatory agents in human lung disease. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  12. alpha-conotoxin EpI, a novel sulfated peptide from Conus episcopatus that selectively targets neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, M; Bond, T; Atkins, A; Cuevas, J; Adams, D J; Broxton, N M; Livett, B G; Down, J G; Jones, A; Alewood, P F; Lewis, R J

    1998-06-19

    We have isolated and characterized alpha-conotoxin EpI, a novel sulfated peptide from the venom of the molluscivorous snail, Conus episcopatus. The peptide was classified as an alpha-conotoxin based on sequence, disulfide connectivity, and pharmacological target. EpI has homology to sequences of previously described alpha-conotoxins, particularly PnIA, PnIB, and ImI. However, EpI differs from previously reported conotoxins in that it has a sulfotyrosine residue, identified by amino acid analysis and mass spectrometry. Native EpI was shown to coelute with synthetic EpI. The peptide sequence is consistent with most, but not all, recognized criteria for predicting tyrosine sulfation sites in proteins and peptides. The activities of synthetic EpI and its unsulfated analogue [Tyr15]EpI were similar. Both peptides caused competitive inhibition of nicotine action on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors) but had no effect on the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (muscle nicotinic ACh receptors). Both EpI and [Tyr15]EpI partly inhibited acetylcholine-evoked currents in isolated parasympathetic neurons of rat intracardiac ganglia. These results indicate that EpI and [Tyr15]EpI selectively inhibit alpha3beta2 and alpha3 beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  13. Role of prostaglandin receptor EP2 in the regulations of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-02-01

    Population studies, preclinical, and clinical trials suggest a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, PTGS2) in tumor formation and progression. The downstream prostanoid receptor signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis are poorly understood, although prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)), a major COX-2 metabolite which is usually upregulated in the involved tissues, presumably plays important roles in tumor biology. Taking advantage of our recently identified novel selective antagonist for the EP2 (PTGER2) subtype of PGE(2) receptor, we demonstrated that EP2 receptor activation could promote prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in vitro, accompanied by upregulation of the tumor-promoting inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-6. Our results suggest the involvement of prostaglandin receptor EP2 in cancer cell proliferation and invasion possibly via its inflammatory actions, and indicate that selective blockade of the PGE(2)-EP2 signaling pathway via small molecule antagonists might represent a novel therapy for tumorigenesis.

  14. Quick stimulation of Alcanivorax sp. by bioemulsificant EPS2003 on microcosm oil spill simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cappello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill microcosms experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of bioemulsificant exopolysaccharide (EPS2003 on quick stimulation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Early hours of oil spill, were stimulated using an experimental seawater microcosm, supplemented with crude oil and EPS2003 (SW+OIL+EPS2003; this system was monitored for 2 days and compared to control microcosm (only oil-polluted seawater, SW+OIL. Determination of bacterial abundance, heterotrophic cultivable and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were carried out. Community composition of marine bacterioplankton was determined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Data obtained indicated that bioemulsificant addition stimulated an increase of total bacterial abundance and, in particular, selection of bacteria related to Alcanivorax genus; confirming that EPS2003 could be used for the dispersion of oil slicks and could stimulate the selection of marine hydrocarbon degraders thus increasing bioremediation process.

  15. A Precision Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U.; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wallny, R; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive deep-inelastic neutral current e+p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12<=Q^2<=150 GeV^2, and Bjorken x, 2x10^-4<=x<=0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E_e=27.6 GeV and E_p=920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E_p=820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data.

  16. Nuclear PDFs at NLO - status report and review of the EPS09 results

    CERN Document Server

    Eskola, K J; Salgado, C A

    2010-01-01

    We review the current status of the global DGLAP analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions, nPDFs, focusing on the recent EPS09 analysis, whose output, EPS09NLO, is the best-constrained NLO nPDF set on the market. Collinear factorization is found to work very well in the kinematical region studied. With the error sets released in the EPS09 package one can compute how the nPDF-related uncertainties propagate into factorizable nuclear hard-process cross sections. A comparison with the other existing NLO nPDF sets is shown, and the BRAHMS forward-$\\eta$ hadron data from d+Au collisions are discussed in the light of the EPS09 nPDFs and their error sets.

  17. TOMS/EP UV Aerosol Index Daily and Monthly Zonal Means V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/EP UV Aerosol Index Daily and Monthly Zonal Means Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this Level-3 Earth Probe TOMS...

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is required for ligand-regulated, but not constitutive, endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Confalonieri, S; Salcini, A E; Puri, C;

    2000-01-01

    for endocytosis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the prototypical ligand-inducible receptor, but not of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical constitutively internalized receptor. Eps15, an endocytic protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated by EGFR, is a candidate for such a function...... of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. A phosphopeptide, corresponding to the phosphorylated sequence of Eps15, inhibited EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that phosphotyrosine in Eps15 serves as a docking site for a phosphotyrosine binding protein. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 represents the first molecular...... determinant, other than those contained in the receptors themselves, which is involved in the differential regulation of constitutive vs. regulated endocytosis....

  19. Fire safety of EPS insulated facades in residential multi-storey buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkola Esko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Effect of EPS ETICS system on fire safety has been studied by using fire safety engineering methods for residential multi-storey buildings up to eight floors. The probabilities of fire spread to apartments above the room-of-fire-origin were assessed by calculating heat exposures and consequences caused by the external flaming both for the EPS ETICS facade and for facade made of at least A2-s1, d0 materials. Concerning consequences for life safety, the fire death probability for EPS ETICS system was found to be within tolerable limits of F-N-curve which illustrates the probability of an event and consequences in terms of number of deaths. Special concern should be paid to fire safety during installation phase when EPS is unprotected without reinforced rendering.

  20. EP-toxicity test of saturated GT-73 resin and resin in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, J.P.

    1985-04-24

    The results of EP-toxicity tests on mercury saturated Duolite{reg_sign} GT-73 cation exchange resin clarify options for the ultimate disposal of spent resin. Samples of GT-73 saturated with mercury passed the EP-toxicity test, indicating that fully spent resin may be classifed as ``solid``-not``hazardous``-waste and stored or disposed-of as such. Samples of GT-73 resin saturated with mercury and then incorporated into Portland Type 1 cement did not pass the EP-toxicity test and fall into the ``hazardous waste`` category. Samples of GT-73 resin less-than-saturated with mercury which were in corporated in Portland Type 1 cement passed the EP-toxicity test and may be classified as ``solid waste.`` Other commercially available materials are being investigated for incorporating fully spent GT-73 resin in a solid waste form.

  1. Added economic value of limited area multi-EPS weather forecasting applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Deckmyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We compare the GLAMEPS system, a pan-European limited area ensemble prediction system, with ECMWF's EPS over Belgium for an extended period from March 2010 until the end of December 2010. In agreement with a previous study, we find GLAMEPS scores considerably better than ECMWF's EPS. To compute the economic value, we introduce a new relative economic value score for continuous forecasts. The added value of combining the GLAMEPS system with the LAEF system over Belgium is studied. We conclude that adding LAEF to GLAMEPS increases the value, although the increase is small compared to the improvement of GLAMEPS to ECMWF's EPS. As an added benefit we find that the combined GLAMEPS-LAEF multi-EPS system is more robust, that is, it is less vulnerable to the (accidental removal of one of its components.

  2. Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aggarwal, R; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Arslan, O; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Bachynska, O; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartosik, N; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Behrens, U; Bellagamba, L; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bindi, M; Blohm, C; Bokhonov, V; Bołd, T; Bondarenko, K; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Bot, D; Brock, I; Brownson, E; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brzozowska, B; Bussey, P J; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; D'Agostini, G; Corso, F Dal; del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; De Pasquale, S; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Dolinska, G; Doyle, A T; Drugakov, V; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, A; Fang, S; Fazio, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Gach, G; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gialas, I; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gogota, O; Golubkov, Yu A; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bołd, I; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Grigorescu, G; Grzelak, G; Gueta, O; Guzik, M; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hilger, E; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Hüttmann, A; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ingbir, R; Ishitsuka, M; Jakob, H -P; Januschek, F; Jones, T W; Jüngst, M; Kadenko, I; Kahle, B; Kananov, S; Kanno, T; Karshon, U; Karstens, F; Katkov, I I; Kaur, M; Kaur, P; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Koffeman, E; Kondrashova, N; Kononenko, O; Kooijman, P; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I A; Kotański, A; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Lee, A; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Libov, V; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, O Yu; Maeda, J; Magill, S; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Mattingly, M C K; Melzer-Pellmann, I -A; Mergelmeyer, S; Miglioranzi, S; Idris, F Mohamad; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Morris, J D; Mujkic, K; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nobe, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Okazaki, N; Olkiewicz, K; Onishchuk, Yu; Papageorgiu, K; Parenti, A; Paul, E; Pawlak, J M; Pawlik, B; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Perlański, W; Perrey, H; Piotrzkowski, K; Pluciński, P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycień, M; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Reisert, B; Ren, Z; Repond, J; Ri, Y D; Robertson, A; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Samson, U; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schönberg, V; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schwartz, J; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Shehzadi, R; Shimizu, S; Singh, I; Skillicorn, I O; Słomiński, W; Smith, W H; Sola, V; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stewart, T P; Stifutkin, A; Stopa, P; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tapper, A D; Tassi, E; Terrón, J; Theedt, T; Tiecke, H; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Trusov, V; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Vázquez, M; Verbytskyi, A; Viazlo, O; Vlasov, N N; Walczak, R; Abdullah, W A T Wan; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, K; Wiggers, L; Wing, M; Wlasenko, M; Wolf, G; Wolfe, H; Wrona, K; Yagües-Molina, A G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zabiegalov, O; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zhmak, N; Zichichi, A; Zolkapli, Z; Zotkin, D S

    2012-01-01

    The production of Z0 bosons in the reaction ep -> eZ0p*, where p* stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb-1 of integrated luminosity. The Z0 was measured in the hadronic decay mode. The elasticity of the events was ensured by a cut on eta_max eZ0p* was measured to be sigma(ep -> eZ0p*) = 0.13 +/- 0.06 (stat.) +/- 0.01 (syst.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of 0.16 pb. This is the first measurement of Z0 production in ep collisions.

  3. Characterization of the EP receptor subtype that mediates the inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on IgE-dependent secretion from human lung mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, L J; Gilbert, M; Pullen, N; Skerratt, S; Farrington, J; Seward, E P; Peachell, P T

    2013-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) has been shown to inhibit IgE-dependent histamine release from human lung mast cells. This effect of PGE2 is believed to be mediated by EP2 receptors. However, definitive evidence that this is the case has been lacking in the absence of EP2 -selective antagonists. Moreover, recent evidence has suggested that PGE2 activates EP4 receptors to inhibit respiratory cell function. The aim of this study was to determine the receptor by which PGE2 inhibits human lung mast cell responses by using recently developed potent and selective EP2 and EP4 receptor antagonists alongside other established EP receptor ligands. The effects of non-selective (PGE2 , misoprostol), EP2 -selective (ONO-AE1-259, AH13205, butaprost-free acid) and EP4 -selective (L-902,688, TCS251) agonists on IgE-dependent histamine release and cyclic-AMP generation in mast cells were determined. The effects of EP2 -selective (PF-04418948, PF-04852946) and EP4 -selective (CJ-042794, L-161,982) antagonists on PGE2 responses of mast cells were studied. The expression of EP receptor subtypes was determined by RT-PCR. Prostaglandin E2 , EP2 agonists and EP4 agonists inhibited IgE-dependent histamine release from mast cells. PGE2 and EP2 agonists, but not EP4 agonists, increased cyclic-AMP levels in mast cells. EP4 -selective antagonists did not affect the PGE2 inhibition of histamine release, whereas EP2 -selective antagonists caused rightward shifts in the PGE2 concentration-response curves. RT-PCR studies indicated that mast cells expressed EP2 and EP4 receptors. Although human lung mast cells may express both EP2 and EP4 receptors, the principal mechanism by which PGE2 inhibits mediator release in mast cells is by activating EP2 receptors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast tumours

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAMIRA SADEGHI; ZOHREH HOJATI; HOSSEIN TABATABAEIAN

    2017-03-01

    The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a proto-oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-mycgenes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer tissues using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) followed by analyses of the association between the outcomes. In this study, 122 fresh tissues, including 104 malignant and 18 benign samples, were disrupted by mortar and pestle, and then the RNA was isolated from the samples and converted to cDNA. The relative expression levels of EpCAM and c-myc genes were measured by2−ΔΔCt method using RT-qPCR. EpCAM protein level was also assessed in 66 cases using Western blot technique. UsingRT-qPCR method, our results showed that EpCAM was overexpressed in 48% of malignant and 11.1% of benign samples. Evaluating EpCAM protein overexpression in a portion of samples depicted the fully concordance rate between Western blot and RT-qPCR techniques. C-myc expression was first evaluated by RT-qPCR method, showing the overexpression rate of 39%and 28% in malignant and benign samples, respectively. These data were also quite concordant with the clinically available immunohistochemistry reports of the same samples studied in this study. Importantly, overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc was significantly associated and showed an agreement of 57.3%. This study demonstrated the cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc in breast tumours collected from breast cancer patients of the Iranian population. EpCAM and c-myc positive cases were significantly associated with reduced and enhanced risk of ER/PR positivity

  5. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Samira; Hojati, Zohreh; Tabatabaeian, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a proto-oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer tissues using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) followed by analyses of the association between the outcomes. In this study, 122 fresh tissues, including 104 malignant and 18 benign samples, were disrupted by mortar and pestle, and then the RNA was isolated from the samples and converted to cDNA. The relative expression levels of EpCAM and c-myc genes were measured by 2(-ΔΔCt) method using RT-qPCR. EpCAM protein level was also assessed in 66 cases using Western blot technique. Using RT-qPCR method, our results showed that EpCAM was overexpressed in 48% of malignant and 11.1% of benign samples. Evaluating EpCAM protein overexpression in a portion of samples depicted the fully concordance rate between Western blot and RT-qPCR techniques. C-myc expression was first evaluated by RT-qPCR method, showing the overexpression rate of 39% and 28% in malignant and benign samples, respectively. These data were also quite concordant with the clinically available immunohistochemistry reports of the same samples studied in this study. Importantly, overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc was significantly associated and showed an agreement of 57.3%. This study demonstrated the cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc in breast tumours collected from breast cancer patients of the Iranian population. EpCAM and c-myc positive cases were significantly associated with reduced and enhanced risk of ER/PR positivity

  6. Leading neutron production in e+p collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Słomiński, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martínez, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pellmann, I.-A.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Hanlon, S.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Heaphy, E. A.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; Loizides, J. H.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2002-08-01

    The production of neutrons carrying at least 20% of the proton beam energy ( x L> 0.2 ) in e+p collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for a wide range of Q2, the photon virtuality, from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. The neutron-tagged cross section, ep→ e' Xn, is measured relative to the inclusive cross section, ep→ e' X, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties. For xL> 0.3, the rate of neutrons in photoproduction is about half of that measured in hadroproduction, which constitutes a clear breaking of factorisation. There is about a 20% rise in the neutron rate between photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering, which may be attributed to absorptive rescattering in the γp system. For 0.64rate of neutrons is almost independent of the Bjorken scaling variable x and Q2. However, at lower and higher xL values, there is a clear but weak dependence on these variables, thus demonstrating the breaking of limiting fragmentation. The neutron-tagged structure function, FLN(3)2( x, Q2, xL), rises at low values of x in a way similar to that of the inclusive F2( x, Q2) of the proton. The total γπ cross section and the structure function of the pion, Fπ2( xπ, Q2) where xπ= x/(1- xL), have been determined using a one-pion-exchange model, up to uncertainties in the normalisation due to the poorly understood pion flux. At fixed Q2, Fπ2 has approximately the same x dependence as F2 of the proton.

  7. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharid-induced sickness behavior by a dry extract from the roots of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs 7630) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöldner, M; Schötz, K

    2007-01-01

    The host response to infections comprise the synthesis and release of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-1ss, TNF-alpha, IL-6) which induce symptoms of sickness behavior characterised by anorexia, depressed activity, listlessness or malaise. In laboratory animals, sickness behavior can be induced by the administration of cytokines itself or by cytokine-inducers such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the active fragment of endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria. Preparations from roots of Pelargonium sidoides have been traditionally used in South African folk medicine for the treatment of different diseases (e.g. diarrhea, dysmenorrhea, hepatic disorders and respiratory tract infections including tuberculosis). Today, aqueous ethanolic extracts of Pelargonium sidoides are marketed mainly for respiratory tract infections. We studied the effects of the extract EPs 7630 and different fractions separated by ultrafiltration in an animal model of sickness behavior. The results of this study demonstrate that the extract EPs 7630 and the high-molecular weight fraction (F3) alleviate the symptoms of sickness behavior.

  8. Two-Photon-Exchange Correction to Elastic ep Scattering in the Forward Angle Limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-Qing

    2009-01-01

    The two-photon-exchange (TPE) correction to elastic ep ecattering in the forward angle region is discussed based on a simple hadronic model.It is found that the correction is exactly zero in the forward angle limit.This analytical result gives a good explanation of the previous numerical results and shows the clear power behavior of the TPE correction to elastic ep scattering in the forward angle region.

  9. EpCAM-independent capture of circulating tumor cells with a 'universal CTC-chip'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Yoneda, Kazue; Ohnaga, Takashi; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2017-01-01

    Capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which are shed from the primary tumor site and circulate in the blood, remains a technical challenge. CellSearch® is the only clinically approved CTC detection system, but has provided only modest sensitivity in detecting CTCs mainly because epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-negative tumor cells may not be captured. To achieve more sensitive CTC‑capture, we have developed a novel microfluidic platform, a 'CTC-chip' comprised of light-curable resins that has a unique advantage in that any capture antibody is easily conjugated. In the present study, we showed that EpCAM-negative tumor cells as well as EpCAM-positive cells were captured with the novel 'universal CTC-chip' as follows: i) human lung cancer cells (PC-9), with strong EpCAM expression, were efficiently captured with the CTC-chip coated with an anti-EpCAM antibody (with an average capture efficiency of 101% when tumor cells were spiked in phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) and 88% when spiked in blood); ii) human mesothelioma cells (ACC-MESO-4), with no EpCAM expression but with podoplanin expression, were captured with the CTC-chip coated with an anti-podoplanin antibody (average capture efficiency of 78% when tumor cells were spiked in PBS and 38% when spiked in blood), whereas ACC-MESO-4 cells were not captured with the CTC-chip coated with the anti-EpCAM antibody. These results indicate that the novel 'CTC-chip' can be useful in sensitive EpCAM-independent detection of CTCs, which may provide new insights into personalized medicine.

  10. EP-3E电子侦察飞机的ESM成套设备改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    立平

    2004-01-01

    2004年4月2日,EDO公司宣称与EP-3E电子侦察机的主合同商Raytheon公司签订了价值840万美元的第二阶段改进合同,以便对美海军EP-3E电子侦察飞机进行多阶段电子支援措施(ESM)改进。

  11. Social, structural, behavioral and clinical factors influencing retention in Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) care in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Trisha; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Chan, Philip A.; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Bologna, Estefany S.; Beauchamps, Laura; Johnson, Kendra; Mena, Leandro; Nunn, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a biomedical intervention that can reduce rates of HIV transmission when taken once daily by HIV-negative individuals. Little is understood about PrEP uptake and retention in care among the populations most heavily impacted by the HIV epidemic, particularly among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in the Deep South. Therefore, this study explored the structural, social, behavioral, and clinical factors that affect PrEP use and retention in care among YMSM in Jackson, Mississippi. Thirty MSM who were prescribed PrEP at an outpatient primary care clinic were interviewed and included 23 men who had been retained in PrEP care and seven who had not been retained. The mean age of participants was 26.6 years. Most (23) participants were African American. Major factors affecting PrEP use and retention in PrEP care included 1) structural factors such as cost and access to financial assistance for medications and clinical services; 2) social factors such as stigma and relationship status; 3) behavioral factors including sexual risk behaviors; and 4) clinical factors such as perceived and actual side effects. Many participants also discussed the positive spillover effects of PrEP use and reported that PrEP had a positive impact on their health. Four of the seven individuals who had not been retained re-enrolled in PrEP care after completing their interviews, suggesting that case management and ongoing outreach can enhance retention in PrEP care. Interventions to enhance retention in PrEP care among MSM in the Deep South will be most effective if they address the complex structural, social, clinical, and behavioral factors that influence PrEP uptake and retention in PrEP care. PMID:28222118

  12. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 in the crosshairs of anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-07-01

    Modulation of a specific prostanoid synthase or receptor provides therapeutic alternatives to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for treating pathological conditions governed by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2). Among the COX-2 downstream signaling pathways, the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP2 subtype (PTGER2) is emerging as a crucial mediator of many physiological and pathological events. Genetic ablation strategies and recent advances in chemical biology provide tools for a better understanding of EP2 signaling. In the brain, the EP2 receptor modulates some beneficial effects, including neuroprotection, in acute models of excitotoxicity, neuroplasticity, and spatial learning via cAMP-PKA signaling. Conversely, EP2 activation accentuates chronic inflammation mainly through the cAMP-Epac pathway, likely contributing to delayed neurotoxicity. EP2 receptor activation also engages β-arrestin in a G-protein-independent pathway that promotes tumor cell growth and migration. Understanding the conditions under which multiple EP2 signaling pathways are engaged might suggest novel therapeutic strategies to target this key inflammatory prostaglandin receptor.

  13. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB.

  14. Preparation and microwave-absorbing property of EP/BaFe12O19/PANI composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huixia; Bai, Dezhong; Tan, Lin; Chen, Nali; Wang, Yueyi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we introduced expanded perlite (EP) into the system of ferrite composites for the first time. By sol-gel self-propagating combustion method, expanded perlite/barium ferrite (EP/BaFe12O19) was prepared, and then ternary composites of expanded perlite/barium ferrite/polyaniline (EP/BaFe12O19/PANI) were obtained by in-situ oxidative polymerization of aniline on EP/BaFe12O19 mixture. Although, as is well known, the values of saturation magnetization (Ms), remnant magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) of composites are all lower than the pure BaFe12O19 particles owing to the existence of the nonmagnetic EP and PANI, the EP/BaFe12O19/PANI composites exhibit absorption characteristics at the range of 2-18 GHz, the effective absorption bandwidth (less than -4 dB) reached 12.12 GHz and the minimum reflection loss of -5.66 dB at 8.48 GHz with only 2 mm thickness of absorbing layer. So the composites could resist urban electromagnetic pollution, such as wireless network, communication and so on, effectively.

  15. A Long Noncoding RNA lincRNA-EPS Acts as a Transcriptional Brake to Restrain Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atianand, Maninjay K; Hu, Wenqian; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Shen, Ying; Ricci, Emiliano P; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Bhatta, Ankit; Schattgen, Stefan A; McGowan, Jason D; Blin, Juliana; Braun, Joerg E; Gandhi, Pallavi; Moore, Melissa J; Chang, Howard Y; Lodish, Harvey F; Caffrey, Daniel R; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-06-16

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. Although lincRNAs are expressed in immune cells, their functions in immunity are largely unexplored. Here, we identify an immunoregulatory lincRNA, lincRNA-EPS, that is precisely regulated in macrophages to control the expression of immune response genes (IRGs). Transcriptome analysis of macrophages from lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice, combined with gain-of-function and rescue experiments, revealed a specific role for this lincRNA in restraining IRG expression. Consistently, lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice manifest enhanced inflammation and lethality following endotoxin challenge in vivo. lincRNA-EPS localizes at regulatory regions of IRGs to control nucleosome positioning and repress transcription. Further, lincRNA-EPS mediates these effects by interacting with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L via a CANACA motif located in its 3' end. Together, these findings identify lincRNA-EPS as a repressor of inflammatory responses, highlighting the importance of lincRNAs in the immune system.

  16. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.williams@oxfordtechnologies.co.uk [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sanders, Stephen [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Weder, Gerard [Tree-C Technology BV, Buys Ballotstraat 8, 6716 BL Ede (Netherlands); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  17. Microvascular COX-2/mPGES-1/EP-4 axis in human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Mercedes; Dilmé, Jaume; Solà-Villà, David; Rodríguez, Cristina; Bellmunt, Sergi; Siguero, Laura; Alcolea, Sonia; Romero, José-María; Escudero, José-Román; Martínez-González, José; Vila, Luis

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the prostaglandin (PG)E2 pathway in human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and its relationship with hypervascularization. We analyzed samples from patients undergoing AAA repair in comparison with those from healthy multiorgan donors. Patients were stratified according to maximum aortic diameter: low diameter (LD) (PGE2 metabolites were higher in AAA than in controls (plasma-controls, 19.9 ± 2.2; plasma-AAA, 38.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml; secretion-normal aorta, 16.5 ± 6.4; secretion-AAA, 72.9 ± 6.4 pg/mg; mean ± SEM). E-prostanoid receptor (EP)-2 and EP-4 were overexpressed in AAA, EP-4 being the only EP substantially expressed and colocalized with mPGES-1 in the microvasculature. Additionally, EP-4 mediated PGE2-induced angiogenesis in vitro. We provide new data concerning mPGES-1 expression in human AAA. Our findings suggest the potential relevance of the COX-2/mPGES-1/EP-4 axis in the AAA-associated hypervascularization.

  18. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  19. Epífora e flacidez sem ectrópio: "tarsal strip" resolve sempre?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knijnik Denis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar se o "tarsal strip" melhora a epífora de pacientes sem ectrópio, mas com pálpebras flácidas. MÉTODOS: Foi feito estudo retrospectivo que incluiu uma amostra composta por pacientes com pálpebras flácidas em posição normal, sem obstrução lacrimal, operados com "tarsal strip" lateral para o tratamento de epífora. Foram incluídas no estudo 14 pálpebras inferiores em 11 pacientes. RESULTADOS: Houve resolução ou melhora significativa da epífora em 10 (71,4% olhos após período de seguimento de três meses. Todas as pálpebras operadas passaram a apresentar resistência normal após a cirurgia. CONCLUSÃO: Em pacientes com epífora, pálpebras flácidas e vias lacrimais pérvias, sem ectrópio, o "tarsal strip" pode obter melhora significativa da epífora na maioria dos casos. Como todas as pálpebras operadas recuperaram sua resistência normal, pode-se supor que a ausência de melhora da epífora, em alguns casos, possa ser explicada pela presença de outros fatores causais concomitantes com a flacidez palpebral.

  20. Central PGE2 exhibits anxiolytic-like activity via EP1 and EP4 receptors in a manner dependent on serotonin 5-HT1A, dopamine D1 and GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2011-07-21

    We found that centrally administered prostaglandin (PG) E(2) exhibited anxiolytic-like activity in the elevated plus-maze and open field test in mice. Agonists selective for EP(1) and EP(4) receptors, among four receptor subtypes for PGE(2), mimicked the anxiolytic-like activity of PGE(2). The anxiolytic-like activity of PGE(2) was blocked by an EP(1) or EP(4) antagonist, as well as in EP(4) but not EP(1) knockout mice. Central activation of either EP(1) or EP(4) receptors resulted in anxiolytic-like activity. The PGE(2)-induced anxiolytic-like activity was inhibited by antagonists for serotonin 5-HT(1A), dopamine D(1) and GABA(A) receptors. Taken together, PGE(2) exhibits anxiolytic-like activity via EP(1) and EP(4) receptors, with downstream involvement of 5-HT(1A), D(1) and GABA(A) receptor systems. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. No negative symptoms in healthy volunteers after single doses of amisulpride, aripiprazole, and haloperidol: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Hyun; Park, Tae-Won; Yang, Jong-Chul; Lee, Keon-Hak; Huang, Guang-Biao; Tong, Zhao; Park, Myung-Sook; Chung, Young-Chul

    2012-03-01

    Noncompliance and poor outcome in patients with schizophrenia are closely related to the negative symptoms secondary to antipsychotics. No controlled study has evaluated whether amisulpride and aripiprazole induce negative symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of single doses of amisulpride, aripiprazole, haloperidol, and risperidone in healthy volunteers. Seventy-eight young volunteers took part in this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel study of four antipsychotics: 400 mg amisulpride, 10 mg aripiprazole, 3 mg haloperidol, and 2 mg risperidone. Assessments of negative symptoms were done 4 h after administration using both subjective rating scales (Neuroleptic Induced Deficit Syndrome Scale and Subjective Deficit Syndrome Scale) and an objective rating scale (Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms). Risperidone only produced significant increases on the avolition score of the Neuroleptic Induced Deficit Syndrome Scale and blunted affect and alogia scores of the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms compared with placebo. The effect on blunted affect persisted after controlling for mental sedation. Amisulpride, aripiprazole, and haloperidol did not induce negative symptoms. Aripiprazole and risperidone induced mild extrapyramidal symptoms. The most common adverse events were somnolence and cognitive slowing. These data indicate that a single risperidone dose induces negative symptoms in normal volunteers, whereas amisulpride, aripiprazole, and haloperidol do not. These characteristics of antipsychotics should be considered when choosing optimal drugs for patients with psychosis.

  2. [The gene wxcA of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004 strain involved in EPS yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang; Wei, Guang-Ning; He, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Bao-Shan

    2004-07-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the pathogenic agent of black rot disease in cruciferous plants, produces large amount of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), which has found wide applications in industry. For the great commercial value of the xanthan gum, many of the genes involved in EPS biosynthesis have been cloned and the mechanism of EPS biosynthesis also has been studied. In order to clone genes involved in EPS biosynthesis, Xcc wild-type strain 8004 was mutagenized with transposon Tn5 gusA5, and a number of EPS-defective mutants were isolated in our previous work. The Tn5 gusA5 inserted sites of these mutants were located by using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and results showed that two EPS-defective mutants were insertion mutants of the gene wxcA which involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. The gene wxcA involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis but dose not extracellular polysaccharide in others' report. wxcA::Tn5 gusA5 mutant 021C12, the polar mutant, was complemented with recombinant plasmid pLATC8570 harboring an intact wxcA gene in this work, but the yield of EPS of the wxcA::Tn5 gusA5 mutant was not restored. In order to identify the function of wxcA gene of Xcc 8004 strain, the gene wxcA was deleted by gene replacement strategy, and the no-polar mutant of wxcA was obtained. DeltawxcA mutant strain, named Xcc 8570, was confirmed by using both PCR and southern analysis. Beside the LPS biosynthesis of deltawxcA mutant was affected, The EPS yield of deltawxcA mutant strain reduced by 50% as compared with the wild-type strain 8004. DeltawxcA mutant could be complemented in trans with the intact wxcA gene, and the EPS yield of the mutant was restored. The combined data showed that wxcA gene not only involved in LPS biosynthesis but also EPS yield in Xcc 8004 strain.

  3. PGE2 EP1 receptor deletion attenuates 6-OHDA-induced Parkinsonism in mice: old switch, new target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Abdullah Shafique; Maruyama, Takayuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2013-04-01

    Recent experimental data on Parkinson's disease (PD) predicts the critical role of inflammation in the progression of neurodegeneration and the promising preventive effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Previous studies suggest that NSAIDs minimize cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity and thereby attenuate free radical generation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an important product of COX activity and plays an important role in various physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions through its EP receptors (EP1-EP4). Part of the toxic effect of PGE2 in the central nervous system has been reported to be through the EP1 receptor; however, the effect of the EP1 receptor in PD remains elusive. Therefore, in our pursuit to determine if deletion of the PGE2 EP1 receptor will attenuate 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinsonism, mice were given a unilateral 6-OHDA injection into the medial forebrain bundle. We found that apomorphine-induced contralateral rotations were significantly attenuated in the 6-OHDA-lesioned EP1(-/-) mice compared with the 6-OHDA-lesioned WT mice. Quantitative analysis showed significant protection of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the 6-OHDA-lesioned EP1(-/-) mice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study to implicate the PGE2 EP1 receptor in toxin-induced Parkinsonism. We propose the PGE2 EP1 receptor as a new target to better understand some of the mechanisms leading to PD.

  4. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 is responsible for cyclooxygenase-2 induction by prostaglandin E2 in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Kausar M; Sung, You Me; He, Guobin; Fischer, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    The EP2 prostanoid receptor is one of the four subtypes of receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We previously reported that deletion of EP2 led to resistance to chemically induced mouse skin carcinogenesis, whereas overexpression of EP2 resulted in enhanced tumor development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that EP2 knockout mice had reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression after 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Further, primary keratinocytes from EP2 transgenic mice had increased COX-2 expression after either TPA or PGE2 treatment and COX-2 expression was blocked by 10 microM SQ 22,536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. EP2 knockout mice had significantly decreased, whereas EP2 transgenic mice had significantly increased PGE2 production in response to a single treatment of TPA. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was elevated to a greater extent in keratinocytes from EP2 transgenic mice compared with those of WT mice following PGE2 treatment. A protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor reduced PGE2-mediated CREB phosphorylation in keratinocytes from EP2 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we found that there was no CREB phosphorylation in EP2 knockout mice following PGE2 treatment. PGE2-induced DNA synthesis (cell proliferation) was significantly decreased in keratinocytes from EP2 knockout mice following pretreatment with 10 microM SQ 22,536. Taken together, EP2 activation of the PKA/CREB-signaling pathway is responsible for keratinocyte proliferation and our findings reveal a positive feedback loop between COX-2 and PGE2 that is mediated by the EP2 receptor.

  5. Suppression of inflammation with conditional deletion of the prostaglandin E2 EP2 receptor in macrophages and brain microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jenny U; Pradhan, Suraj; Lokteva, Ludmila A; Woodling, Nathaniel S; Ko, Novie; Brown, Holden D; Wang, Qian; Loh, Christina; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Buckwalter, Marion; Manning-Bog, Amy B; Andreasson, Katrin I

    2013-10-02

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent lipid signaling molecule, modulates inflammatory responses through activation of downstream G-protein coupled EP(1-4) receptors. Here, we investigated the cell-specific in vivo function of PGE2 signaling through its E-prostanoid 2 (EP2) receptor in murine innate immune responses systemically and in the CNS. In vivo, systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in a broad induction of cytokines and chemokines in plasma that was significantly attenuated in EP2-deficient mice. Ex vivo stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with LPS elicited proinflammatory responses that were dependent on EP2 signaling and that overlapped with in vivo plasma findings, suggesting that myeloid-lineage EP2 signaling is a major effector of innate immune responses. Conditional deletion of the EP2 receptor in myeloid lineage cells in Cd11bCre;EP2(lox/lox) mice attenuated plasma inflammatory responses and transmission of systemic inflammation to the brain was inhibited, with decreased hippocampal inflammatory gene expression and cerebral cortical levels of IL-6. Conditional deletion of EP2 significantly blunted microglial and astrocytic inflammatory responses to the neurotoxin MPTP and reduced striatal dopamine turnover. Suppression of microglial EP2 signaling also increased numbers of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra independent of MPTP treatment, suggesting that microglial EP2 may influence development or survival of DA neurons. Unbiased microarray analysis of microglia isolated from adult Cd11bCre;EP2(lox/lox) and control mice demonstrated a broad downregulation of inflammatory pathways with ablation of microglial EP2 receptor. Together, these data identify a cell-specific proinflammatory role for macrophage/microglial EP2 signaling in innate immune responses systemically and in brain.

  6. 8-iso-PGE2 stimulates anion efflux from airway epithelial cells via the EP4 prostanoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Andrew P; Cowley, Elizabeth A

    2008-02-01

    Isoprostanes are biologically active molecules, produced when reactive oxygen species mediate the peroxidation of membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids. Previous work has demonstrated that the isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated transepithelial anion secretion across the human airway epithelial cell line, Calu-3. Since isoprostanes predominantly achieve their effects via binding to prostanoid receptors, we hypothesized that this 8-iso-PGE(2) stimulation of CFTR activity was the result of the isoprostane binding to a prostanoid receptor. Using RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence, we here demonstrate that Calu-3 cells express the EP(1-4) and FP receptors, and localize these proteins in polarized cell monolayers. Using iodide efflux as a marker for CFTR-mediated Cl(-) efflux, we investigate whether prostanoid receptor agonists elicit a functional response from Calu-3 cells. Application of the agonists PGE(2), misoprostol (EP(2), EP(3), and EP(4)) and PGE(1)-OH (EP(3) and EP(4)) stimulate iodide efflux; however, iloprost, butaprost, sulprostone, and fluoprostenol (agonists of the EP(1), EP(2), EP(3), and FP receptors, respectively) have no effect. The iodide efflux seen with 8-iso-PGE(2) is abolished by the EP(4) receptor antagonist AH23848, the CFTR inhibitor 172, and inhibition of PKA and the PI3K pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that although Calu-3 cells possess numerous prostanoid receptors, only the EP(4) subtype appears capable of eliciting a functional iodide efflux response, which is mediated via the EP(4) receptor. We propose that 8-iso-PGE(2), acting via EP(4) receptor, could play an important role in the CFTR-mediated response to oxidant stress, and which would be compromised in the CF airways.

  7. Role of Microbial Exopolymeric Substances (EPS) on Chromium Sorption and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Soils: I. Cr(III) Complexation with EPS in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Kantar; H Demiray; N Dogan; C Dodge

    2011-12-31

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  8. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantar, C.; Dodge, C.; Demiray, H.; Dogan, N.M.

    2011-01-26

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  9. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Cetin; Demiray, Hilal; Dogan, Nazime Mercan; Dodge, Cleveland J

    2011-03-01

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK(a) values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL(2) monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL(2) and HL(3) monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  10. A neuropsychological comparison of siblings with neurological versus hepatic symptoms of Wilson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguedas, Deborah; Stewart, Jeanette; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Batchelor, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's Disease (WD) (also known as hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 30,000. The clinical features associated with WD are highly varied. However, subtypes generally reflect neurological, hepatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The present case study reports two brothers with a recent diagnosis of WD. Neurological symptoms and cognitive deficits were exhibited in one brother (BL) in the form of extrapyramidal features, while the other brother (AL) only exhibited hepatic symptoms. Extensive neuropsychological testing was conducted on both siblings to compare cognitive profiles. Results for BL indicated significantly impaired motor functioning and information processing speed, which impacted him significantly at school. Aspects of executive dysfunction were also apparent in addition to reduced visual and verbal memory, working memory, and attention. Results for AL revealed evidence of verbal memory difficulties and aspects of executive dysfunction. Comparison is made of the distinct and common cognitive characteristics of the cases presented in terms of implications for early intervention and management of cognitive difficulties.

  11. [Identification and cloning of a novel gene involved in EPS biosynthesis of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Bao-Shan; Tang, Dong-Jie

    2003-11-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ( Xcc), causative agent of the black rot disease of cruciferous crops worldwide, produces large amount of extracellular polysaccharide( EPS), which has found wide applications in industry. In order to clone genes involved in EPS biosynthesis, Xcc wild-type strain 8004 was mutagenized with transposon Tn5gus A5, and a number of EPS-defective mutants were isolated. The Tn5gusA5 insertion sites in the mutants were analyzed by using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR(TAIL-PCR), and the corresponding genes were identified by homology blast to the completely sequenced genome of Xcc 8004 strain. A novel gene, waxE, identified from the EPS-defective mutant 151D09, was found to be disrupted by the insertion of Tn5gusA5 in the open reading frame(ORF) with genome coordinates 4478998bp to 4479819bp.This gene showed 52% similarity to the kdtX gene of Serratia marcescens and 50% to the waaE of Klebsiella pneumoniae at amino acid level, with characteristics of glycostransferase 2 family domain. In order to identify the function of waxE gene, waxE gene deletion mutant of Xcc 8004 was constructed by gene replacement strategy in which waxE gene of genome was replaced by kanamycin resistant gene kan. The waxE gene deletion mutant strain, named Xcc 8570, was confirmed by both PCR and southern analysis. The growth rate of the deletion mutant 8570 in rich medium was not affected, but the EPS yield reduced by 35% as compared with the wildtype strain 8004. The deletion mutant could be completmented in trans with plasmid pLATC8976 harboring an intact waxE gene, and the EPS yield of the mutant was restored. The combined data showed that waxE gene involved in EPS biosynthesis in Xcc.

  12. Role of the pharmacist in pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) therapy for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauson, Kevin A; Polen, Hyla H; Joseph, Shine A; Zapantis, Antonia

    2009-01-01

    With a global estimate of 2.5 million new infections of HIV occurring yearly, discovering novel methods to help stem the spread of the virus is critical. The use of antiretroviral chemoprophylaxis for preventing HIV after accidental or occupational exposure and in maternal to fetal transmission has become a widely accepted method to combat HIV. Based on this success, pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) is being explored in at-risk patient populations such as injecting drug users, female sex workers and men who have sex with men. This off-label and unmonitored use has created a need for education and intervention by pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. Pharmacists should educate themselves on PrEP and be prepared to counsel patients about their means of obtaining it (e.g. borrowing or sharing medications and ordering from disreputable Internet pharmacies). They should also be proactive about medication therapy management in these patients due to clinically important drug interactions with PrEP medications. Only one trial exploring the safety and efficacy of tenofovir as PrEP has been completed thus far. However, five ongoing trials are in various stages and two additional studies are scheduled for the near future. Unfortunately, studies in this arena have met with many challenges that have threatened to derail progress. Ethical controversy surrounding post-trial care of participants who seroconvert during studies, as well as concerns over emerging viral resistance and logistical site problems, have already halted several PrEP trials. Information about these early trials has already filtered down to affected individuals who are experimenting with this unproven therapy as an "evening before pill". The potential for PrEP is promising; however, more extensive trials are necessary to establish its safety and efficacy. Pharmacists are well-positioned to play a key role in helping patients make choices about PrEP, managing their therapy, and developing policy

  13. Expression of prostaglandin E2 and EP receptors in human papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liao; Wei, Xiaohong; Liu, Xueting; Zhou, Danli; Hu, Fang; Zeng, Yingjuan; Sun, Ying; Luo, Shunkui; Zhang, Yu; Yi, Xian Ping

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and downstream EP receptors in the development of human papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 90 thyroid specimens excised from patients undergoing total or subtotal thyroidectomy in the Department of General Surgery, the Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, China, from August 2013 to September 2014, were analyzed. The quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses were employed to examine the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression, respectively. The expressions and significances of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), PGE2, and EP receptors in PTC and nodular goiter were investigated. The COX-2 mRNA and protein expression level significantly increased in the PTC tissues than in the paired noncarcinoma tissues adjacent to the PTC or nodular goiter tissues. The mPGES-1 protein expression was also significantly upregulated in the PTC tissues. All the four subtypes of EP receptors (EP1-4) could express in the thyroid tissues, while only the EP4 mRNA and protein levels significantly increased in the PTC tissues. The local production of PGE2 had a higher-level expression in the PTC tissues than in the noncarcinoma thyroid tissues adjacent to the PTC lesion and the benign nodular goiter tissues. The induction of PGE2 biosynthesis as well as the overexpression of EP4 in PTC suggested that this pathway might play an important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of PTC. These observations raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 and/or EP4 may hold therapeutic promise in this common cancer.

  14. Gout: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treament

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Detecting and Treating Gout Gout: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treament Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of Contents ... Gout may be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms can be vague and could be from other ...

  15. Pertussis Signs & Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Kids with Infectious Diseases (PKIDs) Signs and Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... not for as long as 3 weeks. Early Symptoms In those who have been vaccinated: In most ...

  16. PTSD: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD Symptoms, Diagnosis , Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms As with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD ...

  17. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Support Guides Why no symptoms? Because prostate cancer hardly ever starts in the most convenient part of the prostate for symptoms to occur, near the urethra (the tube that carries urine through the prostate ...

  18. An important role of prostanoid receptor EP2 in host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Vandana; Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Singh, Yogesh; Van Kaer, Luc; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2012-12-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, resides and replicates within susceptible hosts by inhibiting host antimicrobial mechanisms. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), produced by M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages, exerts a variety of immunomodulatory functions via 4 receptors (EP1-EP4), each mediating distinct PGE(2) functions. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis infection selectively upregulates EP2 messenger RNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. We found that EP2 deficiency in mice increases susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection, which correlated with reduced antigen-specific T-cell responses and increased levels of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells. These findings have revealed an important role for EP2 in host immune defense against tuberculosis. As a G protein-coupled receptor, EP2 could serve as a target for immunotherapy of tuberculosis.

  19. Involvement of the prostaglandin E receptor EP2 in paeoniflorin-induced human hepatoma cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shanshan; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei; Wang, Di; Jin, Juan; Wu, Jingjing; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Wang, Qingtong

    2013-02-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to play an important role in tumor development and progression. PGE2 mediates its biological activity by binding any one of four prostanoid receptors (EP1 through EP4). The present study was designed to determine the role of the EP2 receptor during the proliferation and apoptosis of human HepG2 and SMMC-7721 hepatoma cell lines and the effect of paeoniflorin, a monoterpene glycoside. The proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells was determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium after exposure to the selective EP2 receptor agonists butaprost and paeoniflorin. Apoptosis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells was also quantified by flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide staining. The expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were quantified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The expression of the EP2 receptor and cysteine-aspartic acid protease (caspase)-3 was determined by western blotting. Butaprost significantly increased proliferation in HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells. Paeoniflorin significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells stimulated by butaprost at multiple time points (24, 48, and 72 h). Paeoniflorin induced apoptosis in HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells, which was quantified by annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. Our results indicate that the expression of the EP2 receptor and Bcl-2 was significantly increased, whereas that of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 was decreased in HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells after stimulation by butaprost. Paeoniflorin significantly decreased the expression of the EP2 receptor and Bcl-2 and increased Bax and caspase-3 activation in HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells on addition of butaprost. Our results show that the PGE2 receptor subtype EP2 may play a vital role in the survival of both HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells. Paeoniflorin, which may be a promising agent in the treatment of liver cancer, induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by downregulating

  20. Rethinking HIV prevention to prepare for oral PrEP implementation for young African women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie L Celum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV incidence remains high among young women in sub-Saharan Africa in spite of scale-up of HIV testing, behavioural interventions, antiretroviral treatment and medical male circumcision. There is a critical need to critique past approaches and learn about the most effective implementation of evidence-based HIV prevention strategies, particularly emerging interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP. Discussion: Women in sub-Saharan Africa are at increased risk of HIV during adolescence and into their 20s, in part due to contextual factors including gender norms and relationship dynamics, and limited access to reproductive and sexual health services. We reviewed behavioural, behavioural economic and biomedical approaches to HIV prevention for young African women, with a particular focus on the barriers, opportunities and implications for implementing PrEP in this group. Behavioural interventions have had limited impact in part due to not effectively addressing the context, broader sexual norms and expectations, and structural factors that increase risk and vulnerability. Of biomedical HIV prevention strategies that have been tested, daily oral PrEP has the greatest evidence for protection, although adherence was low in two placebo-controlled trials in young African women. Given high efficacy and effectiveness in other populations, demonstration projects of open-label PrEP in young African women are needed to determine the most effective delivery models and whether women at substantial risk are motivated and able to use oral PrEP with sufficient adherence to achieve HIV prevention benefits. Conclusions: Social marketing, adherence support and behavioural economic interventions should be evaluated as part of PrEP demonstration projects among young African women in terms of their effectiveness in increasing demand and optimizing uptake and effective use of PrEP. Lessons learned through evaluations of implementation strategies

  1. PrEP for key populations in combination HIV prevention in Nairobi: a mathematical modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremin, Ide; McKinnon, Lyle; Kimani, Joshua; Cherutich, Peter; Gakii, Gloria; Muriuki, Festus; Kripke, Katharine; Hecht, Robert; Kiragu, Michael; Smith, Jennifer; Hinsley, Wes; Gelmon, Lawrence; Hallett, Timothy B

    2017-05-01

    The HIV epidemic in the population of Nairobi as a whole is in decline, but a concentrated sub-epidemic persists in key populations. We aimed to identify an optimal portfolio of interventions to reduce HIV incidence for a given budget and to identify the circumstances in which pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could be used in Nairobi, Kenya. A mathematical model was developed to represent HIV transmission in specific key populations (female sex workers, male sex workers, and men who have sex with men [MSM]) and among the wider population of Nairobi. The scale-up of existing interventions (condom promotion, antiretroviral therapy, and male circumcision) for key populations and the wider population as have occurred in Nairobi is represented. The model includes a detailed representation of a PrEP intervention and is calibrated to prevalence and incidence estimates specific to key populations and the wider population. In the context of a declining epidemic overall but with a large sub-epidemic in MSM and male sex workers, an optimal prevention portfolio for Nairobi should focus on condom promotion for male sex workers and MSM in particular, followed by improved antiretroviral therapy retention, earlier antiretroviral therapy, and male circumcision as the budget allows. PrEP for male sex workers could enter an optimal portfolio at similar levels of spending to when earlier antiretroviral therapy is included; however, PrEP for MSM and female sex workers would be included only at much higher budgets. If PrEP for male sex workers cost as much as US$500, average annual spending on the interventions modelled would need to be less than $3·27 million for PrEP for male sex workers to be excluded from an optimal portfolio. Estimated costs per infection averted when providing PrEP to all female sex workers regardless of their risk of infection, and to high-risk female sex workers only, are $65 160 (95% credible interval [CrI] $43 520-$90 250) and $10 920 (95% CrI $4700

  2. Proneoplastic effects of PGE2 mediated by EP4 receptor in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Glen A; Byrne, Sinead M; Molloy, Eamonn S; Malhotra, Vikrum; Austin, Sandra C; Kay, Elaine W; Murray, Frank E; Fitzgerald, Desmond J

    2009-06-26

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major product of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to assess PGE2 cell surface receptors (EP 1-4) to examine the mechanisms by which PGE2 regulates tumour progression. Gene expression studies were performed by quantitative RT-PCR. Cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry with cell proliferation quantified by BrdU incorporation measured by enzyme immunoassay. Immunohistochemistry was employed for expression studies on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour tissue. EP4 was the most abundant subtype of PGE2 receptor in HT-29 and HCA7 cells (which show COX-2 dependent PGE2 generation) and was consistently the most abundant transcript in human colorectal tumours (n = 8) by qRT-PCR (ANOVA, p = 0.01). G0/G1 cell cycle arrest was observed in HT-29 cells treated with SC-236 5 microM (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for 24 hours (p = 0.02), an effect abrogated by co-incubation with PGE2 (1 microM). G0/G1 arrest was also seen with a specific EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4A, L-161982) (p = 0.01). Treatment of HT-29 cells with either SC-236 or EP4A caused reduction in intracellular cAMP (ANOVA, p = 0.01). Early induction in p21WAF1/CIP1 expression (by qRT-PCR) was seen with EP4A treatment (mean fold increase 4.4, p = 0.04) while other genes remained unchanged. Similar induction in p21WAF1/CIP1 was also seen with PD153025 (1 microM), an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting EGFR transactivation by EP4 as a potential mechanism. Additive inhibition of HCA7 proliferation was observed with the combination of SC-236 and neutralising antibody to amphiregulin (AR), a soluble EGFR ligand. Concordance in COX-2 and AR localisation in human colorectal tumours was noted. COX-2 regulates cell cycle transition via EP4 receptor and altered p21WAF1/CIP1 expression. EGFR pathways appear important. Specific targeting of the EP4 receptor or downstream targets may offer a safer alternative to COX-2 inhibition in the chemoprevention of CRC.

  3. Proneoplastic effects of PGE2 mediated by EP4 receptor in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, Glen A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major product of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to assess PGE2 cell surface receptors (EP 1-4) to examine the mechanisms by which PGE2 regulates tumour progression. METHODS: Gene expression studies were performed by quantitative RT-PCR. Cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry with cell proliferation quantified by BrdU incorporation measured by enzyme immunoassay. Immunohistochemistry was employed for expression studies on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour tissue. RESULTS: EP4 was the most abundant subtype of PGE2 receptor in HT-29 and HCA7 cells (which show COX-2 dependent PGE2 generation) and was consistently the most abundant transcript in human colorectal tumours (n = 8) by qRT-PCR (ANOVA, p = 0.01). G0\\/G1 cell cycle arrest was observed in HT-29 cells treated with SC-236 5 microM (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for 24 hours (p = 0.02), an effect abrogated by co-incubation with PGE2 (1 microM). G0\\/G1 arrest was also seen with a specific EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4A, L-161982) (p = 0.01). Treatment of HT-29 cells with either SC-236 or EP4A caused reduction in intracellular cAMP (ANOVA, p = 0.01). Early induction in p21WAF1\\/CIP1 expression (by qRT-PCR) was seen with EP4A treatment (mean fold increase 4.4, p = 0.04) while other genes remained unchanged. Similar induction in p21WAF1\\/CIP1 was also seen with PD153025 (1 microM), an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting EGFR transactivation by EP4 as a potential mechanism. Additive inhibition of HCA7 proliferation was observed with the combination of SC-236 and neutralising antibody to amphiregulin (AR), a soluble EGFR ligand. Concordance in COX-2 and AR localisation in human colorectal tumours was noted. CONCLUSION: COX-2 regulates cell cycle transition via EP4 receptor and altered p21WAF1\\/CIP1 expression. EGFR pathways appear important. Specific targeting of the EP4 receptor or downstream targets may offer a safer alternative

  4. Psychiatric symptoms as pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hout, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders are typically seen as the causes of their symptoms. This makes sense in many fields of medicine, but not in psychiatry where symptoms constitute disorders: the notion that mental disorders cause symptoms is a tautology. Biological psychiatry tries to circumvent this logical fallacy by tryi

  5. Understanding medical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a conceptual review and analysis of symptom understanding. Subjective bodily sensations occur abundantly in the normal population and dialogues about symptoms take place in a broad range of contexts, not only in the doctor’s office. Our review of symptom unde...

  6. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause the following signs and symptoms— Vaginal ...

  7. Management of somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Dimsdale, Joel

    2014-01-01

    on the recognition and effective management of patients with excessive and disabling somatic symptoms. The clinical presentation of somatic symptoms is categorized into three groups of patients: those with multiple somatic symptoms, those with health anxiety, and those with conversion disorder. The chapter provides...

  8. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research In Your Community Advocate Get Involved Donate Symptoms and Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite ... the eyes and bladder are generally not affected. Diagnosis ALS is a difficult disease to diagnose. There ...

  9. IL-6 Overexpression in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Prostaglandin Receptor EP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Constanze; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Andrén, Ove; Kirfel, Jutta; Duensing, Stefan; Perner, Sven; Nowak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer in men and multiple risk factors and genetic alterations have been described. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion event and the overexpression of the transcription factor ERG are present in approximately 50% of all prostate cancer patients, however, the clinical outcome is still controversial. Prostate tumors produce various soluble factors, including the pleiotropic cytokine IL-6, regulating cellular processes such as proliferation and metastatic segregation. Here, we used prostatectomy samples in a tissue microarray format and analyzed the co-expression and the clinicopathologic data of ERG and IL-6 using immunohistochemical double staining and correlated the read-out with clinicopathologic data. Expression of ERG and IL-6 correlated strongly in prostate tissue samples. Forced expression of ERG in prostate tumor cell lines resulted in significantly increased secretion of IL-6, whereas the down-regulation of ERG decreased IL-6 secretion. By dissecting the underlying mechanism in prostate tumor cell lines we show the ERG-mediated up-regulation of the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP3. The prostanoid receptor EP2 was overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion in DU145 cells was reduced after treatment with EP2-receptor antagonist. Collectively, our study shows that the expression of ERG in prostate cancer is linked to the expression of IL-6 mediated by the prostanoid receptor EP2.

  10. Acceleration of intestinal polyposis through prostaglandin receptor EP2 in Apc(Delta 716) knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoshita, M; Takaku, K; Sasaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Ushikubi, F; Narumiya, S; Oshima, M; Taketo, M M

    2001-09-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) by cyclooxygenase (COX). COX-2, the inducible COX isozyme, has a key role in intestinal polyposis. Among the metabolites of PGH(2), PGE(2) is implicated in tumorigenesis because its level is markedly elevated in tissues of intestinal adenoma and colon cancer. Here we show that homozygous deletion of the gene encoding a cell-surface receptor of PGE(2), EP2, causes decreases in number and size of intestinal polyps in Apc(Delta 716) mice (a mouse model for human familial adenomatous polyposis). This effect is similar to that of COX-2 gene disruption. We also show that COX-2 expression is boosted by PGE(2) through the EP2 receptor via a positive feedback loop. Homozygous gene knockout for other PGE(2) receptors, EP1 or EP3, did not affect intestinal polyp formation in Apc(Delta 716) mice. We conclude that EP2 is the major receptor mediating the PGE2 signal generated by COX-2 upregulation in intestinal polyposis, and that increased cellular cAMP stimulates expression of more COX-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the polyp stroma.

  11. BEHAVIOUR OF UNREINFORCED EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE (EPS-LWC WALL PANEL ENHANCED WITH STEEL FIBRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHANA MAMAT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used steel fibre as reinforcement while enhancing the EPS-LWC strength. In line with architectural demand and ventilation requirement, opening within wall panel was also taken into account. Experimental tests were conducted for reinforced and unreinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. Two samples with size of 1500 mm (height x 1000 mm (length x 75 mm (thickness for each group of wall panel were prepared. Samples in each group had opening size of 600 mm (height x 400 mm (length located at 350 mm and 550 mm from upper end respectively. EPS-LWC wall panel had fcu of 20.87 N/mm2 and a density of 1900 kg/m3. The loading capacity, displacement profiles and crack pattern of each sample was analyzed and discussed. Unreinforced EPS-LWC enhanced with steel fibre resist almost similar loading as reinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. The presence of steel fibre as the only reinforcement creates higher lateral displacement. Wall panel experience shear failure at the side of opening. The number of micro cracks reduces significantly due to presence of steel fibre.

  12. Prostaglandin E2 regulates pancreatic stellate cell activity via the EP4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charo, Chantale; Holla, Vijaykumar; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Hwang, Rosa; Yang, Peiying; Dubois, Raymond N; Menter, David G; Logsdon, Craig D; Ramachandran, Vijaya

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells are source of dense fibrotic stroma, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We observed correlation between levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the extent of pancreatic fibrosis. The aims of this study were to delineate the effects of PGE2 on immortalized human pancreatic stellate cells (HPSCs) and to identify the receptor involved. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to assess COX-2, extracellular matrix, and matrix metalloproteinase gene expression. Eicosanoid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Human pancreatic stellate cell proliferation was assessed by MTS assay, migration by Boyden chamber assay, and invasion using an invasion chamber. Transient silencing was obtained by small interfering RNA. Human pancreatic stellate cells express COX-2 and synthesize PGE2. Prostaglandin E2 stimulated HPSC proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulated expression of both extracellular matrix and matrix metalloproteinase genes. Human pancreatic stellate cells expressed all 4 EP receptors. Only blocking the EP4 receptor resulted in abrogation of PGE2-mediated HPSC activation. Specificity of EP4 for the effects of PGE2 on stellate cells was confirmed using specific antagonists. Our data indicate that PGE2 regulates pancreatic stellate cell profibrotic activities via EP4 receptor, thus suggesting EP4 receptor as useful therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer to reduce desmoplasia.

  13. PGE2 Regulates Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activity Via The EP4 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charo, Chantale; Holla, Vijaykumar; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Hwang, Rosa; Yang, Peiying; Dubois, Raymond N.; Menter, David G.; Logsdon, Craig D.; Ramachandran, Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic stellate cells are source of dense fibrotic stroma, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We observed correlation between levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the extent of pancreatic fibrosis. Aim of this study was to delineate the effects of PGE2 on immortalized human pancreatic stellate cells (HPSC) and to identify the receptor involved. Methods IHC, RT-PCR and Q-RT-PCR were used to assess COX-2, extracellular matrix (ECM) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) gene expression. Eicosanoid profile was determined by LC/MS/MS. HPSC proliferation was assessed by MTS assay; migration by Boyden chamber assay and invasion using an invasion chamber. Transient silencing was obtained by siRNA. Results HPSC express COX-2 and synthesize PGE2. PGE2 stimulated HPSC proliferation, migration and invasion; stimulated expression of both ECM and MMP genes. HPSC expressed all four EP receptors. Only blocking the EP4 receptor resulted in abrogation of PGE2 mediated HPSC activation. Specificity of EP4 for the effects of PGE2 on stellate cells was confirmed using specific antagonists. Conclusion Our data indicate that PGE2 regulates PSC profibrotic activities via EP4 receptor thus suggesting EP4 receptor as useful therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer to reduce desmoplasia. PMID:23090667

  14. Methane oxidation and formation of EPS in compost: effect of oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilshusen, J.H.; Hettiaratchi, J.P.A.; Visscher, A. de; Saint-Fort, R

    2004-05-01

    Oxygen concentration plays an important role in the regulation of methane oxidation and the microbial ecology of methanotrophs. However, this effect is still poorly quantified in soil and compost ecosystems. The effect of oxygen on the formation of exopolymeric substances (EPS) is as yet unknown. We studied the effect of oxygen on the evolution of methanotrophic activity. At both high and low oxygen concentrations, peak activity was observed twice within a period of 6 months. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis showed that there was a shift from type I to type II methanotrophs during this period. At high oxygen concentration, EPS production was about 250% of the amount at low oxygen concentration. It is hypothesized that EPS serves as a carbon cycling mechanism for type I methanotrophs when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Simultaneously, EPS stimulates nitrogenase activity in type II methanotrophs by creating oxygen-depleted zones. The kinetic results were incorporated in a simulation model for gas transport and methane oxidation in a passively aerated biofilter. Comparison between the model and experimental data showed that, besides acting as a micro-scale diffusion barrier, EPS can act as a barrier to macro-scale diffusion, reducing the performance of such biofilters. - 1.5% oxygen resulted in a slightly higher and more stable methane oxidation activity.

  15. Anti-atherogenic peptide Ep1.B derived from apolipoprotein E induces tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemore, S M; Nikoopour, E; Au, B C Y; Krougly, O; Lee-Chan, E; Haeryfar, S M; Singh, B

    2014-09-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs ), which in turn suppress effector T cell responses. We have previously shown the induction of DCs from human and mouse monocytic cell lines, mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood monocytes by a novel apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-derived self-peptide termed Ep1.B. We also showed that this C-terminal region 239-252 peptide of ApoE has strong anti-atherogenic activity and reduces neointimal hyperplasia after vascular surgery in rats and wild-type as well as ApoE-deficient mice. In this study, we explored the phenotype of DC subset induced by Ep1.B from monocytic cell lines and from the bone marrow-derived cells. We found Ep1.B treatment induced cells that showed characteristics of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). We explored in-vitro and in-vivo effects of Ep1.B-induced DCs on antigen-specific T cell responses. Upon in-vivo injection of these cells with antigen, the subsequent ex-vivo antigen-specific proliferation of lymph node cells and splenocytes from recipient mice was greatly reduced. Our results suggest that Ep1.B-induced pDCs promote the generation of Treg cells, and these cells contribute to the induction of peripheral tolerance in adaptive immunity and potentially contribute its anti-atherogenic activity.

  16. TROP-1/Ep-CAM and CD24 are potential candidates for ovarian cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihong; Zhang, Zhenhua; Ren, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the possible roles of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (TROP-1/Ep-CAM) and CD24 molecule (CD24) in ovarian tumorigenesis, and explore the possible mechanism underlying this disease. Recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors pCIneo-TROP-1/Ep-CAM and pCIneo-CD24 were transfected into human normal ovarian surface epithelia cell line IOSE-80 respectively, with IOSE-80 cells transfected with the empty vector pCIneo as control. MRNA and protein expression of TROP-1/Ep-CAM and CD24 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Cell migration was assayed by trans-well inserts; cell proliferation and adhesion were analyzed by CCK-8 Cell Counting kit; cell cycle and cell apoptosis analysis were performed by flow cytometer. The expressions of TROP-1/Ep-CAM and CD24 were obviously up-regulated in TROP-1/Ep-CAM group and CD24 group compared to that in control group (PCAM group and CD24 group was significantly promoted migratory and proliferation abilities, but inhibited cell apoptosis and adhesive than that of control group (PCAM and CD24 may play key roles in the progression of ovarian cancer through promoting migration, proliferation, inhibiting cell apoptosis and adhesion, and disturbing cell cycle. They may be used as specific therapeutic targets in the treatment of ovarian cancer. However, further experiments are still needed to confirm our results.

  17. Expression of EpCam and Villin in Barrett’s Esophagus and in Gastric Cardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we aimed to clarify the potential of EpCAM and villin as in vivo biomarkers for both Barrett esophagus (BE-associated neoplasia and BE versus cardiac mucosa. Immunohistochemical staining in BE with various degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, Barrett carcinoma (BC and in normal cardiac mucosa (CM revealed a lack of EpCam and villin in squamous esophageal epithelium. All specimens of IN and BC showed EpCam with varying staining intensities. In 57% of CM samples a weak signal was detected; the remainder displayed strong EpCam expression. Villin was found in 97% of BE specimens and in all those with IN; 37% of BC and 75% of CM specimens were also positive. We conclude that expression of EpCam and villin differs only between squamous epithelium and BE. Determination of these proteins does not allow discrimination between different degrees of neoplasia or between esophageal intestinal metaplasia and cardiac mucosa.

  18. Utility of expanded polystyrene (EPS) beads in the control of vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagnaname, N; Amalraj, D Dominic; Mariappan, T

    2005-10-01

    The use of chemicals or bio-larvicides for the control of Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles stephensi breeding in pit latrines and overhead tanks (OHT) respectively is discouraged owing to many undesirable impacts in the environment. Due to faecal contamination and poor survival, use of predatory fish in OHTs is not feasible. The use of expanded polystyrene (EPS) beads is a potential alternative in these habitats. EPS beads not only prevent oviposition but also kill the immature by forming a thick blanket on the water surface. A thick layer of 2 cm with beads of 2 mm is sufficient to suppress and prevent mosquito breeding. These are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need frequent application since they remain on the surface for quiet a long time. Successful trials against C. quinquefasciatus breeding in pit latrines, soakage pits, septic tanks, etc., have been carried out in Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Certain trials with EPS indicated reduction in microfilaria (mf) rate besides decline in biting density. In India, EPS beads have also been used on small scale for the control of A. stephensi and A. culicifacies breeding in OHTs and unused wells respectively. The polystyrene beads have also been reported to be effective in the control of mosquito breeding in biogas plants and other industrial situations. The practical utility of EPS beads in the control of vector-borne diseases has been discussed in the present review.

  19. Altered hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity in mice deficient in the PGE2 EP2 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hongwei; Zhang, Jian; Breyer, Richard M.; Chen, Chu

    2008-01-01

    Our laboratory demonstrated previously that PGE2-induced modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission is via a presynaptic PGE2 EP2 receptor. However, little is known about whether the EP2 receptor is involved in hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Here we show that long-term potentiation (LTP) at the hippocampal perforant path synapses was impaired in mice deficient in the EP2 (KO), while membrane excitability and passive properties in granule neurons were no...

  20. Exogenous arachidonic acid mediates permeability of human brain microvessel endothelial cells through prostaglandin E2 activation of EP3 and EP4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Siddhartha; Nguyen, Hieu H; On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan W; Aukema, Harold M; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Arachidonic acid (ARA; 5,8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) is a conditionally essential polyunsaturated fatty acid [20:4(n-6)] and is a major constituent of brain lipids. The current study examined the transport processes for ARA in confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Addition of radioactive ARA to the apical compartment of HBMEC cultured on Transwell(®) inserts resulted in rapid incorporation of radioactivity into the basolateral medium. Knock down of fatty acid transport proteins did not alter ARA passage into the basolateral medium as a result of the rapid generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an eicosanoid known to facilitate opening of the blood-brain barrier. Permeability following ARA or PGE2 exposure was confirmed by an increased movement of fluorescein-labeled dextran from apical to basolateral medium. ARA-mediated permeability was attenuated by specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. EP3 and EP4 receptor antagonists attenuated the ARA-mediated permeability of HBMEC. The results indicate that ARA increases permeability of HBMEC monolayers likely via increased production of PGE2 which acts upon EP3 and EP4 receptors to mediate permeability. These observations may explain the rapid influx of ARA into the brain previously observed upon plasma infusion with ARA. The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is a restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Radiolabeled arachidonic acid (ARA) movement across, and monolayer permeability in the presence of ARA, was examined in confluent monolayers of primary human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) cultured on Transwell(®) plates. Incubation of HBMECs with ARA resulted in a rapid increase in HBMEC monolayer permeability. The mechanism was mediated, in part

  1. Expression of E-cad and Ep-CAM in head and neck adenoid cystic carcinoma and its clinical significance%E-cad、Ep-CAM 在头颈部腺样囊性癌中表达的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雷激; 张迪; 覃纲; 向兰; 刘跃华; 祝琳; 骆文龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of E-cad,Ep-CAM in head and neck ACC and clarify its role and in the malig-nant progress,invasion and metastasis of ACC.Methods The expression of E-cad and Ep-CAM in 60 cases of head and neck ACC specimens and 30 cases of normal gland tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry EnVision method.The result of immunohis-tochemistry was conducted by the Image-Pro Plus 6.0 image analysis system.Results The expression of E-cad in head and neck ACC was statistically significant lower than that in normal gland tissue(P <0.05).The expression of Ep-CAM in head and neck ACC was statistically significant higher than that in normal gland tissue(P <0.05).The decreasing expression of E-cad in head and neck ACC was closely related to the different pathological patterns,clinical stages,neurological symptom and local recurrences or distant metastases(P <0.05).The high expression of Ep-CAM in head and neck ACC was closely related to the different pathologi-cal patterns,clinical stages,neurological symptoms and local recurrences or distant metastases(P <0.05).There was a negative cor-relation about the expression between E-cad and Ep-CAM in head and neck ACC(r=-0.890,P =0.000).Conclusion E-cad may act as a inhibitor in the occurrence and development of ACC.The higher expression of Ep-CAM in head and neck ACC showed that ACC had a more poorer prognosis.%目的:研究细胞黏附分子(CAM)上皮性钙黏连蛋白(E-cad)、上皮细胞黏附分子(Ep-CAM)在头颈部腺样囊性癌(ACC)中的表达情况,探讨其在头颈部 ACC 发生、发展及侵袭转移中的作用。方法应用免疫组织化学 EnVision 法检测60例头颈部 ACC 及30例正常腺体组织中 E-cad、Ep-CAM 的表达情况,采用 Image-Pro Plus 6.0图像分析系统对免疫组织化学结果进行分析。结果E-cad 在头颈部 ACC 中的表达低于正常腺体组织(P <0.05),Ep-CAM 在头颈部 ACC 中的表达高于正常腺体组织(P <0.05);E-cad

  2. Abortive expansion of the cumulus and impaired fertility in mice lacking the prostaglandin E receptor subtype EP2

    OpenAIRE

    Hizaki, Hiroko; Segi, Eri; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Hirose, Masaya; Saji, Tomomi; Ushikubi, Fumitaka; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Noda, Yoichi; Tanaka, Takashi; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Narumiya, Shuh; Ichikawa, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    Female mice lacking the gene encoding the prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor subtype EP2 (EP2−/−) become pregnant and deliver their pups at term, but with a much reduced litter size. A decrease in ovulation number and a much reduced fertilization rate were observed in EP2−/− females without difference of the uterus to support implantation of wild-type embryos. Treatment with gonadotropins induced EP2 mRNA expression in the cumulus cells of ovarian follicles of wild-type mice. The immature cumuli ...

  3. Isolation of a putative receptor for KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (SH-EP) from cotyledons of Vigna mungo seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru-Furuno, A; Okamoto, T; Minamikawa, T

    2001-10-01

    SH-EP is the major papain-type proteinase expressed in cotyledons of germinated Vigna mungo seeds. The proteinase possesses a KDEL sequence at the C-terminus although the mature form of SH-EP is localized in vacuoles. It has also been shown that the proform of SH-EP is accumulated at the edge or middle region of the endoplasmic reticulum, and the accumulated proSH-EP is directly transported to vacuoles via the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase-accumulating vesicle, KV. In this study, to address the transport machinery of proSH-EP through KV, putative receptor for proSH-EP was isolated from membrane proteins of cotyledons of V. mungo seedlings using a proSH-EP-immobilized column. The deduced amino acid sequence from cDNA to the protein revealed that the putative receptor for proSH-EP is a member of vacuolar sorting receptor, VSR, that is known to be localized in the Golgi-complex and/or clathrin coated vesicle. We carried out subcellular fractionation of cotyledon cells and subsequently conducted SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry with anti-V. mungo VSR (VmVSR) or SH-EP antibody. The results showed that VmVSR is co-localized in the fraction of the gradient in which KV existed.

  4. Ep-CAM expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a potential therapeutic target and prognostic marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiper Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the expression and test the clinical significance of the epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC to check the suitability of esophageal SCC patients for Ep-CAM directed targeted therapies. Methods The Ep-CAM expression was immunohistochemically investigated in 70 primary esophageal SCCs using the monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4. For the interpretation of the staining results, we used a standardized scoring system ranging from 0 to 3+. The survival analysis was calculated from 53 patients without distant metastasis, with R0 resection and at least 2 months of clinical follow-up. Results Ep-CAM neo-expression was observed in 79% of the tumors with three expression levels, 1+ (26%, 2+ (11% and 3+ (41%. Heterogeneous expression was observed at all expression levels. Interestingly, tumors with 3+ Ep-CAM expression conferred a significantly decreased median relapse-free survival period (log rank, p = 0.0001 and median overall survival (log rank, p = 0.0003. Multivariate survival analysis disclosed Ep-CAM 3+ expression as independent prognostic factor. Conclusion Our results suggest Ep-CAM as an attractive molecule for targeted therapy in esophageal SCC. Considering the discontenting results of the current adjuvant concepts for esophageal SCC patients, Ep-CAM might provide a promising target for an adjuvant immunotherapeutic intervention.

  5. Evaluation of the Genetic Response of U937 and Jurkat Cells to 10-Nanosecond Electrical Pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    77 (43%) genes changing due to nsEP exposure. For the Jurkat cells, the top canonical pathway was the “ Hepatic Fibrosis / Hepatic Stellate Cell...150kv nsEP vs. sham Hs.446125 male germ cell-associated kinase MAK 4.483 0.00081 Hs.155111 hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 2 HAVCR2 4.453 0.00479...Symbol Fold change 150kVnsEP vs. sham p-Value 150kv nsEP vs. sham Hs.25647 v-fos FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog FOS 7.269 0.00031 Hs

  6. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Qing; Li, Ming-Ming; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo

    2014-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of heavy metals by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was investigated. Chemical analysis showed that different EPS compositions had different capacities for the adsorption of heavy metals which was investigated using Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Batch adsorption tests indicated that EPS had a higher combined ability with Zn(2+) than Cu(2+). This was confirmed and explained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy analysis. FTIR analysis showed that both polysaccharides and protein combined with Zn(2+) while only protein combined with Cu(2+). EEM spectra further revealed that tryptophan-like substances were the main compositions reacted with the heavy metals. Moreover, Zn(2+) had a higher fluorescence quenching ability than Cu(2+).

  7. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of Vibrio cholerae EpsG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jens, Jason; Raghunathan, Kannan; Vago, Frank; Arvidson, Dennis; (MSU)

    2010-01-12

    EpsG is the major pseudopilin protein of the Vibrio cholerae type II secretion system. An expression plasmid that encodes an N-terminally truncated form of EpsG with a C-terminal noncleavable His tag was constructed. Recombinant EpsG was expressed in Escherichia coli; the truncated protein was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir containing 6 mM zinc sulfate, 60 mM MES pH 6.5, 15% PEG MME 550. The crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.26 {angstrom} and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.61, b = 70.02, c = 131.54 {angstrom}.

  8. EPS solubilization treatment by applying the biosurfactant rhamnolipid to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingpu; Xu, Dong; Trinh, Xuantung; Liu, Shuangyuan; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Junmei; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-10-01

    Application of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) solubilization treatment with biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL) to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands was first conducted in this study. The results showed significant improvement in the solubilization and dispersion of clogging matter following the treatment. And RL dosage of 0.09-0.15g/L altered microbial group make-up and had an overall positive effect on the growth of microorganisms. Moreover, RL was found to enhance EPS dissolution and dispersion, which was beneficial for the release of enzymes embedded in the EPS, and resulted in enhanced pollutant removal. The treatment had no apparent detrimental effect on wetland plants. Our results indicate that the optimum dosage of RL is 0.12g/L, and that the approach provides a promising and moderate option to reverse wetland clogging through RL-mediated solubilization treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE ON PLASMA β-EP IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴绪平; 周爽; 刘又香; 王亚文; 周登方; 孙国杰

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the therapeutic effect of acupuncture at Shuigou (GV 26), Neiguan (PC 6) and Zusanli (ST 36) in treatment of 30 cases of ischemic cerebral apoplexy patients and its action on plasma β-EP (endorphine) level were observed. After treatment, of the 30-inpatients, 16 cases were cured basically, 9 had marked improvement, 4 had slight improvement and the rest one had no any changes. The significantly effective rate was 83.3% and the total effective rate was 96.7%. Before acupuncture treatment, the content of plasma β-EP inpatients with ischemicstroke increased significantly in comparison with that of normal group (P<0.01). While after treatment, plasma β-EP level decreased to approach to the normal level, which may be one of the mechanisms of acupunct。ure in alleviating stoke patients.

  10. Lipoic acid stimulates cAMP production via the EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors and inhibits IFN gamma synthesis and cellular cytotoxicity in NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinthone, Sonemany; Schillace, Robynn V; Marracci, Gail H; Bourdette, Dennis N; Carr, Daniel W

    2008-08-13

    The antioxidant lipoic acid (LA) treats and prevents the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In an effort to understand the therapeutic potential of LA in MS, we sought to define the cellular mechanisms that mediate the effects of LA on human natural killer (NK) cells, which are important in innate immunity as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and tumor cells. We discovered that LA stimulates cAMP production in NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Studies using pharmacological inhibitors and receptor transfection experiments indicate that LA stimulates cAMP production via activation of the EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors and adenylyl cyclase. In addition, LA suppressed interleukin (IL)-12/IL-18 induced IFNgamma secretion and cytotoxicity in NK cells. These novel findings suggest that LA may inhibit NK cell function via the cAMP signaling pathway.

  11. Preferences for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) information among men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) at community outreach settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C.; Corner, David; Garza, Eduardo; Guan, Wentao; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Brown, Larry; Chan, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Community outreach efforts to increase HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) utilization by at risk men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) first need to elucidate preferences for learning about PrEP and linking to PrEP resources. In this pilot study, we observed that among MSM recruited through community outreach, HIV sexual risk-taking was significant, yet self-perceived PrEP knowledge was low and interest in learning more about PrEP was moderate. Most preferred learning about PrEP and being provided local PrEP clinic information through electronic media. However, receipt of PrEP information alone did not appear to motivate these men into presenting to a local clinic for PrEP evaluation. PMID:27076865

  12. Prediction of the Human EP1 Receptor Binding Site by Homology Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Behnoush; Madadkar-Sobhani, Armin; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Mahmoudian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    The prostanoid receptor EP1 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) known to be involved in a variety of pathological disorders such as pain, fever and inflammation. These receptors are important drug targets, but design of subtype specific agonists and antagonists has been partially hampered by the absence of three-dimensional structures for these receptors. To understand the molecular interactions of the PGE2, an endogen ligand, with the EP1 receptor, a homology model of the human EP1 receptor (hEP1R) with all connecting loops was constructed from the 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure (PDB code: 1L9H) of bovine rhodopsin. The initial model generated by MODELLER was subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to assess quality of the model. Also, a step by step ligand-supported model refinement was performed, including initial docking of PGE2 and iloprost in the putative binding site, followed by several rounds of energy minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. Docking studies were performed for PGE2 and some other related compounds in the active site of the final hEP1 receptor model. The docking enabled us to identify key molecular interactions supported by the mutagenesis data. Also, the correlation of r(2)=0.81 was observed between the Ki values and the docking scores of 15 prostanoid compounds. The results obtained in this study may provide new insights toward understanding the active site conformation of the hEP1 receptor and can be used for the structure-based design of novel specific ligands.

  13. Lubiprostone activates CFTR, but not ClC-2, via the prostaglandin receptor (EP(4)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, Yohei; Moran, Aurelia R; MacDonald, Kelvin D

    2012-09-28

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of lubiprostone activation of epithelial chloride transport. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid approved for the treatment of constipation [1]. There is uncertainty, however, as to how lubiprostone increases epithelial chloride transport. Direct stimulation of ClC-2 and CFTR chloride channels as well as stimulation of these channels via the EP(4) receptor has been described [2-5]. To better define this mechanism, two-electrode voltage clamp was used to assay Xenopus oocytes expressing ClC-2, with or without co-expression of the EP(4) receptor or β adrenergic receptor (βAR), for changes in conductance elicited by lubiprostone. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and either βAR or the EP(4) receptor were also studied. In oocytes co-expressing ClC-2 and βAR conductance was stimulated by hyperpolarization and acidic pH (pH = 6), but there was no response to the β adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. Oocytes expressing ClC-2 only or co-expressing ClC-2 and EP(4) did not respond to the presence of 0.1, 1, or 10 μM lubiprostone in the superperfusate. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and βAR did not respond to hyperpolarization, acidic pH, or 1 μM lubiprostone. However, conductance was elevated by isoproterenol and inhibited by CFTR(inh)172. Co-expression of CFTR and EP(4) resulted in lubiprostone-stimulated conductance, which was also sensitive to CFTR(inh)172. The EC(50) for lubiprostone mediated CFTR activation was ~10 nM. These results demonstrate no direct action of lubiprostone on either ClC-2 or CFTR channels expressed in oocytes. However, the results confirm that CFTR can be activated by lubiprostone via the EP(4) receptor in oocytes.

  14. Use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS and Shredded Waste Polystyrene (SWAP Beads for Control of Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Soltani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mosquitoes transmit several diseases to human. There are several measures for control of larvae. As part of Integrated Vector Management (IVM program, the utility of floating layers of polystyrene beads (EPS is a po­ten­tial alternative in habitats of mosquito larva. EPS beads prevent oviposition of mosquito as well as killing the im­ma­ture stages by forming a tick layer on the water surface.  They are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need fre­quent application and remain on the surface of water for long time. The objective of the current study was to asses the effectiveness of two types of polystyrene beads of (EPS and (SWAP for control of mosquito larvae under labo­ra­tory conditions.Methods: Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus were used for experimental purposes. In each tray 250 lar­vae of late 3rd and early 4th instars were introduced. The experiment was conducted on 4 replicates for An. ste­phensi, Cu. quinquefasciatus and combination of both. Emerging of adult mosquitoes were calculated every day until the end of experiments.Results: Mortality rate and Inhibition of Emerge (IE for Cu. quinquefasciatus, An. stephensi and combination of both spe­cies was 97.8%, 100% and 99.07%, respectively using EPS. In average, EPS was able to kill 98.9% of lar­vae. The fig­ures with SWAP were 63%, 91.05% and 72.65%, respectively. The average mortality for mosquitoes was 75.57%Conclusion: EPS and SWAP beads can be very effective and practical for elimination of An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefas­ciatus under the laboratory conditions.

  15. Use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS and Shredded Waste Polystyrene (SWAP Beads for Control of Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Soltani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mosquitoes transmit several diseases to human. There are several measures for control of larvae. As part of Integrated Vector Management (IVM program, the utility of floating layers of polystyrene beads (EPS is a po­ten­tial alternative in habitats of mosquito larva. EPS beads prevent oviposition of mosquito as well as killing the im­ma­ture stages by forming a tick layer on the water surface.  They are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need fre­quent application and remain on the surface of water for long time. The objective of the current study was to asses the effectiveness of two types of polystyrene beads of (EPS and (SWAP for control of mosquito larvae under labo­ra­tory conditions."nMethods: Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus were used for experimental purposes. In each tray 250 lar­vae of late 3rd and early 4th instars were introduced. The experiment was conducted on 4 replicates for An. ste­phensi, Cu. quinquefasciatus and combination of both. Emerging of adult mosquitoes were calculated every day until the end of experiments."nResults: Mortality rate and Inhibition of Emerge (IE for Cu. quinquefasciatus, An. stephensi and combination of both spe­cies was 97.8%, 100% and 99.07%, respectively using EPS. In average, EPS was able to kill 98.9% of lar­vae. The fig­ures with SWAP were 63%, 91.05% and 72.65%, respectively. The average mortality for mosquitoes was 75.57%"nConclusion: EPS and SWAP beads can be very effective and practical for elimination of An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefas­ciatus under the laboratory conditions.

  16. PGE2/EP4 signaling in peripheral immune cells promotes development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Weigert, Andreas; Männich, Julia; Eberle, Max; Birod, Kerstin; Häussler, Annett; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schreiber, Yannick; Kunkel, Hana; Grez, Manuel; Weichand, Benjamin; Brüne, Bernhard; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Nüsing, Rolf; Niederberger, Ellen; Grösch, Sabine; Scholich, Klaus; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2014-02-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a T cell-mediated inflammatory autoimmune disease model of multiple sclerosis (MS). The inflammatory process is initiated by activation and proliferation of T cells and monocytes and by their subsequent migration into the central nervous system (CNS), where they induce demyelination and neurodegeneration. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) - synthesized by cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) - has both pro- and anti-inflammatory potential, which is translated via four different EP receptors. We hypothesized that PGE2 synthesized in the preclinical phase by peripheral immune cells exerts pro-inflammatory properties in the EAE model. To investigate this, we used a bone marrow transplantation model, which enables PGE2 synthesis or EP receptor expression to be blocked specifically in peripheral murine immune cells. Our results reveal that deletion of COX-2 or its EP4 receptor in bone marrow-derived cells leads to a significant delay in the onset of EAE. This effect is due to an impaired preclinical inflammatory process indicated by a reduced level of the T cell activating interleukin-6 (IL-6), reduced numbers of T cells and of the T cell secreted interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the blood of mice lacking COX-2 or EP4 in peripheral immune cells. Moreover, mice lacking COX-2 or EP4 in bone marrow-derived cells show a reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), which results in decreased infiltration of monocytes and T cells into the CNS. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that PGE2 synthesized by monocytes in the early preclinical phase promotes the development of EAE in an EP4 receptor dependent manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Potential Interventions to Support Adherence to HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Julia L.; Buisker, Timothy; Horvath, Tara; Amico, K. Rivet; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Grant, Robert M.; Liu, Albert Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Adherence is critical for maximizing the effectiveness of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in preventing HIV infection. Strategies for promoting adherence to HIV treatment, and their potential application to PrEP adherence, have received considerable attention. However, adherence promotion strategies for prevention medications have not been well characterized and may be more applicable to PrEP. We aimed to identify adherence support interventions that have been effective in other prevention fields and could be applied in the HIV prevention context to support pill taking among PrEP users. Methods To identify adherence support interventions that could be evaluated and applied in the PrEP context, we conducted a systematic review across the following prevention fields: hypertension, latent tuberculosis infection, hyperlipidemia, oral contraceptives, osteoporosis, malaria prophylaxis, and post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the efficacy of interventions to improve adherence to daily oral medications prescribed for primary prevention in healthy individuals or for secondary prevention in asymptomatic individuals. Results Our searches identified 585 studies, of which 48 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the review; nine evaluated multiple strategies, yielding 64 separately tested interventions. Interventions with the strongest evidence for improving adherence included complex, resource-intensive interventions, which combined multiple adherence support approaches, and low-cost, low-intensity interventions that provided education or telephone calls for adherence support. Conclusions Our review identified adherence interventions with strong evidence of efficacy across prevention fields and provides recommendations for evaluating these interventions in upcoming PrEP studies. PMID:24580813

  18. EFFECT OF ESTROGENS ON THE EXPRESSION OF PROSTAGLANDIN E2 RECEPTORS EP2 AND EP4 MRNA IN HOLSTEIN BOVINE OVlDUACTAL EPITHELIAL CELLS%雌激素对荷斯坦奶牛输卵管上皮细胞中前列腺素E2受体EP2和EP4mRNA表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付改玲; 曹金山

    2011-01-01

    本实验旨在探讨奶牛输卵管上皮细胞中是否存在前列腺素E2受体EP2和EP4,且该受体mRNA表达是否受雌激素(E2)的调控.将前列腺素类化合物PCE2和受体选择性激动剂(butaprost)按10-9 mol/L - 10-5 mol/L的浓度分别作用于体外培养的奶牛输卵管上皮细胞,应用Elisa方法检测细胞中第二信使cAMP量的变化.然后,将E2作用于体外培养的奶牛输卵管上皮细胞,应用real time RT- PCR技术检测EP2和EP4受体mRNA表达量的变化.Elisa实验结果显示,前列腺素类化合物PGE2和受体选择性激动剂(butaprost)可引起奶牛输卵管上皮中cAMP量的变化,且cAMP量具有对PCF2和butaprost浓度依存性的变化规律,表明奶牛输卵管上皮细胞中存在前列腺素受体EP2和EP4.Rcal time RT- PCR实验结果表明,奶牛输卵管上皮细胞中存在前列腺素受体EP2和EP4,且E2对EP2和EP4受体mRNA的表达具有调控作用,低浓度(10-12 mol/L)可提高该受体mRNA的表达量.%The study intended to investigate that whether or not the prostaglandin E2 Receptors EP2 and EP4 exist in bovine oviductal epithelial cells, and if estrogens ( E2) could regulate on the raRNA expression of EP2 and EP4 receptors. Methohs: According to concentration (10"'mol/L - 10~5mol/L) , prostaglandins E2(PCE2) and receptor selective agonists (butaprost) treated the bovine oviductal epithelial cell and used Elisa method to measure the quantity of second messenger cAMP in vitro. And then, with the treatment of E2 in vitro, using real time RT - PCR determined and measured EP2 and EP4 receptors mRNA expression on bovine oviductal epithelial cells. ReStultS and Conolusinon: The result of Elisa method shown that after PGE2 and butaprost treatment, the concentration cAMP had significantly and markedly change in bovine epithelial cells, this indicated that the change of cAMP concentration have dependence on concentration of PGE2 and butaprost, and prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4 exsit in

  19. Performance of CTBN(carboxyl-terminated poly (butadiene-co-acrylonitrile))-EP(diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A(DGEBA)) Prepolymers and CTBN-EP/polyetheramine (PEA) System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Minxian; HUANG Zhixiong; LI Yaming; YANG Guorui

    2009-01-01

    CTBN-EP prepolymers were synthesized from CTBN and epoxy resin under the catalysis of HTMAB.FTIR analyses indicate the formation of ester group between the carboxyl group of CTBN and the oxirane group of epoxy resin.The viscosity of modified prepolymer increases with CTBN content increasing,but the epoxy value of the prepolymer decreases greatly.DSC analyses verify that CTBN affects the curing process of CTBN-EP/PEA system.Mechanical testing presents the improved toughness of CTBN-EP/PEA curings for the decrease of tensile strength,flexural strength and compressive strength,and increase of impact strength and elongation-at-break with the CTBN content increasing.SEM micrographs show the rubber phase with many holes in diameter about 0.5-1.5μm is formed when CTBN content is lower than 10 phr.However,the pattern of SEM graph shows some stalactite-like strips when CTBN content is higher than 15 phr.Furthermore,the SEM image of 25 phr CTBN sample forms a kind of co-continuous structure.

  20. Using extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)-producing cyanobacteria for the bioremediation of heavy metals: do cations compete for the EPS functional groups and also accumulate inside the cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sara; Micheletti, Ernesto; Zille, Andrea; Santos, Arlete; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Tamagnini, Paula; De Philippis, Roberto

    2011-02-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) mainly of polysaccharidic nature. These EPS can remain associated to the cell surface as sheaths, capsules and/or slimes, or be liberated into the surrounding environment as released polysaccharides (RPS). The ability of EPS-producing cyanobacteria to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions has been widely reported in the literature, focusing mainly on the biotechnological potential. However, the knowledge of the effects of the metals in the cell's survival/growth is still scarce, particularly when they are simultaneously exposed to more than one metal. This work evaluated the effects of different concentrations of Cu(2+) and/or Pb(2+) in the growth/survival of Gloeothece sp. PCC 6909 and its sheathless mutant Gloeothece sp. CCY 9612. The results obtained clearly showed that both phenotypes are more severely affected by Cu(2+) than Pb(2+), and that the mutant is more sensitive to the former metal than the wild-type. Evident ultrastructural changes were also observed in the wild-type and mutant cells exposed to high levels (10 mg l(-1)) of Cu(2+). Moreover, in bi-metal systems, Pb(2+) was preferentially removed compared with Cu(2+), being the RPS of the mutant that is the most efficient polysaccharide fraction in metal removal. In these systems, the simultaneous presence of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) caused a mutual inhibition in the adsorption of each metal.

  1. Naphthalene/quinoline amides and sulfonylureas as potent and selective antagonists of the EP4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jason D; Farand, Julie; Colucci, John; Sturino, Claudio; Ducharme, Yves; Friesen, Richard W; Lévesque, Jean-François; Gagné, Sébastien; Wrona, Mark; Therien, Alex G; Mathieu, Marie-Claude; Denis, Danielle; Vigneault, Erika; Xu, Daigen; Clark, Patsy; Rowland, Steve; Han, Yongxin

    2011-02-01

    Two new series of EP(4) antagonists based on naphthalene/quinoline scaffolds have been identified as part of our on-going efforts to develop treatments for inflammatory pain. One series contains an acidic sulfonylurea pharmacophore, whereas the other is a neutral amide. Both series show subnanomolar intrinsic binding potency towards the EP(4) receptor, and excellent selectivity towards other prostanoid receptors. While the amide series generally displays poor pharmacokinetic parameters, the sulfonylureas exhibit greatly improved profile. MF-592, the optimal compound from the sulfonylurea series, has a desirable overall preclinical profile that suggests it is suitable for further development.

  2. Measure Guideline. Transitioning From Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco With EPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Davis, G. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This measure guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

  3. Developing risk-based quality control plans: an overview of CLSI EP23-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Nils B

    2013-03-01

    What constitutes quality control (QC) in the clinical laboratory has expanded from being focused on the testing of QC samples to managing the risks of reporting incorrect patient results. To effectively implement this expanded vision of QC, the techniques of risk management are important tools. In 2011, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute published EP23-A, Laboratory Quality Control Based on Risk Management, providing an introduction to risk management techniques and guidance on developing a risk-based QC plan. This article outlines the steps in developing and using a risk based QC plan based on the EP23 model.

  4. Design and implementation of EP-based PID controller for chaos synchronization of Rikitake circuit systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yi-You

    2017-09-01

    This article addresses an evolutionary programming (EP) algorithm technique-based and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control methods are established to guarantee synchronization of the master and slave Rikitake chaotic systems. For PID synchronous control, the evolutionary programming (EP) algorithm is used to find the optimal PID controller parameters kp, ki, kd by integrated absolute error (IAE) method for the convergence conditions. In order to verify the system performance, the basic electronic components containing operational amplifiers (OPAs), resistors, and capacitors are used to implement the proposed chaotic Rikitake systems. Finally, the experimental results validate the proposed Rikitake chaotic synchronization approach. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. COX-2 Elevates Oncogenic miR-526b in Breast Cancer by EP4 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Mousumi; Landman, Erin; Liu, Ling; Hess, David; Lala, Peeyush K

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small regulatory molecules emerging as potential biomarkers in cancer. Previously, it was shown that COX-2 expression promotes breast cancer progression via multiple mechanisms, including induction of stem-like cells (SLC), owing to activation of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 (PTGER4). COX-2 overexpression also upregulated microRNA-526b (miR-526b), in association with aggressive phenotype. Here, the functional roles of miR-526b in breast cancer and the mechanistic role of EP4 signaling in miR-526b upregulation were examined. A positive correlation was noted between miR-526b and COX-2 mRNA expression in COX-2 disparate breast cancer cell lines. Stable overexpression of miR-526b in poorly metastatic MCF7 and SKBR3 cell lines resulted in increased cellular migration, invasion, EMT phenotype and enhanced tumorsphere formation in vitro, and lung colony formation in vivo in immunodeficient mice. Conversely, knockdown of miR-526b in aggressive MCF7-COX-2 and SKBR3-COX-2 cells reduced oncogenic functions and reversed the EMT phenotype, in vitro. Furthermore, it was determined that miR-526b expression is dependent on EP4 receptor activity and downstream PI3K-AKT and cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways. PI3K-AKT inhibitors blocked EP4 agonist-mediated miR-526b upregulation and tumorsphere formation in MCF7 and SKBR3 cells. NF-κB inhibitor abrogates EP agonist-stimulated miRNA expression in MCF7 and T47D cells, indicating that the NF-κB pathway is also involved in miR-526b regulation. In addition, inhibition of COX-2, EP4, PI3K, and PKA in COX-2-overexpressing cells downregulated miR-526b and its functions in vitro. Finally, miR-526b expression was significantly higher in cancerous than in noncancerous breast tissues and associated with reduced patient survival. In conclusion, miR-526b promotes breast cancer progression, SLC-phenotype through EP4-mediated signaling, and correlates with breast cancer patient survival. This study presents novel

  6. Terapeuttisten harjoitteiden luominen mobiilisovellukseen epäspesifin alaselkäkivun kuntoutumisprosessin tueksi

    OpenAIRE

    Koljander, Silja; Kuusela, Johanna; Peltonen, Jaana

    2016-01-01

    Nykyteknologian kehitys on mahdollistanut erilaisten sovellusten käytön perinteisen fysioterapian rinnalla. Tämän opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on luoda näyttöön perustuvia terapeuttisia harjoitteita toimeksiantajana toimivan HealthFOX Oy:n mobiilisovellukseen epäspesifin alaselkäkivun kuntoutumisprosessin tueksi. Epäspesifi alaselkäkipu valikoitui harjoitteiden kohteeksi sen yleisyyden ja toisaalta opinnäytetyöntekijöiden oman mielenkiinnon vuoksi. Harjoitteiden luomisessa hyödynnettiin keh...

  7. EpCAM is a putative stem marker in retinoblastoma and an effective target for T-cell-mediated immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Moutushy; Kandalam, Mallikarjuna; Harilal, Anju; Verma, Rama Shenkar; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Swaminathan, Sethuraman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The molecular markers cluster of differentiation (CD)24, CD44, adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) binding cassette protein G2 (ABCG2), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) are widely used, individually or in combination, to characterize some types of cancer stem cells. In this study we characterized the EpCAM+ retinoblastoma (RB) cells for their cancer stem-like properties in vitro. Additionally, we targeted RB tumor cells via redirecting T cells using bispecific EpCAM×CD3 antibody. Methods Flow cytometry was used to study the co-expression of EpCAM with putative cancer stem cell markers, such as CD44, CD24, and ABCG2, in RB primary tumors. In vitro methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, invasion assay, and neurosphere formation assay were performed to characterize EpCAM+ cells for their cancer stem/progenitor cell-like properties. We assessed the in vitro efficacy of bispecific EpCAM×CD3 antibody on RB tumor cell proliferation and validated the results by evaluating effector cytokine production in the culture medium with the ELISA method. Results EpCAM was co-expressed with all cancer stem cell markers (CD44, CD24, and ABCG2) in primary RB tumors. EpCAM+ cells showed significantly higher proliferative invasive potential and neurosphere formation in vitro compared to EpCAM– Y79 cells. EpCAM+ cells showed higher β-catenin expression compared to EpCAMˉ cells. EpCAM×CD3 significantly retarded proliferation of RB primary tumor cells. EpCAM×CD3 effectively induced the secretion of effector cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and also perforin levels by pre-activated lymphocytes. Conclusions EpCAM might be a novel cancer stem cell marker in RB. EpCAM×CD3 antibody redirecting T cells to attack RB tumor cells may prove effective in RB management. Further preclinical studies are needed to confirm the initial findings of our study. PMID:22328825

  8. An Ep-ICD based index is a marker of aggressiveness and poor prognosis in thyroid carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C-H He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear accumulation of the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-ICD in tumor cells was demonstrated to predict poor prognosis in thyroid carcinoma patients in our earlier study. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of Ep-ICD subcellular localization index (ESLI in distinguishing aggressive papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC from non-aggressive cases. METHODS: Using domain specific antibodies against the intracellular (Ep-ICD and extracellular (EpEx domains of epithelial cell adhesion molecule, 200 archived tissues from a new cohort of patients with benign thyroid disease as well as malignant aggressive and non aggressive PTC were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC. ESLI was defined as sum of the IHC scores for accumulation of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx; ESLI = [Ep-ICD(nuc + Ep-ICD(cyt + loss of membranous EpEx]. RESULTS: For the benign thyroid tissues, non-aggressive PTC and aggressive PTC, the mean ESLI scores were 4.5, 6.7 and 11 respectively. Immunofluorescence double staining confirmed increased nuclear Ep-ICD accumulation and decreased membrane EpEx expression in aggressive PTC. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC of 0.841, 70.2% sensitivity and 83.9% specificity for nuclear Ep-ICD for differentiating aggressive PTC from non-aggressive PTC. ESLI distinguished aggressive PTC from non-aggressive cases with improved AUC of 0.924, 88.4% sensitivity and 85.5% specificity. Our study confirms nuclear accumulation of Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx occurs in aggressive PTC underscoring the potential of Ep-ICD and ESLI to serve as diagnostic markers for aggressive PTC. Kaplan Meier survival analysis revealed significantly reduced disease free survival (DFS for ESLI positive (cutoff >10 PTC (p<0.05, mean DFS=133 months as compared to 210 months for patients who did not show positive ESLI. CONCLUSION: ESLI

  9. Suppression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2 by PPARgamma ligands inhibits human lung carcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, ShouWei; Roman, Jesse

    2004-02-20

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), a major cyclooxygenase (COX-2) metabolite, plays important roles in tumor biology and its functions are mediated through one or more of its receptors EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. We have shown that the matrix glycoprotein fibronectin stimulates lung carcinoma cell proliferation via induction of COX-2 expression with subsequent PGE(2) protein biosynthesis. Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) inhibited this effect and induced cellular apoptosis. Here, we explore the role of the PGE(2) receptor EP2 in this process and whether the inhibition observed with PPARgamma ligands is related to effects on this receptor. We found that human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines (H1838 and H2106) express EP2 receptors, and that the inhibition of cell growth by PPARgamma ligands (GW1929, PGJ2, ciglitazone, troglitazone, and rosiglitazone [also known as BRL49653]) was associated with a significant decrease in EP2 mRNA and protein levels. The inhibitory effects of BRL49653 and ciglitazone, but not PGJ2, were reversed by a specific PPARgamma antagonist GW9662, suggesting the involvement of PPARgamma-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PPARgamma ligand treatment was associated with phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (Erk), and inhibition of EP2 receptor expression by PPARgamma ligands was prevented by PD98095, an inhibitor of the MEK-1/Erk pathway. Butaprost, an EP2 agonist, like exogenous PGE(2) (dmPGE(2)), increased lung carcinoma cell growth, however, GW1929 and troglitazone blocked their effects. Our studies reveal a novel role for EP2 in mediating the proliferative effects of PGE(2) on lung carcinoma cells. PPARgamma ligands inhibit human lung carcinoma cell growth by decreasing the expression of EP2 receptors through Erk signaling and PPARgamma-dependent and -independent pathways.

  10. Moist formulations of the EP flux and their connection to surface westerlies in current and warmer climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J. G.; O'Gorman, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux is an important diagnostic for wave propagation and wave-mean flow interaction in the atmosphere. Here we compare two moist formulations of the EP flux with the traditional dry EP flux and analyze their link to the position and strength of the surface westerlies using reanalysis data and both fully-coupled and idealized climate models. The first moist formulation of the EP flux modifies only the static stability to account for latent heat release by eddies, while the second moist formulation simply replaces all potential temperatures with equivalent potential temperatures. When moisture is taken into account, the latitude of maximum upward EP flux and maximum EP flux convergence shift equatorward and the strengths of both the flux and convergence increase, with larger changes for the second moist formulation. In simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model, both the peak surface winds and peak upward EP flux in the lower troposphere tend to be co-located throughout the seasonal cycle (especially in the moist formulations) and shift poleward by similar amounts in response to greenhouse warming. In simulations over a wider range of climates with an idealized atmospheric climate model we find that in cold climates the position of the surface westerlies coincides with the position of the maximum vertical EP flux and shifts poleward with warming, while in warm climates the surface westerlies coincide with an anomalous region of EP flux divergence near the subtropical jet. An isentropic potential enstrophy budget analysis reveals that in this model the anomalous EP flux divergence is balanced by vertical eddy PV fluxes associated with diabatic heating from large-scale condensation and radiation. The anomalous divergence is weaker when using moist EP fluxes, indicating that the moist formulations are partly capturing this effect.

  11. Dominant role of prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor in furosemide-induced salt-losing tubulopathy: a model for hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüsing, Rolf M; Treude, Antje; Weissenberger, Christian

    2005-01-01

    -/-, EP2-/-, EP3-/-, and EP4-/-), the effect of chronic furosemide administration (7 d) on urine output, sodium and potassium excretion, and renin secretion was determined. Furthermore, furosemide-induced diuresis and renin activity were analyzed in mice with defective PGI2 receptors (IP-/-). In all...... was significantly decreased in EP4-/- mice and to a lesser degree also in IP-/- mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of EP4 receptors in furosemide-treated WT mice with the specific antagonist ONO-AE3-208 mimicked the changes in renin mRNA expression, plasma renin concentration, diuresis, and sodium excretion seen in EP4...

  12. Musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunting, K L; Welch, L S; Cuccherini, B A; Seiger, L A

    1994-02-01

    This study ascertained the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians, in order to evaluate the prevalence of cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) in this population. We adapted the CTD surveillance questionnaire used by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess the prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrist, back, and knee symptoms in the year prior to the survey. Questionnaires were completed by 308 apprentices and journeymen enrolled in training classes at the local union hall. The participants were relatively young individuals, and 86% of the participants were currently working as electricians. Participants reported a high prevalence of symptoms which occurred more than three times during the past year or which lasted more than 1 week. Back symptoms and hand/wrist symptoms were experienced most frequently, by about half the population, while elbow symptoms were reported by only 15% of participants. Symptom prevalence was lower, but still notable, when defined as symptoms which had occurred at least once a month or lasted more than a week in the past year. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one musculoskeletal symptom using the most inclusive definition, while 57% reported two or more symptoms. This survey highlights that: 1) low back discomfort is common in young construction workers, and resulted in medical care, missed work, or light duty for almost 35% of the participants; 2) neck discomfort is also very common and required doctor visits or work modification for almost one quarter of the participants; 3) these construction workers continued to work with symptoms that are classifiable as a CTD; and 4) history of injury is correlated with the subsequent prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  13. Management of somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Dimsdale, Joel

    2014-01-01

    on the recognition and effective management of patients with excessive and disabling somatic symptoms. The clinical presentation of somatic symptoms is categorized into three groups of patients: those with multiple somatic symptoms, those with health anxiety, and those with conversion disorder. The chapter provides...... information to assist with making a diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Management includes ways to improve the physician–patient interaction that will benefit the patient, a step-care model based on illness severity and complexity, and psychological and pharmacologic treatment. The chapter is enhanced...... by figures and tables that summarize health anxiety, symptoms, differential diagnoses, and management strategies, as well as by case studies and examples....

  14. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page Primary Symptoms Other Symptoms What's ... a doctor distinguish CFS from other illnesses. Primary Symptoms As the name chronic fatigue syndrome suggests , fatigue ...

  15. Episcleral eye plaque dosimetry comparison for the Eye Physics EP917 using Plaque Simulator and Monte Carlo simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimmermann, Leonard W; Amoush, Ahmad; Wilkinson, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    ... for an Eye Physics model EP917 eye plaque. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using MCNPX 2.7 was used to calculate the central axis dose in water for an EP917 eye plaque fully loaded with 17 IsoAid Advantage (125)I seeds...

  16. Episcleral eye plaque dosimetry comparison for the Eye Physics EP917 using Plaque Simulator and Monte Carlo simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimmermann, Leonard W; Amoush, Ahmad; Wilkinson, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    ... for an Eye Physics model EP917 eye plaque. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using MCNPX 2.7 was used to calculate the central axis dose in water for an EP917 eye plaque fully loaded with 17 IsoAid Advantage   125 I seeds...

  17. Cerebroprotection by the neuronal PGE2 receptor EP2 after intracerebral hemorrhage in middle-aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, He; Wu, Tao; Han, Xiaoning; Wan, Jieru; Jiang, Chao; Chen, Wenwu; Lu, Hong; Yang, Qingwu; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory responses mediated by prostaglandins such as PGE2 may contribute to secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the cell-specific signaling by PGE2 receptor EP2 differs depending on whether the neuropathic insult is acute or chronic. Using genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we investigated the role of EP2 receptor in two mouse models of ICH induced by intrastriatal injection of collagenase or autologous arterial whole blood. We used middle-aged male mice to enhance the clinical relevance of the study. EP2 receptor was expressed in neurons but not in astrocytes or microglia after collagenase-induced ICH. Brain injury after collagenase-induced ICH was associated with enhanced cellular and molecular inflammatory responses, oxidative stress, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 activity. EP2 receptor deletion exacerbated brain injury, brain swelling/edema, neuronal death, and neurobehavioral deficits, whereas EP2 receptor activation by the highly selective agonist AE1-259-01 reversed these outcomes. EP2 receptor deletion also exacerbated brain edema and neurologic deficits in the blood ICH model. These findings support the premise that neuronal EP2 receptor activation by PGE2 protects brain against ICH injury in middle-aged mice through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects and anti-MMP-2/9 activity. PGE2/EP2 signaling warrants further investigation for potential use in ICH treatment.

  18. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their subfractions to the sludge aggregation in membrane bioreactor coupled with worm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Tian, Yu; Ding, Yi; Wang, Haoyu; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    This study focused on the effect of predated sludge recycle on the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and their subfractions to sludge aggregation in combined MBR system. It was observed that aggregation abilities of sludge samples were decreased by worm predation. Furthermore, worm predation enhanced the energy barriers and weakened the secondary energy minimum in the interaction energy profiles of slime, loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). Further investigations demonstrated that the content decrease and structural change of different EPS fractions induced by worm predation may be the reason for the decreased aggregation of sludge. Concomitantly, the adsorption tests and atomic force microscopy observation confirmed that the worm predation decreased the adsorption of slime, LB-EPS and TB-EPS on membrane. This would indicate the worm predation could keep an optimum EPS level for which floc structure was maintained and the fouling propensity of mixed liquid was reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS) on concrete properties: Influence on flexural strength, water absorption and shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsalah, Jamaleddin; Al-Sahli, Yosra; Akish, Ahmed; Saad, Omar; Hakemi, Abdurrahman

    2013-12-01

    Expanded polystyrene waste in a granular form was used as a lightweight aggregate in order to produce lightweight concretë Lightweight EPS concrete composites were produced by replacing the coarse aggregate, either partially or fully with equal volume of EPS aggregates. The coarse aggregate replacements levels used were 25, 50, 75, and 100%, which corresponded to (9.20, 18.40, 27.60, and 36.8%) from total volume. The investigation is directed towards the development and performance evaluation of the concrete composites containing EPS aggregates, without addition of either bonding additives, or super-plasticizers on some concrete properties such as flexure strength, water absorption and change in length (or shrinkage). Experimental results showed that a density reduction of 12% caused flexure strength to decrease by 25.3% at a replacement level of 25% EPS. However, the reduction percentage strongly depends upon the replacement level of EPS granules. Moreover, the lower strength concretes showed a higher water absorption values compared to higher strength concrete, i.e., increasing the volume percentage of EPS increases the water absorption as well as the negative strain (shrinkage). The negative strain was higher at concretes of lower density (containing a high amount of EPS aggregate). The water to cement ratio of EPS aggregate concrete is found to be slightly lower than that of conventional concrete.

  20. Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Production of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS by Serpentine Rhizobacterium Cupriavidus pauculus KPS 201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Pal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS are complex biopolymers produced by a wide array of microorganisms for protection against dessication, aggregation, adhesion, and expression of virulence. Growth associated production of EPS by Ni-resistant Cupriavidus pauculus KPS 201 was determined in batch culture using sodium gluconate as the sole carbon source. The optimum pH and temperature for EPS production were 6.5 and 25°C, respectively. Optimal EPS yield (118 μg/mL was attained at 0.35% Na-gluconate after 72 h of growth. Cupriavidus KPS 201 cells also utilized glutamate, acetate, pyruvate, fumarate, malate, malonate, formate, citrate, and succinate for EPS production. Although EPS production was positively influenced by the increase of nitrogen and phosphate in the growth medium, it was negatively influenced by nickel ions. Compositional analysis of the purified EPS showed that it is a homopolymer of rhamnose containing uronic acid, protein, and nucleic acid. Presence of lipids was also detected with spectroscopy. Non-destructive EPS mediated biofilm formation of KPS 201 was also visualized by epifluorescence microscopy.

  1. PGE2 promotes breast cancer-associated lymphangiogenesis by activation of EP4 receptor on lymphatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Pinki; Girish, Gannareddy V; Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Tutunea-Fatan, Elena; Lala, Peeyush K

    2017-01-05

    Lymphatic metastasis, facilitated by lymphangiogenesis is a common occurrence in breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms remaining incompletely understood. We had earlier shown that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression by human or murine breast cancer cells promoted lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis by upregulating VEGF-C/D production by tumor cells or tumor-associated macrophages primarily due to activation of the prostaglandin receptor EP4 by endogenous PGE2. It is not clear whether tumor or host-derived PGE2 has any direct effect on lymphangiogenesis, and if so, whether EP4 receptors on lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) play any role. Here, we address these questions employing in vitro studies with a COX-2-expressing and VEGF-C/D-producing murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 and a rat mesenteric (RM) LEC line and in vivo studies in nude mice. RMLEC responded to PGE2, an EP4 agonist PGE1OH, or C3L5 cell-conditioned media (C3L5-CM) by increased proliferation, migration and accelerated tube formation on growth factor reduced Matrigel. Native tube formation by RMLEC on Matrigel was abrogated in the presence of a selective COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist. Addition of PGE2 or EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM individually in the presence of COX-2 inhibitor, or EP4 antagonist, restored tube formation, reinforcing the role of EP4 on RMLEC in tubulogenesis. These results were partially duplicated with a human dermal LEC (HMVEC-dLyAd) and a COX-2 expressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Knocking down EP4 with shRNA in RMLEC abrogated their tube forming capacity on Matrigel in the absence or presence of PGE2, EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM. RMLEC tubulogenesis following EP4 activation by agonist treatment was dependent on PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling pathways and VEGFR-3 stimulation. Finally in a directed in vivo lymphangiogenesis assay (DIVLA) we demonstrated the lymphangiogenic as well as angiogenic capacity of PGE2 and EP4 agonist in vivo. These results demonstrate

  2. EGFR-Based Immunoisolation as a Recovery Target for Low-EpCAM CTC Subpopulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Ana; Abal, Miguel; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Rodriguez-Abreu, Carlos; Rivas, José; López-López, Rafael; Costa, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) play a key role in the metastasis process, as they are responsible for micrometastasis and are a valuable tool for monitoring patients in real-time. Moreover, efforts to develop new strategies for CTCs isolation and characterisation, and the translation of CTCs into clinical practice needs to overcome the limitation associated with the sole use of Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) expression to purify this tumour cell subpopulation. CTCs are rare events in the blood of patients and are believed to represent the epithelial population from a primary tumour of epithelial origin, thus EpCAM immunoisolation is considered an appropriate strategy. The controversy stems from the impact that the more aggressive mesenchymal tumour phenotypes might have on the whole CTC population. In this work, we first characterised a panel of cell lines representative of tumour heterogeneity, confirming the existence of tumour cell subpopulations with restricted epithelial features and supporting the limitations of EpCAM-based technologies. We next developed customised polystyrene magnetic beads coated with antibodies to efficiently isolate the phenotypically different subpopulations of CTCs from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with metastatic cancer. Besides EpCAM, we propose Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) as an additional isolation marker for efficient CTCs detection. PMID:27711186

  3. A thermo-electro-mechanical simulation model for hot wire cutting of EPS foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical mathematical model describing the effects taking place within a Ni-Cr20% wire used in a hot-wire cutting process for free forming and rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is investigated and simulated. The model implements and solves three semi...

  4. Project work on wellbeing in multidisciplinary student teams: a triple testimonial on eps at artesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohaert, S.; Baelus, C.; Lacko, D.

    2012-01-01

    The European Project Semester (EPS) programme offers an educational framework to support students to practice problem-and project-based cross-disciplinary product innovation and research, in small multidisciplinary and international teams. To explore the potential and the restrictions of this intern

  5. EP-DNN: A Deep Neural Network-Based Global Enhancer Prediction Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Gon; Harwani, Mrudul; Grama, Ananth; Chaterji, Somali

    2016-12-01

    We present EP-DNN, a protocol for predicting enhancers based on chromatin features, in different cell types. Specifically, we use a deep neural network (DNN)-based architecture to extract enhancer signatures in a representative human embryonic stem cell type (H1) and a differentiated lung cell type (IMR90). We train EP-DNN using p300 binding sites, as enhancers, and TSS and random non-DHS sites, as non-enhancers. We perform same-cell and cross-cell predictions to quantify the validation rate and compare against two state-of-the-art methods, DEEP-ENCODE and RFECS. We find that EP-DNN has superior accuracy with a validation rate of 91.6%, relative to 85.3% for DEEP-ENCODE and 85.5% for RFECS, for a given number of enhancer predictions and also scales better for a larger number of enhancer predictions. Moreover, our H1 → IMR90 predictions turn out to be more accurate than IMR90 → IMR90, potentially because H1 exhibits a richer signature set and our EP-DNN model is expressive enough to extract these subtleties. Our work shows how to leverage the full expressivity of deep learning models, using multiple hidden layers, while avoiding overfitting on the training data. We also lay the foundation for exploration of cross-cell enhancer predictions, potentially reducing the need for expensive experimentation.

  6. Nuclear PDFs at NLO - status report and review of the EPS09 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskola, K.J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Paukkunen, H.; Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    We review the current status of the global DGLAP analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions, nPDFs, focusing on the recent EPS09 analysis [K.J. Eskola, H. Paukkunen, C.A. Salgado, JHEP 0904 (2009) 065. [ (arXiv:0902.4154 [hep-ph])

  7. Nuclear PDFs at NLO - status report and review of the EPS09 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskola, K. J.; Paukkunen, H.; Salgado, C. A.

    2011-04-01

    We review the current status of the global DGLAP analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions, nPDFs, focusing on the recent EPS09 analysis [K.J. Eskola, H. Paukkunen, C.A. Salgado, JHEP 0904 (2009) 065. [ arXiv:0902.4154 [hep-ph

  8. New Reactor Physics Benchmark Data in the March 2012 Edition of the IRPhEP Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford

    2012-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was established to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications. Numerous experiments that have been performed worldwide, represent a large investment of infrastructure, expertise, and cost, and are valuable resources of data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, development, and validation of methods. If the experimental data are lost, the high cost to repeat many of these measurements may be prohibitive. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. Contributors from around the world collaborate in the evaluation and review of selected benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [1]. Several new evaluations have been prepared for inclusion in the March 2012 edition of the IRPhEP Handbook.

  9. Presentations of Europe on political party websites during the 2004 EP election campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, R.G. van; Wester, F.P.J.; Jankowski, N.W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we investigate the online communication about Europe as present on websites produced by French, British and Dutch political parties during the 2004 European Parliament (EP) election campaign. It is through the manner in which Europe is presented within this online communication that

  10. An EGP-2/Ep-CAM-expressing transgenic rat model to evaluate antibody-mediated immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, PMJ; Kroesen, BJ; Dokter, WHA; van der Molen, H; de Groot, M; Brinker, MGL; Kok, K; Ruiters, MHJ; Buys, CHCM; de Leij, LFMH

    1999-01-01

    The human pancarcinoma-associated epithelial glycoprotein-2 (EGP-2), also known as 17-1A or EpCAM, is a 38-kDa transmembrane antigen, commonly used for targeted immunotherapy of carcinomas. Although strongly expressed by most carcinomas, EGP-2 is also expressed in most simple epithelia. To evaluate

  11. Pro-Oxidant Activity of Flavonoids Induces EpRE-Mediated Gene Expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee-Hilz, Y.Y.; Boerboom, A.M.J.F.; Westphal, A.H.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Flavonoids are important bioactive dietary compounds. They induce electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated expression of enzymes, such as NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which are major defense enzymes against electrophilic toxicants and oxidative

  12. Measurement of isolated photons accompanied by jets in deep inelastic ep scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The production of isolated high-energy photons accompanied by jets has been measured in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 326 pb(-1). Measurements were made for exchanged photon virtualities Q(2), in the range 10 to 350 GeV2. The photons w

  13. Angular correlations in three-jet events in ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Three-jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction was investigated with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of up to 127 pb(-1). Measurements of differential cross sections are presented as functions of angular correlations between the three jets in the fi

  14. Search for single-top production in ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    A search for single-top production, ep -> et X, has been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.37 fb(-1). No evidence for top production was found, consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model. Limits were computed for single-to

  15. Differential regulation of EP receptor isoforms during chondrogenesis and chondrocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine A; Schwarz, Edward M; Zhang, Xinping; Ziran, Navid M; Drissi, Hicham; O'Keefe, Regis J; Zuscik, Michael J

    2005-03-18

    Regulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte maturation by prostaglandins has been a topic of interest during recent years. Particular focus on this area derives from the realization that inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could impact these cartilage-related processes which are important in skeletal development and are recapitulated during bone healing either post-trauma or post-surgery. In addition to reviewing the relevant literature focused on prostaglandin synthesis and signaling through the G-protein coupled EP receptors, we present novel findings that establish the expression profile of EP receptors in chondroprogenitors and chondrocytes. Further, we begin to examine the signaling that may be involved with the transduction of PGE2 effects in these cells. Our findings suggest that EP2 and EP4 receptor activation of cAMP metabolism may represent a central axis of events that facilitate the impact of PGE2 on the processes of mesenchymal stem cell commitment to chondrogenesis and ultimate chondrocyte maturation.

  16. Combined measurement and QCD analysis of the inclusive e(+/-)p scattering cross sections at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Al-daya Martin, M.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Antunovic, B.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borodin, M.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Boudry, V.; Boutle, S. K.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Favereau, J.; Delcourt, B.; del Peso, J.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D. -J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gabathuler, E.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grell, B. R.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Helebrant, C.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Holm, U.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Horton, K.; Hreus, T.; Huettmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Katzy, J.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kollar, D.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krueger, K.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kutak, K.; Kuze, M.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Loktionova, N.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukasik, J.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Luzniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makankine, A.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Marage, P.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H. -U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, K.; Murin, P.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, Th.; Nicholass, D.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Osman, S.; Ota, O.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pejchal, O.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Plucinski, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salek, D.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoening, A.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Sloan, T.; Slominski, W.; Smiljanic, I.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sorokin, Iu.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Sunar, D.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Tchoulakov, V.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Urban, K.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A. Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, V.; Vinokurova, S.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volchinski, V.; Volynets, O.; von den Driesch, M.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wing, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wuensch, E.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zeniaev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolko, M.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    A combination is presented of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e(+/-)p scattering at HERA during the period 1994-2000. The data span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q(

  17. EpCAM Expression in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Carcinoma : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, Anna K.; Hoving, Hilde D.; Rosati, Stefano; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; de Jong, Igle J.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new imaging modalities in prostate carcinoma staging. A non-invasive modality that can assess lymph node and bone metastases simultaneously is preferred. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membranous protein of interest as an imaging target since it is overexp

  18. EpCAM expression in lymph node and bone metastases of prostate carcinoma: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, A.K. (Anna K.); Hoving, H.D. (Hilde D.); S. Rosati (Stefano); G.J.H.L. Leenders (Geert); I.J. de Jong (Igle)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThere is an urgent need for new imaging modalities in prostate carcinoma staging. A non-invasive modality that can assess lymph node and bone metastases simultaneously is preferred. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membranous protein of interest as an imaging target since i

  19. Contributed papers presented at the 24. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    In the report thirteen papers are compiled which were presented by members of the Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasma, Lausanne, at the 24th EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. They mainly deal with problems of the confinement and are based on studies performed in the TCV tokamak. figs., tabs., refs.

  20. Role of Catechin Quinones in the Induction of EpRE-Mediated Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muzolf-Panek, M.; Gliszczynska-Swiglo, A.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Szymusiak, H.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Tyrakowska, B.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the ability of green tea catechins to induce electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression and the role of their quinones in the mechanism of this induction were investigated. To this end, Hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells were used, stably transfected with a luc

  1. Combined measurement and QCD analysis of the inclusive e(+/-)p scattering cross sections at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Al-daya Martin, M.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Antunovic, B.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borodin, M.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Boudry, V.; Boutle, S. K.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Favereau, J.; Delcourt, B.; del Peso, J.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D. -J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gabathuler, E.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grell, B. R.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Helebrant, C.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Holm, U.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Horton, K.; Hreus, T.; Huettmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Katzy, J.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kollar, D.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krueger, K.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kutak, K.; Kuze, M.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Loktionova, N.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukasik, J.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Luzniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makankine, A.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Marage, P.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H. -U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, K.; Murin, P.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, Th.; Nicholass, D.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Osman, S.; Ota, O.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pejchal, O.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Plucinski, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salek, D.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoening, A.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Sloan, T.; Slominski, W.; Smiljanic, I.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sorokin, Iu.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Sunar, D.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Tchoulakov, V.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Urban, K.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A. Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, V.; Vinokurova, S.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volchinski, V.; Volynets, O.; von den Driesch, M.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wing, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wuensch, E.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zeniaev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolko, M.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    A combination is presented of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e(+/-)p scattering at HERA during the period 1994-2000. The data span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared,

  2. Land Surface Albedo From EPS/AVHRR : Method For Retrieval and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.

    2015-12-01

    The scope of Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) is to increase benefit from EUMETSAT Satellites (MSG and EPS) data by providing added value products for the meteorological and environmental science communities with main applications in the fields of climate modelling, environmental management, natural hazards management, and climate change detection. The MSG/SEVIRI daily albedo product is disseminated operationally by the LSA-SAF processing centre based in Portugal since 2009. This product so-called MDAL covers Europe and Africa includes in the visible, near infrared and shortwave bands at a resolution of 3km at the equator. Recently, an albedo product at 1km so-called ETAL has been built from EPS/AVHRR observations in order to primarily MDAL product outside the MSG disk, while ensuring a global coverage. The methodology is common to MSG and EPS data and relies on the inversion of the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model of Roujean et al. On a given target, ETAL products exploits the variability of viewing angles whereas MDAL looks at the variations of solar illumination. The comparison of ETAL albedo product against MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI products over the year 2015 is instructive in many ways and shows in general a good agreement between them. The dispersion may be accounted by different factors that will be explained The additional information provided by EPS appears to be particularly beneficial for high latitudes during winter and for snow albedo.

  3. Quenching Combustible Dust Mixtures Using Electric Particulate Suspensions (EPS): A New Testing Method For Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, Gerald M.; Greene, Nathanael; Shoemaker, David; Xu, Hua

    2003-01-01

    The Electric Particulate Suspension (EPS) is a combustion ignition system being developed at Iowa State University for evaluating quenching effects of powders in microgravity (quenching distance, ignition energy, flammability limits). Because of the high cloud uniformity possible and its simplicity, the EPS method has potential for "benchmark" design of quenching flames that would provide NASA and the scientific community with a new fire standard. Microgravity is expected to increase suspension uniformity even further and extend combustion testing to higher concentrations (rich fuel limit) than is possible at normal gravity. Two new combustion parameters are being investigated with this new method: (1) the particle velocity distribution and (2) particle-oxidant slip velocity. Both walls and (inert) particles can be tested as quenching media. The EPS method supports combustion modeling by providing accurate measurement of flame-quenching distance as a parameter in laminar flame theory as it closely relates to characteristic flame thickness and flame structure. Because of its design simplicity, EPS is suitable for testing on the International Space Station (ISS). Laser scans showing stratification effects at 1-g have been studied for different materials, aluminum, glass, and copper. PTV/PIV and a leak hole sampling rig give particle velocity distribution with particle slip velocity evaluated using LDA. Sample quenching and ignition energy curves are given for aluminum powder. Testing is planned for the KC-135 and NASA s two second drop tower. Only 1-g ground-based data have been reported to date.

  4. EPS (Electric Particulate Suspension) Microgravity Technology Provides NASA with New Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, Gerald M.; Greene, Nate; Xu, Hua

    2004-01-01

    The Electric Particulate Suspension is a fire safety ignition test system being developed at Iowa State University with NASA support for evaluating combustion properties of powders, powder-gas mixtures, and pure gases in microgravity and gravitational atmospheres (quenching distance, ignition energy, flammability limits). A separate application is the use of EPS technology to control heat transfer in vacuum and space environment enclosures. In combustion testing, ignitable powders (aluminum, magnesium) are introduced in the EPS test cell and ignited by spark, while the addition of inert particles act as quenching media. As a combustion research tool, the EPS method has potential as a benchmark design for quenching powder flames that would provide NASA with a new fire safety standard for powder ignition testing. The EPS method also supports combustion modeling by providing accurate measurement of flame-quenching distance as an important parameter in laminar flame theory since it is closely related to characteristic flame thickness and flame structure. In heat transfer applications, inert powder suspensions (copper, steel) driven by electric fields regulate heat flow between adjacent surfaces enclosures both in vacuum (or gas) and microgravity. This simple E-field control can be particularly useful in space environments where physical separation is a requirement between heat exchange surfaces.

  5. EPS insulated façade fires from a fire and rescue perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumm M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the challenges the fire and rescue services can meet at façade fires involving EPS insulation during construction and use of a building. The EPS characteristics are discussed in respect to the fire and rescue operation and results from orientating fire tests performed at a fire and rescue services training and test field are presented. Types of evacuation solutions, involving the fire and rescue services, where façade fires can delay or completely rule out the possibilities for safe evacuation, are presented. The restrictions in the Swedish building codes regarding use of combustible insulation are analysed and reflections over the practical problems with following the instructions to keep an EPS insulated façade safe through the building's whole lifespan are made. A number of occurred fires involving EPS are discussed and analysed from a fire and rescue perspective. Finally, recommendations are given for the fire and rescue services and future research fields are proposed.

  6. Loss of the actin remodeler Eps8 causes intestinal defects and improved metabolic status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Tocchetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a variety of organisms, including mammals, caloric restriction improves metabolic status and lowers the incidence of chronic-degenerative diseases, ultimately leading to increased lifespan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that knockout mice for Eps8, a regulator of actin dynamics, display reduced body weight, partial resistance to age- or diet-induced obesity, and overall improved metabolic status. Alteration in the liver gene expression profile, in behavior and metabolism point to a calorie restriction-like phenotype in Eps8 knockout mice. Additionally, and consistent with a calorie restricted metabolism, Eps8 knockout mice show increased lifespan. The metabolic alterations in Eps8 knockout mice correlated with a significant reduction in intestinal fat absorption presumably caused by a 25% reduction in intestinal microvilli length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implicate actin dynamics as a novel variable in the determination of longevity. Additionally, our observations suggest that subtle differences in energy balance can, over time, significantly affect bodyweight and metabolic status in mice.

  7. Designing strip footing foundations using expanded polystyrene (EPS) as fill material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psarropoulos, Prodromos; Zania, Varvara; Spyrakos, Konstantinos;

    2010-01-01

    One of the modern uses of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is in strip footings as fill material. The current study investigates the effect of the geofoam filling in the static and seismic design of the base slab founded on strip footings. For this purpose the finite element method is employed, and three...

  8. Effect of carbohydrate and protein in the EPS on sludge settling characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, H S; Kang, S T; Nam, S Y

    2001-01-01

    EPSs have been believed to play a bonding role in microbial floc formation. However, the precise role is not well known. In this study, sludge settling characteristics and the carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS were tested at various airflow rates. Sludge was collected from three modified sequencing batch reacetors (MSBRs), which were operated with airflow rates of 0.8 L/min, 2 L/min and 4 L/min, respectively. During the operation periods, the reactor operated at an airflow rate of 0.8 L/min showed a sludge volume index (SVI) of 80 to 90 mL/g and a constant ratio of carbohydrate to protein in the EPS, while a significant increase of this ratio and the SVI occurred in the other reactors. High airflow rate increased the amount of carbohydrate in the EPS, but the protein level was almost constant for reactors with airflow rates of 2 L/min and 4 L/min. The higher ratio of carbohydrate to protein caused the bulking of the sludge; hence it was not favourable for sludge settling. The ratio of carbohydrate and protein in the EPS is inferred to be essential for solid floc formation.

  9. Project work on wellbeing in multidisciplinary student teams: a triple testimonial on eps at artesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohaert, S.; Baelus, C.; Lacko, D.

    2012-01-01

    The European Project Semester (EPS) programme offers an educational framework to support students to practice problem-and project-based cross-disciplinary product innovation and research, in small multidisciplinary and international teams. To explore the potential and the restrictions of this

  10. Evaluation of the Vitek EPS enteric pathogen screen card for detecting Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatrice, C A; Nachamkin, I

    1993-02-01

    We evaluated the Vitek EPS card as a screen for the enteric pathogens Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Y. enterocolitica (125, 54, and 5 isolates, respectively) and 81 nonenteric pathogens that might be selected for screening from primary plates (non-lactose fermenters) were tested. The EPS card correctly identified 183 of 184 pathogens tested (sensitivity, 99.5%). Of 81 nonenteric pathogens screened with the EPS card, 8 were identified as possible enteric pathogens (specificity, 90.1%). We reviewed our stool culture records over the past 1.5 years and analyzed the specificities of TSI-urea screens for 300 stool cultures that had suspicious colonies. From 55 of 300 stool cultures, either Salmonella spp. or Shigella spp. were isolated, and from 245 stool cultures, no pathogen was isolated. Of the 245 negative cultures, 166 gave false-positive screening-test results that resulted in further biochemical identification procedures (Analytab Products or Vitek identification). Thus, the specificity of the TSI-urea screen in our experience was 32.2%. The Vitek EPS card was shown to be a more cost-effective screening procedure than the TSI-urea screen.

  11. Insecticidal activity of rhamnolipid isolated from pseudomonas sp. EP-3 against green peach aphid (Myzus persicae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Young Cheol; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Jin Cheol; Yun, Mi Young; Kim, In Seon

    2011-02-09

    Microorganisms capable of growth on oils are potential sources of biopesticides, as they produce complex molecules such as biosurfactants and lipopeptides. These molecules have antimicrobial activity against plant pathogens, but few data are available on their insecticidal activity. The present study describes the insecticidal activity of a rhamnolipid isolated from diesel oil-degrading Pseudomonas sp. EP-3 (EP-3). The treatment of cell-free supernatants of EP-3 grown on glucose-mineral medium for 96 h led to > 80% mortality of aphids (Myzus persicae) within 24 h. Bioassay-guided chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MADLDI-TOF MS) and (¹H, ¹³C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses was employed to isolate and identify the EP-3 insecticidal metabolites. Dirhamnolipid, with molecular formulas of C₃₂H₅₈O₁₃ and C₃₄H₆₂O₁₃, was identified as a main metabolite exhibiting insecticidal activity against aphids. Dirhamnolipid showed a dose-dependent mortality against aphids, producing about 50% mortality at 40 μg/mL and 100% mortality at 100 μg/mL. Microscopy analyses of aphids treated with dirhamnolipid revealed that dirhamnolipid caused insect death by affecting cuticle membranes. This is the first report of rhamnolipid as an insecticidal metabolite against M. persicae. Rhamnolipid shows potential for use as a pesticide to control agricultural pests.

  12. Designing strip footing foundations using expanded polystyrene (EPS) as fill material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psarropoulos, Prodromos; Zania, Varvara; Spyrakos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    One of the modern uses of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is in strip footings as fill material. The current study investigates the effect of the geofoam filling in the static and seismic design of the base slab founded on strip footings. For this purpose the finite element method is employed, and thr...... economically efficient, since it contributes to a substantial reduction of the bending moments....

  13. EPs7630(®) from Pelargonium sidoides increases stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans probably via the DAF-16/FOXO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaizadehnajafi, Leila; Wink, Michael

    2014-03-15

    EPs7630