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Sample records for extraocular muscles eoms

  1. Microanatomy of adult zebrafish extraocular muscles.

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    Daniel S Kasprick

    Full Text Available Binocular vision requires intricate control of eye movement to align overlapping visual fields for fusion in the visual cortex, and each eye is controlled by 6 extraocular muscles (EOMs. Disorders of EOMs are an important cause of symptomatic vision loss. Importantly, EOMs represent specialized skeletal muscles with distinct gene expression profile and susceptibility to neuromuscular disorders. We aim to investigate and describe the anatomy of adult zebrafish extraocular muscles (EOMs to enable comparison with human EOM anatomy and facilitate the use of zebrafish as a model for EOM research. Using differential interference contrast (DIC, epifluorescence microscopy, and precise sectioning techniques, we evaluate the anatomy of zebrafish EOM origin, muscle course, and insertion on the eye. Immunofluorescence is used to identify components of tendons, basement membrane and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, and to analyze myofiber characteristics. We find that adult zebrafish EOM insertions on the globe parallel the organization of human EOMs, including the close proximity of specific EOM insertions to one another. However, analysis of EOM origins reveals important differences between human and zebrafish, such as the common rostral origin of both oblique muscles and the caudal origin of the lateral rectus muscles. Thrombospondin 4 marks the EOM tendons in regions that are highly innervated, and laminin marks the basement membrane, enabling evaluation of myofiber size and distribution. The NMJs appear to include both en plaque and en grappe synapses, while NMJ density is much higher in EOMs than in somatic muscles. In conclusion, zebrafish and human EOM anatomy are generally homologous, supporting the use of zebrafish for studying EOM biology. However, anatomic differences exist, revealing divergent evolutionary pressures.

  2. Extraocular muscle function testing

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye ...

  3. Wnt and Extraocular Muscle Sparing in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

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    2014-01-01

    The potential role of Wnt signaling factors in extraocular muscle (EOM) sparing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was examined. Three of the Wnts were preferentially upregulated in EOM, suggesting that they may be involved in maintenance of neuromuscular junctions in the EOM of ALS patients.

  4. Creep Behavior of Passive Bovine Extraocular Muscle

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    Lawrence Yoo; Hansang Kim; Andrew Shin; Vijay Gupta; Demer, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper characterized bovine extraocular muscles (EOMs) using creep, which represents long-term stretching induced by a constant force. After preliminary optimization of testing conditions, 20 fresh EOM samples were subjected to four different loading rates of 1.67, 3.33, 8.33, and 16.67%/s, after which creep was observed for 1,500 s. A published quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) relaxation function was transformed to a creep function that was compared with data. Repeatable creep was observed...

  5. Superior calcium homeostasis of extraocular muscles.

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    Zeiger, Ulrike; Mitchell, Claire H; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-11-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are a unique group of skeletal muscles with unusual physiological properties such as being able to undergo rapid twitch contractions over extended periods and escape damage in the presence of excess intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) in Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD). Enhanced Ca(2+) buffering has been proposed as a contributory mechanism to explain these properties; however, the mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated mechanisms modulating Ca(2+) levels in EOM and tibialis anterior (TA) limb muscles. Using Fura-2 based ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging of primary myotubes we found that EOM myotubes reduced elevated Ca(2+) ˜2-fold faster than TA myotubes, demonstrating more efficient Ca(2+) buffering. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blotting revealed higher expression of key components of the Ca(2+) regulation system in EOM, such as the cardiac/slow isoforms sarcoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (Serca2) and calsequestrin 2 (Casq2). Interestingly EOM expressed monomeric rather than multimeric forms of phospholamban (Pln), which was phosphorylated at threonine 17 (Thr17) but not at the serine 16 (Ser16) residue. EOM Pln remained monomeric and unphosphorylated at Ser16 despite protein kinase A (PKA) treatment, suggesting differential signalling and modulation cascades involving Pln-mediated Ca(2+) regulation in EOM. Increased expression of Ca(2+)/SR mRNA, proteins, differential post-translational modification of Pln and superior Ca(2+) buffering is consistent with the improved ability of EOM to handle elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. These characteristics provide mechanistic insight for the potential role of superior Ca(2+) buffering in the unusual physiology of EOM and their sparing in DMD.

  6. Creep behavior of passive bovine extraocular muscle.

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    Yoo, Lawrence; Kim, Hansang; Shin, Andrew; Gupta, Vijay; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-01-01

    This paper characterized bovine extraocular muscles (EOMs) using creep, which represents long-term stretching induced by a constant force. After preliminary optimization of testing conditions, 20 fresh EOM samples were subjected to four different loading rates of 1.67, 3.33, 8.33, and 16.67%/s, after which creep was observed for 1,500 s. A published quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) relaxation function was transformed to a creep function that was compared with data. Repeatable creep was observed for each loading rate and was similar among all six anatomical EOMs. The mean creep coefficient after 1,500 seconds for a wide range of initial loading rates was at 1.37 ± 0.03 (standard deviation, SD). The creep function derived from the relaxation-based QLV model agreed with observed creep to within 2.7% following 16.67%/s ramp loading. Measured creep agrees closely with a derived QLV model of EOM relaxation, validating a previous QLV model for characterization of EOM biomechanics.

  7. Creep Behavior of Passive Bovine Extraocular Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Yoo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper characterized bovine extraocular muscles (EOMs using creep, which represents long-term stretching induced by a constant force. After preliminary optimization of testing conditions, 20 fresh EOM samples were subjected to four different loading rates of 1.67, 3.33, 8.33, and 16.67%/s, after which creep was observed for 1,500 s. A published quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV relaxation function was transformed to a creep function that was compared with data. Repeatable creep was observed for each loading rate and was similar among all six anatomical EOMs. The mean creep coefficient after 1,500 seconds for a wide range of initial loading rates was at 1.37±0.03 (standard deviation, SD. The creep function derived from the relaxation-based QLV model agreed with observed creep to within 2.7% following 16.67%/s ramp loading. Measured creep agrees closely with a derived QLV model of EOM relaxation, validating a previous QLV model for characterization of EOM biomechanics.

  8. Transcriptional and functional differences in stem cell populations isolated from Extraocular and Limb muscles

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    Pacheco-Pinedo, Eugenia Cristina; Budak, Murat T; Zeiger, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOMs) are a distinct muscle group that displays an array of unique contractile, structural and regenerative properties. They also have differential sensitivity to certain diseases and are enigmatically spared in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The EOMs are so distinct ...

  9. Determinants of Extraocular Muscle Volume in Patients with Graves' Disease

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    Samer El-Kaissi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To examine factors contributing to extraocular muscle (EOM volume enlargement in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Methods. EOM volumes were measured with orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in 39 patients with recently diagnosed Graves’ disease, and compared to EOM volumes of 13 normal volunteers. Thyroid function tests, uptake on thyroid scintigraphy, anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity and other parameters were then evaluated in patients with EOM enlargement. Results. 31/39 patients had one or more enlarged EOM, of whom only 2 patients had clinical EOM dysfunction. Compared to Graves’ disease patients with normal EOM volumes, those with EOM enlargement had significantly higher mean serum TSH (0.020±0.005 versus 0.007±0.002 mIU/L; P value 0.012, free-T4 (52.9±3.3 versus 41.2±1.7 pmol/L; P value 0.003 and technetium uptake on thyroid scintigraphy (13.51±1.7% versus 8.55±1.6%; P value 0.045. There were no differences between the 2 groups in anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity, the proportion of males, tobacco smokers, or those with active ophthalmopathy. Conclusions. Patients with recently diagnosed Graves’ disease and EOM volume enlargement have higher serum TSH and more severe hyperthyroidism than patients with normal EOM volumes, with no difference in anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity between the two groups.

  10. Constitutive properties, not molecular adaptations, mediate extraocular muscle sparing in dystrophic mdx mice.

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    Porter, John D; Merriam, Anita P; Khanna, Sangeeta; Andrade, Francisco H; Richmonds, Chelliah R; Leahy, Patrick; Cheng, Georgiana; Karathanasis, Paraskevi; Zhou, Xiaohua; Kusner, Linda L; Adams, Marvin E; Willem, Michael; Mayer, Ulrike; Kaminski, Henry J

    2003-05-01

    Extraocular muscle (EOM) is spared in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we tested putative EOM sparing mechanisms predicted from existing dystrophinopathy models. Data show that mdx mouse EOM contains dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC)-competent and DGC-deficient myofibers distributed in a fiber type-specific pattern. Up-regulation of a dystrophin homologue, utrophin, mediates selective DGC retention. Counter to the DGC mechanical hypothesis, an intact DGC is not a precondition for EOM sarcolemmal integrity, and active adaptation at the level of calcium homeostasis is not mechanistic in protection. A partial, fiber type-specific retention of antiischemic nitric oxide to vascular smooth muscle signaling is not a factor in EOM sparing, because mice deficient in dystrophin and alpha-syntrophin, which localizes neuronal nitric oxide synthase to the sarcolemma, have normal EOMs. Moreover, an alternative transmembrane protein, alpha7beta1 integrin, does not appear to substitute for the DGC in EOM. Finally, genomewide expression profiling showed that EOM does not actively adapt to dystrophinopathy but identified candidate genes for the constitutive protection of mdx EOM. Taken together, data emphasize the conditional nature of dystrophinopathy and the potential importance of nonmechanical DGC roles and support the hypothesis that broad, constitutive structural cell signaling, and/or biochemical differences between EOM and other skeletal muscles are determinants of differential disease responsiveness.

  11. The development of longitudinal variation of Myosin isoforms in the orbital fibers of extraocular muscles of rats.

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    Rubinstein, Neal A; Porter, John D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2004-09-01

    To examine the appearance of longitudinal variation of extraocular and embryonic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms during the development of orbital singly innervated fibers of rat extraocular muscles (EOMs). EOMs were dissected from rat pups of various ages and stained with isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies to the embryonic and extraocular MyHC isoforms and to neurofilaments, as well as with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The orbital layers of whole muscles were examined by confocal microscopy. RNase protection assays for the embryonic (Myh3) and extraocular (Myh13) MyHC isoform mRNAs were also performed. At 10 days postpartum, the EOM MyHC RNA was first detected by RNase protection assay. At 11 days postpartum, the extraocular isoform was detected in the orbital fibers as two thin stripes just proximal and distal to the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Over the next few weeks, the area occupied by the extraocular isoform increased to include the entire central region of the orbital fibers at and surrounding the NMJ. At the same time, the embryonic isoform became excluded from the region of the NMJ. The orbital layer fibers of rat EOMs contain a longitudinal variation in MyHC isoforms not seen in other skeletal muscles. Development of this longitudinal variation begins as a late event postpartum; and the first appearance of it may be closely linked to neural contact. This targeting of MyHC isoforms to distinct domains is unique to EOMs. Copyright Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

  12. Myosin heavy chain isoform expression in human extraocular muscles: longitudinal variation and patterns of expression in global and orbital layers.

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    Park, Kyung-Ah; Lim, Jeonghee; Sohn, Seongsoo; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms along the length of the global and orbital layers of human extraocular muscles (EOMs). Whole muscle tissue extracts of human EOMs were cross-sectioned consecutively and separated into orbital and global layers. The extracts from these layers were subjected to electrophoretic analysis, followed by quantification with scanning densitometry. MyHC isoforms displayed different distributions along the lengths of EOMs. In the orbital and global layers of all EOMs except for the superior oblique muscle, MyHCeom was enriched in the central regions. MyHCIIa and MyHCI were most abundant in the proximal and distal ends. A variation in MyHC isoform expression was apparent along the lengths of human EOMs. These results provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional diversity of EOMs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dystrophic changes in extraocular muscles after gamma irradiation in mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice.

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    McDonald, Abby A; Kunz, Matthew D; McLoon, Linda K

    2014-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) have a strikingly different disease profile than limb skeletal muscles. It has long been known that they are spared in Duchenne (DMD) and other forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, the cause for this sparing is not understood. We have proposed that differences in myogenic precursor cell properties in EOM maintain normal morphology over the lifetime of individuals with DMD due to either greater proliferative potential or greater resistance to injury. This hypothesis was tested by exposing wild type and mdx:utrophin(+/-) (het) mouse EOM and limb skeletal muscles to 18 Gy gamma irradiation, a dose known to inhibit satellite cell proliferation in limb muscles. As expected, over time het limb skeletal muscles displayed reduced central nucleation mirrored by a reduction in Pax7-positive cells, demonstrating a significant loss in regenerative potential. In contrast, in the first month post-irradiation in the het EOM, myofiber cross-sectional areas first decreased, then increased, but ultimately returned to normal compared to non-irradiated het EOM. Central nucleation significantly increased in the first post-irradiation month, resembling the dystrophic limb phenotype. This correlated with decreased EECD34 stem cells and a concomitant increase and subsequent return to normalcy of both Pax7 and Pitx2-positive cell density. By two months, normal het EOM morphology returned. It appears that irradiation disrupts the normal method of EOM remodeling, which react paradoxically to produce increased numbers of myogenic precursor cells. This suggests that the EOM contain myogenic precursor cell types resistant to 18 Gy gamma irradiation, allowing return to normal morphology 2 months post-irradiation. This supports our hypothesis that ongoing proliferation of specialized regenerative populations in the het EOM actively maintains normal EOM morphology in DMD. Ongoing studies are working to define the differences in the myogenic precursor cells

  14. Ultrastructural organization of muscle fiber types and their distribution in the rat superior rectus extraocular muscle.

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    Rashed, Rashed M; El-Alfy, Sherif H

    2012-05-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are unique as they show greater variation in anatomical and physiological properties than any other skeletal muscles. To investigate the muscle fiber types and to understand better the structure-function correlation of the extraocular muscles, the present study examined the ultrastructural characteristics of the superior rectus muscle of rat. The superior rectus muscle is organized into two layers: a central global layer of mainly large-diameter fibers and an outer C-shaped orbital layer of principally small-diameter fibers. Six morphologically distinct fiber types were identified within the superior rectus muscle. Four muscle fiber types, three single innervated fibers (SIFs) and one multiple innervated fiber (MIF), were recognized in the global layer. The single innervated fibers included red, white and intermediate fibers. They differed from one another with respect to diameter, mitochondrial size and distribution, sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofibrillar size. The orbital layer contained two distinct MIFs in addition to the red and intermediate SIFs. The orbital MIFs were categorized into low oxidative and high oxidative types according to their mitochondrial content and distribution. The highly specialized function of the superior rectus extraocular muscle is reflected in the multiplicity of its fiber types, which exhibit unique structural features. The unique ultrastructural features of the extraocular muscles and their possible relation to muscle function are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

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    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K., E-mail: mcloo001@tc.umn.edu

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  16. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: a myogenic precursor cell hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallestad, Kristen M; Hebert, Sadie L; McDonald, Abby A; Daniel, Mark L; Cu, Sharon R; McLoon, Linda K

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin(-/-) (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a subpopulation

  17. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in limb and extraocular muscles of mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Vahid M Harandi

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is currently an incurable fatal motor neuron syndrome characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting and death ensuing 3-5 years after diagnosis. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs are known to be important in both nervous system development and maintenance. However, the attempt to translate the potential of NTFs into the therapeutic options remains limited despite substantial number of approaches, which have been tested clinically. Using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR technique, the present study investigated mRNA expression of four different NTFs: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF in limb muscles and extraocular muscles (EOMs from SOD1G93A transgenic mice at early and terminal stages of ALS. General morphological examination revealed that muscle fibres were well preserved in both limb muscles and EOMs in early stage ALS mice. However, in terminal ALS mice, most muscle fibres were either atrophied or hypertrophied in limb muscles but unaffected in EOMs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in early stage ALS mice, NT-4 was significantly down-regulated in limb muscles whereas NT-3 and GDNF were markedly up-regulated in EOMs. In terminal ALS mice, only GDNF was significantly up-regulated in limb muscles. We concluded that the early down-regulation of NT-4 in limb muscles is closely associated with muscle dystrophy and dysfunction at late stage, whereas the early up-regulations of GDNF and NT-3 in EOMs are closely associated with the relatively well-preserved muscle morphology at late stage. Collectively, the data suggested that comparing NTFs expression between limb muscles and EOMs from different stages of ALS animal models is a useful method in revealing the patho-physiology and progression of ALS, and eventually rescuing motor neuron in ALS patients.

  18. Extra-ocular muscle MRI in genetically-defined mitochondrial disease

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    Pitceathly, Robert D.S.; Morrow, Jasper M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Woodward, Cathy; Sweeney, Mary G. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Neurogenetics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Rahman, Shamima [UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, Mitochondrial Research Group, Clinical and Molecular Genetics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Plant, Gordon T.; Ali, Nadeem [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Moorfields Eye Hospital, Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Davagnanam, Indran [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, The Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Conventional and quantitative MRI was performed in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease, to characterise MRI findings in the extra-ocular muscles (EOMs) and investigate whether quantitative MRI provides clinically relevant measures of disease. Patients with CPEO due to single mitochondrial DNA deletions were compared with controls. Range of eye movement (ROEM) measurements, peri-orbital 3 T MRI T1-weighted (T1w) and short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR) images, and T2 relaxation time maps were obtained. Blinded observers graded muscle atrophy and T1w/STIR hyperintensity. Cross-sectional areas and EOM mean T2s were recorded and correlated with clinical parameters. Nine patients and nine healthy controls were examined. Patients had reduced ROEM (patients 13.3 , controls 49.3 , p < 0.001), greater mean atrophy score and increased T1w hyperintensities. EOM mean cross-sectional area was 43 % of controls and mean T2s were prolonged (patients 75.6 ± 7.0 ms, controls 55.2 ± 4.1 ms, p < 0.001). ROEM correlated negatively with EOM T2 (rho = -0.89, p < 0.01), whilst cross-sectional area failed to correlate with any clinical measures. MRI demonstrates EOM atrophy, characteristic signal changes and prolonged T2 in CPEO. Correlation between elevated EOM T2 and ROEM impairment represents a potential measure of disease severity that warrants further evaluation. (orig.)

  19. Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles

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    Leyla Niyaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM is a rare disorder characterized by hereditary non-progressive restrictive strabismus and blepharoptosis. Although most of the cases are bilateral and isolated, some patients may have systemic findings. CFEOM is divided into three groups as CFEOM 1, 2, and 3 according to the phenotype. Primary responsible genes are KIF21A for CFEOM type 1 and 3 and PHOX2A/ARIX gene for CFEOM type 2. Studies suggest that abnormal innervation of the extraocular muscles is the cause of muscle fibrosis. Early treatment is important because of the risk of amblyopia. Surgery is the primary treatment option for strabismus and blepharoptosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 312-5

  20. Conserved and muscle-group-specific gene expression patterns shape postnatal development of the novel extraocular muscle phenotype.

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    Cheng, Georgiana; Merriam, Anita P; Gong, Bendi; Leahy, Patrick; Khanna, Sangeeta; Porter, John D

    2004-07-08

    Current models in skeletal muscle biology do not fully account for the breadth, causes, and consequences of phenotypic variation among skeletal muscle groups. The muscle allotype concept arose to explain frank differences between limb, masticatory, and extraocular (EOM) muscles, but there is little understanding of the developmental regulation of the skeletal muscle phenotypic range. Here, we used morphological and DNA microarray analyses to generate a comprehensive temporal profile for rat EOM development. Based upon coordinate regulation of morphologic/gene expression traits with key events in visual, vestibular, and oculomotor system development, we propose a model that the EOM phenotype is a consequence of extrinsic factors that are unique to its local environment and sensory-motor control system, acting upon a novel myoblast lineage. We identified a broad spectrum of differences between the postnatal transcriptional patterns of EOM and limb muscle allotypes, including numerous transcripts not traditionally associated with muscle fiber/group differences. Several transcription factors were differentially regulated and may be responsible for signaling muscle allotype specificity. Significant differences in cellular energetic mechanisms defined the EOM and limb allotypes. The allotypes were divergent in many other functional transcript classes that remain to be further explored. Taken together, we suggest that the EOM allotype is the consequence of tissue-specific mechanisms that direct expression of a limited number of EOM-specific transcripts and broader, incremental differences in transcripts that are conserved by the two allotypes. This represents an important first step in dissecting allotype-specific regulatory mechanisms that may, in turn, explain differential muscle group sensitivity to a variety of metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  1. Extraocular muscle dynamics in diplopia from enophthalmos.

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    Yoon, Michael K; Economides, John R; Horton, Jonathan C

    2011-12-01

    The mechanism of diplopia from enophthalmos is not well understood. We describe a 55-year-old man who underwent a left transorbital craniotomy for clipping of a basilar aneurysm. The lateral orbital wall was not reconstructed properly, resulting in 8 mm of left enophthalmos. Months after surgery the patient developed diplopia with ocular excursions, although he remained orthotropic in primary gaze. The left eye was limited in elevation, adduction, and abduction. These findings were confirmed by eye movement recordings, which showed ocular separation increasing with gaze eccentricity. A CT scan demonstrated a defect in the sphenoid and frontal bones, profound enophthalmos, and shortening of the rectus muscles. Slack in the extraocular muscles reduced the force generated by each muscle, causing diplopia with ocular rotation. This case underscores the value of careful orbital wall reconstruction after orbitotomy and suggests a mechanism for diplopia produced by postoperative enophthalmos.

  2. Extraocular muscle afferent signals modulate visual attention.

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    Balslev, Daniela; Newman, William; Knox, Paul C

    2012-10-09

    Extraocular muscle afferent signals contribute to oculomotor control and visual localization. Prompted by the close links between the oculomotor and attention systems, it was investigated whether these proprioceptive signals also modulated the allocation of attention in space. A suction sclera contact lens was used to impose an eye rotation on the nonviewing, dominant eye. With their viewing, nondominant eye, participants (n = 4) fixated centrally and detected targets presented at 5° in the left or right visual hemifield. The position of the viewing eye was monitored throughout the experiment. As a control, visual localization was tested using finger pointing without visual feedback of the hand, whereas the nonviewing eye remained deviated. The sustained passive rotation of the occluded, dominant eye, while the other eye maintained central fixation, resulted in a lateralized change in the detectability of visual targets. In all participants, the advantage in speed and accuracy for detecting right versus left hemifield targets that occurred during a sustained rightward eye rotation of the dominant eye was reduced or reversed by a leftward eye rotation. The control experiment confirmed that the eye deviation procedure caused pointing errors consistent with an approximately 2° shift in perceived eye position, in the direction of rotation of the nonviewing eye. With the caveat of the small number of participants, these results suggest that extraocular muscle afferent signals modulate the deployment of attention in visual space.

  3. The role of extraocular muscle pulleys in incomitant non-paralytic strabismus

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    Robert A Clark

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs and inferior oblique muscle have paths through the orbit constrained by connective tissue pulleys. These pulleys shift position during contraction and relaxation of the EOMs, dynamically changing the biomechanics of force transfer from the tendon onto the globe. The paths of the EOMs are tightly conserved in normal patients and disorders in the location and/or stability of the pulleys can create patterns of incomitant strabismus that may mimic oblique muscle dysfunction and cranial nerve paresis. Developmental disorders of pulley location can occur in conjunction with large, obvious abnormalities of orbital anatomy (e.g., craniosynostosis syndromes or subtle, isolated abnormalities in the location of one or more pulleys. Acquired disorders of pulley location can be divided into four broad categories: Connective tissue disorders (e.g., Marfan syndrome, globe size disorders (e.g., high myopia, senile degeneration (e.g., sagging eye syndrome, and trauma (e.g., orbital fracture or postsurgical. Recognition of these disorders is important because abnormalities in pulley location and movement are often resistant to standard surgical approaches that involve strengthening or weakening the oblique muscles or changing the positions of the EOM insertions. Preoperative diagnosis is aided by: (1 Clinical history of predisposing risk factors, (2 observation of malpositioning of the medial canthus, lateral canthus, and globe, and (3 gaze-controlled orbital imaging using direct coronal slices. Finally, surgical correction frequently involves novel techniques that reposition and stabilize the pulley and posterior muscle belly within the orbit using permanent scleral sutures or silicone bands without changing the location of the muscle′s insertion.

  4. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

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    Heckmann, J M; Uwimpuhwe, H; Ballo, R; Kaur, M.; Bajic, V.B.; Prince, S.

    2009-01-01

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthe...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the extraocular muscles and corresponding cranial nerves in patients with special forms of strabismus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yong-hong; ZHAO Kan-xing; WANG Zhen-chang; QIAN Xue-han; WU Xiao; MAN Feng-yuan; LU Wei; SHE Hai-cheng

    2009-01-01

    Background With the technical advances, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now sensitive enough to detect subtle structural abnormalities of ocular motor nerves arising from the brainstem and orbits of living subjects. This study was designed to delineate the MRI characteristics in patients with special forms of strabismus.Methods A total of 29 patients with special forms of strabismus underwent orbital and intracalvarium MRI. Imaging of the ocular motor nerves in the brainstem was performed in 0.8 mm thickness image planes using the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequence. Nerves to extraocular muscles (EOMs), EOMs and their associated connective tissues were imaged with T1 weighting in tri-planar scans by dual-phased coils within 2.0 mm thick planes.Results Patients with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles exhibited hypoplasia of the oculomotor (CN3), abducens (CN6), trochlear (CN4) nerves, and the EOMs; hypoplasia of CN6 in the brainstem and an extra branch of the inferior division of CN3 to the lateral rectus were the most common but not the only presentation of Duane's retraction syndrome. Hypoplasia of CN6, facial (CN7) and hypoglossal (CN12) nerves were revealed in patients with M(o)bius syndrome. In a rare case of bilateral synergistic convergence and divergence, an enlarged branch of CN3 to the medial rectus and a questionable branch of CN3 to the inferior rectus bilaterally were found.Conclusion MRI can reveal subtle structures of the ocular motor nerves and their corresponding EOMs. This can provide valuable information regarding pathogenesis in some special forms of strabismus.

  6. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Colleen A; Hayess, Katrin; Andrade, Francisco H

    2005-08-17

    Creatine kinase (CK) links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2) the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK) isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  7. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeß Katrin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine kinase (CK links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1 CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2 the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. Results We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL. Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. Conclusion These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  8. Bilateral multiple extraocular muscle metastasis from breast carcinoma

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    Ramesh Murthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare presentation of an initially misdiagnosed case of a pseudotumor, which on histopathology was diagnosed as bilateral breast metastases of lobular carcinoma involving multiple extraocular muscles. A 61-year-old lady presented with external ophthalmoplegia and diplopia. Incisional biopsy was performed using a lid crease approach and the patient received radiotherapy and hormonal therapy. Following prolonged hormonal therapy, complete remission was achieved, with improvement in ocular motility and resolution of diplopia, about 18 months after the initial presentation. Multiple extraocular muscle involvement by breast carcinoma metastasis is very rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients with a prior history of breast carcinoma.

  9. Traumatic avulsion of extraocular muscles: case reports

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    Nilza Minguini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We described the clinical, surgical details and results (motor and sensory of the retrieving procedure of traumatically avulsed muscles in three patients with no previous history of strabismus or diplopia seen in the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Campinas, Brazil. The slipped muscle portion was reinserted at the original insertion and under the remaining stump, which was sutured over the reinserted muscle. For all three cases there was recovery of single binocular vision and stereopsis.

  10. A continuum of myofibers in adult rabbit extraocular muscle: force, shortening velocity, and patterns of myosin heavy chain colocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoon, Linda K; Park, Han Na; Kim, Jong-Hee; Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima; Thompson, Ladora V

    2011-10-01

    Extraocular muscle (EOM) myofibers do not fit the traditional fiber typing classifications normally used in noncranial skeletal muscle, in part, due to the complexity of their individual myofibers. With single skinned myofibers isolated from rectus muscles of normal adult rabbits, force and shortening velocity were determined for 220 fibers. Each fiber was examined for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition by densitometric analysis of electrophoresis gels. Rectus muscle serial sections were examined for coexpression of eight MyHC isoforms. A continuum was seen in single myofiber shortening velocities as well as force generation, both in absolute force (g) and specific tension (kN/m(2)). Shortening velocity correlated with MyHCIIB, IIA, and I content, the more abundant MyHC isoforms expressed within individual myofibers. Importantly, single fibers with similar or identical shortening velocities expressed significantly different ratios of MyHC isoforms. The vast majority of myofibers in both the orbital and global layers expressed more than one MyHC isoform, with up to six isoforms in single fiber segments. MyHC expression varied significantly and unpredictably along the length of single myofibers. Thus EOM myofibers represent a continuum in their histological and physiological characteristics. This continuum would facilitate fine motor control of eye position, speed, and direction of movement in all positions of gaze and with all types of eye movements-from slow vergence movements to fast saccades. To fully understand how the brain controls eye position and movements, it is critical that this significant EOM myofiber heterogeneity be integrated into hypotheses of oculomotor control.

  11. A new teaching model for demonstrating the movement of the extraocular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Joe; Refsland, Jason; Iovino, Lee; Holley, Gary; Laws, Tyler; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    The extraocular muscles consist of the superior, inferior, lateral, and medial rectus muscles and the superior and inferior oblique muscles. This study aimed to create a new teaching model for demonstrating the function of the extraocular muscles. A coronal section of the head was prepared and sutures attached to the levator palpebral superioris muscle and six extraocular muscles. Tension was placed on each muscle from a posterior approach and movement of the eye documented from an anterior view. All movements were clearly seen less than that of the inferior rectus muscle. To our knowledge, this is the first cadaveric teaching model for demonstrating the movements of the extraocular muscles. Clin. Anat. 30:733-735, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Successful repair of injury to the eyelid, lacrimal passage, and extraocular muscle

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    Shah, Shreya Mehul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Injury is a known cause of monocular blindness. Ocular trauma may affect lacrimal canaliculi and the extraocular muscle. We report this case as it includes injury to lid, lacrimal canaliculi and inferior rectus. Case description: A 25-year-old male presented with an injury caused by a sharp object that resulted in a conjunctival tear, lid tear involving the lacrimal canal, and rupture of the inferior rectus muscle. All of the structures were repaired successfully during a single procedure. Conclusion: An extraocular injury involving the conjunctiva, lid, lacrimal passages, and extraocular muscles can be repaired successfully during a single procedure.

  13. An unusual extraocular muscle anomaly in a patient with Crouzon's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    SNIR, M.; Gilad, E.; Ben-Sira, I

    1982-01-01

    A 29-year-old female suffering from Crouzon's disease was admitted to hospital with retinal detachment in the right eye. At operation agenesis of 4 extraocular muscles (superior and inferior recti and obliquus) was found, together with abnormal insertion of the 2 horizontal muscles. The same extraocular muscular abnormalities were found in the left eye. We suggest here a new surgical treatment in such cases and discuss the reasons for the limitation of ocular motility in such cases.

  14. An unusual extraocular muscle anomaly in a patient with Crouzon's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, M.; Gilad, E.; Ben-Sira, I.

    1982-01-01

    A 29-year-old female suffering from Crouzon's disease was admitted to hospital with retinal detachment in the right eye. At operation agenesis of 4 extraocular muscles (superior and inferior recti and obliquus) was found, together with abnormal insertion of the 2 horizontal muscles. The same extraocular muscular abnormalities were found in the left eye. We suggest here a new surgical treatment in such cases and discuss the reasons for the limitation of ocular motility in such cases. Images PMID:7066280

  15. Graves' disease: measurement of the extraocular muscle thickness with the echobiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenome, M; Polizzi, A; Buono, C; Ciurlo, C; Ciurlo, G

    1998-01-01

    The authors measured extraocular muscle thickness in normal subjects and in patients affected by Graves' disease, using a Sonomed A-2000 echobiometer (probe with 10-MHz frequency); Hertel's exophthalmometry was also performed. Statistically significant differences in muscle thickness between normals and patients were found. This technique seems to be sufficiently useful and reliable in extraocular thickness evaluation, showing data similar to those of the recent literature.

  16. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    KAUST Repository

    Heckmann, J M

    2009-08-13

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198CG SNP (odds ratio8.6; P0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5?-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198CG SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, J M; Uwimpuhwe, H; Ballo, R; Kaur, M; Bajic, V B; Prince, S

    2010-01-01

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198C>G SNP (odds ratio=8.6; P=0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5'-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198C>G SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression.

  18. Extraocular Muscles Tension, Tonus, and Proprioception in Infantile Strabismus: Role of the Oculomotor System in the Pathogenesis of Infantile Strabismus—Review of the Literature

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    Costantino Schiavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role played by the extraocular muscles (EOMs in the etiology of concomitant infantile strabismus is still debated and it has not yet definitively established if the sensory anomalies in concomitant strabismus are a consequence or a primary cause of the deviation. The commonest theory supposes that most strabismus results from abnormal innervation of the EOMs, but the cause of this dysfunction and its origin, whether central or peripheral, are still unknown. The interaction between sensory factors and innervational factors, that is, esotonus, accommodation, convergence, divergence, and vestibular reflexes in visually immature infants with family predisposition, is suspected to create conditions that prevent binocular alignment from stabilizing and strengthening. Some role in the onset of fixation instability and infantile strabismus could be played by the feedback control of eye movements and by dysfunction of eye muscle proprioception during the critical period of development of the visual sensory system. A possible role in the onset, maintenance, or worsening of the deviation of abnormalities of muscle force which have their clinical equivalent in eye muscle overaction and underaction has been investigated under either isometric or isotonic conditions, and in essence no significant anomalies of muscle force have been found in concomitant strabismus.

  19. Extraocular muscle is spared despite the absence of an intact sarcoglycan complex in gamma- or delta-sarcoglycan-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J D; Merriam, A P; Hack, A A; Andrade, F H; McNally, E M

    2001-03-01

    Models of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex do not reconcile the novel sparing of extraocular muscle in muscular dystrophy. Extraocular muscle sparing in Duchenne muscular dystrophy implies the existence of adaptive properties in these muscles that may extend protection to other neuromuscular diseases. We studied the extraocular muscle morphology and dystrophin-glycoprotein complex organization in murine targeted deletion of the gamma-sarcoglycan (gsg(-/-)) and delta-sarcoglycan (dsg(-/-)) genes, two models of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy. In contrast to limb and diaphragm, the principal extraocular muscles were intact in gsg(-/-) and dsg(-/-) mice. However, central nucleated, presumptive regenerative, fibers were seen in the accessory extraocular muscles (retractor bulbi, levator palpebrae superioris) of both strains. Skeletal muscles of gsg(-/-) mice exhibited in vivo Evans Blue dye permeability, while the principal extraocular muscles did not. Disruption of gamma-sarcoglycan produced secondary displacement of alpha- and beta-sarcoglycans in the extraocular muscles. The intensity of immunofluorescence for dystrophin and alpha- and beta-dystroglycan also appeared to be slightly reduced. Utrophin localization was unchanged. The finding that sarcoglycan disruption was insufficient to elicit alterations in extraocular muscle suggests that loss of mechanical stability and increased sarcolemmal permeability are not inevitable consequences of mutations that disrupt the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex organization and must be accounted for in models of muscular dystrophy.

  20. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF EXTRA-OCULAR MUSCLES IN DOGS WITH NO CLINICAL EVIDENCE OF ORBITAL DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOSLYN, S.; Richards, S.; Boroffka, S.A.E.B.; Mitchell, M.; Hammond, G.; Sullivan, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of extra-ocular muscles has been reported in cases of orbital pathology in both veterinary and medical magnetic resonance imaging.We have also observed this finding in the absence of orbital disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe extra-ocular muscle contrast enh

  1. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF EXTRA-OCULAR MUSCLES IN DOGS WITH NO CLINICAL EVIDENCE OF ORBITAL DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOSLYN, S.; Richards, S.; Boroffka, S.A.E.B.; Mitchell, M.; Hammond, G.; Sullivan, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of extra-ocular muscles has been reported in cases of orbital pathology in both veterinary and medical magnetic resonance imaging.We have also observed this finding in the absence of orbital disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe extra-ocular muscle contrast enh

  2. Effects of the Rho-Kinase Inhibitor Y-27632 on Extraocular Muscle Surgery in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Ji‐Sun Moon; Hyun Kyung Kim; Sun Young Shin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on postoperative inflammation and adhesion following extraocular muscle surgery in rabbits. Methods. The superior rectus muscle reinsertion was performed on both eyes of 8 New Zealand white rabbits. After reinsertion, the rabbits received subconjunctival injections of the Rho-kinase inhibitor and saline on each eye. To assess acute and late inflammatory changes, Ki-67, CD11β+, and F4/80 were evaluated and the sites of muscle ...

  3. Altered Protein Composition and Gene Expression in Strabismic Human Extraocular Muscles and Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Andrea B.; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Altick, Amy L.; Quilici, David R.; Wen, Dan; Johnson, L. Alan; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether structural protein composition and expression of key regulatory genes are altered in strabismic human extraocular muscles. Methods Samples from strabismic horizontal extraocular muscles were obtained during strabismus surgery and compared with normal muscles from organ donors. We used proteomics, standard and customized PCR arrays, and microarrays to identify changes in major structural proteins and changes in gene expression. We focused on muscle and connective tissue and its control by enzymes, growth factors, and cytokines. Results Strabismic muscles showed downregulation of myosins, tropomyosins, troponins, and titin. Expression of collagens and regulators of collagen synthesis and degradation, the collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and its inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1 and TIMP2, was upregulated, along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNF receptors, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), as well as proteoglycans. Growth factors controlling extracellular matrix (ECM) were also upregulated. Among 410 signaling genes examined by PCR arrays, molecules with downregulation in the strabismic phenotype included GDNF, NRG1, and PAX7; CTGF, CXCR4, NPY1R, TNF, NTRK1, and NTRK2 were upregulated. Signaling molecules known to control extraocular muscle plasticity were predominantly expressed in the tendon rather than the muscle component. The two horizontal muscles, medial and lateral rectus, displayed similar changes in protein and gene expression, and no obvious effect of age. Conclusions Quantification of proteins and gene expression showed significant differences in the composition of extraocular muscles of strabismic patients with respect to important motor proteins, elements of the ECM, and connective tissue. Therefore, our study supports the emerging view that the molecular composition of strabismic muscles is substantially altered. PMID:27768799

  4. Absence of all cyclovertical extraocular muscles in a child who has Apert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Daniel E; Donahue, Sean P

    2007-08-01

    A 6-month-old patient with Apert syndrome underwent strabismus surgery for a hypertropic eye. At surgery, the patient was found to have agenesis of all four cyclovertical muscles in one eye. Further investigation by computed tomography demonstrated absence of all four cyclovertical muscles in the fellow eye as well. A transposition procedure corrected the strabismus. While isolated aberrant or missing extraocular muscles are well documented in patients with craniofacial syndromes, bilateral absence of all four cyclovertical muscles, as demonstrated in this patient, poses unique treatment challenges.

  5. Use of extraocular muscle flaps in the correction of orbital implant exposure.

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    Hsueh-Yen Chu

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: The study is to describe a new surgical technique for correcting large orbital implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps and to propose a treatment algorithm for orbital implant exposure. METHODS: In a retrospective study, seven patients with orbital implant exposure were treated with extraocular muscle flaps. All data were collected from patients in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan during 2007-2012. All surgeries were performed by one surgeon (Y.J.T. Patient demographics, the original etiology, details of surgical procedures, implant types, and follow-up interval were recorded. Small exposure, defined as exposure area smaller than 3 mm in diameter, was treated conservatively first with topical lubricant and prophylactic antibiotics. Larger defects were managed surgically. RESULTS: Seven patients consisting of two males and five females were successfully treated for orbital implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps. The average age was 36.4 (range, 3-55 years old. Five patients were referred from other hospitals. One eye was enucleated for retinoblastoma. The other six eyes were eviscerated, including one for endophthalmitis and five for trauma. Mean follow-up time of all seven patients was 19.5 (range, 2-60 months. No patient developed recurrence of exposure during follow-up. All patients were fitted with an acceptable prosthesis and had satisfactory cosmetic and functional results. CONCLUSIONS: The most common complication of orbital implant is exposure, caused by breakdown of the covering layers, leading to extrusion. Several methods were reported to manage the exposed implants. We report our experience of treating implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps to establish a well-vascularized environment that supplies both the wrapping material and the overlying ocular surface tissue. We believe it can work as a good strategy to manage or to prevent orbital implant exposure.

  6. The properties of the extraocular muscles of the frog. II. Pharmacological properties of the isolated superior oblique and superior rectus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, G

    1978-01-01

    The pharmacological properties of the superior oblique and the superior rectus muscles of the frog's eye were investigated in comparison with those of a skeletal muscle (iliofibularis muscle) of the same animal. Acetylcholine causes sustained contractures of the extraocular muscles; this effect is increased by physostigmine and decreased or abolished by d-tubocurarine. Also the applications of succinylcholine, choline or caffeine are able to evoke contractures. There are no striking differences in pharmacological properties between extraocular and skeletal muscles of the frog. The time-course of the contractures and the sensitivity of the muscle preparations to the drugs which evoke contractures are identical in extraocular and iliofibularis muscles. In comparison with skeletal muscles there is no higher sensitivity of the extraocular muscles against curare-like drugs. The existence of adrenergic receptors could not be found neither in extraocular nor in skeletal muscles of the frog. It is concluded that in frogs no pharmacological differences exist between the muscle fibre types which compose the extraocular and the skeletal muscles.

  7. Contractile properties of extraocular muscle in Siamese cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerstrand, G

    1979-01-01

    Siamese cats are albinos with poor visual resolution and severely impaired binocular vision. Eey muscle phyiology was studied in Siamese cats as a part of a more extensive project on eye muscle properties in cats with deficient binocular vision. Isometric contractions of the inferior oblique muscle were recorded in response to single and repetitive muscle nerve stimulation. Speed of contraction, measured as twitch contraction time, fusion frequency and rate of tetanic tension rise, was lower in Siamese than in normal cats. Eye muscles of Siamese cats fatiqued more easily to continuous activation than normal cat eye mucle. These functional changes have also been found in cats with binocular defects from monocular lid suture, but were much more marked in Siamese cats. It is suggested that the eye muscle changes represent muscular adaptations to genetically caused impairments of binocular vision and visual resolution in Siamese cats.

  8. The properties of the extraocular muscles of the frog. I. Mechanical properties of the isolated superior oblique and superior rectus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, G

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two extraocular muscles (superior oblique and superior rectus muscles) of the frog were studied and compared with those of a frog's skeletal muscle (iliofibularis muscle) which contains the same types of muscle fibres as the oculorotatory muscles. The extraocular muscles are very fast twitching muscles. They exhibit a smaller contraction time, a smaller half-relaxation time, a higher fusion frequency, and a lower twitch-tetanus ratio than the skeletal muscles. The maximum isometric tetanic tension produced per unit cross-sectional area is lower in the extraocular muscles than in skeletal muscles. However, the extraocular muscles show a higher fatigue resistance than the skeletal muscles. With respect to the dynamic properties there are some differences between the various oculorotatory muscles of the frog. The superior rectus muscle exhibits a faster time-course of the contraction, a higher fusion frequency, and a higher fatigability than the superior oblique muscle. An increase of the extracellular K+-concentration evokes sustained contractures not only in the extraocular muscles but also in the iliofibularis muscle; between these muscles there are no striking differences in the mechanical threshold of the whole muscle preparation. The mechanical threshold depends on the Ca++-concentration of the bathing solution and it is found in a range between 12.5 and 17.5 mM K+ in a normal Ringer solution containing 1.8 mM Ca++. The static-mechanical properties of the extraocular muscles of the frog and the dependence of the active developed tension on the muscle extension are very similar to those which are known to exist in the extraocular muscles of other vertebrates. In tetanic activated frog's oculorotatory muscles a linear relationship exists between length and tension. A variation of the stimulation frequency does not change the slope of this curve but causes parallel shifts of the curve. The peculiar properties of the extraocular muscles

  9. Changes of orbital tissue volumes and proptosis in patients with thyroid extraocular muscle swelling after methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Tomoaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Ohji, Masahito

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the changes of orbital tissue volumes and proptosis after methylprednisolone pulse therapy in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). The cross-sectional areas of orbital tissues and proptosis were measured with magnetic resonance imaging in 40 orbits of 20 patients with TAO before and after methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The volumes of the whole orbit, orbital fatty tissue, and extraocular muscles were calculated. The volumes and proptosis were compared before and after treatment using a paired t test. Before treatment, the mean volumes were 33.0 ± 4.8 cm(3) in the whole orbit, 19.9 ± 4.1 cm(3) in the orbital fatty tissue, and 4.6 ± 1.2 cm(3) in the total extraocular muscles. After treatment, the mean volumes were 32.5 ± 4.4 cm(3) in the whole orbit, 19.9 ± 3.7 cm(3) in the orbital fatty tissue, and 4.0 ± 1.0 cm(3) in the total extraocular muscles. The mean volumes of the whole orbit (P = 0.17) and orbital fatty tissue (P = 0.82) were not significantly decreased after treatment, while the mean volume of total extraocular muscles was significantly decreased (P tissue seemed to be unchanged after methylprednisolone pulse therapy while that of total extraocular muscles was decreased. The proptosis value seemed to be unchanged after treatment.

  10. Crotoxin in humans: analysis of the effects on extraocular and facial muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Barros Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Crotoxin is the main neurotoxin of South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. The neurotoxic action is characterized by a presynaptic blockade. The purpose of this research is to assess the ability of crotoxin to induce temporary paralysis of extraocular and facial muscles in humans. METHODS: Doses of crotoxin used ranged from 2 to 5 units (U, each unit corresponding to one LD50. We first applied 2U of crotoxin in one of the extraocular muscles of 3 amaurotic individuals to be submitted to ocular evisceration. In the second stage, we applied crotoxin in 12 extraocular muscles of 9 patients with strabismic amblyopia. In the last stage, crotoxin was used in the treatment of blepharospasm in another 3 patients. RESULTS: No patient showed any systemic side effect or change in vision or any eye structure problem after the procedure. The only local side effects observed were slight conjunctival hyperemia, which recovered spontaneously. In 2 patients there was no change in ocular deviation after 2U crotoxin application. Limitation of the muscle action was observed in 8 of the 12 applications. The change in ocular deviation after application of 2U of crotoxin (9 injections was in average 15.7 prism diopters (PD. When the dose was 4U (2 applications the change was in average 37.5 PD and a single application of 5U produced a change of 16 PD in ocular deviation. This effect lasted from 1 to 3 months. Two of the 3 patients with blepharospasm had the hemifacial spasm improved with crotoxin, which returned after 2 months. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides data suggesting that crotoxin may be a useful new therapeutic option for the treatment of strabismus and blepharospasm. We expect that with further studies crotoxin could be an option for many other medical areas.

  11. Effects of the Rho-Kinase Inhibitor Y-27632 on Extraocular Muscle Surgery in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji‐Sun Moon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the effect of the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on postoperative inflammation and adhesion following extraocular muscle surgery in rabbits. Methods. The superior rectus muscle reinsertion was performed on both eyes of 8 New Zealand white rabbits. After reinsertion, the rabbits received subconjunctival injections of the Rho-kinase inhibitor and saline on each eye. To assess acute and late inflammatory changes, Ki-67, CD11β+, and F4/80 were evaluated and the sites of muscle reattachment were evaluated for a postoperative adhesion score and histopathologically for collagen formation. Results. F4/80 antibody expression was significantly different in the Rho-kinase inhibitor-injected group at both postoperative day 3 and week 4 (p=0.038, 0.031. However, Ki-67 and CD11β+ were not different the between two groups. The difference in the SRM/conjunctiva adhesion score between the two groups was also significant (p=0.034. Conclusion. Intraoperative subconjunctival injection of the Rho-kinase inhibitor may be effective for adjunctive management of inflammation and fibrosis in rabbit eyes following extraocular muscle surgery.

  12. Dynamic Imaging of the Eye, Optic Nerve, and Extraocular Muscles With Golden Angle Radial MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Saikat; Smith, David S; Smith, Alex K; Welch, E Brian; Smith, Seth A

    2017-08-01

    The eye and its accessory structures, the optic nerve and the extraocular muscles, form a complex dynamic system. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of this system in motion can have substantial benefits in understanding oculomotor functioning in health and disease, but has been restricted to date to imaging of static gazes only. The purpose of this work was to develop a technique to image the eye and its accessory visual structures in motion. Dynamic imaging of the eye was developed on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner, based on a golden angle radial sequence that allows freely selectable frame-rate and temporal-span image reconstructions from the same acquired data set. Retrospective image reconstructions at a chosen frame rate of 57 ms per image yielded high-quality in vivo movies of various eye motion tasks performed in the scanner. Motion analysis was performed for a left-right version task where motion paths, lengths, and strains/globe angle of the medial and lateral extraocular muscles and the optic nerves were estimated. Offline image reconstructions resulted in dynamic images of bilateral visual structures of healthy adults in only ∼15-s imaging time. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the motion enabled estimation of trajectories, lengths, and strains on the optic nerves and extraocular muscles at very high frame rates of ∼18 frames/s. This work presents an MRI technique that enables high-frame-rate dynamic imaging of the eyes and orbital structures. The presented sequence has the potential to be used in furthering the understanding of oculomotor mechanics in vivo, both in health and disease.

  13. Surgically mismanaged ptosis in a patient with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A Tawfik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis syndromes comprise a rare form of severe limitation of ocular motility. An 11-year-old girl was referred for the correction of eyelid retraction. The eyelid retraction occurred immediately following levator resection surgery performed by a plastic surgeon who missed the restrictive extraocular muscle abnormalities. On examination, both eyes were fixed in an infraducted position (20 prism diopters (Δ, with a chin-up position and significant lagophthalmos. Bilateral 12-mm inferior rectus recession with adjustable sutures was performed, which resulted in significant reduction of lagophthalmos and elimination of the head tilt.

  14. Evaluation of dysthyroid optic neuropathy using T2-relaxation time of extraocular muscle as parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Fumihiko; Maeda, Toshine; Inoue, Toyoko; Inoue, Yoichi [Olympia Eye Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The T2 value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in evaluating the activity of dysthyroid ophthlamopathy. We applied this method in evaluating dysthyroid optic neuropathy in 15 affected eyes of 15 patients. Another group of 40 eyes of 20 patients of dysthyroid opthalmopathy without hypertrophy of extraocular muscles served as control. The T2 value in dysthyroid optic neuropathy significantly decreased following treatment with corticosteroid but the value was still higher than that in control eyes. The findings show that the T2 value of MRI is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  15. Sparing of the extraocular muscles in mdx mice with absent or reduced utrophin expression: A life span analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-11-01

    Sparing of the extraocular muscles in muscular dystrophy is controversial. To address the potential role of utrophin in this sparing, mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were examined for changes in myofiber size, central nucleation, and Pax7-positive and MyoD-positive cell density at intervals over their life span. Known to be spared in the mdx mouse, and contrary to previous reports, the extraocular muscles from both the mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were also morphologically spared. In the mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, which have a normal life span compared to the mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice, the myofibers were larger at 3 and 12 months than the wild type age-matched eye muscles. While there was a significant increase in central nucleation in the extraocular muscles from all mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, the levels were still very low compared to age-matched limb skeletal muscles. Pax7- and MyoD-positive myogenic precursor cell populations were retained and were similar to age-matched wild type controls. These results support the hypothesis that utrophin is not involved in extraocular muscle sparing in these genotypes. In addition, it appears that these muscles retain the myogenic precursors that would allow them to maintain their regenerative capacity and normal morphology over a lifetime even in these more severe models of muscular dystrophy.

  16. Surgical management of hypotropia in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM presented by pseudoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik HA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hatem A Tawfik,1 Mohammad A Rashad21Oculoplastic Service, 2Pediatric Ophthalmology Service, Ophthalmology Department, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To describe the demographics, characteristics, management pitfalls, and outcomes of pseudoptosis associated with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM.Methods: A retrospective review was performed of eight patients presenting with ptosis and hypotropia to oculoplastic service. All patients underwent full ocular evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging of brain and orbit. Five of these patients underwent stepwise correction of hypotropia by single-stage adjustable strabismus surgery (SSASS, followed by a frontalis sling if needed.Results: Eight patients had congenital strabismus with severe ptosis and a positive forced duction test. There was a highly significant improvement from preoperative mean hypotropia angle of 30 prism diopters (PD to 9 PD mean postoperative angle (P = 0.006. Surgery for ptosis was not needed in 80% of eyes.Conclusion: CFEOM involving both ptosis and hypotropia could be properly managed with the correct sequence of surgical steps. Proper vertical alignment by correction of hypotropia utilizing SSASS may alleviate the need for ptosis surgery.Keywords: congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles, CFEOM, single-stage adjustable suture surgery, SSASS, pseudoptosis

  17. Single motor unit activity in human extraocular muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Konrad P; Rosengren, Sally M; Michels, Rike; Sturm, Veit; Straumann, Dominik; Landau, Klara

    2012-07-01

    Motor unit activity in human eye muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not well understood, since the associated head and eye movements normally preclude single unit recordings. Therefore we recorded single motor unit activity following bursts of skull vibration and sound, two vestibular otolith stimuli that elicit only small head and eye movements. Inferior oblique (IO) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle activity was measured in healthy humans with concentric needle electrodes. Vibration elicited highly synchronous, short-latency bursts of motor unit activity in the IO (latency: 10.5 ms) and IR (14.5 ms) muscles. The activation patterns of the two muscles were similar, but reciprocal, with delayed activation of the IR muscle. Sound produced short-latency excitation of the IO muscle (13.3 ms) in the eye contralateral to the stimulus. Simultaneous needle and surface recordings identified the IO as the muscle of origin of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) thus validating the physiological basis of this recently developed clinical test of otolith function. Single extraocular motor unit recordings provide a window into neural activity in humans that can normally only be examined using animal models and help identify the pathways of the translational VOR from otoliths to individual eye muscles.

  18. Heterozygous mutations of the kinesin KIF21A in congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamada, K; Andrews, C; Chan, WM; McKeown, CA; Magli, A; de Berardinis, T; Loewenstein, A; Lazar, M; O'Keefe, M; Letson, R; London, A; Ruttum, M; Matsumoto, N; Saito, N; Morris, L; Del Monte, M; Johnson, RH; Uyama, E; Houtman, WA; de Vries, B; Carlow, TJ; Hart, BL; Krawiecki, N; Shoffner, J; Vogel, MC; Katowitz, J; Goldstein, SM; Levin, AV; Sener, EC; Ozturk, BT; Akarsu, AN; Brodsky, MC; Hanisch, F; Cruse, RP; Zubcov, AA; Robb, RM; Roggenkaemper, P; Gottlob, [No Value; Kowal, L; Battu, R; Traboulsi, EI; Franceschini, P; Newlin, A; Demer, JL; Engle, EC

    2003-01-01

    Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1; OMIM #135700) is an autosomal dominant strabismus disorder associated with defects of the oculomotor nerve. We show that individuals with CFEOM1 harbor heterozygous missense mutations in a kinesin motor protein encoded by KIF21A. We iden

  19. Differential involvement of orbital fat and extraocular muscles in graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Regensburg, Noortje I; Mourits, Maarten P

    2013-03-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is characterized by swelling of orbital fat and extraocular muscles, but little attention has been given to differential involvement of fat and muscles. Advancements in imaging allow rather accurate measurements of orbital bony cavity volume (OV), fat volume (FV) and muscle volume (MV), and are the topics of this review. Ratios of FV/OV and MV/OV neutralize gender differences. In adult Caucasian controls, mean values ± SD of FV/OV are 0.56 ± 0.11 and of MV/OV are 0.15 ± 0.02. FV increases substantially and MV decreases slightly with advancing age, requiring age-specific reference ranges. In 95 consecutive untreated Caucasian GO patients, both FV and MV were within normal limits in 25%, increased FV but normal MV was present in 5%, normal FV but increased MV was detected in 61%, and both increased FV and MV was evident in 9%. Increased FV was associated with more proptosis and longer GO duration. Increased MV was associated with older age, more severe GO (more proptosis and diplopia, worse eye muscle ductions), higher TBII and current smoking. At the cellular and molecular level differential involvement of fat and muscles might be related to differences between fibroblast phenotypes and cytokine profiles in each compartment, to different orbital T cell subsets during the course of the disease and to peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-γ polymorphisms and modulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1. Enlarged muscles are apparently a rather early phenomenon in GO, whereas increases in fat mass occur relatively late. Why a minor subset of GO patients presents with an increase of only fat remains poorly understood.

  20. Study of crotoxin on the induction of paralysis in extraocular muscle in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Barros Ribeiro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Crotoxin is the major toxin of the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, capable of causing a blockade of the neurotransmitters at the neuromuscular junction. The objective of this study was to appraise the action and effectiveness of the crotoxin induced paralysis of the extraocular muscle and to compare its effects with the botulinum toxin type A (BT-A. METHODS: The crotoxin, with LD50 of 1.5 µg, was injected into the superior rectus muscle in ten New Zealand rabbits. The concentration variance was 0.015 up to 150 µg. Two rabbits received 2 units of botulinum toxin type A for comparative analysis. The evaluation of the paralysis was performed using serial electromyography. After the functional recovery of the muscles, which occurred after two months, six rabbits were sacrificed for anatomopathology study. RESULTS: The animals did not show any evidence of systemic toxicity. Transitory ptosis was observed in almost every animal and remained up to fourteen days. These toxins caused immediate blockade of the electrical potentials. The recovery was gradual in the average of one month with regeneration signs evident on the electromyography. The paralysis effect of the crotoxin on the muscle was proportional to its concentration. The changes with 1.5 µg crotoxin were similar to those produced by the botulinum toxin type A. The histopathology findings were localized to the site of the injection. No signs of muscle fiber's necrosis were seen in any sample. The alterations induced by crotoxin were also proportional to the concentration and similar to botulinum toxin type A in concentration of 1.5 µg. CONCLUSION: Crotoxin was able to induce transitory paralysis of the superior rectus muscle. This effect was characterized by reduction of action potentials and non-specific signs of fibrillation. Crotoxin, in concentration of 1.5 µg was able to induce similar effects as botulinum toxin type A.

  1. Regenerating nerve fiber innervation of extraocular muscles and motor functional changes following oculomotor nerve injuries at different sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenchuan Zhang; Massimiliano Visocchi; Eduardo Fernandez; Xuhui Wang; Xinyuan Li; Shiting Li

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the oculomotor nerves were sectioned at the proximal (subtentorial) and distal (superior orbital fissure) ends and repaired. After 24 weeks, vestibulo-ocular reflex evaluation confirmed that the regenerating nerve fibers following oculomotor nerve injury in the superior orbital fissure had a high level of specificity for innervating extraocular muscles. The level of functional recovery of extraocular muscles in rats in the superior orbital fissure injury group was remarkably superior over that in rats undergoing oculomotor nerve injuries at the proximal end (subtentorium). Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing through the right superior rectus muscle showed that the distribution of neurons in the nucleus of the oculomotor nerve was directly associated with the injury site, and that crude fibers were badly damaged. The closer the site of injury of the oculomotor nerve was to the extraocular muscle, the better the recovery of neurological function was. The mechanism may be associated with the aberrant number of regenerated nerve fibers passing through the injury site.

  2. Impact of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis on Slow Tonic Myofiber Composition in Human Extraocular Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjust, Anton E; Danielsson, Adam; Andersen, Peter M; Brännström, Thomas; Pedrosa Domellöf, Fatima

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the proportion and cross-sectional area of myofibers containing myosin heavy chain slow-twitch (MyHCI) and myosin heavy chain slow tonic (MyHCsto) in extraocular muscles of autopsied amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with either spinal or bulbar site of disease onset. Whole-muscle cross sections from the middle portion of the medial rectus were labeled with antibodies against MyHCI or MyHCsto and laminin. Myofibers labeled with the MyHC antibodies (MyHCI+sto) and the total number of myofibers were quantified in the orbital and global layer of 6 control individuals and 18 ALS patients. The cross-sectional area of myofibers labeled for either MyHC was quantified in 130 to 472 fibers/individual in the orbital and in 180 to 573 fibers/individual in the global layer of each specimen. The proportion of MyHCI+sto myofibers was significantly smaller in the orbital and global layer of ALS compared to control individuals. MyHCI+sto myofibers were significantly smaller in the global layer than in the orbital layer of ALS, whereas they were of similar size in control subjects. The decreased proportion of MyHCI+sto fibers correlated significantly with the age of death, but not disease duration, in patients who had the bulbar-onset variant of ALS but not in patients with spinal variant. ALS, regardless of site of onset, involves a loss of myofibers containing MyHCI+sto. Only in bulbar-onset cases did aging seem to play a role in the pathophysiological processes underlying the loss of MyHCI+sto fibers.

  3. Extraocular muscle atrophy and central nervous system involvement in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Yu-Wai-Man

    Full Text Available Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO is a classical mitochondrial ocular disorder characterised by bilateral progressive ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. These ocular features can develop either in isolation or in association with other prominent neurological deficits (CPEO+. Molecularly, CPEO can be classified into two distinct genetic subgroups depending on whether patients harbour single, large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions or multiple mtDNA deletions secondary to a nuclear mutation disrupting mtDNA replication or repair. The aim of this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study was to investigate whether the ophthalmoplegia in CPEO is primarily myopathic in origin or whether there is evidence of contributory supranuclear pathway dysfunction.Ten age-matched normal controls and twenty patients with CPEO were recruited nine patients with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions and eleven patients with multiple mtDNA deletions secondary to mutations in POLG, PEO1, OPA1, and RRM2B. All subjects underwent a standardised brain and orbital MRI protocol, together with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in two voxels located within the parietal white matter and the brainstem.There was evidence of significant extraocular muscle atrophy in patients with single or multiple mtDNA deletions compared with controls. There was no significant difference in metabolite concentrations between the patient and control groups in both the parietal white matter and brainstem voxels. Volumetric brain measurements revealed marked cortical and cerebellar atrophy among patients with CPEO+ phenotypes.The results of this study support a primary myopathic aetiology for the progressive limitation of eye movements that develops in CPEO.

  4. [The gene mutation screening of a family with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles associated with corpus callosum agenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-tao; Zhou, Lian-hong; Zha, Yun-fei; Liu, Tian; Tian, Ming-xing; Yuan, Jing; Xing, Yi-qiao

    2013-07-01

    To identify TUBB3 gene mutations in a Chinese family with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscle associated with corpus callosum agenesis. We have found a family with CFEOM associated with corpus callosum agenesis, including 4 affected individuals in three generations of 11 familial members. 4 affected individuals were sequenced by direct TUBB3 sequencing, 4 unaffected individuals in the family and 100 cases of unrelated normal person as a control. This family is in line with Mendelian autosomal dominant inheritance. Clinical manifestations belongs to CFEOM3. All affected individuals were detected with TUBB3 c.1249G > A mutation, the mutation is in exon 4, resulting in wild-type gene encoding the Aspartic acid ( Asp or D ) replaced .by Asparagine (Asn or N ). Our study supports that TUBB3 gene mutation c.1249G > A (p. Asp417Asn), is the underlying molecular pathogenesis of this family with CFEOM3.

  5. Phenothiourea sensitizes zebrafish cranial neural crest and extraocular muscle development to changes in retinoic acid and IGF signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bohnsack

    Full Text Available 1-Phenyl 2-thiourea (PTU is a tyrosinase inhibitor commonly used to block pigmentation and aid visualization of zebrafish development. At the standard concentration of 0.003% (200 µM, PTU inhibits melanogenesis and reportedly has minimal other effects on zebrafish embryogenesis. We found that 0.003% PTU altered retinoic acid and insulin-like growth factor (IGF regulation of neural crest and mesodermal components of craniofacial development. Reduction of retinoic acid synthesis by the pan-aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor diethylbenzaldehyde, only when combined with 0.003% PTU, resulted in extraocular muscle disorganization. PTU also decreased retinoic acid-induced teratogenic effects on pharyngeal arch and jaw cartilage despite morphologically normal appearing PTU-treated controls. Furthermore, 0.003% PTU in combination with inhibition of IGF signaling through either morpholino knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of tyrosine kinase receptor phosphorylation, disrupted jaw development and extraocular muscle organization. PTU in and of itself inhibited neural crest development at higher concentrations (0.03% and had the greatest inhibitory effect when added prior to 22 hours post fertilization (hpf. Addition of 0.003% PTU between 4 and 20 hpf decreased thyroxine (T4 in thyroid follicles in the nasopharynx of 96 hpf embryos. Treatment with exogenous triiodothyronine (T3 and T4 improved, but did not completely rescue, PTU-induced neural crest defects. Thus, PTU should be used with caution when studying zebrafish embryogenesis as it alters the threshold of different signaling pathways important during craniofacial development. The effects of PTU on neural crest development are partially caused by thyroid hormone signaling.

  6. Phenothiourea sensitizes zebrafish cranial neural crest and extraocular muscle development to changes in retinoic acid and IGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnsack, Brenda L; Gallina, Donika; Kahana, Alon

    2011-01-01

    1-Phenyl 2-thiourea (PTU) is a tyrosinase inhibitor commonly used to block pigmentation and aid visualization of zebrafish development. At the standard concentration of 0.003% (200 µM), PTU inhibits melanogenesis and reportedly has minimal other effects on zebrafish embryogenesis. We found that 0.003% PTU altered retinoic acid and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) regulation of neural crest and mesodermal components of craniofacial development. Reduction of retinoic acid synthesis by the pan-aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor diethylbenzaldehyde, only when combined with 0.003% PTU, resulted in extraocular muscle disorganization. PTU also decreased retinoic acid-induced teratogenic effects on pharyngeal arch and jaw cartilage despite morphologically normal appearing PTU-treated controls. Furthermore, 0.003% PTU in combination with inhibition of IGF signaling through either morpholino knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of tyrosine kinase receptor phosphorylation, disrupted jaw development and extraocular muscle organization. PTU in and of itself inhibited neural crest development at higher concentrations (0.03%) and had the greatest inhibitory effect when added prior to 22 hours post fertilization (hpf). Addition of 0.003% PTU between 4 and 20 hpf decreased thyroxine (T4) in thyroid follicles in the nasopharynx of 96 hpf embryos. Treatment with exogenous triiodothyronine (T3) and T4 improved, but did not completely rescue, PTU-induced neural crest defects. Thus, PTU should be used with caution when studying zebrafish embryogenesis as it alters the threshold of different signaling pathways important during craniofacial development. The effects of PTU on neural crest development are partially caused by thyroid hormone signaling.

  7. Myostatin shows a specific expression pattern in pig skeletal and extraocular muscles during pre- and post-natal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patruno, Marco; Caliaro, Francesca; Maccatrozzo, Lisa; Sacchetto, Roberta; Martinello, Tiziana; Toniolo, Luana; Reggiani, Carlo; Mascarello, Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Myogenesis is driven by an extraordinary array of cellular signals that follow a common expression pattern among different animal phyla. Myostatin (mstn) is a secreted growth factor that plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle mass regulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate mstn expression in a large mammal (the pig) in order to ascertain whether distinct expression changes of this factor might be linked to the fiber-type composition of the muscle examined and/or to specific developmental stages. To assess the expression pattern of mstn in relation to myogenic proliferative (Pax7 and MyoD) and differentiative (myogenin) markers, we evaluated muscles with different myosin heavy-chain compositions sampled during pre- and post-natal development and on myogenic cells isolated from the same muscles. Skeletal muscles showed higher levels of mRNA for mstn and all other genes examined during fetal development than after birth. The wide distribution of mstn was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry experiments supporting evidence for cytoplasmic staining in early fetal periods as well as the localization in type 1 fibers at the end of the gestation period. Extraocular muscles, in contrast, did not exhibit decreasing mRNA levels for mstn or other genes even in adult samples and expressed higher levels of both mstn mRNA and protein compared with skeletal muscles. Experiments carried out on myogenic cells showed that mstn mRNA levels decreased when myoblasts entered the differentiation program and that cells isolated at early post-natal stages maintained a high level of Pax7 expression. Our results showed that mstn had a specific expression pattern whose variations depended on the muscle type examined, thus supporting the hypothesis that at birth, porcine myogenic cells continue to be influenced by hyperplastic/proliferative mechanisms.

  8. Structural Functional Associations of the Orbit in Thyroid Eye Disease: Kalman Filters to Track Extraocular Rectal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-02-27

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  9. Loss of MAFB Function in Humans and Mice Causes Duane Syndrome, Aberrant Extraocular Muscle Innervation, and Inner-Ear Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong G; Tischfield, Max A; Nugent, Alicia A; Cheng, Long; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Chan, Wai-Man; Maconachie, Gail; Bosley, Thomas M; Summers, C Gail; Hunter, David G; Robson, Caroline D; Gottlob, Irene; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2016-06-02

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) is a congenital eye-movement disorder defined by limited outward gaze and retraction of the eye on attempted inward gaze. Here, we report on three heterozygous loss-of-function MAFB mutations causing DRS and a dominant-negative MAFB mutation causing DRS and deafness. Using genotype-phenotype correlations in humans and Mafb-knockout mice, we propose a threshold model for variable loss of MAFB function. Postmortem studies of DRS have reported abducens nerve hypoplasia and aberrant innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the oculomotor nerve. Our studies in mice now confirm this human DRS pathology. Moreover, we demonstrate that selectively disrupting abducens nerve development is sufficient to cause secondary innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by aberrant oculomotor nerve branches, which form at developmental decision regions close to target extraocular muscles. Thus, we present evidence that the primary cause of DRS is failure of the abducens nerve to fully innervate the lateral rectus muscle in early development.

  10. Structural functional associations of the orbit in thyroid eye disease: Kalman filters to track extraocular rectal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L.; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-03-01

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention, and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  11. Agreement between intraoperative measurements and optical coherence tomography of the limbus-insertion distance of the extraocular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Pablo-Gómez-de-Liaño, L; Fernández-Vigo, J I; Ventura-Abreu, N; Morales-Fernández, L; García-Feijóo, J; Gómez-de-Liaño, R

    2016-12-01

    To assess the agreement between intraoperative measurements of the limbus-insertion distance of the extraocular muscles with those measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. An analysis was made of a total of 67 muscles of 21 patients with strabismus. The limbus-insertion distance of the horizontal rectus muscles were measured using pre-operative SD-OCT and intra-operatively in 2 ways: 1) direct, after a conjunctival dissection in patients who underwent surgery, or 2) transconjunctival in patients who were treated with botulinum toxin, or in those who were not going to be operated. The intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots were calculated to determine the concordance between the 2 methods. The mean age was 45.9 ±20.9 years (range 16 to 85), with 52% being women. The percentage of identification by direct intraoperative measurement was 95.6% (22/23), by transconjunctival intraoperative measurement 90.9% (40/44), and by OCT 85% (57/67), with 22 muscles finally being analysed for the agreement study between direct intraoperative measurement and OCT measurements, and 35 muscles for the agreement between transconjuctival intraoperative measurement and OCT. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed good agreement with OCT and direct intraoperative measurements (0.931; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.839-0.972; P<.001), and with transconjunctival intraoperative measurements (0.889; 95% CI: 0.790-0.942; P<.001). The SD-OCT is an effective technique to measure the distance from the insertion of the horizontal rectus muscles to the limbus, with a high agreement with intraoperative measurements being demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolated abscess in superior rectus muscle in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushank Ashok Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyomyositis is a primary bacterial infection of striated muscles nearly always caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Development of the intramuscular abscess involving the extra-ocular muscles (EOMs remains an extremely rare process. We herein present a case of isolated EOM pyomyositis involving superior rectus muscle in a 2-year male child who was referred with complaints of swelling in left eye (LE and inability to open LE since last 1-month. Orbital computed tomography (CT scan showed a well-defined, hypo-dense, peripheral rim-enhancing lesion in relation to left superior rectus muscle suggestive of left superior rectus abscess. The abscess was drained through skin approach. We concluded that pyomyositis of EOM should be considered in any patient presenting with acute onset of orbital inflammation and characteristic CT or magnetic resonance imaging features. Management consists of incision and drainage coupled with antibiotic therapy.

  13. Abnormal expression of seven myogenesis-related genes in extraocular muscles of patients with concomitant strabismus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZHU, YUJUAN; DENG, DAMING; LONG, CHONGDE; JIN, GUORONG; ZHANG, QINGJIONG; SHEN, HUANGXUAN

    2013-01-01

    ...) and muscle creatine kinase (MCK). This study evaluated the expression of the above seven myogenesis-related genes by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in 18 resected extrocular muscles of patients with concomitant strabismus and 12...

  14. Palisade endings of extraocular muscles in eyes with congenital nystagmus%先天性眼球震颤眼外肌栅栏状终末结构的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚艳峰; 张静; 宫华青; 陈霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the morphology,distribution and function of palisade endings (PE) in human extraocular muscles (EOM),and observe the alterations in eyes with congenital nystagmus (CN).The etiology and pathogenesis of CN were also investigated.Methods It was a experimental study.The distal myotendinous junctions of the EOM were obtained during operation for CN ( CN group) and concomitant strabismus ( control group). The samples from patients with similar age and same extraction sites in the two groups were compared.The muscles cut during operation were immediately put into 4% glutaraldehyde fixative solution.And 1 - 2 transverse bands of tissue were cut every 1 mm from tendon insertion for specimens processing.The ultrastructure of EOM and PE in the two groups was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The distal parts of EOM cut during operation were put into 4% paraformaldehyde promptly.Myotendinous junction region whole mounts were labeled with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT).Muscle fibers were counterstained with phalloidin.And longitudinal and transverse cryostat serial sections were cut at 25 μm and analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy.The ChAT expression,morphology and distribution of PE were observed.The same fragment of myotendinous junction in the two groups was selected.After the total protein was extracted,ChAT was detected by western blot.The expression level of ChAT was analyzed.Results Compared with the controls,the ultrastructure in the CN group had considerable variations.The axon of PE was swelled and deformed partly.The electron density was increased and presented as addicted to osmic acid. In the muscle cells,mitochondria was swelled,and sarcoplasmic reticulum was dilated.All PE exhibited ChAT immunoreactivity in human EOM.In the longitudinal section,nerve fibers extended from the muscle into the tendon,looped back and divided into several terminal arborizations (palisade endings) around the muscle

  15. Crotoxin in humans: analysis of the effects on extraocular and facial muscles Crotoxina em humanos: estudo da ação em músculos extraoculares e faciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Barros Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Crotoxin is the main neurotoxin of South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. The neurotoxic action is characterized by a presynaptic blockade. The purpose of this research is to assess the ability of crotoxin to induce temporary paralysis of extraocular and facial muscles in humans. METHODS: Doses of crotoxin used ranged from 2 to 5 units (U, each unit corresponding to one LD50. We first applied 2U of crotoxin in one of the extraocular muscles of 3 amaurotic individuals to be submitted to ocular evisceration. In the second stage, we applied crotoxin in 12 extraocular muscles of 9 patients with strabismic amblyopia. In the last stage, crotoxin was used in the treatment of blepharospasm in another 3 patients. RESULTS: No patient showed any systemic side effect or change in vision or any eye structure problem after the procedure. The only local side effects observed were slight conjunctival hyperemia, which recovered spontaneously. In 2 patients there was no change in ocular deviation after 2U crotoxin application. Limitation of the muscle action was observed in 8 of the 12 applications. The change in ocular deviation after application of 2U of crotoxin (9 injections was in average 15.7 prism diopters (PD. When the dose was 4U (2 applications the change was in average 37.5 PD and a single application of 5U produced a change of 16 PD in ocular deviation. This effect lasted from 1 to 3 months. Two of the 3 patients with blepharospasm had the hemifacial spasm improved with crotoxin, which returned after 2 months. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides data suggesting that crotoxin may be a useful new therapeutic option for the treatment of strabismus and blepharospasm. We expect that with further studies crotoxin could be an option for many other medical areas.OBJETIVO: A crotoxina é a principal neurotoxina da cascavel sul-americana Crotalus durissus terrificus e sua ação neurotóxica caracteriza-se por um bloqueio pr

  16. CT in the diagnosis of isolated cysticercal infestation of extraocular muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauniyar, R.K.; Thakur, S.K.D.; Panda, A

    2003-02-01

    AIM: To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) to diagnose orbital cysticercosis, and present the diagnostic features. METHOD: US and CT were used to evaluate patients with proptosis. Four patients were diagnosed as having orbital myocysticercosis and treated with oral albendazole and corticosteroid. Follow-up was undertaken with US and CT. RESULT: US features were confirmatory of myocysticercosis in two eyes where as CT was effective in diagnosing the condition in all four eyes. In two patients the medial rectus was involved, in one the superior rectus and, in the other, the inferior rectus muscles. Serial US and CT revealed complete resolution of the lesions in 3 months. CONCLUSION: CT is useful method in diagnosing isolated orbital myocysticercosis. Our report demonstrated that ophthalmic signs and symptoms in the presence of proptosis, especially in an endemic region, should alert the clinician to the possibility of myocysticercosis. Though CT is superior, US can be used as a economical follow-up investigation. Rauniyar, R. K. etal. (2003) Clinical Radiology58, 154--156.

  17. [Central nervous system abnormalities related to congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguel-Ancheita, Silvia; Rodríguez-Garcidueñas, Wendolyn

    2009-01-01

    We undertook this study to describe central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD). This was a retrospective, observational, transversal and descriptive study including patients with congenital fibrotic strabismus. We analyzed clinical files of patients from 2001 to 2006. Neurological lesions were reported. Restrictive strabismus was demonstrated in all cases. Sixteen patients were included: nine males and seven females. Different neurological lesions were reported: corpus callosum anomalies, severe cortipathy, epilepsy, cavum vergae, nystagmus, occipital subarachnoid cyst, and hydrocephalus. Mental retardation was reported in 56% of patients. Different malformations were reported: genital malformations, trigonocephalus, camptodactyly, mild facial hypoplasia, low set ears, and agenesis of left ear. Blepharoptosis was present in 81% of patients. The most frequent form of strabismus was exotropia (56%), hypotropia in 37.5%, hypertropia 18.7%, "A" pattern 18.7%, and esotropia in 6.25%. Affection was cranial nerve III, 93.75%; cranial nerve VI, 6.25%; cranial nerve VII, 6.25%; and lesion to cranial nerve II in eight cases (50%). We have suggested that failure in early stages of embryology of the CNS can lead to the development of paralytic strabismus and generate secondary fibrotic changes, not only in muscle structures but also in other orbital tissues. That is the reason why we have used the term "congenital fibrotic strabismus" to report cases included in CCDD. We have demonstrated the strong association of mental retardation and neurological alterations. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation is relevant for these patients.

  18. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  19. Eye muscle proprioception is represented bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Albert, Neil B; Miall, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The cortical representation of eye position is still uncertain. In the monkey a proprioceptive representation of the extraocular muscles (EOM) of an eye were recently found within the contralateral central sulcus. In humans, we have previously shown a change in the perceived position of the right...... eye after a virtual lesion with rTMS over the left somatosensory area. However, it is possible that the proprioceptive representation of the EOM extends to other brain sites, which were not examined in these previous studies. The aim of this fMRI study was to sample the whole brain to identify...... the proprioceptive representation for the left and the right eye separately. Data were acquired while passive eye movement was used to stimulate EOM proprioceptors in the absence of a motor command. We also controlled for the tactile stimulation of the eyelid by removing from the analysis voxels activated by eyelid...

  20. Study of crotoxin on the induction of paralysis in extraocular muscle in animal model Estudo da crotoxina na indução de paralisia da musculatura extraocular em modelo animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Barros Ribeiro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Crotoxin is the major toxin of the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, capable of causing a blockade of the neurotransmitters at the neuromuscular junction. The objective of this study was to appraise the action and effectiveness of the crotoxin induced paralysis of the extraocular muscle and to compare its effects with the botulinum toxin type A (BT-A. METHODS: The crotoxin, with LD50 of 1.5 µg, was injected into the superior rectus muscle in ten New Zealand rabbits. The concentration variance was 0.015 up to 150 µg. Two rabbits received 2 units of botulinum toxin type A for comparative analysis. The evaluation of the paralysis was performed using serial electromyography. After the functional recovery of the muscles, which occurred after two months, six rabbits were sacrificed for anatomopathology study. RESULTS: The animals did not show any evidence of systemic toxicity. Transitory ptosis was observed in almost every animal and remained up to fourteen days. These toxins caused immediate blockade of the electrical potentials. The recovery was gradual in the average of one month with regeneration signs evident on the electromyography. The paralysis effect of the crotoxin on the muscle was proportional to its concentration. The changes with 1.5 µg crotoxin were similar to those produced by the botulinum toxin type A. The histopathology findings were localized to the site of the injection. No signs of muscle fiber's necrosis were seen in any sample. The alterations induced by crotoxin were also proportional to the concentration and similar to botulinum toxin type A in concentration of 1.5 µg. CONCLUSION: Crotoxin was able to induce transitory paralysis of the superior rectus muscle. This effect was characterized by reduction of action potentials and non-specific signs of fibrillation. Crotoxin, in concentration of 1.5 µg was able to induce similar effects as botulinum toxin type A.OBJETIVO: A

  1. Autologous grafting of extraocular muscles: experimental study in rabbits Transplante autólogo de musculatura ocular extrínseca: estudo experimental em coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Meireles-Teixeira

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility of autologous extraocular muscle grafting as a type of muscle expansion surgery. METHODS: The left superior rectus muscle of twenty-nine rabbits was resected and this fragment was attached to the endpoint of the respective right superior rectus (test group. Thereafter, the superior rectus of the left eye was reattached to the sclera (control group. Both groups were examined during different postoperative periods in order to assess their outcomes. RESULTS: The presence of hyperemia was slightly more frequent in the grafted group. Secretion and muscle atrophy were negligible in both groups. Fibrosis was greater in grafted animals. These muscles were weaker than the control muscles, although the force required to split muscular parts was always greater than the physiological one. CONCLUSIONS: This surgical technique was reliable and useful if one intends to achieve muscle expansion without the intrinsic risks of dealing with heterologous/artificial materials.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a viabilidade do uso de segmentos de músculos oculares extrínsecos como expansores de tendões musculares. MÉTODOS: Vinte e nove coelhos tiveram seu músculo reto superior esquerdo ressecado e o fragmento de cada um foi transplantado para o reto superior contralateral (grupo-teste. Então, o reto superior esquerdo foi reinserido na esclera (grupo-controle. Os animais foram então examinados em diversos períodos pós-operatórios, até os seus sacrifícios, para que se avaliasse o desenrolar dessa técnica cirúrgica. RESULTADOS: A hiperemia foi maior entre os testes. A secreção e a atrofia muscular foram mínimas nos dois grupos. Houve maior presença de fibrose no grupo-teste, mas não tão expressiva a ponto de inviabilizar os efeitos da cirurgia. Esses músculos também se romperam mais facilmente do que os do grupo-controle, porém, a força de rompimento foi sempre bem maior do que aquela presente numa contração muscular normal

  2. Fgf regulates dedifferentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Kahana, Alon

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) regulate critical biological processes such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. In zebrafish, Fgf signaling plays an important role in the regeneration of the spinal cord, liver, heart, fin, and photoreceptors, although its exact mechanism of action is not fully understood. Utilizing an adult zebrafish extraocular muscle (EOM) regeneration model, we demonstrate that blocking Fgf receptor function using either a chemical inhibitor (SU5402) or a dominant-negative transgenic construct (dnFGFR1a:EGFP) impairs muscle regeneration. Adult zebrafish EOMs regenerate through a myocyte dedifferentiation process, which involves a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition and cell cycle reentry by differentiated myocytes. Blocking Fgf signaling reduced cell proliferation and active caspase 3 levels in the regenerating muscle with no detectable levels of apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Fgf signaling is involved in the early steps of dedifferentiation. Fgf signaling in regenerating myocytes involves the MAPK/ERK pathway: inhibition of MEK activity with U0126 mimicked the phenotype of the Fgf receptor inhibition on both muscle regeneration and cell proliferation, and activated ERK (p-ERK) was detected in injured muscles by immunofluorescence and western blot. Interestingly, following injury, ERK2 expression is specifically induced and activated by phosphorylation, suggesting a key role in muscle regeneration. We conclude that the critical early steps of myocyte dedifferentiation in EOM regeneration are dependent on Fgf signaling.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Upregulation of Antioxidant Proteins, Including Adiponectin, in Extraocular Muscular Cells, Orbital Adipocytes, and Thyrocytes in Graves' Disease Associated with Orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marique, Lancelot; Senou, Maximin; Craps, Julie; Delaigle, Aurélie; Van Regemorter, Elliott; Wérion, Alexis; Van Regemorter, Victoria; Mourad, Michel; Nyssen-Behets, Catherine; Lengelé, Benoit; Baldeschi, Lelio; Boschi, Antonella; Brichard, Sonia; Daumerie, Chantal; Many, Marie-Christine

    2015-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is the main extrathyroidal manifestation associated with Graves' disease (GD). It is characterized by reduced eye motility due to an increased volume of orbital fat and/or of extraocular muscles (EOMs) infiltrated by fibrosis and adipose tissue. The pathogenetic mechanisms leading to fibrosis and adipogenesis are mainly based on the interaction between orbital fibroblasts and immune cells (lymphocytes and mast cells) infiltrating the GO EOMs. Analysis of the morphological status, oxidative stress (OS), and antioxidant defenses in the orbital muscular cells and adipocytes in GO patients compared with controls was conducted. Both cell types are affected by OS, as shown by the increased expression of 4-hydroxynonenal, which leads to apoptosis in muscular cells. However, the EOMs and the adipocytes possess antioxidant defenses (peroxiredoxin 5 and catalase) against the OS, which are also upregulated in thyrocytes in GD. The expression of adiponectin (ApN) and proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is also increased in GO muscular cells and adipocytes. OS and antioxidant proteins expression are correlated to the level of blood antithyrotropin receptor antibodies (TSHR-Ab). Even when TSHR-Ab level is normalized, OS and antioxidant protein expression is high in EOM muscular cells and adipocytes in GO compared with controls. This justifies a supplementation with antioxidants in active as well as chronic GO patients. Orbital muscular cells are also the sources of PPARγ and ApN, which have direct or indirect local protective effects against OS. Modulation of these proteins could be considered as a future therapeutic approach for GO.

  4. Susceptible mechanisms of extraocular muscles in the passive transferred experimental myasthenia gravis rats%重症肌无力被动转移大鼠模型眼外肌的易感机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘睿; 王桂平; 杜婴; 周琼; 苗建亭; 李柱一

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨眼外肌在重症肌无力发病过程中的易感机制.方法 给予SD大鼠腹腔注射mAb35建立重症肌无力被动转移(PTMG)大鼠模型,对照组大鼠注射等量生理盐水.选取PTMG组和对照组大鼠眼外肌、膈肌、胫前肌3种骨骼肌组织.采用乙酰胆碱酯酶(AChE)染色法观察神经肌肉接头(NMJ)并检测NMJ面积和灰度;采用银环蛇毒免疫组化法检测乙酰胆碱受体( AChR)数量;采用电镜观察NMJ超微结构和其AChR情况,并分析比较神经末端面积和突触后膜面积的比值以及突触前后膜长度的比值.结果 AChE染色结果显示,对照组眼外肌NMJ面积相对其他两种骨骼肌更小(P<0.01),PTMG组眼外肌与其他两种骨骼肌NMJ面积比较无统计学差异(P>0.05).银环蛇毒免疫组化结果显示,PTMG组和对照组眼外肌与其它两种骨骼肌间AChR灰度值比较均有统计学差异(P<0.01).电镜观察结果显示,PTMG组3种骨骼肌突触前后膜长度比值均较对照组下降(P<0.01),神经末端面积与突触后膜面积比值较对照组增加(P<0.01),其中眼外肌的变化较其他骨骼肌更为显著.结论 PTMG大鼠模型眼外肌易感机制可能与眼外肌和其他骨骼肌间NMJ面积、AChR数量差异造成眼外肌NMJ安全系数较低有关.%Objective To investigate the susceptible mechanisms of extraocular muscles in passive transferred experimental myasthenia gravis ( PTMG) rats. Methods PTMG model was induced by intraperitoneally injection of purified monoclonal antibody 35. The control group were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline. The extraocular muscles, diaphragms and tibial front muscles in the PTMG group and control group were dissected. Acetylcholinesterase staining, which showed neuromuscular junctions, and alpha bungarotoxin immunohistochemical reaction, which showed acetylcholine receptors (AChR) were used. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) ultrastructure was observed by transmission

  5. Accommodation: The role of the external muscles of the eye: A consideration of refractive errors in relation to extraocular malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, B K

    2014-11-01

    Speculation as to optical malfunction has led to dissatisfaction with the theory that the lens is the sole agent in accommodation and to the suggestion that other parts of the eye are also conjointly involved. Around half-a-century ago, Robert Brooks Simpkins suggested that the mechanical features of the human eye were precisely such as to allow for a lengthening of the globe when the eye accommodated. Simpkins was not an optical man but his theory is both imaginative and comprehensive and deserves consideration. It is submitted here that accommodation is in fact a twofold process, and that although involving the lens, is achieved primarily by means of a give - and - take interplay between adducting and abducting external muscles, whereby an elongation of the eyeball is brought about by a stretching of the delicate elastic fibres immediately behind the cornea. The three muscles responsible for convergence (superior, internal and inferior recti) all pull from in front backwards, while of the three abductors (external rectus and the two obliques) the obliques pull from behind forwards, allowing for an easy elongation as the eye turns inwards and a return to its original length as the abducting muscles regain their former tension, returning the eye to distance vision. In refractive errors, the altered length of the eyeball disturbs the harmonious give - and - take relationship between adductors and abductors. Such stresses are likely to be perpetuated and the error exacerbated. Speculation is not directed towards a search for a possible cause of the muscular imbalance, since none is suspected. Muscles not used rapidly lose tone, as evidenced after removal of a limb from plaster. Early attention to the need for restorative exercise is essential and results usually impressive. If flexibility of the external muscles of the eyes is essential for continuing good sight, presbyopia can be avoided and with it the supposed necessity of glasses in middle life. Early attention

  6. Localising rectus muscle insertions using high frequency wide-field ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Smith, David R; Kraft, Stephen P

    2012-05-01

    The ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) can accurately locate an extraocular muscle (EOM) insertion. The authors compared the accuracy of the Sonomed UBM (SUBM), a new 'wide-field ultrasound biomicroscope', with the older model Humphrey UBM (HUBM) in localising EOM insertions and compared their ranges of detection of muscle insertions. Prospective, double-masked, observational study of 27 patients undergoing primary (n=40 muscles) or repeat (n=10 muscles) horizontal or vertical rectus muscle surgery. EOM insertional distances were measured with SUBM, and then intraoperatively with callipers. A Bland-Altman analysis and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to compare the SUBM and surgical data. For all muscles, the differences between SUBM and surgery measurements were less than 1.0 mm. The mean of the SUBM insertion distances was 6.67 mm (SD 1.65 mm) versus 6.7 mm (SD 1.6 mm) at surgery. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed 'excellent' correlation between the two sets of data and was higher than that reported with HUBM. The image quality with the SUBM was superior to the HUBM, and its range of field was much larger (14×18 mm vs 5×6 mm). The SUBM with its smaller, more manoeuvrable probe handpiece and a wider scanning field was more accurate in detecting muscle insertions compared with HUBM.

  7. How to make rapid eye movements “rapid”: the role of growth factors for muscle contractile properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Feng, Cheng-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Different muscle functions require different muscle contraction properties. Saccade-generating extraocular muscles (EOMs) are the fastest muscles in the human body, significantly faster than limb skeletal muscles. Muscle contraction speed is subjected to plasticity, i.e., contraction speed can be adjusted to serve different demands, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control contraction speed. Therefore, we examined whether myogenic growth factors modulate contractile properties, including twitch contraction time (onset of force to peak force) and half relaxation time (peak force to half relaxation). We examined effects of three muscle-derived growth factors: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), cardiotrophin-1 (CT1), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In gain-of-function experiments, CT1 or GDNF injected into the orbit shortened contraction time, and IGF1 or CT1 shortened half relaxation time. In loss-of-function experiments with binding proteins or neutralizing antibodies, elimination of endogenous IGFs prolonged both contraction time and half relaxation time, while eliminating endogenous GDNF prolonged contraction time, with no effect on half relaxation time. Elimination of endogenous IGFs or CT1, but not GDNF, significantly reduced contractile force. Thus, IGF1, CT1, and GDNF have partially overlapping but not identical effects on muscle contractile properties. Expression of these three growth factors was measured in chicken and/or rat EOMs by real-time PCR. The “fast” EOMs express significantly more message encoding these growth factors and their receptors than skeletal muscles with slower contractile properties. Taken together, these findings indicate that EOM contractile kinetics is regulated by the amount of myogenic growth factors available to the muscle. PMID:21279379

  8. 先天性眼外肌纤维化一家系临床分析及手术治疗%Clinical features and surgical treatment on a family with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张剑飞; 王亚丽; 陈静; 乔珊丽

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical characteristics, surgical outcome and curative effect of congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles ( CFEOM) . METHODS: The eye exam of members in a Chinese family with CFEOM includes visual acuity, intraocular pressure, dilated fundus exam, extraocular muscle function test, orbital CT scan, and ultrasound. We did extraocular muscle surgery or frontalis suspension procedure for affected subjects in the family. RESULTS: The incidence of CFEOM in this family was 31%. All patients were affected bilateraly with symptom of congenital eye movement disorder, ptosis, hypotropia, perverted convergence on upgaze and chin up head position. As the age grows, the diseases worsen unobviously. No other systemic disorder was found. Surgical treatment improved the anomalous head position although the ocular movement disorder preserved. CONCLUSION: The pattern of inheritance in our serial patients are autosomal dominant. Surgery can improve chin up head position and cosmetic appearance. However, the eye movement deficiency cannot be improved.%目的:探讨家族性先天性眼外肌纤维化的临床特点、手术治疗方法及疗效。  方法:对先天性眼外肌纤维化家系成员进行眼部的各项检查,包括:视力、眼压、眼底、眼外肌功能、眼眶CT、双眼B超等检查,并对部分患者行斜视矫正术及额肌悬吊术。  结果:该家系眼外肌纤维化发病率为31%。该家系各患者均双眼受累,自幼表现为眼球运动障碍、上睑下垂,眼球位于下转位,向正前方注视时伴有异常辐辏,向前注视抬下颌。随年龄增长病情加重不明显。其他全身系统器官未见异常。经手术治疗,下颌上抬及外观可获得明显改善,眼球运动改善不明显。  结论:该家系具有常染色体显性遗传特征。通过手术治疗可改善头位及外观。眼球运动无明显改善。

  9. Effect of temperature on extracellular organic matter (EOM) of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and effect of EOM on irreversible membrane fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangchao; Su, Yiming; Tan, Xiaobo; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yalei; Yang, Libin; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular organic matter (EOM) can cause serious membrane fouling during the algae harvesting process. In this study, the secretion of EOM, including bound-EOM (bEOM) and dissolved-EOM (dEOM), by Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) at different culturing temperatures, and their influences on membrane filtration, have been investigated. The secretion of EOM was markedly reduced at high temperatures. The specific EOM secretion rate (SEOM) reached 831.1 ± 55.3mg/g at the lowest temperatures of 15 °C; in contrast, the SEOM decreased to only 370-442 and 356-406 mg/g with temperature rising above 20-25 and 30-35 °C, respectively. Based on membrane filtration experiments, the influence of EOM on irreversible membrane fouling was studied. In a critical flux experiment, low critical flux (24 L/m(2)h) was observed in a system with a high EOM concentration. The fouled membranes were rinsed by water and then used for continuous filtration, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The results revealed that there was irreversible membrane fouling caused by EOM, and irreversible membrane fouling can be more serious when an algae solution contains high EOM levels.

  10. 80例以复视为首发症状的眼外肌麻痹病因分析%Analysis of 80 cases of extraocular muscles paralysis with diplopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彬

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨以复视为首发症状的眼肌麻痹患者的临床特征、鉴别诊断,探讨其病因及发病机制。方法回顾分析2008至2013年我院神经内科收治以复视症状为主症的眼肌麻痹患者80例,根据病史、详细的查体和眼部检查,分析其发病原因。结果80例病例中,糖尿病性眼肌麻痹24例(动眼神经麻痹16例,外展神经麻痹6例,合并动眼神经、外展神经麻痹2例),脑血管病20例,动脉粥样硬化性动眼神经、外展神经麻痹18例,颅内动脉瘤者10例,重症肌无力眼肌型2例,躯体形式障碍1例,颅内肿瘤2例,多发性硬化1例,神经梅毒1例,脑干脑炎1例。结论很多神经系统疾病可引起复视的神经眼科体征,其中糖尿病性眼肌麻痹为最主要病因,脑血管病、动脉瘤眼肌麻痹、动脉粥样硬化也是重要原因,其他还有重症肌无力(眼肌型)、躯体形式障碍、颅内占位等。以复视为首发症状的急性眼外肌麻痹病因复杂,容易误诊,临床医生应高度重视,明确诊断,以达到正确治疗。%Objective To evaluate clinical features of extraocular muscles paralysis that initially presented with di -plopia.Methods Eighty cases with extraocular muscles paralysis were analyzed for causes of disease by reviewing medical history, a thorough physical examination and a complete eye examination .The clinical features were studied .Results Twenty-four patients with extraocular muscles paralysis were caused by diabetes , including oculomotor nerve paralysis ( 16 cases), abducent nerve paralysis (6 cases), and combination of oculomotor nerve and abducent nerve paralysis (2 cases). Twenty cases were caused by cerebrovascular diseases , and 18 cases were caused by arteriosclerosis resulted oculomotor and abducent nerve paralysis .Ten cases were caused by intracranial aneurysms ,two cases by myasthenia gravis ,one case by so-matization disorder ,two by

  11. 带状疱疹并发眼外肌麻痹11例临床分析%Analysis of 11 cases of herpes zoster complicated by extraocular muscles paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓鸥

    2012-01-01

    11例带状疱疹并发眼外肌麻痹患者均表现为眼睑及周围皮肤带状疱疹,疹后14天~2个月出现复视、斜视,持续4周~2个月.早期眼部外用、严重者系统应用糖皮质激素治疗可防止眼部后遗症的发生.%Eleven cases of herpes zoster complicated by extraocular muscles paralysis were reported. All cases presented herpes zoster of eyelids and nearby skin. Ten days to two months after the onset of herpes zoster, diplopia and esotropia occurred and lasted for 4 weeks to 2 months. Early application of glucocorticoids can prevent the occurrence of ocular sequelae.

  12. Isobaric Tagging-Based Quantification for Proteomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of Spared and Affected Muscles from mdx Mice at the Early Phase of Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Yuri Matsumura

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common childhood myopathy, characterized by muscle loss and cardiorespiratory failure. While the genetic basis of DMD is well established, secondary mechanisms associated with dystrophic pathophysiology are not fully clarified yet. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of muscle dystrophy during earlier stages of the disease, we performed a comparative proteomic profile of the spared extraocular muscles (EOM vs. affected diaphragm from the mdx mice, using a label based shotgun proteomic approach. Out of the 857 identified proteins, 42 to 62 proteins had differential abundance of peptide ions. The calcium-handling proteins sarcalumenin and calsequestrin-1 were increased in control EOM compared with control DIA, reinforcing the view that constitutional properties of EOM are important for their protection against myonecrosis. The finding that galectin-1 (muscle regeneration, annexin A1 (anti-inflammatory and HSP 47 (fibrosis were increased in dystrophic diaphragm provides novel insights into the mechanisms through which mdx affected muscles are able to counteract dystrophy, during the early stage of the disease. Overall, the shotgun technique proved to be suitable to perform quantitative comparisons between distinct dystrophic muscles and allowed the suggestion of new potential biomarkers and drug targets for dystrophinopaties.

  13. Lymphomas and metastases of the extra-ocular musculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surov, Alexey; Behrmann, Curd; Koesling, Sabrina [Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    The involvement of extra-ocular muscles in malignant diseases has been described only sporadically. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of orbital muscle lymphoma and metastases and to analyse their radiological findings. In the time period from January 2000 to January 2010, 11 patients with extra-ocular muscle malignancies (EOMM) were retrospectively identified in the radiological database of our institution. There were four women and seven men with a median age of 58 years (range, 47 to 72 years). In three patients non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), in seven cases intramuscular metastases of solid tumours and in one patient plasmacytoma of orbital muscles were diagnosed. In all, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 11 patients using a 1.5-T MRI scanner (Magnetom Vision Sonata Upgrade, Siemens, Germany). The diagnosis of EOMM was confirmed histopathologically by muscle biopsy in all cases. The prevalence of orbital muscle involvement in plasmacytoma was 0.3%, in NHL 0.4% and in carcinomas 0.1%. Clinically, EOMM presented as painless proptosis and motility disturbance. Medial and lateral rectus muscles were involved in most patients. On T2-weighted images, the lesions were isointense or mixed iso-to-hyperintense in comparison to the unaffected musculature. On T1-weighted images, all tumours were homogeneously isointense. After intravenous administration of contrast medium, most lesions showed moderate heterogeneous enhancement. Lymphomas and metastases are rare lesions of the extra-ocular musculature with a prevalence below 0.5%. Their radiological and clinical signs are non-specific and include painless muscle enlargement or masses. They should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diseases of extra-ocular muscles. (orig.)

  14. Comparação entre os métodos de injeção de toxina botulínica em músculo ocular externo com o uso do eletromiógrafo e com o uso da pinça de Mendonça Electromyograph assistance and Mendonça's forceps - a comparison between two methods of botulinum toxin A injection into the extraocular muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Fernando Scalamandré Mendonça

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar dois métodos de aplicação de toxina botulínica A (TBA em músculo ocular externo: com auxílio de eletromiógrafo (EMG e com a pinça de Mendonça. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados no Departamento de Oftalmologia da UNIFESP 29 pacientes que apresentavam estrabismo e baixa acuidade visual em um olho. Foram divididos em dois grupos: grupo I - 17 pacientes que receberam a toxina botulínica A por meio de injeção com auxílio da pinça de Mendonça e grupo II - 12 pacientes que receberam a toxina botulínica A por injeção guiada pelo eletromiógrafo. Os pacientes dos dois grupos foram avaliados no 7º e no 14º dia após aplicação. Compararam-se os resultados dos dois grupos neste período de tempo. Os testes de correlação de Friedman e Mann-Whitney foram usados para análise estatística. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença estatística entre as médias de desvio pré-aplicação e em pelo menos um período (7º ou 14º dia após aplicação, tanto no grupo dos pacientes em que foi utilizada a pinça, quanto no grupo de pacientes em que foi utilizado o eletromiógrafo. Não houve diferença estatística dos desvios pré-aplicação e pós-aplicação entre os dois grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os dois métodos de aplicação da toxina botulínica A são equivalentes e portanto, o uso da pinça de Mendonça pode ser método alternativo ao uso do eletromiógrafo, para guiar a injeção de toxina botulínica A.PURPOSE: To compare two methods of botulinum toxin A (BTA injection into the extraocular muscle (EOM: the electromyographically (EMG guided injection and the injection using Mendonça's forceps. METHODS: Twenty-nine (29 patients with strabismus and low visual acuity in one eye were examined at the Department of Ophthalmology of UNIFESP. They were divided into 2 groups - group I with 17 patients receiving the botulinum toxin A injection using Mendonça's forceps, and group II with 12 patients receiving the toxin with electromyographical

  15. Human Brain Reacts to Transcranial Extraocular Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihua; Peräkylä, Jari; Kovalainen, Anselmi; Ogawa, Keith H; Karhunen, Pekka J; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial extraocular light affects the brains of birds and modulates their seasonal changes in physiology and behavior. However, whether the human brain is sensitive to extraocular light is unknown. To test whether extraocular light has any effect on human brain functioning, we measured brain electrophysiology of 18 young healthy subjects using event-related potentials while they performed a visual attention task embedded with emotional distractors. Extraocular light delivered via ear canals abolished normal emotional modulation of attention related brain responses. With no extraocular light delivered, emotional distractors reduced centro-parietal P300 amplitude compared to neutral distractors. This phenomenon disappeared with extraocular light delivery. Extraocular light delivered through the ear canals was shown to penetrate at the base of the scull of a cadaver. Thus, we have shown that extraocular light impacts human brain functioning calling for further research on the mechanisms of action of light on the human brain.

  16. Calcium-binding proteins in skeletal muscles of the mdx mice: potential role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertille, Adriana; de Carvalho, Candida Luiza Tonizza; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common hereditary diseases. Abnormal ion handling renders dystrophic muscle fibers more susceptible to necrosis and a rise in intracellular calcium is an important initiating event in dystrophic muscle pathogenesis. In the mdx mice, muscles are affected with different intensities and some muscles are spared. We investigated the levels of the calcium-binding proteins calsequestrin and calmodulin in the non-spared axial (sternomastoid and diaphragm), limb (tibialis anterior and soleus), cardiac and in the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) of control and mdx mice. Immunoblotting analysis showed a significant increase of the proteins in the spared mdx EOM and a significant decrease in the most affected diaphragm. Both proteins were comparable to the cardiac muscle controls. In limb and sternomastoid muscles, calmodulin and calsequestrin were affected differently. These results suggest that differential levels of the calcium-handling proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of myonecrosis in mdx muscles. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin activation and calsequestrin expression may be a valuable way to develop new therapeutic approaches to the dystrophinopaties.

  17. Original hydroxyapatite orbital implant covered with small autoscleral flap with extraocular rectus muscles orbital implantation%直肌及其止端处小巩膜瓣下义眼台植入术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景明; 孙琰; 周哲; 高玉; 马戈; 葛茸茸; 王传星; 蔡金辉

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察自创的带直肌止点处小巩膜瓣下羟基磷灰石(HA)义眼台植入术的临床效果.方法 用自创方法行义眼台植入术296例(296只眼),随机对其中32例(32只眼)进行眼眶增强MRI检查以观察术后1周、1、2、3、4、5、6及18个月义眼台血管化进程.结果 所有病例随访1 ~18个月,义眼台活动良好,无义眼台外露发生.增强MRI检查显示义眼台于术后1个月即完全血管化,随着时间进展,血管化密度逐渐增大.结论 作者自创的带直肌止点区域小巩膜瓣下HA义眼台植入术,彻底解决了HA义眼台植入术外露的问题,促进义眼台血管化的优势明显,具有良好的使用前景.%Objective To observe the clinical efficacy of orbital implantation with original hydroxyapatite (HA) orbital implant covered with small autoscleral flap at extraocular rectus muscles insertions area which was designed by the author.Methods Thirty-two cases were randomly selected from a total of 296 patients who were treated with the original hydroxyapatite implantation method.Serial precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained at 1 week,1,2,3,4,5,6 and 18 months after implantation to assess the fibrovascularization of HA orbital implants.Results Patients were followed up for 1to18 months.In all cases HAs were fixed to orbit and moved well.There was no complication of prostheses exposure.Contrast-enhanced MRI showed the HA spheres had achieved complete vascularization 1 month after implantation.The vascularization density increased with time.Conclusion The author' s original hydroxyapatite orbital implantation covered with small autoscleral flap with extraocular rectus muscles method completely solves the problem of prostheses exposure complication and its advantage of promoting the fibrovascularization is obvious.The application prospect is good.

  18. Study of extraocular muscle with direct injection of insulin-like growth factorⅠ%胰岛素样生长因子局部注射对眼外肌作用的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余新平; 许金玲; 陈洁; 黄盈; 余焕云; 张芳; 高军

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects on muscle mass and force generation of IGF-I injection in adult rabbit superior rectus muscle. Methods One superior rectus muscle in normal adult rabbits received a single injection of 10ug (0.05ml) IGF-I, and the contralateral muscle received an injection of 0.05ml saline only. One week after injection, muscle force and muscle morphology were studied both in IGF treated and control muscles. Results In the treated muscles, the mean single-twitch force generation was 2.4515+1.1019mN compared with 1.1511+0.6755mN (t =2.58, P =0.049) in control muscles. Mean titanic force generation was increased significantly at all stimulation frequencies. The cross-sectional area of muscles was 10.04+2.52mm2 compared with 7.79+1.85 mm2 (t =2.84, P =0.047) in control. The frequency of activated satellite cells was 30.63+6.76% compared with 17.07+5.36% in control (t =8.73, P =0.000). Conclusions Direct injection of IGF-I effectively increase extraocular muscle force generation with increased number of activated satellite cells.%目的 探讨局部注射胰岛素样生长因子(insulin-like growth factor-Ⅰ,IGF-Ⅰ)对成年兔眼外肌的作用及机制.方法 7只成年新西兰大白兔,双眼上直肌随机注射0.05ml(10靏)IGF-Ⅰ或0.05ml生理盐水,1周后肌肉张力换能器检测上直肌肌肉力量,获取上直肌行组织学检查.结果 实验组上直肌单刺激收缩力为(2.4515±1.1019)mN,对照组上直肌为(1.1511±0.6755)mN,差异有统计学意义(t =2.58,P =0.049),实验组上直肌各刺激频率的强直收缩力比对照组明显更大,均有显著性差别.实验组单位重量肌肉的收缩力比对照组更大,各刺激频率均有显著性差异.实验组上直肌横截面面积为(10.04±2.52)mm2较对照组(7.79±1.85) mm2明显更大,差异有统计学意义(t =2.84,P =0.047);实验组上直肌中活化的卫星细胞为(30.63±6.76)%,比对照组(17.07±5.36)%显著更高(t =8.73,P =0.000).结论 成年动物

  19. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  20. Histotopographical study of human periocular elastic fibers using aldehyde-fuchsin staining with special reference to the sleeve and pulley system for extraocular rectus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Hajime; Murakami, Gen; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Takashi; Tatsumi, Haruyuki

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed configuration of periocular elastic fibers. Semiserial paraffin sections were made using 40 whole orbital contents from 27 elderly cadavers and stained by the aldehyde-fuchsin method. Periocular tissues were classified into three types according to directions of the elastic fibers, i.e., tissues containing anteroposteriorly running elastic fibers, those with mediolateral fibers, and those with meshwork of fibers. Anteroposterior elastic fiber-dominant tissue was seen in the upper eyelid and newly defined pulley plate for the medial and lateral recti (MR, LR). Mediolateral fibers were predominant in the central part of the inferior rectus pulley. In the pulley plates for the MR and LR, anteroposteriorly running fibers encased the striated muscle. Tenon's capsule and the epimysium of the recti were mediolateral fiber-dominant. However, at the entrance of the muscle terminal where Tenon's capsule reflects and continues to the epimysium, composite elastic fibers provided a meshwork-like skeleton. The elastic mesh was also seen around the lacrimal canaliculi. The pulley for the recti seemed to be composed of two parts--a connective tissue plate encasing the recti and specialized Tenon's capsule at an entrance or porta of the muscle. For both parts, elastic fibers were major functional components. The anteroposterior elastic fibers in the MR and LR pulley plates, especially, seemed to receive anteroposteriorly directed stress and tension from these striated muscles. The elastic interfaces seemed to prevent any concentration of stress that would interfere with periocular striated muscle functions, including hypothetical active pulleys.

  1. 4D-visualization of the orbit based on dynamic MRI with special focus on the extra-ocular muscles and the optic nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, C. [Univ. of Applied Sciences Osnabrueck (Germany); Boerner, B.I.; Buitrago, C.; Klarhoefer, M.; Scheffler, K.; Kunz, C.; Zeilhofer, H.F. [Univ. Hospital Basle (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    By recording time dependent patients' behaviour, dynamic radiology is dedicated to capturing functional anatomy. Dynamic 'quasi-continuous' MRI data of lateral eye movements of a healthy volunteer were acquired using SE imaging sequence (Siemens, 1.5 T). By means of combined application of several image processing and visualization techniques, namely shaded and transparent surface reconstruction as well as direct volume rendering, 4D-visualization of the dynamics of the extra ocular muscles was possible. Though the original MRI data were quite coarse vascular structures could be recognized to some extent. For the sake of 4D-visualization of the optic nerve, the optic cavity was opened by axial clipping of the visualization. Superimposition of the original MRI slices to the visualization, either transparently or opaque, served as validation and comparison to conventional diagnosis. For facilitation of the analysis of the visualization results, stereoscopic rendering was rated as quite significant especially in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  2. 21 CFR 886.3340 - Extraocular orbital implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraocular orbital implant. 886.3340 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3340 Extraocular orbital implant. (a) Identification. An extraocular orbital implant is a nonabsorbable device intended to be implanted during...

  3. Restrictive extraocular myopathy: A presenting feature of acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Heireman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man presented with binocular diplopia in primary gaze for 1 year. Orthoptic evaluation showed 10-prism diopter right eye hypotropia and 6-prism diopter right eye esotropia. The elevation and abduction of the right eye were mechanically restricted. This was associated with systemic features suggestive of acromegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain demonstrated a pituitary macroadenoma. An elevated serum insulin-like growth factor I level and the failure of growth hormone suppression after an oral glucose load biochemically confirmed the diagnosis of acromegaly. Computed tomography (CT of the orbit demonstrated bilateral symmetrical enlargement of the medial rectus and inferior rectus muscle bellies. All tests regarding Graves-Basedow disease were negative. Although rare, diplopia due to a restrictive extraocular myopathy could be the presenting symptom of acromegaly.

  4. Differential expression of genes involved in the calcium homeostasis in masticatory muscles of MDX mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert-Keil, C H; Gredes, T; Lucke, S; Botzenhart, U; Dominiak, M; Gedrange, T

    2014-04-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and its murine model, mdx, are characterized by Ca(2+) induced muscle damage and muscle weakness followed by distorted dentofacial morphology. In both, DMD patients and in mdx mice, could be proven so far that only the extraocular muscles (EOM) are not affected by muscular dystrophy. The EOMs are protected against calcium overload by enhanced expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis. We could recently demonstrate that masticatory muscles of mdx mice are differentially affected by muscle dystrophy. The dystrophic masseter and temporalis shows muscle histology comparable to all other skeletal muscles in this animal model, whereas dystrophic tongue muscles seem to develop a milder phenotype. Due to this fact it is to hypothesize that an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis seems to underlie the mdx masticatory muscle pathology. Aim of this study was to examine the mRNA and protein levels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases SERCA1 and SERCA2, the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases Atp2b1 and Atp2b4, the sodium/calcium exchanger NCX1, the ryanodine receptor 1, parvalbumin, sarcolipin, phospholamban and the L-type Ca(2+) channel alpha-1 subunit (Cacna1s) in Musculus masseter, temporalis, and tongue of 100 day old control and mdx mice. In mdx masseter muscle significant increased mRNA levels of NCX1 and Cacna1s were found compared to control mice. In contrast, the mRNA amount of RYR1 was significant reduced in mdx temporalis muscle, whereas ATP2b4 was significant increased. In mdx tongue a down-regulation of the ATP2b1, sarcolipin and parvalbumin mRNA expression was found, whereas the phospholamban mRNA level was significantly increased compared to controls. These data were verified by western blot analyses. Our findings revealed that mdx masticatory muscles showed an unequally altered expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis that can support the differences in masticatory muscles response to dystrophin deficiency.

  5. A study of the pathological changes and expression of the hepatocyte growth factor in the extraocular muscle in concomitant strabismus%共同性斜视眼外肌的病理变化及肝细胞生长因子表达研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗琪; 周炼红; 易贝茜; 叶美红; 徐永红

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究共同性斜视弱侧眼外肌的病理变化及肝细胞生长因子(HGF)的表达。方法实验研究。收集在武汉大学人民医院眼科行共同性斜视手术的58例患者手术中切下的眼外肌作为斜视组,将其分成共同性外斜视(32例)和共同性内斜视(26例)2组,同期10例角膜移植供体眼眼外肌作为对照组(供体均无斜视)。观察眼外肌的组织结构变化,用免疫组织化学法检测眼外肌中HGF的表达,并测定其平均光密度值。比较斜视组与对照组眼外肌HGF的表达差异,并分析其与斜视度、患者年龄之间相关性。所得数据采用t检验及直线相关分析进行统计学处理。结果①共同性外斜视组内直肌肌纤维横截面积(308.9±68.4)μm2,显著低于对照组内直肌[(738.4±56.3)μm2](t=16.74,P<0.05),共同性内斜视组外直肌肌纤维横截面积(217.9±34.7)μm2,显著低于对照组外直肌[(620.9±46.5)μm2](t=28.34,P<0.05),差异有统计学意义。②Masson染色显示共同性斜视弱侧眼外肌肌纤维数量减少,排列紊乱,胶原纤维含量增多,纤维组织、脂肪组织和肌纤维间隙增宽。③免疫组化检测HGF在对照眼眼外肌及斜视眼弱侧眼外肌中均有阳性表达,主要表达于胞浆,细胞外基质中有少量的表达。其中共同性外斜视组内直肌(t=6.33,P<0.05)、共同性内斜视组外直肌(t=4.75,P<0.05)HGF的表达均低于对照组。④HGF的表达与患者病程(r=-0.856,P<0.05)以及斜视度(r=-0.525,P<0.05)呈负相关。结论共同性斜视弱侧眼外肌出现胶原纤维增生,肌纤维横截面积减小等萎缩性病理改变;HGF的低表达可能是共同性斜视发生的危险因素。%Objective To study the pathomorphological changes and expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the extraocular muscle in concomitant strabismus

  6. Eomes expression reports the progressive differentiation of IFN-γ-producing Th1-like γδ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Ciro N R; Barros-Martins, Joana; Oberdörfer, Linda; Walzer, Thierry; Prinz, Immo

    2017-04-06

    The transcription factor Eomesodermin (Eomes) plays a crucial role in regulating cytotoxic function, development and survival of immune cells. γδ T cells can express Eomes, but its contribution to their differentiation is unknown. Using Eomes-IRES-GFP mice, we show that Eomes(+) γδ T cells are unequally distributed among organs, with the highest proportion in spleen. While the majority of Eomes(+) γδ T cells expressed Vγ1(+) and Vγ4(+) TCRs, Eomes was absent in Vγ5(+) , Vγ6(+) and Vγ7(+) subsets. Moreover, Eomes was co-expressed in γδ T cells with Th1 lineage-related factors such as CD27, T-bet and Ly6C, but not with Th17 lineage-related genes. Eomes(+) and Eomes(-) γδ T-cell populations showed distinct gene expression profiles, with an increase of cytotoxic-related genes in Eomes(+) γδ T cells. Furthermore, Eomes could be induced in peripheral γδ T cells by IL-12 and IL-4, and Eomes(+) γδ T cells presented a higher proliferation rate and IFN-γ production when stimulated in vitro with IL-12 and IL-18. However, γδ T cells with very high Eomes levels displayed an exhausted phenotype with high levels of PD-1, and were less capable of IFN-γ production. Together, this study highlights Eomes as a marker for the differentiation of Th1-like effector γδ T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Presumed isotretinoin-induced extraocular myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shahid Alam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotretinoin a synthetic analogue of vitamin A is primarily used for cystic acne not responding to conventional treatment. Several ocular side effects including blurring of vision, decreased dark adaptation, corneal opacities and meibomian gland atrophy have been reported with prolonged use of isotretinoin. There have been reports of muscular damage caused by isotretinoin. Extra ocular myopathy as an adverse effect of long term used of isotretinoin has never been mentioned in literature. We report a case of a young male who presented to us with complaints of diplopia after using isotretinoin for a prolonged period. He was diagnosed as a case of presumed isotretinoin extraocular myopathy after imaging and other blood investigations.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscle associated with limb movement disorder in a family%伴有肢体运动障碍的先天性眼外肌纤维化综合征家系的影像学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周炼红; 李春义; 查云飞; 张俊涛; 刘甜

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM) affects patient' s appearance and quality of life,and no effective treatment for this disease is available.Imaging study is helpful for exploring the pathogenesis of CFEOM.Objective This study was to describe the characteristics of CFEOM associated with limb movement disorder using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Methods A family with CFEOM associated with limb movement disorder was investigated in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University.Disease history was collected and the pedigree was investigated.Ophthalmologic examinations,including corrected visual acuity,refractive error,slitlamp examination,ophthalmoscopic examination,force of levator palpebrae superioris,ocular movement,eye position,forced duction test,and bell phenomenon examination,were performed.Ocular orbital and cranial MRI was performed in 4 CFEOM patients and 10 normal subjects to compare the structures of the extraocular muscles,motor nerve and cranium.Oral informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to any medical examination.Results A total of 1 1 members from 3 generations were investigated in this study,presenting with 4 cases of disease.The mode of inheritance of this family complied with the Mendelian autosomal dominant inheritance law.Clinical signs included disturbance of eye movement,deviation of eye position,ptosis,lack of Bell sign and positive reaction of passive pull test.In addition,unstable gait,improper body limb alignment,dysphasia and mental retardation were ohserved in 1 patient,which coincided with the diagnostic criteria of type 3 CFEOM.MRI results demonstrated that the levator palpebrae superioris,superior rectus and superior oblique muscle were clearly thinner,and the medial rectus,lateral rectus,inferior rectus muscle were thinning in the patients,showing significant differences in comparison with the normal controls(P<O.05).The oculomotor and abducens nerves became thinner and even absent in the patients

  9. USDA, ARS EOM 402-10 high B-carotene cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high B-carotene cucumber (Cucumis sativus var. sativus L.) line EOM 402-10 is being released. This line was derived from a cross between the "Xishuangbanna gourd" (XIS; Cucumis sativus var. xishuangbannanesis Qi et Yuan; 2n = 2x = 14) that bears orange fruit and the non-orange-fruited cultivated c...

  10. Characterization of T-bet and eomes in peripheral human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James J; Cosma, Gabriela L; Betts, Michael R; McLane, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    The T-box transcription factors T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes) have been well defined as key drivers of immune cell development and cytolytic function. While the majority of studies have defined the roles of these factors in the context of murine T-cells, recent results have revealed that T-bet, and possibly Eomes, are expressed in other immune cell subsets. To date, the expression patterns of these factors in subsets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells beyond T-cells remain relatively uncharacterized. In this study, we used multiparametric flow cytometry to characterize T-bet and Eomes expression in major human blood cell subsets, including total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells, γδ T-cells, invariant NKT cells, natural killer cells, B-cells, and dendritic cells. Our studies identified novel cell subsets that express T-bet and Eomes and raise implications for their possible functions in the context of other human immune cell subsets besides their well-known roles in T-cells.

  11. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractPurpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos. Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  12. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractPurpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos. Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cruse RP, Zubcov AA, Robb RM, Roggenkäemper P, Gottlob I, Kowal L, Battu R, Traboulsi EI, Franceschini ... Akarsu AN, Sabol LJ, Demer JL, Sullivan TJ, Gottlob I, Roggenkäemper P, Mackey DA, De Uzcategui CE, ...

  14. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  15. EPR and EOM studies in well samples from some Venezuelan oil fields: possible mechanisms of magnetic authigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, M.; Díaz, M.; Costanzo-Alvarez, V.; Jiménez, S. M.; Sequera, P.

    2003-04-01

    In the last few years we have conducted Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) studies in drilling fines, from near-surface levels, from producer and non-producer wells. These studies were aimed at examining a possible causal relationship between magnetic contrasts and underlying hydrocarbons. In this work we have extended these studies to some new wells, trying to identify the possible origin (microbial and/or thermochemical) of the observed anomalies. Together with EPR and MS studies, quantification of extractable organic matter (EOM) has been also performed. The samples were pulverized and split into two aliquots. One aliquot was treated with chloroform in order to separate de EOM and obtain the sample without EOM and the EOM itself. The other aliquot was not solvent extracted. The EOM was quantified and EPR measurements were performed on both aliquots in order to determine the organic matter free radical concentration (OMFRC). The treatments performed allow identifying whether the OMFRC belongs to the EOM or to the total organic matter (TOM). Asphaltenes tend to be the major components in highly biodegraded crude oils. Then the presence of OMFRC belonging to the TOM or to the EOM could indicate a possible microbial or thermochemical origin, respectively, of the detected MS anomalies. We have found OMFRC and EOM anomalies only at the producer wells, in the same zone where MS anomalies, associated with the presence of spherical aggregates of magnetic minerals, were observed. For some of these wells our results indicate the solely presence of free radicals of kerogen at OMFRC anomalous level. In fact, the EOM of these wells has no EPR signal and precipitation of asphaltene in n-heptane was not observed. In other instances, free radicals of kerogen and asphaltenes and precipitation of asphaltene from the EOM in n-heptane was observed. In the former case we suggest the existence of a reducing zone where thermochemical conditions are

  16. [Treatment of primary retinal detachment. Minimal extraocular or intraocular?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissig, I

    2002-06-01

    The developments in treatment modalities for a primary retinal detachment over the last 70 years have been reviewed. There was a change from a surgery limited to the area of the break to a form of prophylactic surgery including the extent of the detachment. In between Rosengren had limited the treatment to the break with an intraocular gas bubble. A change was brought about by Custodis in 1953 who limited surgery to the break and omitted drainage. This procedure had serious postoperative complications which were eliminated by Lincoff by developing the cryosurgical detachment operation which was subsequently refined to extraocular minimal surgery. The ultimate realization of a minimal extraocular approach was the operation with a temporary balloon. Two additional intraocular procedures evolved, pneumatic retinopexy and primary vitrectomy, following one or the other pattern of treatment. With all four methods reattachment can result in 94-99% of the cases but differences can be seen in the morbidity and rate of reoperations.

  17. Roles of CDX2 and EOMES in human induced trophoblast progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Gong, Yun Guo; Khoo, Sok Kean [Genomic Microarray Core Facility, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► CDX2 and EOMES play critical roles in human induced trophoblast progenitors (iTP). ► iTP cells directly transformed from fibroblasts. ► Differentiation of iTP cells into extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. -- Abstract: Abnormal trophoblast lineage proliferation and differentiation in early pregnancy have been associated with the pathogenesis of placenta diseases of pregnancy. However, there is still a gap in understanding the molecular mechanisms of early placental development due to the limited primary trophoblast cultures and fidelity of immortalized trophoblast lines. Trophoblasts stem (TS) cells, an in vitro model of trophectoderm that can differentiate into syncytiotrophoblasts and extravillous trophoblasts, can be an attractive tool for early pregnancy research. TS cells are well established in mouse but not in humans due to insufficient knowledge of which trophoblast lineage-specific transcription factors are involved in human trophectoderm (TE) proliferation and differentiation. Here, we applied induced pluripotent stem cell technique to investigate the human trophoblast lineage-specific transcription factors. We established human induced trophoblast progenitor (iTP) cells by direct reprogramming the fibroblasts with a pool of mouse trophoblast lineage-specific transcription factors consisting of CDX2, EOMES, and ELF5. The human iTP cells exhibit epithelial morphology and can be maintained in vitro for more than 2 months. Gene expression profile of these cells was tightly clustered with human trophectoderm but not with human neuron progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells, or endoderm cells. These cells are capable of differentiating into cells with an invasive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts. They also form multi-nucleated cells which secrete human chorionic gonadotropin and estradiol, consistent with a syncytiotrophoblast phenotype. Our results provide the evidence that transcription factors CDX2 and

  18. Intraocular and extraocular hemorrhage associated with ligature release of non-valved glaucoma drainage implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Go

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: and importance: This is the first report of a rare occurrence of intraocular and extraocular hemorrhage associated following spontaneous release of ligature of a non-valved glaucoma drainage implant. The presumed mechanism was sudden shallowing of the anterior chamber resulting in the tube irritating uveal vasculature. We do not have an explanation for the extraocular blood.

  19. The histone demethylase Jmjd3 sequentially associates with the transcription factors Tbx3 and Eomes to drive endoderm differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kartikasari, Apriliana E R; Zhou, Josie X; Kanji, Murtaza S

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation depends on transcriptional activation driven by lineage-specific regulators as well as changes in chromatin organization. However, the coordination of these events is poorly understood. Here, we show that T-box proteins team up with chromatin modifying enzymes to drive...... feedback loop. In addition, Eomes activates a transcriptional network of core regulators of endodermal differentiation. Our results demonstrate that Jmjd3 sequentially associates with two T-box factors, Tbx3 and Eomes to drive stem cell differentiation towards the definitive endoderm lineage....

  20. Stimulation of the retina with a multielectrode extraocular visual prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Vivek; Morley, John W; Coroneo, Minas T

    2005-08-01

    An extraocular approach to developing a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using electrodes placed on the outer surface of the eye is suggested. Experiments were carried out to determine the feasibility of this approach, and evaluate electrode configurations and parameters for stimulation. In anaesthetized cats, a 21-electrode extraocular retinal prosthesis (ERP) array was sutured to the sclera over the lateral surface of the eye. Electrically evoked potentials (EEP) were recorded at the visual cortex bilaterally in response to retinal stimulation with the electrode array. Bipolar stimulation of the ERP array electrodes in horizontal and vertical configurations and at different interelectrode separations was investigated with biphasic constant-current pulses. Electrical stimulation of the lateral retina with an ERP elicited EEP that were higher in the ipsilateral visual cortex. The threshold for bipolar retinal stimulation was 500 microA. EEP amplitude increased with increases in stimulus pulse duration and current intensity. Retinal stimulation was slightly more effective with electrodes in a vertical as opposed to horizontal orientation. A larger interelectrode separation resulted in a higher EEP amplitude. Retinal stimulation with a prototype ERP array is demonstrated. The thresholds for retinal excitation are below safe charge-density limits for chronic neural stimulation. Ipsilateral localization of the EEP suggests that localized retinal stimulation is occurring. An ERP is a new approach to retinal prosthesis research, and might lead to the development of a low-resolution visual prosthesis for blind patients.

  1. MRI of extraocular orbital diseases; Comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-12-01

    The author investigated the usefulness of MRI in the diagnosis of extraocular orbital diseases, and the diagnostic ability of MRI was compared with that of CT. The materials consisted of 38 cases of diseases in extraocular orbital region (all cases were examined with MRI and 34 of them were also examined with CT). MRI was performed with spin echo or STIR sequences using a 1.5 tesla superconductive unit (GE SIGNA). CT was performed using SOMATOM CR and DR-H. The study showed that MRI was equally or more useful than CT in detecting lesions as well as assessing the internal architecture and extension of the lesions. Differentiation between benign and malignant tumors by MRI is difficult from their signal intensity only and can be made from their extraorbital extension, just as by CT. In Graves' orbitopathy, T{sub 2}-weighted images were more sensitive in reflecting its new or old pathological changes than CT. T{sub 1}-weighted images enhanced with Gd-DTPA were useful in differentiating sphenoid wing meningiomas from other tumors, but not useful in assessing the degree of intraorbital extension. STIR sequences were particularly useful in the diagnosis of optic nerve atrophy and expectd to be applied to the lesions which were not detected or poorly demonstrated with CT and spin echo sequences. (author).

  2. T-bet and Eomes Are Differentially Linked to the Exhausted Phenotype of CD8+T Cells in HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, Marcus; Tauriainen, Johanna; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    -specific CD8+ T cells was longitudinally related to persistent Eomes expression after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Strikingly, these characteristics remained stable up to 10 years after ART initiation. This study supports the concept that poor human viral-specific CD8+ T cell functionality is due...

  3. Effect of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Ageing on T-Bet and Eomes Expression on T-Cell Subsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouneh, Fakhri; Lopez-Sejas, Nelson; Campos, Carmen; Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Tarazona, Raquel; Pera, Alejandra; Solana, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The differential impact of ageing and cytomegalovirus (CMV) latent infection on human T-cell subsets remains to some extent controversial. The purpose of this study was to analyse the expression of the transcription factors T-bet and Eomes and CD57 on CD4+, CD4hiCD8lo and CD8+ T-cell subsets in healthy individuals, stratified by age and CMV serostatus. The percentage of CD4+ T-cells expressing T-bet or Eomes was very low, in particular in CD4+ T-cells from young CMV-seronegative individuals, and were higher in CMV-seropositive older individuals, in both CD57− and CD57+ CD4+ T-cells. The study of the minor peripheral blood double-positive CD4hiCD8lo T-cells showed that the percentage of these T-cells expressing both Eomes and T-bet was higher compared to CD4+ T-cells. The percentage of CD4hiCD8lo T-cells expressing T-bet was also associated with CMV seropositivity and the coexpression of Eomes, T-bet and CD57 on CD4hiCD8lo T-cells was only observed in CMV-seropositive donors, supporting the hypothesis that these cells are mature effector memory cells. The percentage of T-cells expressing Eomes and T-bet was higher in CD8+ T-cells than in CD4+ T-cells. The percentages of CD8+ T-cells expressing Eomes and T-bet increased with age in CMV-seronegative and -seropositive individuals and the percentages of CD57− CD8+ and CD57+ CD8+ T-cells coexpressing both transcription factors were similar in the different groups studied. These results support that CMV chronic infection and/or ageing are associated to the expansion of highly differentiated CD4+, CD4hiCD8lo and CD8+ T-cells that differentially express T-bet and Eomes suggesting that the expression of these transcription factors is essential for the generation and development of an effector-memory and effector T lymphocytes involved in conferring protection against chronic CMV infection. PMID:28661443

  4. Prevalence of Diplopia and Extraocular Movement Limitation according to the Location of Isolated Pure Blowout Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Seok Park

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Isolated pure blowout fractures are clinically important because they are themain cause of serious complications such as diplopia and limitation of extraocular movement.Many reports have described the incidence of blowout fractures associated with diplopiaand limitation of extraocular movement; however, no studies have statistically analyzedthis relationship. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the correlation betweenthe location of isolated pure blowout fractures and orbital symptoms such as diplopia andlimitation of extraocular movement.Methods We enrolled a total of 354 patients who had been diagnosed with isolated pureblowout fractures, based on computed tomography, from June 2008 to November 2011.Medical records were reviewed, and the prevalence of extraocular movement limitations anddiplopia were determined.Results There were 14 patients with extraocular movement limitation and 58 patientscomplained of diplopia. Extraocular movement limitation was associated with the followingfindings, in decreasing order of frequency: floor fracture (7.1%, extended fracture (3.6%,and medial wall (1.7%. However, there was no significant difference among the types offractures (P=0.60. Diplopia was more commonly associated with floor fractures (21.4%and extended type fractures (23.6% than medial wall fractures (10.4%. The difference wasstatistically significant (Bonferroni-corrected chi-squared test P<0.016.Conclusions Data indicate that extended type fractures and orbital floor fractures tend tocause diplopia more commonly than medial wall fractures. However, extraocular movementlimitation was not found to be dependent on the location of the orbital wall fracture.

  5. T-Bet and Eomes Regulate the Balance between the Effector/Central Memory T Cells versus Memory Stem Like T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available Memory T cells are composed of effector, central, and memory stem cells. Previous studies have implicated that both T-bet and Eomes are involved in the generation of effector and central memory CD8 T cells. The exact role of these transcription factors in shaping the memory T cell pool is not well understood, particularly with memory stem T cells. Here, we demonstrate that both T-bet or Eomes are required for elimination of established tumors by adoptively transferred CD8 T cells. We also examined the role of T-bet and Eomes in the generation of tumor-specific memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer. We showed that combined T-bet and Eomes deficiency resulted in a severe reduction in the number of effector/central memory T cells but an increase in the percentage of CD62L(highCD44(low Sca-1(+ T cells which were similar to the phenotype of memory stem T cells. Despite preserving large numbers of phenotypic memory stem T cells, the lack of both of T-bet and Eomes resulted in a profound defect in antitumor memory responses, suggesting T-bet and Eomes are crucial for the antitumor function of these memory T cells. Our study establishes that T-bet and Eomes cooperate to promote the phenotype of effector/central memory CD8 T cell versus that of memory stem like T cells.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Determination of Young’s Modulus of Bovine Extra-ocular Tendon Fiber Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Lawrence; Reed, Jason; Shin, Andrew; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Extra-ocular tendons (EOTs) transmit the oculorotary force of the muscles to the eyeball to generate dynamic eye movements and align the eyes, yet the mechanical properties of the EOTs remain undefined. The EOTs are known to be composed of parallel bundles of small fibers whose mechanical properties must be determined in order to characterize the overall behavior of EOTs. The current study aimed to investigate the transverse Young’s modulus of EOT fiber bundles using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fresh bovine EOT fiber bundle specimens were maintained under temperature and humidity control, and indented 100 nm by the inverted pyramid tip of an AFM (Veeco Digital Instruments, NY). Ten indentations were conducted for each of 3 different locations of 10 different specimens from each of 6 EOTs, comprising a total of 1,800 indentations. Young’s modulus for each EOT was determined using a Hertzian contact model. Young’s moduli for fiber bundles from all six EOTs were determined. Mean Young’s moduli for fiber bundles were similar for the six anatomical EOTs: lateral rectus 60.12 ± 2.69 (±SD) MPa, inferior rectus 59.69 ± 5.34 MPa, medial rectus 56.92 ±1.91 MPa, superior rectus 59.66 ±2.64 MPa, inferior oblique 57.7± 1.36 MPa, and superior oblique 59.15± 2.03. Variation in Young’s moduli among the six EOTs was not significant (P > 0.25). The Young’s modulus of bovine EOT fibers is highly uniform among the six extraocular muscles, suggesting that each EOT is assembled from fiber bundles representing the same biomechanical elements. This uniformity will simplify overall modeling. PMID:24767704

  7. The low EOMES/TBX21 molecular phenotype in multiple sclerosis reflects CD56+ cell dysregulation and is affected by immunomodulatory therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Fiona C; Gatt, Prudence N; Fewings, Nicole; Parnell, Grant P; Schibeci, Stephen D; Basuki, Monica A I; Powell, Joseph E; Goldinger, Anita; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Kermode, Allan G; Burke, Therese; Vucic, Steve; Stewart, Graeme J; Booth, David R

    2016-02-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease treated by therapies targeting peripheral blood cells. We previously identified that expression of two MS-risk genes, the transcription factors EOMES and TBX21 (ET), was low in blood from MS and stable over time. Here we replicated the low ET expression in a new MS cohort (p<0.0007 for EOMES, p<0.028 for TBX21) and demonstrate longitudinal stability (p<10(-4)) and high heritability (h(2)=0.48 for EOMES) for this molecular phenotype. Genes whose expression correlated with ET, especially those controlling cell migration, further defined the phenotype. CD56+ cells and other subsets expressed lower levels of Eomes or T-bet protein and/or were under-represented in MS. EOMES and TBX21 risk SNP genotypes, and serum EBNA-1 titres were not correlated with ET expression, but HLA-DRB1*1501 genotype was. ET expression was normalised to healthy control levels with natalizumab, and was highly variable for glatiramer acetate, fingolimod, interferon-beta, dimethyl fumarate.

  8. Extraocular Light Therapy in Winter Depression : A Double-blind Placebo-controlled Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorengevel, Kathelijne M.; Gordijn, Marijke C.M.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; Meesters, Ybe; den Boer, Johan; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den; Daan, Serge

    2001-01-01

    Background: It has been hypothesized that the circadian pacemaker is phase delayed in seasonal affective disorder, (SAD) winter type, and that the phase advance resulting from morning ocular light accounts for the efficacy of light therapy. Extraocular light has been reported to produce phase-shifts

  9. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Extraocular Cranial Nerves during Expanded Endonasal Surgery (EES) of the Skull Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of extraocular cranial nerves (EOCN) III, IV, and VI during expanded endonasal surgery (EES) of the skull base in reducing iatrogenic cranial nerve (CN) deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 200 patients out of 990 who had at least one EOCN monitored during EES. We further separated patients into groups according to the specific CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as Group I and those who did not as Group II. Results A total of 696 EOCNs were monitored. The number of muscles supplied by EOCNs that had SG f-EMG activity was 88, including CN III = 46, CN IV = 21, and CN VI = 21. There were two deficits involving CN VI in patients who had SG f-EMG activity during surgery. There were 14 deficits observed, including CN III = 3, CN IV = 2, and CN VI = 9 in patients who did not have SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG monitoring of EOCN during EES can be useful in identifying the location of the nerve. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of EOCN during EES need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG.

  10. Tendinous muscle insertions (scleromuscular junctions of the recti muscles) in patients with ocular alignment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, M G; Palmowski-Wolfe, A M; Meyer, P

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the hypothesis whether the scleromuscular junction of extraocular recti muscle is tendinous. Muscle samples of the 41 extraocular recti muscles of 33 patients and 4 muscle-/eye-matched samples from 2 postmortem eyes, were processed for light/electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry with antibodies against desmin, smooth-muscle actin and muscle regulating proteins like myf3 and myf4 (myogenin), tenascin C and for 8 samples against collagens I to IV. Histological examination of the muscle samples confirmed a thick collagen-structured tissue, specific for muscle tendon; without appearance of muscle tissue. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with antibodies against desmin, smooth-muscle actin, myf3 and myf4 (myogenin) and for eight samples with collagens I to IV. Anti-tenascin C marker was only strongly positive in the connective tissue of the blood vessel walls. Electron microscopy demonstrated collagen bundles composed of parallel oriented fibrils with a moderate amount of ground substance. The absence of contractile fibers at the sclerotendinous junction is an entirely normal finding in humans and cannot be related to ocular alignment pathogenesis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva with extraocular involvement: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Goñi Espildora

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El carcinoma escamoso de la conjuntiva es el tumor maligno más frecuente de la superficie ocular. Constituye una enfermedad rara con una incidencia de 0,13 a 1,9 por 100 000 habitantes que afecta principalmente a individuos entre los 50 y los 75 años. Suele tener un curso lento y poco agresivo. El tratamiento depende de la extensión tumoral. En presencia de compromiso intraocular la enucleación está indicada y en presencia de compromiso extraocular la exanteración orbitaria es el tratamiento estándar. Reportamos el caso de un paciente de 82 años con carcinoma escamoso conjuntival con compromiso intra y extraocular, se discute el caso y se revisa la literatura.

  12. Prevention of oculocardiac reflex (O.C.R during extraocular muscle surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misurya V

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the effectiveness of intravenous atropine sulphate which blocks the peripheral muscarinic receptors at the heart and retrobulbar xylocaine hydrochloride which blocks the conduction at ciliary ganglion on the afferent limb of OCR was studied during strabismus surgery. The study was conducted on fifty three patients of either sex having squint of more than ten years duration. The patients were randomly allocated into four groups. No preanaesthetic medication with atropine or retrobulbar block with xylocaine was given in control group of patients. In the second group, only preanaesthetic medication with atropine was given; while in the third group only retrobulbar injection of xylocaine was given five minutes before operation. In the last group both atropine as preanaesthetic medication and xylocaine as retrobulbar block were given. The electrocardiographic recordings were taken before and throughout the operative procedure. It was interesting to note that in the group where atropine and xylocaine were used none of the patients exhibited activation of OCR. Results have been discussed.

  13. Examination of transcriptional networks reveals an important role for TCFAP2C, SMARCA4, and EOMES in trophoblast stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Benjamin L; Palmer, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Trophoblast stem cells (TS cells), derived from the trophectoderm (TE) of blastocysts, require transcription factors (TFs) and external signals (FGF4, INHBA/NODAL/TGFB1) for self-renewal. While many reports have focused on TF networks that regulate embryonic stem cell (ES cell) self-renewal and pluripotency, little is know about TF networks that regulate self-renewal in TS cells. To further understand transcriptional networks in TS cells, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation with DNA microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip) analysis to investigate targets of the TFs-TCFAP2C, EOMES, ETS2, and GATA3-and a chromatin remodeling factor, SMARCA4. We then evaluated the transcriptional states of target genes using transcriptome analysis and genome-wide analysis of histone H3 acetylation (AcH3). Our results describe previously unknown transcriptional networks in TS cells, including TF occupancy of genes involved in ES cell self-renewal and pluripotency, co-occupancy of TCFAP2C, SMARCA4, and EOMES at a significant number of genes, and transcriptional regulatory circuitry within the five factors. Moreover, RNAi depletion of Tcfap2c, Smarca4, and Eomes transcripts resulted in a loss of normal colony morphology and down-regulation of TS cell-specific genes, suggesting an important role for TCFAP2C, SMARCA4, and EOMES in TS cell self-renewal. Through genome-wide mapping and global expression analysis of five TF target genes, our data provide a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional networks that regulate TS cell self-renewal.

  14. Salvinorin B derivatives, EOM-Sal B and MOM-Sal B, produce stimulus generalization in male Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate salvinorin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Mary Melissa; Baker, Lisa E

    2011-09-01

    Salvinorin A, the main active component of Salvia divinorum, is a potent and selective κ opioid receptor agonist. Synthetic derivatives of this substance may be useful in the development of medicinal treatments for pain, mood disorders, and drug dependence. Such developments require extensive preclinical screening of these compounds. The drug discrimination assay is a valuable method for exploring potential similarities between novel compounds and known drugs of abuse with respect to their interoceptive stimulus properties, and can be used to investigate the potency of salvinorin A and its derivatives in vivo. This study used drug discrimination methods to compare two synthetic derivatives of salvinorin B, the ethoxymethyl ether (EOM-Sal B) and methoxymethyl ether (MOM-Sal B) with salvinorin A. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 2.0 mg/kg of salvinorin A from its vehicle (75% dimethylsulfoxide/25% water) in a fixed ratio 20 food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure, and were tested for stimulus generalization with EOM-Sal B and MOM-Sal B. For comparison, substitution tests were also conducted with a μ agonist, morphine, a dissociative hallucinogen, ketamine, and two serotonergic hallucinogens, D-lysergic diethylamide (LSD) and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylphenyl)-2-aminopropane. Time-course tests were also conducted with salvinorin A and EOM-Sal B. Both EOM-Sal B and MOM-Sal B substituted fully for salvinorin A and displayed greater potency than salvinorin A. EOM-Sal B was discriminated at longer postinjection intervals than salvinorin A. Morphine and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylphenyl)-2-aminopropane failed to substitute for salvinorin A, although ketamine and LSD produced significant drug-appropriate responding. The current findings are consistent with previous reports that salvinorin A produces detectable stimulus effects that are distinct from those of other drug classes and, for the first time, establish that synthetic derivatives of this

  15. Multi-purpose extraocular forceps for small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Elias; Chun, Dal W; Gurley, Kiersten

    2012-01-01

    A multi-purpose titanium forceps has been developed for small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy surgery. These forceps were designed to provide the vitreoretinal surgeon with a single tool for the extraocular manipulations that are necessary for the placement and removal of 23- and 25-gauge trochars for small-incision, sutureless pars plana vitrectomy surgery. The forceps has been designed to allow for the atraumatic manipulation of the conjunctiva, measurement of distance from the limbus, and a strong purchase of the trochar for both its fixation and removal.

  16. Sushruta in 600 B.C. introduced extraocular expulsion of lens material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Ascaso, Francisco J

    2014-03-01

    It is generally accepted that Jacques Daviel introduced in the 18th century the extracapsular technique of extraction of the lens while the couching method of cataract operation had already been practiced since ancient times. Present study analyses the first known cataract surgery description in three translations into English from the original Sanskrit Sushruta textbook and all the available literature on the subject. We found evidences that some sort of extraocular expulsion of lens material through a limbal puncture (paracentesis) was described by the Indian surgeon. Nevertheless, this incision cannot be considered as a classic extracapsular procedure because it was not large enough to allow the extraction of the entire lens.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging in the evaluation of thyroid-associated orbitopathy: getting below the tip of the iceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Godi, Claudia; Falini, Andrea [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Department and Neuroradiology Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Cammarata, Gabriella; Bianchi Marzoli, Stefania [IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Neurophthalmology Service, Ophthalmology Department, Milan (Italy); Ambrosi, Alessandro [Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Iadanza, Antonella [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Department and Neuroradiology Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Lanzi, Roberto [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Endocrinology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    To compare extraocular muscles (EOMs) T2, post-contrast T1 (T1Gad) signal intensity ratios (SIRs) and normalized-apparent diffusion coefficient (n-ADC) values in patients with thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) at different phases of activity and severity and correlate MRI modifications to clinical evolution during follow-up. A total of 74 TAO patients were classified as active or inactive on the basis of the clinical activity score (CAS). Severity of EOM impairment was evaluated by assigning a functional score to each rectus. T2, T1Gad SIRs and n-ADC of EOMs were compared in patients with active inflammation, those with inactive disease and 26 healthy controls, and correlated with clinical scores. MRI parameter variation was correlated with clinical modifications during follow-up. All MRI parameters in TAO EOMs were significantly higher than in healthy subjects and correlated with muscle dysfunction and CAS. EOMs of active patients showed higher T2 and T1Gad SIRs than those with inactive disease. The T2 SIR and n-ADC of normally functioning TAO EOMs were higher than those of healthy controls. SIRs decreased in clinically improved and clinically stable EOMs after therapy. T2 SIR, T1Gad SIR and n-ADC are objective measures of activity and severity of EOMs in TAO patients. MRI shows clinically silent muscle involvement and modifications. (orig.)

  18. Simple Eyes, Extraocular Photoreceptors and Opsins in the American Horseshoe Crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne

    2016-11-01

    The eyes and photoreceptors of the American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus have been studied since the 1930s, and this work has been critical for understanding basic mechanisms of vision. One of the attractions of Limulus as a preparation for studies of vision is that it has three different types of eyes-a pair of later compound, image-forming eyes and two types of simple eyes, a pair of median ocelli, and three pair of larval eyes. Each eye type is tractable for experimentation. Limulus also has extraocular photoreceptors in its segmental ganglia and tail. The current contribution focuses on photoreceptors in Limulus larval eyes and ocelli and its extraocular photoreceptors with the goal of summarizing what is currently known and not known about their physiology and function and the opsins they express. The Limulus genome encodes a surprisingly large number of opsins (18), and studies of their expression pattern have raised new questions about the role of opsin co-expression, the functions of peropsins expressed outside of eyes, and the physiological relevance of opsins with apparently very low expression levels. Studies of opsin expression in Limulus lead one to wonder whether photoreceptors yet to be discovered might be present throughout its central nervous system. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Ocular and extra-ocular features of patients with Leber congenital amaurosis and mutations in CEP290

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, Suzanne; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Lopez, Irma; Pott, Jan-Willem R.; de Faber, Jan Tjeerd H. N.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the centrosomal protein, 290-KD (CEP290) associated genotype and ocular and extra-ocular phenotype in 18 patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Methods: Eighteen patients with LCA from 14 families with mutations in the CEP290 gene were identified with sequen

  20. Ocular and extra-ocular features of patients with Leber congenital amaurosis and mutations in CEP290

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, S.; Hollander, A.I. den; Lopez, I.; Pott, J.W.; Faber, J.T. de; Cremers, F.P.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Born, L.I. van den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigated the centrosomal protein, 290-KD (CEP290) associated genotype and ocular and extra-ocular phenotype in 18 patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). METHODS: Eighteen patients with LCA from 14 families with mutations in the CEP290 gene were identified with sequen

  1. Ocular and extra-ocular features of patients with Leber congenital amaurosis and mutations in CEP290

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, Suzanne; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Lopez, Irma; Pott, Jan-Willem R.; de Faber, Jan Tjeerd H. N.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the centrosomal protein, 290-KD (CEP290) associated genotype and ocular and extra-ocular phenotype in 18 patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Methods: Eighteen patients with LCA from 14 families with mutations in the CEP290 gene were identified with sequen

  2. Application of the FlexiForce contact surface force sensor to continuous extraocular compression monitoring during craniotomy for cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Hiromi; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce our newly developed device equipped with a contact surface force sensor (FlexiForce) for monitoring extraocular compression continuously, and to illustrate its potential clinical application using this device in patients undergoing uncomplicated frontotemporal or bifrontal craniotomy for surgical clipping of unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. In a pilot study with volunteers, we determined the critical force of 100 gf to cause painful ocular sensation. Then we performed the bilateral extraocular force measurements in 15 patients undergoing uncomplicated frontotemporal or bifrontal craniotomy for surgical clipping of unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. Extraocular force increased immediately after retraction of the flap, increased to 144+/-26 gf (mean+/-SD) during lower craniotomy close to the orbit, was maintained at 91+/-18 gf during microsurgery, and returned close to baseline at 24+/-14 gf after restoration of skin flap retraction. Such changes were observed only on the surgical side in frontotemporal craniotomy. Abnormal increase in extraocular force was effectively reduced by placing a real-time digital panel meter to warn surgeons to avoid excessive skin flap retraction during the surgical procedure. In conclusion, this new tool may allow us to monitor the external forces that can be applied intraoperatively to the ocular globe in the supine position.

  3. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (pmyasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected.

  4. Metástase no músculo reto inferior como sinal de apresentação de adenocarcinoma renal: relato de caso Inferior rectus muscle metastasis as a presenting sign of renal cell carcinoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Christian Pieroni Gonçalves

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Proptose e diplopia decorrentes de alargamento de músculo extra-ocular representam importante sinal de apresentação de várias afecções da órbita. Embora a causa mais comum de alargamento de músculo extra-ocular seja a orbitopatia distiroidiana, o diagnóstico diferencial destas doenças é extenso. Relatamos neste trabalho o caso de um paciente com história de diplopia e proptose unilateral de três meses que apresentava importante espessamento isolado do músculo reto inferior direito e após investigação clínica, radiológica e biopsia incisional teve o diagnóstico de tumor metastático de células renais para o músculo reto inferior. Há poucos casos relatados de metástases para a musculatura ocular extrínseca sendo assim nosso objetivo relatar um novo caso, revisar a literatura e reforçar a inclusão deste distúrbio no diagnóstico diferencial do espessamento da musculatura extra-ocular.Proptosis and diplopia due to enlargement of extraocular muscles represent important presenting signs of many orbital disorders. Although dysthyroid ophthalmopathy is the most common cause of enlargement of extraocular muscles, the differential diagnosis is extensive. We report a patient with a 3-month history of diplopia and unilateral proptosis and a markedly enlarged inferior rectus muscle on imaging studies. A biopsy of the lesion followed by systemic evaluation established the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. There are few cases of metastatic tumors to the extraocular muscles reported in the literature and thus our objective is to report a new case, review the literature and reiterate the inclusion of this disorder in the differential diagnosis of enlargement of the extraocular muscles.

  5. Followup of a Dog with an Intraocular Silicone Prosthesis Combined with an Extraocular Glass Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyna Romkes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of unpredictable corneal changes, evisceration and implantation of a silicone prosthesis does not always lead to a satisfying cosmetic result. This paper describes the use of an intraocular silicone prosthesis in combination with an extraocular glass prosthesis and shows a followup of two and a half years in a nonexperimental study. An intraocular silicone prosthesis was implanted after evisceration of the left eye in a five-month-old Bernese mountain dog. A glass prosthesis was fitted four weeks after evisceration. Two and a half years after the operation, the dog is in good health and free of medication. No short-term or long-term complications were seen. The owners do not have trouble with handling the glass prosthesis. The combination of both prostheses shows a perfect solution to retrieve a normal looking and moving eye after evisceration.

  6. Is the Bethe-Salpeter Formalism Accurate for Excitation Energies? Comparisons with TD-DFT, CASPT2, and EOM-CCSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Denis; Duchemin, Ivan; Blase, Xavier

    2017-03-21

    Developing ab initio approaches able to provide accurate excited-state energies at a reasonable computational cost is one of the biggest challenges in theoretical chemistry. In that framework, the Bethe-Salpeter equation approach, combined with the GW exchange-correlation self-energy, which maintains the same scaling with system size as TD-DFT, has recently been the focus of a rapidly increasing number of applications in molecular chemistry. Using a recently proposed set encompassing excitation energies of many kinds [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2016, 7, 586-591], we investigate here the performances of BSE/GW. We compare these results to CASPT2, EOM-CCSD, and TD-DFT data and show that BSE/GW provides an accuracy comparable to the two wave function methods. It is particularly remarkable that the BSE/GW is equally efficient for valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. In contrast, it provides a poor description of triplet excited states, for which EOM-CCSD and CASPT2 clearly outperform BSE/GW. This contribution therefore supports the use of the Bethe-Salpeter approach for spin-conserving transitions.

  7. Irradiation followed by muscle surgery for dysthyroid ophthalmopathy with diplopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Satoko; Asakura, Akiko [Iwate Prefectural Central Hospital, Morioka (Japan); Ogasawara, Kosuke; Mori, Toshiro; Shibuya, Masako; Kurihara, Hideo; Tazawa, Yutaka

    1995-10-01

    We obtained favorable therapeutic outcome in 12 cases of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy with diplopia. All the patients underwent Lineac irradiation to the retrobulbar tissue totalling 15 to 20 Gy over 10 days. Extraocular muscle surgery was performed 30 days after irradiation. Diplopia at the primary position almost disappeared one day after surgery. An additional surgery was necessary in one case. The interval between onset of diplopia and surgery averaged 6.1 months. Irradiation prior to muscle surgery appeared to be beneficial in allowing an early surgery and in avoiding surgical overcorrection. (author).

  8. Anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle as the initial treatment of a snapped inferior rectus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Aquino, B I; Riemann, C D; Lewis, H; Traboulsi, E I

    2001-02-01

    Snapping or tearing of an extraocular muscle refers to its rupture across its width, usually at the junction between muscle and tendon several millimeters behind the insertion. Tearing occurs during strabismus or retinal reattachment surgery, or after trauma. If the proximal end of the muscle cannot be located, transposition procedures are necessary to achieve ocular realignment. These surgical procedures carry the risk of anterior segment ischemia, especially in the elderly. Anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle has been used for the treatment of inferior oblique overaction, especially in the presence of a dissociated vertical deviation, and in patients with fourth nerve palsy. We transposed the inferior oblique muscle insertion in a 73-year-old woman with a snapped inferior rectus muscle.

  9. Ocular myositis: insights into recurrence and semiological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, William Alves; Marrone, Luiz Carlos Porcello; Saute, Ricardo; Becker, Jefferson; Vargas, José Amadeu Almeida; da Costa Vargas, Juliana Ferreira; Marrone, Antonio Carlos Huf

    2015-01-01

    Ocular myositis (OM) is a rare clinical entity characterized by idiopathic, nonspecific inflammation of primarily or exclusively extraocular muscles (EOM). Presentation usually encompasses painful diplopia, exacerbated by eye movement. We report two cases of idiopathic OM with unique characteristics. The first presented with pseudo-sixth nerve palsy due to medial nucleus inflammation and the second presented with recurrent OM, subsequently affecting both eyes. Knowledge of different patterns of presentation and recurrence are important to manage this rare inflammatory syndrome.

  10. Systematic Comparison of Second-Order Polarization Propagator Approximation (SOPPA) and Equation-of-Motion Coupled Cluster Singles and Doubles (EOM-CCSD) Spin-Spin Coupling Constants for Molecules with C, N, and O Double and Triple Bonds and Selected F-Substituted Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2009-01-13

    Ab initio EOM-CCSD and SOPPA calculations with the Ahlrichs (qzp,qz2p) basis set have been carried out to evaluate one-, two-, and three-bond spin-spin coupling constants for molecules HmXYHn and HmXYHn for X, Y = (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O, and selected (19)F-substituted derivatives. In the great majority of cases, EOM-CCSD one-bond C-C, C-N, C-O, C-F, N-N, N-O, and N-F coupling constants and three-bond F-F coupling constants are smaller in absolute value than the corresponding SOPPA coupling constants, with the EOM-CCSD values in better agreement with experimental data. SOPPA tends to significantly overestimate the absolute values of large one- and three-bond couplings involving fluorine. The majority of two-bond SOPPA coupling constants are in better agreement with experiment than EOM-CCSD, although differences between EOM-CCSD and experimental values are not dramatic. A statistical analysis of thirty EOM-CCSD and SOPPA coupling constants versus experimental coupling constants demonstrates that better agreement with experiment is found when EOM-CCSD is the computational method.

  11. The differentiation and morphogenesis of craniofacial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noden, Drew M; Francis-West, Philippa

    2006-05-01

    Unraveling the complex tissue interactions necessary to generate the structural and functional diversity present among craniofacial muscles is challenging. These muscles initiate their development within a mesenchymal population bounded by the brain, pharyngeal endoderm, surface ectoderm, and neural crest cells. This set of spatial relations, and in particular the segmental properties of these adjacent tissues, are unique to the head. Additionally, the lack of early epithelialization in head mesoderm necessitates strategies for generating discrete myogenic foci that may differ from those operating in the trunk. Molecular data indeed indicate dissimilar methods of regulation, yet transplantation studies suggest that some head and trunk myogenic populations are interchangeable. The first goal of this review is to present key features of these diversities, identifying and comparing tissue and molecular interactions regulating myogenesis in the head and trunk. Our second focus is on the diverse morphogenetic movements exhibited by craniofacial muscles. Precursors of tongue muscles partly mimic migrations of appendicular myoblasts, whereas myoblasts destined to form extraocular muscles condense within paraxial mesoderm, then as large cohorts they cross the mesoderm:neural crest interface en route to periocular regions. Branchial muscle precursors exhibit yet another strategy, establishing contacts with neural crest populations before branchial arch formation and maintaining these relations through subsequent stages of morphogenesis. With many of the prerequisite stepping-stones in our knowledge of craniofacial myogenesis now in place, discovering the cellular and molecular interactions necessary to initiate and sustain the differentiation and morphogenesis of these neglected craniofacial muscles is now an attainable goal.

  12. Prospective separation and transcriptome analyses of cortical projection neurons and interneurons based on lineage tracing by Tbr2 (Eomes)-GFP/Dcx-mRFP reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiancheng; Wu, Xiwei; Zhang, Heying; Qiu, Runxiang; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Lu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex, projection neurons and interneurons work coordinately to establish neural networks for normal cortical functions. While the specific mechanisms that control productions of projection neurons and interneurons are beginning to be revealed, a global characterization of the molecular differences between these two neuron types is crucial for a more comprehensive understanding of their developmental specifications and functions. In this study, using lineage tracing power of combining Tbr2(Eomes)-GFP and Dcx-mRFP reporter mice, we prospectively separated intermediate progenitor cell (IPC)-derived neurons (IPNs) from non-IPC-derived neurons (non-IPNs) of the embryonic cerebral cortex. Molecular characterizations revealed that IPNs and non-IPNs were enriched with projection neurons and interneurons, respectively. Expression profiling documented cell-specific genes including differentially expressed transcriptional regulators that might be involved in cellular specifications, for instance, our data found that SOX1 and SOX2, which were known for important functions in neural stem/progenitor cells, continued to be expressed by interneurons but not by projection neurons. Transcriptome analyses of cortical neurons isolated at different stages of neurogenesis revealed distinct temporal patterns of expression of genes involved in early-born or late-born neuron specification. These data present a resource useful for further investigation of the molecular regulations and functions of projection neurons and interneurons.

  13. Design Modifications for Increasing the BOm and EOM Power Output and Reducing the Size and Mass of RTG for the Pluto Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Kumar, Vasanth

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. A companion paper analyzed the effect on source modules for three specific fuel options, and compared the predicted power output with JPL's latest goals for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission. The results showed that a 5-module RTG cannot fully meet JPL's goals with any of the available fuels; and that a 6-module RTG more than meets those goals with Russian fuel, almost meets them with U.S. (Cassini-type) fuel, but still falls far short of meeting them with the depleted fuel from the aged (1982) Galileo spare RTG. The inadequacy of the aged fuel was disappointing,because heat source modules made from it already exist, and their use in PFF could result in substantial cost savings. The present paper describes additional analyses which showed that a six-module RTG with the aged fuel can meet JPL's stipulated power margin with a relatively simple design modification, that a second design modification makes it possible to recover all of the mass and size penalty for going from five to six heat source modules, and that a third modification could raise the EOM power margin to 16%.

  14. Design Modifications for Increasing the BOM and EOM Power Output and Reducing the Size and Mass of RTG for the Pluto Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Kumar, Vasanth

    1994-06-01

    A companion paper analyzed the effect on source modules for three specific fuel options, and compared the predicted power output with JPL's latest goals for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission. The results showed that a 5-module RTG cannot fully meet JPL's goals with any of the available fuels; and that a 6-module RTG more than meets those goals with Russian fuel, almost meets them with U.S. (Cassini-type) fuel, but still falls far short of meeting them with the depleted fuel from the aged (1982) Galileo spare RTG. The inadequacy of the aged fuel was disappointing,because heat source modules made from it already exist, and their use in PFF could result in substantial cost savings. The present paper describes additional analyses which showed that a six-module RTG with the aged fuel can meet JPL's stipulated power margin with a relatively simple design modification, that a second design modification makes it possible to recover all of the mass and size penalty for going from five to six heat source modules, and that a third modification could raise the EOM power margin to 16%. There are four copies in the file. Cross Reference ESD Files FSC-ESD-217-94-531 (CID #8572)

  15. Fractional anisotropy and diffusivity changes in thyroid-associated orbitopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ji Sung; Seo, Hyung Suk; Lee, Young Hen [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ansan, Gyeonggido (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwa [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Sang-il [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Eun-Kee; Sapkota, Nabraj [University of Utah, Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kim, Ki Joon [Nanoori Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate the extraocular muscle (EOM) changes in thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) on DTI and the correlations between DTI parameters and clinical features. Twenty TAO patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls provided informed consent and were enrolled. Ten-directional DTI was acquired in orbit. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, and radial diffusivities were obtained at medial and lateral EOMs in both orbits. EOM thickness was measured in patients using axial CT images. FA and diffusivities were compared between patients and controls. The relationships between DTI values and muscle thickness and exophthalmos were evaluated. DTI values compared between patients in active and inactive phases by clinical activity score of TAO. DTI values were also compared between acute and chronic stages by the duration of disease. In medial EOM, FA was significantly lower in patients (p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with muscle thickness (r = -0.604, p < 0.001). Radial diffusivity was significantly higher in patients (p = 0.010) and correlated with muscle thickness (r = 0.349, p = 0.027). In lateral EOM, DTI values did not differ between patients and controls. In the acute stage, the diffusivities of the medial rectus EOM were increased compared with the chronic stage. DTI values of the medial and lateral rectus EOM did not differ significantly between active and inactive phases. DTI can be used to diagnose TAO with FA and radial diffusivity change in EOM. Diffusivities can be used to differentiate acute and chronic stage of TAO. However, DTI values showed limitation in reflecting TAO activity according to the CAS. (orig.)

  16. Intraocular and extraocular cameras for retinal prostheses: Effects of foveation by means of visual prosthesis simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Benjamin Patrick

    Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa is unfortunately both widespread and largely incurable. Advances in visual prostheses that can restore functional vision in those afflicted by these diseases have evolved rapidly from new areas of research in ophthalmology and biomedical engineering. This thesis is focused on further advancing the state-of-the-art of both visual prostheses and implantable biomedical devices. A novel real-time system with a high performance head-mounted display is described that enables enhanced realistic simulation of intraocular retinal prostheses. A set of visual psychophysics experiments is presented using the visual prosthesis simulator that quantify, in several ways, the benefit of foveation afforded by an eye-pointed camera (such as an eye-tracked extraocular camera or an implantable intraocular camera) as compared with a head-pointed camera. A visual search experiment demonstrates a significant improvement in the time to locate a target on a screen when using an eye-pointed camera. A reach and grasp experiment demonstrates a 20% to 70% improvement in time to grasp an object when using an eye-pointed camera, with the improvement maximized when the percept is blurred. A navigation and mobility experiment shows a 10% faster walking speed and a 50% better ability to avoid obstacles when using an eye-pointed camera. Improvements to implantable biomedical devices are also described, including the design and testing of VLSI-integrable positive mobile ion contamination sensors and humidity sensors that can validate the hermeticity of biomedical device packages encapsulated by hermetic coatings, and can provide early warning of leaks or contamination that may jeopardize the implant. The positive mobile ion contamination sensors are shown to be sensitive to externally applied contamination. A model is proposed to describe sensitivity as a function of device geometry, and verified experimentally. Guidelines are

  17. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ferretti, Renato; Vomero, Viviane Urbini; Minatel, Elaine; Neto, Humberto Santo

    2007-03-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles share many anatomical and physiological properties with extraocular muscles, which are unaffected in both Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mdx mice. We hypothesized that intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in mdx mice and may serve as an additional tool to understand the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of adult and aged mdx and control C57Bl/10 mice were investigated. The percentage of central nucleated fibers, as a sign of muscle fibers that had undergone injury and regeneration, and myofiber labeling with Evans blue dye, as a marker of myofiber damage, were studied. Except for the cricothyroid muscle, none of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles from adult and old mdx mice showed signs of myofiber damage or Evans blue dye labeling, and all appeared to be normal. Central nucleation was readily visible in the TA of the same mdx mice. A significant increase in the percentage of central nucleated fibers was observed in adult cricothyroid muscle compared to the other intrinsic laryngeal muscles, which worsened with age. Thus, we have shown that the intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from the lack of dystrophin and may serve as a useful model to study the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy.

  18. Collision and containment detection between biomechanically based eye muscle volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Sosa, Graciela; Kaltofen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Collision and containment detection between three-dimensional objects is a common requirement in simulation systems. However, few solutions exist when exclusively working with deformable bodies. In our ophthalmologic diagnostic software system, the extraocular eye muscles are represented by surface models, which have been reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. Those models are projected onto the muscle paths calculated by the system's biomechanical model. Due to this projection collisions occur. For their detection, three approaches have been implemented, which we present in this paper: one based on image-space techniques using OpenGL, one based on the Bullet physics library and one using an optimized space-array data structure together with software rendering. Finally, an outlook on a possible response to the detected collisions is given.

  19. The posterior cricoarytenoid muscle is spared from MuRF1-mediated muscle atrophy in mice with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, D Clark; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Tan; Liu, Chun; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo; Feng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting in acute lung injury (ALI) patients increases the morbidity and mortality associated with this critical illness. The contribution of laryngeal muscle wasting to these outcomes is unknown, though voice impairments and aspiration are common in intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. We evaluated the intrinsic laryngeal abductor (PCA, posterior cricoarytenoid), adductor (CT, cricothyroid) and limb (EDL, extensor digitorum longus) muscles in a mouse model of ALI. Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides were instilled into the lungs of adult male C57Bl6J mice (ALI mice). Limb and intrinsic laryngeal muscles were analyzed for fiber size, type, protein expression and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition by SDS-PAGE and mass spectroscopy. Marked muscle atrophy occurred in the CT and EDL muscles, while the PCA was spared. The E3 ubiquitin ligase muscle ring finger-1 protein (MuRF1), a known mediator of limb muscle atrophy in this model, was upregulated in the CT and EDL, but not in the PCA. Genetic inhibition of MuRF1 protected the CT and EDL from ALI-induced muscle atrophy. MyHC-Extraocular (MyHC-EO) comprised 27% of the total MyHC in the PCA, distributed as hybrid fibers throughout 72% of PCA muscle fibers. The vocal cord abductor (PCA) contains a large proportion of fibers expressing MyHC-EO and is spared from muscle atrophy in ALI mice. The lack of MuRF1 expression in the PCA suggests a previously unrecognized mechanism whereby this muscle is spared from atrophy. Atrophy of the vocal cord adductor (CT) may contribute to the impaired voice and increased aspiration observed in ICU survivors. Further evaluation of the sparing of muscles involved in systemic wasting diseases may lead to potential therapeutic targets for these illnesses.

  20. Muscle Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  1. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur ... minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  2. Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer Recurrence Based on Urinary Levels of EOMES, HOXA9, POU4F2, TWIST1, VIM, and ZNF154 Hypermethylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Thomas; Borre, Michael; Christiansen, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    Non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has the highest recurrence rate of any malignancy and as many as 70% of patients experience relapse. Aberrant DNA methylation is present in all bladder tumors and can be detected in urine specimens. Previous studies have identified DNA methylation marker...

  3. Study on etiologic causes of binocular diplopia in patients with extraocular related diseases in department of ophthalmology%眼科首诊双眼复视患者的眼外相关病因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珣竹

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the etiologic causes of binocular diplopia as the first onset symptom in patients with extraocular related ophthalmic diseases. Methods On the basis of medical history, routine ophthalmologic examination and ocular muscle examination, general check - up and blood biochemical examinations were applied to explore the pathogenic causes. Results The main aetiological cause was vascular disease, then traumatic injury of cranial nerves and abducent nerve palsy were its secondary causes. Conclusion The pathogenic factors of binocular diplopia were complicated, therefore detail clinical data should be correctly collected and necessary diagnostic examinations should be performed for proper diagnosis and treatment.%目的 探讨眼科以双眼复视为首发症状的眼外相关病因的分布情况.方法 根据病史、眼科专科检查、全身相关检查及相关科室检查会诊意见分析病因.结果 68例双眼复视患者中,发病原因中以血管性疾病居多(占32.3%);外伤次之,占16.2%.眼外肌及颅神经受累情况,外展神经麻痹居多24例,占35.3%.结论 双眼复视病因复杂,详细正确的临床资料和必要的辅助检查有助于明确病因.

  4. Sporadic and familial blepharophimosis -ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome: FOXL2 mutation screen and MRI study of the superior levator eyelid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, H; Stoetzel, C; Riehm, S; Lahlou Boukoffa, W; Bediard Boulaneb, F; Quillet, R; Abu-Eid, M; Speeg-Schatz, C; Francfort, J J; Flament, J; Veillon, F; Perrin-Schmitt, F

    2003-02-01

    The analysis of the FOXL2 gene (3q23) in a series of two families and two sporadic cases affected with Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) is presented. This study detected two novel FOXL2 mutations (missence and nonsens mutations) and confirmed the recurrence of a previously described duplication. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the orbit, in one family, showed absence or hypotrophy of the eyelid superior levator muscle suggesting a possible role of FOXL2 in the development of this extra-ocular muscle.

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of laryngeal muscles in normal horses and horses with subclinical recurrent laryngeal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Hannah S; Steel, Catherine M; Derksen, Frederik J; Robinson, N Edward; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2009-08-01

    We used immunohistochemistry to examine myosin heavy-chain (MyHC)-based fiber-type profiles of the right and left cricoarytenoideus dorsalis (CAD) and arytenoideus transversus (TrA) muscles of six horses without laryngoscopic evidence of recurrent laryngeal neuropathy (RLN). Results showed that CAD and TrA muscles have the same slow, 2a, and 2x fibers as equine limb muscles, but not the faster contracting fibers expressing extraocular and 2B MyHCs found in laryngeal muscles of small mammals. Muscles from three horses showed fiber-type grouping bilaterally in the TrA muscles, but only in the left CAD. Fiber-type grouping suggests that denervation and reinnervation of fibers had occurred, and that these horses had subclinical RLN. There was a virtual elimination of 2x fibers in these muscles, accompanied by a significant increase in the percentage of 2a and slow fibers, and hypertrophy of these fiber types. The results suggest that multiple pathophysiological mechanisms are at work in early RLN, including selective denervation and reinnervation of 2x muscle fibers, corruption of neural impulse traffic that regulates 2x and slow muscle fiber types, and compensatory hypertrophy of remaining fibers. We conclude that horses afflicted with mild RLN are able to remain subclinical by compensatory hypertrophy of surviving muscle fibers.

  6. Skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  7. A 3D model of the oculomotor plant including the pulley system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegener, A; Armentano, R L [Fundacion Universitaria Dr. Rene G. Favaloro, SolIs 453 (1078) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Early models of the oculomotor plant only considered the eye globes and the muscles that move them. Recently, connective tissue structures have been found enveloping the extraocular muscles (EOMs) and firmly anchored to the orbital wall. These structures act as pulleys; they determine the functional origin of the EOMs and, in consequence, their effective pulling direction. A three dimensional model of the oculomotor plant, including pulleys, has been developed and simulations in Simulink were performed during saccadic eye movements. Listing's law was implemented based on the supposition that there exists an eye orientation related signal. The inclusion of the pulleys in the model makes this assumption plausible and simplifies the problem of the plant noncommutativity.

  8. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  9. Muscle disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  10. Myosin Heavy Chain 2B isoform is expressed in specialized eye muscles but not in trunk and limb muscles of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Maccatrozzo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHC of adult skeletal muscles are codified by four genes named: slow, or type 1, and fast types 2A, 2X and 2B. The slow, 2A and 2X isoforms have been found expressed in all mammalian species studied so far whereas there is a large inter-species variability in the expression of MHC-2B. In this study histochemistry (m- ATPase, immunohistochemistry with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies and RT-PCR were combined together to assess whether the MHC-2B gene is expressed in bovine muscles. ATPase staining and RT-PCR experiments showed that three MHC isoforms (1, 2A, 2X were expressed in trunk and limb muscles. Slow or type 1 expression was confirmed using a specific antibody (BA-F8 whereas the detection of fast MHC isoforms were validate by means of BF-35 antibody although not by the SC-71 antibody. MHC-2B was absent in limb and trunk muscles, but was present in specialized eye muscles (rectus lateralis and retractor bulbi as consistently showed by RT-PCR and reactivity with a specific antibody (BF-F3. Interestingly, a cardiac isoform, MHC-a- cardiac was found to be expressed not only in extraocular muscles but also in masticatory muscles as masseter.

  11. 甲状腺相关性眼病眼外肌病变的手术治疗%Operative effect about extraocular myopathy in patients with Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄勇志; 何剑峰

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss surgery effect about extraocular myopathy in patients with Thyroid -associated ophthalmopathy . Methods:The surgical management of strabismus in 13 cases with Thyroid -associated ophthalmopathy who received extraocular muscle surgery in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed .Nine cases were males and 4 were females,ranging in age from 28 to 61 years(mean:46 years).All patients were Vertical strabismus.The preoperative deciation of all cases was 25°to 45°.The patients were followed up for 3 ~18 months.Postoperative results were divided into 2 categories:successful outcome :orthotropia, or deviation ≤5°,there was no di-plopia or residual little diplopia could being corrected by low degree prism in primary position or reading position ,compensatory head pos-ture disappeared;Failure:deviation >5°in primary position,There are persistent diplopia that it was not easy being corrected by prism in primary position or reading position ,Compensatory head posture could not being significantly improved .Results:All patients accepted sin-gle vertical rectus recession .Postoperatively,76.9% patients were orthotropic in primary position , rebuilded binocular field of single vi-sion.There was small residual deviation (≤5°) in primary position in 15.4%patients .All patients could significantly improve compensa-tory head posture. Surgical success rate was 92.8%.Diplopia could not being eliminated in secondary positions .Postoperative eyeball motility improved markedly .Serious complications were not found .Conclusion:The surgical management of extraocular myopathy in pa-tients with TAO was safe and effective after inflammation disappeared and stable eye position , single rectus recession could correct large deviation in patients with restrictive strabismus , It could significantly improve diplopia and compensatory head posture .%目的:观察甲状腺相关性眼病眼外肌病变手术治疗临床效果. 方法:回顾性分析我院13例14眼TAO

  12. Muscle biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  13. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy. Exercises may include ones done in a swimming pool to reduce the muscle workload, and other types ... a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms, including: When did the muscle atrophy ...

  14. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develops. There they help to push the baby out of the mother's body when it's time to be born. You'll find smooth muscles at work behind the scenes in your eyes, too. These muscles keep the eyes ... thick muscles of the heart contract to pump blood out and then relax to let blood back in ...

  15. Modeling Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  16. 眼外肌矫正术治疗先天性下睑退缩%Repair of lower eyelid retraction via diorthosis of the extraocular muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽蓉; 胡兰; 何伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of balanced adjustment of superior or inferior rectus insertion in both eye for the treatment of lower eyelid retraction.Methods The anatomical structure of eyelid and eyeball was analyzed,and the binocular vision function and fundus in 2 adult lower eyelid retractors were totally examined.Plication of both inferior rectus was performed in one case,and the other with recession of both superior rectus.Eye position and binocular vision were assessed intraoperatively and postoperative follow-up was carried out.Results Eye movement was normal in both cases,non accompanied with diplopia,decreased vision,headache and dizziness.The width of palpebral fissure is normal in all eye,and there were no scar and pathological changes.Patients looked naturelly and the satisfaction was obtained.Conclusion Surgery of superior or inferior rectus is effective with little damage and quick recovery.%目的 通过均衡调整双眼球上、下直肌的附着点,使眼球向下移位,矫正下睑退缩外观.方法 对2例成年先天性下睑退缩患者,进行眼睑及眼球解剖结构特点的分析,全面检查分析双眼视功能及眼底功能,选择局部麻醉下双眼下直肌折叠缩短术1例,双眼上直肌后徙术1例,并在术中调整眼球位置及观察双眼视觉效果,术后跟踪随访.结果 本组2例患者术后眼球各向运动无明显受限,双眼无复视,无视力下降及头痛头晕,双眼无不适感.双眼睑裂高度正常,眼睑皮肤无手术瘢痕及病理性改变,患者容貌自然美观,效果满意.结论 此术式损伤轻微,术后恢复快,效果理想.

  17. Expression and identification of 10 sarcomeric MyHC isoforms in human skeletal muscles of different embryological origin. Diversity and similarity in mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Francesco; Toniolo, Luana; Cancellara, Pasqua; Reggiani, Carlo; Maccatrozzo, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian genome, among myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms a family can be identified as sarcomeric based on their molecular structure which allows thick filament formation. In this study we aimed to assess the expression of the 10 sarcomeric isoforms in human skeletal muscles, adopting this species as a reference for comparison with all other mammalian species. To this aim, we set up the condition for quantitative Real Time PCR assay to detect and quantify MyHC mRNA expression in a wide variety of human muscles from somitic, presomitic and preotic origin. Specific patterns of expression of the following genes MYH1, MYH2, MYH3, MYH4, MYH6, MYH7, MYH8, MYH13, MYH14/7b and MYH15 were demonstrated in various muscle samples. On the same muscle samples which were analysed for mRNA expression, the corresponding MyHC proteins were studied with SDS PAGE and Western blot. The mRNA-protein comparison allowed the identification of 10 distinct proteins based on the electrophoretic migration rate. Three groups were formed based on the migration rate: fast migrating comprising beta/slow/1, alpha cardiac and fast 2B, slow migrating comprising fast 2X, fast 2A and two developmental isoforms (NEO and EMB), intermediate migrating comprising EO MyHC, slow B (product of MYH15), slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b). Of special interest was the demonstration of a protein band corresponding to 2B-MyHC in laryngeal muscles and the finding that all 10 isoforms are expressed in extraocular muscles. These latter muscles are the unique localization for extraocular, slow B (product of MYH15) and slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b).

  18. Flap tear of rectus muscles: an underlying cause of strabismus after orbital trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Irene H; Brown, Mark S

    2002-11-01

    To present an avulsion injury of the rectus muscle after orbital trauma, usually the inferior rectus, and detail its diagnosis and operative repair. Forty-three patients underwent repair of flap tears of 62 rectus muscles. During surgery, we found the muscle abnormality was often subtle, with narrowing or thinning of the remaining attached global layer of muscle. The detached flap of external (orbital) muscle was found embedded in surrounding orbital fat and connective tissue. Retrieval and repair were performed in each case. The causes of orbital trauma were as follows: orbital fractures (15 patients), blunt trauma with no fracture (11 patients), suspected trauma but did not undergo computerized tomographic scan (12 patients), and status after retinal detachment repair (5 patients). Of note, 15 of the 43 patients (35%) underwent repair of the flap tear alone, without any additional orbital or strabismus surgery. Diagnostically, the predominant motility defect in 45 muscles was limitation toward the field of action of the muscle, presumably as a result of a tether created by the torn flap; these tethers simulated muscle palsy. Seventeen muscles were restricted away from their field of action, simulating entrapment. The direction taken by the flap during healing determined the resultant strabismus pattern. All patients with gaze limitation toward an orbital fracture had flap tears. The worst results after flap tear repair were seen in patients (1) who had undergone orbital fracture repair before presentation, (2) who had undergone previous attempts at strabismus repair, and (3) who had the longest intervals between the precipitating event and the repair. The best results were obtained in patients who underwent simultaneous fracture and strabismus repair or early strabismus repair alone. Avulsion-type flap tears of the extraocular muscles are a common cause of posttraumatic strabismus. Early repair produces the best results, but improvement is possible despite long

  19. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical activity, infections, hyper or .... Acupuncture. It is a traditional Chinese-based therapeutic method which ..... and Spinal Mechanisms of Pain and Dry Needling Mediated Analgesia: A Clinical.

  20. Referred pain elicited by manual exploration of the lateral rectus muscle in chronic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Gerwin, Robert D; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the presence of referred pain elicited by manual examination of the lateral rectus muscle in patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). A case-control blinded study. It has been found previously that the manual examination of the superior oblique muscle can elicit referred pain to the head in some patients with migraine or tension-type headache. However, a referred pain from other extraocular muscles has not been investigated. Fifteen patients with CTTH and 15 healthy subjects without headache history were included. A blinded assessor performed a manual examination focused on the search for myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in the right and left lateral rectus muscles. TrP diagnosis was made when there was referred pain evoked by maintained pressure on the lateral corner of the orbit (anatomical projection of the lateral rectus muscle) for 20 seconds, and increased referred pain while the subject maintained a medial gaze on the corresponding side (active stretching of the muscle) for 15 seconds. On each side, a 10-point numerical pain rate scale was used to assess the intensity of referred pain at both stages of the examination. Ten patients with CTTH (66.6%) had referred pain that satisfied TrPs diagnostic criteria, while only one healthy control (0.07%) reported referred pain upon the examination of the lateral rectus muscles (P < 0.001). The elicited referred pain was perceived as a deep ache located at the supraorbital region or the homolateral forehead. Pain was evoked on both sides in all subjects with TrPs, with no difference in pain intensity between the right and the left. The average pain intensity was significantly greater in the patient group (P < 0.001). All CTTH patients with referred pain recognized it as the frontal pain that they usually experienced during their headache attacks, which was consistent with active TrPs. In some patients with CTTH, the manual examination of lateral rectus muscle TrPs elicits a referred pain that

  1. Muscle strain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  2. Muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15)

  3. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anatomy of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anatomy of the Eye En Español Read in Chinese External (Extraocular) Anatomy Extraocular Muscles: There are six muscles that are ...

  5. Muscle strain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  6. Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  7. Is modified clinical activity score an accurate indicator of diplopia progression in Graves' orbitopathy patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Woo, Young Jun; Yoon, Jin Sook

    2016-12-30

    The aim of this study is to describe characteristics of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) patients with progressive diplopia and to consider whether modified clinical activity score (CAS) is a useful indicator for prediction of diplopia progression. Medical records and images of GO patients with progressive diplopia were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical parameters (e.g., modified CAS, modified NOSPECS score, exophthalmometry results, score of diplopia, and prevalence of optic neuropathy) were evaluated. Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor autoantibody (TRAb) values were determined. Maximum recti muscle diameters and extraocular muscle (EOM) indices were evaluated. Sixty-three of the 435 GO patients had progressive diplopia; 44.4% (28/63) of these patients had a low CAS (diplopia, prevalence of optic neuropathy and the positive rate and level of TRAb were not significantly different between groups. There were no differences in maximum recti muscle diameters or EOM indices between the two groups. Diplopia may progress even in patients with a low modified CAS. CAS may not reflect the inflammatory activity of myopathy, especially in mild to moderate GO with low NOSPECS and exophthalmos values. Careful patient follow-up using subjective and objective measures for diplopia should be performed.

  8. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  9. Referred pain areas of active myofascial trigger points in head, neck, and shoulder muscles, in chronic tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; González-Iglesias, Javier; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-10-01

    Our aim was to analyze the differences in the referred pain patterns and size of the areas of those myofascial trigger points (TrPs) involved in chronic tension type headache (CTTH) including a number of muscles not investigated in previous studies. Thirteen right handed women with CTTH (mean age: 38 ± 6 years) were included. TrPs were bilaterally searched in upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, masseter, levator scapulae, superior oblique (extra-ocular), and suboccipital muscles. TrPs were considered active when both local and referred pain evoked by manual palpation reproduced total or partial pattern similar to a headache attack. The size of the referred pain area of TrPs of each muscle was calculated. The mean number of active TrPs within each CTTH patient was 7 (95% CI 6.2-8.0). A greater number (T = 2.79; p = 0.016) of active TrPs was found at the right side (4.2 ± 1.5) when compared to the left side (2.9 ± 1.0). TrPs in the suboccipital muscles were most prevalent (n = 12; 92%), followed by the superior oblique muscle (n =11/n = 9 right/left side), the upper trapezius muscle (n = 11/n = 6) and the masseter muscle (n = 9/n=7). The ANOVA showed significant differences in the size of the referred pain area between muscles (F = 4.7, p = 0.001), but not between sides (F = 1.1; p = 0.3): as determined by a Bonferroni post hoc analysis the referred pain area elicited by levator scapulae TrPs was significantly greater than the area from the sternocleidomastoid (p = 0.02), masseter (p = 0.003) and superior oblique (p = 0.001) muscles. Multiple active TrPs exist in head, neck and shoulder muscles in women with CTTH. The referred pain areas of TrPs located in neck muscles were larger than the referred pain areas of head muscles. Spatial summation of nociceptive inputs from multiple active TrPs may contribute to clinical manifestations of CTTH. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fetal development of the pulley for muscle insertion tendons: A review and new findings related to the tensor tympani tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Honkura, Yohei; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The existence of hard tissue pulleys that act to change the direction of a muscle insertion tendon is well known in the human body. These include (1) the trochlea for the extraocular obliquus superior muscle, (2) the pterygoid hamulus for the tensor veli palatini muscle, (3) the deep sulcus on the plantar aspect of the cuboid bone for the peroneus longus tendon, (4) the lesser sciatic notch for the obturator internus muscle, and (5) the bony trochleariformis process for the tensor tympani muscle tendon. In addition, (6) the stapedius muscle tendon shows a lesser or greater angulation at the pyramidal eminence of the temporal bone. Our recent studies have shown that the development of pulleys Nos. 1 and 2 can be explained by a change in the topographical relationship between the pulley and the tendon, that of pulley No. 3 by the rapidly growing calcaneus pushing the tendon, and that of pulley No. 4 by migration of the insertion along the sciatic nerve and gluteus medius tendon. Therefore, in Nos. 1-4, an initially direct tendon curves secondarily and obtains an attachment to the pulley. In case No. 6, the terminal part of the stapedius tendon originates secondarily from the interzone mesenchymal tissue of the incudostapedial joint. In the case of pulley No. 5, we newly demonstrated that its initial phase of development was similar to No. 6, but the tensor tympani tendon achieved a right-angled turn under guidance by a specific fibrous tissue and it migrated along the growing malleus manubrium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of head muscles and glands correlated with cranial nerves and surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Johnson, Aleksandra; Qian, Guoyu; Poh, Lan Eng; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Bivi, Aminah; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2013-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relationships between head muscles and cranial nerves innervating them are complicated. Existing sources present these relationships in illustrations, radiologic scans, or autopsy photographs, which are limited for learning and use. Developed electronic atlases are limited in content, quality, functionality, and/or presentation. We create a truly 3D interactive, stereotactic and high quality atlas, which provides spatial relationships among head muscles, glands and cranial nerves, and correlates them to surface and sectional neuroanatomy. The head muscles and glands were created from a 3T scan by contouring them and generating 3D models. They were named and structured according to Terminologia anatomica. The muscles were divided into: extra-ocular, facial, masticatory and other muscles, and glands into mouth and other glands. The muscles, glands (and also head) were placed in a stereotactic coordinate system. This content was integrated with cranial nerves and neuroanatomy created earlier. To explore this complex content, a scalable user interface was designed with 12 modules including central nervous system (cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord), cranial nerves, muscles, glands, arterial system, venous system, tracts, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, white matter, visual system, head. Anatomy exploration operations include compositing/decompositing, individual/group selection, 3D view-index mapping, 3D labeling, highlighting, distance measuring, 3D brain cutting, and axial/coronal/sagittal triplanar display. To our best knowledge, this is the first truly 3D, stereotactic, interactive, fairly complete atlas of head muscles, and the first attempt to create a 3D stereotactic atlas of glands. Its use ranges from education of students and patients to research to potential clinical applications.

  12. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Emerson Randolph; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in t...

  13. Muscle strain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  14. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  15. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  16. Optical characterization of muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  17. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  18. Clinical Analysis of 133 Cases of Extraocular Stage and Metastasis Stage Metastatic Retinoblastoma%眼外期及远处播散期视网膜母细胞瘤133例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张谊; 黄东生; 张伟令; 王一卓; 周燕; 韩涛; 洪亮; 杨怡平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics and curative effect of terminal retinoblastoma(Rb). Methods The clinical document of 133 cases (162 eyes,78 male,55 female) with extraocular and metastasis stage of Rb confirmed in Department of Pediatrics of Tongren Hospital from Sep. 2005 to May 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The average age of 133 cases was 2.04 years old( range 0. 33 -12.66 years old); primary eye types:the right eyes diagnosed primarily were 48 cases (extraocular 36 cases,metastasis stage 12 cases) ,left eyes diagnosed primarily were 56 cases (extraocular 46 cases, metastasis stage 10 cases), and double eyes diagnosed primarily were 29 cases.Results Leucocoria was the most common manifestation of terminal Rb with the primary diagnosis rate was 69.92% (93/133 cases) based on this symptom; secondly,lacrimation, flare, photophobia, exophthalmos ( 10.52% ) and side - glance ( 9.77% ), weak - eyed, blindness,cataract ( 6.77 % ), misdiagnose ( 1.51% ), recur after operation ( 1.51% ). The hospitalized rate of male [ 58 % (78/133 cases) ] was more than that of female. Seven cases (5.26%) showed the positive family history in all of cases. In all the 133 cases,131 cases (98.49%) had an increase in neurone specific enolase(NSE) ,the max was 370.00 μ.g · L-1. The total survival rate was 82.35% (98/119 cases), 14 cases ( in the metastasis stage 9 cases ,extraocular 5 cases) given up treatment and lost followed - up. One hundred and nineteen cases were followed up: the median follow - up visit was 27 months,the survival rate was 82.35% (98/119 cases). Moreover,the survival rate of Rb in the metastasis stage was 26.08% (6/23 cases); the survival rate of Rb in the extraocluar stage was 95.83% (92/96 cases). Conclusions The mortality of terminal Rb is very high, especially in metastasis stage. Therefore, it is very important to diagnose early and give an overall treatment.%目的 总结晚期视网膜母细胞瘤(Rb)患儿的

  19. Muscles, exercise and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    . The finding that the muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones and brain. However, some myokines exert their effects within......During the past decade, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. Accordingly, we have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed and released by muscle fibres and exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects should be classified as myokines...... the muscle itself. Thus, myostatin, LIF, IL-6 and IL-7 are involved in muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, whereas BDNF and IL-6 are involved in AMPK-mediated fat oxidation. IL-6 also appears to have systemic effects on the liver, adipose tissue and the immune system, and mediates crosstalk between intestinal...

  20. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence......, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle...

  1. The hamstring muscle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Made, A D; Wieldraaijer, T; Kerkhoffs, G M; Kleipool, R P; Engebretsen, L; van Dijk, C N; Golanó, P

    2015-07-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous inscription in the semitendinosus muscle known as the raphe. Fifty-six hamstring muscle groups were dissected in prone position from 29 human cadaveric specimens with a median age of 71.5 (range 45-98). Data pertaining to origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, MTJ length and length as well as width of the raphe were collected. Besides these data, we also encountered interesting findings that might lead to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern. These include overlapping proximal and distal tendons of both the long head of the biceps femoris muscle and the semimembranosus muscle (SM), a twist in the proximal SM tendon and a tendinous inscription (raphe) in the semitendinosus muscle present in 96 % of specimens. No obvious hypothesis can be provided purely based on either muscle length, tendon length or MTJ length. However, it is possible that overlapping proximal and distal tendons as well as muscle architecture leading to a resultant force not in line with the tendon predispose to muscle injury, whereas the presence of a raphe might plays a role in protecting the muscle against gross injury. Apart from these architectural characteristics that may contribute to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern, the provided reference values complement current knowledge on surgically relevant hamstring anatomy. IV.

  2. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  3. Accessory piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Develi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis muscle originates from facies pelvica of sacrum and inserts on the trochanter major. It is one of the lateral rotator muscles of the hip and a landmark point in the gluteal region since n. ischiadicus descends to the thigh by passing close to the muscle. This contiguity may be associated with the irritation of the nerve which is known as piriformis syndrome. A rare anatomic variation of the muscle which observed on 74 years old male cadaver is discussed in this case report. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 182-183

  4. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence...

  5. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue, satell

  6. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue,

  7. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  8. Healthy Muscles Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower than normal number of red blood cells. Atrophy (A-truh-fee). Wasting away of the body or of an organ or part, as from deficient nutrition, nerve damage, or lack of use. Cardiac (KAR-dee-ak) muscle . The heart muscle. An ...

  9. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  10. Turning Marrow into Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In unexpected testimony2 to the versatility3 of the body's cells,researchers have found they can make bone marrow cells turn into muscle, causing mice with muscular dystrophy4 to produce correctly working muscle cells. The experiment suggests that a form of bone marrow transplant- - a well established surgical procedure5- - could in principle treat patients with a variety of diseases.

  11. Muscle contraction and force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Risbo, Jens; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction studies often focus solely on myofibres and the proteins known to be involved in the processes of sarcomere shortening and cross-bridge cycling, but skeletal muscle also comprises a very elaborate ancillary network of capillaries, which not only play a vital role in terms...... contributor to force transfer within muscular tissue....

  12. G\\'eom\\'etrie birationnelle \\'equivariante des grassmanniennes

    CERN Document Server

    Florence, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Let k be a field, and A a finite-dimensional k-algebra. Let d be an integer. Denote by Gr(d,A) the Grassmannian of d-subspaces of A (viewed as a k-vector space), and by GL_1(A) the algebraic k-group whose points are invertible elements of A. The group GL_1(A) acts naturally on Gr(d,A) (by the formula g.E=gE). The aim of this paper is to study some birational properties of this action. More precisely, let r be the gcd of d and dim(A). Under some hypothesis on A (satisfied if A/k is \\'etale), I show that the variety Gr(d,A) is birationally and GL_1(A)-equivariantly isomorphic to the product of Gr(r,A) by a projective space (on which GL_1(A) acts trivially). By twisting, this result has some corollaries in the theory of central simple algebras. For instance, let B and C be two central simple algebras over k, of coprime degrees. Then the Severi-Brauer variety SB(B \\otimes C) is birational to the product of SB(B) \\times SB(C) by an affine space of the correct dimension. These corollaries are in the spirit of Krash...

  13. Onion artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  14. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  15. A muscle model for hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauer Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop model-based control strategies for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES in order to support weak voluntary muscle contractions, a hybrid model for describing joint motions induced by concurrent voluntary-and FES induced muscle activation is proposed. It is based on a Hammerstein model – as commonly used in feedback controlled FES – and exemplarily applied to describe the shoulder abduction joint angle. Main component of a Hammerstein muscle model is usually a static input nonlinearity depending on the stimulation intensity. To additionally incorporate voluntary contributions, we extended the static non-linearity by a second input describing the intensity of the voluntary contribution that is estimated by electromyography (EMG measurements – even during active FES. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN is used to describe the static input non-linearity. The output of the ANN drives a second-order linear dynamical system that describes the combined muscle activation and joint angle dynamics. The tunable parameters are adapted to the individual subject by a system identification approach using previously recorded I/O-data. The model has been validated in two healthy subjects yielding RMS values for the joint angle error of 3.56° and 3.44°, respectively.

  16. Muscle Bioenergetic Considerations for Intrinsic Laryngeal Skeletal Muscle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Mary J.; Smith, Audrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Intrinsic laryngeal skeletal muscle bioenergetics, the means by which muscles produce fuel for muscle metabolism, is an understudied aspect of laryngeal physiology with direct implications for voice habilitation and rehabilitation. The purpose of this review is to describe bioenergetic pathways identified in limb skeletal muscle and…

  17. Polymer artificial muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tissaphern Mirfakhrai

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The various types of natural muscle are incredible material systems that enable the production of large deformations by repetitive molecular motions. Polymer artificial muscle technologies are being developed that produce similar strains and higher stresses using electrostatic forces, electrostriction, ion insertion, and molecular conformational changes. Materials used include elastomers, conducting polymers, ionically conducting polymers, and carbon nanotubes. The mechanisms, performance, and remaining challenges associated with these technologies are described. Initial applications are being developed, but further work by the materials community should help make these technologies applicable in a wide range of devices where muscle-like motion is desirable.

  18. Acquired smooth muscle hamartoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari Arfan ul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle hamartoma is an uncommon, usually congenital, cutaneous hyperplasia of the arrectores pilorum muscles. When it is acquired, it may be confused with Becker′s nevus. We report a case of this rare tumor in a 19-year-old man. The disease started several years ago as multiple small skin-colored papules that subsequently coalesced to form a large soft plaque on the back of the left shoulder. The diagnosis of acquired smooth muscle hamartoma was confirmed on histopathology. The patient was reassured about the benign nature of the lesion and was not advised any treatment.

  19. Early Differential Diagnosis of Rhino-Orbito-Cerebral Mucormycosis and Bacterial Orbital Cellulitis: Based on Computed Tomography Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jun Hyuk; Lim, Hyung Bin; Lee, Soo Hyun; Yang, Jae Wook; Lee, Sung Bok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify significant clinical and radiological findings that distinguish rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis (ROCM) from bacterial orbital cellulitis (BOC). Methods This study was retrospective, multicenter, case-control study that enrolled 34 cases; 14 cases were diagnosed with ROCM and 20 cases were diagnosed with BOC at three different tertiary hospitals between 2005 and 2013. The medical records of all 34 cases were reviewed. The initial clinical manifestations (eyelid swelling, ptosis, extraocular muscle [EOM] limitation, conjunctival injection, and chemosis) and computed tomography (CT) findings (sinus mucosal thickening, full opacification, and air-fluid level) of both diseases were compared. Results Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) showed higher incidence rates of ROCM than BOC (DM: p < 0.001, HTN: p = 0.036). ROCM cases exhibited more frequent EOM limitation than cases with BOC (100.0% vs. 66.7%, p = 0.024) but less frequent eyelid swelling (35.7% vs. 90.0%, p = 0.002). However, the incidence rates of ptosis, conjunctival injection, and chemosis exhibited no differences between the diseases. Abnormal CT findings were observed in the sinuses of all patients with ROCM, whereas 12 patients with BOC had sinus abnormalities (100.0% vs. 60.0%, p = 0.011). Thickening of the sinus mucosa was more frequent in patients with ROCM than in those with BOC (92.9% vs. 45.0%, p = 0.009). No significant differences in full opacification or air-fluid level were detected between the groups. Conclusions The differential diagnosis of ROCM and BOC is difficult. Nevertheless, physicians should consider ROCM when a patient with suspected orbital cellulitis presents with EOM limitation without swollen eyelids or thickening of the sinus mucosa on a CT scan. PMID:27501044

  20. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  1. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  2. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Muscle Cramp – A Common Pain Page Content Has a muscle ... body’s natural tendency toward self-healing. Causes of Muscle Cramps Muscle cramps can occur anywhere, anytime to anyone. “ ...

  3. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  4. Muscles and their myokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-01-01

    In the past, the role of physical activity as a life-style modulating factor has been considered as that of a tool to balance energy intake. Although it is important to avoid obesity, physical inactivity should be discussed in a much broader context. There is accumulating epidemiological evidence...... or endocrine effects should be classified as 'myokines'. Given that skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body, our discovery that contracting skeletal muscle secretes proteins sets a novel paradigm: skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ producing and releasing myokines, which work in a hormone...... that a physically active life plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, dementia and even depression. For most of the last century, researchers sought a link between muscle contraction and humoral changes in the form of an 'exercise factor', which could...

  5. smooth-muscle activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with atropine could not abolish the effect of the venom on smooth muscle. ... cholenergic factor with acetylcholine was confirmed using radioimmunoassay of ... peripheral nervous antagonists on the venom action are still uncertain. The present.

  6. Muscle biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  7. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bach, A. D; Beier, J. P; Stern‐Staeter, J; Horch, R. E

    2004-01-01

    The reconstruction of skeletal muscle tissue either lost by traumatic injury or tumor ablation or functional damage due to myopathies is hampered by the lack of availability of functional substitution...

  8. Lipolysis in Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Annette Karen Lundbeck

    and especially the energy sensor 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is activated during exercise, has received increased attention. However, whether AMPK is an activator or inhibitor of lipolysis in skeletal muscle is not clear. Therefore, we in study I aimed to identify the role...... contraction. Accordingly, AMPK is suggested to be an important regulator of basal IMTG and lipid handling in skeletal muscle as well as an important activator of lipolysis by phosphorylation of ATGL and HSL during muscle contractions. Oversupply of energy and dietary fat leads to obesity and accumulation...... chemical structure of DAG. We took advantage of the fact that insulin sensitivity is increased after exercise, and that mice knocked out (KO) of HSL accumulate DAG after exercise, and measured insulin stimulated glucose uptake after treadmill running in skeletal muscle from HSL KO mice and wildtype control...

  9. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  10. Muscle as a secretory organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.

  11. Changes in T2-weighted MRI of supinator muscle, pronator teres muscle, and extensor indicis muscle with manual muscle testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Akiyama, Sumikazu; Takamori, Masayoshi; Otsuka, D. Eng, Hiroshi; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] In order to detect muscle activity with manual muscle testing, T2-weighted magnetic resonance (T2w-MR) images were detected by a 0.2 T compact MRI system. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 3 adult males. Transverse T2-weighted multi-slice spin-echo images of the left forearm were measured by a 39 ms echo-time with a 2,000 ms repetition time, a 9.5 mm slice thickness, 1 accumulation and a total image acquisition time of 4 min 16 s. First, T2w-MR images in the resting condition were measured. Then, manipulative isometric contraction exercise (5 sec duration) to the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle or the extensor indicis muscle was performed using Borg’s rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale of 15–17. The T2w-MR images were measured immediately after the exercise. [Results] T2w-MR image intensities increased significantly in the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle and the extensor indicis muscle after the exercise. However, the image intensities in the rest of the muscle did not change. [Conclusion] Using T2w-MR images, we could detect muscle activity in a deep muscle, the supinator muscle, and a small muscle, the extensor indicis muscle. These results also support the reliability of the manual muscle testing method. PMID:28356621

  12. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume.

  13. Artificial muscles on heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  14. Signaling in muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-02-02

    Signaling pathways regulate contraction of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. Although these are similar, there are striking differences in the pathways that can be attributed to the distinct functional roles of the different muscle types. Muscles contract in response to depolarization, activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other stimuli. The actomyosin fibers responsible for contraction require an increase in the cytosolic levels of calcium, which signaling pathways induce by promoting influx from extracellular sources or release from intracellular stores. Rises in cytosolic calcium stimulate numerous downstream calcium-dependent signaling pathways, which can also regulate contraction. Alterations to the signaling pathways that initiate and sustain contraction and relaxation occur as a consequence of exercise and pathophysiological conditions.

  15. Foot muscles strengthener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris T. Glavač

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous experience in the correction of flat feet consisted of the use of insoles for shoes and exercises with toys, balls, rollers, inclined planes, etc. A device for strengthening foot muscles is designed for the correction of flat feet in children and, as its name suggests, for strengthening foot muscles in adults. The device is made of wood and metal, with a mechanism and technical solutions, enabling the implementation of specific exercises to activate muscles responsible for the formation of the foot arch. It is suitable for home use with controlled load quantities since it has calibrated springs. The device is patented with the Intellectual Property Office, Republic of Serbia, as a petty patent.

  16. Megnetic resonance imaging findings in sporadic M(o)bius syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shao-qin; MAN Feng-yuan; JIAO Yong-hong; XIAN Jun-fang; WANG Yi-di; WANG Zhen-chang

    2013-01-01

    Background Although neuroradiological findings of M(o)bius syndrome have been reported as a result of brain and brainstem abnormalities,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now permits the direct imaging of the cranial nerve (CN) and branches in the orbits.This study presents the MRI findings in patients with sporadic M(o)bius syndrome.Methods Prospectively,CNs were imaged in the cistern using head coils and three dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA),yielding a 0.5 mm2 resolution in planes of 0.8 mm thickness in seven patients with sporadic M(o)bius syndrome.The cavernous and intraorbital segment of the CN and the extraocular muscles (EOMs) were imaged with T1 weighting in all patients.The cavernous segment was imaged in coronal planes,while the intraorbit in quasicoronal planes were imaged using surface coils.Intraorbital resolution was 0.16 mm2 within 2.0 mm thick planes.Results In the seven patients,the CN were absent or showed hypoplasia in the cistern,cavernous sinus,and orbit.Abducens (CN Ⅵ) and facial (CN Ⅶ) nerves were absent on the affected sides.Unilateral CN IX (glossopharyngeal nerve) in two cases displayed dysplasia.Branches from the inferior division of CN Ⅲ were observed to innervate the lateral rectus (LR) bilaterally in three cases and unilaterally in one case,and had intimate continuity with the LR muscle in two cases bilaterally and two cases unilaterally.Hypoplasia of EOMs was shown in five cases.Dysplasia of the medulla on the left side was found in one patient.Conclusions Direct imaging of CNs and EOMs by MRI is useful in diagnosis of M(o)bius syndrome.It can directly demonstrate the abnormalities of the CN and orbital structures.The absence or hypoplasia of CN Ⅵ and CN Ⅶ may be the most common radiologic features in sporadic M(o)bius syndrome,and hypoplasia of CN IX may be an associated feature.The abnormality of EOMs and aberrant innervations in the orbit should be observed,and may be important for

  17. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  19. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  20. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003975.htm Pelvic floor muscle training exercises To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises ...

  1. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  2. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  3. Physics in muscle research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwazumi, T

    2000-01-01

    Muscle is one of few organs whose performance can be measured by physical quantities. However, very few attempts have been made to apply theoretical physics to muscle. In this paper we will see how physical principles can be applied by taking advantage of unique properties of muscle structure. The first topic is to establish the stability conditions of sarcomere structure. The conclusions are then compared to some experimental facts. Next, we move on to the field theory fundamentals. The concept of energy density as a stress tensor is shown to be a powerful tool for the dielectric force theory to understand how proteins move under electric fields. By combining the structural stability theory and the dielectric force theory we arrive at a helical dipole array. We discuss the source of strong dipole fields and how the dipole strength could be controlled by Ca ions. The behavior of water and ions under electric fields is briefly discussed. The third topic is the mechanical stiffness of muscle in longitudinal and lateral directions. Some experimental data are shown and the physics of anisotropic stiffness is discussed. An appendix is provided to explain the pitfalls of experimenting with isolated components rather than organized structures (sarcomere).

  4. Calpains in muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Marc; Richard, Isabelle

    2005-10-01

    Calpains are intracellular nonlysosomal Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases. They mediate regulatory cleavages of specific substrates in a large number of processes during the differentiation, life and death of the cell. The purpose of this review is to synthesize our current understanding of the participation of calpains in muscle atrophy. Muscle tissue expresses mainly three different calpains: the ubiquitous calpains and calpain 3. The participation of the ubiquitous calpains in the initial degradation of myofibrillar proteins occurring in muscle atrophy as well as in the necrosis process accompanying muscular dystrophies has been well characterized. Inactivating mutations in the calpain 3 gene are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A and calpain 3 has been found to be downregulated in different atrophic situations, suggesting that it has to be absent for the atrophy to occur. The fact that similar regulations of calpain activities occur during exercise as well as in atrophy led us to propose that the calpains control cytoskeletal modifications needed for muscle plasticity.

  5. Inflammatory muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastaglia F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The three major immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies, dermatomyositis (DM, polymyositis (PM and inclusion body myositis (IBM, each have their own distinctive clinical features, underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and patterns of muscle gene expression. In DM a complement-dependent humoral process thought to be initiated by antibodies to endothelial cells results in a microangiopathy with secondary ischemic changes in muscles. On the other hand, in PM and IBM there is a T-cell response with invasion of muscle fibers by CD8+ lymphocytes and perforin-mediated cytotoxic necrosis. In IBM degenerative changes are also a feature and comprise autophagia with rimmed vacuole formation and inclusions containing β-amyloid and other proteins whose accumulation may be linked to impaired proteasomal function. The relationship between the inflammatory and degenerative component remains unclear, as does the basis for the selective vulnerability of certain muscles and the resistance to conventional forms of immunotherapy in most cases of IBM. Patients with DM or PM usually respond to treatment with glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents but their use remains largely empirical. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy can be used to achieve disease control in patients with severe weakness or dysphagia, or in patients with immunodeficiency, but its use is limited by expense. Emerging therapies for resistant cases include TNFα inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab and monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, alemtuzumab. However, experience with these therapies is still limited and there is a need for randomized trials to test their efficacy and establish guidelines for their use in clinical practice.

  6. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside the cells, pro- ducing energy (ATP) for muscle contraction and other cellular functions. In meta- bolic myopathies, ... after exercising. The exercise-induced cramps (actually sharp contractions that may seem to ... Muscular Dystrophy Association offers a vast array of services ...

  7. Electrical muscle stimulation for deep stabilizing muscles in abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Simon; Crowe, Louis; McCarthyPersson, Ulrik; Minogue, Conor; Caulfield, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with dysfunction in recruitment of muscles in the lumbopelvic region. Effective rehabilitation requires preferential activation of deep stabilizing muscle groups. This study was carried out in order to quantify the response of deep stabilizing muscles (transverses abdominis) and superficial muscle in the abdominal wall (external oblique) to electrical muscle stimulation (EMS). Results demonstrate that EMS can preferentially stimulate contractions in the deep stabilizers and may have significant potential as a therapeutic intervention in this area, pending further refinements to the technology.

  8. Muscle spindles in the human bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikert, Kevin; May, Christian Albrecht

    2015-07-01

    Muscle spindles are crucial for neuronal regulation of striated muscles, but their presence and involvement in the superficial perineal muscles is not known. Bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscle specimens were obtained from 31 human cadavers. Serial sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Sirius red, antibodies against Podocalyxin, myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC-slow tonic, S46; MyHC-2a/2x, A4.74), and neurofilament for the purpose of muscle spindle screening, counting, and characterization. A low but consistent number of spindles were detected in both muscles. The muscles contained few intrafusal fibers, but otherwise showed normal spindle morphology. The extrafusal fibers of both muscles were small in diameter. The presence of muscle spindles in bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles supports physiological models of pelvic floor regulation and may provide a basis for further clinical observations regarding sexual function and micturition. The small number of muscle spindles points to a minor level of proprioceptive regulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nerve-muscle interactions during flight muscle development in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    During Drosophila pupal metamorphosis, the motoneurons and muscles differentiate synchronously, providing an opportunity for extensive intercellular regulation during synapse formation. We examined the existence of such interactions by developmentally delaying or permanently eliminating synaptic partners during the formation of indirect flight muscles. When we experimentally delayed muscle development, we found that although adult-specific primary motoneuron branching still occurred, the higher order (synaptic) branching was suspended until the delayed muscle fibers reached a favourable developmental state. In reciprocal experiments we found that denervation caused a decrease in the myoblast pool. Furthermore, the formation of certain muscle fibers (dorsoventral muscles) was specifically blocked. Exceptions were the adult muscles that use larval muscle fibers as myoblast fusion targets (dorsal longitudinal muscles). However, when these muscles were experimentally compelled to develop without their larval precursors, they showed an absolute dependence on the motoneurons for their formation. These data show that the size of the myoblast pool and early events in fiber formation depend on the presence of the nerve, and that, conversely, peripheral arbor development and synaptogenesis is closely synchronized with the developmental state of the muscle.

  10. Relationship between cortisone and muscle work in determining muscle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A. L.; Goodman, H. M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Large doses of cortisone caused marked atrophy of the plantaris muscle and other pale muscles of hind limbs of hypophysectomized rats, but hormone treatment had little effect on the size of the red soleus muscle. 2. Denervation increased the sensitivity of the soleus and plantaris to the catabolic effects of cortisone. 3. Increased work induced by tenotomy of the synergistic gastrocnemius made the plantaris muscle less sensitive to cortisone-induced atrophy. 4. Since the catabolic effects of cortisone are more pronounced in the less active muscles, it is suggested that in mobilizing body protein for gluconeogenesis the hormone spares those muscles physiologically most active. 5. The rapidity with which muscles lose weight in response to cortisone indicates that the hormone must decrease protein half-lives as well as decrease protein synthesis. PMID:5765854

  11. Influence of muscle length on muscle atrophy in the mouse tibialis anterior and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoto; Fujimoto, Taro; Tasaki, Hiromitsu; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Matsubara, Takako; Miki, Akinori

    2009-02-01

    The tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were fixed at the stretched or shortened positions to examine the influence of muscle length on muscle atrophy. Mice were divided into control (C), hindlimb suspension (HS), hindlimb suspension with ankle joint fixation at the maximum dorsiflexion (HSD), and hindlimb suspension with ankle joint fixation at the maximum plantarflexion (HSP). During the hindlimb suspension, the length of these muscles in the HS and HSP groups was very similar. Fourteen days after the hindlimb suspension, the atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle in the HS and HSP groups was evidently milder than that in the HSD group, and that in the HS and HSP groups was very similar, suggesting that atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle might largely depend on muscle length. Atrophy of the soleus muscle in the HSD group was milder than that in the HS and HSP groups, indicating that atrophy of the soleus muscle might also depend on muscle length. But atrophy of this muscle in the HSP group was milder than that in the HS group. These results demonstrate that some factors induced by the joint immobilization might be effective in preventing atrophy of the soleus muscle.

  12. Muscle glycogen stores and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan; Nielsen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

      Studies performed at the beginning of the last century revealed the importance of carbohydrate as a fuel during exercise, and the importance of muscle glycogen on performance has subsequently been confirmed in numerous studies. However, the link between glycogen depletion and impaired muscle...... function during fatigue is not well understood and a direct cause-and-effect relationship between glycogen and muscle function remains to be established. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not homogeneously distributed in skeletal muscle fibres, but rather localized in distinct...... pools being of key importance for SR Ca2+ release and thereby affecting muscle contractility and fatigability....

  13. Iliopsoas muscle injury in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabon, Quentin; Bolliger, Christian

    2013-05-01

    The iliopsoas muscle is formed by the psoas major and iliacus muscles. Due to its length and diameter, the iliopsoas muscle is an important flexor and stabilizer of the hip joint and the vertebral column. Traumatic acute and chronic myopathies of the iliopsoas muscle are commonly diagnosed by digital palpation during the orthopedic examination. Clinical presentations range from gait abnormalities, lameness, and decreased hip joint extension to irreversible fibrotic contracture of the muscle. Rehabilitation of canine patients has to take into account the inciting cause, the severity of pathology and the presence of muscular imbalances.

  14. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  15. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Systematic Review of Muscle Strength Assessment and Muscle Strength Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-02-01

    To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion isokinetic dynamometry. A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles were reviewed. Twenty studies covering 316 PPSH were included. High intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) inter- and intrasession reliability was reported for isokinetic dynamometry, which was independent of the tested muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Slightly higher ICC values were found for the nonparetic extremity. Standard error of the mean (SEM) values showed that a change of 7% to 20% was required for a real group change to take place for most muscle groups, with the knee extensors showing the smallest SEM% values. The muscle strength of paretic muscles showed deficits when compared with both healthy and nonparetic muscles, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Nonparetic muscles only showed minor strength impairments when compared with healthy muscles. Criterion isokinetic dynamometry is a reliable test in persons with stroke, generally showing marked reductions in muscle strength of paretic and, to a lesser degree, nonparetic muscles when compared with healthy controls, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Copyright

  16. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  17. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  18. Dismorfia muscular Muscle dysmorphia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Seleri Marques Assunção

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Preocupações mórbidas com a imagem corporal eram tidas até recentemente como problemas eminentemente femininos. Atualmente estas preocupações também têm sido encontradas no sexo masculino. A dismorfia muscular é um subtipo do transtorno dismórfico corporal que ocorre principalmente em homens que, apesar da grande hipertrofia muscular, consideram-se pequenos e fracos. Além de estar associada a prejuízos sociais, ocupacionais, recreativos e em outras áreas do funcionamento do indivíduo, a dismorfia muscular é também um fator de risco para o abuso de esteróides anabolizantes. Este artigo aborda aspectos epidemiológicos, etiológicos e padrões clínicos da dismorfia muscular, além de tecer comentários sobre estratégias de tratamento para este transtorno.Morbid concern over body image was considered, until recently, a female issue. Nowadays, it has been viewed as a common male disorder. Muscle dysmorphia, a subtype of a body dysmorphic disorder, affects men who, despite having clear muscular hypertroph,y see themselves as frail and small. Besides being associated to major social, leisure and occupational dysfunction, muscle dysmorphia is also a risk factor for the abuse of steroids. This article describes epidemiological, etiological and clinical characteristics of muscle dysmorphia and comments on its treatment strategy.

  19. Creating an Artificial Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Katherine; Krause, Sonja

    1997-03-01

    Striated skeletal muscle responds to a nerve impulse in less than 100 ms. In the past, polymeric gels and conducting polymers have been investigated for use as artificial muscle. However, the main problem with these materials is their relatively slow response (>3 seconds). On the other hand, electrorheological (ER) fluids are materials that change from a liquid to a solid upon application of an electric field. These fluids have a response on the order of a millisecond. A novel approach to artificial muscle utilizing the fast time response of ER fluids and the elasticity of polymeric gels has been investigated. A commercial sample of a two-part poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) dielectric gel was used. The PDMS was cured around two flexible electrodes 5 mm apart while a mixture of PDMS with solvent was cured between the electrodes. The solvents were either silicone oil or an ER fluid composed of crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) particles in silicone oil. The mixtures investigated were 90/10, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60, 10/90 PDMS/solvent. Upon application of a 6.2 kV/cm DC electric field the gel was reversibly compressed. The time response of the gel was actuator has been created using the 60/40 PDMS/ER fluid mixture.

  20. [Delayed post effort muscle soreness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudreuse, J M; Dupont, P; Nicol, C

    2004-08-01

    Muscle intolerance to exercise may result from different processes. Diagnosis involves confirming first the source of pain, then potential pathological myalgia. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), commonly referred as tiredness, occurs frequently in sport. DOMS usually develops 12-48 h after intensive and/or unusual eccentric muscle action. Symptoms usually involve the quadriceps muscle group but may also affect the hamstring and triceps surae groups. The muscles are sensitive to palpation, contraction and passive stretch. Acidosis, muscle spasm and microlesions in both connective and muscle tissues may explain the symptoms. However, inflammation appears to be the most common explanation. Interestingly, there is strong evidence that the progression of the exercise-induced muscle injury proceeds no further in the absence of inflammation. Even though unpleasant, DOMS should not be considered as an indicator of muscle damage but, rather, a sign of the regenerative process, which is well known to contribute to the increased muscle mass. DOMS can be associated with decreased proprioception and range of motion, as well as maximal force and activation. DOMS disappears 2-10 days before complete functional recovery. This painless period is ripe for additional joint injuries. Similarly, if some treatments are well known to attenuate DOMS, none has been demonstrated to accelerate either structural or functional recovery. In terms of the role of the inflammatory process, these treatments might even delay overall recovery.

  1. Reinnervation of Paralyzed Muscle by Nerve Muscle Endplate Band Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    reinnervation of paralyzed laryngeal and facial muscles11,12 as well as the extremities.8,10 However, further studies are needed to determine the...noninnervated endplates of the operated and unoperated SMmuscles in each rat were computed. The variables of the reinnervated SM muscles were expressed as...Brunelli G, Brunelli LM. Direct neurotization of severely damaged denervated muscles. Int Surg 1980;65(6):529–531 11 Hall SJ, Trachy RE, Cummings CW. Facial

  2. Painful Unilateral Temporalis Muscle Enlargement: Reactive Masticatory Muscle Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Katsetos, Christos D.; Bianchi, Michael A.; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptoma...

  3. Isolation, Culture, and Immunostaining of Skeletal Muscle Myofibers from Wildtype and Nestin-GFP Mice as a Means to Analyze Satellite Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuelsatz, Pascal; Keire, Paul; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2017-01-01

    the Myf5(nLacZ) knockin reporter (approaches that are also detailed herein), the Nestin-GFP reporter distinctively permits quantification of satellite cells in live myofibers, which enables linking initial Time 0 numbers and subsequent performance upon culturing. We additionally point out to the implementation of the Nestin-GFP transgene for monitoring other selective cell lineages as illustrated by GFP expression in capillaries, endothelial tubes and neuronal cells. Myofibers from other types of muscles, such as diaphragm, masseter, and extraocular, can also be isolated and analyzed using protocols described herein. Collectively, this chapter provides essential tools for studying satellite cells in their native position and their interplay with the parent myofiber.

  4. Study on congenital complex strabismus with 3D-fiesta sequences%3 D-FIESTA序列在儿童复杂性斜视中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹秋凤; 李芳珍; 张玉珍; 夏正荣; 丁茗; 刘明

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of 3D-Fiesta sequences for showing ophthalmic motion nerves and extraocular muscles abnormalities in the complex strabismus of children.Methods Eighteen patients with complex strabismus underwent MRI examination on 3.0 T MR unit.Ophthalmic nerves to extraocular muscles were imaged and analyzed with 3D-Fiesta scanning sequences in all patients.Results Patients with duane syndrome (11 cases, 15 eyes) all exhibited absence or hypoplasia of ab-ducens nerve ( CN6) and there were no hypoplasia of EOMs.Patients with congenital fibrosis of EOMs (3 cases, 5 eyes) exhibi-ted severe hypoplasia of CN3 and CN6, and EOMs appeared hypoplasia to a different degree, particularly severe for the superior rectus.Multiple nerves displayed aplasia in patients with Mobius syndrome (4 case, 7 eyes) and there were hypoplasia of the lat-eral rectus in two cases.Conclusion Using 3D-fiesta scanning sequences could directly demonstrate absence or hypoplasia of ophthalmic nerves and abnormalities of corresponding extraocular muscles, which indicates its important value of clinical applica-tion in congenital complex strabismus.%目的:探讨3D-Fiesta序列在儿童复杂性斜视中,对于相关眼运动神经及受累眼外肌异常的诊断价值。方法18例经临床诊断证实的儿童复杂性斜视患者,回顾性分析各眼运动神经及眼外肌的MR影像表现。结果1)眼球后退综合征:11例共15只患眼,患侧外展神经脑池段缺如或发育不良,眼外肌形态正常;2)眼外肌纤维化综合征:3例共5只患眼,表现为动眼神经、外展神经脑池段异常纤细改变,多组眼外肌不同程度变细、变薄,以上直肌明显;3)先天性眼一面麻痹综合征:4例7只患眼,表现为外展神经、面神经脑池段纤细或缺如,患侧外直肌变薄、变细。结论3D-Fiesta序列能够清晰显示眼运动神经及其支配的眼外肌异常,提供判断复杂性斜视病因

  5. Muscle as a secretory organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many...... evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists...... proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise....

  6. PDH regulation in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian

    is determined by the overall content / activity of the regulatory proteins PDH kinase (PDK), of which there are 4 isoforms, and PDH phosphatase (PDP), of which there are 2 isoforms. The overall aim of the PhD project was to elucidate 4 issues. 1: Role of muscle type in resting and exercise-induced PDH...... in arm than leg muscles during exercise in humans may be the result of lower PDH-E1? content and not a muscle type dependent difference in PDH regulation. Both low muscle glycogen and increased plasma FFA are associated with upregulation of PDK4 protein and less exercise-induced increase in PDHa activity...... in human skeletal muscle. It may be noted that the increased PDK4 protein associated with elevated plasma FFA occurs already 2 hours after different dietary intake. A week of physical inactivity (bed rest), leading to whole body glucose intolerance, does not affect muscle PDH-E1? content, or the exercise...

  7. Muscle dysfunction in male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A K; Katiyar, B C; Misra, S; Thacker, A K; Singh, N K

    1986-05-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive male patients with primary and secondary hypogonadism (14 each) were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically for muscle dysfunction. Although generalised muscle weakness was initially reported by only 9 patients, on direct questioning, it was recorded in 19. Objective weakness was found in 13 patients and it involved both the proximal and distal limb muscles. Quantitative electromyography showed evidence of myopathy in the proximal muscle in 25 patients, i.e., reduced MUP duration and amplitude with increased polyphasia in the deltoid and the gluteus maximus. There were no denervation potentials. None of the patients showed clinical neuropathy or NCV abnormalities. Thus, the profile of muscle involvement in hypogonadism closely simulates limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and other endocrine myopathies. The incidence of muscle involvement was higher in secondary hypogonadism. Diminished androgens in primary hypogonadism and diminished growth hormone in the secondary hypogonadism are probably responsible for the myopathy.

  8. [Myoma of the breast muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro, M C; Fernández-Redondo, V; Zulaica, A; Toribio, J

    1985-01-01

    A female patient presented with a tumoral lesion of the areola of the left breast; the lesion surrounded the nipple. Histopathologically there was proliferation of smooth muscle fibers of the middle and deep layers of the dermis; the papillary dermis was not affected. Myomas in this site do not present the typical characteristics of other kinds of leiomyomas, including those of the scrotum. Therefore, mamillary muscle myomas should not be considered authentic tumors, but rather smooth muscle hyperplasias.

  9. [Reconstruction of quadriceps femoris muscle function with muscle transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Meric, C

    2010-08-01

    Femoral nerve palsy, mostly of iatrogen cause, leads to paresis of quadriceps muscle with complete loss of knee extension. Therapeutical options include neurolysis, nerve reconstruction or functional muscle transplantations. Another concept is the transfer of hamstring muscles as described in post polio surgery. We describe our experience of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscle transfer for reconstruction of knee extension. From 2003 to 2007 seven patients (mean age 43) with complete loss of knee extension after femoral nerve lesion were treated. Nerve palsy was caused by direct lesion, traction, hematoma after collapse, lesion of lumbosacral plexus and an unclear muscle dystrophy. Indication for muscle transfer was due to long standing muscle paresis. All patients received a transfer of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscle/tendon into the quadriceps tendon. Patients were immobilised in a cast for 6 weeks in extended knee position. Weight bearing started after 8 weeks. Operations went uneventfully. All patients were able to extend the knee postoperatively against gravity and were able to climb stairs without help. 4 Patients had complete knee extension, 2 had a lack of 20 degrees , one of 30 degrees. Daily routine was possible in all cases. No instability of knee joints occurred postoperatively. In a nerve lesion close to the muscle a nerve reconstruction should be aimed. If not performed or with unsuccessful outcome, muscle transfer is a good option to restore function. All recent studies describe good to excellent results with stable knees, allowing the patient to manage daily routine without assistance and to climb stairs up and down. Long term complications such as dislocation of patella or genu recurvatum were not observed in our patients. The latter results as typical complication in polio from weakening knee flexion through biceps femoris transfer, if the gastrocnemius muscle is not forceful enough. However in an isolated femoral nerve lesion this

  10. Electrical stimulation and muscle strengthening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dehail, P; Duclos, C; Barat, M

    2008-01-01

    ...: muscular or neuromuscular, electromyostimulation, electrical stimulation, strengthening, strength training, immobilization, muscle dystrophy, bed-rest, bed-bound, knee or hip surgery, postoperative...

  11. New twist on artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Aliev, Ali E.; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy. PMID:27671626

  12. Nutritional interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, Evelien M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle mass is the main predictor for muscle strength and physical function. The amount of muscle mass can decline rapidly during periods of reduced physical activity or during periods of energy intake restriction. For athletes, it is important to maintain muscle mass, since the loss of muscle is

  13. Nutritional interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, Evelien M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle mass is the main predictor for muscle strength and physical function. The amount of muscle mass can decline rapidly during periods of reduced physical activity or during periods of energy intake restriction. For athletes, it is important to maintain muscle mass, since the loss of muscle is as

  14. Trunk extensor muscle fatigue influences trunk muscle activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinpoor, Tahere Seyed; Kahrizi, Sedighe; Mobini, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Trunk muscles fatigue is one of the risk factors in workplaces and daily activities. Loads would be redistributed among active and passive tissues in a non-optimal manner in fatigue conditions. Therefore, a single tissue might be overloaded with minimal loads and as a result the risk of injury would increase. The goal of this paper was to assess the electromyographic response of trunk extensor and abdominal muscles after trunk extensor muscles fatigue induced by cyclic lifting task. This was an experimental study that twenty healthy women participated. For assessing automatic response of trunk extensor and abdominal muscles before and after the fatigue task, electromyographic activities of 6 muscles: thorasic erector spine (TES), lumbar erector spine (LES), lumbar multifidus (LMF), transverse abdominis/ internal oblique (TrA/IO), rectus abdominis (RA) and external oblique (EO) were recorded in standing position with no load and symmetric axial loads equal to 25% of their body weights. Statistical analysis showed that all the abdominal muscles activity decreased with axial loads after performing fatigue task but trunk extensor activity remained constant. Results of the current study indicated that muscle recruitment strategies changed with muscle fatigue and load bearing, therefore risks of tissue injury may increase in fatigue conditions.

  15. Skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Fontaine, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    This is an update on skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies since knowledge in the field have dramatically increased in the past years. The relationship between two phenotypes and SCN4A has been confirmed with additional cases that remain extremely rare: severe neonatal episodic laryngospasm mimicking encephalopathy, which should be actively searched for since patients respond well to sodium channel blockers; congenital myasthenic syndromes, which have the particularity to be the first recessive Nav1.4 channelopathy. Deep DNA sequencing suggests the contribution of other ion channels in the clinical expressivity of sodium channelopathies, which may be one of the factors modulating the latter. The increased knowledge of channel molecular structure, the quantity of sodium channel blockers, and the availability of preclinical models would permit a most personalized choice of medication for patients suffering from these debilitating neuromuscular diseases. Advances in the understanding of the molecular structure of voltage-gated sodium channels, as well as availability of preclinical models, would lead to improved medical care of patients suffering from skeletal muscle, as well as other sodium channelopathies.

  16. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of muscle motor point stimulation in eliciting muscle cramps, 11 subjects underwent eight sessions of electrical stimulation of the following muscles bilaterally: abductor hallucis flexor hallucis brevis, and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles. Bursts of 150 square wave stimuli (duration: 152 micros; current intensity: 30% supramaximal) were applied. The stimulation frequency was increased from 4 pulses per second (pps) at increments of 2 pps until a cramp was induced. The number of cramps that could be elicited was smaller in flexor hallucis brevis than in abductor hallucis (16 vs. 22 out of 22 trials each; P muscles have different cramp susceptibility, and the intermuscle variability in the elicitability profile for electrically induced cramps supports the use of the proposed method for cramp research.

  17. Muscle force compensation among synergistic muscles after fatigue of a single muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzig, Norman; Siebert, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine control strategies among synergistic muscles after fatigue of a single muscle. It was hypothesized that the compensating mechanism is specific for each fatigued muscle. The soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and medialis (GM) were fatigued in separate sessions on different days. In each experiment, subjects (n = 11) performed maximal voluntary contractions prior to and after fatiguing a single muscle (SOL, GL or GM) while the voluntary muscle activity and torque were measured. Additionally, the maximal single twitch torque of the plantarflexors and the maximal spinal reflex activity (H-reflex) of the SOL, GL and GM were determined. Fatigue was evoked using neuromuscular stimulation. Following fatigue the single twitch torque decreased by -20.1%, -19.5%, and -23.0% when the SOL, GL, or GM, have been fatigued. The maximal voluntary torque did not decrease in any session but the synergistic voluntary muscle activity increased significantly. Moreover, we found no alterations in spinal reflex activity. It is concluded that synergistic muscles compensate each other. Furthermore, it seems that self-compensating mechanism of the fatigued muscles occurred additionally. The force compensation does not depend on the function of the fatigued muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  19. Trichinella spiralis in human muscle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the parasite Trichinella spiralis in human muscle tissue. The parasite is transmitted by eating undercooked ... produce large numbers of larvae that migrate into muscle tissue. The cysts may cause muscle pain and ...

  20. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  1. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in

  2. Sternalis muscle: a mystery still.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Bowers, Maggi; Hullett, Joel

    2004-05-01

    Despite intensive anatomical research during the last century, anatomical structures or variations of these structures may still cause confusion or even iatrogenic injury. A matter of debate is the sternalis muscle. We present a review of the literature of the sternalis muscle with special emphasis on its clinical anatomy.

  3. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in th

  4. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in th

  5. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...... dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented...

  6. The Basis of Muscle Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Musarò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration recapitulates many aspects of embryonic myogenesis and is an important homeostatic process of the adult skeletal muscle, which, after development, retains the capacity to regenerate in response to appropriate stimuli, activating the muscle compartment of stem cells, namely, satellite cells, as well as other precursor cells. Moreover, significant evidence suggests that while stem cells represent an important determinant for tissue regeneration, a “qualified” environment is necessary to guarantee and achieve functional results. It is therefore plausible that the loss of control over these cell fate decisions could lead to a pathological transdifferentiation, leading to pathologic defects in the regenerative process. This review provides an overview about the general aspects of muscle development and discusses the cellular and molecular aspects that characterize the five interrelated and time-dependent phases of muscle regeneration, namely, degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, remodeling, and maturation/functional repair.

  7. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...... by a dystrophic morphology. The results add to the complexity of the pathogenesis underlying mitochondrial myopathies, and expand the knowledge about the impact of energy deficiency on another aspect of muscle structure and function....

  8. Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Muscle Fiber Composition, and Power Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Karandreas, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV), fiber type composition, and power performance in participants with different training background. Thirty-eight young males with different training background participated: sedentary (n = 10), endurance runners (n = 9), power trained (n = 10), and strength trained (n = 9). They performed maximal countermovement jumps (CMJ) and maximal isometric leg press for the measurement of the rate of force development (RFD). Resting vastus lateralis MFCV was measured with intramuscular microelectrodes on a different occasion, whereas muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA) of vastus lateralis were evaluated through muscle biopsies 1wk later. MFCV, CMJ power, RFD, and % CSA of type II and type IIx fibers were higher for the power-trained group (P power participants. Close correlations were found between MFCV and fiber CSA as well as the % CSA of all fiber types as well as with RFD and CMJ power (r = 0.712-0.943, P power performance. Significant models for the prediction of the % CSA of type IIa and type II as well as the CSA of all muscle fibers based upon MFCV, RFD, and CMJ were revealed (P = 0.000). MFCV is closely associated with muscle fiber % CSA. RFD and jumping power are associated with the propagation of the action potentials along the muscle fibers. This link is regulated by the size and the distribution of type II, and especially type IIx muscle fibers.

  9. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  10. Intermuscular pressure between synergistic muscles correlates with muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Lars; Siebert, Tobias; Leichsenring, Kay; Blickhan, Reinhard; Böl, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between muscle force generated during isometric contractions (i.e. at a constant muscle-tendon unit length) and the intermuscular (between adjacent muscles) pressure in synergistic muscles. Therefore, the pressure at the contact area of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscle was measured synchronously to the force of the whole calf musculature in the rabbit species Oryctolagus cuniculus Similar results were obtained when using a conductive pressure sensor, or a fibre-optic pressure transducer connected to a water-filled balloon. Both methods revealed a strong linear relationship between force and pressure in the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. The shape of the measured force-time and pressure-time traces was almost identical for each contraction (r=0.97). Intermuscular pressure ranged between 100 and 700 mbar (70,000 Pa) for forces up to 287 N. These pressures are similar to previous (intramuscular) recordings within skeletal muscles of different vertebrate species. Furthermore, our results suggest that the rise in intermuscular pressure during contraction may reduce the force production in muscle packages (compartments).

  11. Skeletal muscle connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline

      The connective tissue content of skeletal muscle is believed to be the major factor responsible for defining the eating quality of different meat cuts, although attempts to correlate quantifications based on traditional histological methods have not as yet been able to prove this relation....... Collagen, being the major protein in connective tissue, has been extensively investigated with regard to its relation to meat tenderness, but the results have been rather conflicting. Meat from older animals is tougher than that from younger animals, and changes in the properties of the collagen due...... that collagen plays a significant role in determining the tenderness of meat. What are we missing? Therefore, fundamental aspects of connective tissue research have been the centre of attention throughout this thesis. A holistic view has been applied, glancing at this complex tissue which has many facets...

  12. Electrical stimulation counteracts muscle decline in seniors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    .... We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function...

  13. Stretching skeletal muscle: chronic muscle lengthening through sarcomerogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Zöllner

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09[Formula: see text]m to 3.51[Formula: see text]m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance

  14. 复方樟柳碱联合地塞米松离子导入治疗眼外肌麻痹的疗效观察%Effect observation on compound anisodine hydrobromide combined with dexamethasone iontophoresis in ;treating extraocular palsy J

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋燕玲; 姜士军; 张竖

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of compound anisodine hydrobromide combined with dexamethasone iontophoresis in treatment of extraocular palsy.Methods 36 cases of extraocular palsy patient were divided into 2 groups in random.Control group used danhong injection 20ml qd, 10d a course of treatment. Continuous treatment 2 ~4 course according to patient's condition.Therapy group to plus arterial temporalis superficialis side hypodermic injection in trouble eye with 2ml compound anisodine hydrobromide combine dexamethasone iontophoresis, qd, 10 days a course.Continuous treatment 2 ~4 course according to patient's condition.To observe the diplopic get better status, position of eye and recover of eye movement status.Results In therapy group, cured 16 cases (88.9%), improved 1 case, inefficacy 1 case, total effective rate was 90%.In Control group, cured 11 cases (60%), improved 3 case, inefficacy 4 case, total effective rate was 77%.The cure rate was significant differenct between 2 groups(P <0.05).Conclusions Treatment with compound anisodine hydrobromide combined with dexamethasone iontophoresis can obviously improve the effect for extraocular palsy, has no adverse reaction or complication.%目的:观察复方樟柳碱联合地塞米松离子导入治疗眼外肌麻痹的临床疗效。方法将36例(36眼)眼外肌麻痹患者随机分为治疗组及对照组,每组各18例(18眼)。对照组全身应用活血化淤治疗,静滴丹红注射液20 ml qd,10 d为1个疗程,根据病情连续治疗2~4个疗程,治疗组加用复方樟柳碱2 ml行颞浅动脉旁注射联合地塞米松离子导入,每天1次,10 d为1个疗程,根据病情连续治疗2~4个疗程;观察两组病例复视好转情况、眼位及眼球运动恢复情况。结果治疗组18例中治愈16例(88.9%),好转1例,无效1例,总有效率90%,对照组18例中治愈11例(60%),好转3例,4例无效,总有效率77%。两组治

  15. Development of Postural Muscles and Their Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. IJkema-Paassen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of posture is a prerequisite for efficient motor performance. Posture depends on muscles capable of enduring contractions, whereas movements often require quick, forceful muscle actions. To serve these different goals, muscles contain fibers that meet these different tasks. Muscles with strong postural functions mainly consist of slow muscle fibers with a great resistance against fatigue. Flexor muscles in the leg and arm muscles are mainly composed of fast muscle fibers producing relatively large forces that are rapidly fatigable. Development of the neuromuscular system continues after birth. We discuss in the human baby and in animal experiments changes in muscle fiber properties, regression from polyneural into mononeural innervation, and developmental changes in the motoneurons of postural muscles during that period. The regression of poly-neural innervation in postural muscles and the development of dendrite bundles of their motoneurons seem to be linked to the transition from the immature into the adult-like patterns of moving and postural control.

  16. Factors in delayed muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, W M

    1977-01-01

    The possible causes of delayed muscle soreness which occur 24 to 48 hr after exercise were examined from three different approaches, each designed to test an existing hypothesis. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate the muscle spasm theory; the possibility of actual muscle cell damage was monitored by the presence of myoglobinuria, while the ratio of hydroxyproline/creatinine (OHP/Cr) in 24 hr urine collection was used as a marker for connective tissue involvement. In the first study, although all volunteers developed muscle soreness 24 and 48 hr after exercise, no change in the EMG activity of the sore muscles was observed. Myoglobin excretion was found in 88% of the subjects who developed soreness. However, in a second study, 92% of the subject who performed both moderate and heavy exercise but did not develop muscle soreness had myoglobinuria. In contrast, during a third experiment subjects on gelatin-free diets showed an increase (P less than .1) in the OHP/Cr between control (.020+/-.001) and 48 hr post-exercise (.002+/-.001, X+/-SE). Soreness resulted in all cases. When the OHP/Cr value is taken for the day of maximal soreness, the post-exercise mean increases to .024+/-.001 and the level of significance rises (P less than .005). These observations support the concept that exercise induced soreness may be related to disruption of the connective tissue elements in the muscle and/or their attachments.

  17. Muscle channelopathies and electrophysiological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Ajith; Baheti, Neeraj N.; Kuruvilla, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Myotonic syndromes and periodic paralyses are rare disorders of skeletal muscle characterized mainly by muscle stiffness or episodic attacks of weakness. Familial forms are caused by mutation in genes coding for skeletal muscle voltage ionic channels. Familial periodic paralysis and nondystrophic myotonias are disorders of skeletal muscle excitability caused by mutations in genes coding for voltage-gated ion channels. These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness (paralysis) or stiffness (myotonia). Clinical studies have identified two forms of periodic paralyses: hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP), based on changes in serum potassium levels during the attacks, and three distinct forms of myotonias: paramyotonia congenita (PC), potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM), and myotonia congenita (MC). PC and PAM have been linked to missense mutations in the SCN4A gene, which encodes α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, whereas MC is caused by mutations in the chloride channel gene (CLCN1). Exercise is known to trigger, aggravate, or relieve symptoms. Therefore, exercise can be used as a functional test in electromyography to improve the diagnosis of these muscle disorders. Abnormal changes in the compound muscle action potential can be disclosed using different exercise tests. Five electromyographic (EMG) patterns (I-V) that may be used in clinical practice as guides for molecular diagnosis are discussed. PMID:19966974

  18. Electrical stimulation and muscle strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehail, P; Duclos, C; Barat, M

    2008-07-01

    To identify the effects of application methods and indications of direct muscle electrostimulation on strength gain. Literature review and analysis of articles from Medline database with the following entries: muscular or neuromuscular, electromyostimulation, electrical stimulation, strengthening, strength training, immobilization, muscle dystrophy, bed-rest, bed-bound, knee or hip surgery, postoperative phase, cachexia, sarcopenia, and their French equivalent. Because of its specific muscle recruitment order, different from that of voluntary contraction, direct muscle electrostimulation is theoretically a complementary tool for muscle strengthening. It can be used in healthy subjects and in several affections associated with muscle function loss. Its interest seems well-established for post-traumatic or postsurgery lower-limb immobilizations but too few controlled studies have clearly shown the overall benefits of its application in other indications. Whatever the indication, superimposed or combined electrostimulation techniques are generally more efficient than electrostimulation alone. Even though widely used, the level of evidence for the efficiency of electromyostimulation is still low. For strength gains, it yielded no higher benefits than traditional strengthening methods. Its interest should be tested in medical affections leading to major muscle deconditioning or in sarcopenia.

  19. Muscle channelopathies and electrophysiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherian Ajith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic syndromes and periodic paralyses are rare disorders of skeletal muscle characterized mainly by muscle stiffness or episodic attacks of weakness. Familial forms are caused by mutation in genes coding for skeletal muscle voltage ionic channels. Familial periodic paralysis and nondystrophic myotonias are disorders of skeletal muscle excitability caused by mutations in genes coding for voltage-gated ion channels. These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness (paralysis or stiffness (myotonia. Clinical studies have identified two forms of periodic paralyses: hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP, based on changes in serum potassium levels during the attacks, and three distinct forms of myotonias: paramyotonia congenita (PC, potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM, and myotonia congenita (MC. PC and PAM have been linked to missense mutations in the SCN4A gene, which encodes α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, whereas MC is caused by mutations in the chloride channel gene (CLCN1. Exercise is known to trigger, aggravate, or relieve symptoms. Therefore, exercise can be used as a functional test in electromyography to improve the diagnosis of these muscle disorders. Abnormal changes in the compound muscle action potential can be disclosed using different exercise tests. Five electromyographic (EMG patterns (I-V that may be used in clinical practice as guides for molecular diagnosis are discussed.

  20. [Muscles and connective tissue: histology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, J-P

    2012-10-01

    Here, we give some comments about the DVD movies "Muscle Attitudes" from Endovivo productions, the movies up lighting some loss in the attention given to studies on the connective tissue, and especially them into muscles. The main characteristics of the different components in the intra-muscular connective tissue (perimysium, endomysium, epimysium) are shown here with special references to their ordered architecture and special references to their spatial distributions. This connective tissue is abundant into the muscles and is in continuity with the muscles in vicinity, with their tendons and their sheath, sticking the whole on skin. This connective tissue has also very abundant connections on the muscles fibres. It is then assumed that the connective tissue sticks every organs or cells of the locomotion system. Considering the elastic properties of the collagen fibres which are the most abundant component of connective tissue, it is possible to up light a panel of connective tissue associated functions such as the transmission of muscle contractions or the regulation of protein and energetic muscles metabolism.

  1. Bigorexia: bodybuilding and muscle dysmorphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Philip E

    2009-05-01

    Muscle dysmorphia is an emerging condition that primarily affects male bodybuilders. Such individuals obsess about being inadequately muscular. Compulsions include spending hours in the gym, squandering excessive amounts of money on ineffectual sports supplements, abnormal eating patterns or even substance abuse. In this essay, I illustrate the features of muscle dysmorphia by employing the first-person account of a male bodybuilder afflicted by this condition. I briefly outline the history of bodybuilding and examine whether the growth of this sport is linked to a growing concern with body image amongst males. I suggest that muscle dysmorphia may be a new expression of a common pathology shared with the eating disorders.

  2. Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channel Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina eSimkin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Five inherited human disorders affecting skeletal muscle contraction have been traced to mutations in the gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.4. The main symptoms of these disorders are myotonia or periodic paralysis caused by changes in skeletal muscle fiber excitability. Symptoms of these disorders vary from mild or latent disease to incapacitating or even death in severe cases. As new human sodium channel mutations corresponding to disease states become discovered, the importance of understanding the role of the sodium channel in skeletal muscle function and disease state grows.

  3. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men

  4. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men an

  5. Disease: H00838 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00838 Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) Congenital fibrosis o...2 OMIM: 135700 602078 600638 PMID:21217899 (description, gene) Cooymans P, Al-Zuhaibi S, Al-Senawi R, Ganesh A Congenital...) PMID:18214786 (description) Heidary G, Engle EC, Hunter DG Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles.

  6. Physical Rehabilitation Improves Muscle Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Seene T, Kaasik P: Role of exercise therapy in prevention of decline in aging muscle function : glucocorticoid myopathy and unloading. J Aging Res...Combination of exercise training and diet restriction normalizes limited exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function in diet-induced diabetic mice... exercise . Int J Sports Med 2014, 35(1):19–27. 25. Hourdé C, Joanne P, Medja F, Mougenot N, Jacquet A, Mouisel E, Pannerec A, Hatem S, Butler-Browne G

  7. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  8. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  9. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... next step in treatment. During surgery, the lower abdominal muscles and connective tissues are released and reattached. Some ... a Training Program Postdoctoral Training OPTI Clearinghouse OGME Development Physician Profiles Order Physician Credentialing Reports Professional Development ...

  10. Knitting and weaving artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziz, Ali; Concas, Alessandro; Khaldi, Alexandre; Stålhand, Jonas; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind’s oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices. PMID:28138542

  11. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion...... isokinetic dynamometry. DATA SOURCES: A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. STUDY SELECTION: Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had...... undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. DATA EXTRACTION: The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles...

  12. Fuel-Powered Artificial Muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Von Howard Ebron; Zhiwei Yang; Daniel J. Seyer; Mikhail E. Kozlov; Jiyoung Oh; Hui Xie; Joselito Razal; Lee J. Hall; John P. Ferraris; Alan G. MacDiarmid; Ray H. Baughman

    2006-01-01

    ... long inactivity during battery recharge. To help solve these problems, we demonstrated two types of artificial muscles that convert the chemical energy of high-energy-density fuels to mechanical energy...

  13. Muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, S; Vissing, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by fatigue and fluctuating muscle weakness as a result of impaired neuromuscular transmission (NMT). Although MG is a prototypic fatiguing disorder, little is known about how the condition affects fixed weakness, and if present, whether weakness...... is related to disease duration or gender. The aim of this study was to quantify the strength of patients with MG and investigate whether it is related to disease duration. METHODS: Eight muscle groups were tested by manual muscle testing and with a hand-held dynamometer in 38 patients with generalized MG...... and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The disease duration was recorded and compared with strength measures. RESULTS: On average, muscle strength was decreased by 28% compared with controls (Pmuscle...

  14. Contractile Properties of Esophageal Striated Muscle: Comparison with Cardiac and Skeletal Muscles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Shiina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The external muscle layer of the mammalian esophagus consists of striated muscles. We investigated the contractile properties of esophageal striated muscle by comparison with those of skeletal and cardiac muscles. Electrical field stimulation with single pulses evoked twitch-like contractile responses in esophageal muscle, similar to those in skeletal muscle in duration and similar to those in cardiac muscle in amplitude. The contractions of esophageal muscle were not affected by an inhibitor of gap junctions. Contractile responses induced by high potassium or caffeine in esophageal muscle were analogous to those in skeletal muscle. High-frequency stimulation induced a transient summation of contractions followed by sustained contractions with amplitudes similar to those of twitch-like contractions, although a large summation was observed in skeletal muscle. The results demonstrate that esophageal muscle has properties similar but not identical to those of skeletal muscle and that some specific properties may be beneficial for esophageal peristalsis.

  15. Putting muscle in DNA methylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James P Reddington; Richard R Meehan

    2011-01-01

    Over 25 years ago seminal experiments from the labs of Peter Jones and Harold Weintraub demonstrated that alteration in the DNA modification state underlie the myogenic conversion of fibroblast cell lines [1,2].This paved the way for the identification of myogenic helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins in muscle differentiation,but the mechanism by which DNA methylation regulates muscle differentiation has remained elusive [3].

  16. Simvastatin effects on skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Stride, Nis; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) content, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity were measured in simvastatin-treated patients (n = 10) and in well-matched control subjects (n = 9).......Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) content, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity were measured in simvastatin-treated patients (n = 10) and in well-matched control subjects (n = 9)....

  17. Evaluation of muscle hyperactivity of the grimacing muscles by unilateral tight eyelid closure and stapedius muscle tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Masato; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Nagai, Fumio

    2012-10-01

    Muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles, including the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles that cause crow's feet and a glabellar frown line with ageing, cannot be accurately evaluated by surface observation. In 71 subjects, this study investigated the extent to which grimacing muscles are innervated by the bilateral motor cortices, whether the corticofacial projection to the grimacing muscles affects the facially innervated stapedius muscle tone by measuring static compliance of the tympanic membrane, and whether unilateral tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles changes static compliance. Unilateral tight eyelid closure and its subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position revealed that motor neurons of the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles were innervated by the bilateral motor cortices with weak-to-strong contralateral dominance. The orbicularis oculi, corrugator supercilii, and stapedius muscles innervated by the bilateral motor cortices had increased muscle hyperactivity, which lowered the vertical medial eyebrow position and decreased the static compliance of the tympanic membrane more than those innervated by the unilateral motor cortex. Unilateral enhanced tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles in certain subjects ipsilaterally decreased the static compliance with increased contraction of the stapedius muscle, which probably occurs to immobilise the tympanic membrane and protect the inner ear from loud sound. Evaluation of unilateral tight eyelid closure and the subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position as well as a measurement of the static compliance for the stapedius muscle tone has revealed muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles.

  18. Quantitative ultrasound of denervated hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Neil G; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Poncelet, Ann N; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kliot, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Presentations to the neuromuscular clinic commonly involve hand muscle denervation, but few studies have evaluated hand muscle ultrasound. Ultrasound studies of abductor pollicis brevis, first dorsal interosseous, and abductor digit minimi were prospectively performed in a cohort of 34 patients (77 muscles) with electromyography (EMG)-confirmed denervation, compared with 58 healthy control subjects. In control subjects, muscle thickness was highly reproducible [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.88-0.98], and echogenicity was moderately reproducible (ICC = 0.542-0.686). Age, gender, and body mass index influenced muscle thickness and echogenicity. Ultrasound changes in denervated muscles correlated with the severity of EMG abnormalities. A z-score cutoff of 0 identified denervated muscles with a sensitivity of 100% and 89% for echogenicity and muscle thickness, respectively. Hand muscle ultrasound provides a noninvasive method to quantify muscle denervation and may be useful as a screening tool before EMG studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The cleidosternohyoid: a fifth infrahyoid muscle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a cleidosternohyoid muscle found bilaterally during routine dissection of a cadaver (92 year-old male of Irish descent. On the right side, the muscle originated from the clavicle with a cleidohyoid muscle. On the left side, the muscle originated from the clavicle and accompanied the inferior belly of an omohyoid muscle. On both sides the muscle inserted into the sternohyoid muscle. Since the muscle variant courses with a cleidohyoid on the right and the inferior belly of an omohyoid on the left, it is best described as a distinct fifth infrahyoid muscle rather than an accessory infrahyoid muscle. This is the first definitive case of a bilateral cleidosternohyoid reported in the literature.

  20. Assessment of muscle fatigue using electromygraphm sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Muhammad Hazimin Bin; Ping, Chew Sue; Ishak, Nur Elliza Binti; Saad, Mohd Alimi Bin Mohd; Mokhtar, Anis Shahida Niza Binti

    2017-08-01

    Muscle fatigue is condition of muscle decline in ability after undergoing any physical activity. Observation of the muscle condition of an athlete during training is crucial to prevent or minimize injury and able to achieve optimum performance in actual competition. The aim of this project is to develop a muscle monitoring system to detect muscle fatigue in swimming athlete. This device is capable to measure muscle stress level of the swimmer and at the same time provide indication of muscle fatigue level to trainer. Electromyography signal was recorded from the muscle movement while practicing the front crawl stroke repetitively. The time domain data was processed to frequency spectra in order to study the effect of muscle fatigue. The results show that the recorded EMG signal is able to sense muscle fatigue.

  1. Muscle histochemistry in chronic alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Ferraz

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two chronic acoholic patients were assessed by neurologic examination and muscle biopsy. The patients manifested proximal muscular weakness to a variable extent. One case presented as an acute bout of myopathy, according to the Manual Muscle Test, MMT. The most prominent histologic feature observed was muscle atrophy (95.3% better evidenced through the ATPase stain with the predominance of type II A fibers (71.4%. Lack of the mosaic pattern (type grouping seen in 76% of the cases and an important mitochondrial proliferation with intrasarcoplasmatic lipid accumulation in 63% of the patients. In case of acute presentation of muscle weakness the. pathological substrate is quite different, i.e. presence of myositis mainly interstitial characterized by lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate and several spots of necrosis like Zencker degeneration. Based on histologic criteria, our data suggest that: the main determinant of muscle weakness seen in chronic alcoholic patients is neurogenic in origin (alcoholic polineuropathy; the direct toxic action of ethanol under the skeletal muscle is closely related to the mitochondrial metabolism; the so-called acute alcoholic myopathy has probably viral etiology.

  2. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-12-19

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings.

  3. Morphology of peroneus tertius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S D; Joshi, S S; Athavale, S A

    2006-10-01

    Peroneus tertius (PT) muscle is peculiar to man, and man is the only member among the primates in whom this muscle occurs. The muscle is variable in its development and attachment. Because of functional demands of bipedal gait and plantigrade foot, part of extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) has migrated upwards into the leg from the dorsum of foot. PT is a muscle that evolution is rendering more important. In a total of 110 cadavers, extensor compartment of leg and dorsum of foot were dissected in both the lower limbs and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and PT muscles were dissected and displayed. PT was found to be absent in 10.5% limbs, the incidence being greater on the right side. The remaining limbs in which the PT muscle was present had a very extensive origin from lower 3/4th of extensor surface of fibula (20% on right and in 17% on left), and the EDL was very much reduced in size. In approximately 12%, the tendon of PT was thick or even thicker than the tendon of EDL. In 4%, the tendon extended beyond fifth metatarsal up to metatarsophalangeal joint of fifth toe, and in 1.5%, it extended up to the proximal phalanx of little toe. In two cases (both on the right side), where PT was absent, it was replaced by a slip from lateral margin of EDL. We conclude that PT, which is preeminently human, is extending its purchase both proximally and distally.

  4. Simple technique for maximal thoracic muscle harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, M Blair; Kaiser, Larry R; Kucharczuk, John C

    2004-04-01

    We present a modification of technique for standard muscle flap harvest, the placement of cutaneous traction sutures. This technique allows for maximal dissection of the thoracic muscles even through minimal incisions. Through improved exposure and traction, complete dissection of the muscle bed can be performed and the tissue obtained maximized. Because more muscle bulk is obtained with this technique, the need for a second muscle may be prevented.

  5. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies.

  6. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitakoji Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle, muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle. Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  7. Epifascial accessory palmaris longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengo, Cesare; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Bassetto, Franco; De Caro, Raffaele

    2006-09-01

    In hand reconstructive surgery the palmaris longus muscle is one of the most utilized donor site for tendon reconstruction procedures. However, its anatomic position is variable and anatomic variations may be responsible for median nerve compression. We report the case of a 40-year-old, right-handed woman, who presented with numbness and paresthesias in the palm and in the flexor aspect of the first, second, and third fingers of her right hand for the preceding 5 months, coinciding with increase of office work (typing). The clinical examination and radiological investigations (ultrasound and magnetic resonance) revealed a subcutaneous mass (15 mm x 2.3 mm x 6 cm), with a lenticular shape and definite edges at the level of the volar aspect of the distal third of the forearm. The fine-needle aspiration biopsy revealed the presence of striated muscle fibers. During surgery, a muscle belly was found in the epifascial plane. This muscle originated from subcutaneous septa in the middle forearm and inserted on to the superficial palmar aponeurosis with fine short tendon fibers. Exposure of the antebrachial fascia did not reveal any area of weakness or muscle herniation. The palmaris longus tendon, flexor digitorum superficialis tendons, and flexor carpi radialis tendon showed usual topography under the antebrachial fascia. The accessory muscle was excised and histology revealed unremarkable striated muscle fibers, limited by a thin connective sheath. The presence of an accessory palmaris longus (APL) located in the epifascial plane could be ascribed to an unusual migration of myoblasts during the morphogenesis. Although extremely rare, APL is worth bearing in mind as a possible cause of median nerve compression and etiology of a volar mass in the distal forearm.

  8. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  10. Choosing a skeletal muscle relaxant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon; Ginzburg, Regina

    2008-08-01

    Skeletal muscle relaxants are widely used in treating musculoskeletal conditions. However, evidence of their effectiveness consists mainly of studies with poor methodologic design. In addition, these drugs have not been proven to be superior to acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support using skeletal muscle relaxants for short-term relief of acute low back pain when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen are not effective or tolerated. Comparison studies have not shown one skeletal muscle relaxant to be superior to another. Cyclobenzaprine is the most heavily studied and has been shown to be effective for various musculoskeletal conditions. The sedative properties of tizanidine and cyclobenzaprine may benefit patients with insomnia caused by severe muscle spasms. Methocarbamol and metaxalone are less sedating, although effectiveness evidence is limited. Adverse effects, particularly dizziness and drowsiness, are consistently reported with all skeletal muscle relaxants. The potential adverse effects should be communicated clearly to the patient. Because of limited comparable effectiveness data, choice of agent should be based on side-effect profile, patient preference, abuse potential, and possible drug interactions.

  11. Muscle pathology in juvenile dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenilson Eduardo Calore

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study muscle biopsies, using histochemistry, on ten children with infantile dermatomyositis. DESIGN: Series of ten patients (of whom eight patients had received treatment and two had not were submitted to muscle biopsy in order to diagnose possible inflammatory myopathy or to detect recurrences. PLACE OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE STUDY: Public Health Service of São Paulo State. PARTICIPANTS: children with clinical features of inflammatory myopathy. INTERVENTION: biopsies were performed on the vastus lateralis using local anesthetic. Histochemistry was performed according to standardized methods. RESULTS: Architectural changes of the muscle fibers, necrosis of variable intensity and accentuated evidence of regeneration were observed in patients who had not received treatment (2 cases and in one case where muscular weakness persisted in spite of corticosteroid therapy. Necrosis and regeneration were minimal or absent in cases treated for one year or more (4 cases. In 3 cases with clinical and laboratorial recurrences, muscle necrosis and architectural changes were detected. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that muscle biopsy could aid in diagnosing infantile dermatomyositis as well as in detecting recurrences even in cases without clinical activity of the disease.

  12. Laser therapy of muscle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Munqith S; Al-Salihi, Anam Rasheed; Qasim, Amenah Wala'a

    2013-05-01

    Low-level lasers are used in general therapy and healing process due to their good photo-bio-stimulation effects. In this paper, the effects of diode laser and Nd:YAG laser on the healing process of practically managed skeletal muscle trauma has been successfully studied. Standard impact trauma was induced by using a specially designed mechanical device. The impacted muscle was left for 3 days for complete development of blunt trauma. After that it was irradiated by five laser sessions for 5 days. Two types of lasers were used; 785-nm diode laser and 1.064-nm Nd:YAG laser, both in continuous and pulsed modes. A special electronic circuit was designed and implemented to modulate the diode laser for this purpose. Tissue samples of crushed skeletal muscle have been dissected from the injured irradiated muscle then bio-chemically analyzed for the regeneration of contractile and collagenous proteins using Lowry assay for protein determination and Reddy and Enwemeka assay for hydroxyproline determination. The results showed that both lasers stimulate the regeneration capability of traumatized skeletal muscle. The diode laser in CW and pulsed modes showed better results than the Nd:YAG in accelerating the preservation of the normal tissue content of collagenous and contractile proteins beside controlling the regeneration of non-functional fibrous tissue. This study proved that the healing achieved by the laser treatment was faster than the control group by 15-20 days.

  13. Diagnosis of skeletal muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Jennifer; Fialho, Doreen; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare disorders of muscle membrane excitability. Their episodic nature may result in diagnostic difficulty and delays in diagnosis. Advances in diagnostic clinical electrophysiology combined with DNA-based diagnosis have improved diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. Ascribing pathogenic status to identified genetic variants in muscle channel genes may be complex and functional analysis, including molecular expression, may help with this. Accurate clinical and genetic diagnosis enables genetic counselling, advice regarding prognosis and aids treatment selection. An approach to accurate and efficient diagnosis is outlined. The importance of detailed clinical evaluation including careful history, examination and family history is emphasised. The role of specialised electrodiagnostics combined with DNA testing and molecular expression is considered. New potential biomarkers including muscle MRI using MRC Centre protocols are discussed. A combined diagnostic approach using careful clinical assessment, specialised neurophysiology and DNA testing will now achieve a clear diagnosis in most patients with muscle channelopathies. An accurate diagnosis enables genetic counselling and provides information regarding prognosis and treatment selection. Genetic analysis often identifies new variants of uncertain significance. In this situation, functional expression studies as part of a diagnostic service will enable determination of pathogenic status of novel genetic variants.

  14. Muscle channelopathies and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Muscle channelopathies and related disorders are neuromuscular disorders predominantly of genetic origin which are caused by mutations in ion channels or genes that play a role in muscle excitability. They include different forms of periodic paralysis which are characterized by acute and reversible attacks of muscle weakness concomitant to changes in blood potassium levels. These disorders may also present as distinguishable myotonic syndromes (slowed muscle relaxation) which have in common lack of involvement of dystrophic changes of the muscle, in contrast to dystrophia myotonica. Recent advances have been made in the diagnosis of these different disorders, which require, in addition to a careful clinical evaluation, detailed EMG and molecular study. Although these diseases are rare, they deserve attention since patients may benefit from drugs which can dramatically improve their condition. Patients may have atypical presentations, sometimes life-threatening, which may delay a proper diagnosis, mostly in the first months of life. The creation of specialized reference centers in the Western world has greatly benefited the proper recognition of these neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic effects of massage and electrotherapy on muscle tone, stiffness and muscle contraction following gastrocnemius muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joong-San

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of a combined intervention consisting of massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on gastrocnemius muscle fatigue, assessing whether the intervention improved muscle tone, stiffness, and muscle contraction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 healthy males in their 20s who were equally divided into a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group and a combined therapy group that received a combination of massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Muscle fatigue was triggered on the gastrocnemius muscle, and the effects of intervention method on muscle tone, stiffness, and muscle contraction were examined over time. [Results] Lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscle tone and stiffness significantly increased and gastrocnemius muscle contraction significantly decreased in each group immediately after fatigue was triggered on the gastrocnemius muscle. There was no difference in the effects of the two intervention methods over time. [Conclusion] This study verified that a combined therapy of massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was able to be used effectively in improving muscle tone, stiffness, muscle contraction, thereby reducing gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. PMID:28210061

  16. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MUSCLE MASS, MUSCLE STRENGTH, PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, AND MUSCLE FATIGUE RESISTANCE IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING ELDERLY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the correlations between muscle mass, muscle strength, physical performance, and muscle fatigue resistance in community-dwelling elderly people in order to elucidate factors which contribute to elderly’s performance of daily activities. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on community-dwelling elderly in Bandung from September to December 2014. One hundred and thirty elderly, 60 years old or above, were evaluated using bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure muscle mass; grip strength to measure muscle strength and muscle fatigue resistance; habitual gait speed to measure physical performance; and Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ to assess physical activity. Results: There were significant positive correlations between muscle mass (r=0,27, p=0,0019, muscle strength (r=0,26, p=0,0024, and physical performance (r=0,32, p=0,0002 with muscle fatigue resistance. Physical performance has the highest correlation based on multiple regression test (p=0,0025. In association with muscle mass, the physical activity showed a significant positive correlation (r=0,42, p=0,0000. Sarcopenia was identified in 19 (14.61% of 130 subjects. Conclusions: It is suggested that muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance influence muscle fatigue resistance.

  17. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    Body movements are mainly provided by mechanical function of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle is composed of numerous bundles of myofibers that are sheathed by intramuscular connective tissues. Each myofiber contains many myofibrils that run longitudinally along the length of the myofiber. Myofibrils are the contractile apparatus of muscle and they are composed of repeated contractile units known as sarcomeres. A sarcomere unit contains actin and myosin filaments that are spaced by the Z discs and titin protein. Mechanical function of skeletal muscle is defined by the contractile and passive properties of muscle. The contractile properties are used to characterize the amount of force generated during muscle contraction, time of force generation and time of muscle relaxation. Any factor that affects muscle contraction (such as interaction between actin and myosin filaments, homeostasis of calcium, ATP/ADP ratio, etc.) influences the contractile properties. The passive properties refer to the elastic and viscous properties (stiffness and viscosity) of the muscle in the absence of contraction. These properties are determined by the extracellular and the intracellular structural components (such as titin) and connective tissues (mainly collagen) (1-2). The contractile and passive properties are two inseparable aspects of muscle function. For example, elbow flexion is accomplished by contraction of muscles in the anterior compartment of the upper arm and passive stretch of muscles in the posterior compartment of the upper arm. To truly understand muscle function, both contractile and passive properties should be studied. The contractile and/or passive mechanical properties of muscle are often compromised in muscle diseases. A good example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle wasting disease caused by dystrophin deficiency (3). Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle cell membrane (sarcolemma) during muscle contraction (4). In the

  18. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  19. Vitamin D and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, and risk of falling in older adults. Special consideration is given to the impact of both the starting 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and the dose administered on the clinical response to supplemental vitamin D in older men and women. Based on available evidence, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels D dose range of 800-1000 IU per day has been effective in many studies; lower doses have generally been ineffective and several doses above this range have increased the risk of falls. In conclusion, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  1. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  2. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition.

  3. Relationship of Skeletal Muscle Development and Growth to Breast Muscle Myopathies: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velleman, Sandra G

    2015-12-01

    Selection in meat-type birds has focused on growth rate, muscling, and feed conversion. These strategies have made substantial improvements but have affected muscle structure, repair mechanisms, and meat quality, especially in the breast muscle. The increase in muscle fiber diameters has reduced available connective tissue spacing, reduced blood supply, and altered muscle metabolism in the breast muscle. These changes have increased muscle fiber degeneration and necrosis but have limited muscle repair mechanisms mediated by the adult myoblast (satellite cell) population of cells, likely resulting in the onset of myopathies. This review focuses on muscle growth mechanisms and how changes in the cellular development of the breast muscle may be associated with breast muscle myopathies occurring in meat-type birds.

  4. Resistance training induces qualitative changes in muscle morphology, muscle architecture, and muscle function in elderly postoperative patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Andersen, Jesper L; Dalgas, Ulrik;

    2008-01-01

    beneficial qualitative changes in muscle fiber morphology and muscle architecture in elderly postoperative patients. In contrast, rehabilitation regimes based on functional exercises and neuromuscular electrical stimulation had no effect. The present data emphasize the importance of resistance training...

  5. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia;

    2009-01-01

    storage disease type X and novel mutations in the gene encoding the muscle subunit of PGAM (PGAM2). DESIGN: Clinical, pathological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospitals and academic institutions. Patients A 37-year-old Danish man of Pakistani origin who had...... PGAM deficiency, and molecular studies revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations, a nonsense mutation and a single nucleotide deletion. Pathological studies of muscle showed mild glycogen accumulation but prominent tubular aggregates in both patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found that glycogen storage disease...

  6. No Muscle Is an Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Jane A; Ørtenblad, Niels; Hogan, Michael C;

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fatigue has been studied with a variety approaches, tools and technologies. The foci of these studies have ranged tremendously, from molecules to the entire organism. Single cell and animal models have been used to gain mechanistic insight into the fatigue process. The theme of this review...... is the concept that the mechanisms of muscle fatigue do not occur in isolation in vivo: muscular work is supported by many complex physiological systems, any of which could fail during exercise and thus contribute to fatigue. To advance our overall understanding of fatigue, a combination of models and approaches...

  7. Muscle GLUT4 in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland-Fischer, Peter; Andersen, Per Heden; Lund, Sten

    2007-01-01

    test and later a muscle biopsy. Levels of GLUT4 total protein and mRNA content were determined in muscle biopsies by polyclonal antibody labelling and RT-PCR, respectively. RESULTS: GLUT4 protein content in the cirrhosis group was not different from that of the controls, but at variance......: In cirrhosis GLUT4 protein content was quantitatively intact, while limiting glucose tolerance. This indicates loss of redundancy of the major glucose transport system, possibly related to the markedly decreased expression of its gene. Hyper-insulinemia may be a primary event. Our findings implicate...

  8. Spontaneous waves in muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2007-11-01

    Mechanical oscillations are important for many cellular processes, e.g. the beating of cilia and flagella or the sensation of sound by hair cells. These dynamic states originate from spontaneous oscillations of molecular motors. A particularly clear example of such oscillations has been observed in muscle fibers under non-physiological conditions. In that case, motor oscillations lead to contraction waves along the fiber. By a macroscopic analysis of muscle fiber dynamics we find that the spontaneous waves involve non-hydrodynamic modes. A simple microscopic model of sarcomere dynamics highlights mechanical aspects of the motor dynamics and fits with the experimental observations.

  9. Muscle cramps in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shivang S; Fallon, Michael B

    2013-11-01

    Muscle cramps are common in patients with liver disease and adversely influence quality of life. The exact mechanisms by which they occur remain unclear, although a number of pathophysiological events unique to liver disease may contribute. Clinical studies have identified alterations in 3 areas: nerve function, energy metabolism, and plasma volume/electrolytes. Treatments have focused on these particular areas with varied results. This review will focus on the clinical features of muscle cramps in patients with liver disease and review potential mechanisms and current therapies.

  10. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  11. Neural effects of muscle stretching on the spinal reflexes in multiple lower-limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugi, Yohei; Obata, Hiroki; Inoue, Daisuke; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that muscle stretching suppresses monosynaptic spinal reflex excitability in stretched muscles, its effects on non-stretched muscles is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of muscle stretching on monosynaptic spinal reflex in non-stretched muscles. Ten healthy male subjects participated in this study. Muscle stretching of the right triceps surae muscle was performed using a motor torque device for 1 minute. Three different dorsiflexion torques (at approximately 5, 10, and 15 Nm) were applied during muscle stretching. Spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded in both the lower-limb muscles before, during, and at 0 and 5 min following muscle stretching. The amplitudes of the spinal reflexes in both the stretched and non-stretched muscles in the right (ipsilateral) leg were smaller during stretching compared to before, and at 0 and 5 min after stretching. Furthermore, the degree of reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes in the right (ipsilateral) leg muscles increased significantly as the dorsiflexion torque (i.e., stretching of the right triceps surae muscles) increased. In contrast, reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes with increasing dorsiflexion torque was not seen in the left (contralateral) leg muscles. Our results clearly indicate that muscle stretching has inhibitory effects on monosynaptic spinal reflexes, not only in stretched muscles, but also in non-stretched muscles of the ipsilateral leg.

  12. PLASTICITY OF SKELETAL MUSCLE STUDIED BY STEREOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Eržen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution provides an overview of stereological methods applied in the skeletal muscle research at the Institute of Anatomy of the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana. Interested in skeletal muscle plasticity we studied three different topics: (i expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in slow and fast muscles under experimental conditions, (ii frequency of satellite cells in young and old human and rat muscles and (iii capillary supply of rat fast and slow muscles. We analysed the expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms within slow rat soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles after (i homotopic and heterotopic transplantation of both muscles, (ii low frequency electrical stimulation of the fast muscle and (iii transposition of the fast nerve to the slow muscle. The models applied were able to turn the fast muscle into a completely slow muscle, but not vice versa. One of the indicators for the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles is its satellite cell pool. The estimated parameters, number of satellite cells per unit fibre length, corrected to the reference sarcomere length (Nsc/Lfib and number of satellite cells per number of nuclei (myonuclei and satellite cell nuclei (Nsc/Nnucl indicated that the frequency of M-cadherin stained satellite cells declines in healthy old human and rat muscles compared to young muscles. To access differences in capillary densities among slow and fast muscles and slow and fast muscle fibres, we have introduced Slicer and Fakir methods, and tested them on predominantly slow and fast rat muscles. Discussing three different topics that require different approach, the present paper reflects the three decades of the development of stereological methods: 2D analysis by simple point counting in the 70's, the disector in the 80's and virtual spatial probes in the 90's. In all methods the interactive computer assisted approach was utilised.

  13. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyewon; Jee, Sungju; Park, Soo Ho; Ahn, Seung-Chan; Im, Juneho; Sohn, Min Kyun

    2016-12-01

    To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all pquantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US.

  14. Variations in pectoral girdle muscles in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alić, I; Trbojević Vukičević, T; Đuras, M; Kužir, S; Fazarinc, G; Gjurčević Kantura, V

    2014-02-01

    Muscle variations take the form of additional muscle bundle or belly, unusual muscle origin or termination, as well as complete muscle absence. Knowledge of such variations not only has clinical importance for guiding surgery, but also can help reveal phylogenetic relationships. To improve our understanding of muscle variations in dogs, 57 medium-sized, cross-breed male and female adult animals were dissected as part of a gross anatomy course between 2005 and 2011. Variations in pectoral girdle muscles were observed in 7 (12.3%) dogs and took the form of an additional muscle bundle in the brachiocephalicus muscle (n = 2), in the omotransversarius muscle (n = 2), in the cervical part of the rhomboideus muscle (n = 2) and in the cervical part of the serratus ventralis muscle (n = 1). Muscle variation was bilateral in only one dog; it involved the omotransversarius muscle. The variations did not seem to be sex dependent. Such variations can appear regularly in dogs and should be taken into consideration during anatomical dissection. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Sleep disturbances in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Westeneng, H.J.; Hal, M.A. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Overeem, S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a relatively common mitochondrial disorder. In addition to extraocular muscle weakness, various other organs can typically be affected, including laryngeal and limb muscles, cerebrum, cerebellum, and peripheral nerves. Given this mul

  16. Nature and frequency of respiratory involvement in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Cuppen, F.; Engelen, B.G. van

    2011-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a relatively common mitochondrial disorder. Weakness of the extra-ocular, limb girdle and laryngeal muscles are established clinical features. Respiratory muscle involvement however has never been studied systematically, even though respiratory

  17. Muscle force recovery in relation to muscle oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufland, Pierre; Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Buchheit, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of human muscle reoxygenation on force recovery following a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Ten athletes (22·9 ± 4·0 years) executed a plantar-flexion sequence including two repeated MVCs [i.e. a 30-s MVC (MVC(30)) followed by a 10-s MVC (MVC(10))] separated by 10, 30, 60, 120 or 300 s of passive recovery. A 10-min passive recovery period was allowed between each MVC sequence. This procedure was randomly repeated with two different recovery conditions: without (CON) or with (OCC) arterial occlusion of the medial gastrocnemius. During OCC, the occlusion was maintained from the end of MVC(30) to the end of MVC(10). Muscle oxygenation (Near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, [Hb(diff) ]) was continuously measured during all MVC sequences and expressed as a percentage of the maximal changes in optical density observed during MVC(30). Maximal Torque was analysed at the start of each contraction. Torque during each MVC(10) was expressed as a percentage of the Torque during the previous MVC(30). Torque recovery was complete within 300 s after MVC(30) during CON (MVC(10) = 101·8 ± 5·0%); 88·6 ± 8·9% of the Torque was recovered during OCC (P = 0·005). There was also a moderate correlation between absolute level of muscle oxygenation and Torque (r = 0·32 (90% CI, 0·09;0·52), P = 0·02). Present findings confirm the role of human muscle oxygenation in muscular force recovery during repeated-maximal efforts. However, the correlation between absolute muscle oxygenation and force level during recovery is only moderate, suggesting that other mechanisms are likely involved in the force recovery process.

  18. Myofascial force transmission between antagonistic rat lower limb muscles: Effects of single muscle or muscle group lengthening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M; Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M.; Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of lengthening of the whole group of anterior crural muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscles (TA + EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)) on myofascial interaction between synergistic EDL and TA + EHL muscles, and on myofascial force transmission between anterior c

  19. Pharmacology of airway smooth muscle proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Reinoud; Roscioni, Sara S.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Pera, Tonio; Schmidt, Martina; Schaafsma, Dedmer; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    2008-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle thickening is a pathological feature that contributes significantly to airflow limitation and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. Ongoing research efforts aimed at identifying the mechanisms responsible for the increased airway smooth muscle mass have indicated that hyperplasi

  20. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Eccentric exercise, in which the muscles exert force by lengthening, is associated with delayed onset muscle soreness. How soreness occurs, how recovery proceeds, and what precautions athletes should take are described. (Author/MT)

  1. Respiratory Action of the Intercostal Muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    André De Troyer; Peter A. Kirkwood; Theodore A. Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical advantages of the external and internal intercostals depend partly on the orientation of the muscle but mostly on interspace number and the position of the muscle within each interspace...

  2. Muscle development in mdx mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangain, J; Vrbova, G

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and contractile properties of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from X-linked muscular dystrophic (mdx) mutant mice at different stages of development are compared to those of muscles from normal control animals. There is no difference between the tension output, speeds of contraction and relaxation, and weight of TA muscles from mutant adults and normal control animals. However, it is found that in 3-4-week-old mutant animals, tension output and muscle weight are very much reduced, and half relaxation time is prolonged. Thus, during this stage of development, muscles from mdx mice do not function properly. Histological examination of these muscles provides further evidence that, in these animals, rapid muscle destruction occurs at a particular time of development and that it is followed by complete recovery. This new mutant therefore presents an interesting case of muscle destruction and rapid regeneration. However, it is not an adequate model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  3. The characteristics of a pneumatic muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrala, Dawid

    The article presents static and dynamic characteristics of pneumatic muscles. It presents the structure of the laboratory stand used to test pneumatic muscles. It discusses the methodology for determination of static and dynamic characteristics. The paper also illustrates characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles length and operating pressure, at a constant loading force (isotonic characteristics). It presents characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles shortening and values of loading forces, at a constant operational pressure (isobaric characteristics). It also shows the dependence of force generated by the muscle on the operating pressure, at a constant value of pneumatic muscles shortening (isometric characteristics). The paper also presents dynamic characteristics of a pneumatic muscle showing the response of an object to a gradual change in the operating pressure, at a constant loading force acting on the pneumatic muscle.

  4. Esterase profile of human masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Vilmann, H

    1988-01-01

    The esterase profile of fresh human masseter muscle was investigated by use of histochemistry and electrophoresis. The histochemical methods included reactions for alpha-naphthyl esterase, myofibrillar ATPase, reverse myofibrillar ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. In frozen sections of the muscl...

  5. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overstretched. Sprains are an overstretching or a partial tear of the ligaments. Strains usually happen when a person takes part in a strenuous activity when the muscles haven't properly warmed up or the muscle ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  7. The characteristics of a pneumatic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrala Dawid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents static and dynamic characteristics of pneumatic muscles. It presents the structure of the laboratory stand used to test pneumatic muscles. It discusses the methodology for determination of static and dynamic characteristics. The paper also illustrates characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles length and operating pressure, at a constant loading force (isotonic characteristics. It presents characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles shortening and values of loading forces, at a constant operational pressure (isobaric characteristics. It also shows the dependence of force generated by the muscle on the operating pressure, at a constant value of pneumatic muscles shortening (isometric characteristics. The paper also presents dynamic characteristics of a pneumatic muscle showing the response of an object to a gradual change in the operating pressure, at a constant loading force acting on the pneumatic muscle.

  8. Signaling in Muscle Atrophy and Hypertrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Sandri

    2008-01-01

    Muscle performance is influenced by turnover of contractile proteins. Production of new myofibrils and degradation of existing proteins is a delicate balance, which, depending on the condition, can promote muscle growth or loss...

  9. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powers, Scott K; Wiggs, Michael P; Duarte, Jose A; Zergeroglu, A Murat; Demirel, Haydar A

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals...

  10. Scientists Create Clothing with 'Knitted' Muscle Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163272.html Scientists Create Clothing With 'Knitted' Muscle Power Fabric reacts to low voltage charge and could ... techniques that one day might help provide muscle power to disabled people or seniors who have trouble ...

  11. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    This PhD thesis is based on research conducted at the University of Copenhagen and Helene Elsass Center from 2012 to 2015. Measurements and treatment of passive muscle stiffness in people with cerebral palsy (CP) comprise the focus of the thesis. The thesis summarizes the results from four studies......, which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements. 2) The association between increased...... passive muscle, muscle strength and gait function in adults with CP 3) The effect of resistance training and gait training accordingly on muscle strength, passive muscle stiffness and functional gait in adults with CP. The first part of the thesis defines reflex mediated stiffness and passive muscle...

  12. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  13. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartee, Gregory D; Hepple, Russell T; Bamman, Marcas M

    2016-01-01

    caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial...... respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes "healthy aging" by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle....

  14. STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF SKELETAL MUSCLE IN COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita eMathur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30-40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species, altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function.

  15. Mechanisms of exertional fatigue in muscle glycogenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Haller, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    concentrations of extracellular potassium in exercising muscle and (3) exaggerated accumulation of ADP during exercise that may inhibit sodium-potassium and calcium-ATPases. Disorders of muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis reveal the crucial role of these metabolic processes for supplying both anaerobic...... and aerobic energy for muscle contraction; and the pathological fatigue that occurs when glycogenolysis and/or glycolysis is blocked imply an important role for theses metabolic pathways in normal muscle fatigue....

  16. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  17. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Scott K.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent exp...

  18. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd. Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Existing models (such as bed rest) of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive. We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power, or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre-and postflightastronaut performance data for the same tasks. Splineregression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/BW of 79 J/kg, isokineticknee extension (KE)/BW of 6 Nm/kg, and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg.Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of relative strength has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function, for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant strength thresholds.

  19. [Antisynthetase syndrome without muscle involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júdez Navarro, Enrique; Martínez Carretero, Myriam; Martínez Jiménez, Gonzalo Fidel

    2007-11-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a well defined syndrome characterized by the presence of interstitial lung disease in association with arthritis, miositis, mechanic's hands and Ruynaud's phenomenon in the presence of antisynthetase antibodies, especially Ac anti-Jo1. We described the case of a 68-year-old man with this syndrome in the absence of inflammatory muscle disease.

  20. Engineering vascularized skeletal muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Macdonald, Mara; Garfein, Evan S.; Kohane, Daniel S.; Darland, Diane C.; Marini, Robert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Mulligan, Richard C.; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Langer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in engineering thick, complex tissues such as muscle is the need to vascularize the tissue in vitro. Vascularization in vitro could maintain cell viability during tissue growth, induce structural organization and promote vascularization upon implantation. Here we describe

  1. Muscle mechanics and neuromuscular control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the properties of the mechanical system, especially muscle elasticity and limb mass, to a large degree determine force output and movement. This makes the control demands of the central nervous system simpler and more robust. In human triceps surae, a

  2. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  3. Quantitative muscle ultrasound and muscle force in healthy children: A 4-year follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.; Jansen, M; Janssen, H.; Raijmann, W.; Alfen, N. van; Pillen, S.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: No longitudinal data on the normal development of muscle thickness (MT), quantitative muscle ultrasound echo intensity (EI), and muscle force (MF) in healthy children are yet available. METHODS: Reference values of MT, EI, and MF of 4 muscles from infancy to age 16 years were establish

  4. Muscle fatigue in fibromyalgia is in the brain, not in the muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Elisabeth; Amris, Kirstine; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    To investigate relationships between perceived and objectively measured muscle fatigue during exhausting muscle contractions in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls (HC).......To investigate relationships between perceived and objectively measured muscle fatigue during exhausting muscle contractions in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls (HC)....

  5. Classification of the intrafusal muscle fibres in the frog muscle spindle: histochemical and immunofluorescent studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, A; Fujitsuka, N; Sokabe, M; Naruse, K; Nomura, K; Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1990-01-01

    Intrafusal muscle fibres from bull-frog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were classified into three types using the histochemical, immunofluorescent and morphological characteristics, with reference to the extrafusal muscle fibres, which were classified into five types in accordance with Rowlerson & Spurway (1988). Immunofluorescent reactions with antibodies against slow or fast myosins obtained from anterior or posterior latissimus dorsi muscles (ALD or PLD), respectively,...

  6. Integrated expression analysis of muscle hypertrophy identifies Asb2 as a negative regulator of muscle mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Jonathan R.; Watt, Kevin I.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Chaudhuri, Rima; Ryall, James G.; Cunningham, Louise; Qian, Hongwei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; James, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling network is a critical regulator of skeletal muscle mass and function and, thus, is an attractive therapeutic target for combating muscle disease, but the underlying mechanisms of action remain undetermined. We report that follistatin-based interventions (which modulate TGF-β network activity) can promote muscle hypertrophy that ameliorates aging-associated muscle wasting. However, the muscles of old sarcopenic mice demonstrate reduced response to follistatin compared with healthy young-adult musculature. Quantitative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of young-adult muscles identified a transcription/translation signature elicited by follistatin exposure, which included repression of ankyrin repeat and SOCS box protein 2 (Asb2). Increasing expression of ASB2 reduced muscle mass, thereby demonstrating that Asb2 is a TGF-β network–responsive negative regulator of muscle mass. In contrast to young-adult muscles, sarcopenic muscles do not exhibit reduced ASB2 abundance with follistatin exposure. Moreover, preventing repression of ASB2 in young-adult muscles diminished follistatin-induced muscle hypertrophy. These findings provide insight into the program of transcription and translation events governing follistatin-mediated adaptation of skeletal muscle attributes and identify Asb2 as a regulator of muscle mass implicated in the potential mechanistic dysfunction between follistatin-mediated muscle growth in young and old muscles. PMID:27182554

  7. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  8. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  9. Intramuscular variation in fresh ham muscle color

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experiment was conducted to characterize a defect involving pale muscle tissue in the superficial, ventral portion of ham muscles, resulting in two-toned appearance of cured ham products. Biceps femoris muscles (n = 200), representing 3 production systems, were obtained from the ham-boning lin...

  10. Breast muscle tissue characteristics in growing broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cell development in broilers influences growth rate, breast meat yield, and meat quality. The objective of this study was to characterize muscle tissue changes in breast muscles from two commercial lines of broilers from 21 to 56 days of age. The experiment was designed as a 2×2×6 factorial...

  11. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  12. Primary psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Amy; Lau, Kenneth K; Korman, Tony M; Kornman, Tony; Wallace, Euan M; Polyakov, Alex

    2008-12-01

    Primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess formation is very uncommon during pregnancy. We present a case of a primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy causing back pain with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Understanding the clinical presentation of iliacus-psoas muscle abscess helps with considering it in the differential diagnosis of back pain during pregnancy.

  13. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decide to move, the motor cortex sends an electrical signal through the spinal cord and peripheral nerves to the muscles, causing them to contract. The motor cortex on the right side of the brain controls the muscles on the left side of the body and vice versa. The cerebellum coordinates the muscle ...

  14. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  15. Interleukin-6 myokine signaling in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Scheele, Camilla; Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    been associated with stimulation of hypertrophic muscle growth and myogenesis through regulation of the proliferative capacity of muscle stem cells. Additional beneficial effects of IL-6 include regulation of energy metabolism, which is related to the capacity of actively contracting muscle...

  16. Effect of transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation on postoperative muscle mass and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, O; Edvardsen, L; Jensen, F

    1996-01-01

    In an experimental study, 13 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were given postoperative transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation (TEMS) to the quadriceps femoris muscle on one leg; the opposite leg served as control. Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle protein...... muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass after abdominal surgery and should be evaluated in other catabolic states with muscle wasting....... synthesis were assessed by computed tomography and ribosome analysis of percutaneous muscle biopsies before surgery and on the sixth postoperative day. The percentage of polyribosomes in the ribosome suspension decreased significantly (P

  17. In cirrhotic patients reduced muscle strength is unrelated to muscle capacity for ATP turnover suggesting a central limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin; Nielsen, H B; Secher, Niels H.

    2011-01-01

      We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria.......  We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria....

  18. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (PBlood flow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability.

  19. A Case Report of the Angiosarcoma Involving Epicranial Muscle and Fascia : Is the Occipitofrontalis Muscle Composed of Two Different Muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Hui Joong

    2016-01-01

    The occipitofrontalis muscle is generally regarded as one muscle composed of two muscle bellies joined through the galea aponeurotica. However, two muscle bellies have different embryological origin, anatomical function and innervations. We report a case of angiosarcoma of the scalp in a 63-year-old man whose MR showed that the superficial fascia overlying the occipital belly becomes the temporoparietal fascia and ends at the superior end of the frontal belly. Beneath the superficial fascia, the occipital belly of the occipitofrontalis muscle becomes the galea aponeurotica and inserts into the underside of the frontal belly. The presented case report supported the concept of which the occipitofrontalis muscle appears to be composed of two anatomically different muscles.

  20. Muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Kazunori; Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; Chen, Trevor C

    2011-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) induces muscle damage that is characterised by histological alterations of muscle fibres and connective tissue, increases in circulating creatine kinase (CK) activity, decreases in muscle strength and development of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Muscle damage is induced not only by eccentric contractions with ES but also by isometric contractions evoked by ES. Muscle damage profile following 40 isometric contractions of the knee extensors is similar between pulsed current (75 Hz, 400 μs) and alternating current (2.5 kHz delivered at 75 Hz, 400 μs) ES for similar force output. When comparing maximal voluntary and ES-evoked (75 Hz, 200 μs) 50 isometric contractions of the elbow flexors, ES results in greater decreases in maximal voluntary contraction strength, increases in plasma CK activity and DOMS. It appears that the magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES-evoked isometric contractions is comparable to that induced by maximal voluntary eccentric contractions, although the volume of affected muscles in ES is not as large as that of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. It seems likely that the muscle damage in ES is associated with high mechanical stress on the activated muscle fibres due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment (i.e., non-selective, synchronous and spatially fixed manner). The magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES is significantly reduced when the second ES bout is performed 2-4 weeks later. It is possible to attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage by "pre-conditioning" muscles, so that muscle damage should not limit the use of ES in training and rehabilitation.

  1. Functional morphology of the thoracolumbar transversospinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon; Stringer, Mark D; Duxson, Marilyn

    2011-07-15

    STUDY DESIGN. A qualitative and semiquantitative study of the morphology of the human thoracolumbar transversospinal (TSP) muscles. OBJECTIVE. To further define the functional morphology of the thoracolumbar TSP muscles. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. The TSP muscle group plays an important role in vertebral function but few studies have rigorously investigated their morphology throughout the thoracolumbar region and details on the location of motor endplates (MEPs) and fiber types are sparse. METHODS. Thoracolumbar TSP muscles were examined by microdissection in five cadavers (seven sides). MEPs were identified using acetylcholinesterase histochemistry in muscles between T5 and S4 unilaterally in two cadavers. The relative proportions of type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers were determined using immunohistochemistry on whole cross sections of every TSP muscle from one side of one cadaver (T5-S4). RESULTS.TSP morphology was homogeneous and consistent throughout the thoracolumbar region. Notable differences to standard descriptions included: (1) consistent attachments between muscles; (2) no discrete cleavage planes between muscles; and (3) attachment sites over the sacrum and to lumbar zygapophysial joints. Previously undescribed small muscles were found attaching to the medial sacrum. All TSP muscles were multipennate, with fibers arranged in parallel having one MEP per muscle fiber. Muscles were highly aerobic (mean proportion of type I fibers 89%), with the proportion of type I fibers decreasing caudally. A significantly greater proportion of type I fibers were found in the midthoracic compared to the low lumbar regions. CONCLUSION. The complex morphology of the TSP muscles indicates that they would be better classified as spinotransverse muscles. They are multipennate, highly aerobic, with fibers organized in parallel, an arrangement lending itself to "fine-tuning" of vertebral movements. Understanding their morphology has implications for investigation

  2. Muscle involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindehammar, H; Lindvall, B

    2004-12-01

    An observational study of changes in muscle structure and the relation to muscle strength in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Fifteen children and teenagers (eight girls and seven boys) with JIA, aged 9-19 yr (mean age 16.1), were studied. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the anterior tibial muscle and were examined using histopathological and immunohistochemical methods. Muscle fibre types were classified and fibre areas measured. As markers of inflammation, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were analysed. Results were compared with biopsies from the gastrocnemius muscle in 33 young (19-23 yr) healthy controls. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strengths were measured in ankle dorsiflexion. Strength was compared with reference values for healthy age-matched controls. Nerve conduction velocities were recorded in the peroneal and sural nerves. Four of the 15 muscle biopsies were morphologically normal. Eleven biopsies showed minor unspecific changes. Two of these also showed minor signs of inflammation. MHC class II expression was found in 4/15 patients, which was significantly more than in the healthy controls (P = 0.0143). The expression of MHC class I and MAC did not differ from that in the controls. The mean area of type I fibres was lower than that of type IIA fibres in 12/13 biopsies. Muscle strength was significantly reduced in the patient group. There was a significant positive correlation between muscle fibre area and muscle strength. Nerve conduction studies were normal in all cases. Changes in leg muscle biopsies appear to be common in children and teenagers with JIA. The presence of inflammatory cells in the muscle and expression of MHC class II on muscle fibres may be a sign of inflammatory myopathy. There are no findings of type II muscle fibre hypotrophy or neuropathy, as in adults with RA.

  3. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells improve muscle function in a skeletal muscle re-injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Andrade

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively. Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model.

  4. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  5. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies.

  6. New perspectives of studying gastrointestinal muscle function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hans Gregersen; Donghua Liao

    2006-01-01

    The motor function of the gastrointestinal tract has primarily been studied using manometry and radiography,though more indirect tests have also been applied. Manometry and radiography do not provide detailed information about the muscle properties as can be assessed from studies of muscle properties in muscle strips in vitro. In recent years a technique based on impedance planimetric mEasurement of pressure-cross-sectional area relations in a distending bag has proven to provide more detailed information about the muscle function in vivo. This review shows examples of new muscle function analysis such as length-tension diagrams, forcevelocity curves and preload-afterload diagrams.

  7. Emerin increase in regenerating muscle fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Squarzoni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The fate of emerin during skeletal muscle regeneration was investigated in an animal model by means of crush injury. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and mRNA analysis demonstrated that emerin level is increased in regenerating rat muscle fibers with respect to normal mature myofibers. This finding suggests an involvement of emerin during the muscle fiber regeneration process, in analogy with its reported involvement in muscle cell differentiation in vitro. The impairment of skeletal muscle physiological regeneration or reorganization could be a possible pathogenetic mechanism for Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

  8. Muscle coordination changes during intermittent cycling sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Basset, Fabien A; Falgairette, Guy

    2005-06-03

    Maximal muscle power is reported to decrease during explosive cyclical exercises owing to metabolic disturbances, muscle damage, and adjustments in the efferent neural command. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of inter-muscle coordination in fatigue occurrence during 10 intermittent 6-s cycling sprints, with 30-s recovery through electromyographic activity (EMG). Results showed a decrease in peak power output with sprint repetitions (sprint 1 versus sprint 10: -11%, Pcycling sprints of short duration, decreased possibly due to the inability of muscles to maintain maximal force. This reduction in maximal power output occurred in parallel to changes in the muscle coordination pattern after fatigue.

  9. Procedural Options for Measuring Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindova S.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to provide alternative means of measurement and evaluation of muscle strength in rehabilitation practice and diagnostics. In the last few years many electronic devices for evaluation of muscle strength have developed. Contemporary studies have shown that in addition to the standard manual muscle testing muscle strength can be assessed more objectively and analytically using electronic dynamometers and equipment. The strain gauges are used as a tool of precision in the industry that allows measurement of mechanical loads by dynamometers. By using these tools is possible to obtain continuous digital measurement and recording of muscle strength.

  10. Impact of weightlessness on muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.

    1995-01-01

    The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent function of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.

  11. A variation of the palmaris profundus muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark ME

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During routine anatomical dissection of the anterior compartment of the forearm region, a tendinous-musculo-tendinous muscle was found on the right forearm originating from the medial aspect of the radial shaft and inserting into the palmar aponeurosis. The muscle coursed deep to pronator teres muscle, parallel and lateral to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle and deep to the tendon of the flexor carpi radialis. Distally, the muscle tendon coursed under the flexor retinaculum and it was invested with the median nerve by a common fascial sheath. The muscle was found in the presence of an intact palmaris longus muscle. Because of its attachments and course, the muscle was classified as a palmaris profundus muscle. Several subtypes of palmaris profundus muscles have been reported. To our knowledge this is the first case of a palmaris profundus with a tendon originating from the medial aspect of the radial diaphysis, a muscular portion and a distal tendon inserting in the palmar aponeurosis. Anatomical variations of muscles in the flexor compartment of the forearm may have functional, diagnostic, and surgical implications.

  12. Pathophysiology of muscle dysfunction in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Agustí, Alvar; Roca, Josep

    2013-05-01

    Muscle dysfunction often occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may involve both respiratory and locomotor (peripheral) muscles. The loss of strength and/or endurance in the former can lead to ventilatory insufficiency, whereas in the latter it limits exercise capacity and activities of daily life. Muscle dysfunction is the consequence of complex interactions between local and systemic factors, frequently coexisting in COPD patients. Pulmonary hyperinflation along with the increase in work of breathing that occur in COPD appear as the main contributing factors to respiratory muscle dysfunction. By contrast, deconditioning seems to play a key role in peripheral muscle dysfunction. However, additional systemic factors, including tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, exercise, exacerbations, nutritional and gas exchange abnormalities, anabolic insufficiency, comorbidities and drugs, can also influence the function of both respiratory and peripheral muscles, by inducing modifications in their local microenvironment. Under all these circumstances, protein metabolism imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammatory events, as well as muscle injury may occur, determining the final structure and modulating the function of different muscle groups. Respiratory muscles show signs of injury as well as an increase in several elements involved in aerobic metabolism (proportion of type I fibers, capillary density, and aerobic enzyme activity) whereas limb muscles exhibit a loss of the same elements, injury, and a reduction in fiber size. In the present review we examine the current state of the art of the pathophysiology of muscle dysfunction in COPD.

  13. Can antioxidants protect against disuse muscle atrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K

    2014-11-01

    Long periods of skeletal muscle inactivity (e.g. prolonged bed rest or limb immobilization) results in a loss of muscle protein and fibre atrophy. This disuse-induced muscle atrophy is due to both a decrease in protein synthesis and increased protein breakdown. Although numerous factors contribute to the regulation of the rates of protein breakdown and synthesis in skeletal muscle, it has been established that prolonged muscle inactivity results in increased radical production in the inactive muscle fibres. Further, this increase in radical production plays an important role in the regulation of redox-sensitive signalling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and proteolysis in skeletal muscle. Indeed, it was suggested over 20 years ago that antioxidant supplementation has the potential to protect skeletal muscles against inactivity-induced fibre atrophy. Since this original proposal, experimental evidence has implied that a few compounds with antioxidant properties are capable of delaying inactivity-induced muscle atrophy. The objective of this review is to discuss the role that radicals play in the regulation of inactivity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and to provide an analysis of the recent literature indicating that specific antioxidants have the potential to defer disuse muscle atrophy.

  14. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent experiments have provided direct evidence connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to muscle atrophy. Numerous studies have described changes in mitochondria shape, number, and function in skeletal muscles exposed to prolonged periods of inactivity. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that increased mitochondrial ROS production plays a key signaling role in both immobilization-induced limb muscle atrophy and diaphragmatic atrophy occurring during prolonged mechanical ventilation. Moreover, new evidence reveals that, during denervation-induced muscle atrophy, increased mitochondrial fragmentation due to fission is a required signaling event that activates the AMPK-FoxO3 signaling axis, which induces the expression of atrophy genes, protein breakdown, and ultimately muscle atrophy. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of future research to better understand the mitochondrial signaling mechanisms that contribute to disuse muscle atrophy and to develop novel therapeutic interventions for prevention of inactivity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:22395111

  15. Impact of weightlessness on muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.

    1995-01-01

    The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent function of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.

  16. Skeletal muscle regeneration in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossola, Maurizio; Marzetti, Emanuele; Rosa, Fausto; Pacelli, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Muscle wasting is the most important phenotypic and clinical feature of cancer cachexia, and the principal cause of impaired physical function, fatigue, and respiratory complications. Muscle loss has been attributed to a variable combination of reduced nutritional intake and an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic processes. It has been suggested that defective skeletal muscle regeneration may also contribute to muscle wasting in cancer patients. However, there is little in vitro or in vivo data available, in either animals or in humans, regarding skeletal muscle regeneration in cancer wasting. The aim of the present review is to define the role of skeletal muscle regeneration in the muscle wasting of cancer patients and to determine possible therapeutic implications.

  17. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  18. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial function. Therefore, this study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in the smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cardiac......, skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), psmooth muscle (222±13; 115±2; 48±2 umol•g(-1)•min(-1), p

  19. Diagnosis and new treatment in muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Hanna, M G; Fontaine, B

    2009-04-01

    The skeletal muscle fibre membrane plays a major role in muscle contraction by generating and propagating action potentials, and linking the latter to the release of intracellular calcium stores which triggers mechanical contraction. This function relies on the proper functioning of ion channels. In the last two decades, diseases caused by mutations in muscle ion channel genes have been identified, the so-called muscle channelopathies. Even though the pathophysiology of muscle channelopathies is not completely elucidated, major advances have been made in their understanding, thus linking patient symptoms and neurophysiology with abnormal functioning of the muscle membrane. This has facilitated significant progress both in the diagnosis of these disorders and in the rationale for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we will focus on diagnosis and treatments of muscle channelopathies of relevance to the clinical neurologist.

  20. Topographic study of the sphenomandibular muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raulino Naves Borges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal muscle is housed in the fossa of the bone bearing its name – the temporal bone. Its origin, body, and insertion have been well studied, and it has been described as a muscle consisting of three bundles and responsible for various functions. The advancement of technology has allowed the observation of yet another muscle next to this bundle of fi bers and above the temporal muscle, namely the sphenomandibular muscle. The present study was designed to study the topography of the sphenomandibular muscle. Ten anatomical sets (fi ve cadavers were dissected with the intention of displaying the topography of the temporal and sphenomandibular muscles using the techniques of cutting and folding and conventional cross cuts. The folding of the structures and mapping of the muscles was carried out on four cadavers, analyzing their origins and describing their bodies and insertions. On another cadaver, cross-sectional (horizontal, 2 mm-thick slices were made in a sequential manner. We observed the topography of the muscle and its relationship with adjacent structures. The sphenomandibular muscle was found to be independent of the temporal muscle, for its origin is in the zygomatic-frontal complex, lateral to the orbit and overlaying the fi ber of the anterior bundle of the temporal muscle. Its body is separated from the body of the temporal muscle by a thin fascia and is inserted on an oblique line external to the mandible presenting, therefore, its origin, body, and insertion independent of the origin, body, and insertion of the temporal muscle.

  1. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Thompson Wright

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant muscle proteins (e.g. titin, nebulin, and obscurin play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion ranging from 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level.

  2. The Gradual Expansion Muscle Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    defects can usu- ally be obtained with a rotational flap , larger size defects commonly require free tissue transfer. A number of techni- ques have...feasible.21,22 Because limb salvage situations occur in which rota- tional muscle coverage is inadequate and free flap coverage is less desirable, we...larger defects which previously would have required free tissue transfer. Surgical Technique The GEM flap for large soft tissue defects of the leg requires

  3. Intracellular Acidosis Enhances the Excitability of Working Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Thomas H.; Nielsen, Ole B.; Lamb, Graham D.; Stephenson, D. George

    2004-08-01

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  4. Intracellular acidosis enhances the excitability of working muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Thomas H; Nielsen, Ole B; Lamb, Graham D; Stephenson, D George

    2004-08-20

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  5. Semimembranosus muscle herniation: a rare case with emphasis on muscle biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naffaa, Lena [American University of Beirut, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut (Lebanon); Moukaddam, Hicham [Saint Rita Medical Center, Lima, OH (United States); Samim, Mohammad [New York University, Department of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States); Lemieux, Aaron [University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA (United States); Smitaman, Edward [University of California, San Diego, Teleradiology and Education Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Muscle herniations are rare and most reported cases involve muscles of the lower leg. We use a case of muscle herniation involving the semimembranosus muscle, presenting as a painful mass in an adolescent male after an unspecified American football injury, to highlight a simple concept of muscle biomechanics as it pertains to muscle hernia(s): decreased traction upon muscle fibers can increase conspicuity of muscle herniation(s) - this allows a better understanding of the apt provocative maneuvers to employ, during dynamic ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, in order to maximize diagnostic yield and, thereby, limit patient morbidity related to any muscle herniation. Our patient subsequently underwent successful decompressive fasciotomy and has since returned to his normal daily activities. (orig.)

  6. Postinjection Muscle Fibrosis from Lupron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Everest

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 6.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty (CPP, which signifies the onset of secondary sexual characteristics before the age of eight in females and the age of nine in males as a result of stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Her case is likely related to her adoption, as children who are adopted internationally have much higher rates of CPP. She had left breast development at Tanner Stage 2, adult body odor, and mildly advanced bone age. In order to halt puberty and maximize adult height, she was prescribed a gonadotropin releasing hormone analog, the first line treatment for CPP. She was administered Lupron (leuprolide acetate Depot-Ped (3 months intramuscularly. After her second injection, she developed swelling and muscle pain at the injection site on her right thigh. She also reported an impaired ability to walk. She was diagnosed with muscle fibrosis. This is the first reported case of muscle fibrosis resulting from Lupron injection.

  7. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  8. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K(+) levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are "channelopathies" caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1), and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, and Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  9. The role of passive muscle stiffness in symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Kremenic, I J; Nicholas, S J; Gleim, G W

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether passive stiffness of an eccentrically exercising muscle group affects the subsequent symptoms of muscle damage. Passive hamstring muscle stiffness was measured during an instrumented straight-leg-raise stretch in 20 subjects (11 men and 9 women) who were subsequently classified as "stiff" (N = 7), "normal" (N = 6), or "compliant" (N = 7). Passive stiffness was 78% higher in the stiff subjects (36.2 +/- 3.3 N.m.rad(-1)) compared with the compliant subjects (20.3 +/- 1.8 N.m.rad(-1)). Subjects then performed six sets of 10 isokinetic (2.6 rad.s(-1)) submaximal (60% maximal voluntary contraction) eccentric actions of the hamstring muscle group. Symptoms of muscle damage were documented by changes in isometric hamstring muscle strength, pain, muscle tenderness, and creatine kinase activity on the following 3 days. Strength loss, pain, muscle tenderness, and creatine kinase activity were significantly greater in the stiff compared with the compliant subjects on the days after eccentric exercise. Greater symptoms of muscle damage in subjects with stiffer hamstring muscles are consistent with the sarcomere strain theory of muscle damage. The present study provides experimental evidence of an association between flexibility and muscle injury. Muscle stiffness and its clinical correlate, static flexibility, are risk factors for more severe symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise.

  10. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

  11. Measurement of muscle architecture concurrently with muscle hardness using ultrasound strain elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Kentaro; Akagi, Ryota; Dohi, Michiko; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    The B-mode ultrasound image that can measure muscle architecture is displayed side by side with the ultrasound strain elastogram that can assess muscle hardness. Consequently, muscle architecture can be measured concurrently with muscle hardness using ultrasound strain elastography. To demonstrate the measurement of muscle architecture concurrently with muscle hardness using ultrasound strain elastography. Concurrent measurements of muscle architectural parameters (muscle thickness, pennation angle, and fascicle length) and muscle hardness of the medial gastrocnemius were performed with ultrasound strain elastography. Separate measurements of the muscle architectural parameters were also performed for use as reference values for the concurrent measurements. Both types of measurements were performed twice at 20° dorsiflexion, neutral position, and 30° plantar flexion. Coefficients of variance of the muscle architectural parameters obtained from the concurrent measurements (≤7.6%) were significantly higher than those obtained from the separate measurements (≤2.4%) (all P muscle architectural parameters between the concurrent and separate measurements (all P > 0.05). The use of ultrasound strain elastography for the concurrent measurement of muscle architecture and muscle hardness is feasible. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Metabolic demand and muscle damage induced by eccentric cycling of knee extensor and flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Guzmán, Nicolás; Cangas, José; Reyes, Alvaro; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the metabolic demand and extent of muscle damage of eccentric cycling targeting knee flexor (FLEX) and knee extensor (EXT) muscles. Eight sedentary men (23.3 ± 0.7 y) underwent two eccentric cycling sessions (EXT and FLEX) of 30 min each, at 60% of the maximum power output. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR) and rated perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during cycling. Countermovement and squat jumps (CMJ and SJ), muscle flexibility, muscle soreness and pain pressure threshold (PPT) of knee extensor and flexor muscles were measured before, immediately after and 1-4 days after cycling. FLEX showed greater VO2 (+23%), HR (+14%) and RPE (+18%) than EXT. CMJ and SJ performance decreased similarly after cycling. Muscle soreness increased more after EXT than FLEX and PPT decreased in knee extensor muscles after EXT and decreased in knee flexor muscles after FLEX. Greater loss of muscle flexibility in knee flexor muscles after FLEX was observed. Eccentric cycling of knee flexor muscles is metabolically more demanding than that of knee extensors, however muscle damage induced is similar. Knee flexors experienced greater loss of muscle flexibility possibly due to increased muscle stiffness following eccentric contractions.

  13. Determining all parameters necessary to build Hill-type muscle models from experiments on single muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, Marcus; Hooper, Scott L; Guschlbauerc, Christoph; White, William E; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Characterizing muscle requires measuring such properties as force-length, force-activation, and force-velocity curves. These characterizations require large numbers of data points because both what type of function (e.g., linear, exponential, hyperbolic) best represents each property, and the values of the parameters in the relevant equations, need to be determined. Only a few properties are therefore generally measured in experiments on any one muscle, and complete characterizations are obtained by averaging data across a large number of muscles. Such averaging approaches can work well for muscles that are similar across individuals. However, considerable evidence indicates that large inter-individual variation exists, at least for some muscles. This variation poses difficulties for across-animal averaging approaches. Methods to fully describe all muscle's characteristics in experiments on individual muscles would therefore be useful. Prior work in stick insect extensor muscle has identified what functions describe each of this muscle's properties and shown that these equations apply across animals. Characterizing these muscles on an individual-by-individual basis therefore requires determining only the values of the parameters in these equations, not equation form. We present here techniques that allow determining all these parameter values in experiments on single muscles. This technique will allow us to compare parameter variation across individuals and to model muscles individually. Similar experiments can likely be performed on single muscles in other systems. This approach may thus provide a widely applicable method for characterizing and modeling muscles from single experiments.

  14. Stress-induced Skeletal Muscle Gadd45a Expression Reprograms Myonuclei and Causes Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Bullard, Steven A.; Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Foster, Eric D.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse stresses including starvation and muscle disuse cause skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45a protein (Gadd45a) is a critical mediator of muscle atrophy. We identified Gadd45a through an unbiased search for potential downstream mediators of the stress-inducible, pro-atrophy transcription factor ATF4. We show that Gadd45a is required for skeletal muscle atrophy induced by three distinct skeletal muscle stresses: fasting, muscle immobilization, and muscle denervation. Conversely, forced expression of Gadd45a in muscle or cultured myotubes induces atrophy in the absence of upstream stress. We show that muscle-specific ATF4 knock-out mice have a reduced capacity to induce Gadd45a mRNA in response to stress, and as a result, they undergo less atrophy in response to fasting or muscle immobilization. Interestingly, Gadd45a is a myonuclear protein that induces myonuclear remodeling and a comprehensive program for muscle atrophy. Gadd45a represses genes involved in anabolic signaling and energy production, and it induces pro-atrophy genes. As a result, Gadd45a reduces multiple barriers to muscle atrophy (including PGC-1α, Akt activity, and protein synthesis) and stimulates pro-atrophy mechanisms (including autophagy and caspase-mediated proteolysis). These results elucidate a critical stress-induced pathway that reprograms muscle gene expression to cause atrophy. PMID:22692209

  15. Muscle quality in aging: a multi-dimensional approach to muscle functioning with applications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala, Maren S; Kenny, Anne M; Kuchel, George A

    2015-05-01

    Aging is often accompanied by declines in physical functioning which impedes older adults' quality of life, sense of independence, and ability to perform daily tasks. Age-related decreases in skeletal muscle quantity, termed sarcopenia, have traditionally been blamed for these physical decrements. However, recent evidence suggests that the quality of muscle tissue may be more functionally relevant than its quantity. 'Muscle quality' has been emerging as a means to elucidate and describe the intricate intramuscular changes associated with muscle performance in the context of aging and sarcopenia. While muscle quality has most commonly been defined in terms of muscle composition or relative strength, at the core, muscle quality really describes muscle's ability to function. Skeletal muscle displays a strong structure-function relationship by which several architectural characteristics factor into its functional capacity. This review describes the structural, physiological, and functional determinants of muscle quality at the tissue and cellular level, while also introducing other novel parameters such as sarcomere spacing and integrity, circulating biomarkers, and the muscle quality index. Muscle qualitative features are described from the perspective of how physical exercise may improve muscle quality in older adults. This broad, multidimensional perspective of muscle quality in the context of aging and sarcopenia offers comprehensive insights for consideration and integration in developing improved prognostic tools for research and clinical care, while also promoting translational approaches to the design of novel targeted intervention strategies designed to maintain function and mobility into late life.

  16. Engineering skeletal muscle tissue in bioreactor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yang; Li Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To give a concise review of the current state of the art in tissue engineering (TE) related to skeletal muscle and kinds of bioreactor environment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection A total of 106 articles were selected from several hundred original articles or reviews.The content of selected articles is in accordance with our purpose and the authors are authorized scientists in the study of engineered muscle tissue in bioreactor.Results Skeletal muscle TE is a promising interdisciplinary field which aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss.Although numerous studies have indicated that engineering skeletal muscle tissue may be of great importance in medicine in the near future,this technique still represents a limited degree of success.Since tissue-engineered muscle constructs require an adequate connection to the vascular system for efficient transport of oxygen,carbon dioxide,nutrients and waste products.Moreover,functional and clinically applicable muscle constructs depend on adequate neuromuscular junctions with neural calls.Third,in order to engineer muscle tissue successfully,it may be beneficial to mimic the in vivo environment of muscle through association with adequate stimuli from bioreactors.Conclusion Vascular system and bioreactors are necessary for development and maintenance of engineered muscle in order to provide circulation within the construct.

  17. Redox control of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K; Morton, Aaron B; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscles comprise the largest organ system in the body and play an essential role in body movement, breathing, and glucose homeostasis. Skeletal muscle is also an important endocrine organ that contributes to the health of numerous body organs. Therefore, maintaining healthy skeletal muscles is important to support overall health of the body. Prolonged periods of muscle inactivity (e.g., bed rest or limb immobilization) or chronic inflammatory diseases (i.e., cancer, kidney failure, etc.) result in skeletal muscle atrophy. An excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with a poor prognosis in several diseases and significant muscle weakness impairs the quality of life. The skeletal muscle atrophy that occurs in response to inflammatory diseases or prolonged inactivity is often associated with both oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this report, we critically review the experimental evidence that provides support for a causative link between oxidants and muscle atrophy. More specifically, this review will debate the sources of oxidant production in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy as well as provide a detailed discussion on how reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species modulate the signaling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and protein breakdown.

  18. Interactions between muscle tissues and bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawao, Naoyuki; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Sarcopenia and osteoporosis have recently been noted for their relationship with locomotive syndrome and increased number of older people. Sarcopenia is defined by decreased muscle mass and impaired muscle function, which may be associated with frailty. Several clinical data have indicated that increased muscle mass is related to increased bone mass and reduced fracture risk. Genetic, endocrine and mechanical factors as well as inflammatory and nutritional states concurrently affect muscle tissues and bone metabolism. Several genes, including myostatin and α-actinin 3, have been shown in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to be associated with both sarcopenia and osteoporosis. Vitamin D, growth hormone and testosterone as well as pathological disorders, such as an excess in glucocorticoid and diabetes, affect both muscle and bone. Basic and clinical research of bone metabolism and muscle biology suggests that bone interacts with skeletal muscle via signaling from local and humoral factors in addition to their musculoskeletal function. However, the physiological and pathological mechanisms related to muscle and bone interactions remain unclear. We found that Tmem119 may play a critical role in the commitment of myoprogenitor cells to the osteoblast lineage. We also reported that osteoglycin and FAM5C might be muscle-derived humoral osteogenic factors. Other factors, including myostatin, osteonectin, insulin-like growth factor I, irisin and osteocalcin, may be associated with the interactions between muscle tissues and bone metabolism. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  20. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  1. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  2. The problem Of muscle hypertrophy: Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Samuel L; Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Jessee, Matthew B; Mouser, J Grant; Counts, Brittany R; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we revisit a topic originally discussed in 1955, namely the lack of direct evidence that muscle hypertrophy from exercise plays an important role in increasing strength. To this day, long-term adaptations in strength are thought to be primarily contingent on changes in muscle size. Given this assumption, there has been considerable attention placed on programs designed to allow for maximization of both muscle size and strength. However, the conclusion that a change in muscle size affects a change in strength is surprisingly based on little evidence. We suggest that these changes may be completely separate phenomena based on: (1) the weak correlation between the change in muscle size and the change in muscle strength after training; (2) the loss of muscle mass with detraining, yet a maintenance of muscle strength; and (3) the similar muscle growth between low-load and high-load resistance training, yet divergent results in strength. Muscle Nerve 54: 1012-1014, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and electromyogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A non-intrusive novel detection scheme has been implemented to detect the lateral muscle extension, force of the skeletal muscle and the motor action potential (EMG) synchronously. This allows the comparison of muscle dynamics and EMG signals as a basis for modeling and further studies to determine which architectural parameters are most sensitive to changes in muscle activity. For this purpose the transmission time for ultrasonic chirp signal in the frequency range of 100 kHz to 2.5 MHz passing through the muscle under observation and respective motor action potentials are recorded synchronously to monitor and quantify biomechanical parameters related to muscle performance. Additionally an ultrasonic force sensor has been employed for monitoring. Ultrasonic traducers are placed on the skin to monitor muscle expansion. Surface electrodes are placed suitably to pick up the potential for activation of the monitored muscle. Isometric contraction of the monitored muscle is ensured by restricting the joint motion with the ultrasonic force sensor. Synchronous monitoring was initiated by a software activated audio beep starting at zero time of the subsequent data acquisition interval. Computer controlled electronics are used to generate and detect the ultrasonic signals and monitor the EMG signals. Custom developed software and data analysis is employed to analyze and quantify the monitored data. Reaction time, nerve conduction speed, latent period between the on-set of EMG signals and muscle response, degree of muscle activation and muscle fatigue development, rate of energy expenditure and motor neuron recruitment rate in isometric contraction, and other relevant parameters relating to muscle performance have been quantified with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  4. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Methods Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Results Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all p<0.05). EI demonstrated a significant positive correlation with latency of the median motor and sensory NCS in CTS patients (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that quantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US. PMID:28119835

  5. Are muscle synergies useful for neural control ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymar ede Rugy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The observation that the activity of multiple muscles can be well approximated by a few linear synergies is viewed by some as a sign that such low-dimensional modules constitute a key component of the neural control system. Here, we argue that the usefulness of muscle synergies as a control principle should be evaluated in terms of errors produced not only in muscle space, but also in task space. We used data from a force-aiming task in two dimensions at the wrist, using an EMG-driven virtual biomechanics technique that overcomes typical errors in predicting force from recorded EMG, to illustrate through simulation how synergy decomposition inevitably introduces substantial task space errors. Then, we computed the optimal pattern of muscle activation that minimizes summed-squared muscle activities, and demonstrated that synergy decomposition produced similar results on real and simulated data. We further assessed the influence of synergy decomposition on aiming errors in a more redundant system, using the optimal muscle pattern computed for the elbow-joint complex (i.e., 13 muscles acting in two dimensions. Because EMG records are typically not available from all contributing muscles, we also explored reconstructions from incomplete sets of muscles. The redundancy of a given set of muscles had opposite effects on the goodness of muscle reconstruction and on task achievement; higher redundancy is associated with better EMG approximation (lower residuals, but with higher aiming errors. Finally, we showed that the number of synergies required to approximate the optimal muscle pattern for an arbitrary biomechanical system increases with task-space dimensionality, which indicates that the capacity of synergy decomposition to explain behaviour depends critically on the scope of the original database. These results have implications regarding the viability of muscle synergy as a putative neural control mechanism, and also as a control algorithm to

  6. Preserving Healthy Muscle during Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Edda; Yeat, Nai Chien; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2017-05-01

    Weight loss is the cornerstone of therapy for people with obesity because it can ameliorate or completely resolve the metabolic risk factors for diabetes, coronary artery disease, and obesity-associated cancers. The potential health benefits of diet-induced weight loss are thought to be compromised by the weight-loss-associated loss of lean body mass, which could increase the risk of sarcopenia (low muscle mass and impaired muscle function). The objective of this review is to provide an overview of what is known about weight-loss-induced muscle loss and its implications for overall physical function (e.g., ability to lift items, walk, and climb stairs). The currently available data in the literature show the following: 1) compared with persons with normal weight, those with obesity have more muscle mass but poor muscle quality; 2) diet-induced weight loss reduces muscle mass without adversely affecting muscle strength; 3) weight loss improves global physical function, most likely because of reduced fat mass; 4) high protein intake helps preserve lean body and muscle mass during weight loss but does not improve muscle strength and could have adverse effects on metabolic function; 5) both endurance- and resistance-type exercise help preserve muscle mass during weight loss, and resistance-type exercise also improves muscle strength. We therefore conclude that weight-loss therapy, including a hypocaloric diet with adequate (but not excessive) protein intake and increased physical activity (particularly resistance-type exercise), should be promoted to maintain muscle mass and improve muscle strength and physical function in persons with obesity. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. [Masticatory muscles. Part III. Biomechanics of the masticatory muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolstra, J H

    1997-08-01

    The masticatory muscles are able to produce forces. These forces may cause movements of the lower jaw. Furthermore, they can be applied by the teeth for the generation of bite or chewing forces. During these kind of processes the temporomandibular joints will be loaded also. The interaction between forces and movements in the masticatory system is complex but obeys the relatively simple laws of mechanics. By application of these laws the development of joint loading, force patterns and movements during masticatory function and dysfunction can be understood. This is illustrated by a few examples of both statical and dynamical masticatory performance.

  8. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eMeireles Nogueira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route towards the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies.It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells.To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm.

  9. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  10. THREE INTERMITTENT SESSIONS OF CRYOTHERAPY REDUCE THE SECONDARY MUSCLE INJURY IN SKELETAL MUSCLE OF RAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. L. Oliveira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cryotherapy associated to compression is recommended as immediate treatment after muscle injury, the effect of intermittent sessions of these procedures in the area of secondary muscle injury is not established. This study examined the effect of three sessions of cryotherapy (30 min of ice pack each 2h and muscle compression (sand pack in the muscle-injured area. Twenty-four Wistar rats (312 ± 20g were evaluated. In three groups, the middle belly of tibialis anterior (TA muscle was injured by a frozen iron bar and received one of the following treatments: a three sessions of cryotherapy; b three sessions of compression; c not treated. An uninjured group received sessions of cryotherapy. Frozen muscles were cross- sectioned (10 µm and stained for the measurement of injured and uninjured muscle area. Injured muscles submitted to cryotherapy showed the smallest injured area (29.83 ± 6.6%, compared to compressed (39.2 ± 2.8%, p= 0.003 and untreated muscles (41.74 ± 4.0%, p = 0.0008. No difference was found between injured compressed and injured untreated muscles. In conclusion, three intermittent sessions of cryotherapy applied immediately after muscle damage was able to reduce the secondary muscle injury, while only the muscle compression did not provide the same effectiveness

  11. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... of IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However...... protein synthesis and breakdown, that is, reduced turnover with a minor increase in net muscle degradation. Very similar observations have been made in models of acute inflammation, induced by high-dose endotoxin injection. However, these changes were suggested not to be attributed to a direct effect...

  12. Radioisotope scanning in inflammatory muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.B.; Swift, T.R.; Spies, S.M.

    1976-06-01

    Fourteen whole-body rectilinear bone scans using technetium 99m-polyphosphate were done in nine patients with well-documented inflammatory myopathy (either polymyositis or dermatomyositis). In all nine patients the scans showed evidence of increased muscle labeling. Muscle uptake was markedly increased in one patient, moderately increased in two patients, and minimally increased in six patients. The degree of muscle labeling correlated with the severity of the muscle weakness at the time the scan was done. In four patients, who received high-dose corticosteroid treatment, muscle uptake was decreased following therapy. These findings suggest that radioisotope scanning may be useful in the diagnosis and management of patients with inflammatory muscle diseases.

  13. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... protein synthesis and breakdown, that is, reduced turnover with a minor increase in net muscle degradation. Very similar observations have been made in models of acute inflammation, induced by high-dose endotoxin injection. However, these changes were suggested not to be attributed to a direct effect...... of IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However...

  14. Adaptive Filters for Muscle Response Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Søren; Biering-Soerensen, Fin; Hansen, Steffen Duus

    1996-01-01

    are proposed, based on the observation that the shape of the muscle responses only exhibits moderate changes during a time window of up to 300 ms. The filters are derived and compared with a conventional fixed comb filter on both simulated and real data. For variations in amplitude of the muscle responses...... the performance of the adaptive filters are independent of the filter length, whereas for variations in the shape the performance is increased with the filter length. Using the adaptive filters it is possible to obtain a signal-to-noise ratio, which enables the EMG from a partly paralysed muscle to be used......To be able to use the voluntary EMG-signal from an electrically stimulated muscle as control signal for FES-applications, it is necessary to eliminate the muscle response evoked by the stimulation. The muscle response is a non-stationary signal, therefore a set of linear adaptive prediction filters...

  15. Muscle biopsy findings in inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2002-11-01

    The inflammatory myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of acquired muscle diseases characterized clinically, by muscle weakness, and histologically, by inflammatory infiltrates within the skeletal muscles. The group of these myopathies comprise three major and discrete subsets: polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Each subset retains its characteristic clinical, immunopathologic, and morphologic features regardless of whether it occurs separately or in connection with other systemic diseases. Although the diagnosis of these disorders is based on the combination of clinical examination, electromyographic data, serum muscle enzyme levels, various autoantibodies, and the muscle biopsy findings, the muscle biopsy offers the most definitive diagnostic information in the majority of the cases. This article summarizes the main histologic features that characterize PM, DM, or IBM and emphasizes the main pitfalls associated with interpretation of the biopsies.

  16. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  17. The exercised skeletal muscle: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Marini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle is the second more plastic tissue of the body - second to the nervous tissue only. In fact, both physical activity and inactivity contribute to modify the skeletal muscle, by continuous signaling through nerve impulses, mechanical stimuli and humoral clues. In turn, the skeletal muscle sends signals to the body, thus contributing to its homeostasis. We'll review here the contribute of physical exercise to the shaping of skeletal muscle, to the adaptation of its mass and function to the different needs imposed by different physical activities and to the attainment of the health benefits associated with active skeletal muscles. Focus will primarily be on the molecular pathways and on gene regulation that result in skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise.

  18. [Molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astratenkova, I V; Rogozkin, V A

    2014-06-01

    Enzymes Akt, AMPK, mTOR, S6K and PGC-1a coactivator take part in skeletal muscles in the regulation of synthesis of proteins. The expression of these proteins is regulated by growth factors, hormones, nutrients, mechanical loading and leads to an increase in muscle mass and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The review presents the results of studies published in the past four years, which expand knowledge on the effects of various factors on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. The attention is focused on the achievements that reveal and clarify the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. The central place is taken by mTOR enzyme which controls and regulates the main stages of the cascade of reactions of muscle proteins providing synthesis in the conditions of human life. coactivator PGC-1a.

  19. Effects of strength training and detraining on knee extensor strength, muscle volume and muscle quality in elderly women

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Cleiton Silva; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Radaelli, Régis; Lanferdini,Fábio Juner; Cunha, Giovani dos Santos; Reischak-Oliveira, Álvaro; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Pinto, Ronei Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Strength training seems to be an interesting approach to counteract decreases that affect knee extensor strength, muscle mass and muscle quality (force per unit of muscle mass) associated with ageing. However, there is no consensus regarding the changes in muscle mass and their contribution to strength during periods of training and detraining in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed at verifying the behaviour of knee extensor muscle strength, muscle volume and muscle quality in elderly wo...

  20. ACUTE EXERCISE-INDUCED MUSCLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Mckune, Andrew J; Stuart J Semple; Edith M Peters-Futre

    2012-01-01

    While much research has recently been focussing on the chronic effects of overtraining, the acute damaging effects of individual eccentric exercise bouts on muscle remain of interest and underlie long-term training effects. Systemic markers of muscle damage are limited in terms of sensitivity and reliability. A clearer insight into the extent of the damage and mechanisms involved are being obtained from ultrastructural, functional and molecular examination of the muscle. There are currently i...

  1. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Richard D

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°, secondary muscle spindles (2° and Golgi tendon organs (GTO. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS. Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length.

  2. Perceived Muscle Soreness in Recreational Female Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Burnett, D; Smith, K; Smeltzer, C.; Young, K.; Burns, S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if rating of perceived exertion correlated with perceived muscle soreness during delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in female runners. This study examined the pre and post running economy measures and perceived muscle soreness before and after a 30-min downhill run (DHR) at −15% grade and 70% of the subjects predetermined maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 peak). Six female recreational runners (mean age = 24.5) performed level running at 65%, 75%, and 85%...

  3. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    OpenAIRE

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-01-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres...

  4. A Depolarizing Electrogenic Pump in Frog Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    mw copy AFRRI SR75-20 AUGUST 1975 AFRRI SCIENTIFIC REPORT O ■ to A DEPOLARIZING ELECTROGENIC PUMP IN FROG MUSCLE D. Geduldig D. R...Academy of Sciences - National Research Council. AFRRI SR75-20 August 1975 A DEPOLARIZING ELECTROGENIC PUMP IN FROG MUSCLE D. GEDULDIG* D. R...INTRODUCTION When Na-enriched frog muscles are bathed in Na- and K-free saline, the small amount of potassium which could accumulate outside of the membrane

  5. Airway Epithelium Stimulates Smooth Muscle Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Malavia, Nikita K.; Raub, Christopher B.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Reynold A Panettieri; George, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air–liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (...

  6. Role of Smooth Muscle in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion that smooth muscle function is altered in inflammation is prompted by clinical observations of altered motility in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. While altered motility may reflect inflammation-induced changes in intrinsic or extrinsic nerves to the gut, changes in gut hormone release and changes in muscle function, recent studies have provided in vitro evidence of altered muscle contractility in muscle resected from patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In addition, the observation that smooth muscle cells are more numerous and prominent in the strictured bowel of IBD patients compared with controls suggests that inflammation may alter the growth of intestinal smooth muscle. Thus, inflammation is associated with changes in smooth muscle growth and contractility that, in turn, contribute to important symptoms of IBD including diarrhea (from altered motility and pain (via either altered motility or stricture formation. The involvement of smooth muscle in this context may be as an innocent bystander, where cells and products of the inflammatory process induce alterations in muscle contractility and growth. However, it is likely that intestinal muscle cells play a more active role in the inflammatory process via the elaboration of mediators and trophic factors, including cytokines, and via the production of collagen. The concept of muscle cells as active participants in the intestinal inflammatory process is a new concept that is under intense study. This report summarizes current knowledge as it relates to these two aspects of altered muscle function (growth and contractility in the inflamed intestine, and will focus on mechanisms underlying these changes, based on data obtained from animal models of intestinal inflammation.

  7. Magnetic stimulation of muscle evokes cerebral potentials in assessment of paraspinal muscle spasm.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Objectlve: To assess the muscle spasm by magnetic stimulation of muscle evokes cerebral potentials (MMSEP). Methods: Paraspinal MMSEP and function assessment was recorded in detail before and after treat-

  8. Potassium initiates vasodilatation induced by a single skeletal muscle contraction in hamster cremaster muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marika L. Armstrong; Ashok K. Dua; Coral L. Murrant

    2007-01-01

    ... + ). To test the hypothesis that K + was in part responsible for the rapid dilatation produced by muscle contraction we stimulated four to five skeletal muscle fibres in the anaesthetized hamster cremaster preparation in situ...

  9. Impaired muscle glycogen resynthesis after a marathon is not caused by decreased muscle GLUT-4 content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, S; Rohde, T; Richter, Erik

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate whether the slow rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis after a competitive marathon is associated with a decrease in the total muscle content of the muscle glucose transporter (GLUT-4). Seven well-trained marathon runners participated in the study, and muscle biopsies...... were obtained from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle before, immediately after, and 1, 2, and 7 days after the marathon, as were venous blood samples. Muscle GLUT-4 content was unaltered over the experimental period. Muscle glycogen concentration was 758 +/- 53 mmol/kg dry weight before...... the marathon and decreased to 148 +/- 39 mmol/kg dry weight immediately afterward. Despite a carbohydrate-rich diet (containing at least 7 g carbohydrate.kg body mass-1.day-1), the muscle glycogen concentration remained 30% lower than before-race values 2 days after the race, whereas it had returned to before...

  10. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F

    2015-10-13

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies.

  11. Calcium ion in skeletal muscle: its crucial role for muscle function, plasticity, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, M W; Brinkmeier, H; Müntener, M

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle shows an enormous variability in its functional features such as rate of force production, resistance to fatigue, and energy metabolism, with a wide spectrum from slow aerobic to fast anaerobic physiology. In addition, skeletal muscle exhibits high plasticity that is based...... on the potential of the muscle fibers to undergo changes of their cytoarchitecture and composition of specific muscle protein isoforms. Adaptive changes of the muscle fibers occur in response to a variety of stimuli such as, e.g., growth and differentition factors, hormones, nerve signals, or exercise....... Additionally, the muscle fibers are arranged in compartments that often function as largely independent muscular subunits. All muscle fibers use Ca(2+) as their main regulatory and signaling molecule. Therefore, contractile properties of muscle fibers are dependent on the variable expression of proteins...

  12. Increased muscle glucose uptake during contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, H; Richter, E A

    1984-01-01

    We reinvestigated the prevailing concept that muscle contractions only elicit increased muscle glucose uptake in the presence of a so-called "permissive" concentration of insulin (Berger et al., Biochem. J. 146: 231-238, 1975; Vranic and Berger, Diabetes 28: 147-163, 1979). Hindquarters from rats......-methylglucose uptake increased during contractions and glucose uptake was negative at rest and zero during contractions. An increase in muscle transport and uptake of glucose during contractions does not require the presence of insulin. Furthermore, glucose transport in contracting muscle may only increase if glycogen...

  13. Muscle relaxant use during intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Tod B

    2013-02-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents have generally been avoided during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) where muscle responses to nerve stimulation or transcranial stimulation are monitored. However, a variety of studies and clinical experience indicate partial neuromuscular blockade is compatible with monitoring in some patients. This review presents these experiences after reviewing the currently used agents and the methods used to assess the blockade. A review was conducted of the published literature regarding neuromuscular blockade during IOM. A variety of articles have been published that give insight into the use of partial pharmacological paralysis during monitoring. Responses have been recorded from facial muscles, vocalis muscles, and peripheral nerve muscles from transcranial or neural stimulation with neuromuscular blockade measured in the muscle tested or in the thenar muscles from ulnar nerve stimulation. Preconditioning of the nervous system with tetanic or sensory stimulation has been used. In patients without neuromuscular pathology intraoperative monitoring using peripheral muscle responses from neural stimulation is possible with partial neuromuscular blockade. Monitoring of muscle responses from cranial nerve stimulation may require a higher degree of stimulation and less neuromuscular blockade. The role of tetanic or sensory conditioning of the nervous system is not fully characterized. The impact of neuromuscular pathology or the effect of partial blockade on monitoring muscle responses from spontaneous neural activity or mechanical nerve stimulation has not been described.

  14. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  15. Muscle dynamics in fish during steady swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadwick, RE; Steffensen, JF; Katz, SL

    1998-01-01

    position in swimming fish. Quantification of muscle contractile properties in cyclic contractions relies on in vitro experiments using strain and activation data collected in vivo. In this paper we discuss the relation between these parameters and body kinematics. Using videoradiographic data from swimming...... contraction, suggesting that the phase relation between the muscle strain cycle and its activation must vary along the body. Since this phase relation is critical in determining how the muscle performs in cyclic contractions, the possibility has emerged that dynamic muscle function may change with axial...

  16. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Paolo; Sandri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases. PMID:23268536

  17. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  18. [Asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, L; Corre, P; Khonsari, R H; Mercier, J-M; Piot, B

    2012-06-01

    Hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles most commonly affects the masseter. Less common cases of isolated or associated temporalis hypertrophy are also reported. Parafunctional habits, and more precisely bruxism, can favor the onset of the hypertrophy. This condition is generally idiopathic and can require both medical and/or surgical management. A 29-year-old patient was referred to our department for an asymmetric swelling of the masticatory muscles. Physical examination revealed a bilateral hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles, predominantly affecting the right temporalis and the left masseter. Major bruxism was assessed by premature dental wearing. The additional examinations confirmed the isolated muscle hypertrophy. Benign asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles promoted by bruxism was diagnosed. Treatment with injections of type A botulinum toxin was conducted in association with a splint and relaxation. Its effectiveness has been observed at six months. Few cases of unilateral or bilateral temporalis hypertrophy have been reported, added to the more common isolated masseter muscles hypertrophy. The diagnosis requires to rule out secondary hypertrophies and tumors using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The condition is thought to be favoured by parafunctional habits such as bruxism. The conservative treatment consists in reducing the volume of the masticatory muscles using intramuscular injections of type A botulinum toxin. Other potential conservative treatments are wearing splints and muscle relaxant drugs. Surgical procedures aiming to reduce the muscle volume and/or the bone volume (mandibular gonioplasty) can be proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Verges, S; Lenherr, O; Haner, A C; Schulz, C.; Spengler, C M

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue develops during exhaustive exercise and can limit exercise performance. Respiratory muscle training, in turn, can increase exercise performance. We investigated whether respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT) reduces exercise-induced inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers performed twenty 30-min sessions of either normocapnic hyperpnoea (n = 13) or sham training (CON, n = 8) over 4-5 wk. Before and after training, subjects...

  20. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were col...

  1. Real-time visualization of muscle stiffness distribution with ultrasound shear wave imaging during muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Minoru; Sabra, Karim; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaél

    2010-09-01

    A stand-alone ultrasound shear wave imaging technology has been developed to quantify and visualize Young's modulus distribution by remotely applying ultrasound radiation force and tracking the resulting microvibrations in soft tissues with ultrafast ultrasound imaging. We report the first preliminary data that detected the distribution of local muscle stiffness within and between resting and contracting muscles at different muscle lengths with this technology. This technique may assist clinicians in characterizing muscle injuries or neuromuscular disorders.

  2. An Autologous Muscle Tissue Expansion Approach for the Treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access An Autologous Muscle Tissue Expansion Approach for the Treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss Catherine L. Ward...regeneration. But they require ample donor muscle tissue and therefore may be limited in their application for large clinical VML. Here, we tested the...autologous minced grafts for the regeneration of muscle tissue after VML, but indicate the need to identify optimal carrier materials for expansion

  3. Functional recovery of completely denervated muscle: implications for innervation of tissue-engineered muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Olson, Jennifer L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2012-09-01

    Tissue-engineered muscle has been proposed as a solution to repair volumetric muscle defects and to restore muscle function. To achieve functional recovery, engineered muscle tissue requires integration of the host nerve. In this study, we investigated whether denervated muscle, which is analogous to tissue-engineered muscle tissue, can be reinnervated and can recover muscle function using an in vivo model of denervation followed by neurotization. The outcomes of this investigation may provide insights on the ability of tissue-engineered muscle to integrate with the host nerve and acquire normal muscle function. Eighty Lewis rats were classified into three groups: a normal control group (n=16); a denervated group in which sciatic innervations to the gastrocnemius muscle were disrupted (n=32); and a transplantation group in which the denervated gastrocnemius was repaired with a common peroneal nerve graft into the muscle (n=32). Neurofunctional behavior, including extensor postural thrust (EPT), withdrawal reflex latency (WRL), and compound muscle action potential (CMAP), as well as histological evaluations using alpha-bungarotoxin and anti-NF-200 were performed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks (n=8) after surgery. We found that EPT was improved by transplantation of the nerve grafts, but the EPT values in the transplanted animals at 12 weeks postsurgery were still significantly lower than those measured for the normal control group at 4 weeks (EPT, 155.0±38.9 vs. 26.3±13.8 g, ptissue is able to regenerate neuromuscular junctions within denervated muscle, and thus the muscle can recover partial function. However, the function of the denervated muscle remains in the subnormal range even at 12 weeks after direct nerve transplantation. These results suggest that tissue-engineered muscle, which is similarly denervated, could be innervated and become functional in vivo if it is properly integrated with the host nerve.

  4. Muscle fibre types in the external eye muscles of the pigeon, Columba livia.

    OpenAIRE

    McVean, A; Stelling, J; Rowlerson, A.

    1987-01-01

    Fibre typing with antisera raised against specific myosin types from muscles of known physiological properties were used to characterise the fibre types within the oculorotatory muscles of pigeons. Fibres reacting strongly to antiserum anti-ALD (specific for tonic fibre myosin) were found lying along the global margin of the muscle and also in a layer lying immediately beneath a discrete band of fibres running along the orbital margin. These fibres resembled those of the skeletal muscle ALD i...

  5. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  6. The number and choice of muscles impact the results of muscle synergy analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Muterspaugh Steele

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available One theory for how humans control movement is that muscles are activated in weighted groups or synergies. Studies have shown that electromyography (EMG from a variety of tasks can be described by a low-dimensional space thought to reflect synergies. These studies use algorithms, such as nonnegative matrix factorization, to identify synergies from EMG. Due to experimental constraints, EMG can rarely be taken from all muscles involved in a task. However, it is unclear if the choice of muscles included in the analysis impacts estimated synergies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the number and choice of muscles on synergy analyses. We used a musculoskeletal model to calculate muscle activations required to perform an isometric upper-extremity task. Synergies calculated from the activations from the musculoskeletal model were similar to a prior experimental study. To evaluate the impact of the number of muscles included in the analysis, we randomly selected subsets of between 5 and 29 muscles and compared the similarity of the synergies calculated from each subset to a master set of synergies calculated from all muscles. We determined that the structure of synergies is dependent upon the number and choice of muscles included in the analysis. When five muscles were included in the analysis, the similarity of the synergies to the master set was only 0.57 ± 0.54; however, the similarity improved to over 0.8 with more than ten muscles. We identified two methods, selecting dominant muscles from the master set or selecting muscles with the largest maximum isometric force, which significantly improved similarity to the master set and can help guide future experimental design. Analyses that included a small subset of muscles also over-estimated the variance accounted for (VAF by the synergies compared to an analysis with all muscles. Thus, researchers should use caution using VAF to evaluate synergies when EMG is measured from a small

  7. Chronic Stimulation-Induced Changes in the Rodent Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Colleen A.; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Dietrich, Maria; Andreatta, Richard D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Fry, Lisa; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Therapies for certain voice disorders purport principles of skeletal muscle rehabilitation to increase muscle mass, strength, and endurance. However, applicability of limb muscle rehabilitation to the laryngeal muscles has not been tested. In this study, the authors examined the feasibility of the rat thyroarytenoid muscle to remodel as a…

  8. Chronic Stimulation-Induced Changes in the Rodent Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Colleen A.; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Dietrich, Maria; Andreatta, Richard D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Fry, Lisa; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Therapies for certain voice disorders purport principles of skeletal muscle rehabilitation to increase muscle mass, strength, and endurance. However, applicability of limb muscle rehabilitation to the laryngeal muscles has not been tested. In this study, the authors examined the feasibility of the rat thyroarytenoid muscle to remodel as a…

  9. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in skeletal muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Martin J; Bolster, Ferdia; Foran, Paul; Crosbie, Ian; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Eustace, Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    The evaluation of muscle diseases has traditionally integrated clinical with biochemical findings, occasionally resorting to muscle biopsy. This article reviews the role and imaging appearances of muscle diseases at MRI, specifically emphasising the role of WBMRI in global assessment of muscle abnormality, and in particular its role in determining distribution and extent of muscle abnormality.

  10. A 3D skeletal muscle model coupled with active contraction of muscle fibres and hyperelastic behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C Y; Zhang, G; Tsui, C P

    2009-05-11

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of skeletal muscle which was developed to simulate active and passive non-linear mechanical behaviours of the muscle during lengthening or shortening under either quasi-static or dynamic condition. Constitutive relation of the muscle was determined by using a strain energy approach, while active contraction behaviour of the muscle fibre was simulated by establishing a numerical algorithm based on the concept of the Hill's three-element muscle model. The proposed numerical algorithm could be used to predict concentric, eccentric, isometric and isotonic contraction behaviours of the muscle. The proposed numerical algorithm and constitutive model for the muscle were derived and implemented into a non-linear large deformation finite element programme ABAQUS by using user-defined material subroutines. A number of scenarios have been used to demonstrate capability of the model for simulating both quasi-static and dynamic response of the muscle. Validation of the proposed model has been performed by comparing the simulated results with the experimental ones of frog gastrocenemius muscle deformation. The effects of the fusiform muscle geometry and fibre orientation on the stress and fibre stretch distributions of frog muscle during isotonic contraction have also been investigated by using the proposed model. The predictability of the present model for dynamic response of the muscle has been demonstrated by simulating the extension of a squid tentacle during a strike to catch prey.

  11. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Madsen, K.; Kiens, Bente;

    1996-01-01

    (kg wet weight)-1 min-1). The rate of muscle glycogen breakdown was the same in C and HL (8.1 +/- 1.2 vs. 8.2 +/- 1.0 mmol (kg wet weight)-1 min-1). 5. The present data suggest that elevated muscle acidity does not reduce muscle glycogenolysis/glycolysis and is not the only cause of fatigue during...

  12. Regulation of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and muscle mass by SIRT3

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously reported that the expression of mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 is high in the slow oxidative muscle and that the expression of muscle SIRT3 level is increased by dietary restriction or exercise training. To explore the function of SIRT3 in skeletal muscle, we report here the esta...

  13. Glycogen synthesis in human gastrocnemius muscle is not representative of whole-body muscle glycogen synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serlie, M.J.; Haan, J.H.A. de; Tack, C.J.J.; Verberne, H.J.; Ackermans, M.T.; Heerschap, A.; Sauerwein, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has enabled noninvasive measurement of muscle glycogen synthesis in humans. Conclusions based on measurements by the MRS technique assume that glucose metabolism in gastrocnemius muscle is representative for all skeletal muscles and thus

  14. Muscle mechanics. The effect of stretch and shortening on skeletal muscle force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to study systematically the impact of history dependent effects in intact muscles. For this purpose, experiments were performed on in situ medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SOL) muscles of the rat. Furthermore, mathematical muscle models were developed that

  15. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  16. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  17. Muscle fiber and motor unit behavior in the longest human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A John; Duxson, Marilyn J; Butler, Jane E; Hodges, Paul W; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2005-09-14

    The sartorius muscle is the longest muscle in the human body. It is strap-like, up to 600 mm in length, and contains five to seven neurovascular compartments, each with a neuromuscular endplate zone. Some of its fibers terminate intrafascicularly, whereas others may run the full length of the muscle. To assess the location and timing of activation within motor units of this long muscle, we recorded electromyographic potentials from multiple intramuscular electrodes along sartorius muscle during steady voluntary contraction and analyzed their activity with spike-triggered averaging from a needle electrode inserted near the proximal end of the muscle. Approximately 30% of sartorius motor units included muscle fibers that ran the full length of the muscle, conducting action potentials at 3.9 +/- 0.1 m/s. Most motor units were innervated within a single muscle endplate zone that was not necessarily near the midpoint of the fiber. As a consequence, action potentials reached the distal end of a unit as late as 100 ms after initiation at an endplate zone. Thus, contractile activity is not synchronized along the length of single sartorius fibers. We postulate that lateral transmission of force from fiber to endomysium and a wide distribution of motor unit endplates along the muscle are critical for the efficient transmission of force from sarcomere to tendon and for the prevention of muscle injury caused by overextension of inactive regions of muscle fibers.

  18. Improved identification of dystonic cervical muscles via abnormal muscle activity during isometric contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruijn, E.; Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Forbes, P. A.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; van der Helm, F. C. T.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; Happee, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The preferred treatment for cervical dystonia (CD) is injection of botulinum toxin in the dystonic muscles. Unfortunately, in the absence of reliable diagnostic methods it can be difficult to discriminate dystonic muscles from healthy muscles acting in compensation. We investigated if dy

  19. Improved identification of dystonic cervical muscles via abnormal muscle activity during isometric contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruijn, E; Nijmeijer, S W R; Forbes, P A; Koelman, J H T M; van der Helm, F C T; Tijssen, M A J; Happee, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The preferred treatment for cervical dystonia (CD) is injection of botulinum toxin in the dystonic muscles. Unfortunately, in the absence of reliable diagnostic methods it can be difficult to discriminate dystonic muscles from healthy muscles acting in compensation. We investigated if dy

  20. Muscle mechanics; the effect of stretch and shortening on skeletal muscle force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Kenneth

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to study systematically the impact of history dependent effects in intact muscles. For this purpose, experiments were performed on in situ medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SOL) muscles of the rat. Furthermore, mathematical muscle models were developed that desc