WorldWideScience

Sample records for extracurricular routine activities

  1. Keeping Adolescents Busy with Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tsui-Sui Annie; Salerno, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent participation in academic/extracurricular activities is related to fewer diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections during adolescence. The role parents play in motivating participation in such activities is unclear. This mixed-methods study explored parental influences on academic/extracurricular activity participation, and the…

  2. Extracurricular activities do little for pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesh, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Science-related extracurricular activities do not encourage more students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) subjects at high school, according to a study by researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK.

  3. Extracurricular activities of medical school applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medical school applicants' involvements in extracurricular activities including medical volunteering/community services, nonmedical community services, club activities, leadership role, and research. Extracurricular characteristics were compared for 448 applicants (223 males and 225 females) who applied to Kangwon Medical School in 2013 to 2014. Frequency analysis, chi-square test, and simple correlation were conducted with the collected data. The 448 applicants participated in medical volunteer/community services (15.3%), nonmedical community services (39.8%), club activities (22.9%), club officials (10%), and research (13.4%). On average, applicants from foreign universities participated in 0.9 medical volunteer/community service, 0.8 nonmedical community service, 1.7 club activities, and 0.6 research work. On the other hand, applicants from domestic universities reported 0.2 medical volunteer/community service, 1.0 nonmedical community service, 0.7 club activity, and 0.3 research. Involvement in extracurricular activities was extensive for medical school applicants. Participation in extracurricular activities differed between applicants from foreign and domestic universities. Females consistently reported greater participation in extracurricular activities than males. The data can be helpful for admission committees to recruit well-rounded applicants and compare between applicants with similar academic backgrounds.

  4. Playing It Smart: Safety in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Tony

    2011-01-01

    An integral part of the school experience for many students is involvement in extracurricular activities such as athletics, cheerleading, band, and others. Likewise, cocurricular activities, such as field trips, provide a chance for students to connect off-campus experiences to the material learned in the classroom. These types of activities,…

  5. Immigrant Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activity involvement is generally beneficial toward student progress and success. Little is known, however, about immigrant youth involvement in school-based extracurricular activities. The author examined the patterns of Latino and Asian American youth extracurricular involvement by focusing on the pertinent role of immigrant…

  6. Teachers, students and extracurricular activities in primary education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antovska, Ankica; Kostov, Borce

    2016-01-01

    ...) activities in the primary education process. Certain investigations show that teachers, through extracurricular activities, can have a significant role in building and improving the talents of students...

  7. The Influence of Extracurricular Activities on Student Performance Perceived by Texas Rural High School Principals with Successful Extracurricular Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Christopher John

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of student participation in extracurricular activities, as perceived by rural high school principals, with successful extracurricular programs. Participating principals were asked about their perceptions on the influence of student participation in extracurricular activities on student…

  8. Telomerase and its extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rishi Kumar; Kumar, Pramod; Yadava, Pramod Kumar

    2013-12-01

    The classical activity of telomerase is to synthesize telomeric repeats and thus maintain telomere length, which in turn ensures chromosome stability and cellular proliferation. However, there is growing evidence that implicates telomerase in many other functions that are independent of TERC being used as its template. Telomerase has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) activity in the mitochondria. Other than viral RdRPs, it is the only RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that has been identified in mammals. It also plays a role in the Wnt signaling pathway by acting as a transcriptional modulator. Telomerase acts as a reverse transcriptase independent of its core subunit, TERC. Studies indicate that telomerase is also involved in apoptosis and DNA repair.

  9. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of…

  10. Participation in High School Extracurricular Activities: Investigating School Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the influence of school attributes, such as pupil/teacher ratio and emphasis on academic achievement, on student participation in high school extracurricular activities. Reveals that the size, school climate, and social milieu of the school affect student involvement in extracurricular activities. (CMK)

  11. A Profile of Latino School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Participation in school-based extracurricular activities influences educational success. Thus, it is important to depict a profile of school-based extracurricular activity involvement for a Latino student population that is marginalized in schools. This research uses the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 and logistic regression analyses to…

  12. Development of pupils' creativities within extracurricular activities in computer science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Даниил Сергеевич Рыбаков

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is about organization of the theoretical aspects of extracurricular activities in computer science. There are presented techniques of developing creative abilities of pupils using the project method.

  13. TEACHERS, STUDENTS AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN PRIMARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankica Antovska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the scientific public, since long ago, there has been an interest in studying leisure time. Leisure time is a central issue of modern civilization, integral part of the structure of modern society and a significant factor for a person’s development. The goal of this research is to study the modern concept of and the benefits from the introduction of leisure (extracurricular activities in the primary education process. Certain investigations show that teachers, through extracurricular activities, can have a significant role in building and improving the talents of students. From the answers received in the enquiry it can be seen that both teachers and students have different attitudes and interests regarding extracurricular activities. The school has still the best position and the hope for developing students’ skills for the wide world of extracurricular activities.

  14. Opportunities for extracurricular physical activity in North Carolina middle schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael B; Kanters, Michael A; Bocarro, Jason N

    2011-07-01

    This study's purpose was to assess the opportunities for North Carolina adolescents to be physically active in extracurricular middle school environments and to compare opportunities across community types. Data were analyzed based on the results of an electronic questionnaire distributed to a sample of 431 schools with a response rate of 75.4% (N = 325). Nearly all schools offered interscholastic sports while fewer than half offered intramurals or noncompetitive activities to students. "Open gym" was offered at only 35% of schools, while 24% of schools offered extracurricular activities to students with disabilities. Overall, 43.4% of schools offered special transportation to students who participated in some extracurricular physical activities. Schools in rural areas generally offered fewer programs and had fewer supports than schools located in more urbanized areas. Over two-thirds of rural schools offered no extracurricular programs other than interscholastic sports. Schools can be important settings for physical activity. North Carolina's middle schools and its rural schools in particular, are falling short in efforts to provide extracurricular physical activity programming recommended by researchers and policy groups. Lower accessibility to extracurricular physical activities may partially contribute to higher levels of physical inactivity found in the state.

  15. TEACHERS, STUDENTS AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN PRIMARY EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ankica Antovska; Borče Kostov

    2016-01-01

    In the scientific public, since long ago, there has been an interest in studying leisure time. Leisure time is a central issue of modern civilization, integral part of the structure of modern society and a significant factor for a person’s development. The goal of this research is to study the modern concept of and the benefits from the introduction of leisure (extracurricular) activities in the primary education process. Certain investigations show that teachers, through extracurricular acti...

  16. Differences in physical characteristics and motor abilities between students attending sports extracurricular activities and students not attending sports extracurricular activities

    OpenAIRE

    Klun, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we observed differences in physical characteristics and motor abilities between students attending sports extracurricular activities and students not attending sports extracurricular activities. 333 students between 1st and 5th grade participated in the research. They attended the Dr France Prešeren Elementary School in Ribnica and the Dr Ivan Prijatelj Elementary School in Sodražica in the 2014/15 school year. We collected the data using a questionnaire and results from ...

  17. Organized extracurricular activities of Canadian children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guèvremont, Anne; Findlay, Leanne; Kohen, Dafna

    2008-09-01

    This article presents rates of participation in organized extracurricular activity by Canadian children and youth aged 6 to 17 years, and examines how these rates vary by sociodemographic and socio-economic characteristics. The data are from Cycle 4 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (2000/2001). The majority of children and youth (86%) participated in at least one extracurricular activity. Girls were more likely than boys to be involved in non-sport activities and in clubs or community groups. Young children who lived in urban areas and those who lived with two parents had relatively high rates of participation in extracurricular activities. Participation rose with family income for children aged 6 to 13, but not for 14- to 17-year-olds. Children of all ages in the Western provinces had high participation rates in each type of activity; rates tended to be low in Quebec.

  18. the subject of physical education and extracurricular physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Campos Izquierdo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article there is analyzed the possible connection of physical education classes with the extracurricular physical activities in the Primary School of the Region of Madrid. This research places inside the methodology of quantitative type of descriptive cut, across survey, which has been in use as instrument of withdrawal of information the interview standardized by means of questionnaire created ad hoc, that was completed by 300 teachers. In the study there is obtained that the vast majority of the teachers who give classes in the extracurricular physical activities say they do not establish any coordination with the Physical Education teacher of the school. However, most of these teachers feel they would be good if there were a coordination with the teachers of Physical Education. However, more than half of teachers who give classes in the extracurricular physical activities believe that the objectives of the activities they provide are not related to the objectives of the Physical Education.

  19. Physical extracurricular activities in educational child-robot interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, Daniel Patrick; Schindler, Louisa; Reidsma, Dennis; Dautenhahn, K.; Baxter, P.; Weiss, A.; Salem, A.

    In an exploratory study on educational child-robot interaction we investigate the effect of alternating a learning activity with an additional shared activity. Our aim is to enhance and enrich the relationship between child and robot by introducing ``physical extracurricular activities''. This

  20. Health-Promoting Physical Activity and Extra-Curricular Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtner-Smith, Matthew; Sofo, Seidu; Chouinard, Jeremy; Wallace, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this exploratory study was to determine the percentage of time in which school pupils coached by teachers were engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during extra-curricular sport practices. Three secondary purposes of the study were to determine (a) the percentage of time allocated by teachers for pupils…

  1. School Physical Education, Extracurricular Sports, and Lifelong Active Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocarro, Jason; Kanters, Michael A.; Casper, Jonathan; Forrester, Scott

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the role of school-based extracurricular initiatives in facilitating immediate and long-term positive impact on physical activity, healthy behavior, and obesity in children. A critique of the role of various sports-related initiatives that have been developed to address the obesity epidemic currently…

  2. Adolescent Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Influences on Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Donna; Dyk, Patricia Hyjer; Jones, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Study examined adolescents' participation in sports, school, and community extracurricular activities to assess the influence of different involvement roles and adult support on leadership skills. The study found that males and females who perceived their adult support more positively had more positive perceptions of their leadership skills.…

  3. Views of Turkish Teachers on Extracurricular Activities at Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ömer Tugrul

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are educational applications for students outside the school curriculum that require specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors as well as continuity of participation. Because student experiences inside the classroom are organized according to the educator's or institution's instructional goals, which themselves are…

  4. Extracurricular Physical Activity Programs in California Private Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Interscholastic, intramural, and club physical activity (PA) programs can be important contributors to student PA accrual at schools. Few studies have assessed factors related to the provision of these extracurricular PA programs, especially in private schools. Methods: We used a 16-item questionnaire to assess the associations and…

  5. Extra-Curricular Activities and Academic Performance in Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriana, Juan Antonio; Alos, Francisco; Alcala, Rocio; Pino, Maria-Jose; Herruzo, Javier; Ruiz, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In this paper we study the possible influence of extra-curricular activities (study-related and/or sports) on academic performance of first- and second-year pupils in "Educacion Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO)" [N.T. seventh- and eighth-graders]. Method: We randomly selected 12 schools in the city (9 public and 3 private), and…

  6. Participation Motivation for Extracurricular Activities: Study on Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Zeycan; Gündüz, Nevin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the participation motivation for extracurricular activities; study on primary school students. It also analysed whether such factors as age and sex change on the basis of their participation motivation. The population of the study is composed of 797 students in primary school and, the sample is composed of 513…

  7. Immigration, Extracurricular Activity, and the Role of Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Peguero, Anthony A.

    2017-01-01

    The children of immigrants' educational progress and success have been the focus of social research for decades. Although it is known that extracurricular activities contribute to adolescent development and overall well-being, it is also clear that participation varies across immigrant generations. Yet, empirical study explaining generational…

  8. EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON UNIVERSITY'S ATTRACTIVENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Oana DUMITRASCU

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the respondents' opinion regarding the extracurricular activities within their universities and to establish the influencing factors on the university's attractiveness. This study has been elaborated based on the quantitative research, through primary research and the data is gathered through the questionnaire method. The research has been developed within the "Lucian Blaga" University of Sibiu, Politehnica University Timișoara, Babeș Bolyai University Cluj, Bucha...

  9. Better Education at Ishik University Preparatory School with Extracurricular Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Yildiz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It cannot be said that education today in institutions is better than the previous century. Because in the past, students’ mind was not as full of time-consuming things like spending enormous time in front of a computer or a television as today. Subsequently, teachers used to concentrate their job well and students used to focus on the study better because there was nothing serious except studying. On the other hand, it can be said that the youth today are not eager to learn as yesterday. Because of the fact that they are economically free and supported, they do not worry about failing in the exams supposing that they can possess the questions somehow easily and pass the exams. As a result, they think that whatever they want, they can simply gain without pain. Doing homework or extra studies are a torture from students' perspective. As lecturers we are we have to find much more tactics to motivate students in this education era. Hence, extracurricular activities might play a great role for motivating them to study and on their study achievement if they are used in institutions effectively. In my research article educators’ observations and extracurricular activities’ positive impact on weak language learners will be mentioned. Keywords: Extracurricular, impact, observation, education, achievement

  10. The Impact of Extracurricular Activities on Children's School Performance and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Amber L.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of extracurricular activities and the school performance and mental health of children and adolescents was examined. One hundred thirty-three parents completed measures on extracurricular activity participation, academic performance, and mental health for their children in Grades 3-12. Results indicated one significant linear and one significant curvilinear relationship between extracurricular activity participation and school performance of adolescents. As...

  11. Frequency of Preschool Teacher Education Students' Participation in Extracurricular Music Activities in Croatia and Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaškovic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular music activities are those performed outside regular and obligatory school programme. Students' aesthetic education is the goal of art extracurricular activities. The point and purpose of these activities is to uphold favourable conditions for the realisation of various cultural-art activities through which the insight into…

  12. Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Identifying Differences in Perceptions of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Andrew; Coker, Crystal; McMahon, Susan D.; Cohen, Jonathan; Thapa, Amrit

    2016-01-01

    Many youth participate in extracurricular activities, and research has linked activity participation with school engagement and academic success. Social-ecological theory suggests that the social contexts of different types of extracurricular activities may differentially affect student outcomes. Yet, there is scant research examining the relation…

  13. Level of and motivation for extracurricular activity are associated with academic performance in the veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredyth L; Rush, Bonnie R; Elmore, Ronnie G; White, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the number of school-sanctioned extracurricular opportunities available to veterinary students and characterize the policies of school administrations toward extracurricular involvement and academic standing. Further, we sought to describe the level of extracurricular involvement of veterinary students, determine the association between extracurricular activity involvement and academic performance, and determine the motivation for extracurricular involvement of veterinary students. Survey data were obtained from 18 associate deans of colleges of veterinary medicine regarding the number of extracurricular student organizations within their school and administrative recommendations regarding student involvement. Another survey was administered and responded to by 665 veterinary students enrolled in curricular years 1-3 at Kansas State University and Texas A&M University regarding their extracurricular involvement. Associate deans of 11 schools responded that they make formal or informal recommendations to students about extracurricular activities, workload, and academic priority (61.1%). In a multivariate model, students who participated two times per week or more had a significantly higher overall grade point average (GPA) than students participating once per week (pacademic difficulty. Moderate levels of extracurricular involvement can contribute to the academic success of students, but students should temper their level of involvement based upon their own motivations.

  14. Differences in Extracurricular Activity Participation Intensity among Middle School Students: Implications for Hispanic Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Extracurricular activity participation has been associated with a multitude of positive outcomes, including school completion, and research suggests that students at risk for school failure are particularly likely to benefit from participation. However, before extracurricular activity participation can be promoted to address such issues,…

  15. Young School-Aged Children's Behaviour and Their Participation in Extra-Curricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, Kym; Caltabiono, Nerina

    2012-01-01

    While research has repeatedly shown the benefits of participation in extracurricular activities for adolescents, few studies have focused on very young children. Extra-curricular activities afford children opportunities for development and can also influence their behaviour. Children's behaviour is an important predictor of their future successes…

  16. The Contribution of Extracurricular Activities to Adolescent Friendships: New Insights through Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, David R.; Simpkins, Sandra D.; Vest, Andrea E.; Price, Chara D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are settings that are theorized to help adolescents maintain existing friendships and develop new friendships. The overarching goal of the current investigation was to examine whether coparticipating in school-based extracurricular activities supported adolescents' school-based friendships. We used social network methods…

  17. Australian Adolescents' Extracurricular Activity Participation and Positive Development: Is the Relationship Mediated by Peer Attributes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, Corey; Barber, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent participation in extracurricular activities is associated with numerous positive outcomes, yet the mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. This study had two goals: to investigate the association between participation in extracurricular activities and indicators of positive and negative development for Australian…

  18. The Effect of Curricular and Extracurricular Activities on University Students' Entrepreneurial Intention and Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Nieves; Ubierna, Francisco; Arroyabe, Marta. F.; Perez, Carlos; Fernandez de Arroyabe, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of curricular and extracurricular activities on the entrepreneurial motivation and competences of university students. In order to address these issues, the authors have used Ajzen's model of planned behaviour, including curricular and extracurricular activities, analysing their effect on university students'…

  19. Effects of Extracurricular Activities on Postsecondary Completion for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ashley N.; Elliott, William, III; Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors focused on participation in extracurricular activities as a way of improving the educational outcomes of children with disabilities. Regarding students in the general population, adolescent involvement in extracurricular activities has been shown to have a positive association with school involvement and adolescent self-esteem,…

  20. Outside the Classroom: Gender Differences in Extracurricular Activities in Engineering Students. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, Debbie; Chen, Helen L.; Kilgore, Deborah; Sheppard, Sheri

    2009-01-01

    Student engagement in extracurricular activities, and the integration of these activities with academics, can be critical factors influencing student persistence. There is also evidence linking extracurricular and social involvement to career choices, goals and plans, as well as success in future employment and earnings. This paper explores the…

  1. Typology of Extra-Curricular Activities and Academic Procrastination among Primary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, M.; Cladellas, R.; Gotzens, C.; Badia, M.; Dezcallar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Some previous studies have shown that participation in extra-curricular activities optimises both academic grades and the socialisation process of students. However, nobody has so far related extracurricular activities with a tendency for academic procrastination; that is, the more or less deep-rooted habit of leaving study tasks…

  2. Interscholastic Sports, Extracurricular Activities, and the Law: Accommodating Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Allan G., Jr.; Russo, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    In most school systems in the United States, interscholastic sporting events and other extracurricular activities help bring people together while enhancing opportunities for students to become integral parts of their communities. Because of the important role that extracurricular activities, especially sports, play in the lives of students,…

  3. A Literature Review of the Impact of Extracurricular Activities Participation on Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Poh-Sun; Pan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) have become an important component of students' school life and many schools have invested significant resources on extracurricular activities. The authors suggest three major theoretical frameworks (zero-sum, developmental, and threshold) to explain the impact of ECA participation on students' academic…

  4. Clarifying the Meaning of Extracurricular Activity: A Literature Review of Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkus, Kenneth R.; Nemelka, Blake; Nemelka, Mark; Gardner, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities has long been recognized as having important benefits for business students, including the development of competencies relevant to future career success. Unfortunately, a review of the literature suggests that what constitutes an extracurricular activity remains ambiguous and unclear as no…

  5. Athletics, Clubs, or Music? The Influence of College Extracurricular Activities on Job Prestige and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongeun; Bastedo, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how college extracurricular activities influence students' early occupational outcomes. In particular, we examine how the type and number of extracurricular activities, as well as level of participation, influence occupational prestige and job satisfaction. Employing the three national databases, we compare the…

  6. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  7. Student Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Post-Secondary Education Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Courtney J.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities have been an important part of adolescents' lives for generations (Kremer-Sadlik, Izquierdo, & Fatigante, 2010). Extracurricular activities take place outside of the classroom and result in several benefits to students (National Federation of State High School Associations [NFHS], 2010). With the recent recession in…

  8. Children with chronic disease and extracurricular activities: training needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desserprix, Agnès; Marchand, Claire; Crozet, Cyril

    2016-10-19

    Background: ln the current context of increasing numbers of children living with a chronic disease and increasing numbers of people supervising extracurricular activities, difficulties appear to persist despite the Personalised Core Project (PCP). This study explores the accessibility and usefulness of the information provided by the Personalised Care Project and the value of complementary support. Methods: Based on the key messages identified by experts in the four most common chronic diseases, a questionnaire was deve/oped and sent to people supervising extracurricular activities in three districts of the Saône-et-Loire department. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: 55 people participated in the study. 30 (54.5%) had already supervised children with a chronic disease, 21 (70%) of them had been able to read the PCP and 17 (57%) had participated in an information meeting. 23 out of 28 (82%) considered thot the information contained in the PCP was helpful and 21 (81%) expressed their needs for further information. 98% of respondents thought thot additional support would be useful. Their main needs corresponded to 3 main self-core ski/Js: to recognize, analyse and measure; to deal with and decide; to resolve prevention problems. Conclusion: This study confirms the value of the PCP, but also the Jack of preparation of people supervising extracurricu/ar activ ities. lt highlights the need for training to allow these people to ensure the safety of chi /dren living with chronic diseases.

  9. [The significance of extracurricular activities in the life of junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, S; Muto, T

    2001-06-01

    In this study, the significance of extracurricular activities in the life of junior high school students were examined. Seventh and eighth graders participated in a two-stage questionnaire survey, administered in May and October. Based on developmental stage-environment fit theory (Eccles, Wigfield, & Schiefele, 1998), how well extracurricular activity settings fit needs of the students was analyzed. In support of the theory's hypothesis, results indicated that whether an extracurricular activity satisfied the student's developmental needs affected his/her sense of fulfillment and satisfaction in school life. In addition, the effect of seventh graders' commitment to extracurricular activities on their satisfaction of school life was stronger in October than in May. The findings suggested that for students who felt uneasy in class for whatever reasons, extracurricular activities provided an opportunity for relief.

  10. Exploring intercultural competence through an intercultural extracurricular activity in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Kai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used interviews to explore how 10 Taiwanese college students' intercultural competence was developed after participating in an intercultural extracurricular activity designed with a purpose to facilitate foreign students’ study in Taiwan and to promote meaningful home-foreign student contacts. In-depth information and narratives from the interviews were collected as evidence of intercultural competence development. The results showed all the interviewees appreciated the experience and felt it to have been of value to them in terms of building international friendships, heightening their intercultural awareness and the benefits of intercultural competence, and having more appreciation and better understanding of Taiwanese culture. Students also realized that a lack of understanding of Taiwanese culture could exacerbate communication difficulties. Students thus became aware of the importance of describing Taiwanese cultural practices in English and realized that more language practice was necessary for smoother communication. Suggestions for both extracurricular activities and language programs improvement in the future were also provided in the conclusion.

  11. The Relationship of Participation in Extracurricular Activities to Student Achievement, Student Attendance, and Student Behavior in a Nebraska School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible relationships between participation in extracurricular activities and student achievement, participation in extracurricular activities and attendance, and participation in extracurricular activities and behavior. The setting for this study was a high school in western Nebraska. Data for 275 of the…

  12. Extracurricular Activities and Bullying Perpetration: Results from a Nationally Representative Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, Alison; Gjelsvik, Annie; Ranney, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a widespread problem for school-aged children and adolescents. Interventions to reduce bullying are not well disseminated. Extracurricular involvement is, however, common. This study aims to examine the relationship between parent-reported participation in extracurricular activities and bullying perpetration. Methods: Using…

  13. "It's Everything Else You Do...": Alumni Views on Extracurricular Activities and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gordon; Marsden, Rebecca; Whyatt, J. Duncan; Thompson, Leanne; Walker, Marion

    2015-01-01

    This article explores students' extracurricular activities and, uniquely, their short- and long-term effects on employability. Drawing on the literature, six research questions are identified. A questionnaire and interviews with alumni provide the quantitative and qualitative information needed. The effects of different extracurricular activities…

  14. After the Bell: Participation in Extracurricular Activities, Classroom Behavior, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covay, Elizabeth; Carbonaro, William

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has not examined how much of the socioeconomic status (SES) advantage on schooling outcomes is related to participation in extracurricular activities. The authors explore the SES advantage and extracurricular participation in elementary school-aged children, with a focus on noncognitive skills. The authors argue that noncognitive…

  15. USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATIONAL EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN HIGHER TOURIST INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliia O. Matviyiv-Lozynska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with extracurricular educational activities in higher educational establishment of tourism profile with information technologies usage. It is known that extracurricular activities of higher educational establishment has an impact on the professional activities of future specialists in the tourism industry, as is in the process of extracurricular activities students can put into practice the obtained knowledge and skills. The task of teachers is to build a learning process, in particular activities outside classrooms as its component, so that the students were interested in it. In the modern world of tourism prosperity it is very difficult to do without the usage of multimedia technologies (internet, media, etc.

  16. Adolescents' social environment and depression: social networks, extracurricular activity, and family relationship influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J; Schmidt, Christopher; Abraham, Anisha; Walker, Leslie; Tercyak, Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    The present study examined components of adolescents' social environment (social network, extracurricular activities, and family relationships) in association with depression. A total of 332 adolescents presenting for a routine medical check-up were self-assessed for social network risk (i.e., smoking habits of best male and female friends), extracurricular activity level (i.e., participation in organized sports teams, clubs, etc.), family relationship quality (i.e., cohesion and conflict), and symptoms of depression (i.e., minimal, mild, moderate/severe). Results of a forward linear regression modeling indicate that social environment components were associated with a significant proportion of the variance in adolescent depression (Adjusted R (2) = .177, p social network (beta = .107, p social environment plays in adolescent depression, as well as yields new insights into socially-based intervention targets that may ameliorate adolescent depression. These intervention targets may be gender-specific, include positive social network skills training, increase adolescents' engagement in organized activities, and attend to the quality of their family relationships.

  17. Extracurricular Activities and Bullying Perpetration: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, Alison; Gjelsvik, Annie; Ranney, Megan L

    2015-08-01

    Bullying is a widespread problem for school-aged children and adolescents. Interventions to reduce bullying are not well disseminated. Extracurricular involvement is, however, common. This study aims to examine the relationship between parent-reported participation in extracurricular activities and bullying perpetration. Using the 2011 National Survey of Children's Health, 62,215 interviews with parents of children 6 to 17 were analyzed. Extracurricular categories of sports only, sports + nonsport, nonsport only, and no activities were based on parental response to questions regarding sport teams/lessons, clubs, and organizations. Bullying was derived from report of the child "bullying or being cruel/mean to others." Weighted bivariate analyses, logistic regression, and sex/race/ethnicity/age stratified analyses were conducted. Eighty percent of children participated in extracurricular activities: 8% sports, 48% sports + nonsports, and 24% nonsports. Bullying perpetration was reported in 15% of the sample. Compared with those not participating in extracurricular activities, the odds of bullying were significantly lower for children who participated in sports + nonsports (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.79) and nonsport only (AOR 0.82, 95% CI 0.70-0.97). Stratified analyses showed attenuated effects of extracurricular activities for boys and for Hispanics. Children who participate in a variety of extracurricular activities exhibit the least frequent bullying perpetration. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  18. Burnout and its association with extracurricular activities among medical students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Sami A; Almojali, Abdullah I; Alothman, Ali S; Masuadi, Emad M; Alaqeel, Meshal K

    2017-04-26

    To assess levels of burnout in medical students, and to explore the influence of extracurricular activities on burnout at a medical school in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study was conducted with first to fourth year medical students at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Socio-demographic, burnout level (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, MBI-SS) and participation in extracurricular activities data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using the Pearson's chi-square test and binary logistic regression. From the 306 medical students approached, 249 (81.4%) completed the questionnaire. The level of high burnout was 67.1% (n=167). The study revealed that the majority (62.3%, n=155) of students had high levels of cynicism, 58.6% (n=146) had high levels of emotional exhaustion, and 60.2% (n=150) had low levels of professional efficacy. Most of the students (73.5%, n=183) participated in extracurricular activities, and 112 (45%) students were organizers of extracurricular activities. No significant association was found between burnout levels and the frequency of involvement in extracurricular activities (χ2=2.2, df=2, p=0.333). However, students who were organizing extracurricular activities were less likely to have low professional efficacy (OR=0.51, 95% CI: 0.27- 0.96). High levels of burnout were reported at this medical school. Although the burnout level is not significantly associated with the frequency of involvement in extracurricular activities, leading and organizing extracurricular activities might result in lower levels of burnout. Therefore, improving the students' leadership skills should be considered in curriculum planning, and greater emphasis should be placed on the quality of involvement in extracurricular activities rather than the quantity.

  19. Participation in extracurricular activities for children with and without siblings with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigston, Christine; Falkmer, Marita; Vaz, Sharmila; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    To compare the number, frequency, enjoyment and performance in extracurricular activities of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to their typically developing (TD) peers, and to identify differences between actual and desired participation. A case-control study with 30 siblings of children with ASD and 30 siblings of TD children was conducted using the Paediatric Interest Profiles and a questionnaire. Siblings of children with ASD participated in fewer extracurricular activities than those with TD siblings. ASD symptoms were significantly associated with the sibling participating in fewer extracurricular activities. Children with TD siblings had higher enjoyment scores in relaxation activities than children with siblings with ASD. While results were mainly positive, some differences indicated that having a sibling with ASD may impact participation in extracurricular activities. Assessments of participation barriers, as well as support to minimise participation restrictions among siblings of children with ASD are required.

  20. Retrospective measurement of students' extracurricular activities with a selfadministered calendar instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Furthmüller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    "With the expansion of all-day schooling in Germany, students' extracurricular activities are being brought into greater focus in educational and social sciences. However, the diverse range of activities and individual biographies makes it difficult to gather data on the variety and periods of extracurricular activities in classroom-based surveys. This paper introduces a tailored calendar instrument that was applied by the Study on the Development of All-Day Schools (StEG) to retrospectively ...

  1. Gender Variation in Extracurricular Activity Participation and Perceived Life Chances in Trinidad and Tobago Adolescents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mello, Zena R; Worrell, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities has surfaced as an important context for adolescent development and may be a fruitful avenue for fostering future attitudes, a concept shown to predict adolescent behaviors...

  2. Effect of light exposure during sleep on the curricular and extracurricular activities of medical students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swamy Ravindra Shantakumar; Naveen Kumar; Farah Suziantiebinti Adnan; Fateen Najwabinti Mohd Yacob; Fateen Nadhirabinti Ismai; Hastantibinti Samsuddin; Husnabinti Rosleli; Swamy Rajeev Shantkumar

    2017-01-01

    ...: We conducted a study to find the effects of the exposure of light during sleep on student’s sleep quality, level of concentration in class, academic performances and involvement in extracurricular activities...

  3. A Plan of Extra-Curricular Activities "Learning about Relationships" -With Structured Group Encounter-

    OpenAIRE

    輿, 幸雄; 下田, 好行

    2002-01-01

    There are few educational practices for learning about interpersonal relationships in extra-curricular activities. Learning about relationships is important for students these days. In this report, a plan of learning about relationships with structured group encounter is suggested.

  4. The relationship between extracurricular activities assessed during selection and during medical school and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Urlings-Strop (Louise); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); K.M. Stegers-Jager (Karen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSeveral medical schools include candidates’ extracurricular activities in their selection procedure, with promising results regarding their predictive value for achievement during the clinical years of medical school. This study aims to reveal whether the better achievement in clinical

  5. Self-reported extracurricular activity, academic success, and quality of life in UK medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Lumley, Sophie; Ward, Peter; Roberts, Lesley; Mann, Jake P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relationship between academic performance, extracurricular activity, and quality of life at medical school in the UK to aid our understanding of students’ work-life balance. Methods A cross-sectional study, using an electronic questionnaire distributed to UK final year medical students across 20 medical schools (4478 students). Participants reported the hours of self-regulated learning and extracurricular activities undertaken each year at medical school; along with ...

  6. Extracurricular research activities among senior medical students in Kuwait: experiences, attitudes, and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halabi, Becher; Marwan, Yousef; Hasan, Mohammad; Alkhadhari, Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Background Research is the foundation of scientific advancement and improvement in quality of health care, which ensures the good health of the community. The aim of this study is to explore experiences, attitudes, and barriers of medical students in Kuwait University (KU) in regards to extracurricular research. Methods A questionnaire about extracurricular research activities (ie, any research activity that is not part of the required undergraduate curriculum, such as publishing a paper, research elective, etc) was distributed to 175 senior medical students (years 6 and 7). Descriptive and chi-square analyses were used to analyze the responses, considering a P-value of extracurricular research activities. Results Of the 150 participants (response rate = 85.7%), 26 (17.3%), 68 (45.3%), 52 (34.7%), and 17 (11.3%) had published their required medical school research, presented abstracts in conferences, conducted extracurricular research, and completed a research elective/course, respectively; 99 (66.0%) took part in any of these activities. Participants who read medical journals regularly (81; 54%) reported higher participation in extracurricular research activities than those who did not read journals (P=0.003). Improving the availability of mentors for students’ extracurricular research was ranked by the participants as the most important factor to improve their participation in extracurricular research (4.05/5.00). Conclusion Despite the lack of adequate support, extracurricular research activities among medical students of KU were comparable to students from other countries. Barriers for these activities should be addressed by KU medical educators in order to enhance research activities among the students. PMID:24812535

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ON THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF A UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Oana DUMITRASCU; Constantin Manuel HILA

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to analyse the influence of the extracurricular offer on the attractiveness of the study location, analysing four universities from Germany. This study aims to determine the involvement of students in extracurricular activities, their awareness, and to formulate recommendations for the University of Applied Sciences Worms. The research focuses on the sports activities offer. The study has been accomplished using the bibliographic study, the methodology ...

  8. Burnout and its association with extracurricular activities among medical students in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Almalki, Sami A.; Almojali, Abdullah I.; Alothman, Ali S.; Masuadi, Emad M; Alaqeel, Meshal K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess levels of burnout in medical students, and to explore the influence of extracurricular activities on burnout at a medical school in Saudi Arabia. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with first to fourth year medical students at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Socio-demographic, burnout level (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, MBI-SS) and participation in extracurricular activities data were...

  9. Extracurricular research activities among senior medical students in Kuwait: experiences, attitudes, and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halabi, Becher; Marwan, Yousef; Hasan, Mohammad; Alkhadhari, Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Research is the foundation of scientific advancement and improvement in quality of health care, which ensures the good health of the community. The aim of this study is to explore experiences, attitudes, and barriers of medical students in Kuwait University (KU) in regards to extracurricular research. A questionnaire about extracurricular research activities (ie, any research activity that is not part of the required undergraduate curriculum, such as publishing a paper, research elective, etc) was distributed to 175 senior medical students (years 6 and 7). Descriptive and chi-square analyses were used to analyze the responses, considering a P-value of extracurricular research activities. Of the 150 participants (response rate = 85.7%), 26 (17.3%), 68 (45.3%), 52 (34.7%), and 17 (11.3%) had published their required medical school research, presented abstracts in conferences, conducted extracurricular research, and completed a research elective/course, respectively; 99 (66.0%) took part in any of these activities. Participants who read medical journals regularly (81; 54%) reported higher participation in extracurricular research activities than those who did not read journals (P=0.003). Improving the availability of mentors for students' extracurricular research was ranked by the participants as the most important factor to improve their participation in extracurricular research (4.05/5.00). Despite the lack of adequate support, extracurricular research activities among medical students of KU were comparable to students from other countries. Barriers for these activities should be addressed by KU medical educators in order to enhance research activities among the students.

  10. Human rights education: transformative learning through student participation in extracurricular activities at school

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    This research involved a comparative case study analysis of the informal extracurricular human rights education programs in a school in Australia and a school in Asia. The research questions explored how and why schools implement teaching and learning about human rights; the impact that learning about human rights through informal extracurricular activities has on the development of student skills, attitudes, knowledge and understanding as cosmopolitan citizens; and the extent to which learn...

  11. Bonding, Achievement, and Activities: School Bonding, Academic Achievement, and Participation in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Anissa K.; Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing a single-group interrupted time series design (Creswell, 2003), this pilot study examined the relationship between academic achievement, school bonding, and the extracurricular activity participation of "uninvolved" students (n=11) who participated in a voluntary support group at a suburban high school in the southeast. Results…

  12. Effects of physical education, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on adolescent aggressive behavior: A latent growth modeling approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanghyun Park; Weisheng Chiu; Doyeon Won

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the longitudinal influence of physical education classes, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on aggressive behavior among South Korean adolescents...

  13. Socialization through Informal Education: The Extracurricular Activities of Russian Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaniushina, V. A.; Aleksandrov, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a large-scale study on the scope of extracurricular education services and an assessment of the potential role of education outside the classroom and informal education in solving children's socialization issues. The study was carried out by questioning students as consumers of education services. A new instrument…

  14. About Extra-Curricular Activities of The University Graduate – Student’s Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-curricular activity of modern youth, including university students, is considered to reduce. Students are thought to demonstrate consumer’s attitude, unwillingness to participate in any social activity, and as a result, the level of soft skills acquired by university students is decreasing. The study of social activity of 100 Bachelor graduates from TPU, including the program “Electrical engineering”, indicated the role of the university in creation of conditions for competence development during training of students according to individual educational trajectory and development of their social (extra-curricular activity.

  15. Motivation towards extracurricular activities and motivation at school: A test of the generalization effect hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denault, Anne-Sophie; Guay, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is a promising avenue for enhancing students' school motivation. Using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), the goal of this study was to test a serial multiple mediator model. In this model, students' perceptions of autonomy support from their extracurricular activity leader predicted their activity-based intrinsic and identified regulations. In turn, these regulations predicted their school-based intrinsic and identified regulations during the same school year. Finally, these regulations predicted their school-based intrinsic and identified regulations one year later. A total of 276 youths (54% girls) from disadvantaged neighborhoods were surveyed over two waves of data collection. The proposed mediation model was supported for both types of regulation. These results highlight the generalization effects of motivation from the extracurricular activity context to the school context. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Active parents, active children: The importance of parental organized physical activity in children's extracurricular sport participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Padez, Cristina; Machado-Rodrigues, Aristides M

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether parental participation in organized and unorganized physical activity (PA) was associated with children's participation in extracurricular sport. The sample comprised 834 parents and their children (aged 6-10 years), living in central Portugal. Questionnaires assessed parental PA (organized and unorganized) and extracurricular sport participation in children (number of sports and frequency of participation). Multinomial logistic regression was applied to assess associations between parental and child physical behaviors. Having both parents active was significantly associated with frequent participation in more sports both in girls and boys but a strong relation according to gender was found. The odds of boys practicing more than one sport and more times per week were higher if they had an active father. Girls with physically active mothers, particularly with mothers practicing organized PA in a regular way, were engaged in more sports and practiced sport more times per week. The type of PA practiced by the parents was not related to boys' participation in sport. Future interventions should be family-based and focus on the promotion of higher levels of parental PA, including organized, in order to improve their children's active behaviors.

  17. Developmental Experiences during Extracurricular Activities and Australian Adolescents' Self-Concept: Particularly Important for Youth from Disadvantaged Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, Corey J.; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activities provide adolescents with a number of positive personal and interpersonal developmental experiences. This study investigated whether developmental experiences that occurred during extracurricular activities were linked to a more positive self-concept for Australian adolescents, and whether this link was particularly…

  18. A School-Level Analysis of Adolescent Extracurricular Activity, Delinquency, and Depression: The Importance of Situational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Andrew M.; McRee, Nick

    2009-01-01

    In this article we investigate the extent to which the relationship between extracurricular activities and youth development depends on situational contexts. Using a national sample including 13,466 youths in grades 7-12 across 120 schools, we conduct school-level analyses of the association between extracurricular activities, delinquency, and…

  19. Brief Report: Performing on the Stage, the Field, or Both? Australian Adolescent Extracurricular Activity Participation and Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, Corey J.; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between Australian adolescents' participation in extracurricular activities and their self-concepts was investigated. A total of 1489 adolescents (56% female; mean age 13.8 years) completed measures of social self-concept, academic self-concept, and general self-worth, and reported on their extracurricular activity participation.…

  20. Extracurricular Activity Participation and the Acquisition of Developmental Assets: Differences between Involved and Noninvolved Canadian High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forneris, Tanya; Camiré, Martin; Williamson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In order to prepare students for adulthood and responsible citizenship, most high schools offer extracurricular activities designed to facilitate the learning of a wide range of competencies. The purpose of this study was to examine how participation in a single or a combination of extracurricular school activities for high school students may…

  1. Participation in Extracurricular Activities and Emotional and Behavioral Adjustment in Middle Childhood in Spanish Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinuevo, Beatriz; Bonillo, Albert; Pardo, Yolanda; Doval, Eduardo; Torrubia, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concurrent relationship between participation in extracurricular activities and externalizing and internalizing problems and social school behavior in a Spanish community sample, separately for boys (n=439) and girls (n=428), enrolled in 2nd, 4th, or 6th grades. Weekly participation in extracurricular activities was related…

  2. Perceptions of preclinical medical students towards extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasry, Mazen; Kayali, Zeina; Alsaad, Rakan; Alhayaza, Ghada; Ahmad, Mohammad Sharique; Obeidat, Akef; Abu-Zaid, Ahmed

    2017-08-16

    To determine the percentage of students involved in extracurricular activities (EAs), explore relationships between participation in EAs and students' characteristics, and investigate students' perceptions (i.e., motives and barriers) towards participation in EAs. An online, anonymous, random, cross-sectional, self-rating survey was administered during spring 2015-2016 to second-year and third-year students (n=340). Chi-square test was used to explore relationships between participation in EAs and students' characteristics. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the mean 5-point Likert scale responses according to students' characteristics. Statistical significance was determined as p<0.05. Two hundred thirty-seven students participated in the survey (n=237/340, response rate: 69.7%). Only 143 students (60.3%, n=140/237) participated in EAs, and this percentage significantly differed by gender (χ(2)(1, N=237)=4.3205, p<0.037), nationality (χ(2)(1, N=237)=18.7069, p<0.000) and cumulative grade point average (cGPA, χ(2)(1, N=237)=17.8296, p<0.000). The top three motives towards participation in EAs were: "improve resume" (83.5%, n=198), "improve networking skills" (82.7%, n=196) and "improve teamwork skills" (76.8%, n=182). The top three barriers towards participation in EAs were: "lack of time" (61.2%, n=145), "lack of equal opportunities in EAs" (57.8%, n=137) and "lack of curricular emphasis of EAs" (52.7%, n=125). There was a statistically significant difference of means between male (mean=2.8) and female (mean=3.2) students regarding the following barrier: "affect academic performance negatively" (U=5389.5, p<0.002). The participation rate in EAs was satisfactory, and positively related to students' characteristics of male gender, non-Saudi nationality and high cGPA. Medical schools should facilitate all potential motives and resolve all associated barriers towards participation in EAs.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ON THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF A UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana DUMITRASCU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to analyse the influence of the extracurricular offer on the attractiveness of the study location, analysing four universities from Germany. This study aims to determine the involvement of students in extracurricular activities, their awareness, and to formulate recommendations for the University of Applied Sciences Worms. The research focuses on the sports activities offer. The study has been accomplished using the bibliographic study, the methodology of qualitative and quantitative research, using various secondary and primary sources. Using the survey method, data from 699 students from Germany, registered in the university year 2013/2014 were gathered. The collected data were analysed through univariate and bivariate analysis. As a result of the study, specific gaps from each region are identified regarding the extracurricular offer of the analysed universities and recommendations for the University of Applied Sciences Worms are formulated.

  4. THE ROLE OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND THEIR IMPACT ON LEARNING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cordea

    2014-07-01

    In terms of entrepreneurial learning student's engagement in extracurricular activities provides enhanced opportunities for 'learning by doing' through action and experience. The data show that an increased action leads to reflective practice and social learning is important for students. The article highlights the capacity of entrepreneurship education to stimulate entrepreneurial learning; illustrating the value of extracurricular activities and explaining how develop student's enterprising behaviours. Furthermore, it is very important to examine the need to develop a more enterprising approach to learning by adopting an experiential approach.

  5. Goal orientation, motivational climate, and dispositional flow of high school students engaged in extracurricular physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelló, Eduardo M; Moreno, Juan A; Villodre, Nestor Alonso; Iglesias, Damián

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of goal orientation, motivational climate, and dispositional flow in physical education lessons on extracurricular involvement in physical activity. Questionnaires were administered to 1,103 (792 athletes; 311 nonathletes) secondary school students (M age = 14.3 yr., SD = 0.7). Analysis showed significant mean differences between groups on goal orientation and dispositional flow in physical education lessons, but none for perception of motivational climate. These findings suggest that dispositional variables are related to extracurricular involvement in physical activity.

  6. Extracurricular School-Based Sports as a Stepping Stone toward an Active Lifestyle? Differences in Physical Activity and Sports-Motivation between Extracurricular School-Based Sports Participants and Non-Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, An; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Haerens, Leen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The goals were to investigate whether extracurricular school-based sports reach students not engaging in community sports and whether extracurricular school-based sports participants are more physically active and/or autonomously motivated toward sports than nonparticipants. Method: 1526 students (48.0% boys; 85.9% Belgian natives; age =…

  7. Extracurricular School-Based Sports as a Stepping Stone toward an Active Lifestyle? Differences in Physical Activity and Sports-Motivation between Extracurricular School-Based Sports Participants and Non-Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, An; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Haerens, Leen

    Purpose: The goals were to investigate whether extracurricular school-based sports reach students not engaging in community sports and whether extracurricular school-based sports participants are more physically active and/or autonomously motivated toward sports than nonparticipants. Method: 1526 students (48.0% boys; 85.9% Belgian natives; age =…

  8. Developmental Benefits of Extracurricular Involvement: Do Peer Characteristics Mediate the Link between Activities and Youth Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, Jennifer A.; Eccles, Jacquelynn S.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we test: (a) the relation between school-based extracurricular participation and indicators of positive and negative development across a range of activity contexts, and (b) a mediation model linking activity participation, prosocial peers, and development. Extensive survey information was collected from a predominately White…

  9. Recent Advances in Research on School-Based Extracurricular Activities and Adolescent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farb, Amy Feldman; Matjasko, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Updating a previous systematic review of the literature, this review summarizes the literature over the last 5 years on the relationship between school-based extracurricular activity participation and academic achievement, substance use, sexual activity, psychological adjustment, and delinquency. The review also considers mediators and moderators…

  10. Involvement in Extracurricular Activities as Related to Academic Performance, Personality, and Peer Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Yee-wang; Wong, Ngai-ying

    1991-01-01

    Reveals findings of a survey of 294 Hong Kong secondary school students. Evaluates relationships among involvement in extracurricular activities, academic performance, personality, and peer acceptance. Concludes that activity involvement is positively related to academic performance, personality, and peer acceptance. Suggests that further research…

  11. Integration of Active Video Games in Extracurricular Activity at Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Huang, Charles; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Active video games require players to be physically active. Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is an interactive dancing game that requires fast-foot movement coordinated with energetic music and visuals. The Wii and Xbox Kinect games have also become good active video games for the promotion of physical activity participation. These games are much more…

  12. Leveling the Playing Field: First Generation Korean American Males and School Based Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Corey

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the manner in which extracurricular activities impacted the acculturation of first-generation adolescent males. Specifically, the project focused on the influence of organized high school soccer on the development of first-generation adolescent Korean American males. Eight adolescent participants, ranging in age from fourteen…

  13. School Extracurricular Activity Participation as a Moderator in the Development of Antisocial Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Examined antecedents and moderators of antisocial behavior among children interviewed annually through high school and in early adulthood. Analyses identified four configurations differing in early school dropout and criminal arrests. School extracurricular activity participation related to reduced rates of early dropout and criminal arrest among…

  14. Outsourcing Extra-Curricular Activities: A Management Strategy in a Time of Neoliberal Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shun Wing; Chan, Tsan Ming Kenneth; Yuen, Wai Kwan Gail

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on an exploratory study designed to illuminate the complexity of outsourcing extra-curricular activities (ECAs) in primary schools in a time of neoliberal influence and to examine the views of teaching professionals on the reasons, issues and considerations of outsourcing ECAs such as the dynamic…

  15. School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.; Hagewen, Kellie J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on adolescent self-esteem indicates that adolescence is a time in which individuals experience important changes in their physical, cognitive, and social identities. Prior research suggests that there is a positive relationship between an adolescent's participation in structured extracurricular activities and well-being in a variety of…

  16. Extracurricular Activities and Their Effect on the Student's Grade Point Average: Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakoban, R. A.; Aljarallah, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are part of students' everyday life; they play important roles in students' lives. Few studies have addressed the question of how student engagements to ECA affect student's grade point average (GPA). This research was conducted to know whether the students' grade point average in King Abdulaziz University,…

  17. The Relationship between Extracurricular Activities Assessed during Selection and during Medical School and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urlings-Strop, Louise C.; Themmen, Axel P. N.; Stegers-Jager, Karen M.

    2017-01-01

    Several medical schools include candidates' extracurricular activities in their selection procedure, with promising results regarding their predictive value for achievement during the clinical years of medical school. This study aims to reveal whether the better achievement in clinical training of students selected on the basis of their…

  18. Extracurricular Activity and Parental Involvement Predict Positive Outcomes in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.; Case, Emily

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore if parental involvement and extracurricular activity participation could predict well-being and academic competence in elementary school children. Seventy-two children (mean age = 10.9 years, SD = 0.85) and their parents participated. Results revealed that parental pressure and support, when paired with…

  19. Supporting Gender Equality in Extracurricular Activities and the Impact on Female Bullying Victimization in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Brett

    2017-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the extent to which U.S. high school students are bullied in connection with participation in and attitudes towards extracurricular activities. Previous research suggests that students are bullied when their participation exhibits gender abnormal performances of masculinity or femininity, but less is known…

  20. Participation in Sports-Related Extracurricular Activities: A Strategy That Enhances School Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Amand, Jerome; Girard, Stéphanie; Hiroux, Marie-Hélène; Smith, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines a strategy that we, as high school teachers, used in the academic year 2012-2013 to improve a student's school engagement. Extracurricular activities such as sports have proven useful (among other strategies) to counter school disengagement, specifically in enhancing positive social relations among the teachers and students…

  1. Physical Activity Patterns in Portuguese Adolescents: The Contribution of Extracurricular Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro; Sousa, Michael; Aires, Luisa; Seabra, Andre; Ribeiro, Jose; Welk, Gregory; Mota, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    In Portugal, two sports systems exist, one through schools and the other in community clubs. The purpose was to determine the impact of extra-curricular sports (EC sports) on boys' and girls' moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). 208 adolescents (79 boys and 129 girls), between 12 and 18 years old, wore an accelerometer over seven days.…

  2. The formation of logic thinking of junior schoolchildren during some extracurricular activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimov Vladimir Fedorovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the topical issue of formation of junior schoolchildren's mathematical abilities, discloses the modern scientific concept of General and specific mathematical abilities. The structure of mathematical abilities, analyzed the specificity of extra-curricular activities, which under favorable conditions accompanies the intellectual development of junior schoolchildren.

  3. Adolescent Developmental Experiences and Participation in Extracurricular Activities in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfnifie, Shuaa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined adolescent developmental experiences and participation in extracurricular activities. Providing youth with multiple channels to nurture their development and acknowledge their interests and strengths can play a significant role in their holistic growth. This is a descriptive study of a mixed-methods design (quantitative and…

  4. Investigating the Relationship among Extracurricular Activities, Learning Approach and Academic Outcomes: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yiu-Kong

    2016-01-01

    Learning effectiveness requires an understanding of the relationship among extracurricular activities, learning approach and academic performance and, it is argued, this helps educators develop techniques designed to enrich learning effectiveness. Biggs' Presage-Process-Product model on student learning has identified the relationship among…

  5. Timetabling and Extracurricular Activities: A Study of Teachers' Attitudes towards Preparation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Robert F.; Richard, George

    2012-01-01

    Many models of timetabling exist in secondary schools in Western educational jurisdictions. This study examines whether or not teachers teaching a full course load without preparation time during a semester are willing to volunteer to participate in extracurricular activities. This research was conducted in a rural school district in British…

  6. Socioemotional Behavior and School Achievement in Relation to Extracurricular Activity Participation in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsapelto, Riitta-Leena; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study investigated the associations of student (aged 9 to 10 years at the beginning of the study; n = 281; 51% girls) participation in extracurricular activities with teacher-rated socioemotional behavior and school achievement. MANOVA results showed that, after controlling for the grade level and the initial level of the…

  7. Athletics, Music, Languages, and Leadership: How Parents Influence the Extracurricular Activities of Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbourne, Dianne; Andres, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact that parents have on the participation of their children in extracurricular activities (ECAs) in a sample of Canadian parents with children between the ages of four and 17. Employing a concurrent, nested, mixed methods strategy, we use the insights gained through semi-structured interviews with parents to…

  8. Possibilities of Extracurricular Activities in the Student's Spiritual and Moral Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykova, Saule A.; Yergazina, Aliya A.; Yeshpanov, Vladimir S.; Korvyakov, Valeriy A.; Aitzhanova, Akmaral B.

    2016-01-01

    With the purpose of substantiating pedagogical terms of the student's spiritually-moral becoming it is necessary to expose possibilities of extracurricular activities during this process. Its intrinsic characteristics are described as a factor of the student's spiritually-moral becoming. The main idea of the article is to reveal possibilities of…

  9. School Principals' Agency as Reflected by Extracurricular Activities in the Israeli Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemini, Miri; Addi-Raccah, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the nature and extent of extracurricular activities in the Palestinian Arab, Jewish Religious and Jewish Secular educational sectors (Israeli education system also includes the Ultra-Orthodox sector with its own management, monitoring and governance apparatus.) in Israel, in order to characterise the contextual variables that…

  10. Inequity outside the Classroom: Growing Class Differences in Participation in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellman, Kaisa; Silva, Jennifer M.; Putnam, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on research that shows that extracurricular activities help cultivate the skills, connections, and knowledge that prepare children for lifelong success. They add, however, that low-income students are increasingly being excluded from participating. Struggling with budget cuts and deficits, many school districts…

  11. Possible Selves: Students Orientating Themselves towards the Future through Extracurricular Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jacqueline; Clegg, Sue

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the under-researched area of extracurricular activity undertaken by students through the lens of the possible selves literature, which has largely been developed in the North American context. In the UK the employability agenda assumes an orientation towards the future and employers are increasingly expecting students to…

  12. Place Disparities in Supportive Environments for Extracurricular Physical Activity in North Carolina Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael B.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Kanters, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Disadvantaged rural youth may be especially at risk for obesity and poorer health due to physical inactivity. Research suggests that extracurricular school programs can increase physical activity for this population. This study sought to determine whether local differences existed in the availability of supportive environments for extracurricular…

  13. Extracurricular Activity Participation of Hispanic Students: Implications for Social Capital Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Gonzalez, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated whether participation in school-based extracurricular activities would predict social and behavioral outcomes (school membership, peer prosocial orientation, and prosocial behavior) associated with school social capital in a group of Hispanic middle school students from the United States of America. Results of hierarchical…

  14. The Effects of Extracurricular Activities on the Academic Achievement of Seventh and Eighth Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sudhir K.

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the effects of extracurricular activities on academic achievement of seventh and eighth graders. This study compared the academic achievements of participants and non-participants in Mathematics and Language Arts. The three different measurements used for the academic achievement were TCAP, ThinkLink, and GPA…

  15. The Influence of Extracurricular Activities on Middle School Students' Science Learning in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Tang, Xing

    2017-01-01

    Informal science learning has been found to have effects on students' science learning. Through the use of secondary data from a national assessment of 7410 middle school students in China, this study explores the relationship among five types of extracurricular science activities, learning interests, academic self-concept, and science…

  16. Beyond Participation: The Association between School Extracurricular Activities and Involvement in Violence across Generations of Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study…

  17. [Extracurricular activities of adolescents useful for smoking prevention programs. OCTOPUS team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López González, M L; López, T; Comas Fuentes, A; Herrero Puente, P; González Blázquez, J; Cueto Espinar, A; Thomas, H; Douglas, J; Markham, W; Charlton, A; de Vries, H; Leijs, I; Mester, I; Ausems, M

    1999-01-01

    The cigarette smoking habit continues to be prevalent to a greater degree than would be desirable among teenagers. Innovative prevention programs are needed. This descriptive cross-sectional study sets out the behavior variables related to the cigarette smoking habit and the extracurricular activities in which teenagers are most frequently involved which are useful for setting out extracurricular prevention programs. The data was collected by means of a questionnaire validated in a representative sample of school age youths (ages 10-11 and 13-14) from Asturias. The variables entailed in cigarette smoking were analyzed using the regression method. The starting smoker percentage is 14.5%-42.5%, regular smokers totaling 1.1% and 12.4%, respectively. Two models were constructed with the variables significantly related to smoking behavior, which are properly classified into smoker/non-smoker by 98.85% and 91.39% of the children, by ages. The environmental variables (availability of cigarettes and alcoholic beverages and regular visits to places entailing risk) are the major aspects comprising the model. The most common extracurricular activities are: watching TV, reading and listening to music and watching or playing sports. The findings provide keys to planning extracurricular activities tailored to fit in with the activities most popular among teens: TV commercials and ads on music media (CD's, tapes, etc.) and printed information mailed directly to teens at their homes, with messages conveyed by opinion-leaders among teens in the fields of sports, music and television.

  18. Extracurricular activity availability and participation and substance use among American Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Kristin L; Markstrom, Carol A; Jones, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    School-based extracurricular activity involvement has been associated with lower levels of substance use among adolescents from various populations; however, these associations have only been slightly examined among American Indian (AI) adolescents. Building from various theoretical perspectives, it was hypothesized that AI adolescents' perceived access to and the intensity (i.e., frequency) of participation in extracurricular activities would be associated with lower substance use and less engagement in risky substance use behaviors (i.e., being drunk or high at school, riding/driving with an intoxicated driver, and selling drugs). The moderating influences of sex, age, reservation residence, and metropolitan status also were examined. Data from the 2010 Arizona Youth Survey were analyzed for 5,701 8th, 10th, and 12th grade AI adolescents (49.1% female). The expected protective effects of extracurricular participation were demonstrated, such that high levels of perceived availability and intensity of participation consistently predicted low levels of all outcomes. Some of these associations were moderated by one or more demographic factors, with unique patterns emerging for each behavior. Ultimately, the findings suggest that AI adolescents benefit from the availability of extracurricular activities and intensity of participation in them, but the degree of the effect is contingent upon other individual and contextual characteristics.

  19. Extracurricular Sport Activities and their Importance in Children Socialization and Integration Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomohaci Marcel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of sports activities nowadays is showing their effects on the future development of children, extracurricular activities come in the help of the physical education teacher with benefits on children's development. Our study focuses on revealing the importance of extracurricular sports activities in the process of children's socialization and integration. The research sample was formed from two different groups, the experimental group was formed by 25 students (age 10 ± 2.1 years, 13 boys, and 12 girls, that practiced 2 hours a week physical education and other 2 hours a week extracurricular activities like basketball and volleyball; and the sample group formed by 24 students (age 10 ± 1.8 years, 12 boys and 12 girls, that practiced 2 hours a week classic physical education. The results showed us that extracurricular activities have a good impact on children's socialization and integration, the experimental group improved their coefficient of group cohesion from 0.04 at the initial testing to 0.06 at the final test, and the index of cohesion from 0.02 at the initial test to 0.05 at the final testing. Significant differences were found within the experimental group both in the initial and in the final tests (p < 0.05, also significant differences were discovered between the experimental and the sample group in the final measurement (p < 0.05. Conclusions of this research presented that the experimental group had good improvements of cohesion and social integration of children, showing that extracurricular sport activities have a positive impact on improving socialization, developing cohesion and integrate the marginalized children in the social group.

  20. Extracurricular activity participation moderates impact of family and school factors on adolescents' disruptive behavioural problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, Corine M E F

    2015-11-11

    The prevalence of problem behaviours among British adolescents has increased in the past decades. Following Erikson's psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner's developmental ecological model, it was hypothesized that youth problem behaviour is shaped in part by social environment. The aim of this project was to explore potential protective factors within the social environment of British youth's for the presentation of disruptive behavioural problems. This study used secondary data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England, a cohort study of secondary school students. These data were analysed with generalized estimation equations to take the correlation between the longitudinal observations into account. Three models were built. The first model determined the effect of family, school, and extracurricular setting on presentation of disruptive behavioural problems. The second model expanded the first model by assuming extracurricular activities as protective factors that moderated the interaction between family and school factors with disruptive behavioural problems. The third model described the effect of prior disruptive behaviour on current disruptive behaviour. Associations were found between school factors, family factors, involvement in extracurricular activities and presence of disruptive behavioural problems. Results from the second generalized estimating equation (GEE) logistic regression models indicated that extracurricular activities buffered the impact of school and family factors on the presence of disruptive behavioural problems. For instance, participation in sports activities decreased the effect of bullying on psychological distress. Results from the third model indicated that prior acts of disruptive behaviour reinforced current disruptive behaviour. This study supports Erikson's psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner's developmental ecological model; social environment did influence the presence of

  1. Extra-curricular physical activity and socioeconomic status in Italian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langiano Elisa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between physical activity and health status has been thoroughly investigated in several studies, while the relation between physical activity and socio-economic status (SES is less investigated. The aim of this study was to measure the extra-curricular physical activity of adolescents related to the socio-economic status (SES of their families. Methods The survey was carried out by submitting an anonymous questionnaire to junior high school students in the following Regions: Lazio, Abruzzo, Molise, Campania, Puglia, during the school year 2002–2003. Extra-curriculum physical activity was evaluated considering whether or not present and hours of activity weekly conducted. 2411 students agreed to participate in the study. Results Participants were 1121 males (46.5% and 1290 females (53.5%, aged between 11 and 17 years (median age: 12 years. 71.1% of the students reported to practice extra-curricular physical activity. Parents' educational levels and work activities play an important role in predicting students' physical activity, with the more remunerative activities and higher educational levels being more predictive. Conclusion The results confirm the relationship between adolescents' physical activity and their families' SES. In particular, a positive relationship between participation in extra-curricular physical activity and their families high SES was found. These data will be useful for school administrators and for politicians in order to reduce the gap between adolescents from the least and most disadvantaged families.

  2. About Extra-Curricular Activities of The University Graduate – Student’s Viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova Veronica; Mertins Kseniya; Kaftasev Semen

    2017-01-01

    Extra-curricular activity of modern youth, including university students, is considered to reduce. Students are thought to demonstrate consumer's attitude, unwillingness to participate in any social activity, and as a result, the level of soft skills acquired by university students is decreasing. The study of social activity of 100 Bachelor graduates from TPU, including the program "Electrical engineering", indicated the role of the university in creation of conditions for competence developm...

  3. Protective factors for youth considered at risk of criminal behaviour: does participation in extracurricular activities help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Jodi M; Marshall, Lisa A

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of research investigating the potential protective effect of participation in extracurricular activities on youth who are at risk of engaging in delinquent activity. This study examined the potential for participation in extracurricular activities to act as a protective factor for youth deemed at risk of engaging in delinquent activity. One hundred and sixty-nine secondary students from Glasgow, Scotland completed two questionnaires (the Youth Self-Report and an additional information sheet) requesting information about their participation in extracurricular and delinquent activities as well as their possible risk factors. Activities included sports, non-sports (hobbies and games), current activities (youth clubs and other organisations) and previous involvement in activities. Risk factors included residing in a broken home, having four or more siblings, academic failure and lacking a non-parental very important person. Delinquent activities included rule-breaking and aggressive behaviours. Independent samples t-tests found that females participated in significantly more non-sports and previous activities than males and that males participated in significantly more rule-breaking behaviour than females. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses found that gender and participation in sports were strong predictors of rule-breaking behaviour. A significant positive correlation was found between participation in sports and involvement in aggressive behaviour. The results suggest that participation in extracurricular activities does not act as a protective factor for youth, regardless of whether or not they are considered to be at risk of engaging in delinquent activity. The significant correlation found between participation in sports and involvement in aggressive behaviour suggests that youth participation in sports may act as a risk factor.

  4. The relative roles of types of extracurricular activity on smoking and drinking initiation among tweens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi-Mejia, Anna M; Gibson Chambers, Jennifer J; Li, Zhigang; Sargent, James D

    2014-01-01

    Youth involvement in extracurricular activities may help prevent smoking and drinking initiation. However, the relative roles of types of extracurricular activity on these risks are unclear. Therefore, we examined the association between substance use and participation in team sports with a coach, other sports without a coach, music, school clubs, and other clubs in a nationally representative sample of U.S. tweens. We conducted telephone surveys with 6522 U.S. students (ages 10 to 14 years) in 2003. We asked participants if they had ever tried smoking or drinking, and we asked them about their participation in extracurricular activities. We used sample weighting to produce response estimates that were representative of the population of adolescents aged 10 to 14 years at the time of data collection. Logistic regression models that adjusted for appropriate sampling weights using jackknife variance estimation tested associations with trying smoking and drinking, controlling for sociodemographics, child and parent characteristics, friend/sibling/parent substance use, and media use. A little over half of the students reported participating in team sports with a coach (55.5%) and without a coach (55.4%) a few times per week or more. Most had minimal to no participation in school clubs (74.2%); however, most reported being involved in other clubs (85.8%). A little less than half participated in music, choir, dance, and/or band lessons. Over half of participants involved in religious activity did those activities a few times per week or more. In the multiple regression analysis, team sport participation with a coach was the only extracurricular activity associated with lower risk of trying smoking (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.49, 0.96) compared to none or minimal participation. Participating in other clubs was the only extracurricular activity associated with lower risk of trying drinking (adjusted odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.32, 0

  5. Extracurricular activities, athletic participation, and adolescent alcohol use: gender-differentiated and school-contextual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, John P

    2006-09-01

    This research investigates the effects of extracurricular activities on alcohol use among male (n = 4,495) and female (n = 5,398) adolescents who participated in the 1990-92 National Education Longitudinal Study. Previous studies have assessed the association between extracurricular activities and alcohol use, but none have explored whether the association depends on the school context. Using a multilevel model, I examine whether school-level factors affect the relationship between involvement in athletic or nonathletic activities and changes in adolescent alcohol use from 1990 to 1992. The results indicate that the negative association between nonathletic activities and alcohol use is stronger among males in low-minority-population schools. Moreover the positive association between athletic involvement and alcohol use is stronger among females in lower-socioeconomic-status schools and males in higher-socioeconomic-status schools. I propose that these results reflect variation in high school cultures and in the resources available to schools.

  6. Self-reported extracurricular activity, academic success, and quality of life in UK medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sophie; Ward, Peter; Roberts, Lesley; Mann, Jake P

    2015-09-19

    To explore the relationship between academic performance, extracurricular activity, and quality of life at medical school in the UK to aid our understanding of students' work-life balance. A cross-sectional study, using an electronic questionnaire distributed to UK final year medical students across 20 medical schools (4478 students). Participants reported the hours of self-regulated learning and extracurricular activities undertaken each year at medical school; along with their academic decile (1 = highest, 10 = lowest). Self-reported quality of life (QoL) was assessed using an established screening tool (7 = highest, 1 = lowest). Seven hundred responses were obtained, across 20 participating medical schools, response rate 16% (700/4478). Factors associated with higher academic achievement were: graduate entry course students (2 deciles higher, p academic study during term and revision periods (rho=-0.1, p academic achievement and QoL. Graduate-entry students attain higher decile scores despite similar self-reported duration of study.

  7. [Social interactions of preschool children with Down syndrome during extracurricular activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucisano, Renata Valdívia; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pinto, Maria Paula Panuncio; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Anhão, Patrícia Páfaro Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify the process of social interaction of children with Down Syndrome (DS) during extracurricular activities in the regular early childhood education in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil. Six children aged 3-6 years participated in this study. There were two recordings of each child in situations of social interaction during extracurricular activities, and analyzed by 15 behaviors, divided into two categories of social skills: interpersonal and self-expression. The results demonstrate that, in the interpersonal skill category, the higher occurrence was the behavior "occurs interaction with other children". In the self-expression skills category, only the behaviors "smiles" and "imitates other children" have significant occurrence. The behaviors more frequently identified in this study permit to understand that the school environment is a facilitator for the interaction of child with DS with the typical developmental children, allowing him/her to develop the expected social skills.

  8. Outcome evaluation of a high school smoking reduction intervention based on extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K Stephen; Cameron, Roy; Madill, Cheryl; Payne, M Elizabeth; Filsinger, Stephanie; Manske, Stephen R; Best, J Allan

    2002-11-01

    An outcome evaluation of a high school tobacco control intervention using extracurricular activities developed by teachers and students is reported. Eligible subjects (n = 3,028) had participated in a randomized trial of an elementary school smoking prevention curriculum. Their high schools were matched in pairs; one school in each pair was randomly assigned to the intervention condition, the second to a "usual-care" control condition. Data were collected at the end of Grades 9 and 10. For Grade 8 never smokers, regular smoking rates were significantly lower for males from intervention schools (9.8 vs 16.2%, P = 0.02) at the end of Grade 10. There were no significant differences among Grade 10 smoking rates for females, or for students of either gender with previous smoking experience in Grade 8. The extracurricular activities approach to tobacco control is practical to implement and has promise.

  9. School extracurricular activity participation as a moderator in the development of antisocial patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, J L

    2000-01-01

    This research involves a longitudinal study of antecedents and moderators in the development of antisocial patterns. Participants included 695 boys and girls who were interviewed annually from childhood to the end of high school and again at ages 20 and 24. Cluster analyses identified four configurations of boys and girls that were reasonably homogeneous with respect to behavior and academic performance at the beginning of the investigation. When tracked over time, the configurations differed significantly in patterns of early school dropout and criminal arrests. Boys and girls in the "multiple risk configuration" were more likely than those in other configurations to show long-term antisocial patterns. Participation in school extracurricular activities was associated with reduced rates of early dropout and criminal arrest among high-risk boys and girls. The decline in antisocial patterns was dependent on whether the individuals' social network also participated in school extracurricular activities.

  10. STUDENT CLUBS AS A FORM OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vasilievna Tolstoukhova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The students as a specific stratum of young people actively involved in various associations, movements. Today, more than ever need the support of positive student associations from universities. This paper considers the extracurricular activities of students, and in particular the creation and development of a student club that promotes self-learning, self-education and self-development of students.Purpose: to develop the author a mechanism for the development of activities of the student club «Studio».Methodology: a theoretical analysis of the pedagogical literature on the problems of students ‘ extracurricular activities.Results: the experience of the Tyumen oil and gas University on the organization and management of extracurricular educational work with students. The basis of this system became the tradition and the experience of the music club «Studio». Lists the sessions conducted with students for career mobility, career advancement. In conclusion traces the development of motivation of students, who are members of a student club. The paper presents information from the personal experience of the authors.

  11. Dramatization at Extracurricular Activities as a Means to Enhance Foreign Language Teaching

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    Marina Valeryevna Kuimova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of foreign language teaching is to learn to communicate and overcome the language barrier. The article studies dramatization and its appropriateness in foreign language teaching, provides criteria for choosing a literary work for dramatization. The use of dramatization at extracurricular activities develops communication abilities, creativity; enhances motivation to learn a foreign language and strengthens students’ confidence in a foreign language.

  12. Coordination between the subject of physical education and extracurricular physical activities

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Campos Izquierdo; María Dolores González Rivera

    2013-01-01

    In this article there is analyzed the possible connection of physical education classes with the extracurricular physical activities in the Primary School of the Region of Madrid. This research places inside the methodology of quantitative type of descriptive cut, across survey, which has been in use as instrument of withdrawal of information the interview standardized by means of questionnaire created ad hoc, that was completed by 300 teachers. In the study there is obtained that the vast ma...

  13. [Effects of social support on the adjustment to extracurricular sports activities among junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshi, Ryoko; Sekizawa, Keiko

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that when students received and/or provided either support for skill improvement or support for interpersonal relations, their overall adjustment level in extracurricular activities would be higher than for students who received and/or provided neither support. Data were analyzed from 475 junior high school students (female 175, male 300) who were taking extracurricular sports activities, out of 743 research participants. The results were as follows. Students who received support mainly for skill improvement showed a statistically equivalent adjustment level as students who received support mainly for interpersonal relations. Students who received either support showed higher adjustment levels than students who received neither. Additionally, providing support showed the same results. The exchange of different types of social support showed equivalent effects on the adjustment level as the exchange of the same type of social support. These results suggest that even though the types of social support are different for skill improvement or interpersonal relations, the exchange of support positively contributes to junior high school students' adjustment level in extracurricular activities.

  14. Organized Extracurricular Activities: Are In-School and Out-of-School Activities Associated with Different Outcomes for Canadian Youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guèvremont, Anne; Findlay, Leanne; Kohen, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Participation in extracurricular activities can have positive effects on youth, with greater participation associated with higher academic as well as better socioemotional and behavioral outcomes. Little research has examined differential effects of in-school and out-of-school activities. Methods: This study examines in-school and…

  15. Health-compromising behaviors among Vietnamese adolescents: the role of education and extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Celia Patricia; Zabkiewicz, Denise; McPhee, Stephen J; Nguyen, Tung; Gregorich, Steven E; Disogra, Charles; Hilton, Joan F; Jenkins, Christopher

    2003-05-01

    To examine the prevalence of unhealthy behaviors among a cohort of Vietnamese adolescents in California; to examine the relationship between these behaviors and school-related variables (school performance, educational risk behaviors, higher-education aspirations, and participation in extracurricular activities); and to assess the differences that may exist between males and females with regard to these factors. We conducted telephone interviews with 783 Vietnamese adolescents, aged 12-17 years, recruited through telephone listings from four California counties where large Vietnamese populations reside: San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and Orange. Of the 783 completed interviews, 60.8% were conducted in English and 39.2% in Vietnamese. The main outcome measure is a health risk behavior scale that includes adolescents' reports of ever smoking a cigarette, sedentary vs. active lifestyle, consumption of fruits and vegetables, consumption of foods high in fat, ever drinking alcohol, and ever engaging in sexual behavior. Multiple regression analyses were employed to estimate the association among the demographic variables, acculturation, school performance, aspirations, extracurricular activities, and the overall health risk. Females were significantly more sedentary than males. Over one-quarter (29%) of the females reported not having participated in vigorous physical activity on 3 or more days per week, compared with just 18% of the males. Most adolescents reported they had never tried cigarettes (84%), never used alcohol (77%), and never had sex (97%). Males were more likely than females to report a higher frequency of experimentation with smoking and drinking. Overall, school performance and participation in extracurricular activities were significantly related to the health risk behavior scale. Adolescents who demonstrated at least one educational risk (ever skipped school or ever sent out of the classroom) were more likely to engage in other risky

  16. The influence of curricular and extracurricular learning activities on students' choice of chiropractic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, David M; KizhakkeVeettil, Anupama; Tobias, Gene S

    2016-03-01

    Surveys for the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners indicate that diversified chiropractic technique is the most commonly used chiropractic manipulation method. The study objective was to investigate the influences of our diversified core technique curriculum, a technique survey course, and extracurricular technique activities on students' future practice technique preferences. We conducted an anonymous, voluntary survey of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year chiropractic students at our institution. Surveys were pretested for face validity, and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. We had 164 students (78% response rate) participate in the survey. Diversified was the most preferred technique for future practice by students, and more than half who completed the chiropractic technique survey course reported changing their future practice technique choice as a result. The students surveyed agreed that the chiropractic technique curriculum and their experiences with chiropractic practitioners were the two greatest bases for their current practice technique preference, and that their participation in extracurricular technique clubs and seminars was less influential. Students appear to have the same practice technique preferences as practicing chiropractors. The chiropractic technique curriculum and the students' experience with chiropractic practitioners seem to have the greatest influence on their choice of chiropractic technique for future practice. Extracurricular activities, including technique clubs and seminars, although well attended, showed a lesser influence on students' practice technique preferences.

  17. NEUROCARDIOGENIC SYNCOPE AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES OF ADOLESCENTS IN THE HIGH-INTENSITY EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

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    A. V. Pogodina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS is widespread among adolescents, which makes it relevant to study the factors contributing to the implementation of syncopic readiness in susceptible persons. Objective: The aim was to assess the connection between extracurricular activities of adolescents and the emergence of NCS. Methods:The questionnaire survey among the Lyceum students aged 14–18 tried to find out the presence of syncope (presyncope and its nature in a child’s medical history; the nature and intensity of extracurricular loads; and intensity and success of curricular activities. Results: The study included the results of the questionnaire survey among 286 students (62.2% girls. Syncope and presinkope states were observed in a medical history of 136 (47.6% students, and 105 (77% of them had NCS. Independent risk factors for the development of NCS were private lessons with tutors, and only in cases where a child had no other extracurricular classes (creative, sports — OR 6.4 (95% CI 1.7–24.8. The NCS risk was also higher in adolescents, who had good grades at school — OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1–4.6. Conclusion: The risk of NCS development in teenage schoolchildren is defined by the area of subject education: high risk of this kind of syncope is in children, who have private classes with tutors and no other extracurricular loads, as well as in children, who have good grades at school.

  18. International note: prevailing with extracurricular activities in an alcohol-dominated environment: sex differences in resilience among middle school youth.

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    Habib, Elana L; Zimmerman, Marc A; Ostaszewski, Krzysztof

    2014-08-01

    Extracurricular involvement creates an outlet for adolescents to gain skills and resources that assist them in overcoming certain risks. Resiliency theory is applied to study the promotive effects of extracurricular activity involvement as this may help Polish youth overcome risks for alcohol use. Our data include 2903, 13 and 14 year old Polish adolescents. We use regression analysis to test the main and interaction effects of extracurricular involvement after adjusting for demographics and social influences. Sex differences are examined within the resilience framework. We found protective effects of extracurricular involvement for males, but only a compensatory effect for females. Implications for future research and intervention are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Including students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities in school extracurricular and community recreation activities.

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    Kleinert, Harold L; Miracle, Sally; Sheppard-Jones, Kathy

    2007-02-01

    We conducted an online statewide survey of teachers of students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities to determine the extent to which their students were included in school extracurricular and community recreation activities. For the 252 teacher respondents who indicated that their primary caseload consisted of students with significant intellectual disabilities, we report the numbers of students participating in school and community activities and the primary type of support students required to participate in each activity. Finally, we identify implications for practitioners who want to increase the participation of students with significant disabilities in school and community activities.

  20. The influence of modern trends in extracurricular educational activities on architecture kindergarten

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    Наталия Владимировна Ламехова

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the problem of organizing an architectural space for conducting out-of-school activities and leisure activities in kindergartens. The article examines the existing provision on the possibilities of the architectural space of a kindergarten for carrying out extracurricular activities of pupils. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of using architectural space for conducting various types of non-educational activities in accordance with the development of modern educational programs. The tendency of formation of a polyfunctional architectural environment in a kindergarten for carrying out different types and forms of employment is indicated.

  1. Education of natural science in the work of the Municipal Center for Extracurricular Activities

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    Jokin, I.

    2012-04-01

    In the description of my work I presented my own experience in the organizing and carrying out of extracurricular activities with the students, the used modes and methods of work, the obtained results and some good practices in the field of natural sciences. Organizing and carrying out of scientific festivals, participation in joint projects together with scientific organizations. Key words: European dimension, interactive methods, key competences, natural sciences, extracurricular activities. We are witnesses of a fundamental change in the pedagogical culture and practice in our schools to establish the parameters of the quality of training. The good scientific culture is an important part of the students' education. Unfortunately, at the present time the scientific and technological culture is on a low level. One of the contemporary problems and realities of the education in natural science school subjects, as a whole and in particular in the secondary education, is the decreased interest for the training in them and in particular in physics, as well as synchronization of the interrelations: school environment - society. In many countries there is a drop in the orientation of the students towards the science and technology - the problem of Science and Technology (S&T). The training of the young people often creates some problems. The teachers meet with the problem of insufficient motivation of the learners for study and difficulties that they encounter in the process of training. The students find it difficult to apply the mastered knowledge to an applied context. The knowledge is rather academic and rather remote from the context, in which the children live and communicate, which makes it nonfunctional. At present there are not enough extracurricular activities that should meet these necessities of the Bulgarian school. The reasons are various, but they mainly consist in the lack of a material base, an exchange of experience and good practices and motivation

  2. Adolescents' physical activity in physical education, school recess, and extra-curricular sport by motivational profiles.

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    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Viciana, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in adolescents´ objective physical activity levels and perceived effort in physical education, school recess, and extra-curricular organized sport by motivational profiles in physical education. A sample of 102 students 11-16 yr. old completed a self-report questionnaire assessing self-determined motivation toward physical education. Subsequently, students' objective physical activity levels (steps/min., METs, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) and perceived effort were evaluated for each situation. Cluster analysis identified a two-cluster structure: "Moderate motivation toward physical education profile" and "High motivation toward physical education profile." Adolescents in the second cluster had higher physical activity and perceived effort values than adolescents in the first cluster, except for METs and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in extra-curricular sport. These results support the importance of physical education teachers who should promote self-determined motivation toward physical education so that students can reach the recommended physical activity levels.

  3. The contribution of extracurricular activities to adolescent friendships: new insights through social network analysis.

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    Schaefer, David R; Simpkins, Sandra D; Vest, Andrea E; Price, Chara D

    2011-07-01

    Extracurricular activities are settings that are theorized to help adolescents maintain existing friendships and develop new friendships. The overarching goal of the current investigation was to examine whether coparticipating in school-based extracurricular activities supported adolescents' school-based friendships. We used social network methods and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine whether dyadic friendship ties were more likely to exist among activity coparticipants while controlling for alternative friendship processes, namely dyadic homophily (e.g., demographic and behavioral similarities) and network-level processes (e.g., triadic closure). Results provide strong evidence that activities were associated with current friendships and promoted the formation of new friendships. These associations varied based on school level (i.e., middle vs. high school) and activity type (i.e., sports, academic, arts). Results of this study provide new insight into the complex relations between activities and friendship that can inform theories of their developmental outcomes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  4. The Attitude Of The Students Participating In The Religious Extracurricular Activities And Its Relation To Their Behavior

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    Diden Rosenda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human beingman is considered as the most perfectly created creature among other creatures that living in this world. As for what distinguishes a man is the fact that God has given a man an intelligence. By using that intelligence a man can develop the culture through the education process. Efforts to educate the life of the nation is not acquired with the mere of formal education but can also be supported by the provision of textbooks supplementary lessons and extracurricular activities. One of the extracurricular activities that are important to participate is religious extracurricular activity. Noble values which embedded in such activities can be seen as the basis for the formation of a strong character and excellent manners which are useful as shields in life.

  5. Another Way to Develop Chinese Students' Creativity: Extracurricular Innovation Activities

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    Xiao-jiang, Zhao; Xue-ting, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In China, improving students' creativity is becoming an important goal of modern colleges and universities, especially in the domain of science and technology. The efforts made for this goal can be observed not only in classroom, but also in activities and competitions which were held out-of-school. This paper will firstly give a brief description…

  6. Extracurricular activities associated with stress and burnout in preclinical medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Jawad; Saadeddin, Zein; Al Tabosh, Hayat; Aridi, Hussam; El Mouhayyar, Christopher; Koleilat, Mohamad Karim; Chaaya, Monique; El Asmar, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to assess the prevalence of stress and burnout among preclinical medical students in a private university in Beirut, Lebanon, and evaluate the association between extracurricular involvement and stress and burnout relief in preclinical medical students. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random sample of 165 preclinical medical students. Distress level was measured using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) while that of burnout was measured through the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS). The MBI-SS assesses three interrelated dimensions: emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and academic efficacy. Extracurricular activities were divided into four categories: physical exercise, music, reading, and social activities. All selected participants responded. A substantial proportion of preclinical medical students suffered from stress (62%) and burnout (75%). Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses revealed that being a female or a 1st year medical student correlated with higher stress and burnout. Music-related activities were correlated with lower burnout. Social activities or living with parents were associated with lower academic efficacy. The high stress and burnout levels call for action. Addressing the studying conditions and attending to the psychological wellbeing of preclinical medical students are recommendations made in the study. Copyright © 2015 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. "It's Just Like an Extra String to Your Bow": Exploring Higher Education Students' Perceptions and Experiences of Extracurricular Activity and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Leanne J.; Clark, Gordon; Walker, Marion; Whyatt, J. Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Students' experience of higher education comprises not only their academic studies but also their extracurricular activities. This article reports on the findings from a mixed-methods research project, exploring in detail the nature and value of extracurricular activity engagement and the significance of institutional schemes encouraging…

  8. The Role of School-Based Extracurricular Activities in Adolescent Development: A Comprehensive Review and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Amy F.; Matjasko, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the contemporary literature on school-based activity participation, focusing on patterns of participation, academic achievement, substance use, sexual activity, psychological adjustment, delinquency, and young adult outcomes. Also, the authors discuss possible mediators and moderators of extracurricular activity participation…

  9. Extracurricular sports activity around growth spurt and improved tibial cortical bone properties in late adolescence.

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    Shi, Hui-Jing; Nakamura, Keiko; Kizuki, Masashi; Inose, Tomoko; Seino, Kaoruko; Takano, Takehito

    2006-12-01

    To elucidate whether extracurricular sports activity during rapid growth correlates with improved bone properties in late adolescence, a longitudinal observation was performed among 96 high-school enrollments (46 boys and 50 girls, born in 1981-1982) in metropolitan Tokyo. In each year of high school, tibial cortical speed of sound (TCSOS) was measured by quantitative ultrasonometry, and participation in extracurricular sports activity (ECSA) since primary school was examined by structured questionnaire. We calculated the number of years since peak height velocity (ysPHV) based on annual records of height from 6 to 18 y of age to indicate progression of puberty. The increase in TCSOS during high school in boys (32.5 m/s) was significantly greater than that in girls (5.4 m/s). The magnitude of positive association between ysPHV and TCSOS attenuated gradually over time. ECSA in grades 7-9 in boys and in grades 4-6 in girls were significant predictors of TCSOS throughout high school, independent of potential confounders. The bone benefits of ECSA around the growth spurt are maintainable in subsequent years. The importance of physical activities that are integrated into the ordinary lifestyle of children and adolescents during this crucial period is emphasized.

  10. Profiles and portfolios of adolescent school-based extracurricular activity participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A F; Matjasko, J L

    2007-04-01

    The current study presented a new description of adolescent school-based activity participation, in the form of mutually exclusive activity portfolios, and described the kinds of youth that participate in each portfolio. These portfolios included (1) Sports Only, (2) Academics Only, (3) School Only, (4) Performance Only, (5) Multiple Activities, and (6) Non-Participation. Findings indicated that youth demographic characteristics and school size differentiated between different kinds of activity participation as well as nonparticipation. More detailed activity portfolios were also identified that were complex and demonstrate the difficulty of examining participation beyond larger, more inclusive groupings. The Multiple Activity portfolio emerged as a unique group worthy of further examination. Characteristics of non-participators included: lower socioeconomic status, lower grades, and attended larger schools. Hispanic adolescents were also less likely to participate in school-based extracurricular activities. Findings from this study inform ecological models of adolescent development as well as school and social policy.

  11. Why are some Children Left Out? Factors Barring Canadian Children from Participating in Extracurricular Activities

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    Li Xu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Using three waves of data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this study examines the impact of child, family and community level characteristics on children’s participation in extracurricular activities between the ages of 4 and 9 (n=2,289. Results show a large positive effect of family income on children’s participation in structured activities. Living in a poor neighbourhood constitutes an extra disadvantage for children's participation in organized sport activities. Our study also identifies a positive association between parent’s education and children’s participation in most activities, and a negative association between family size and some structured activities. Furthermore, children of immigrants, as well as children of visible minority and aboriginal children were found to be disadvantaged in their participation in some activities.

  12. Self-reported extracurricular activity, academic success, and quality of life in UK medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sophie; Ward, Peter; Roberts, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relationship between academic performance, extracurricular activity, and quality of life at medical school in the UK to aid our understanding of students’ work-life balance. Methods A cross-sectional study, using an electronic questionnaire distributed to UK final year medical students across 20 medical schools (4478 students). Participants reported the hours of self-regulated learning and extracurricular activities undertaken each year at medical school; along with their academic decile (1 = highest, 10 = lowest). Self-reported quality of life (QoL) was assessed using an established screening tool (7 = highest, 1 = lowest). Results Seven hundred responses were obtained, across 20 participating medical schools, response rate 16% (700/4478). Factors associated with higher academic achievement were: graduate entry course students (2 deciles higher, pstudy during term and revision periods (rho=-0.1, pstudy was associated with lower QoL (rho = -0.13, pStudy skills may be more important than duration spent studying, for academic achievement and QoL. Graduate-entry students attain higher decile scores despite similar self-reported duration of study. PMID:26385285

  13. A Dual Step Transfer Model: Sport and Non-Sport Extracurricular Activities and the Enhancement of Academic Achievement

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    Bradley, John L.; Conway, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the influence that school sport and non-sport extracurricular activities (ssEC and nsEC) can have on academic achievement. A central thesis of this paper is that, despite the literature on the perceived and presumed benefits of school sport and of non-sport activities, theorising a model of the process by which the benefit is…

  14. Extracurricular Activities in Multiethnic Middle Schools: Ideal Context for Positive Intergroup Attitudes?

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    Knifsend, Casey A; Juvonen, Jaana

    2017-06-01

    This study examined processes by which extracurricular participation is linked with positive ethnic intergroup attitudes in multiethnic middle schools in California. Specifically, the mediating roles of activity-related cross-ethnic friendships and social identities including alliances with multiple groups were examined in a sample including African American or Black, East or South-East Asian, White, and Latino youth (N = 1,446; Mage  = 11.60 in sixth grade). Results of multilevel modeling suggested that in addition to activity-related cross-ethnic friendships, complex social identities mediated the association between availability of cross-ethnic peers in activities and ethnic intergroup attitudes. Results are discussed in terms of how activities can be structured to promote cross-ethnic relationships and complex social identities, as well as positive ethnic intergroup attitudes. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  15. Mexican-Origin Youth Participation in Extracurricular Activities: Predicting Trajectories of Involvement from 7th to 12th Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Nickki Pearce; Modecki, Kathryn L; Gonzales, Nancy; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The potential benefits of participation in extracurricular activities may be especially important for youth who are at risk for academic underachievement, such as low income Mexican-origin youth in the U.S. To advance understanding of factors that drive participation for this population, this study examined Mexican-origin youth's trajectories of participation in extracurricular activities across Grades 7-12 and tested theoretically-derived predictors of these trajectories. Participants were 178 adolescents (53.9 % Female, Mage = 12.28) and their mothers who separately completed in-home interviews. Youth reported the frequency of their participation across a range of extracurricular activities. Latent growth curve models of overall extracurricular activities participation, sports participation, and fine arts participation were individually estimated via structural equation modeling. The findings demonstrated developmental declines in overall participation and in sports participation. For fine arts, declines in participation in middle school were followed by subsequent increases during high school (a curvilinear pattern). Motivationally-salient predictors of participation trajectories included youth's traditional cultural values orientation (sports), the mothers' educational aspirations for the youth (sports, fine arts, overall activity), and youth gender (sports, fine arts). Overall, the results suggest variability in participation trajectories based on program type, and highlight the need for additional research to enhance our understanding of the impact of culturally-relevant predictors on participation over time.

  16. Ensuring Full Participation in Extra-Curricular Activities for Students Experiencing Homelessness. Best Practices in Homeless Education

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    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Extra-curricular school activities, such as sports, music, theater, debate, and clubs, are often a key to engaging children and youth in school. They can provide students with a sense of belonging, stability, pride, and responsibility and strengthen a student's applications for higher education admission and scholarships. Homelessness, however,…

  17. School-Based Extracurricular Activities, Personality, Self-Concept, and College Career Development Skills in Chinese Society

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    Shiah, Yung-Jong; Huang, Ying; Chang, Frances; Chang, Chuan-Feng; Yeh, Lun-Chang

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we examined in Chinese society the association of school-based extracurricular activities (SBEAs) in both high school and college with students' career development skills in college, as well as with various personality characteristics and self-concept. Each of 281 college students administered the Lai Personality Inventory,…

  18. Effects of Extracurricular Activities and Their Quality on Primary School-Age Students' Achievement in Mathematics in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of mathematics achievement in children attending extracurricular activities intensively in comparison with the development in a control group of children attending only the obligatory hours of school instruction. In addition, we investigated the question of possible effects of intensity of attendance and…

  19. The Effect of Extracurricular Activity Participation on the Academic Performance of Male and Female High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliker, S. Alan; Quirk, Jeffrey T.

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether extracurricular activity participation (EAP) enhances the academic performance of high school students. Analyzed 123 students who played interscholastic soccer. Results indicate that EAP does not harm and may enhance academic performance. Male athletes showed in-season improvements in academic performance. Discusses implications…

  20. Extracurricular Activity Intensity and Adolescent Risk-Taking: Exploring Interactive Effects of Contextual Risk and Coping Effcacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslip, Gabriel P.; Barber, Bonnie L.

    Adolescence is a period of heightened risk-taking. Therefore it is important to investigate positive settings that can facilitate healthy adolescent development and reduce risk-taking behaviour. This study investigated the relations between non-sporting extracurricular activity participation intensity and risky behaviour. Adolescents' coping…

  1. Effects of Participation in High School Sports and Nonsport Extracurricular Activities on Political Engagement among Black Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, Jomills Henry; Hua, Lv; Dawkins, Marvin P.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of involvement in high school athletics and nonsport extracurricular activities on political engagement among young Black adults was examined. We developed a conceptual model to identify school engagement factors and assess their influence on political participation (i.e., voter registration and voting behavior) of Blacks in early…

  2. Developing Employability Skills via Extra-Curricular Activities in Vietnamese Universities: Student Engagement and Inhibitors of Their Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Le Huu Nghia

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study that investigated student engagement and inhibitors of their engagement with developing employability skills via extra-curricular activities in Vietnamese universities. Content analysis of 18 interviews with students and statistical analysis of 423 students' responses to a paper-based survey showed that despite a…

  3. Extracurricular Activity Intensity and Adolescent Risk-Taking: Exploring Interactive Effects of Contextual Risk and Coping Effcacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslip, Gabriel P.; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of heightened risk-taking. Therefore it is important to investigate positive settings that can facilitate healthy adolescent development and reduce risk-taking behaviour. This study investigated the relations between non-sporting extracurricular activity participation intensity and risky behaviour. Adolescents' coping…

  4. The Effectiveness of Student Extracurricular Activities in Evaluating Violent Behavior among Students in the Preparatory Year at Hail University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleid, Alkhamsah Saleh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of student extracurricular activities in evaluating violent behavior among students in the preparatory year at Hail University. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, and used two tools for the purpose of the study, the study sample consisted of 104 (violent) female students from the…

  5. The Impact of External Employment on 12th Grade Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities as a Function of School Size

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    Garcia, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 were used to compare 11,000 high school students on school size, time spent participating in extracurricular activities (ECA), and hours spent in employment. Findings indicated that students from small schools spent more time participating in ECA than students from larger schools for equivalent…

  6. Extracurricular Activity Participation in High School: Mechanisms Linking Participation to Math Achievement and 4-Year College Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activity participation (EAP) has been positively linked with increased academic achievement and college attendance. However, the mechanisms linking EAP to educational outcomes are poorly understood. Using the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS), this study contributes to our understanding of the relationship between EAP and…

  7. Undergraduate Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Leadership Development in College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Elizabeth A.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe experiences of undergraduate extracurricular involvement that result in increased leadership development. Senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University completed an online questionnaire about their extracurricular experiences. Leadership development…

  8. EXTRACURRICULAR MUSICAL CREATIVE ACTIVITY OF PRIMARY SCHOOL PUPILS ATTENDING MOUNTAIN SCHOOLS IN THE CARPATHIAN REGION

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    Iryna Lypa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the declared idea of general music education for pupils based on Ukrainian national culture lies in the relation to music art as to an integral part of the spiritual life of people, appealing to folk music in the light of its connections with spiritual, material and practical world of a human being. To implement such an idea, it is necessary to put ethnoregional material widely into music educational practice at comprehensive secondary school. It is both an important component of ethnic and cultural environment of the child and the background for musical creative development. However, due to the music program for grades 1- 4 it is expected to use only 10% of ethnoregional material at the lesson 4. Therefore, the problem of organizing extracurricular musical creative activity for pupils based on ethnic culture of an appropriate region in Ukraine, especially a Carpathian one, is a burning question.

  9. Extracurricular Activities are Associated with Lower Suicidality through Decreased Thwarted Belongingness in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brian W; Capron, Daniel W; Ward-Ciesielski, Erin; Gustafsson, Hanna C; Doyle, Carol

    2018-02-02

    Research has shown a negative association between extracurricular activities (ECAs) and suicidality. This study builds upon past research by using the interpersonal psychological theory of suicide to better understand the mechanisms involved in the relationship between ECAs and suicide risk. 121 community and online-recruited adults ages 18 to 24-years-old participated. Self-report measures of suicidality, thwarted belongingness, and perceived burdensomeness were collected. Duration and breadth of participation in ECAs were assessed. ECA involvement was negatively associated with thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. An indirect effect of ECAs on suicidality through thwarted belongingness was statistically significant, but not for perceived burdensomeness. ECA involvement was associated with decreased suicidality through lower levels of thwarted belongingness. Interventions utilizing ECAs may be a low-cost, high-access option for decreasing suicide risk.

  10. The impact of extracurricular activities participation on youth delinquent behaviors: An instrumental variables approach.

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    Han, Sehee; Lee, Jonathan; Park, Kyung-Gook

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between extracurricular activities (EA) participation and youth delinquency while tackling an endogeneity problem of EA participation. Using survey data of 12th graders in South Korea (n = 1943), this study employed an instrumental variables approach to address the self-selection problem of EA participation as the data for this study was based on an observational study design. We found a positive association between EA participation and youth delinquency based on conventional regression analysis. By contrast, we found a negative association between EA participation and youth delinquency based on an instrumental variables approach. These results indicate that caution should be exercised when we interpret the effect of EA participation on youth delinquency based on observational study designs. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Students’ Extracurricular Activities in Higher Education and Its Effect on Personal Development and Academic Achievement (Case Study In Islamic State University of Suska Riau)

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    Amirah Diniaty; Annisa Kurniati

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the students’ extracurricular activities at Islamic State University of Suska Riau concerning the types and forms of their activities, background of the activity, benefits of extracurricular activities, and its effect on students’ self-development and academic achievement. 300 students who enroll at sixth semester in eight Faculties (Tarbiyah and Teacher’s Training, Sharia and Law, Ushuludin, Dakwah and Communication Sciences, Science and Technology, Psychology, Econom...

  12. Exploring the Roles of Extracurricular Activity Quantity and Quality in the Educational Resilience of Vulnerable Adolescents: Variable- and Pattern-Centered Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Stephen C; Roeser, Robert W; Zarrett, Nicole; Eccles, Jacquelynne S

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how extracurricular activity involvement contributes to "educational resilience"-the unexpected educational attainments of adolescents who are otherwise vulnerable to curtailed school success due to personal- and social-level risks. Educationally vulnerable youth characterized by significant risks and an absence of assets were identified during early adolescence (approximately age 14) using measures of academic motivation, achievement, and mental health as well as family, school, and peer contexts. Using a mixture of variable- and pattern-centered analytic techniques, we investigate how both the total amount time that vulnerable youth spent in positive extracurricular activities and the specific pattern of their extracurricular activity involvement during late adolescence (approximately age 17) predict their subsequent enrollment in college during early adulthood (up through approximately age 21). Educational resilience was predicted uniquely by some, but not all, activity patterns. These results suggest that positive extracurricular activity settings afford vulnerable youth developmentally appropriate experiences that promote educational persistence and healthy development.

  13. Students’ Extracurricular Activities in Higher Education and Its Effect on Personal Development and Academic Achievement (Case Study In Islamic State University of Suska Riau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirah Diniaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the students’ extracurricular activities at Islamic State University of Suska Riau concerning the types and forms of their activities, background of the activity, benefits of extracurricular activities, and its effect on students’ self-development and academic achievement. 300 students who enroll at sixth semester in eight Faculties (Tarbiyah and Teacher’s Training, Sharia and Law, Ushuludin, Dakwah and Communication Sciences, Science and Technology, Psychology, Economics and Social Sciences, Agriculture and Animal Husbandry were the sample of this study. The data were then processed statistically using percentages and regression of correlation. It was found that the type of extracurricular followed by the students were leadership (70%, those of whom had the motivation to add insight, knowledge and more critical thinking were (44.67%. Some students followed extra-curricular activity because of their solicitation or to follow the main stream (37%, some students did not get financial benefits from the activity (34.67%. Some other respondents felt that they could follow the extracurricular talents, interests and personal abilities (58.67%, and think about their future after graduating from the college (66%. Things need to be followed up by students and university staffs were the more active students who attend the extracurricular activities were the lower achievement ones. Copyright © 2014 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  14. Effects of physical education, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on adolescent aggressive behavior: A latent growth modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghyun; Chiu, Weisheng

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the longitudinal influence of physical education classes, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on aggressive behavior among South Korean adolescents. Data were drawn from the Korea Youth Panel Survey. We used latent growth curve modeling to explain the growth trajectory of adolescent aggressive behaviors and a multi-group analysis to investigate gender differences in aggressive behavior. The results indicated that adolescents’ aggressive behavior significantly changed with age. There were significant gender-based differences in the level of and changes in aggressive behavior over time. Both extracurricular sports activities and leisure satisfaction had significant influences on the changes in adolescents’ aggressive behavior with age, whereas physical education classes did not. PMID:28410365

  15. Effects of physical education, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on adolescent aggressive behavior: A latent growth modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghyun; Chiu, Weisheng; Won, Doyeon

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the longitudinal influence of physical education classes, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on aggressive behavior among South Korean adolescents. Data were drawn from the Korea Youth Panel Survey. We used latent growth curve modeling to explain the growth trajectory of adolescent aggressive behaviors and a multi-group analysis to investigate gender differences in aggressive behavior. The results indicated that adolescents' aggressive behavior significantly changed with age. There were significant gender-based differences in the level of and changes in aggressive behavior over time. Both extracurricular sports activities and leisure satisfaction had significant influences on the changes in adolescents' aggressive behavior with age, whereas physical education classes did not.

  16. Participation in home, extracurricular, and community activities among children and young people with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Margo N; Palisano, Robert J; Chiarello, Lisa A; Kang, Lin-Ju; Polansky, Marcia; Almasri, Nihad; Maggs, Jill

    2010-02-01

    Participation in home, extracurricular, and community activities is a desired outcome of rehabilitation services for children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of age and gross motor function on participation among children and young people with CP. Five hundred participants (277 males, 223 females) were grouped by age and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level. There were 291 children aged 6 to 12 years and 209 young people aged 13 to 21 years. There were 128 participants in GMFCS level I, 220 in levels II/III, and 152 in levels IV/V. Participants completed the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment to measure number of activities (diversity) and how often they were performed (intensity) in the past 4 months. Children had higher overall participation diversity and intensity than young people (pactivities. Children (pactivities; diversity and intensity were generally low. The findings provide evidence of the effect of age and gross motor function on participation of children and young people with CP. Low participation in physical activities may have implications for fitness and health, especially for children and young people in GMFCS levels IV and V.

  17. READINESS OF TEACHERS FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS AT HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENT OF ECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Vishnevetskaja

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the article, its theoretical and practical importance are caused by the existing contradiction between the state order for the formation of socially active person and lack of scientifically-practical workings out in the field of pedagogical support of the organization of extracurricular socially useful activity of the students. The settlement of the contradiction is possible in the presence of teachers specially prepared for the given process.Purpose. The purpose of the article is the theoretical substantiation and experimental estimation of teachers’ readiness for the organization of extracurricular activities of students in higher education establishments of economics.Methodology, Results. Complex application of theoretical (element and the structural analysis, comparison, generalization and empirical (questioning, testing, the expert estimation, included pedagogical supervision methods has allowed to define the essence of investigated concept as integrative personal formation, to develop criteria and its indicators of its formation and experimentally estimate the level of readiness of teaching staff for the organization of students’ extracurricular activities in higher education establishments of economics.Practical implications. The results of the research can be widely used in the work of curators of academic groups, tutors, teachers-organizers, in the system of training and advanced training of teaching staff.

  18. Curricular and extracurricular activities of medical students during war, Zagreb University School of Medicine, 1991-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluncić, V; Pulanić, D; Prka, M; Marusíc, A; Marusíc, M

    2001-01-01

    War, as a major human disaster, affects many aspects of life, including medical education. This report describes curricular and extracurricular activities of the students at the Zagreb University School of Medicine during the wars in Croatia and neighboring Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although condensed versions of the curricula were prepared in case of a major breakdown in civilian life, the school maintained the continuity and quality of its curriculum throughout the war. Students engaged in extracurricular activities related to medical aspects of the war, including organization of resuscitation and first aid courses, collecting medical documentation on war victims, humanitarian help to refugees, and peace-promoting activities. Some students joined mobile surgical teams on the battlefronts. After army service, most of them returned to the school and successfully continued with their studies. The school also accepted guest-students from other new states emerged from former Yugoslavia. The authors found that the students' engagement in extracurricular activities related to medicine was enormously beneficial both to the psychological well-being of the students and to the region's peace-building efforts.

  19. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M.; El Tantawi, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. Methods: The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation i...

  20. Extracurricular activities: Investigating the affects of participation-nonparticipation on the Georgia High School Science Graduation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Ray A.

    Student achievement research suggests that participation in extracurricular activities has a positive impact on the academic and developmental outcomes for adolescents. Specifically, several studies reported that adolescents who participate in extra-curricular activities are more likely to experience increases in academic achievement, self-esteem, high school graduation rates, and pro-social behaviors. On the other hand, there is research suggesting that participation in extracurricular activities may distract students from their academic pursuits. The state of Georgia requires all eleventh grade students to participate in the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT). The GHSGT consists of five separate tests that include (a) English/language arts, (b) math, (c) writing, (d) social studies, and (e) science. Each comprehensive exam is worth 600 points. A high school diploma will be awarded if the student scores at least 500 points on each individual exam. Further, review of student outcomes on the GHSGT revealed that first-time test takers were failing the science portion of the test at a greater percentage than any other subject on the GHSGT. Specifically, the Governor's Office of Student Achievement (GOSA) reported that from 2002 through 2004, a total of 70,451 students or 30.3% of students that were first-time test takers failed the science portion of the GHSGT. As a result, investigating factors that potentially could increase student achievement in science became the impetus for this study. In particular, this study examined the relationships between the levels of student participation in school sponsored extracurricular activities in relation to the level of student achievement in the area of science.

  1. Analysis of Benefits to Young Rail Enthusiasts of Participating in Extracurricular Academic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fraszczyk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines a number of positive academic outcomes achieved by university students who, as young rail enthusiasts representing over 10 European institutions, took part in extracurricular rail-related academic activities. Analyses presented in the paper are based on the evaluation of the responses to the questionnaire distributed amongst participants of three consecutive editions of an intensive program in rail and logistics which took place in 2012, 2013, and 2014. Also, quotes from follow-up one-to-one interviews with participants are used to support the results presented. The sample for each year varies in terms of numbers, nationalities, academic backgrounds, and male:female ratio. Academic benefits are specifically looked into, which includes teaching and learning activities throughout the three weeks of the program. The analysis of results revealed that young rail enthusiasts who participated in the program benefited from lectures delivered in Week 1, especially those focused on multimodal transport and rail infrastructure in 2013, which received positive mean ratings of 4.45 and 4.53, respectively, on a five-point Likert scale. Moreover, academic benefits were strongly supported by non-technical skills improvements in areas such as English language and communication, both reaching the mean ratings of 4.35 or above in 2014. A number of recommendations for improvements of next editions of similar rail-related programs as well as areas for future research are identified in the paper

  2. Orienteering section as a form of extracurricular activities in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracurricular activities offer students the opportunity to learn and train sports not provided by curriculum of physical education. Staying active in nature in terms of the orientation movement is greatly beneficial for the development of mental and physical abilities. The aim of this paper is to present opportunities for the organizing orienteering section in elementary school. Descriptive method was applied to be shown plan and program of the section designed so that teachers of physical education in their schools provide implementation of orienteering section for 30 classes. The expected outcome of orienteering section is to enable students to independently perform at competitions. Training is done through the implementation of goals and objectives of sections, using methodological procedures with respect to the pupils' age, prior knowledge and the pace of overcoming the training. Plan and program section includes mastering the basic technique in orienteering, through theoretical and practical work. In working with students who are for the first time in orienteering, the main focus should be on reading the maps, and understanding the relationship between nature and maps. In primary schools there are possibilities to organize orienteering section, and there is a significant correlation with other subjects. The presented model provides the optimal level of theoretical and practical knowledge that students can apply in school competitions.

  3. Relationship between admission data and pharmacy student involvement in extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiersma, Mary E; Plake, Kimberly S; Mason, Holly L

    2011-10-10

    To assess pharmacy student involvement in leadership and service roles and to evaluate the association between admissions data and student involvement. Doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students were invited to complete a 56-item online survey instrument containing questions regarding leadership and service involvement, work experiences, perceived contribution of involvement to skill development, and perceived importance of involvement. Responses were linked to admissions data to identify possible associations. Five hundred fourteen (82.4%) pharmacy students completed the survey instrument. Students with higher admissions application and interview scores were more likely to be involved in organizations and hold leadership roles, while students with higher admissions grade point averages were less likely to be involved in organizations and leadership roles. Assessing students' involvement in leadership and service roles can assist in the evaluation of students' leadership skills and lead to modification of curricular and co-curricular activities to provide development opportunities. Student involvement in extracurricular activities may encourage future involvement in and commitment to the pharmacy profession.

  4. The influence of artistics, sportives and extracurricular activities in the academic success of students

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Gabriela Queiroz da Silva; Mônica Caldas Ehrenberg

    2017-01-01

    Resumo Apresentando a problemática “O exercício de atividades culturais e esportivas extracurriculares pode influir no rendimento acadêmico do aluno? ”, a presente pesquisa incumbiu-se de investigar a relação da prática de atividades culturais e esportivas extracurriculares no desenvolvimento do estudante. Confrontou-se a pesquisa bibliográfica realizada em plataformas nacionais e internacionais com os dados tabulados, obtidos em um questionário aplicado a estudantes do curso de Licenciatura ...

  5. Beyond good grades: School composition and immigrant youth participation in extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Dina G; Herda, Daniel; Hartzog, Cassie

    2013-01-01

    Past research has typically focused on educational attainment and achievement to understand the assimilation process for immigrant youth. However, academic achievement constitutes only part of the schooling experience. In this paper, we move beyond traditional measures such as test scores and dropout, and examine patterns of school-sponsored extracurricular activity participation. Analyzing data from Add Health and drawing upon the frog-pond and segmented assimilation frameworks, we find that immigrant minority youth are disadvantaged in regards to activity participation relative to the average student in high- compared to low-SES schools. In high-SES schools, immigrant youth are less similar to their peers in terms of socioeconomic, race, and immigrant status, and as suggested by the frog-pond hypothesis, social comparison and ranking processes contribute to lower levels of social integration of immigrant youth into the school setting. We also find that as percent minority rises in high-SES schools, participation increases as well. The opposite pattern appears in low-SES schools: when percent minority increases, activity participation among immigrant minority students declines. These results are commensurate with both theoretical frameworks, and suggest that different mechanisms are at work in high- and low-SES schools. However, the effects of minority peers do not seem to hold for sports participation, and we also find that percent immigrant operates differently from percent minority, depressing the probability of activity participation across both high- and low-SES schools. The main implication of our results is that racially diverse, higher-SES schools are the most favorable contexts for the social integration of immigrant minority youth as well as third- and later-generation blacks and Hispanics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Associations Between Extracurricular Activity and Self-Regulation: A Longitudinal Study From 5 to 10 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piché, Geneviève; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Pagani, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    Health promotion in youth is likely to benefit from enhancing academic achievement and physical activity. The present study examines how kindergarten childhood self-regulation skills and behaviors predict involvement in both structured and unstructured physical and nonphysical extracurricular activities in the fourth grade. As a second objective this study also investigated how kindergarten childhood participation in extracurricular activities predicts classroom engagement, reflective of self-regulation, by the fourth grade. Secondary analyses were conducted using prospective-longitudinal data. The Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, Quebec, Canada. Participants were randomly selected at birth from a stratified sample of 2694 born in Québec, Canada, between 1997 and 1998. Participants were included if they had complete data on teacher ratings of child self-regulation as measured by classroom engagement and parent ratings of sports participation (n = 935). Teachers reported self-regulation skills in children through a measure of classroom engagement. Parents provided reports of child participation extracurricular activities. Ordinary least-squares regressions were conducted. A higher-frequency kindergarten involvement with structured physical activities was associated with fourth-grade classroom engagement (β = .061, 95% confidence interval [CI]: .017, .104). Better kindergarten classroom engagement predicted more frequent participation in fourth-grade structured physical activities (β = .799, 95% CI: .405, 1.192) and team sports (β = .408, 95% CI: .207, .608). Results suggest mutual relations between physical activity and self-regulation from kindergarten to grade four. This suggests strong learning skills indicative of self-regulation and opportunities to participate in supervised physical activities or sports teams may help children develop healthy dispositions and behaviors in emerging adolescence.

  7. Extracurricular Involvement and Adolescent Adjustment: Impact of Duration, Number of Activities, and Breadth of Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, Jennifer A.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the associations between a variety of measures of extracurricular participation and indicators of youth development. We use data from the Childhood and Beyond Study, a larger longitudinal study of adolescent development. The sample is primarily White middle-class adolescents in Grades 7…

  8. The Impact of Extracurricular Activities on Academic Performance for Rural Secondary Students in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Michael Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold in nature. First, this study sought to identify whether extracurricular participation for students in a rural, Grades 7-12 building created significant differences when examining academic performance, attendance, gender, lunch status, and student discipline compared to their non-participant peers. Secondly,…

  9. DIAGNOSTICS OF READINESS OF TEACHERS TO THE EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN ECOLOGICAL AND LOCAL HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Viktorovna Sineva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of preparation of the future teacher to the organization of extracurricular activities in environmental (ecological and local history for younger students and dedicated to this aspect in the implementation of the Federal state educational standard of the new generation. It describes the components of professional readiness of the future teacher for this type of activity; analyzes the results of the evaluation of the readiness of the future teachers carried out by the author developed criteria, indicators and diagnostic tools. Materials can be used by teachers of pedagogical universities and teacher training institutes.

  10. Influence of extracurricular sport activities on body composition and physical fitness in boys: a 3-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, I; Vicente-Rodriguez, G; Perez-Gomez, J; Jimenez-Ramirez, J; Serrano-Sanchez, J A; Dorado, C; Calbet, J A L

    2006-07-01

    To analyse the effect of extracurricular physical activities on fat mass accumulation and physical fitness during growth in early pubertal males. Longitudinal study. A total of 42 male children (9.4+/-1.4 years, Tanner I-II and 12.7+/-1.5 years, Tanner III-IV, before and after the 3.3 years follow-up, respectively), randomly sampled from the population of Gran Canaria (Spain), 26 of them physically active (PA, at least 3 h per week during 3 years) and 16 non-physically active (non-PA). Body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), anthropometrics (body circumferences and skinfolds) and physical fitness variables (dynamic and isometric force, anaerobic capacity and maximal aerobic power) were determined in all subjects. Both groups had comparable body sizes at the start and the end of the study. Body mass index increased with growth more in the PA than in the non-PA group (Pactive children (r2=0.93). In contrast, there was an inverse relationship between the total lean mass growth and the accumulation of total and regional fat mass (r=-0.37 to -0.41, all Pactivities are more protected against total and regional fat mass accumulation. They also increase their total lean and bone mass to a greater extent than children who do not participate in extracurricular sport activities. In addition, PA children maintain their physical fitness during growth, while it deteriorates in the non-PA children.

  11. An exploratory study of future plans and extracurricular activities of transition-age youth and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Cecily L; Redcay, Gay

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive profile of the health related concerns, school-related and extracurricular activities, employment-related activities, social relationships and future plans of 25 transition-aged youth and young adults (ages 14 to 21 years) were conducted. The findings of this exploratory study provide insight on the impact their chronic condition had upon all aspects of their lives. Sixty percent of respondents indicated they had missed school due to their condition and a third of the respondents had not completed high school. Health care professionals usually were not identified as participatory in youth transition planning. The majority of these transition-aged youth and young adults had positive feelings towards their school experience, although most of the respondents were not involved in school projects or clubs, which suggests their participation in school-related extra-curricular activities was limited. Nearly all of the respondents had some form of employment experience. Most of their work experiences were nonpaying jobs such as serving as a volunteer and participating in school-based employment training. Nearly all of the respondents expressed desires for sustainable employment and fiscal and social independence. Most of the respondents reported having social relationships with just less than half reporting seeing friends outside of school.

  12. Gender Variation in Extracurricular Activity Participation and Perceived Life Chances in Trinidad and Tobago Adolescents Variación por Sexo de la Participación en Actividades Extracurriculares y la Percepción de Oportunidades de Vida en Adolescentes de Trinidad y Tobago

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zena R Mello; Frank C Worrell

    2008-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities has surfaced as an important context for adolescent development and may be a fruitful avenue for fostering future attitudes, a concept shown to predict adolescent behaviors...

  13. Exploring the Roles of Extracurricular Activity Quantity and Quality in the Educational Resilience of Vulnerable Adolescents: Variable- and Pattern-Centered Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Stephen C.; Roeser, Robert W.; Zarrett, Nicole; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how extracurricular activity involvement contributes to “educational resilience”—the unexpected educational attainments of adolescents who are otherwise vulnerable to curtailed school success due to personal- and social-level risks. Educationally vulnerable youth characterized by significant risks and an absence of assets were identified during early adolescence (approximately age 14) using measures of academic motivation, achievement, and mental health as well as family, school, and peer contexts. Using a mixture of variable- and pattern-centered analytic techniques, we investigate how both the total amount time that vulnerable youth spent in positive extracurricular activities and the specific pattern of their extracurricular activity involvement during late adolescence (approximately age 17) predict their subsequent enrollment in college during early adulthood (up through approximately age 21). Educational resilience was predicted uniquely by some, but not all, activity patterns. These results suggest that positive extracurricular activity settings afford vulnerable youth developmentally appropriate experiences that promote educational persistence and healthy development. PMID:19543445

  14. "Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Writing: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities": Re-Visiting a Theoretical Lens Five Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Published in a 2008 issue of "Journal of Basic Writing" ("JBW"), "Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Writing: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities" was Kevin Roozen's first single-authored publication. Drawn from data collected for the first case study from…

  15. The Participation of Girls and Boys from Ages 10 to 18 in Structured Sports and Extra-Curricular Activities in the Aspect of Social and Economic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitruk Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The importance of socio-economic factors in differentiating the physical activities of children and teenagers keeps changing. That is why the goal of this research was to identify certain social variables amongst those listed most often which differentiate the level of targeted physical activity of urban children and youths from the Bialskie district. Material and methods. The research was conducted on 1.084 students between the ages of 10 and 18. Three age groups were chosen: 10 to 12, 13 to 15, and 16 to 18. Information about the attendance of respondents in Physical Education classes and structured extra-curricular sport activities, as well as preferred forms of physical activities were collected via a diagnostic survey. The same method was used in the assessment of the socio-economic status of the families of the respondents. The relations between attendance in extra-curricular sports activities and socio-economic factors was assessed by a multifactoral logistic regression model, and the statistical relevance of the differences was calculated by the Wald test. Results. Attendance in structured extra-curricular physical activity depended mostly on income per family member. In the case of type of work performed by parents, the attendance rate in both boys and girls was higher if the parents performed intellectual work. Parents' education and number of children in the family did not have a high influence on the attendance of respondents in structured extra-curricular sport activities. Conclusions. Increasing disproportions in societal prosperity can be an important factor limiting the attendance of the poorest group of children and youths in structured physical activities. The lack of influence on physical activity of such socio-economic variables as parents' education and the number of children in the family can be connected with the change of meaning of those factors in modern society (depreciation of the importance of higher

  16. The Current Situation of Students’ Participatation in Extracurricular Sports Activities of Private Middle School in Henan Province and the Analysis of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Wang

    By using the methods of document literature, questionnaire survey and mathematical statistics, this paper investigates and analyses the cuurent situation of students' participation in extrucurricular sports activities of 36 private middle schools in Henan province which have legal education procedures through the following aspects: the attitude, motivation, times, duration, selection of programs, and influential factors of participating in extracurricular sports activities. Based on the investigation and analysis, this paper points out the existing problems and puts forward suggestions

  17. Extracurricular activities in young applicants' résumés: what are the motives behind their involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Applicants use résumés to demonstrate their knowledge, skills, abilities, and other personal characteristics (KSAOs) to recruiters, through education and job-related or non-job-related experiences. But research suggests that the situation for young applicants is especially competitive, since they increasingly enter the labour market with similar educational credentials and limited job-related experience. They may thus use non-job-related experiences, such as participation in extracurricular activities (ECAs) during their studies, to demonstrate KSAOs to recruiters, but also to add distinction and value to their credentials. ECAs may therefore become more important in the selection of young applicants. Yet few studies have undertaken a comprehensive and systematic analysis of the relationships students have with these activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent students' involvement in ECAs is due to internal (e.g., passion) or external (e.g., résumé-building) motives, and what factors influence these motives. Results from a study with 197 students suggest that students engage in ECAs mainly out of internal motives. But external motives are stronger for activities started closer to entering the labour market, for students active in associative or volunteering activities (as compared to sports or artistic activities), and for students holding leadership positions in their activities. Our results suggest that labour market pressure may be a key component of applicants' involvement in ECAs. Also, organizations and recruiters may want to consider that students tend not to engage in ECAs purely out of internal motives, but also to add value to their credentials and match employers' expectations. The authors thank Anna Ambrosetti for her help with the data collection.

  18. Effect of a ban on extracurricular sports activities by secondary school teachers on physical activity levels of adolescents: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Gauvin, Lise; Paradis, Gilles; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2006-10-01

    To study the effect of a teachers' ban on supervising sports-related extracurricular physical activities (ECAs), levels of physical activity among 979 grade 7 students (mean age=12.7 [0.5] years at baseline) were compared during and after the ban in seven schools that fully implemented the ban, and three schools that did not implement the ban fully. On average, schools offered 18.0 (SD=5.1) ECAs during a no-ban school year. Students attending full implementation schools were significantly more likely than students in nonimplementation schools to be active after the ban ended (odds ratio for being active=1.89 [95% confidence interval: 1.39, 2.58]). They also increased the number of physical activities in which they participated (coefficient=4.04; SE=1.01). Ending a teachers' ban on sports-related ECAs was associated with increased involvement in physical activity among secondary school students.

  19. Unsupervised daily routine and activity discovery in smart homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie Yin; Qing Zhang; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2015-08-01

    The ability to accurately recognize daily activities of residents is a core premise of smart homes to assist with remote health monitoring. Most of the existing methods rely on a supervised model trained from a preselected and manually labeled set of activities, which are often time-consuming and costly to obtain in practice. In contrast, this paper presents an unsupervised method for discovering daily routines and activities for smart home residents. Our proposed method first uses a Markov chain to model a resident's locomotion patterns at different times of day and discover clusters of daily routines at the macro level. For each routine cluster, it then drills down to further discover room-level activities at the micro level. The automatic identification of daily routines and activities is useful for understanding indicators of functional decline of elderly people and suggesting timely interventions.

  20. Interações sociais de crianças pré-escolares com Síndrome de Down durante atividades extracurriculares Interacciones sociales de niños en edad preescolar con síndrome de Down durante actividades extracurriculares Social interactions of preschool children with Down syndrome during extracurricular activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Valdívia Lucisano

    2013-02-01

    ños" tuvieran ocurrencia significativa. Los comportamientos más comunes que se encuentran en este estudio demuestran que el entorno escolar se convierte en un facilitador de la interacción del niño con síndrome de Down con otros niños con desarrollo normal, lo que permite el desarrollo de habilidades sociales esperadas.The aim of this research was to identify the process of social interaction of children with Down Syndrome (DS during extracurricular activities in the regular early childhood education in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil. Six children aged 3-6 years participated in this study. There were two recordings of each child in situations of social interaction during extracurricular activities, and analyzed by 15 behaviors, divided into two categories of social skills: interpersonal and self-expression. The results demonstrate that, in the interpersonal skill category, the higher occurrence was the behavior "occurs interaction with other children". In the self-expression skills category, only the behaviors "smiles" and "imitates other children" have significant occurrence. The behaviors more frequently identified in this study permit to understand that the school environment is a facilitator for the interaction of child with DS with the typical developmental children, allowing him/her to develop the expected social skills.

  1. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M; ElRefae, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation in ECAs, and time allocated for these activities. Students were asked about their perceptions of the relationship between ECAs and academic studies, and their reasons for participating in and satisfaction with ECAs. The study included 199 students from Alexandria and 146 students from Dammam, with response rates of 99.5% and 73%, respectively. The percentages of those reporting ECA participation were 27.1% and 43.8%, respectively, mostly in community service, sports, and social activities. About 60% of students did not think that ECAs affected their studies, although the perceived difficulty of balancing ECAs and academics was associated with lower odds of participation (odds ratio = 0.51). Most students participated in ECAs to socialize and make friends, and the majority was dissatisfied with school-organized ECAs (52% and 59%, respectively). Gender and/or perceived relation between ECAs and academic studies affected actual participation in ECAs in one school but not the other. ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students' preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics.

  2. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M.; ElRefae, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. Methods The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation in ECAs, and time allocated for these activities. Students were asked about their perceptions of the relationship between ECAs and academic studies, and their reasons for participating in and satisfaction with ECAs. Results The study included 199 students from Alexandria and 146 students from Dammam, with response rates of 99.5% and 73%, respectively. The percentages of those reporting ECA participation were 27.1% and 43.8%, respectively, mostly in community service, sports, and social activities. About 60% of students did not think that ECAs affected their studies, although the perceived difficulty of balancing ECAs and academics was associated with lower odds of participation (odds ratio = 0.51). Most students participated in ECAs to socialize and make friends, and the majority was dissatisfied with school-organized ECAs (52% and 59%, respectively). Gender and/or perceived relation between ECAs and academic studies affected actual participation in ECAs in one school but not the other. Conclusions ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students’ preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics. PMID:26792968

  3. Enhancing science education through extracurricular activities: A retrospective study of "Suzy Science and the Whiz Kids(c)"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralina, Linda M.

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are informal settings offering free-choice experiences that are generally voluntary, open-ended, non-sequential, self-directed, hands-on, and evaluation-free. This mixed methods study investigates participation in a high school science ECA by collecting the memories of former student members for their perceptions of engagement as well as social positioning. First, this study examines the levels in which the science club engaged these members, particularly females, in science and teaching. Second, the study also ascertains how participation in the club allowed members to explore new identities and fostered the development of new skills, actions and behaviors, expanding possible future trajectories of identification, specifically in science- and education-related career fields. Based on a review of the related literature regarding engagement and identity formation and the reconstructed reality from the memories of these students and sponsor, a theoretical framework has been constructed, based on seven essential elements of informal learning for an engaging as well as a socially constructive high school science ECA. The most significant findings are (1) the high correlation between engagement, specifically, cognitive engagement with social positioning, (2) the important role of emotional engagement in science ECA, (3) the major perception roadblocks to science learning that can be overcome, particularly for females in physical science, and (4) the importance of the teacher-student interactions in science ECA. Articulating a theoretical framework to legitimate the power of informal learning structures may help other educators to understand the potential benefits of science ECA and thus, increase opportunities for such experiential activities in order to enhance engagement and expand positioning of their students in science. More engaging, socially constructive science ECA have the potential to enhance science education.

  4. Profiles and Portfolios of Adolescent School-Based Extracurricular Activity Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A. F.; Matjasko, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The current study presented a new description of adolescent school-based activity participation, in the form of mutually exclusive activity portfolios, and described the kinds of youth that participate in each portfolio. These portfolios included (1) Sports Only, (2) Academics Only, (3) School Only, (4) Performance Only, (5) Multiple Activities,…

  5. Extracurricular activities and the development of social skills in children with intellectual and specific learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B A; Floyd, F; Robins, D L; Chan, W Y

    2015-07-01

    Children with intellectual disability and specific learning disabilities often lack age-appropriate social skills, which disrupts their social functioning. Because of the limited effectiveness of classroom mainstreaming and social skills training for these children, it is important to explore alternative opportunities for social skill acquisition. Participation in social activities is positively related to children's social adjustment, but little is known about the benefits of activity participation for children with intellectual and specific learning disabilities. This study investigated the association between frequency and type of social activity participation and the social competence of 8-11-year-old children with intellectual disability (n = 40) and specific learning disabilities (n = 53), in comparison with typically developing peers (n = 24). More time involved in unstructured activities, but not structured activities, was associated with higher levels of social competence for all children. This association was strongest for children with intellectual disability, suggesting that participation in unstructured social activities was most beneficial for these children. Future research on the quality of involvement is necessary to further understand specific aspects of unstructured activities that might facilitate social development. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Building Self-Determination through Inclusive Extracurricular Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoski, Erin; Graybill, Emily; Roach, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activities provide students a range of rich experiences that influence their academic achievement, leadership and communication skills, and career paths. Students with disabilities (SWDs) historically have had limited access to extracurricular programs and thus fewer opportunities for academic, social, and vocational development.…

  7. Gender Variation in Extracurricular Activity Participation and Perceived Life Chances in Trinidad and Tobago Adolescents Variación por Sexo de la Participación en Actividades Extracurriculares y la Percepción de Oportunidades de Vida en Adolescentes de Trinidad y Tobago

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Zena R.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities has surfaced as an important context for adolescent development and may be a fruitful avenue for fostering future attitudes, a concept shown to predict adolescent behaviors. In this study of youth from Trinidad and Tobago, we examined gender differences in activity participation and perceived life chances in 1,385 adolescents (59% male). Trinidadian adolescents were highly active, on average, participating in three activities. More males were involv...

  8. Barriers to delivering extracurricular school sport and physical activity in Wales: a qualitative study of 5x60 officers' views and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Paul; Griffiths, Robert; Cropley, Brendan; Jarvis, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    In light of recent reports, schools must be realistic in that physical activity recommendations cannot be met through curriculum PE alone. However, extracurricular PE and school sport has the potential to further promote physical activity in adolescents. Consequently, the Welsh Government, UK, proposed through its Climbing Higher strategy (2006) for secondary school children to achieve 60 minutes of physical activity a day. This was implemented through Sport Wales and the 5×60 scheme. This study aimed to examine the experiences of the 5×60 officers responsible for implementing the program, with a view to gain an understanding of the barriers associated with increasing participation in physical activity. Officers from 14 unitary authorities across Wales were interviewed using a socioecological approach that considered the impact of: personal behaviors, physical environment, social environment, and policy. Participants reported a number of challenges affecting the delivery of the program, including: availability of facilities, lack of support from senior management, time, and conflict with PE staff. This study suggests that current methods used by personnel to facilitate extracurricular school sport may not be the most appropriate, and future direction should consider the place and contribution of physical activity to young people's lives.

  9. The Motivational Importance of Extracurricular Activities for Adolescent Development: Cultivating Undivided Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathunde, Kevin

    Activities that engaged the full attention of adolescents at school were explored using the Experience Sampling Method, in which subjects were interrupted by a pager to record their experience at the moment the pager signaled. Two variables indicating optimal subjective experience and undivided attention were operationalized: interest and flow…

  10. What Do Mothers Say? Korean Mothers' Perceptions of Children's Participation in Extra-Curricular Musical Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun

    2015-01-01

    A recent study of Korean middle-class mothers' perceptions and parenting practices associated with children's participation in musical activities reported unique forms of musical parenting, which closely correspond with previous studies of concerted cultivation in Western middle-class families. Are these unique patterns exclusive to middle-class…

  11. Extracurricular Activities Targeted towards Increasing the Number of Engineers Working in the Field of Precision Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Leon Bonde; Stark Olsen, Kent; Ahrenkiel, Linda

    SERVICE ROBOTS in precision agriculture have the potential to ensure a more competitive and sustainable production, but the lack of skilled engineers within this area is limiting the industry’s ability to develop new and innovative agricultural technology products. Part of the reason...... is that engineers and scientists have little knowledge about agricultural technology, and they therefore choose to work in other domains. It is hypothesised that introducing engineering students to precision agriculture through practical work with small-scale service robots will increase their interest...... robot. The activity was called Practical experience from day one and its primary objective was to improve the participants’ practical experience and give them a broader view of technology applied in agriculture. Based on evaluation of the activities it is concluded that working with a small...

  12. Extracurricular activities and teens' alcohol use: The role of religious and secular sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Amy

    2012-03-01

    Much research has found that more religious youth are less likely to engage in riskier health-related behaviors. However, very little research has examined the role that religion may play in shaping the health-related behaviors of secular youth. There is reason to think that more and less religious youth may gain some health-related benefits from involvement with religious organizations through activities such as basketball and volunteering. Using two waves of data from the National Study of Youth and Religion, this study finds that involvement in religion-supported secular activities is associated with less alcohol use for all involved teens. The number of friends who belong to a religious youth group, in part, explains the relationship. Conversely, network overlap between parents and teens, the number of friends who drink or use drugs, and having an adult confidant from a religious group are not mechanisms that mediate the relationship. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. METHODIC OF UPBRINGING ECOLOGICAL CULTURE OF TEENAGERS WITH MEANS OF CURRICULAR AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Abaturov Eugeny Igorevich

    2012-01-01

    Ecological culture is understood today as intellectual and moral basis of stable community. In accordance with it the purpose of study is upbringing ecological culture, which is most meaningful at the secondary school because of teenagers’ age appropriate. Teenagers’ ecological culture is considered by the author as developing personal education, including the system of ecological knowledge, ecological activities, ecological consciousness and ecological world view. Upbringing ecological cultu...

  14. Examining daily activity routines of older adults using workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jane; Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Demiris, George

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the value of workflow analysis supported by a novel visualization technique to better understand the daily routines of older adults and highlight their patterns of daily activities and normal variability in physical functions. We used a self-reported activity diary to obtain data from six community-dwelling older adults for 14 consecutive days. Workflow for daily routine was analyzed using the EventFlow tool, which aggregates workflow information to highlight patterns and variabilities. A total of 1453 events were included in the data analysis. To demonstrate the patterns and variability of each individual's daily activities, participant activity workflows were visualized and compared. The workflow analysis revealed great variability in activity types, regularity, frequency, duration, and timing of performing certain activities across individuals. Also, when workflow approach was applied to spatial information of activities, the analysis revealed the ability to provide meaningful data on individuals' mobility in different levels of life spaces from home to community. Results suggest that using workflows to characterize the daily activities of older adults will be helpful for clinicians and researchers in understanding their daily routines and preparing education and prevention strategies tailored to each individual's activity level. This tool also has the potential to be integrated into consumer informatics technologies, such as patient portals or personal health records, so that consumers may be encouraged to become actively involved in monitoring and managing their health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Why are some Children Left Out? Factors Barring Canadian Children from Participating in Extracurricular Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strohschein, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractUsing three waves of data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey ofChildren and Youth, this study examines the impact of child, family andcommunity level characteristics on children’s participation in extracurricularactivities between the ages of 4 and 9 (n=2,289. Results show a large positiveeffect of family income on children’s participation in structured activities.Living in a poor neighbourhood constitutes an extra disadvantage for children'sparticipation in organized sport activities. Our study also identifies a positiveassociation between parent’s education and children’s participation in mostactivities, and a negative association between family size and some structuredactivities. Furthermore, children of immigrants, as well as children of visibleminority and aboriginal children were found to be disadvantaged in theirparticipation in some activities.RésuméSur la base de trois cycles de données de l’Enquête canadienne longitudinalesur les enfants et les jeunes, cette étude examine l'impact des caractéristiques del'enfant, de la famille et de la communauté sur la participation des enfants de 4à 9 ans (n=2,289 dans des activités parascolaires. Les résultats démontrent unfort effet positif du revenu familial sur la participation dans des activitésstructurées. Vivre dans un quartier pauvre constitue un désavantagesupplémentaire pour la participation des enfants dans des activités de sportorganisé. Notre étude identifie aussi une association positive entre la scolaritédes parents et la participation des enfants à la plupart des activités, et uneassociation négative entre la taille de la famille et certaines activitésstructurées. De plus, on a trouvé que les enfants d'immigrants, de même que lesenfants de minorités visibles et les enfants autochtones étaient désavantagés parrapport à leur participation dans certaines activités.

  16. Literature Review Lifestyles and routine activities of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The United Nations estimates that 79% of teenage girls trafficked globally every year are forced into involuntary prostitution. About 247 000 South African children work in exploitative conditions; about 40 000 South African female teenagers work as prostitutes. This paper investigates lifestyles and routine activities of ...

  17. Analysis of the motivation, attitude and participation in extracurricular physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Arturo Abraldes Valeiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The current essay tries to evaluate the effect of the styles of teaching about participation and motivation among the students of Physical Education in the third year of secondary education. A quasi-experimental design was carried out in a group of 30 students, and it was divided into two subgroups, A and B, of 15 students, to which it will be applied the traditional teaching style (of direct lead character to the subgroup A, and a style that will promote the participation of the subgroup B. The experimental essay covered a total of 9 practical sessions of Physical Education in a school of secondary education. An attitude questionnaire towards physical activity was done before starting and finishing the educational unit of games and sports, to value if any kind of modification was produced in the behaviour of the students; and a satisfaction-motivation questionnaire at the end of each section of sessions. Variables subject of the study will be: traditional teaching style of direct lead and styles that help to socialization, motivation, participation, attitude and satisfaction.

  18. It Isn’t All Just Fun and Games: Collegiate Participation in Extracurricular Activities and Risk for Generalized and Sexual Harassment, Psychological Distress, and Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Meredith; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Liu, Li; Richman, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Collegiate extracurricular activities, despite their benefits, may place students at an increased risk for experiencing harassment. This study utilizes multiple waves of data from an online longitudinal survey to examine how participation in college activities (intramural sports, fraternities/sororities, school clubs) relates to experiences of sexual and generalized harassment and outcomes (psychological distress, heavy alcohol use) among undergraduates (N = 1852, 58.6% female, 57.4% White) in the Midwestern United States. Activity participation was related to harassment, but the pattern depended on the activity, harassment type, and sex. Fraternity/sorority involvement was associated with generalized harassment, whereas school club involvement was linked to both generalized and sexual harassment. Female intramural athletes were at an increased risk to experience both harassment types. In addition to direct relations, activity participation was indirectly linked to future psychological distress (depression, anxiety) and heavy alcohol use via harassment. Implications for intervention with this college student population are discussed. PMID:27771523

  19. Children's Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivanova, K. N.; Lebedev, M. V.; Sivak, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Why do children learn in different ways: some are good students who show interest and zeal, while others are lazy and have to be taught against their will? Why do schools have over- and underachievers? Of course, there are a multitude of reasons. But almost 50 years ago it was shown using large data sets that families with high socioeconomic…

  20. SVM detection of epileptiform activity in routine EEG.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Routine electroencephalogram (EEG) is an important test in aiding the diagnosis of patients with suspected epilepsy. These recordings typically last 20-40 minutes, during which signs of abnormal activity (spikes, sharp waves) are looked for in the EEG trace. It is essential that events of short duration are detected during the routine EEG test. The work presented in this paper examines the effect of changing a range of input values to the detection system on its ability to distinguish between normal and abnormal EEG activity. It is shown that the length of analysis window in the range of 0.5s to 1s are well suited to the task. Additionally, it is reported that patient specific systems should be used where possible due to their better performance.

  1. Extracurricular Business Planning Competitions: Challenging the Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kayleigh; McGowan, Pauric; Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Business planning competitions [BPCs] are a commonly offered yet under-examined extracurricular activity. Given the extent of sceptical comment about business planning, this paper offers what the authors believe is a much-needed critical discussion of the assumptions that underpin the provision of such competitions. In doing so it is suggested…

  2. [The association between extracurricular activities and exercise and substance abuse among high school students in Japan: results for an aggregate sample from the Japanese School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs in 2004, 2006, and 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yoshihiro; Katsuno, Shingo; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the subgroup differences in the association between participation in school-based extracurricular activities and exercise and levels of cigarette, alcohol, or marijuana use during one's lifetime and in the past year. This study also sought to determine the optimal classification of subgroups based on four variables (participation in school-based extracurricular activities, exercise, gender, and school year). Data consisted of a combined sample (aggregate sample) from the Japanese School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (JSPAD) conducted in 2004, 2006, and 2009. The aggregate sample consisted of 75,726 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-year students (37,697 males and 38,029 females) at full-time high schools nationwide that were selected by stratified, single-stage cluster sampling during each survey. The aggregate sample combined randomly selected samples of the same size from each year the survey was conducted. Results indicated that 63.4% of the entire sample participated in school-based extracurricular activities, 64.8% of males did so, and 61.9% of females did so. Results also indicated that 66.4% of the entire sample exercised outside of PE class, 79.2% of males did so, and 53.8% of females did so. In addition, the prevalence of cigarette, alcohol, or marijuana use was predicted from the four variables by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results yielded optimal subgroups for the prevalence of each drug's use. Results revealed (1) that participation in school-based extracurricular activities and gender were more predictive, whereas exercise was least predictive, (2) that the association between exercise and substance use measures varies subtly for each subgroup, suggesting the existence of a great variety of opportunities for high school students to exercise, and (3) that school year had a substantial and positive effect on drinking among students who actively participated in school-based extracurricular activities.

  3. A school-based peer-led smoking prevention intervention with extracurricular activities: the LILT-LdP cluster randomized controlled trial design and study population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Sandra; Gorini, Giuseppe; Tamelli, Marco; Monti, Claudia; Storani, Simone; Carreras, Giulia; Martini, Andrea; Allara, Elias; Angelini, Paola; Faggiano, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Few school programs are effective in preventing adolescents' tobacco smoking initiation. The "Lega contro i Tumori - Luoghi di Prevenzione" is a cluster randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a school-based peer-led smoking prevention intervention with extracurricular activities for students aged 14-15 years. This paper presents the study design and the baseline characteristics of the study population. Twenty secondary schools located in the Reggio Emilia province took part in the study. Five schools were excluded because they already participated in smoking prevention interventions. The schools were randomized to control or intervention arms. The study population consisted of students attending the first grade. Components of the intervention included 1) the out-of-school "Smoking Prevention Tour" (SPT) at the "Luoghi di Prevenzione" Center, a 4-hour (4 sessions) extracurricular activity; 2) the "Smoke-free Schools" intervention, combining a life-skills-based peer-led intervention at school, an in-depth lesson on one of the SPT sessions, and enforcement surveillance of the school antismoking policy. Tobacco use was studied through a questionnaire administered before and 6 months after the intervention. Eleven high schools and 9 vocational secondary schools took part in the study for a total of 2,476 out of 3,050 eligible students (81.2%). The proportions of respondents in high schools and vocational secondary schools were 90.9% and 64.5%, respectively (P Intervention and control arms showed a different distribution of gender and school type, whereas no difference was observed in any tobacco-use characteristic. This study is one of the few Italian trials to evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based program for preventing smoking initiation.

  4. It isn't all just fun and games: Collegiate participation in extracurricular activities and risk for generalized and sexual harassment, psychological distress, and alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Meredith; Rospenda, Kathleen M; Liu, Li; Richman, Judith A

    2016-12-01

    Collegiate extracurricular activities, despite their benefits, may place students at an increased risk for experiencing harassment. This study utilizes multiple waves of data from an online longitudinal survey to examine how participation in college activities (intramural sports, fraternities/sororities, school clubs) relates to experiences of sexual and generalized harassment and outcomes (psychological distress, heavy alcohol use) among undergraduates (N = 1852, 58.6% female, 57.4% White) in the Midwestern United States. Activity participation was related to harassment, but the pattern depended on the activity, harassment type, and sex. Fraternity/sorority involvement was associated with generalized harassment, whereas school club involvement was linked to both generalized and sexual harassment. Female intramural athletes were at an increased risk to experience both harassment types. In addition to direct relations, activity participation was indirectly linked to future psychological distress (depression, anxiety) and heavy alcohol use via harassment. Implications for intervention with this college student population are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inclusion in Extracurricular Sport: A How-to Guide for Implementation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Shannon Titus; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity and extracurricular activity has become a topic of importance in the United States. The nation's government officials have brought to light the need for increased awareness, advocacy, and support of the participation of youth with disabilities in recreation and leisure activities (e.g., extracurricular and school-sanctioned…

  6. Residence-Based Fear of Crime: A Routine Activities Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yung-Lien; Ren, Ling; Greenleaf, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Most fear-of-crime research uses resident's neighborhood as a key reference location to measure fear, yet the location effects of one's own dwelling unit on crime-specific fear has not been explicitly studied theoretically in the literature. Drawing upon routine activities theory, this study undertakes an investigation into the levels and determinants of residence-based fear of crime across three racial/ethnic groups-Whites, African Americans, and non-White Hispanics. Data used in the analyses were collected from a random-sample telephone survey of 1,239 respondents in Houston, Texas. The results derived from factor analyses revealed that residents do distinguish between fear in the neighborhood and fear at home. Proximity to motivated offenders measured by perception of crime was found to be the most salient predictor of fear, followed by the measures of target vulnerability and capable guardianship. In addition, residence-based fear varies significantly across racial/ethnic groups. The significance of these findings and the policy implications are highlighted.

  7. Relationship between Success in Extracurricular Programs and Student Academic Performance in Economically Disadvantaged High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgo, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the common characteristics of economically disadvantaged schools that demonstrate success in academics and extracurricular activities. Mixed-method design was used for this study. The quantitative portion of the study determined the correlation between a school's performance in extracurricular activities,…

  8. Daily life activity routine discovery in hemiparetic rehabilitation patients using topic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, J; Derungs, A; Schuster-Amft, C; Amft, O; Tröster, G

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring natural behavior and activity routines of hemiparetic rehabilitation patients across the day can provide valuable progress information for therapists and patients and contribute to an optimized rehabilitation process. In particular, continuous patient monitoring could add type, frequency and duration of daily life activity routines and hence complement standard clinical scores that are assessed for particular tasks only. Machine learning methods have been applied to infer activity routines from sensor data. However, supervised methods require activity annotations to build recognition models and thus require extensive patient supervision. Discovery methods, including topic models could provide patient routine information and deal with variability in activity and movement performance across patients. Topic models have been used to discover characteristic activity routine patterns of healthy individuals using activity primitives recognized from supervised sensor data. Yet, the applicability of topic models for hemiparetic rehabilitation patients and techniques to derive activity primitives without supervision needs to be addressed. We investigate, 1) whether a topic model-based activity routine discovery framework can infer activity routines of rehabilitation patients from wearable motion sensor data. 2) We compare the performance of our topic model-based activity routine discovery using rule-based and clustering-based activity vocabulary. We analyze the activity routine discovery in a dataset recorded with 11 hemiparetic rehabilitation patients during up to ten full recording days per individual in an ambulatory daycare rehabilitation center using wearable motion sensors attached to both wrists and the non-affected thigh. We introduce and compare rule-based and clustering-based activity vocabulary to process statistical and frequency acceleration features to activity words. Activity words were used for activity routine pattern discovery using topic models

  9. The influence of participation in extracurricular activities to the employability of Industrial Engineering graduates of one Private University in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Joy E. Chua

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Filipinos have been regarding education as the leading avenue of success. Having the system patterned from the American Education structure, education in the country provides basic learning needs and a foundation on which successive learning can be based on. Aside from traditional learning inside the classroom, extracurricular activities (ECAs are also provided for students, which basically have the same goal as that of courses in a curriculum. These activities however, let the students have experiences not included in formal education. Moreover, ECAs are being promoted in some college institutions considering that it benefits students in ways that would prepare them for their future. Certain companies focus on investing on leadership development of their employees to make them globally competitive. This paper focused on determining the degree or extent of influence of ECAs to the employability of the University of Santo Tomas (UST Industrial Engineering graduates of Batches 2013, 2014, and 2015. A survey was administered to 43 sampled graduates. Logistic regression was used in determining the influence of participation in ECAs to the employability of the graduates. Correlational analysis showed that there exists a significant relationship between and among independent variables of number of jobs, number of initial interview, level of participation and soft skills developed through ECAs. Meanwhile, Paired Sample Means Test exhibited that at 95% level of significance, there exists no relationship between the soft skills possessed by the graduates and as expected by the company with which they are employed. Recommendations were provided to enhance the activities offered in UST towards increasing employability rate of graduate students.

  10. 'Do what you can with what you have where you are': Extracurricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the activities of their choice. The findings contribute to research which argues for sufficient implementation of extracurricular provisioning within context in view of the value of a holistic development of the child. Key words: Extracurricular provisioning; Holistic development; School dropout; Retention; Inner-city environment.

  11. Gender Variation in Extracurricular Activity Participation and Perceived Life Chances in Trinidad and Tobago Adolescents Variación por Sexo de la Participación en Actividades Extracurriculares y la Percepción de Oportunidades de Vida en Adolescentes de Trinidad y Tobago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena R Mello

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Participation in extracurricular activities has surfaced as an important context for adolescent development and may be a fruitful avenue for fostering future attitudes, a concept shown to predict adolescent behaviors. In this study of youth from Trinidad and Tobago, we examined gender differences in activity participation and perceived life chances in 1,385 adolescents (59% male. Trinidadian adolescents were highly active, on average, participating in three activities. More males were involved in athletic and organized groups, whereas more females participated in artistic and religious activities. Artistic and athletic activity participation predicted positive perceived life chances, even after controlling for academic achievement. Artistic activities were especially beneficial for predicting future attitudes for males compared to females.La participación en actividades extracurriculares es un importante contexto para el desarrollo adolescente y puede ser una provechosa vía para promover actitudes acerca del futuro, un concepto que permite predecir el comportamiento adolescente. En esta investigación se examinaron las diferencias por sexo de la participación en actividades y la percepción de las oportunidades de vida en 1.385 adolescentes de Trinidad y Tobago (59% varones. Los adolescentes eran muy activos, participando en promedio en tres actividades. Los hombres participaban más en deportes y grupos organizados, mientras las mujeres lo hacían en actividades artísticas y religiosas. La participación en actividades artísticas y deportivas predijo una percepción positiva sobre las oportunidades de vida, aun después de controlar los logros académicos. Las actividades artísticas fueron especialmente beneficiosas para predecir las actitudes de los hombres respecto del futuro.

  12. A Cocktail of Extracurricular Activities (ECAs): Different ECA Combinations and Their Association with Heavy Drinking in Two College Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Julia A.; Johnson, Douglas N.; Jones, Jane A.

    2015-01-01

    The activities that students participate in are important to college life and outcomes. With regard to the problem outcome of heavy drinking, some activities pose risks (e.g., fraternity/sorority life) and others are protective (e.g., religious groups), yet students often participate in multiple activities. We estimated the odds of frequent heavy…

  13. "If You Want to Win, You Have to Learn to Get Along:" Youth Talk about Their Participation in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Jodi; Bremer, Karin Lindstrom

    2004-01-01

    Young people report being both emotionally and cognitively engaged in youth activities in ways they are not in other parts of their lives. Research has identified six developmental processes that categorize youths' growth experiences in their activities. These include identity work; developing initiative; learning, emotional competencies;…

  14. Extracurricular participation among adolescents from immigrant families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Daisy E; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Participation in organized after-school activities could be especially beneficial for youth from immigrant backgrounds, whose families often have little knowledge of American school systems. The role of extracurricular involvement in the achievement and motivation of students from immigrant families was examined among 468 eleventh grade (52.4% female) students from Asian American (44.4%), European American (19.0%) and Latino (36.5%) backgrounds who varied in generational status (first: 25%; second: 52.4%, third: 22.6%) and attended high school in the Los Angeles area. Participants completed questionnaires regarding their extracurricular activities, school belonging, and intrinsic motivation. Students' grade point average (GPA) was obtained from official school records. Controls included parental education, ethnicity, generational status, gender, school, and the outcome variables in tenth grade. First generation students were less likely to participate in academic activities than their third generation peers but, overall, there were few generational differences in participation. Participation predicted achievement and engagement after accounting for tenth grade levels of educational adjustment. Most notably, although all students benefitted from participation, the gain in GPA as a function of participation was greater for first generation than third generation students. Results suggest that organized after-school activities are particularly important for students in immigrant families, providing them with additional experiences that contribute to academic achievement.

  15. Less Socially Engaged? Participation in Friendship and Extracurricular Activities Among Racial/Ethnic Minority and Immigrant Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherng, Hua-Yu Sebastian; Turney, Kristin; Kao, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Prior research has linked social engagement, such as peer interaction and participation in school activities, to a host of positive outcomes for youth and adolescents. However, little research considers patterns of social engagement among racial/ethnic minority and immigrant adolescents, despite prior research suggesting…

  16. EXTRACURRICULAR CLASSES FOR STUDENTS IN ACADEMIC SUBJECTS (ORGANIZATIONAL-PEDAGOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Kazarenkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the pedagogical foundations of organizing the extracurricular activities of the students in various academic disciplines. The content of the article reflects the situation characterizing the importance of the purposeful development of these activities for the successful socialization, professionalization and self-realization in the system of university education. The actualization of extracurricular work is determined by the socio-economic changes taking place in the Russian state and society, and thus in higher education. Drawing on the analysis of the scientific literature and the state of practice of the specialist training in high school we have identified the main factors of actualization of these activities of students (social, socio-educational, socio-psychological, pedagogical, psychological and revealed the essence of each of those. This publication submits a brief description of the principles, goals, objectives, contents, methods, means and forms of organization of educational work on extracurricular classes of students on academic subjects, it also stresses the importance of optimal selection of the content of the material, the choice of methods, means and forms of extracurricular work, integrating extracurricular and classroom work of students, individualization and differentiation of their education and training in extracurricular activities. The article shows the role of the teacher in the development of the student’s individuality in extracurricular activities.

  17. Students with Disabilities Participation in Extracurricular Athletics: School District Obligations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Losinski, Mickey L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    2014-01-01

    On January 25, 2013 the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) in the U.S. Department of Education issued a Dear Colleague letter (DCL) that addressed the obligations of school districts under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act regarding the participation of students with disabilities in extracurricular athletic activities (U.S. Department of Education,…

  18. Socioeconomic Segregation of Activity Spaces in Urban Neighborhoods: Does Shared Residence Mean Shared Routines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christopher R; Calder, Catherine A; Krivo, Lauren J; Smith, Anna L; Boettner, Bethany

    2017-02-01

    Residential segregation by income and education is increasing alongside slowly declining black-white segregation. Segregation in urban neighborhood residents' non-home activity spaces has not been explored. How integrated are the daily routines of people who live in the same neighborhood? Are people with different socioeconomic backgrounds that live near one another less likely to share routine activity locations than those of similar education or income? Do these patterns vary across the socioeconomic continuum or by neighborhood structure? The analyses draw on unique data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey that identify the location where residents engage in routine activities. Using multilevel p2 (network) models, we analyze pairs of households located in the same neighborhood and examine whether the dyad combinations across three levels of SES conduct routine activities in the same location, and whether neighbor socioeconomic similarity in the co-location of routine activities is dependent on the level of neighborhood socioeconomic inequality and trust. Results indicate that, on average, increasing SES diminishes the likelihood of sharing activity locations with any SES group. This pattern is most pronounced in neighborhoods characterized by high levels of socioeconomic inequality. Neighborhood trust explains a nontrivial proportion of the inequality effect on the extent of routine activity sorting by SES. Thus stark, visible neighborhood-level inequality by SES may lead to enhanced effects of distrust on the willingness to share routines across class.

  19. Socioeconomic Segregation of Activity Spaces in Urban Neighborhoods: Does Shared Residence Mean Shared Routines?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christopher R.; Calder, Catherine A.; Krivo, Lauren J.; Smith, Anna L.; Boettner, Bethany

    2017-01-01

    Residential segregation by income and education is increasing alongside slowly declining black-white segregation. Segregation in urban neighborhood residents’ non-home activity spaces has not been explored. How integrated are the daily routines of people who live in the same neighborhood? Are people with different socioeconomic backgrounds that live near one another less likely to share routine activity locations than those of similar education or income? Do these patterns vary across the socioeconomic continuum or by neighborhood structure? The analyses draw on unique data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey that identify the location where residents engage in routine activities. Using multilevel p2 (network) models, we analyze pairs of households located in the same neighborhood and examine whether the dyad combinations across three levels of SES conduct routine activities in the same location, and whether neighbor socioeconomic similarity in the co-location of routine activities is dependent on the level of neighborhood socioeconomic inequality and trust. Results indicate that, on average, increasing SES diminishes the likelihood of sharing activity locations with any SES group. This pattern is most pronounced in neighborhoods characterized by high levels of socioeconomic inequality. Neighborhood trust explains a nontrivial proportion of the inequality effect on the extent of routine activity sorting by SES. Thus stark, visible neighborhood-level inequality by SES may lead to enhanced effects of distrust on the willingness to share routines across class. PMID:29034322

  20. Socioeconomic Segregation of Activity Spaces in Urban Neighborhoods: Does Shared Residence Mean Shared Routines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Browning

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Residential segregation by income and education is increasing alongside slowly declining black-white segregation. Segregation in urban neighborhood residents’ nonhome activity spaces has not been explored. How integrated are the daily routines of people who live in the same neighborhood? Are people with different socioeconomic backgrounds that live near one another less likely to share routine activity locations than those of similar education or income? Do these patterns vary across the socioeconomic continuum or by neighborhood structure? The analyses draw on unique data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey that identify the location where residents engage in routine activities. Using multilevel p2 (network models, we analyze pairs of households in the same neighborhood and examine whether the dyad combinations across three levels of SES conduct routine activities in the same location, and whether neighbor socioeconomic similarity in the co-location of routine activities is dependent on the level of neighborhood socioeconomic inequality and trust. Results indicate that, on average, increasing SES diminishes the likelihood of sharing activity locations with any SES group. This pattern is most pronounced in neighborhoods characterized by high levels of socioeconomic inequality. Neighborhood trust explains a nontrivial proportion of the inequality effect on the extent of routine activity sorting by SES. Thus stark, visible neighborhood-level inequality by SES may lead to enhanced effects of distrust on the willingness to share routines across class.

  1. Extracurricular school-based sports as a motivating vehicle for sports participation in youth: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, An; Aelterman, Nathalie; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Haerens, Leen

    2014-04-07

    Extracurricular school-based sports are considered to be an ideal means of reaching children who are not active in community sports. The purposes of this study were to examine the extent to which pupils not engaging in community sports do participate in extracurricular school-based sports, and to assess whether extracurricular school-based sports participants are more physically active and/or more autonomously motivated towards sports in daily life than children who do not participate in extracurricular school-based sports. One thousand forty-nine children (53.7% boys; M age = 11.02 years, SD = 0.02) out of 60 classes from 30 Flemish elementary schools, with an extracurricular school-based sports offer, completed validated questionnaires to assess physical activity (Flemish Physical Activity Questionnaire) and motivation (Behavioral Regulations in Physical Education Questionnaire). Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to examine the data generated from these questionnaires. More than three quarters of the children (76%) reported participating in extracurricular school-based sports during the current school year and 73% reported engaging in organized community sports. Almost two third of the children (65%) not participating in community sports stated that they did participate in extracurricular school-based sports. Extracurricular school-based sports participants were significantly more physically active than children not participating in extracurricular school-based sports (β = 157.62, p school-based sports participation × community sports participation) were found for autonomous motivation, with boys engaging in extracurricular school-based sports but not in community sports being significantly more autonomously motivated towards sports than boys not engaging in community or extracurricular school-based sports (β = 0.58, p = 0.003). Such differences were not noted among girls. If extracurricular school-based sports are offered at school, the vast

  2. Extracurricular school-based sports as a motivating vehicle for sports participation in youth: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracurricular school-based sports are considered to be an ideal means of reaching children who are not active in community sports. The purposes of this study were to examine the extent to which pupils not engaging in community sports do participate in extracurricular school-based sports, and to assess whether extracurricular school-based sports participants are more physically active and/or more autonomously motivated towards sports in daily life than children who do not participate in extracurricular school-based sports. Methods One thousand forty-nine children (53.7% boys; M age = 11.02 years, SD = 0.02) out of 60 classes from 30 Flemish elementary schools, with an extracurricular school-based sports offer, completed validated questionnaires to assess physical activity (Flemish Physical Activity Questionnaire) and motivation (Behavioral Regulations in Physical Education Questionnaire). Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to examine the data generated from these questionnaires. Results More than three quarters of the children (76%) reported participating in extracurricular school-based sports during the current school year and 73% reported engaging in organized community sports. Almost two third of the children (65%) not participating in community sports stated that they did participate in extracurricular school-based sports. Extracurricular school-based sports participants were significantly more physically active than children not participating in extracurricular school-based sports (β = 157.62, p sports participation × community sports participation) were found for autonomous motivation, with boys engaging in extracurricular school-based sports but not in community sports being significantly more autonomously motivated towards sports than boys not engaging in community or extracurricular school-based sports (β = 0.58, p = 0.003). Such differences were not noted among girls. Conclusions If extracurricular school-based sports are offered

  3. Extracurricular Activities and 504 Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, George

    2011-01-01

    Schools today are faced with an ever-growing number of case law regulating them with regards to students with disabilities. This regulating does not only occur with students with disabilities, but also with their participation in interscholastic sports (Sullivan, 2000). Schools are charged with providing equal education for a variety of students,…

  4. Diabetes that impacts on routine activities predicts slower recovery after total knee arthroplasty: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen Amusat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Question: In the 6 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA, what is the pattern of pain resolution and functional recovery in people without diabetes, with diabetes that does not impact on routine activities, and with diabetes that does impact on routine activities? Is diabetes that impacts on routine activities an independent predictor of slower resolution of pain and functional recovery after TKA? Design: Community-based prospective observational study. Participants: A consecutive cohort of 405 people undergoing primary TKA, of whom 60 (15% had diabetes. Participants with diabetes were also asked preoperatively whether diabetes impacted on their routine activities. Participants were categorised into three groups: no diabetes (n = 345, diabetes with no impact on activities (n = 41, and diabetes that impacted activities (n = 19. Outcome measures: Pain and function were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index within the month before surgery and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. Demographic, medical and surgical factors were also measured, along with depression, social support and health-related quality of life. Results: No baseline differences in pain and function were seen among the three groups (p > 0.05. Adjusting for age, gender and contralateral joint involvement across the 6 postoperative months, participants with diabetes that impacted on routine activities had pain scores that were 8.3 points higher (indicating greater pain and function scores that were 5.4 points higher (indicating lower function than participants without diabetes. Participants with diabetes that doesn’t impact on routine activities had similar recovery to those without diabetes. Conclusion: People undergoing TKA who report preoperatively that diabetes impacts on their routine activities have less recovery over 6 months than those without diabetes or those with diabetes that does not impact on routine activities

  5. Lifestyles and routine activities of South African teenagers at risk of being trafficked for involuntary prostitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutya, Thozama Mandisa

    2010-12-01

    The United Nations estimates that 79% of teenage girls trafficked globally every year are forced into involuntary prostitution. About 247 000 South African children work in exploitative conditions; about 40 000 South African female teenagers work as prostitutes. This paper investigates lifestyles and routine activities of teenagers at risk of being trafficked for involuntary prostitution. The key concepts involuntary prostitution, intergenerational sex and exploitative conditions are defined in relation to the lifestyles and routine activities of South African female teenagers. Human trafficking for involuntary prostitution is described, based on a literature review. Lifestyle exposure and routine activities theories help to explain the potential victimisation of these teenagers in human trafficking for involuntary prostitution. Actual lifestyle and routine activities of South African teenagers and risky behaviours (substance abuse, intergenerational sex and child prostitution) are discussed as factors that make teens vulnerable to such trafficking. This paper recommends that human trafficking prevention efforts (awareness programmes and information campaigns) be directed at places frequented by human traffickers and teenagers in the absence of a capable guardian to reduce victimisation, as traffickers analyse the lifestyles and routine activities of their targets. South Africa should also interrogate entrenched practices such as intergenerational sex.

  6. The Country Council Work on Extracurricular Enlightenment of Adults in the Volga-Ural Region

    OpenAIRE

    Timur A. Magsumov; Marina S. Nizamova

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals the activity of the Volga and Ural country councils to create a system of extracurricular enlightenment of adults in the later period of the existence of the Russian empire. The article is based on the statistical and mass sources, including office records from regional archives. The authors, resorting to a comparative multiaspect approach to the study of the country councils’ forms and methods of work to organize extracurricular establishments and popular educational even...

  7. Extracurricular Involvement, Friendships, and Social Identity Development in Ethnically Diverse Middle Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Knifsend, Casey Anne

    2014-01-01

    My dissertation consists of two studies investigating extracurricular activities as a context for social identity development. These studies relied on a sample drawn from 11 multiethnic middle schools as part of a larger project investigating the role of school ethnic diversity in socio-emotional adjustment. Study 1 examined the correlates of extracurricular participation and identification among seventh grade youth (N = 2,376). African-American and Latino/Mexican-American adolescents were...

  8. Increasing Completion of Classroom Routines through the Use of Picture Activity Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kamille J.; DiCarlo, Cynthia F.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers spend the first few days of school teaching routines to children that will help transitions in the classroom between different activities. When children have difficulty, they move more slowly and/or require teacher prompting. A picture activity schedule intervention (Breitfelder in Teach Except Child Plus 4(5):2-15, 2008; Bryan and Gast…

  9. A Gendered Lifestyle-Routine Activity Approach to Explaining Stalking Victimization in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyns, Bradford W; Henson, Billy; Fisher, Bonnie S; Fox, Kathleen A; Nobles, Matt R

    2016-05-01

    Research into stalking victimization has proliferated over the last two decades, but several research questions related to victimization risk remain unanswered. Accordingly, the present study utilized a lifestyle-routine activity theoretical perspective to identify risk factors for victimization. Gender-based theoretical models also were estimated to assess the possible moderating effects of gender on the relationship between lifestyle-routine activity concepts and victimization risk. Based on an analysis of a representative sample of more than 15,000 residents of Canada from the Canadian General Social Survey (GSS), results suggested conditional support for lifestyle-routine activity theory and for the hypothesis that predictors of stalking victimization may be gender based. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Influences of Affect Associated with Routine Out-of-Home Activities on Subjective Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobson Bergstad, C.J.; Gamble, A.; Hagman, O.; Polk, M.; Gärling, T.; Ettema, D.F.; Friman, M.; Olsson, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of a random sample of 1,330 Swedish residents assessed the relationships between affect associated with performance of routine out-of-home activities, mood, and judgments of life satisfaction (cognitive subjective wellbeing, CSWB). Regression analyses showed that sociodemographic

  11. DAS-driven therapy versus routine care in patients with recent-onset active rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goekoop-Ruiterman, Y. P. M.; de Vries-Bouwstra, J. K.; Kerstens, P. J. S. M.; Nielen, M. M. J.; Vos, K.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Speyer, I.; Seys, P. E. H.; Breedveld, F. C.; Allaart, C. F.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of Disease Activity Score (DAS)-driven therapy and routine care in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis receiving traditional antirheumatic therapy from either the BeSt study, a randomised controlled trial comparing

  12. Towards the normalization of cybercrime victimization : A routine activities analysis of cybercrime in europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, Marianne; Montoya, L.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Heydari, Maliheh

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between users' routine activities and socio-economic characteristics and three forms of cybercrime victimization of 1) online shopping fraud, 2) online banking fraud and 3) cyber-attacks (i.e. DDoS attacks). Data from the Eurobarometer, containing a sample

  13. Undergraduate women in STEM: Does participation in STEM extracurricular programs enhance success among students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kasey Marie

    Women have been underrepresented in the STEM fields since the 1650's to today (Hunter, 2005). This study examined the extracurricular participation of undergraduate women, in Fall 2009, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, who were majoring in at least one (1) of the 49 STEM majors at Southeastern State University participated in STEM extracurricular programs and if any specific program contributed to success more than other programs. A second question was whether participation in an extracurricular program(s) influenced their success. Women who were older, had been enrolled more semesters, had more credit hours, and had families with higher incomes were more likely to be involved in STEM only or STEM and Non-STEM extracurricular activities. Additionally, students who completed a high level of high school math, had a higher high school GPA, had received a regular high school diploma, and who had mothers with a higher level of education were also more likely to be involved in STEM only or STEM and Non-STEM extracurricular activities. Students who had been enrolled in college seven (7) or more semesters, who had selected their current major within their first year of college, were more likely to be involved in STEM extracurricular activities. Students believe that their STEM extracurricular involvement helps them to be successful because it provided them with student relationships, opportunity for the future, advising relationships, mentorship, and exploration of the campus and larger community. This study may be useful for student affairs professionals and academics who take an active role in serving as advisors, mentors, and providers of STEM-related opportunities.

  14. Routine daily physical activity and glucose variations are strongly coupled in adults with T1DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S; Carley, David W; Cinar, Ali; Quinn, Lauretta

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) is characterized by altered glucose homeostasis resulting in wide glucose variations throughout a 24-h period. The relationship between routine daily physical activity and glucose variations has not been systematically investigated in adults with T1DM. The objectives of this study were to characterize and quantify the relationship between routine daily activity and glucose variations in a small group of adults with T1DM. Adults with T1DM treated with an insulin pump were recruited for the study. Over a 3-day period, glucose variations were monitored with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) and routine daily physical activity was assessed using an accelerometer-based physical activity-monitoring band. Simultaneous glucose and physical activity data for one 24-h period were used for analysis. Cross-correlation function and wavelet coherence analyses were employed to quantify the coupling between physical activity and glucose. Twelve subjects were included in the analysis. Cross-correlation function analysis revealed strong coupling between activity and glucose. Wavelet Coherence demonstrated that slower oscillations (120-340 min) of glucose and physical activity exhibited significantly greater coherence (F = 12.6, P < 0.0001) than faster oscillations (10 and 120 min). Physical activity and glucose demonstrate strong time and frequency-dependent coupling throughout a 24-h time period in adults with T1DM. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  15. Assessing the Macro-Level Correlates of Malware Infections Using a Routine Activities Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Thomas J; Burruss, George W; Bossler, Adam M

    2016-12-01

    The ability to gain unauthorized access to computer systems to engage in espionage and data theft poses a massive threat to individuals worldwide. There has been minimal focus, however, on the role of malicious software, or malware, which can automate this process. This study examined the macro-correlates of malware infection at the national level by using an open repository of known malware infections and utilizing a routine activities framework. Negative inflated binomial models for counts indicated that nations with greater technological infrastructure, more political freedoms, and with less organized crime financial impact were more likely to report malware infections. The number of Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) in a nation was not significantly related with reported malware infection. The implications of the study for the understanding of malware infection, routine activity theory, and target-hardening strategies are discussed.

  16. Spatial/Temporal Variations of Crime: A Routine Activity Theory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Silas Nogueira; Pereira, Débora V S; Andresen, Martin A; Matias, Lindon Fonseca

    2017-04-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of crime in Campinas, Brazil, are analyzed considering the relevance of routine activity theory in a Latin American context. We use geo-referenced criminal event data, 2010-2013, analyzing spatial patterns using census tracts and temporal patterns considering seasons, months, days, and hours. Our analyses include difference in means tests, count-based regression models, and Kulldorff's scan test. We find that crime in Campinas, Brazil, exhibits both temporal and spatial-temporal patterns. However, the presence of these patterns at the different temporal scales varies by crime type. Specifically, not all crime types have statistically significant temporal patterns at all scales of analysis. As such, routine activity theory works well to explain temporal and spatial-temporal patterns of crime in Campinas, Brazil. However, local knowledge of Brazilian culture is necessary for understanding a portion of these crime patterns.

  17. Adolescents' Time Use: Effects on Substance Use, Delinquency and Sexual Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Grace M.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Welte, John W.; Farrell, Michael P.; Dintcheff, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    Using an integration of social control theory and the routine activity perspective, adolescent time use was examined for effects on problem behaviors. We examined a wide variety of time use categories, including homework, extracurricular activities, sports time, alone time, paid work, housework, television watching, as well as indices of family…

  18. Association of extracurricular sports participation with obesity in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonogeorgos, G; Papadimitriou, A; Panagiotakos, D B; Priftis, K N; Nicolaidou, P

    2011-03-01

    Childhood obesity has become a modern epidemic with escalating rates. The aim of our study was the assessment of the association between extracurricular sports participation with the obesity status among Greek schoolchildren aged 10-12 years. Seven-hundred children (323 boys) aged 10-12 years were evaluated through a standardized questionnaire. Several lifestyle, dietary and physical activity attributes were recorded. Children according to the median hours of participation in after-school structured physical activity were classified as participating for more or less than 3 hours per week. Body height and mass were measured and body mass index was calculated in order to classify children as overweight or obese according to IOTF classification. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used in order to evaluate the association between the participation of more than 3 hours per week in structured physical activity after school with overweight or obesity. A total of 48.9% of the boys and 31.8% of the girls were participating for more than 3 hours per week (Psport activities. Moreover, 33.9 % of the boys and 22.1 % of the girls were classified as overweight and 9.4% of the boys and 8.6% of the girls as obese (P=0.006). Girls who participated in excess of 3 hours in extracurricular sport activities were 59% less likely to be overweight or obese than their non participating counterparts, adjusted for several confounders (adjusted OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.20-0.83). Participation in extracurricular sports activity is inversely related to overweight or obesity in 10-12 years old Greek girls.

  19. Phishing for suitable targets in the Netherlands: routine activity theory and phishing victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukfeldt, E Rutger

    2014-08-01

    This article investigates phishing victims, especially the increased or decreased risk of victimization, using data from a cybercrime victim survey in the Netherlands (n=10,316). Routine activity theory provides the theoretical perspective. According to routine activity theory, several factors influence the risk of victimization. A multivariate analysis was conducted to assess which factors actually lead to increased risk of victimization. The model included background and financial data of victims, their Internet activities, and the degree to which they were "digitally accessible" to an offender. The analysis showed that personal background and financial characteristics play no role in phishing victimization. Among eight Internet activities, only "targeted browsing" led to increased risk. As for accessibility, using popular operating systems and web browsers does not lead to greater risk, while having up-to-date antivirus software as a technically capable guardian has no effect. The analysis showed no one, clearly defined group has an increased chance of becoming a victim. Target hardening may help, but opportunities for prevention campaigns aimed at a specific target group or dangerous online activities are limited. Therefore, situational crime prevention will have to come from a different angle. Banks could play the role of capable guardian.

  20. Availability of high school extracurricular sports programs and high-risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah A; Taylor, Stephanie L; Zonta, Michela; Vestal, Katherine D; Schuster, Mark A

    2007-02-01

    The Surgeon General has called for an expansion of school-based extracurricular sports programs to address the obesity epidemic. However, little is known about the availability of and participation in high school extracurricular sports and how participation in these sports is related to high-risk behaviors. We surveyed Los Angeles County public high schools in 2002 to determine the number of extracurricular sports programs offered and the percentage of students participating in those programs. We used community data on rates of arrests, births, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among youth to examine associations between risk behaviors and participation in sports programs. The average school offered 14 sports programs, and the average participation rate was 39% for boys and 30% for girls. Smaller schools and schools with higher percentages of disadvantaged students offered fewer programs. The average school offering 13 or fewer programs had 14% of its students participating, while the average school offering 16 or more programs had 31% of its students participating in sports. Controlling for area-level demographics, juvenile arrest rates and teen birth rates, but not STD rates, were lower in areas where schools offered more extracurricular sports. Opportunities for participation in high school extracurricular sports are limited. Future studies should test whether increased opportunities will increase physical activity and impact the increasing overweight problem in youths.

  1. Taking Up an Active Role: Emerging Participation in Early Mother–Infant Interaction during Peekaboo Routines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Nomikou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical systems approaches to social coordination underscore how participants' local actions give rise to and maintain global interactive patterns and how, in turn, they are also shaped by them. Developmental research can deliver important insights into both processes: (1 the stabilization of ways of interacting, and (2 the gradual shaping of the agentivity of the individuals. In this article we propose that infants' agentivity develops out of participation, i.e., acting a part in an interaction system. To investigate this development this article focuses on the ways in which participation in routinized episodes may shape infant's agentivity in social events. In contrast to existing research addressing more advanced forms of participating in social routines, our goal was to assess infants' early participation as evidence of infants' agentivity. In our study, 19 Polish mother–infant dyads were filmed playing peekaboo when the infants were 4 and 6 months of age. We operationalized infants' participation in the peekaboo in terms of their use of various behaviors across modalities during specific phases of the game: We included smiles, vocalizations, and attempts to cover and uncover themselves or their mothers. We hypothesized that infants and mothers would participate actively in the routine by regulating their behavior so as to adhere to the routine format. Furthermore, we hypothesized that infants who experienced more scaffolding would be able to adopt a more active role in the routine. We operationalized scaffolding as mothers' use of specific peekaboo structures that allowed infants to anticipate when it was their turn to act. Results suggested that infants as young as 4 months of age engaged in peekaboo and took up turns in the game, and that their participation increased at 6 months of age. Crucially, our results suggest that infants' behavior was organized by the global structure of the peekaboo game, because smiles, vocalizations, and

  2. Residual activities of 99mTc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals in routine nuclear medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Petros Z; Papachristou, Maria; Persakis, Evangelos; Kouvelis, Konstantinos; Datseris, Ioannis E

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we present a series of common Tc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals administrations performed in a busy nuclear medicine department within a 1-year timeframe in routine practice. The main objective is to identify the true activity administered to the patient and whether that is in compliance with the EANM guidelines, where applicable, and/or with the department's protocols. As a secondary objective, we aimed to assess whether the volume of the injected dose correlates to the percentage of residual activity measured after injection for each studied radiotracer. A number of commonly used Tc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals including Tc-pertechnetate, Tc-methylenediphosphonic acid, Tc-hydroxymethylenediphosphonic acid, Tc-3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propanedicarboxylic acid, Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine, Tc-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (sestamibi), Tc-1,2-bis[bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phosphino]ethane (tetrofosmin) and Tc-HYNIC-Tyr-octreotide (Tektrotyd) were assessed. All data were collected prospectively within a 1-year period under routine medical practice and included (a) injected activity, (b) residual activity, (c) percentage of residual activity (residual activity/injected activity×100), (d) effective activity (injected activity minus the residual activity), (e) injected volume, (f) time of injection and (g) type of procedure. In the 1837 collected measurements, the average percentage of residual activity was 13% (95% confidence interval: 12.75-13.39%). The mean effective activities were within the recommended range by the EANM guidelines, where applicable, or did not exceed the recommended doses from the department's protocols. In cases where actual injected activity was lower than the minimum suggested by the department's protocols, the imaging quality was not compromised. There was a negative correlation and thus an inverse relationship between the percentage of residual activity and administered volume for Tc-pertechnetate, Teceos

  3. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which…

  4. Routine activities and time use: a latent profile approach to sexual offenders' lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedneault, Amelie; Beauregard, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The routine activities of a sample of 147 incarcerated sexual offenders were studied. During interviews conducted between 1994 and 2000 in a province of Canada, data were collected on the participants' time involvement in a variety of activities in the weeks preceding their index sexual offense(s). Using latent profile analysis, a typology of lifestyles of sexual offenders was created. Five distinct profiles were identified. The inactive loner was characterized by little time involvement with their romantic partners and social activities. The social traveler spent the highest time driving and reported the highest number of friends. The single walker reported the highest amount of time walking around. The partyers' lifestyle was centered around alcohol and drugs. Finally, offenders from the familial homebody profile spent most of their time at home. Differences between profiles were investigated with regard to characteristics of index sexual offense.

  5. AN EXPLANATION OF THE CYBERCRIME VICTIMISATION: SELF-CONTROL AND LIFESTILE/ROUTINE ACTIVITY THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Ilievski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current paper is to examine the causes of cybercrime victimisation, to highlight limitations of the existing cybercrime victimisation etiological studies and provide guidance for further research. The general findings are reported on the basis of a review of previous empirical studies. In addition to minor deficiencies, elements of self-control and lifestyle/routine activity theory together can be applied to the study of cybercrime victimisation. On the basis of the review of existing research, six main conclusions have been drawn. The limitation of the current research is that examines only the causes of cybercrime victimisation through the application of self-control and lifestyle/routine activity theory as the most useful for this purpose. Future research should take into account all the conclusions discussed in the paper and test new or other existing victimological theories for the purpose of better explaining cybercrime victimisation. This study contributes to improved etiological exploration of cybercrime victimisation and, consequently, to the creation of effective measures to prevent it.

  6. Gender Differences in the Routine Activities Associated With Risks for Larceny in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry; Jeong, SeokJin; Yoon, Hae-Sung

    2016-08-01

    The present research uses data from the 2010 Korean National Criminal Victimization Survey to examine gender differences in larceny victimization and in predictors of victimization (i.e., target attractiveness, exposure to potential offenders, target hardening, guardianship, and proximity to crime and social disorder) identified by routine activity theory. The findings show no significant gender difference in general larceny victimization, suggesting that Korean females are just as likely to be victims of theft of personal belongings as males. Consistent with the theory, physical proximity to crime and social disorder are significant predictors of larceny victimization for both males and females. However, public transportation appears to have unexpected protective influences for both gender groups, showing the importance of differences in national context. Overall, the current research provides partial support for routine activity theory's applicability in explaining larceny victimization across gender groups outside of the Western context. It also raises questions about reasons for women's increasing larceny victimization rates in Korea. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Integration of short bouts of physical activity into organizational routine a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; AuYoung, Mona; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C; Glenn, Beth A; Yancey, Antronette K

    2011-01-01

    Recommended daily physical activity accumulated in short intervals (e.g., activity bouts incorporated into organizational routine as part of the regular "conduct of business." PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases were searched in August 2009 (updated search in February and July 2010) to identify relevant, peer-reviewed journal articles and abstracts on school-, worksite-, and faith-based interventions of short, structurally integrated physical activity breaks. The majority of interventions implemented daily physical activity bouts of 10-15 minutes in length. Schools were the most common settings among the 40 published articles included in this review. The rigor of the studies varied by setting, with more than 75% of worksite versus 25% of school studies utilizing RCT designs. Studies focused on a broad range of outcomes, including academic/work performance indicators, mental health outcomes, and clinical disease risk indicators, in addition to physical activity level. Physical activity was the most commonly assessed outcome in school-based studies, with more than half of studies assessing and observing improvements in physical activity outcomes following the intervention. About a quarter of worksite-based studies assessed physical activity, and the majority found a positive effect of the intervention on physical activity levels. About half of studies also observed improvements in other relevant outcomes such as academic and work performance indicators (e.g., academic achievement, cognitive performance, work productivity); psychosocial factors (e.g., stress, mood); and clinical disease risk indicators (e.g., blood pressure, BMI). The average study duration was more than 1 year, and several reported outcomes at 3-6 years. Interventions integrating physical activity into organizational routine during everyday life have demonstrated modest but consistent benefits, particularly for physical activity, and these are promising avenues of investigation. The

  8. Extracurricular Dance Organizations: Body Image, Identity & Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Nicolette Zuzanna

    2017-01-01

    I explored the socialization and experiences of older adolescents and young adults who were involved in three extracurricular dance organizations at a large Midwestern university. I conducted a six-month, comparative ethnographic study using observations, interviews and a survey. I identified three key themes through which I explored the meanings…

  9. Pattern of physical activity among persons with type 2 diabetes with special consideration to daily routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Rozina; Younis, Bilal Bin; Masood, Junaid; Tahira, Maham; Khurhsid, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is essential in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Physical activity can improve general health, quality of life and diabetes management. The aim and objective of the study was to assess the physical activity trends in daily routine of people with type 2 diabetes. Two hundred persons with diabetes from four different clinical settings were included to access the trends of physical activity using a customized questionnaire EPIC-2. Pattern of physical activity was assessed across a set of domains including sleep time, hours of TV watch, preferred mode of transport for specific distance and household activities. Data was analyzed using SPSS 21. Out of 200 persons with diabetes, 104(52%) were male and 96 (48%) were female. Out of the total sample of patients, 85 (81.7%) Male and 80 (83.3%) female patients preferred walk to cover a distance of less than one mile. There was a significant difference in selection of mode of transport for all other specified distance, esp. in female patients with both age groups. There was insignificant difference for physical activity pattern related to household activities in young and elderly male subjects. The mean sleeping time for younger male subjects on weekend was 464.31± 88.88 minutes/day and for elder it was 418.65± 102.66 minutes/day while for young female subjects was 476.25± 113.74 minutes/day and in female elderly subjects it was 420.62± 120.62 minutes/day respectively. In type 2 diabetics we observed a low level of physical activity which may be detrimental for the control of diabetes mellitus.

  10. The Work and Role of Extracurricular Clubs in Fostering Student Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Kristina; Sabljic, Jakov

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activities play an important role in the educational process as they provide students with the opportunity to deepen their knowledge and develop various skills, meet their creative needs and acquire the culture of free time. They also provide space for a closer relationship between the club coordinators and students, for students'…

  11. Effects of Extracurricular Participation during Middle School on Academic Motivation and Achievement at Grade 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Myung Hee; Hughes, Jan N.; Cao, Qian; Kwok, Oi-man

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of participating in two domains of extracurricular activities (sports and performance arts/clubs) in Grades 7 and 8 on Grade 9 academic motivation and letter grades, above baseline performance. Participants were 483 students (55% male; 33% Euro-American, 25% African American, and 39% Latino). Propensity score weighting…

  12. Student Extracurricular Participation, Student Achievement, and School Perception: An Elementary School Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Research studies of extracurricular activities have illustrated specific relationships between participation and certain student characteristics, such as higher grades, higher standardized test scores, higher attendance, fewer discipline issues, and increased positive school perception. Since so much of the previous research on extracurricular…

  13. The Country Council Work on Extracurricular Enlightenment of Adults in the Volga-Ural Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur A. Magsumov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the activity of the Volga and Ural country councils to create a system of extracurricular enlightenment of adults in the later period of the existence of the Russian empire. The article is based on the statistical and mass sources, including office records from regional archives. The authors, resorting to a comparative multiaspect approach to the study of the country councils’ forms and methods of work to organize extracurricular establishments and popular educational events, make an overview of tendencies and directions, progress and problems in their development. The belated formation of the extracurricular adult education system the authors explain by the country councils; focus on primary education. The study revealed the dominant poison of country councils in the sphere of extracurricular enlightenment, a financial and pedagogical availability of this education form for great masses of population of this education form, combining general knowledge and professional skills. The social and cultural activity of country councils in the late XIXth – early XXth c.c. was profound and diverse as far as enlightenment is concerned, and helped achieve top results within a short period of time.

  14. INCORPORATING ROUTINE ACTIVITIES, ACTIVITY SPACES, AND SITUATIONAL DEFINITIONS INTO THE SOCIAL SCHEMATIC THEORY OF CRIME*

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARR, ASHLEY B.; LEI, MAN-KIT; STEWART, ERIC

    2014-01-01

    Simons and Burt’s (2011) social schematic theory (SST) of crime posits that adverse social factors are associated with offending because they promote a set of social schemas (i.e., a criminogenic knowledge structure) that elevates the probability of situational definitions favorable to crime. This study extends the SST model by incorporating the role of contexts for action. Furthermore, the study advances tests of the SST by incorporating a measure of criminogenic situational definitions to assess whether such definitions mediate the effects of schemas and contexts on crime. Structural equation models using 10 years of panel data from 582 African American youth provided strong support for the expanded theory. The results suggest that childhood and adolescent social adversity fosters a criminogenic knowledge structure as well as selection into criminogenic activity spaces and risky activities, all of which increase the likelihood of offending largely through situational definitions. Additionally, evidence shows that the criminogenic knowledge structure interacts with settings to amplify the likelihood of situational definitions favorable to crime. PMID:26392633

  15. Adolescent girls' and parents' views on recruiting and retaining girls into an after-school dance intervention: implications for extra-curricular physical activity provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powell Jane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescents are not sufficiently active and girls are less active than boys. Physical activity interventions delivered during curriculum time have reported weak effects. More sustained changes in physical activity may be obtained by facilitating participation in enjoyable activities. Dance is the favourite activity of UK girls but there is a shortage of dance provision. Dance sessions delivered after the school day could prove to be an effective means of engaging adolescent girls in physical activity. There is a lack of information about the factors that would affect girls' recruitment and retention in an after-school dance programme. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 65, Year 7 (11-12 year old girls from 4 secondary schools in Bristol. In-depth phone interviews were also conducted with 16 (4 per school of the girls' parents. Interviews and focus groups examined issues that would affect recruitment into the intervention, strategies that could be used to attract girls who have little or no previous experience in dance, any factors that would increase their interest in participating in an after-school dance programme and any factors that would affect retention in the programme. All interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and thematically analysed. Results Girls reported that a taster session in which they had an opportunity to sample the intervention content and "word of mouth" campaigns by peers, who did not need to be their friends, would encourage them to participate in an after-school dance programme. Sessions that maximised enjoyment and facilitated socialisation opportunities would enhance retention. Parents reported that encouraging groups of friends to join the programme, and stressing the enjoyment of the session would increase participation. Conclusions Recruitment and retention campaigns that focus on enjoyment, socialisation, mastery, goal setting and relating to other girls may be effective

  16. Adolescent girls' and parents' views on recruiting and retaining girls into an after-school dance intervention: implications for extra-curricular physical activity provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Many adolescents are not sufficiently active and girls are less active than boys. Physical activity interventions delivered during curriculum time have reported weak effects. More sustained changes in physical activity may be obtained by facilitating participation in enjoyable activities. Dance is the favourite activity of UK girls but there is a shortage of dance provision. Dance sessions delivered after the school day could prove to be an effective means of engaging adolescent girls in physical activity. There is a lack of information about the factors that would affect girls' recruitment and retention in an after-school dance programme. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 65, Year 7 (11-12 year old) girls from 4 secondary schools in Bristol. In-depth phone interviews were also conducted with 16 (4 per school) of the girls' parents. Interviews and focus groups examined issues that would affect recruitment into the intervention, strategies that could be used to attract girls who have little or no previous experience in dance, any factors that would increase their interest in participating in an after-school dance programme and any factors that would affect retention in the programme. All interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and thematically analysed. Results Girls reported that a taster session in which they had an opportunity to sample the intervention content and "word of mouth" campaigns by peers, who did not need to be their friends, would encourage them to participate in an after-school dance programme. Sessions that maximised enjoyment and facilitated socialisation opportunities would enhance retention. Parents reported that encouraging groups of friends to join the programme, and stressing the enjoyment of the session would increase participation. Conclusions Recruitment and retention campaigns that focus on enjoyment, socialisation, mastery, goal setting and relating to other girls may be effective strategies for recruiting

  17. Adolescent girls' and parents' views on recruiting and retaining girls into an after-school dance intervention: implications for extra-curricular physical activity provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Davis, Laura; McNeill, Jade; Sebire, Simon J; Haase, Anne; Powell, Jane; Cooper, Ashley R

    2011-08-23

    Many adolescents are not sufficiently active and girls are less active than boys. Physical activity interventions delivered during curriculum time have reported weak effects. More sustained changes in physical activity may be obtained by facilitating participation in enjoyable activities. Dance is the favourite activity of UK girls but there is a shortage of dance provision. Dance sessions delivered after the school day could prove to be an effective means of engaging adolescent girls in physical activity. There is a lack of information about the factors that would affect girls' recruitment and retention in an after-school dance programme. Focus groups were conducted with 65, Year 7 (11-12 year old) girls from 4 secondary schools in Bristol. In-depth phone interviews were also conducted with 16 (4 per school) of the girls' parents. Interviews and focus groups examined issues that would affect recruitment into the intervention, strategies that could be used to attract girls who have little or no previous experience in dance, any factors that would increase their interest in participating in an after-school dance programme and any factors that would affect retention in the programme. All interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and thematically analysed. Girls reported that a taster session in which they had an opportunity to sample the intervention content and "word of mouth" campaigns by peers, who did not need to be their friends, would encourage them to participate in an after-school dance programme. Sessions that maximised enjoyment and facilitated socialisation opportunities would enhance retention. Parents reported that encouraging groups of friends to join the programme, and stressing the enjoyment of the session would increase participation. Recruitment and retention campaigns that focus on enjoyment, socialisation, mastery, goal setting and relating to other girls may be effective strategies for recruiting and retaining girls in an after

  18. Cyber Dating Abuse Victimization Among Secondary School Students From a Lifestyle-Routine Activities Theory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ouytsel, Joris; Ponnet, Koen; Walrave, Michel

    2016-02-12

    Controlling one's romantic partner through digital media is a form of cyber dating abuse. To design effective educational campaigns, a deeper understanding of how some young people become victim of this type of abuse within their romantic relationships is warranted. This study is the first to adopt a lifestyle-routine activities theory perspective toward online romantic partner monitoring, by looking at whether secondary school students' risky digital lifestyle and their digital media use are linked to a higher chance of being controlled by a romantic partner, taking into account gender, age, and the length of the romantic relationship. The data of 466 secondary school students (71.0% girls, n = 331) between 16 and 22 years old (M = 17.99 years; SD = 0.92) who were in a romantic relationship are analyzed. Linear regression analysis suggests that engagement in online risk behavior, the length of the romantic relationship, engagement in sexting with the romantic partner, and the amount of social networking site use were significantly linked to victimization of digital controlling behavior. The results are important to practitioners, as they indicate that messages about safe Internet use should be incorporated in prevention and educational campaigns with regard to cyber dating abuse. Suggestions for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Festin Karin; Ekberg Kerstin; Ståhle Agneta; Bendtsen Preben; Leijon Matti E; Nilsen Per

    2010-01-01

    Background: Written prescriptions of physical activity, so‐called physical activity referral (PAR) schemes, have increased in popularity in recent years. Such schemes have mostly been evaluated in terms of efficacy. This study reports on a Swedish PAR scheme implemented in routine primary health care (PHC) measuring patients’ self‐reported adherence to physical activity prescriptions. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to physical activity prescriptions issued in everyday PHC at ...

  20. Increasing children's physical activity through a teaching-assistant led extracurricular intervention: process evaluation of the action 3:30 randomised feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J; Davies, Ben; Wood, Lesley; Banfield, Kathryn; Edwards, Mark J; Powell, Jane E; Montgomery, Alan A; Thompson, Janice L; Fox, Kenneth R

    2015-02-18

    Many children do not engage in recommended levels of physical activity (PA), highlighting the need to find ways to increase children's PA. Process evaluations play an important role in improving the science of randomised controlled trials. We recently reported the results of the Action 3:30 cluster randomised feasibility trial illustrating higher levels of moderate to vigorous intensity PA among boys but not girls. The aim of this paper is to report the process evaluation results including intervention fidelity, implementation, context and how intervention components and trial design could be improved before proceeding to a definitive RCT. Children's session enjoyment was assessed every two weeks. Reasons for non-attendance were provided by questionnaire at the end of the intervention. Post intervention interviews were held with participating teaching assistants (TAs) and school key contacts (KCs), and focus groups were conducted with children in all 10 intervention schools. Interviews and focus groups examined how recruitment and session attendance might be improved and established which elements of the programme that were and were not well received. Data indicated good intervention fidelity with TA's adopting enjoyment-focussed teaching styles and the sessions improving children's skills and self-esteem. Several positive aspects of implementation were identified, including high session variety, the opportunity to work in teams, the child-led sessions and the engaging leader style. In terms of context there was evidence that TA's faced difficulties managing challenging behaviour and that further training in this area was needed. TAs and KCs felt that recruitment could be improved by providing taster sessions during PE lessons and clarifying the days that the clubs would run at the point of recruitment. The programme could be improved to enhance interest for girls, by including training for managing disruptive behaviour and making some activities more age

  1. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part II--What Parents Should Know and Do to Ensure Extracurricular Interscholastic Sport Opportunities for Their Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymeson, Garth

    2013-01-01

    The rights of all students to participate in extracurricular programs are required by current law but are often nonexistent, misunderstood, or even sometimes purposely not shared with parents. This article is addressed to parents regarding the rights of their children with disabilities to participate in extracurricular sport activities. Included…

  2. School-Based Extracurricular Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy in 2009 focused considerable public attention on Astronomy and generated valuable resources for educators. These activities are an effective vehicle for promoting Science to students and to the wider school community. The most engaging practical astronomy activities are best delivered with sustained support from…

  3. The effect of routine hoof trimming on locomotion score, ruminating time, activity and milk yield of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertem, van T.; Parmet, Y.; Steensels, M.; Maltz, E.; Antler, A.; Schlageter Tello, A.A.; Lokhorst, C.; Romanini, C.E.B.; Viazzi, S.; Bahr, C.; Berckmans, D.; Halachmi, I.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of hoof trimming on cow behavior (ruminating time, activity, and locomotion score) and performance (milk yield) over time. Data were gathered from a commercial dairy farm in Israel where routine hoof trimming is done by a trained hoof trimmer

  4. Los estudiantes universitarios ante las actividades extracurriculares

    OpenAIRE

    Pozón López, José Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Este estudio aborda el fenómeno del involucramiento estudiantil en actividades extracurriculares, utilizándose para ello una estrategia esencialmente de corte cualitativo, con la participación de estudiantes, profesores y administrativos en grupos focales, entrevistas y un cuestionario, haciendo posible: conocer valoraciones sobre el fenómeno; averiguar qué factores lo influyen; detectar sus consecuencias; e identificar qué prioridad se otorga a cada actividad. El estudio se realizó en una un...

  5. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN ORGANIZATION OF EXTRACURRICULAR WORK WITH GIFTED STUDENTS IN THE SYSTEM OF THE LITERARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Петрович

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of features of the use of information and communication technology in organizing extra-curricular activities with the literary gifted students. Main attention is drawn on the effective forms and methods of information and communication technology for the successful conduction of extracurricular activities with gifted high school students in literary education system, in particular such as: web quests, QR-codes, QR-quests, Google Groups, multimedia presentations, blogging, virtual tours, use of interactive whiteboards, educational forums, databases educational resources, virtual libraries, creating the electronic portfolio, media library of educational material, comics, doodles, clouds of words etc.

  6. Teaching Astronomy in Extracurricular Study Groups of Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, Mher; Grigoryan, Avetik

    2016-12-01

    The report presents the history of activity of Extracurricular Study Groups of Ar¬menia teaching astronomy and related subjects. It mainly refers to the Aerospace Club founded in 1988, which has long been acting as an officially unre¬gis¬tered, but efficiently performing non-governmental organization - Armenian Youth Ae¬ro¬space Society. The Club teaches, provides a truly scientific view of the world, advocates astronomy and other scientific and technical areas, provides interesting lectures and ar¬ticles to schools and mass media, arranges seminars and meetings with renowned experts, publishes scientific ar¬ticles, manuals, books, puts forward important scientific and techno-logical problems and offer students to work together on them, seek for solutions and develop possible appli¬ca¬tions. All this is aimed at maintaining and further development of leading positions of Armenia's scientific potential, particularly in astronomy.

  7. Under-Represented College Students and Extracurricular Involvement: The Effects of Various Student Organizations on Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christina N.

    2008-01-01

    Several studies indicate that students who are involved in extracurricular activities during college are more academically successful than are those who are not; however, most studies do not distinguish between different types of activities nor do they adequately consider the unique experiences of under-represented college students. Drawing on…

  8. Extracurricular Participation and the Development of School Attachment and Learning Goal Orientation: The Impact of School Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Natalie; Theis, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    School motivation and attachment typically decline after the transition to middle school. According to the stage-environment fit approach, extracurricular activities are supposed to promote motivation. However, research has shown that the effects depend on the quality of the activities, which usually is measured by assessing students' individual…

  9. 75 FR 43996 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, OMB No. 1660-0029...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Extracurricular for Training Activities AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice; 60-day... of Requirements to Use the NETC Extracurricular for Training Activities. Type of Information... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection...

  10. Demographic and Motivation Differences Among Online Sex Offenders by Type of Offense: An Exploration of Routine Activities Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jordana N; Jasinski, Jana L

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the relationship between online sexual offenders' demographic background and characteristics indicative of motivation and offense type. Specifically, we investigate whether these characteristics can distinguish different online sexual offender groups from one another as well as inform routine activity theorists on what potentially motivates perpetrators. Using multinomial logistic regression, this study found that online sexual offenders' demographic backgrounds and characteristics indicative of motivation do vary by offense types. Two important implications of this study are that the term "online sexual offender" encompasses different types of offenders, including some who do not align with mainstream media's characterization of "predators," and that the potential offender within routine activity theory can be the focus of empirical investigation rather than taken as a given in research.

  11. Mental health and extracurricular education in Korean first graders: a school-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Young Shin; Jon, Duk-In; Soek, Jeong Ho; Hong, Narei; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M; Miller, Ann M; Greenhill, Laurence L

    2011-06-01

    This study explores the results of mental health screening in Korean first graders in association with the amount of time the children spent in extracurricular education. The study included a community sample of 761 boys and girls, with a mean age of 6.6 years, collected from 5 elementary schools in Gunpo-si, South Korea, in July 2007. Primary caregivers completed a questionnaire that included information on demographic characteristics, the amount of time the children spent in extracurricular education and other activities, and an adapted form of the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) to screen for mental health problems. These first graders spent a mean of a little over 2 hours each day in extracurricular education. Extracurricular education demonstrated positive correlations with 4 BASC-2 domains, including hyperactivity (r = 0.092, P education was also evident in regression analyses (F = 2.25, R(2) = 0.022, P = .001). The relationship held true even when controlling for time spent with parents, time spent with friends, and time spent asleep. Post hoc analyses revealed that children receiving more than 4 hours of extracurricular education per day showed a sharp increase in depressive symptoms as well as a decrease in the amount of time spent with caregivers. Results of this study demonstrate that excessive amounts of time spent in extracurricular education (greater than 4 hours per day) may be associated with depression in school-aged children. These findings have relevance for mental health screening and educational policy. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Parental Active Transportation Routines (PATRns) as a Moderator of the Association Between Neighborhood Characteristics and Parental Influences and Active School Transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kann, D.H.H. van; Kremers, S.P.J.; Vries, S.I. de; Vries, N.K. de; Jansen, M.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of interventions to stimulate active school transportation (AST) requires better understanding of this behavior. This study explored the associations between Parental Active Transportation Routines (PATRns) and children’s AST use, as well as the role of PATRns as a

  13. Gender Differences in Motivation for Participation in Extra-Curricular Dance: Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steven David; Leyland, Sandra Darkings; Ling, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    A key influence on motivation to take part in lifelong physical activity is experience of physical education during the school years. Curriculum-based dance is important for providing a pathway into extra-curricular dance because, for many young people, physical education is their only opportunity to experience dance. A sample of 362 adolescents…

  14. Be BOLD: Encouraging Girls to Include Unstructured Bouts of Physical Activity into Daily Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kory; Williams, Gwynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are less active than their male counterparts and physical activity levels tend to decline as one ages. One of the goals of concerned physical educators is to promote a physically active lifestyle and to teach skills and promote behaviors that will allow students to be active both in and out of school. This article presents a…

  15. Routines of Riparian Women of the Amazon Region: Activities and Roles in the Family, at Work and in the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuzeli Maria de Almeida Pinto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of the routines of women who live in Amazon riverside communities, identifying the roles and activities related to domestic work, açaí gathering and actions in community associations. The participants were three women from two island communities in Belem, Ilha Grande and Combu, who earn their living solely from açaí gathering, work at home and in community associations. The instruments used were the sociodemographic schedule (ISD, the Inventory of Routine (IR and Field Diary (DC. All activities are defined by gender. Although riparian women follow the rigid family concepts of gender division in regards to labor, the participation women in paid professional activities, in this case, açaí gathering, has increased. The woman’s place in riparian family structure is considered dynamic and encompasses a cluster of systems that maintain interdependent relationships. In this sense, the context acts as a facilitator for development, producing constancy and change in the characteristics of riverside women and during the course of her life, family and community.

  16. Developmental Benefits of Extracurricular Sports Participation Among Brazilian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdito, Riller S; Galatti, Larissa R; Carvalho, Humberto M; Scaglia, Alcides J; Côté, Jean; Gonçalves, Carlos E; Paes, Roberto R

    2017-10-01

    Youth sporting activities have been explored as a way to impact positive personal transformation and development, glaringly demonstrated by world-wide investments in public policies, programs, and projects. We studied positive effects of participation in sports on the developmental assets of 614 adolescents (13.1 ± 1.7 years) actively engaged in extracurricular sport programs targeted at socially disadvantaged youths, from five municipalities across five states of the southern, south-eastern and north-eastern regions of Brazil. Participants responded to a developmental assets questionnaire designed to capture sociodemographic and human development data. Multilevel logistic regression was used to explore associations between years of participation in sport and human development indicators, controlling for age and sex. Our results showed that the quality of the young people's support network and duration of program participation positively influenced sport participation, which, in turn, was associated with willingness to learn. A strong association was also observed between sport participation and developmental assets. Thus, we offer new evidence of a relationship between positive development and environmental factors in which individual and contextual forces can be aligned, and we provide new reference data for developing countries.

  17. A Delphi Study to Develop a Standard List of Activities that Comprise Routine Clinical Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Denzin and Lincoln propose that “Qualitative research is a situated activity that locates the observer in the world. It consists of a set of......Publications, 2003. Davies, Martin Brett. Doing a Successful Research Project. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Denzin , Norman K., and Yvonna S

  18. Environmental Assessment for Increasing Routine Flightline Activities, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    i. Laboratory activities, research, and development; j. Propellant mixing; k. Abrasive blasting, grinding /milling, and sanding operations; and l...issue, perform quality control, and account for aviation fuels, ground fuels, cryogenic fluids, and missile propellants. Air Force Instruction 23-204

  19. Parental work demands and the frequency of child-related routine and interactive activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, A.; Lippe, T. van der; Kluwer, E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether the frequency of child-related activities was associated with parents’ own work demands and those of their partners. In addition to parental paid working hours, we considered the parents’ organizational culture and experienced job insecurity. Moreover, we differentiated

  20. Parental work demands and the frequency of child-related routine and interactive activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, A.; Lippe, A.G. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether the frequency of child-related activities was associated with parents' own work demands and those of their partners. In addition to parental paid working hours, we considered the parents' organizational culture and experienced job insecurity. Moreover, we differentiated

  1. Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Festin Karin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Written prescriptions of physical activity have increased in popularity. Such schemes have mostly been evaluated in terms of efficacy in clinical trials. This study reports on a physical activity prescription referral scheme implemented in routine primary health care (PHC in Sweden. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' self-reported adherence to physical activity prescriptions at 3 and 12 months and to analyse different characteristics associated with adherence to these prescriptions. Methods Prospective prescription data were obtained for the general population in 37 of 42 PHC centres in Östergötland County, during 2004. The study population consisted of 3300. Results The average adherence rate to the prescribed activity was 56% at 3 months and 50% at 12 months. In the multiple logistic regression models, higher adherence was associated with higher activity level at baseline and with prescriptions including home-based activities. Conclusions Prescription from ordinary PHC staff yielded adherence in half of the patients in this PAR scheme follow-up.

  2. Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijon, Matti E; Bendtsen, Preben; Ståhle, Agneta; Ekberg, Kerstin; Festin, Karin; Nilsen, Per

    2010-05-19

    Written prescriptions of physical activity have increased in popularity. Such schemes have mostly been evaluated in terms of efficacy in clinical trials. This study reports on a physical activity prescription referral scheme implemented in routine primary health care (PHC) in Sweden. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' self-reported adherence to physical activity prescriptions at 3 and 12 months and to analyse different characteristics associated with adherence to these prescriptions. Prospective prescription data were obtained for the general population in 37 of 42 PHC centres in Ostergötland County, during 2004. The study population consisted of 3300. The average adherence rate to the prescribed activity was 56% at 3 months and 50% at 12 months. In the multiple logistic regression models, higher adherence was associated with higher activity level at baseline and with prescriptions including home-based activities. Prescription from ordinary PHC staff yielded adherence in half of the patients in this PAR scheme follow-up.

  3. Victims' routine activities and sex offenders' target selection scripts: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers-Varin, Nadine; Beauregard, Eric

    2010-09-01

    This study investigates target selection scripts of 72 serial sex offenders who have committed a total of 361 sex crimes on stranger victims. Using latent class analysis, three target selection scripts were identified based on the victim's activities prior to the crime, each presenting two different tracks: (1) the Home script, which includes the (a) intrusion track and the (b) invited track, (2) the Outdoor script, which includes the (a) noncoercive track and the (b) coercive track, and (3) the Social script, which includes the (a) onsite track and the (b) off-site track. The scripts identified appeared to be used by both sexual aggressors of children and sexual aggressors of adults. In addition, a high proportion of crime switching was found among the identified scripts, with half of the 72 offenders switching scripts at least once. The theoretical relevance of these target selection scripts and their practical implications for situational crime prevention strategies are discussed.

  4. Nutritional status in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease: prevalence of malnutrition and methods for routine nutritional assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijac, Dragana D; Janković, Goran L J; Jorga, Jagoda; Krstić, Miodrag N

    2010-08-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There are numerous methods for the assessment of nutritional status, but the gold standard has not yet been established. The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of undernutrition and to evaluate methods for routine nutritional assessment of active IBD patients. Twenty-three patients with active Crohn disease, 53 patients with active ulcerative colitis and 30 controls were included in the study. The nutritional status was assessed by extensive anthropometric measurements, percentage of weight loss in the past 1-6 months and biochemical markers of nutrition. All investigated nutritional parameters were significantly different in IBD patients compared to control subjects, except MCV, tryglicerides and serum total protein level. Serum albumin level and body mass index (BMI) were the most predictive parameters of malnutrition. According to different assessment methods the prevalence of undernutrition and severe undernutrition in patients with active IBD were 25.0%-69.7% and 1.3%-31.6%, respectively, while in the control subjects no abnormalities have been detected. There was no statistically significant difference of nutritional parameters between UC and CD patients except lower mid-arm muscle circumference in UC group. Malnutrition is common in IBD patients. BMI and serum albumin are simple and convenient methods for the assessment of the nutritional status in IBD patients. Further studies with larger group of patients are necessary to elucidate the prevalence of malnutrition and the most accurate assessment methods in IBD patients.

  5. Intelligent Routines

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassiou, George A

    “Intelligent Routines II: Solving Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry with Sage” contains numerous of examples and problems as well as many unsolved problems. This book extensively applies the successful software Sage, which can be found free online http://www.sagemath.org/. Sage is a recent and popular software for mathematical computation, available freely and simple to use. This book is useful to all applied scientists in mathematics, statistics and engineering, as well for late undergraduate and graduate students of above subjects. It is the first such book in solving symbolically with Sage problems in Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry. Plenty of SAGE applications are given at each step of the exposition.

  6. Importância dos cursos extracurriculares na formação profissional dos acadêmicos do Curso Técnico em Agropecuária - The importance of extracurricular courses in professional training of students of the Agriculture Technical Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gutierre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Cursos extracurriculares são uma oportunidade de praticar e aprender assuntos muitas vezes não abordados no decorrer de um curso. Este trabalho objetivou verificar a percepção dos discentes do início e final do Curso Técnico em Agropecuária do Colégio Politécnico da UFSM em relação aos cursos extracurriculares. Por meio de questionário foi observado que os estudantes consideram os cursos extracurriculares importantes para a formação profissional. Também foi observado que grande parte dos estudantes já participou de atividades semelhantes. Os resultados obtidos demonstram a preocupação dos alunos com o futuro profissional e também o papel fundamental de agências financiadoras de atividades na formação qualificada dos estudantes. Palavras-chave: aprendizagem, práticas, currículo, Pronatec. THE IMPORTANCE OF EXTRACURRICULAR COURSES IN PROFESSIONAL TRAINING OF STUDENTS OF THE AGRICULTURE TECHNICAL COURSE Abstract Extracurricular courses are an opportunity to practice and learn subjects not often addressed in the curriculum. This study aimed to determine the perceptions of students from the beginning and end of the Agriculture Technical Course of Colégio Politécnico of UFSM regarding extracurricular courses. Through questionnaire was observed that students from both semesters consider extracurricular courses an important methodology for the training. In addition was observed that most students have already participated in similar activities. These results indicated interest and the preoccupation of the students with the professional future and the fundamental role of financial agencies in the training of qualified students. Key-words: learning, practices, curriculum, Pronatec.

  7. Too Much of a Good Thing? How Breadth of Extracurricular Participation Relates to School-Related Affect and Academic Outcomes during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knifsend, Casey A.; Graham, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Although adolescents often participate in multiple extracurricular activities, little research has examined how the breadth of activities in which an adolescent is involved relates to school-related affect and academic performance. Relying on a large, multi-ethnic sample (N = 864; 55.9% female), the current study investigated linear and non-linear…

  8. The Effect of Pre-College Extracurricular Participation on First-Year College Engagement and Completion. SERU Consortium Research Paper. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.6.17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tongshan

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how student pre-college participation in extracurricular activities and volunteer and community services varies by demographic and academic variables, and how their experience participating in these activities affects first-year college engagement and learning outcomes. The analysis focuses on students at the University of…

  9. Models of Individual Dietary Behavior Based on Smartphone Data: The Influence of Routine, Physical Activity, Emotion, and Food Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Edmund; Hua, Jenna; Wu, Lemuel; Shia, Victor; Eom, Sue; Wang, May; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Smartphone applications (apps) facilitate the collection of data on multiple aspects of behavior that are useful for characterizing baseline patterns and for monitoring progress in interventions aimed at promoting healthier lifestyles. Individual-based models can be used to examine whether behavior, such as diet, corresponds to certain typological patterns. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate individual-based modeling methods relevant to a person's eating behavior, and the value of such approach compared to typical regression models. Using a mobile app, 2 weeks of physical activity and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) data, and 6 days of diet data were collected from 12 university students recruited from a university in Kunming, a rapidly developing city in southwest China. Phone GPS data were collected for the entire 2-week period, from which exposure to various food environments along each subject's activity space was determined. Physical activity was measured using phone accelerometry. Mobile phone EMA was used to assess self-reported emotion/feelings. The portion size of meals and food groups was determined from voice-annotated videos of meals. Individual-based regression models were used to characterize subjects as following one of 4 diet typologies: those with a routine portion sizes determined by time of day, those with portion sizes that balance physical activity (energy balance), those with portion sizes influenced by emotion, and those with portion sizes associated with food environments. Ample compliance with the phone-based behavioral assessment was observed for all participants. Across all individuals, 868 consumed food items were recorded, with fruits, grains and dairy foods dominating the portion sizes. On average, 218 hours of accelerometry and 35 EMA responses were recorded for each participant. For some subjects, the routine model was able to explain up to 47% of the variation in portion sizes, and the energy balance model was

  10. Models of Individual Dietary Behavior Based on Smartphone Data: The Influence of Routine, Physical Activity, Emotion, and Food Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Seto

    Full Text Available Smartphone applications (apps facilitate the collection of data on multiple aspects of behavior that are useful for characterizing baseline patterns and for monitoring progress in interventions aimed at promoting healthier lifestyles. Individual-based models can be used to examine whether behavior, such as diet, corresponds to certain typological patterns. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate individual-based modeling methods relevant to a person's eating behavior, and the value of such approach compared to typical regression models.Using a mobile app, 2 weeks of physical activity and ecological momentary assessment (EMA data, and 6 days of diet data were collected from 12 university students recruited from a university in Kunming, a rapidly developing city in southwest China. Phone GPS data were collected for the entire 2-week period, from which exposure to various food environments along each subject's activity space was determined. Physical activity was measured using phone accelerometry. Mobile phone EMA was used to assess self-reported emotion/feelings. The portion size of meals and food groups was determined from voice-annotated videos of meals. Individual-based regression models were used to characterize subjects as following one of 4 diet typologies: those with a routine portion sizes determined by time of day, those with portion sizes that balance physical activity (energy balance, those with portion sizes influenced by emotion, and those with portion sizes associated with food environments.Ample compliance with the phone-based behavioral assessment was observed for all participants. Across all individuals, 868 consumed food items were recorded, with fruits, grains and dairy foods dominating the portion sizes. On average, 218 hours of accelerometry and 35 EMA responses were recorded for each participant. For some subjects, the routine model was able to explain up to 47% of the variation in portion sizes, and the energy

  11. Historic Preservation and Elementary Student Extracurricular Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2016-01-01

    Elementary students survey buildings in an extracurricular community service project to learn social studies and historic preservation. From these experiences students formed values and dispositions by engaging in a constructivist process of creating knowledge by examining their community. They gathered data, transformed it into information, and…

  12. [Activities of public health nurses during routine health check-ups for 18-month-old children in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Chikage; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the actual activities of public health nurses (PHNs) during routine health check-ups at health centers of municipalities, for the 18-month-old children in Japan. The targets were municipalities with 200 births and more per year. A questionnaire about the contents of implementation of health check-ups, and follow-up activities, were mailed to 105 municipalities between April 2000 and March 2001. The response rate was 62.9%. 1) All municipalities adopted some form of group checku-ups. They mainly conducted medical interviews by physicians and dentists (100%), somatometry (100%), health interviews by PHNs (95.5%), group lectures (47.0%), individual health consultations, 93.9% (for all participants, 83.3%), and conferences after check-ups by main staff, (92.4%). 2) The allocation of various professionals included physicians and dentists (100%), PHNs (100%), dental hygienists (98%), dieticians (88%), and psychological staff. (75%). 3) Municipal populations had a negative correlation with check-up rates. Municipal populations and birth numbers per year had positive correlations with the frequency of group check-ups per year. 4) PHNs were involved in many scenarios, and were concerned with decisions regarding the effects of health check-ups. However, among these municipalities, only 36.4% had definite criteria, or a manual, for assessment of check-ups by PHNs. The follow-up rates ranged from 1.9 to 56.3%, with considerable differences. 5) Follow-up and absentees of check-ups were mainly dealt with by PHNs. We clarified the implementation of health check-ups and associated activities of PHNs among municipalities. The check-ups and follow-up activities were mostly conducted PHNs. However, the existence of standards for check-ups by PHNs, and the methods for follow-up differed considerably. Therefore, it is necessary to further consider the quality of check-ups.

  13. A Literacy Exercise: An Extracurricular Reading Program as an Intervention to Enrich Student Reading Habits in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Nasser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates an extracurricular reading activity in Qatari schools. The paper presents a two-month extracurricular reading program designed for fourth grade students. The methodology used triangulation of the data to analyze, in detail, the students’ primary perceptions towards reading, teacher self-efficacy, teacher instructional behavior and home literacy measures. The program was implemented in four randomly selected schools. The reading program was announced to each school, and students in the four schools were asked whether they wished to enroll contingent upon receiving parental consent. There were 248 students in the treatment group (students enrolled in the English and Arabic reading program, and 176 students were recruited for the control group (not enrolled in the reading program. The main design was a randomized subjects pretest-posttest control group design and analytical  split-plot analysis of variance (ANOVA design. The findings of this study suggested that students in the reading program demonstrated greater interest in reading than those who did not enroll in the reading program, even when factoring out the effects of parents and home environments. The extracurricular program was significant to the extent that it has improved students’ reading habits. An increase in breadth and depth of such programs shall increase language literacy and numeracy in schools and can improve the school culture towards a more student-teacher interactions and engaging activities.

  14. Importance of Family Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... although family time is essential, it is equally important for parents to set aside some time just for themselves, too. Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org: Turning Family Time into Active Time Bedtime Routines for School-Aged Children The Benefits & Tricks to Having a Family Dinner ​ ...

  15. The Thief With a Thousand Faces and the Victim With None: Identifying Determinants for Online Identity Theft Victimization With Routine Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyns, Bradford W; Henson, Billy

    2016-08-01

    Available evidence suggests that identity theft is a growing problem that has significant consequences for victims, not the least of which is billions of dollars in financial losses. However, very little is known about the correlates or causes of identity theft victimization. Utilizing a nationally representative sample of individuals from the Canadian General Social Survey, the current study attempts to address this deficiency by examining the link between victims' online routine activities and their online identity theft victimization. It was found that certain routine activities directly influence the likelihood of experiencing identity theft. Potential research and policy implications also are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. A importância das atividades extracurriculares universitárias para o alcance dos objetivos profissionais dos alunos de administração da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Knoll Pereira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the importance attributed by students of the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina to the extracurricular activities in order to reach their professional goals. The general objective was configured as: identify how the students evaluate the importance of extracurricular activities to achieve their professional goals. The specific objectives were: a identify the extracurricular activities that students consider important for achieving career goals; b identify the career aspirations of ingress and egress students; c identify if the ingress and egress students plan their careers; d explore how the educational institution has been contributing to it by offering extracurricular activities; e identify which activities are more relevant to help students in the pursuit of professional achievement. This research was classified as descriptive and qualitative, and the method used was literature review and research. The data collection instrument used was printed and online questionnaires. The final findings of this article points to a lack of guidance on choosing the extracurricular activities that could contribute to the achievement of the students’ goals, among others conclusions which are presented at the final section of this article.

  17. The concept of minimum detectable activity of radionuclide activity meters and their suitability for routine quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagni, F; Cesarini, F; Lucconi, G; Cicoria, G; Pancaldi, D; Infantino, A; Vichi, S; Marengo, M

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclide activity meters ("dose calibrators") are ionization chambers designed to measure relatively high amount of activities which are normally contained in radiopharmaceuticals. However, in the current radiopharmacy practice, these radiation detectors have been proposed to be used in measurements of samples with lower activity, such as in routine quality control (QC) tests. To check the feasibility of such measurements, in this work we assessed the performance of four different devices in the lower range of detectability, by means of experimental measurements of a radioactive sample. Accuracy and precision of each device was evaluated as a function of the activity contained in the sample in order to estimate a threshold value, or minimum detectable activity (MDA), which, according to our operational definition, may be used to express the concept of Limit of Quantification (LoQ). Moreover, a generalized procedure for the estimation of the MDA was established, which, being device- and radionuclide-independent, it may be adopted by every laboratory. Our results showed a significant variability in the MDA achieved by different activity meters. Hence a single QC test may result feasible with one specific instrument, and not with another one. Moreover, feasibility depends also on the confidence level required for each test. For these reasons, each activity meter should be qualified for its MDA or LoQ by each laboratory according to a procedure such as that described in this paper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proyecto gestor de actividades académicas extracurriculares

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Campo, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Proyecto final de carrera en Ingeniería del Software que consiste en la elaboración de las fases de análisis y diseño técnico de un software que permita realizar la gestión de las actividades académicas extracurriculares que se ofrecen en una universidad. Projecte final de carrera en Enginyeria del Programari que consisteix en l'elaboració de les fases d'anàlisi i disseny tècnic d'un programari que permeti realitzar la gestió de les activitats acadèmiques extracurriculars que s'ofereixen e...

  19. On program of extracurricular mini-football training program for university girl students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamozhanskaya A.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at working out of efficient program for first year girl students’ health improvement, which is based on mini-football means’ application in extra-curricular activities. Purpose: to substantiate the program of one year mini-football trainings for girl students. Material: one year experiment envisaged participation of 18-20 years’ age 56 first year girl students (two groups, 28 people each. The girl students of every group endured different physical loads: group 1 - 70% of specific means and 30% of non-specific; group 2 - 65% of specific means and 35% of non specific. Results: we worked one year efficient program for girl students’ health improvement, which was based on application of mini-football specific and non specific means’ optimal correlation in extracurricular trainings. We found that optimal correlation of specific and non-specific training loads was 70:30 (%. Practically equal level of workability in both groups was ensured by the following: in group 1 - at the account of special endurance; in group 2 - by means of general physical training. Conclusions: we recommend the program of one-year mini-football trainings, which ensures improvement of physical and technical fitness, rising of girl students organism’s and health indicators.

  20. Masculine, feminine and neutral sports: Extracurricular sport modalities in practice

    OpenAIRE

    Alvariñas-Villaverde, Myriam; López-Villar, Cristina; Fernández-Villarino, María A.; Alvarez-Esteban, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    The present work constitutes a novel approach to extracurricular sport modalities. The aim was to analyze the participation model and to determine the relevance of sex in this context. Data from 616 students, aged 15 to 17, were collected. The questionnaire on sport lifestyle from a gender perspective (Alvariñas-Villaverde et al., 2009) was used for assessment. The results showed that sport choice corresponds to sports traditionally associated with men or women. Nevertheless, these coexist wi...

  1. The Role of Extracurricular Activities in Active Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Filiz; Akar, Hanife; Yildirim, Ali

    2011-01-01

    There have been multiple trends of building democratic citizens through formal education, and in the European context the trials have been dramatically increased with the Europeanization process since the 1980s. In line with this trend, an in-depth qualitative case study was carried out in a private primary school in Turkey to shed light on the…

  2. Distress of Routine Activities and Perceived Safety Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress, Depression, and Alcohol Use: 2002 Washington, DC, Sniper Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Carol S; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Benevides, K Nikki; Morganstein, Joshua C; Ursano, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    For over 3 weeks in October 2002, a series of sniper attacks in the Washington, DC, area left 10 people dead and 3 wounded. This study examined the relationship of distress associated with routine activities and perceived safety to psychological and behavioral responses. Participants were 1238 residents of the Washington, DC, metropolitan area (aged 18 to 90 years, mean=41.7 years) who completed an Internet survey including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and items pertaining to distress related to routine activities, perceived safety, and alcohol use. Data were collected at one time point approximately 3 weeks after the first sniper shooting and before apprehension of the suspects. Relationships of distress and perceived safety to post-traumatic stress, depressive symptoms, and increased alcohol use were examined by using linear and logistic regression analyses. Approximately 8% of the participants met the symptom criteria for probable post-traumatic stress disorder, 22% reported mild to severe depression, and 4% reported increased alcohol use during the attacks. Distress related to routine activities and perceived safety were associated with increased post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms and alcohol use. Distress and perceived safety are associated with specific routine activities and both contribute to psychological and behavioral responses during a terrorist attack. These findings have implications for targeted information dissemination and risk communication by community leaders.

  3. Activity spaces of men who have sex with men: An initial exploration of geographic variation in locations of routine, potential sexual risk, and prevention behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam S; Kramer, Michael R; Cooper, Hannah L F; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2017-02-01

    Theory and research on HIV and among men who have sex with men (MSM) have long suggested the importance of non-residential locations in defining structural exposures. Despite this, most studies within these fields define place as a residential context, neglecting the potential influence of non-residential locations on HIV-related outcomes. The concept of activity spaces, defined as a set of locations to which an individual is routinely exposed, represents one theoretical basis for addressing this potential imbalance. Using a one-time online survey to collect demographic, behavioral, and spatial data from MSM, this paper describes activity spaces and examines correlates of this spatial variation. We used latent class analysis to identify categories of activity spaces using spatial data on home, routine, potential sexual risk, and HIV prevention locations. We then assessed individual and area-level covariates for their associations with these categories. Classes were distinguished by the degree of spatial variation in routine and prevention behaviors (which were the same within each class) and in sexual risk behaviors (i.e., sex locations and locations of meeting sex partners). Partner type (e.g. casual or main) represented a key correlate of the activity space. In this early examination of activity spaces in an online sample of MSM, patterns of spatial behavior represent further evidence of significant spatial variation in locations of routine, potential HIV sexual risk, and HIV prevention behaviors among MSM. Although prevention behaviors tend to have similar geographic variation as routine behaviors, locations where men engage in potentially high-risk behaviors may be more spatially focused for some MSM than for others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracurricular school-based sports as a motivating vehicle for sports participation in youth: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Meester, An; Aelterman, Nathalie; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Haerens, Leen

    2014-01-01

    .... The purposes of this study were to examine the extent to which pupils not engaging in community sports do participate in extracurricular school-based sports, and to assess whether extracurricular...

  5. Program sustainability: focus on organizational routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluye, P; Potvin, L; Denis, J L; Pelletier, J

    2004-12-01

    Program sustainability is an ongoing concern for most people in health promotion. However, the current notion of sustainability in organizations, namely routinization, needs refinement. This article examines organizational routines. In so doing, it refines the notion of sustainability and the assessment of routines. Drawing on the organizational literature, a routinized program is defined by the presence of routinized activities, meaning that these activities exhibit four characteristics of organizational routines: memory, adaptation, values and rules. To answer the question of how these characteristics are useful, we conducted an empirical study of the routinization of the Quebec Heart Health Demonstration Project in five community health centers. Our method consisted of a multiple-case study. We observed project activities in each center in 2000. The data came from documents and interviews with project actors. Our results show that, in one of the centers, no resources had been officially committed to project activities. Even so, the actors continued some activities on an informal basis. In another center, the activities satisfied three of the four routine characteristics. In the three others, activities satisfied all of the characteristics. These results suggest focusing the study of program sustainability on the routinization of activities resulting from it. They indicate four distinct degrees of sustainability: (1) the absence of sustainability; no program activity is continued; (2) precarious sustainability; some residual activities are pursued, at least unofficially; (3) weak sustainability; the program produces some official activities that are not routinized; and (4) sustainability through routinization; routinized activities result from the program.

  6. Extra-Curricular Social Studies in an Open Air History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ronald Vaughan

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses extra-curricular social studies in an Open Air History Museum. Open Air History Museum, Conner Prairie Interpretive Park in Fishers, Indiana, is a cultural institution that encourages and supports talented students as they participate in an extra-curricular program. Ten-to sixteen-year-old youths "apply for jobs"…

  7. The Arrangement of Students' Extracurricular Piano Practice Process with the Asynchronous Distance Piano Teaching Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Ahmet Suat

    2015-01-01

    That the students do their extracurricular piano practices in the direction of the teacher's warnings is a key factor in achieving success in the teaching-learning process. However, the teachers cannot adequately control the students' extracurricular practices in the process of traditional piano education. Under the influence of this lack of…

  8. Extracurricular Participation, "At-Risk" Status, and the High School Dropout Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispin, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    I estimate the effect of extracurricular participation on the high school dropout decision with a particular focus on at-risk students. Using a sample of tenth grade students from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988, I jointly estimate the dropout and participation decisions (including extracurricular offerings per student), and…

  9. Sport education and extracurricular sport participation: an examination using the trans-contextual model of motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the opportunity to participate in weekly, voluntary lunch recess sport club sessions during the intervention period. SE elicited a moderate increase in autonomous motives in physical education. The TCM accounted for a significant proportion of the explained variance in lunch recess sport club intention and participation. Autonomy-supportive curricular models, such as SE, may have the potential to facilitate transfer of motivation and participation in physical activity from a physical education to an extracurricular context.

  10. Propuesta de sistema de actividades extracurriculares para potenciar el desarrollo de la cultura artístico-literaria cubana desde la biblioteca universitaria

    OpenAIRE

    Figueredo Figueredo, Ana Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Its propose the elaboration of the system of extracurricular activities from the university library which principal objective isto potent the artistical cultural-cuban library development in the students of the first year of Sociocultural Studios in Granma´s University.The system consist of 16 activities. Applied between October to May, Duch us: lecture, debate, concourse, conversations, literary gathering, expositions and book cinema debate in creative and systematic way to allow the student...

  11. Extracurricular enrichment workshops for high ability students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Rojo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze and explain attention to diversity measures for high ability (gifted and talented students. The model, developed in the Spanish region of Murcia, is based on cognitive psychology and aims to encourage thinking skills. The program is developed as a curriculum extension and the interests, motivations and abilities of children have been considered once these were identified. The article offers a theoretical approach, a set of objectives, and some of the activities that have been done with students.

  12. [Psychoeducational intervention in high ability: intellectual functioning and extracurricular enrichment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Riba, Sylvia

    2014-02-24

    The 'new paradigm' defines the high intellectual ability as a potential that should crystallize progressively throughout development. Its main feature is a high intellectual initial multidimensional potential, which is transformed so that, being a person with high intellectual ability is the result of a developmental process from a neurobiological substrate and the incidence of variables (psychosocial and education) which determines its manifestation more or less stable and optimal to excellence. It is interesting to know the effectiveness of psychoeducational intervention of the extracurricular enrichment programs and their effects on the expression of differential functioning and the optimization of the management of cognitive resources that lead to excellence. An extracurricular enrichment program is described and evaluated through: 1) the stability of the intellectual measures; 2) the satisfaction level of participants and families. Participants are 58 high ability students on the enrichment program and 25 parents. Intellectual profiles are obtained on T1-T2 and calculated their stability by regression analysis, the CSA and CSA-P questionnaires were applied in order to know the participants and families' satisfaction measure. Results show the basic stability of intellectual profiles with five cases of instability among the 58 profiles obtained, and a high satisfaction with the results obtained in the domain of cognitive and personal management among the participants.

  13. Las características laborales del profesorado de las actividades físico-deportivas extraescolares en función de la edad y el sexo, dentro de la Comunidad de Madrid. (The employment characteristics of teachers of extracurricular sport activities according to their age and gender in the Community of Madrid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana María Gallardo-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEn relación a la población de las personas que desarrollan la función de docencia de las actividades físico-deportivas extraescolares en la Comunidad de Madrid, los objetivos del presente estudio pretenden describir y analizar la relación entre los tipos de contratos, los ingresos y las variables sociodemográficas. Esta investigación sigue una metodología cuantitativa, de corte transversal y descriptiva en una muestra de 350 personas. El muestro ha sido aleatorio por conglomerados aplicándose una entrevista estandarizada por medio de cuestionario. Los resultados del estudio muestran que existe relación significativa entre el tipo de contrato y la edad [x2 (6= 17.462; p= .008; Φ=.616], la experiencia profesional y el sexo [x2 (36 = 79.047; p=.000; Φ= .475], los ingresos con el tipo de centro educativo donde se realiza la actividad [x2 (14 = 185.922; p=.000; Φ=.745] y el sexo [x2 (7= 15.943; p=.026; Φ=.218]. Las conclusión final del estudio indica que la situación profesional de las personas que trabajan en este ámbito es bastante inestable y precaria.AbstractIn regard to the group of people carrying out the function of teaching extracurricular sport activities in Comunidad de Madrid, the aims of this study are to describe and analyse the relationship among contract, salary and demographic variables. The present study used a quantitative method. A cross-sectional study was performed by means of face-to-face interviews to a random sample of 350 teachers that completed a brief questionnaire. The results show a significant relationship between type contract and age [x2 (6= 17.462; p= .008; Φ=.616], professional experience and gender [x2 (36 = 79.047; p=.000; Φ= .475], salary with type of school [x2 (14 = 185.922; p=.000; Φ=.745] and gender [x2 (7= 15.943; p=.026; Φ=.218]. The general conclusión suggests that the professional situation of the people who work in this area is quite unstable and precarious

  14. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu-Reis Phillipe; Oliveira Guilherme; Curtarelli de Oliveira Arthur; Sadique Hammad; Nasr Adonis; Saavedra Tomasich Flávio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM) and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the ext...

  15. Extracurricular Participation and Course Performance in the Middle Grades: A Study of Low-Income, Urban Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kate; Cappella, Elise; Seidman, Edward

    2015-12-01

    The transition to middle/junior high school is associated with declines in students' academic performance, especially among low-income, urban youth. Developmental psychologists posit such declines are due to a poor fit between the needs of early adolescents-industry, identity, and autonomy-and the environment of their new schools. Extracurricular participation during these years may act as a buffer for youth, providing a setting for development outside the classroom. The current study examines participation within and across activity settings among low-income, urban youth in New York City over this transition. Using the Adolescent Pathways Project data, this study explores how such participation relates to course performance. We find that a large percentage of youth are minimally or uninvolved in extracurricular activities during these years; that participation varies within youth across time; and that the association between participation and course performance varies by activity setting. Youth who participate frequently in community or athletic settings or have high participation in two or more settings are found to have higher GPAs in the year in which they participate and youth who participate frequently in the religious setting are found to have lower GPAs. High participation in more than two settings may be detrimental.

  16. Children's Daily Routines during Kindergarten Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenger, Leah K.; McIntyre, Laura Lee; Fiese, Barbara H.; Eckert, Tanya L.

    2008-01-01

    Routines are an important feature of family life and functioning in families with young children. Common daily routines such as dinnertime, bedtime, and waking activities are powerful organizers of family behavior and may be instrumental to children and families during times of transition, such as elementary school entry. Daily routines were…

  17. The cognitive role of routine activities: the case of familiar field interventions in nuclear power plants; Le role cognitif des activites routinieres: le cas des interventions de terrain familieres en centrale nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noizet, A

    2000-07-01

    Routine works incorporate part of the environment as their own control (exo-monitoring). The routine activity is itself in the self-monitoring situation of a cognitive control, which moves with the constraints, and which is not in direct relation with the errors made and detected, but which is in relation with the check of mastery. (J.S.)

  18. Perspectives of best Practices for Learning Gender-Inclusive Science: Influences of Extracurricular Science for Gifted Girls and Electrical Engineering for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Shaunda L.

    Gifted girls in elementary school must follow the set curriculum, but their choices of extracurricular activities may indicate future subject preferences. This study attempted to explore the perceptions of gifted girls regarding how the family, home, and school environments influenced their choices to take extracurricular science classes. A mixed methodology was adopted: qualitative, to understand the girls' perceptions of influence, and quantitative, to measure their attitudes toward science. Influential factors identified in this study highlight fun as occurring with the highest frequency and four emergent factors: doubt, traditional sex roles, boredom, and group work. In addition, findings from a focused case study of a graduate electrical engineer are interwoven with the girls' perspectives of science. The varying ages and experiences with science of the participants provide interesting views. This study adds knowledge to the field of science education, specifically on withingender differences of gifted girls and women in engineering.

  19. Reflexivity of Routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Yutaka; Hiramoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    This study reconsiders the meaning and implications of reflexivity for the theory of routines. Due to their mundane nature, routines tend to be considered unambiguous phenomena that everyone can readily understand. The performative theory of routines has challenged this view by suggesting there i...

  20. Routines and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sangyoon; Becker, Markus; Knudsen, Thorbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Routines have been perceived as a source of inertia in the process of organizational change. In this study, we suggest an overlooked, but prevalent, mechanism by which the inertial nature of routines helps, rather than hinders, organizational adaptation. Routine-level inertia plays a hidden role...

  1. Development of a speech-discriminating electromyogram system for routine ambulatory recordings for the low-level masseter muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazaki, Y; Naito, M; Kawakami, S; Hirata, A; Oki, K; Minagi, S

    2014-04-01

    Previous work suggests a relationship between sustained low-level tooth clenching and the aetiology of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain. This study aimed to establish a reliable system with which to evaluate low-level electromyographic (EMG) activity related to low-level tooth clenching while discriminating speech activity, which is one of the most common facial muscle activities to be discriminated from low-level clenching. This device should facilitate the clinical evaluation of awake muscle activity in TMD patients. Eight female and eight male subjects (38.9 ± 11.3 years) participated in the study to evaluate the validity of estimation of speech duration. Actual speech duration was defined by one examiner by pointing out the timing of beginning and end point of each speech on wave-editing software. Speech duration, as detected by a voice sensor system, which was activated by a voice loudness of 54.71 ± 5.00 dB, was significantly correlated with the above actual speech duration (P speech, EMG activity during speech could be precisely discriminated. The results of this study demonstrate that the EMG system with voice sensor system would be an effective tool for the evaluation of low-level masticatory muscle activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Contribution of Ideational Behavior to Creative Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Sue Hyeon; Park, Hyeri; Runco, Mark A.; Choe, Ho-Seong

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of creative performance from ideation has shown promise, but questions remain. In this study, the relationship of ideational behavior and the creative performance of elementary school children (N = 255) was examined across 6 domains of creative performance: science, mathematics, technology, fine arts, music, and writing.…

  3. Better Education at Ishik University Preparatory School with Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Yunus

    2015-01-01

    It cannot be said that education today in institutions is better than the previous century. Because in the past, students' minds were not as full of time-consuming things like spending enormous time in front of a computer or a television as today. Subsequently, teachers used to concentrate their job well and students used to focus on the study…

  4. Better Education at Ishik University Preparatory School with Extracurricular Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Yunus Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    It cannot be said that education today in institutions is better than the previous century. Because in the past, students’ mind was not as full of time-consuming things like spending enormous time in front of a computer or a television as today. Subsequently, teachers used to concentrate their job well and students used to focus on the study better because there was nothing serious except studying. On the other hand, it can be said that the youth today are not eager to learn as yesterday. Bec...

  5. Professional Identities of Vocational High School Students and Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Bilge Aslan; Altintas, Havva Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Vocational high schools are one of the controversial topics, and also the hardly touched fields in educational field. Students' profiles of vocational schools, their visions, and professional identity developments are not frequently reflected in the literature. Therefore, the main aim of the study is to research whether vocational high school…

  6. Extracurricular factors influence perceived stress in a large cohort of Colombian dental students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Divaris, Kimon; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Villa-Torres, Laura; Mafla, Ana Cristina; Moya, Gloria Aranzazu; González-Martínez, Farith; Vila-Sierra, Luis Armando; Fortich-Mesa, Natalia; Gómez-Scarpetta, Ruth Ángela; Duque-Restrepo, Liliana María

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of extracurricular factors including socioeconomic status and career choice with perceived stress in dental school in a large cohort of Colombian dental students...

  7. Sleep Duration, Schedule and Quality among Urban Chinese Children and Adolescents: Associations with Routine After-School Activities: e0115326

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaoxiao Jiang; Louise L Hardy; Louise A Baur; Ding Ding; Ling Wang; Huijing Shi

    2015-01-01

    .... This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day...

  8. Sleep duration, schedule and quality among urban Chinese children and adolescents: associations with routine after-school activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Hardy, Louise L; Baur, Louise A; Ding, Ding; Wang, Ling; Shi, Huijing

    2015-01-01

    .... This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day...

  9. Quantification of the activity of tritium produced during the routine synthesis of (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C; Talboys, M A; Bukhari, S; Evans, W D

    2014-06-01

    Gamma emitting radioactive by-products generated during the cyclotron irradiation of (18)O labelled water by protons to produce (18)FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) for positron emission tomography are well characterised. However, the production of tritium ((3)H) through the (18)O(p,t)(16)O nuclear reaction has not been investigated in detail. The aim of this study was to measure tritium activity produced during a large number of (18)FDG production runs in order to obtain a better perspective on its impact on radioactive waste management, particularly as regards storage and disposal. Tritium was assayed by liquid scintillation counting in recovered (18)O water from 24 separate production runs. The mean (SD) values of activity and activity concentration were 170 (20) kBq and 81 (8) kBq ml(-1) respectively. Both quantities were positively correlated with the activity of (18)F. Tritium was detected in much lower concentration in water used to rinse the target vessel. The activity of tritium is such that it is exempt from regulatory control and may be combined with bulk non-active waste for disposal as Very Low Level Waste. However, variations in the irradiation conditions or the procedures for the collection of recovered water might result in its classification as Low Level Waste, necessitating a more complex disposal regime.

  10. THE 2013 CURRICULUM BASED SYLLABUS FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL’S ENGLISH EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Masrur Mustolih; Hermayawati Hermayawati

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at designing syllabus for English extracurricular in SMAN 1 Seyegan based on the 2013 Curriculum. This was Research and Development (R&D) study using ADDIE model. There were five stages in conducting the research; (1) Analysis; (2) Design; (3) Development; (4) Implementation; (5) Evaluation. This study involved 15 students of ten graders who registered to English extracurricular program. To gain the Needs Analysis (NA), the researcher used observation, questionn...

  11. Sleep duration, schedule and quality among urban Chinese children and adolescents: associations with routine after-school activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Hardy, Louise L; Baur, Louise A; Ding, Ding; Wang, Ling; Shi, Huijing

    2015-01-01

    With rapid urbanization accompanied by lifestyle changes, children and adolescents living in metropolitan areas are faced with many time use choices that compete with sleep. This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day. Cross-sectional, school-based survey of school children (Grades 4-8) living in Shanghai, China, conducted in 2011. Self-reported data were collected on students' sleep duration and timing, sleep quality, habitual after-school activities (i.e. homework, leisure-time physical activity, recreational screen time and school commuting time), and potential correlates. Mean sleep duration of this sample (mean age: 11.5-years; 48.6% girls) was 9 hours. Nearly 30% of students reported daytime tiredness. On school nights, girls slept less (psleep duration (p=0.005) and bedtime (p=0.002). Prolonged time spent on homework and mobile phone playing was related to shorter sleep duration and later bedtime. Adjusting for all other factors, with each additional hour of mobile phone playing, the odds of daytime tiredness and having difficulty maintaining sleep increased by 30% and 27% among secondary students, respectively. There are sex differences in sleep duration, schedule and quality. Habitual activities had small but significant associations with sleep hygiene outcomes especially among secondary school students. Intervention strategies such as limiting children's use of electronic screen devices after school are implicated.

  12. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu-Reis Phillipe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the extra-curricular practical activities on the performance and confidence of students in carrying out the different procedures in the emergency department, and on their own perception of how well they did. Also, to assess the influence the practical activities have on student´s future choice of specialty. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted by collecting data through a questionnaire. 102 eligible individuals were included and divided into two groups according to the number of extra-curricular hours performed (Group 1- up to 200 hours and Group 2- over 200 hours. Results Students in Group 2 (over 200 hours had a greater number of procedures performed on all variables evaluated, in particular, initial patient care (mean 363.8 vs.136.905 in Group 1 - p = 0.001, Simple Sutures (mean of 96.2 vs 33.980 respectively ( p = 0.00003. To determine patient follow-up by the student, the number of initial patient care was correlated with number of discharge procedures performed (in Group 1, 49.6% of patients were not followed up and discharged by the same students who first talked to them in the hospital. While in Group 2, this value becomes 29.4 % - values for Group 1 - p = 0.011 and Group 2 - p = 0.117. Regarding the influence of the practical extra-curricular activities, 76.5% of the total reported that it had influenced their choice of future specialty. Conclusions The aptitude, confidence and skill of students are closely linked to the practice time (number of

  13. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Reis, Phillipe; Oliveira, Guilherme Czelusniak; Curtarelli de Oliveira, Arthur; Sadique, Hammad; Nasr, Adonis; Saavedra Tomasich, Flávio Daniel

    2012-08-22

    Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM) and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the extra-curricular practical activities on the performance and confidence of students in carrying out the different procedures in the emergency department, and on their own perception of how well they did. Also, to assess the influence the practical activities have on student´s future choice of specialty. A Cross-sectional study conducted by collecting data through a questionnaire. 102 eligible individuals were included and divided into two groups according to the number of extra-curricular hours performed (Group 1- up to 200 hours and Group 2- over 200 hours). Students in Group 2 (over 200 hours) had a greater number of procedures performed on all variables evaluated, in particular, initial patient care (mean 363.8 vs.136.905 in Group 1 - p = 0.001), Simple Sutures (mean of 96.2 vs 33.980 respectively) ( p = 0.00003). To determine patient follow-up by the student, the number of initial patient care was correlated with number of discharge procedures performed (in Group 1, 49.6% of patients were not followed up and discharged by the same students who first talked to them in the hospital. While in Group 2, this value becomes 29.4 % - values for Group 1 - p = 0.011 and Group 2 - p = 0.117). Regarding the influence of the practical extra-curricular activities, 76.5% of the total reported that it had influenced their choice of future specialty. The aptitude, confidence and skill of students are closely linked to the practice time (number of training hours served). Two hundred hours appeared to be a

  14. Sleep duration, schedule and quality among urban Chinese children and adolescents: associations with routine after-school activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With rapid urbanization accompanied by lifestyle changes, children and adolescents living in metropolitan areas are faced with many time use choices that compete with sleep. This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day. METHODS: Cross-sectional, school-based survey of school children (Grades 4-8 living in Shanghai, China, conducted in 2011. Self-reported data were collected on students' sleep duration and timing, sleep quality, habitual after-school activities (i.e. homework, leisure-time physical activity, recreational screen time and school commuting time, and potential correlates. RESULTS: Mean sleep duration of this sample (mean age: 11.5-years; 48.6% girls was 9 hours. Nearly 30% of students reported daytime tiredness. On school nights, girls slept less (p<0.001 and went to bed later (p<0.001, a sex difference that was more pronounced in older students. Age by sex interactions were observed for both sleep duration (p=0.005 and bedtime (p=0.002. Prolonged time spent on homework and mobile phone playing was related to shorter sleep duration and later bedtime. Adjusting for all other factors, with each additional hour of mobile phone playing, the odds of daytime tiredness and having difficulty maintaining sleep increased by 30% and 27% among secondary students, respectively. CONCLUSION: There are sex differences in sleep duration, schedule and quality. Habitual activities had small but significant associations with sleep hygiene outcomes especially among secondary school students. Intervention strategies such as limiting children's use of electronic screen devices after school are implicated.

  15. Sleep Duration, Schedule and Quality among Urban Chinese Children and Adolescents: Associations with Routine After-School Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Hardy, Louise L.; Baur, Louise A.; Ding, Ding; Wang, Ling; Shi, Huijing

    2015-01-01

    Background With rapid urbanization accompanied by lifestyle changes, children and adolescents living in metropolitan areas are faced with many time use choices that compete with sleep. This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day. Methods Cross-sectional, school-based survey of school children (Grades 4–8) living in Shanghai, China, conducted in 2011. Self-reported data were collected on students’ sleep duration and timing, sleep quality, habitual after-school activities (i.e. homework, leisure-time physical activity, recreational screen time and school commuting time), and potential correlates. Results Mean sleep duration of this sample (mean age: 11.5-years; 48.6% girls) was 9 hours. Nearly 30% of students reported daytime tiredness. On school nights, girls slept less (psleep duration (p=0.005) and bedtime (p=0.002). Prolonged time spent on homework and mobile phone playing was related to shorter sleep duration and later bedtime. Adjusting for all other factors, with each additional hour of mobile phone playing, the odds of daytime tiredness and having difficulty maintaining sleep increased by 30% and 27% among secondary students, respectively. Conclusion There are sex differences in sleep duration, schedule and quality. Habitual activities had small but significant associations with sleep hygiene outcomes especially among secondary school students. Intervention strategies such as limiting children’s use of electronic screen devices after school are implicated. PMID:25611973

  16. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  17. SIGNIFICANT INFLUENCES OF VIOLIN EXTRACURRICULAR ACHIEVEMENT TO EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out (1 whether there is an influence between student’s achievements of learning violin toward their emotional intelligence, (2 whether there is a correlation between student’s achievement of learning violin and their emotional intelligence, and (3 how much contribution of student’s achievement of learning violin to their emotional intelligence. It is a qualitative research which is defined as a research method based on positivism philosophy which is used to study particular sample and population. The sample and population are drawn randomly using research instruments to collect data, and the data are analyzed statistically. This aims to examine the hypothesis defined. The finding shows that there is a significant influence between student’s achievement of learning violin and their emotional intelligence about 76.1%, while the rest of it 23.9% is influenced by other factors which are not studied in this research. It proves that learning violin influences student’s emotional intelligence very much and emotional intelligence is influential in increasing student’s achievement. From the data, it shows that most of the students participating in violin extracurricular are able to increase their learning achievement.

  18. Significados de atividades extracurriculares para crianças bailarinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Paula Brandão

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este estudo investigou o cotidiano de crianças da classe média em Salvador, Bahia. A pesquisa foi realizada em uma escola de balé com meninas entre seis e sete anos de idade. Para a coleta de dados, foi feita observação não estruturada de caráter etnográfico e exploratório na escola de balé e entrevistas-conversa com cinco crianças. Os resultados apontam para os sentidos ambivalentes que circunscrevem o balé entre as dimensões da disciplina e do lúdico, além do status de hiperocupação, que constitui um ponto que une as crianças do presente estudo e nos faz refletir sobre as representações da infância atualmente. Na medida em que surgem cada vez mais instituições especializadas em ofertar atividades para crianças, os resultados indicam que os ambientes em que se desenvolvem atividades extracurriculares permanecem ainda pouquíssimo explorados no Brasil; e discutem, também, a necessidade de investigar mais essa infância, invisibilizada por ser considerada normativa.

  19. Indirect Effects of Extracurricular Participation on Academic Adjustment Via Perceived Friends' Prosocial Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N; Cao, Qian; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2016-11-01

    Students who participate in extracurricular activities in middle school exhibit higher levels of academic motivation and achievement, including graduation from high school. However, the mechanisms responsible for these beneficial effects are poorly understood. Guided by the bioecological models of development, this study tested the indirect effects of participation in grade 8 in school sports or performance arts and clubs on grade 9 academic achievement, academic competence beliefs, and school belonging, via adolescents' perceptions of their friends' prosocial norms. Participants were 495 (45 % female) ethnically diverse students (mean age at grade 8 = 13.9 years; SD = .58) who were recruited into a longitudinal study on the basis of below average literacy in grade 1. Using weighted propensity score analyses to control for potential confounders, results of longitudinal SEM found indirect effect of participation in sports, but not of participation in performance arts and clubs, on grade 9 outcomes noted above. Implications of findings for improving educational attainment of at-risk youth are discussed.

  20. Indirect Effects of Extracurricular Participation on Academic Adjustment via Perceived Friends’ Prosocial Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Cao, Qian; Kwok, Oi-man

    2016-01-01

    Students who participate in extracurricular activities in middle school exhibit higher levels of academic motivation and achievement, including graduation from high school. However, the mechanisms responsible for these beneficial effects are poorly understood. Guided by the bioecological models of development, this study tested the indirect effects of participation in grade 8 in school sports or performance arts and clubs on grade 9 academic achievement, academic competence beliefs, and school belonging, via adolescents’ perceptions of their friends’ prosocial norms. Participants were 495 (45% female) ethnically diverse students (mean age at grade 8 = 13.9 years; SD =.58) who were recruited into a longitudinal study on the basis of below average literacy in grade 1. Using weighted propensity score analyses to control for potential confounders, results of longitudinal SEM found indirect effect of participation in sports, but not of participation in performance arts and clubs, on grade 9 outcomes noted above. Implications of findings for improving educational attainment of at-risk youth are discussed. PMID:27299761

  1. A contextual perspective on talented female participants and their development in extracurricular STEM programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Heidrun; Schirner, Sigrun; Laemmle, Lena; Obergriesser, Stefanie; Heilemann, Michael; Ziegler, Albert

    2016-08-01

    We advocate a more contextual perspective in giftedness research. In our view, doing so opens up three particularly interesting research areas, which we refer to as the participation issue, the effectiveness issue, and the interaction issue. To illustrate their utility, we examined characteristics of females participating in German high achiever-track secondary education who had applied for participation in a 1-year extracurricular e-mentoring program in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (n = 1237). Their characteristics were compared with male and female random-sample control groups. We assessed the effectiveness of the mentoring program by comparing the developmental trajectories of program participants with those of three control groups: applicants who were randomly chosen for later participation (waiting-list control group) and a female and a male control group. Finally, we examined whether differences in program effectiveness could be partially explained by characteristics of the interaction with the domain. Program applicants possessed more advantageous individual characteristics but, unexpectedly, less advantageous home and school environments than female and male members of the control groups. Program participation affected positive changes in certainty about career goals (independent of STEM) and in the number of STEM activities. The amount of STEM communication partially explained differences in program effectiveness. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  3. Outdoor fitness routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000891.htm Outdoor fitness routine To use the sharing features on this ... you and is right for your level of fitness. Here are some ideas: Warm up first. Get ...

  4. Consuming technologies - developing routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    technologies and in this article these processes will be investigated from three different perspectives: an historical perspective of how new technologies have entered homes, a consumer perspective of how both houses and new technologies are purchased and finally, as the primary part of the article, a user...... perspective of how routines develop while these technologies are being used. In the conclusion these insights are discussed in relation to possible ways of influencing routines....

  5. Social Activities of Youth with Disabilities. NLTS2 Data Brief. Volume 3, Issue 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mary; Cadwallader, Tom W.; Garza, Nicolle; Cameto, Renee

    2004-01-01

    This report discusses the friendships and extracurricular activities of youths with disabilities. Although extracurricular activities and relationships may be crucial to the healthy development of all youth, some kinds of disabilities can present challenges to participation. The National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2)1, sponsored by the…

  6. Routines, rigidity and real estate

    OpenAIRE

    Dooley, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Finding ways to reduce the environmental impact of the existing building stock is an important element in climate change mitigation. This article examines environmentally focused organisational innovations in the corporate real estate industry. Organisational innovations are often overlooked as they cause considerable disruption to the daily routines of employees. In this article, the focal organisational innovation is the adoption of activity-based working. The study aims to uncover the barr...

  7. The Role of Intentional Self Regulation, Lower Neighborhood Ecological Assets, and Activity Involvement in Youth Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jennifer Brown; Lewin-Bizan, Selva; Lerner, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Extracurricular activities provide a key context for youth development, and participation has been linked with positive developmental outcomes. Using data from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development (PYD), this study explored how the intentional self regulation ability of youth interacted with participation in extracurricular activities to…

  8. Motivation through Routine Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koth, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    This informed commentary article offers a simple, effective classroom management strategy in which the teacher uses routine documentation to motivate students both to perform academically and to behave in a manner consistent with established classroom rules and procedures. The pragmatic strategy is grounded in literature, free to implement,…

  9. When Denial Becomes Routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Leo

    1991-01-01

    Claims denial of genocide has become a routine defense as a result of the United Nations definition of international crimes. Describes grounds for denial by various governments and list arguments they have made to justify genocidal policies. Argues some academics assist in the process of denial by using revisionist strategies. (NL)

  10. Learning from Homeschooling Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a rare opportunity to look inside the homeschool and to observe the routines of homeschooling families from across the United States. With more than 1000 survey participants, and nine parents selected for interviews, the compiled data were analyzed through open coding techniques. Meaningful aspects that arose from the routines…

  11. Undergraduate Women in STEM: Does Participation in STEM Extracurricular Programs Enhance Success among Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kasey Marie

    2010-01-01

    Women have been underrepresented in the STEM fields since the 1650's to today (Hunter, 2005). This study examined the extracurricular participation of undergraduate women, in Fall 2009, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, who were majoring in at least one (1) of the 49 STEM majors at Southeastern State University participated in STEM…

  12. Writing as Embodied, College Football Plays as Embodied: Extracurricular Multimodal Composing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifenburg, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent explorations position multimodality as a largely curricular practice wherein the body typically is not figured as a potential mode of meaning making. Such a projection not only fails to acknowledge extracurricular uses of such a rhetoric but also fails to acknowledge the role of the body in and especially for composing. In hopes of…

  13. Australian Primary Students' Motivation and Learning Intentions for Extra-Curricular Music Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Clarence

    2017-01-01

    What are the motivational differences between students who intend to continue their learning in instrumental and choral music programmes and those who intend to discontinue? Using an achievement-goal perspective, this study investigated motivation and learning intentions of Australian students who had engaged in these extra-curricular music…

  14. Gender Differences on Attitudes and Participation in an Extracurricular Gymnastics Course among Greek University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosis, Dimitrios; Papaioannou, Athanasios G.; Siatras, Theophanis A.; Proios, Miltiadis; Proios, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were (a) to test the effectiveness of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict Greek university students' voluntary participation in an extracurricular gymnastics course, and (b) to evaluate gender differences. Two hundred sixty-three (127 female, 136 male) students participated in the study. Students' attitudes,…

  15. Escolas de tempo integral e atividades extracurriculares: universos à espera da Psicologia brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neyfsom Carlos Fernandes Matias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Observa-se que, no Brasil, diversas ações vêm sendo desenvolvidas com o intuito de se implantar uma educação em tempo integral. Sabe-se que as atividades ligadas ao esporte, às artes e culturais podem contribuir significativamente nesse sentido. Com base nisso, este artigo apresenta algumas iniciativas que visavam à execução de escolas de tempo integral e como as atividades extracurriculares podem ser úteis na efetivação de uma educação em tempo integral. O objetivo deste estudo foi o de verificar o que já se tem publicado sobre as escolas de tempo integral e atividades extracurriculares, desde uma pesquisa bibliográfica, nos periódicos “Psicologia: teoria e pesquisa”; “Psicologia: reflexão e crítica”; “Psicologia escolar e educacional”. As considerações finais apontam que o estudo sobre as atividades extracurriculares e escolas de tempo integral ainda é embrionário no Brasil e que urge a realização de pesquisas empíricas sobre atividades extracurriculares no País

  16. Exercise and nutrition routine improving cancer health (ENRICH: The protocol for a randomized efficacy trial of a nutrition and physical activity program for adult cancer survivors and carers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyes Allison

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Exercise and Nutrition Routine Improving Cancer Health (ENRICH study is investigating a novel lifestyle intervention aimed at improving the health behaviors of adult cancer survivors and their carers. The main purpose of the study is to determine the efficacy of lifestyle education and skill development delivered via group-based sessions on the physical activity and dietary behaviors of participants. This article describes the intervention development, study design, and participant recruitment. Methods/Design ENRICH is a randomized controlled trial, conducted in Australia, with two arms: an intervention group participating in six, two-hour face-to-face sessions held over eight weeks, and a wait-list control group. Intervention sessions are co-facilitated by an exercise physiologist and dietician. Content includes healthy eating education, and a home-based walking (utilizing a pedometer and resistance training program (utilizing elastic tubing resistance devices. The program was developed with reference to social cognitive theory and chronic disease self-management models. The study population consists of cancer survivors (post active-treatment and their carers recruited through community-based advertising and referral from health professionals. The primary outcome is seven-days of sealed pedometry. Secondary outcomes include: self-reported physical activity levels, dietary intake, sedentary behavior, waist circumference, body mass index, quality of life, and perceived social support. The outcomes will be measured at baseline (one week prior to attending the program, eight-weeks (at completion of intervention sessions, and 20-weeks. The intervention group will also be invited to complete 12-month follow-up data collection. Process evaluation data will be obtained from participants by questionnaire and attendance records. Discussion No trials are yet available that have evaluated the efficacy of group-based lifestyle

  17. Time reduction and automation of routine planning activities through the use of macros; Reduccion de tiempo y automatizacion de las actividades rutinarias de planificacion mediante el uso de macros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, C. del; Osorio, J. L.; Almansa, J.

    2011-07-01

    The use of macros in scheduler automates Adac Pinnacle3 much of the routine activities in the planning process, from the display options and placement of beams, to, among other possibilities, systematic naming them and export of the physical and clinical dosimetry. This automation allows reduction of the times associated with the planning process and an error reduction.

  18. #4: No Routine Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Lothian, Judith; Amis, Debby; Crenshaw, Jeannette; Goer, Henci

    2004-01-01

    In this position paper—one of six care practice papers published by Lamaze International and reprinted here with permission—the benefit of no routine interventions during birth is discussed and presented as an evidence-based practice that helps promote, protect, and support normal birth. The paper is written for childbearing women and their families. It presents evidence related to restrictions on eating and drinking, use of intravenous fluids, continuous electronic fetal monitoring, artifici...

  19. The Role of Neighborhood Ecological Assets and Activity Involvement in Youth Developmental Outcomes: Differential Impacts of Asset Poor and Asset Rich Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jennifer Brown; Lewin-Bizan, Selva; Lerner, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental system theories recognize that variables from multiple levels of organization within the bioecology of human development contribute to adolescent development, including individual factors, family factors and the neighborhood which includes extracurricular activities. Extracurricular activities provide a context for youth development,…

  20. Factors affecting construction of science discourse in the context of an extracurricular science and technology project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Horace P.

    Doing and learning science are social activities that require certain language, activities, and values. Both constitute what Gee (2005) calls Discourses. The language of learning science varies with the learning context (Lemke, 2001,1990). Science for All Americans (AAAS, 1990) and Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 2000) endorse inquiry science learning. In the United States, most science learning is teacher-centered; inquiry science learning is rare (NRC, 2000). This study focused on 12 high school students from two suburban high schools, their three faculty mentors, and two engineering mentors during an extracurricular robotics activity with FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC). FRC employed student-centered inquiry focus to teach science principles integrating technology. Research questions were (a) How do science teachers and their students enact Discourses as they teach and learn science? and (b) How does the pedagogical approach of a learning activity facilitate the Discourses that are enacted by students and teachers as they learn and teach science? Using Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), the study examined participants' language during robotic activities to determine how language used in learning science shaped the learning and vice versa. Data sources included videorecordings of participant language and semi-structured interviews with study participants. Transcribed recordings were coded initially using Gee's (2005) linguistic Building Tasks as a priori codes. CDA was applied to code transcripts, to construct Discourses enacted by the participants, and to determine how context facilitated their enactment. Findings indicated that, for the students, FRC facilitated elements of Science Discourse. Wild About Robotics (W.A.R.) team became, through FRC, part of a community similar to scientists' community that promoted knowledge and sound practices, disseminated information, supported research and development and encouraged interaction of

  1. Formation of Cross-Cultural Interaction Experience in Students in Conditions of Curricular and Extracurricular Hours Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Kazarenkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data characterizing the reserves of the integration of curricular and extracurricular classes in forming the experience of cross-cultural interaction in students. The main directions, techniques, tools and forms of working with students as well as the conditions of effective forming the cross-cultural interaction experience in students with the integration of curricular and extracurricular classes are revealed.

  2. Effects of Extracurricular Participation on the Internalizing Problems and Intrapersonal Strengths of Youth in a System of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraczinskas, Michelle; Kilmer, Ryan; Haber, Mason; Cook, James; Zarrett, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Although extracurricular participation has been linked to positive youth outcomes in the general population, no research to date has examined benefits for youth diagnosed with mental health challenges. Youth in systems of care (SOCs) receive a variety of services and supports that could help them capitalize on this potential for positive development, such as access to flexible funding to support recreational interests. However, research has not examined the degree to which the increased community involvement (e.g., extracurricular participation) sought in SOCs contributes to improved outcomes. This study addresses these gaps by investigating the relationships between both average and increased extracurricular participation frequency and breadth and internalizing problems and intrapersonal strengths among SOC youth. Findings revealed that, on average, higher frequency of youth participation was associated with higher intrapersonal strengths and lower internalizing problems. Increases in participation frequency were also associated with increased strengths and decreased internalizing problems. These findings suggest that efforts to implement supports for increasing extracurricular participation of SOC youth could improve their psychosocial outcomes beyond the benefits yielded via formal services. Taken together, these results provide support for advocacy efforts to integrate youth with mental health challenges into existing extracurriculars and to create new extracurricular opportunities. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  3. A CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISON OF SLEEP DURATION BETWEEN U.S. AND AUSTRALIAN ADOLESCENTS: THE EFFECT OF SCHOOL START TIME, PARENT-SET BEDTIMES, AND EXTRA-CURRICULAR LOAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michelle; Gradisar, Michael; Lack, Leon; Wright, Helen; Dewald, Julia; Wolfson, Amy; Carskadon, Mary

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE To test whether sleep duration on school nights differs between adolescents in Australia and the U.S. and, if so, whether this difference is explained by cultural differences in school start time, parental involvement in setting bedtimes and extra-curricular commitments. PARTICIPANTS 385 adolescents aged 13-18 years (M=15.57,SD=0.95; 60% male) from Australia and 302 adolescents aged 13-19 years (M=16.03, SD=1.19; 35% male) from the United States. METHODS Adolescents completed the School Sleep Habits Survey during class time, followed by an 8-day Sleep Diary. RESULTS After controlling for age and sex, Australian adolescents obtained an average of 47 minutes more sleep per school night than those in the U.S. Australian adolescents were more likely to have a parent-set bedtime (17.5% vs 6.8%), have a later school start time (8:32am vs 7:45am) and spend less time per day on extra-curricular commitments (1h37m vs 2h41m) than their U.S. peers. The mediating factors of parent-set bedtimes, later school start times, and less time spent on extra-curricular activities were significantly associated with more total sleep. CONCUSIONS In addition to biological factors, extrinsic cultural factors significantly impact upon adolescent sleep. The present study highlights the importance of a cross-cultural, ecological approach and the impact of early school start times, lack of parental limit setting around bedtimes and extracurricular load in limiting adolescent sleep. PMID:22984209

  4. What’s in a Name? Student Pharmacists’ Novel Extracurricular Process of Drug Therapy Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenric B. Ware

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fostering excitement in pharmacy student learning can be achieved through reinforcing drug therapies in curricular and extracurricular endeavors. This paper described an extracurricular initiative that elevated awareness of drug therapy in its current, future, and past members. This process occurred on an annual basis. Upon invitation, participants were expected to attend meetings with current and graduate organizational members. These settings provided opportunities for recognition and remembrance of organizational history and drug therapies. Checkpoints were inserted to verify progression towards full membership. The primary role of graduate members in this process was the yielding of their professional insights. A student – led, peer – facilitated model of drug therapy exposure along these lines resonates with calls for increased innovative learning strategies.

  5. Avaliação dos estágios extracurriculares de medicina em unidade de terapia intensiva adulto Evaluation of extracurricular internships in the adult's intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Teixeira Nascimento

    2008-12-01

    to detect changes in attitude and interest of students who concluded these internships as well as the most frequent activities developed. METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional survey conducted with students who did extracurricular internships in adult intensive care units during the second semester of 2006. A self-administered questionnaire was given using objective questions. RESULTS: We evaluated 49 students. Interest in becoming an intensivist was classified as high/very high by 32.7% before internship, after which 61.2% reported increased interest. Before internship, students on a 1 to 5 scale rated the importance of critical care medicine as 4.55 ± 0.70. After internship, 98% felt more confident to refer a patient to the intensive care unit, 95.9% to evaluate with supervision, patients admitted to intensive care units and 89.8% to attend patients in the emergency room. The most common procedures observed were: central venous access (100%, peripheral venous access (91.8% and orotracheal intubation (91.8%. Topics ranked in terms of interest from 1 to 5 were: systemic inflammatory response syndrome/sepsis (4.82 ± 0.48, shock (4.81 ± 0.44 and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (4.77 ± 0.55. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that internships in adult intensive care units of Salvador (BA, Brazil provided students with greater assurance to evaluate critical patients, increased their interest to follow an intensivist physician career and allowed contact with the main procedures and topics related to critical care medicine.

  6. Activităţile academice extracurriculare, performanţele şcolare şi angajabilitatea masteranzilor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian MOLDOVAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although universities use Extracurricular Academic Activities (EAA as a marketing technique to attract students and boost their ratings vis-à-vis potential employers, their actual effects (positive or negative are still debated. This research explored (both theoretically and empirically the relationships between EAA, academic performances and employability (the perceived likelihood of graduates to find a job. According to quantitative empirical data, participation in EAA improves academic performances and although participation in EAA requires the same amount of time as normal coursework, the two activities seem to be in accordance with each other. Referring to the future, most respondents believe that universities should continuously develop EAA and are willing to recommend participation to their peers (believing that employers take into account participation in EAA when assessing candidates. The positive opinion regarding how EAA participation contributes toward finding a job can be explained by the perception that participation in EAA increases professional abilities, while EAA might represent a more convincing argument for employers than academic performances.Furthermore, the qualitative data shows that the professional and academic competencies (abilities improved by participating in AAE coincide with the expectations of potential employers and that the overall quality of academic programs could be improved by institutionalizing EAA, multiplying and diversifying these activities, including strategic partners, and so on. 

  7. Individual Values, Learning Routines and Academic Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. Aims: The…

  8. Adolescents' Accounts of Growth Experiences in Youth Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Jodi B.; Larson, Reed; Hansen, David

    2003-01-01

    Conducted 10 focus groups in which adolescents discussed their "growth experiences" in extracurricular and community-based activities. The 55 participants reported personal and interpersonal processes and generally described themselves as agents of their own development and change. (SLD)

  9. Reduction of diabetes risk in routine clinical practice: are physical activity and nutrition interventions feasible and are the outcomes from reference trials replicable? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrell Stephen L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical effectiveness of intensive lifestyle interventions in preventing or delaying diabetes in people at high risk has been established from randomised trials of structured, intensive interventions conducted in several countries over the past two decades. The challenge is to translate them into routine clinical settings. The objective of this review is to determine whether lifestyle interventions delivered to high-risk adult patients in routine clinical care settings are feasible and effective in achieving reductions in risk factors for diabetes. Methods Data sources: MEDLINE (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and grey literature were searched for English-language articles published from January 1990 to August 2009. The reference lists of all articles collected were checked to ensure that no relevant suitable studies were missed. Study selection: We included RCTs, before/after evaluations, cohort studies with or without a control group and interrupted time series analyses of lifestyle interventions with the stated aim of diabetes risk reduction or diabetes prevention, conducted in routine clinical settings and delivered by healthcare providers such as family physicians, practice nurses, allied health personnel, or other healthcare staff associated with a health service. Outcomes of interest were weight loss, reduction in waist circumference, improvement of impaired fasting glucose or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT results, improvements in fat and fibre intakes, increased level of engagement in physical activity and reduction in diabetes incidence. Results Twelve from 41 potentially relevant studies were included in the review. Four studies were suitable for meta-analysis. A significant positive effect of the interventions on weight was reported by all study types. The meta-analysis showed that lifestyle interventions achieved weight and waist circumference reductions after one year

  10. Determination of indexes of psychophysiology qualities for the students of universities of different courses that engage in futsal in the process of extracurricular work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kostyunin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify psychophysiological qualities of football players’ students. Material : the study involved 128 students aged 17 to 22 years. The technique used for assessment the level of functional mobility of nervous processes in terms of the maximum speed of information processing. Each student performed the test three times, of which recorded the best result. Results : indicators identified characteristics of higher nervous activity. Values of the latent period of a simple visual-motor reactions, select one of the three signals, the latent period of the reaction of selecting two of the three signals. Conclusions : when planning training activities should consider the dynamics of psychophysiological qualities of students. Notes that extracurricular classes have a great impact on the health and physical condition of students.

  11. Determination of indexes of psychophysiology qualities for the students of universities of different courses that engage in futsal in the process of extracurricular work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostyunin A.V.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify psychophysiological qualities of football players’ students. Material : the study involved 128 students aged 17 to 22 years. The technique used for assessment the level of functional mobility of nervous processes in terms of the maximum speed of information processing. Each student performed the test three times, of which recorded the best result. Results : indicators identified characteristics of higher nervous activity. Values of the latent period of a simple visual-motor reactions, select one of the three signals, the latent period of the reaction of selecting two of the three signals. Conclusions : when planning training activities should consider the dynamics of psychophysiological qualities of students. Notes that extracurricular classes have a great impact on the health and physical condition of students.

  12. Individual values, learning routines and academic procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. The model tested in this study posits that postmodern value orientations are positively related to procrastination and to a lack of daily routines concerning the performance of academic activities. In contrast, modern values are negatively related to procrastination and positively to learning routines. Academic procrastination, in-turn, should be associated with the tendency to prefer leisure activities to schoolwork in case of conflicts between these two life domains. Seven hundred and four students from 6th and 8th grade with a mean age of 13.5 years participated in the study. The sample included students from all tracks of the German educational system. Students completed a questionnaire containing two value prototypes as well as scales on learning routines and procrastination. Decisions in motivational conflicts were measured using two vignettes. Results from structural equation modelling supported the proposed model for the whole sample as well as for each school track. A planned course of the day can prevent procrastination and foster decisions for academic tasks in case of conflicts. Students' learning takes place within a societal context and reflects the values held in the respective culture.

  13. Extracurricular scientific production among medical students has increased in the past decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sofie Bech; Østergaard, Lauge; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2015-09-01

    Undergraduate research among medical students is essential in the education of future physicians and scientists. This study aimed to evaluate the scientific yield of extracurricular undergraduate research among medical students. Medical students at the University of Copenhagen who completed an extracurricular research year between January 2004 and June 2013 were evaluated through a manual search in PubMed MEDLINE. The primary focus was the number of peer-reviewed, published articles. Of the 363 included students, 3.1% did their research in 2004-2005 compared with 46.5% in 2012-2013. After three years, 70.4% of the students had published a peer-reviewed article, and of all the 363 students, 36.5%, had published as a first author. In total, 87.7% had a medical specialty as their research area versus a surgical specialty. Most students were involved in cardiology (14.1%). Cardiology was also associated with the greatest scientific yield with a median number of 0.8 publications per year after the students concluded their undergraduate research period. Three or more years after concluding their undergraduate research, 32.8% of the students had continued with research in the context of a PhD programme. Overall, the number of medical students who engaged in extracurricular research followed an increasing trend, and more than two-thirds of these students published a peer-reviewed paper within three years. Cardiology was the most popular specialty and also the specialty with the greatest scientific yield. A third of the undergraduate research students continued doing research in the context of a PhD programme.

  14. Efectos de un programa de actividad física extracurricular en niños de primer ciclo de ESO con sobrepeso y obesidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Pastor Vicedo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its impact are increasingly obvious in Spanish society. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an extracurricular intervention of physical and sports activities in order to improve students' body composition and fitness level between two groups of adolescences with overweight or obesity for a six-month period. Moreover, a comparison based on gender was also targeted in this intervention. The sample consisted of 38 students, seventeen boys and twenty-one girls, with BMI above the 85th percentile. Several fitness tests and anthropometric measurements were performed. The results showed significant improvements in the experimental group regarding their physical condition and body fat percentage compared to the control group who did not show any significant achievements. According to the comparison based on gender, within the experimental group, girls achieved more significant results both in their physical fitness and in their body fat percentage.

  15. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  16. Using Routines-Based Interventions in Early Childhood Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Danielle; Hanline, Mary Frances; Woods, Juliann

    2012-01-01

    Embedding early intervention activities into routines and activities of early care and education programs can result in increased skill development for young children with special needs or developmental delays. Routines-based interventions must be implemented through ongoing collaboration and communication among teachers, families, intervention…

  17. The Effects of Racial and Extracurricular Friendship Diversity on Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Nathan

    2008-01-01

    This paper finds the effect of having friends of a similar race and who are involved in similar activities. It explores data which allows a peer group to be defined openly through self nominations. Using a strategy that corrects for the endogeneity of peer effects by instrumenting using variables at the "grade within school" level, it is shown that friendship diversity can help whites increase achievement. Although not much significance was found with other races, most of the strategies pushe...

  18. The institutionalization of a routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    2008-01-01

    -which has before largely been treated in overview by institutionalism-plays an important role in the making of a routine. In my empirical study, I demonstrate that the concept and practice of the valve changes, and that it is identified in a number of ways, as it passes through the testing phase...... of production. I argue that the negotiation of these changes during test production is the fulcrum in the routinization of the production procedure. It is through these identity shifts that the valve is both reified, and rendered producible and applicable in the customer world.......The theoretical ambition in this paper is to contribute to institutionalism, and the literature on organizational routines, by allotting a precise role to the context and the material. Through a theoretical discussion of several perspectives on organizational routines, I argue that materiality...

  19. Oatmeal Facials and Sock Wrestling: The Perils and Promises of Extra-Curricular Strategies for "Fixing" Boys' Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B.

    2010-01-01

    Advocates for boys' education have forwarded numerous "fixes" for boys' supposed educational woes, including both academic and non-academic programs and strategies. This article focuses on the lesser-discussed non-academic, extra-curricular means suggested, specifically outdoor education. Using qualitative analysis of an Australian…

  20. O estágio extracurricular na formação profissional: a opinião dos estudantes de fisioterapia The academic training for the professional education: the opinion of the Physiotherapy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Távora Viana

    2012-12-01

    students affirmed to have participated of extracurricular internship. Out of these, 55 (90.2% were motivated by the necessity of acquiring experience; 53 (86.9% were performing therapeutic interventions in patients; and 13 (21.3% had 15 to 20 working hours. However, 36 academics (59.0% did work in disagreement with the rules of the Federal Council of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy. The students considered the extracurricular internship as a tool of improvement of their professional formation, because it allowed the practice of common physical therapist daily life activities procedures and techniques. There is a necessity for competent organizations to inspect these kind of activities, so that the students can practice tasks accordingly their qualification level.

  1. Modeling Routinization in Games: An Information Theory Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner, Simon; Pichlmair, Martin; Hecher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    -time, discrete-space Markov chains and information theory to measure the actual error between the dynamically trained models and the player interaction. Preliminary research supports the hypothesis that Markov chains can be effectively used to model routinization in games. A full study design is presented......Routinization is the result of practicing until an action stops being a goal-directed process. This paper formulates a definition of routinization in games based on prior research in the fields of activity theory and practice theory. Routinization is analyzed using the formal model of discrete...

  2. Routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    Melser and Michie (1970), 135-151. Sacerdoti, Earl D, [1977], A structure for plans and behavior, Elsevier. * Sartre , Jean - Paul , [1976], Critique of...theorem proving to problem solving," Artificial Intelligence, 2 (3) 189-208. Fitts, Paul M and Michael I Posner, [1967], Human performance, Brooks/Cole...Laing, R D and A Esterson, [1964], Sanity, Madness, and the Family, Tavistock. Laird, John E, Paul Rosenbloom, and Allen Newell, [1984], Towards

  3. Recapturing Desired Family Routines: A Parent-Professional Behavioral Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschbacher, Pamelazita; Fox, Lise; Clarke, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    Children with complex disabilities such as autism spectrum disorders and Landau Kleffner syndrome often lack means to participate in everyday family routines. Serious problem behaviors may result from their challenges in responding to and initiating communicative interactions. These behaviors can change routine family activities such that the…

  4. Routines in School Organizations: Creating Stability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Sharon; Enomoto, Ernestine K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents routinized action theory as a way to examine the regular, habitual activities that occur in school organizations. Using this theoretical lens, school routines were analyzed in order to understand organizational stability and change. Design/methodology/approach: Using case study methods, three discrete cases are…

  5. El papel del maestro y de las actividades extracurriculares en la formacion de jovenes investigadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando García M

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta el texto de una conferencia dictada a un grupo de jóvenes universitarios identificados como investigadores promisorios dentro de las actividades de la Misión de Ciencia, Educación y Desarrollo. Se enfatiza, a partir de experiencias del autor, la importancia de que los jóvenes tengan contacto directo con verdaderos maestros de ciencia y con investigadores activos que les sirvan como modelos de identificación y paradigmas de vida. Igualmente se resalta la importancia de las actividades extracurriculares en la formación de los jóvenes con potencial investigativo, tanto a nivel de la educación secundaria como universitaria.

  6. EL PAPEL DEL MAESTRO Y DE LAS ACTIVIDADES EXTRACURRICULARES EN LA FORMACION DE JOVENES INVESTIGADORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando García M.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta el texto de una conferencia dictada a un grupo de jóvenes universitarios identificados como investigadores promisorios dentro de las actividades de la Misión de Ciencia, Educación y Desarrollo. Se enfatiza, a partir de experiencias del autor, la importancia de que los jóvenes tengan contacto directo con verdaderos maestros de ciencia y con investigadores activos que les sirvan como modelos de identificación y paradigmas de vida. Igualmente se resalta la importancia de las actividades extracurriculares en la formación de los jóvenes con potencial investigativo, tanto a nivel

  7. Extracurricular scientific production among medical students has increased in the past decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech Andersen, Sofie; Østergaard, Lauge; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Undergraduate research among medical students is essential in the education of future physicians and scientists. This study aimed to evaluate the scientific yield of extracurricular undergraduate research among medical students. Methods: Medical students at the University of Copenha...... in cardiology (14.1%). Car - diology was also associated with the greatest scientific yield with a median number of 0.8 publications per year after the students concluded their undergraduate research period. Three or more years after concluding their undergraduate research, 32.8% of the students had continued...... specialty and also the specialty with the greatest scientific yield. A third of the undergraduate re - search students continued doing research in the context of a PhD programme....

  8. Too much of a good thing? How breadth of extracurricular participation relates to school-related affect and academic outcomes during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knifsend, Casey A; Graham, Sandra

    2012-03-01

    Although adolescents often participate in multiple extracurricular activities, little research has examined how the breadth of activities in which an adolescent is involved relates to school-related affect and academic performance. Relying on a large, multi-ethnic sample (N = 864; 55.9% female), the current study investigated linear and non-linear relationships of 11th grade activity participation in four activity domains (academic/leadership groups, arts activities, clubs, and sports) to adolescents' sense of belonging at school, academic engagement, and grade point average, contemporarily and in 12th grade. Results of multiple regression models revealed curvilinear relationships for sense of belonging at school in 11th and 12th grade, grade point average in 11th grade, and academic engagement in 12th grade. Adolescents who were moderately involved (i.e., in two domains) reported a greater sense of belonging at school in 11th and 12th grade, a higher grade point average in 11th grade, and greater academic engagement in 12th grade, relative to those who were more or less involved. Furthermore, adolescents' sense of belonging at school in 11th grade mediated the relationship of domain participation in 11th grade to academic engagement in 12th grade. This study suggests that involvement in a moderate number of activity domains promotes positive school-related affect and greater academic performance. School policy implications and recommendations are discussed.

  9. Family routines and rituals: a context for occupational therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the importance of family daily routines and rituals for the family's functioning and sense of identity. The findings of this paper are derived from an analysis of the morning routines of 40 families with children with disabilities in the United States and Canada. The participants lived in urban and rural areas. Forty of the 49 participants were mothers and the majority of the families were of European descent. Between one and four interviews were conducted with each participant. Topics included the family's story, daily routines, and particular occupations. Data on the morning routines of the families were analyzed for order and affective and symbolic meaning using a narrative approach. The findings are presented as narratives of morning activities in five families. These narratives are examples for rituals, routines, and the absence of a routine. Rituals are discussed in terms of their affective and symbolic qualities, routines are discussed in terms of the order they give to family life, whereas the lack of family routine is discussed in terms of lack of order in the family. Family routines and rituals are organizational and meaning systems that may affect family's ability to adapt them.

  10. Routine outcome measures in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschner, Bernd; Becker, Thomas; Bauer, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The German healthcare system offers comprehensive coverage for people with mental illness including inpatient, day hospital and outpatient services. These services are primarily financed through the statutory health and pension insurances. According to legal regulations, providers are required to base their services on current scientific evidence and to continuously assure the quality of their services. This paper gives an overview of recent initiatives to develop, evaluate and disseminate routine outcome measurement (ROM) in service settings in Germany. A large number of projects have shown outcome monitoring to be feasible, and that feedback of outcome may enhance routine care through an improved allocation of treatment resources. However, none of these initiatives have been integrated into routine care on a nationwide or trans-sectoral level, and their sustainability has been limited. This is due to various barriers in a fragmented mental health service system and to the lack of coordinated national or state-level service planning. The time is ripe for a concerted effort including policy-makers to pick up on these initiatives and move them towards wide-spread implementation in routine care accompanied by practice-oriented research including service user involvement.

  11. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Tippo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimericks, Koen H.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Special Issue and discusses the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories...

  12. Updates: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    During routine testing of civilian applicants for U.S. military service, the overall seroprevalence of antibodies to HIV-1 in 2011 was the second lowest of any year since 1990. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Army, HIV-1 seroprevalences were higher during 2008 to 2011 than in recent prior years. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, the Marine Corps Reserve, and the Army National Guard, HIV-1 seroprevalences have slightly declined or remained relatively stable for at least ten years. In the reserve components of most service branches, it is difficult to discern long-term trends because of instability of seroprevalences in the relatively small numbers of reserve component members tested each year. Monitoring of HIV-1 seroprevalences can help target and focus prevention initiatives. The recent repeal of the Don't Ask Don't Tell policy has created opportunities for prevention messages targeted to men who have sex with men.

  13. Effects of Youth Participation in Extra-Curricular Sport Programs on Perceived Self-Efficacy: A Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdito, Riller S; Carvalho, Humberto M; Galatti, Larissa R; Scaglia, Alcides J; Gonçalves, Carlos E; Paes, Roberto R

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined extracurricular sport participation variables and developmental context in relationship to perceived self-efficacy among underserved adolescents. Participants ( n = 821, 13.6 ± 1.5 years) completed the Youth Experience in Sport questionnaire and General Self-Efficacy Scale. We used the Human Development Index (HDI) to characterize developmental contexts. Multilevel regression models were used to explore the relative contributions of age, sex, years of participation in extracurricular sport, HDI, and perceived positive experience in sport. Our results highlight that positive experience alone and in interaction with length of participation in the program fostered perceived self-efficacy. Participants from higher HDI contexts remained longer in the program. An implication of our research is that variables linked to positive sport experiences and perceived self-efficacy can be used as markers to evaluate the outcomes and impact of sport participation programs aimed at promoting positive youth development.

  14. Systematic development of a theory-informed multifaceted behavioural intervention to increase physical activity of adults with type 2 diabetes in routine primary care: Movement as Medicine for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Leah; Charman, Sarah J; Taylor, Louise; Flynn, Darren; Mosely, Kylie; Speight, Jane; Lievesley, Matthew; Taylor, Roy; Sniehotta, Falko F; Trenell, Michael I

    2016-07-19

    Despite substantial evidence for physical activity (PA) as a management option for type 2 diabetes, there remains a lack of PA behavioural interventions suitable for delivery in primary care. This paper describes the systematic development of an evidence-informed PA behavioural intervention for use during routine primary care consultations. In accordance with the Medical Research Council Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions, a four-stage systematic development process was undertaken: (1) exploratory work involving interviews and workshop discussions identified training needs of healthcare professionals and support needs of adults with type 2 diabetes; (2) a systematic review with meta- and moderator analyses identified behaviour change techniques and optimal intervention intensity and duration; (3) usability testing identified strategies to increase implementation of the intervention in primary care and (4) an open pilot study in two primary care practices facilitated intervention optimisation. Healthcare professional training needs included knowledge about type, intensity and duration of PA sufficient to improve glycaemic control and acquisition of skills to promote PA behaviour change. Patients lacked knowledge about type 2 diabetes and skills to enable them to make sustainable changes to their level of PA. An accredited online training programme for healthcare professionals and a professional-delivered behavioural intervention for adults with type 2 diabetes were subsequently developed. This multifaceted intervention was informed by the theory of planned behaviour and social cognitive theory and consisted of 15 behaviour change techniques. Intervention intensity and duration were informed by a systematic review. Usability testing resolved technical problems with the online training intervention that facilitated use on practice IT systems. An open pilot study of the intervention with fidelity of delivery assessment informed

  15. Routine High Dose Excretory Urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronner, Arthur T.; Arkoff, Robert S.; Burhenne, H. Joachim

    1967-01-01

    Radiologic evaluation of 316 excretory urograms utilizing a single 50 ml injection of a 50 to 60 per cent tri-iodinated contrast medium indicated that these studies are of better quality than those previously obtained with the injection of 30 ml. The low incidence of side effects coincides with recent reports in the literature that this dosage level is safe. High dose intravenous drip infusion pyelography was necessary only in selected cases. High dose excretory urography is recommended for routine use. ImagesFigure 1A, 1BFigure 2. PMID:6045483

  16. Reduction of diabetes risk in routine clinical practice: are physical activity and nutrition interventions feasible and are the outcomes from reference trials replicable? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cardona-Morrell, Magnolia; Rychetnik, Lucie; Morrell, Stephen L; Espinel, Paola T; Bauman, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    .... The objective of this review is to determine whether lifestyle interventions delivered to high-risk adult patients in routine clinical care settings are feasible and effective in achieving reductions...

  17. Rotavirus vaccines in routine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines are now available to combat rotavirus, the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children worldwide. We review clinical trial data for available rotavirus vaccines and summarize postlicensure data on effectiveness, impact, and safety from countries routinely using these vaccines in national programs. In these countries, rotavirus vaccines have reduced all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations by 17%-55% and 49%-92%, respectively, and all-cause diarrhea deaths by 22%-50% in some settings. Indirect protection of children who are age-ineligible for rotavirus vaccine has also been observed in some high and upper middle income countries. Experience with routine use of rotavirus vaccines in lower middle income countries has been limited to date, but vaccine introductions in such countries have been increasing in recent years. The risk-benefit analysis of rotavirus vaccines is extremely favorable but other strategies to improve the effectiveness of the vaccine, particularly in lower middle income settings, should be considered. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Programa de Actividad Física Extracurricular en Adolescentes con Sobrepeso u Obesidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Tortosa-Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro objetivo en este estudio es comprobar la eficacia de un programa de actividad físico-deportiva (PAF extracurricular, en un grupo de adolescentes con sobrepesoobesidad, durante un período de 6 meses, respecto al consumo máximo de oxígeno, frecuencia cardíaca de recuperación, presión arterial e índice de grasa cintura/cadera, y ver las diferencias en cuanto al género. El estudio lo realizamos con 38 estudiantes de primer ciclo de secundaria, con un IMC superior al percentil 85. Los resultados reflejan mejoras significativas en el grupo experimental (GE, tras la realización del PAF, comparado con el grupo control (GC. Los componentes del GE mejoran en las variables fisiológicas y antropométricas, y también en función del género. Por otro lado, los datos obtenidos por el GC, reflejan una leve mejora en cuanto al VO2max, pero no en el resto de variables. Estos resultados sugieren la importancia de un adecuado programa de actividad físico-deportiva como contribución a mejorar parámetros cardiovasculares en adolescentes.

  19. Programa de Actividad Física Extracurricular en Adolescentes con Sobrepeso u Obesidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Tortosa Martínez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro objetivo en este estudio es comprobar la eficacia de un programa de actividad físico-deportiva (PAF extracurricular, en un grupo de adolescentes con sobrepeso obesidad, durante un período de 6 meses, respecto al consumo máximo de oxígeno, frecuencia cardíaca de recuperación, presión arterial e índice de grasa cintura/cadera, y ver las diferencias en cuanto al género. El estudio lo realizamos con 38 estudiantes de primer ciclo de secundaria, con un IMC superior al percentil 85. Los resultados reflejan mejoras significativas en el grupo experimental (GE, tras la realización del PAF, comparado con el grupo control (GC. Los componentes del GE mejoran en las variables fisiológicas y antropométricas, y también en función del género. Por otro lado, los datos obtenidos por el GC, reflejan una leve mejora en cuanto al VO2max, pero no en el resto de variables. Estos resultados sugieren la importancia de un adecuado programa de actividad físico-deportiva como contribución a mejorar parámetros cardiovasculares en adolescentes.

  20. Extracurricular factors influence perceived stress in a large cohort of Colombian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Villa-Torres, Laura; Mafla, Ana Cristina; Moya, Gloria Aranzazu; González-Martínez, Farith; Vila-Sierra, Luis Armando; Fortich-Mesa, Natalia; Gómez-Scarpetta, Ruth Ángela; Duque-Restrepo, Liliana María

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of extracurricular factors including socioeconomic status and career choice with perceived stress in dental school in a large cohort of Colombian dental students. Participants in the study were 5,700 students enrolled in seventeen Colombian dental schools. The study employed a Spanish adaptation of the Dental Environment Stressors (DES30-Sp) questionnaire and recorded an array of demographic, socioeconomic, career choice, and dental studies-related information. Data analyses relied on descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate methods based on multi-level mixed-effects linear regression and post hoc estimation of predictive margins. "Fear of failing a course or year" emerged as the highest ranked item. Male students consistently reported less perceived stress than females, and stress scores were higher among seniors. Independent of gender, age, and study year, having dentistry as one's first career choice, relying on financial support, and belonging to higher socioeconomic strata were associated with lower stress levels. Academic environment interventions aimed to improve students' educational well-being will need to account for the individual heterogeneity among them. These data from a robust cohort of predoctoral dental students underscore the importance of considering students' educational experiences in a broader social and economic context.

  1. Extracurricular leadership development programme to prepare future Saudi physicians as leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuob, Nasra Naeim; Al Sayes, Faten Mohamed; El Deek, Basem Salama

    2016-06-01

    To describe and evaluate an innovative approach for developing leadership skills in a cohort of medical students through an extracurricular programme. The study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, from April to June of the academic year 2014-15, and comprised medical students from all batches. Mixed-method design was used to evaluate the leadership development programme. Pre- and post-tests were conducted to assess students' learning and their satisfaction was evaluated at the end of the programme. Focus groups were conducted to assess the programme's impact on participants' behaviour. Data analysis was done using SPSS 16. Of the 55 participants, 45(82%) responded to the evaluation survey. Of them, 29(65%) reported intended changes in their leadership practices immediately after the programme, with 8(28%) of them reporting more than one change. The mean students' satisfaction with the overall performance of the speakers and programme organisation was high at 4.12±0.91 and 4.54±0.89, respectively. Early experience of the leadership development programme produced positive results. An intense programme analysis is required to fully understand this significant organisational need.

  2. DRAWING MUSIC! ANAL Y Z ING AN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY OF VISUALI Z ING A CONCERT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Váradi, Judit

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature and recent studies, a high number of encounters with classical music during childhood and adolescence in the context of positive feelings closely correlates with the formation of classical music competencies. During the investigation of primary students’ attitudes towards classical music, it has been revealed that those who have more opportunities to enter music education will come closer to understanding classical music. At the University of Debrecen Faculty of Music, we have organised and staged various educational youth performances in the last decades. Our goal is to get elementary school children acquainted with live music, classical instruments. A key element of our mission is to form the preferences of children and young people who do not participate in art education, so that they may become interested and sophisticated adults. In our paper we analysis the creations of the drawing competition what connects in theme with the youth concert.

  3. Extracurricular Activities and the Development of Social Skills in Children with Intellectual and Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B. A.; Floyd, F.; Robins, D. L.; Chan, W. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disability and specific learning disabilities often lack age-appropriate social skills, which disrupts their social functioning. Because of the limited effectiveness of classroom mainstreaming and social skills training for these children, it is important to explore alternative opportunities for social skill…

  4. Are Students More Engaged When Schools Offer Extracurricular Activities? PISA in Focus. No. 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Are students more engaged and do they perform better in science if their school encourages them to work on science projects, participate in science fairs, belong to a science-related club or go on science-related field trips--in addition to teaching them the mandatory science curriculum? To find out, PISA (Programme for International Student…

  5. Birth Order and Participation in School Sports and Other Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Daniel I.; Lopez, Elizabeth; Averett, Susan L.; Argys, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    Argys, L.M., Rees, D.I., Averett S.L., & Witoonchart, B. (2006). Birth order and risky adolescent behavior. "Economic Inquiry", 44(2), 215-233 demonstrated that a strong link exists between birth order and adolescent risky behavior. Using data on 10th graders from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988, we extend the work of Argys et…

  6. Extracurricular activity participation moderates impact of family and school factors on adolescents' disruptive behavioural problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Driessens, Corine M E F

    2015-01-01

    .... Following Erikson's psychosocial developmental theory and Bronfenbrenner's developmental ecological model, it was hypothesized that youth problem behaviour is shaped in part by social environment...

  7. An Initial Investigation of Sexual Minority Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Russell B.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual minority youth are at risk for negative school-based experiences and poor academic outcomes. Yet, little is known about their experiences in positive school-based contexts. Using the "National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health" (1,214 sexual minority and 11,427 heterosexual participants), this study compared participation…

  8. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a program...

  9. Routines Are the Foundation of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Allanson, Patricia Bolton; Notar, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom management is the key to learning. Routines are the foundation of classroom management. Students require structure in their lives. Routines provide that in all of their life from the time they awake until the time they go to bed. Routines in a school and in the classroom provide the environment for learning to take place. The paper is…

  10. ROUTINE IMMUNIZATION IN INDIA: A PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Taneja

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Immunization Programme is possibly the longest and one of the biggest public health intervention measures undertaken in India. To improve immunization coverage in the country various initiatives have been undertaken since the inception of the programme in 1985; key inputs being strengthening and expanding the cold chain system, establishing a network of outreach immunization sites, alternate vaccine delivery model, capacity building of health functionaries and medical officers and intensified polio control measures. Introduction of new and underutilized vaccines, drafting of the national vaccine policy, tracking of beneficiaries through the Maternal and Child Tracking system are some of the recent developments. However in spite of more than 25 years since inception the programme is still adversely impacted by challenges across key thematic areas of programme management, cold chain and vaccine management, recording and reporting and injection safety. To further strengthen and improve service delivery 2012-13 has been declared as the “Year of Intensification of Routine Immunization” with the objective of improving immunization coverage rates across poor performing districts and states so as to attain Global Immunization Vision and Strategy goals of 90% coverage at national and more than 80% coverage at district level. Key activities planned during the year include sustained advocacy at all levels, improved communication and social mobilization, robust and regular program reviews, comprehensive microplanning, strengthening cold chain and vaccine logistics system, special catch up rounds through immunization weeks, piloting the teeka express, improved surveillance systems, strengthened partnerships and operational research activities. The current review pertains to the existing scenario of Universal Immunization Program in the country with impetus on the existing challenges, progress achieved till date as a result of various

  11. An open-source, self-explanatory touch screen in routine care. Validity of filling in the Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Function Index, the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales in comparison with paper versions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schefte, David B; Hetland, Merete L

    2010-01-01

    The Danish DANBIO registry has developed open-source software for touch screens in the waiting room. The objective was to assess the validity of outcomes from self-explanatory patient questionnaires on touch screen in comparison with the traditional paper form in routine clinical care.......The Danish DANBIO registry has developed open-source software for touch screens in the waiting room. The objective was to assess the validity of outcomes from self-explanatory patient questionnaires on touch screen in comparison with the traditional paper form in routine clinical care....

  12. Victimization, Urbanicity, and the Relevance of Context: School Routines, Race and Ethnicity, and Adolescent Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Peguero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The United States is undergoing a historical racial and ethnic demographic shift. There is limited criminological research exploring if and how these changes influence variation in the relationship between routine activity theory and adolescent violence. Although the link between routine activities and victimization has been tested and well established, criminologists have questioned if routine activities can explain adolescent violence across different social contexts. Prior research demonstrates that there are potential nuances in the theoretical connections between routine activities and victimization, particularly when considering race and ethnicity. This study builds on previous research by questioning if the elements of routine activities predict victimization across predominately urban, rural, and suburban schools. The implications of the relevance of school context in the relationships between routine activities and adolescent victimization will also be discussed more generally.

  13. Propuesta Educativa de Enriquecimiento Extracurricular y su Implementación: PEEEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissia Morales Chacón

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1984686X14322Este trabajo contiene un Plan de intervención psicoeducacional para niños superdotados con un abordaje multidimensional de acuerdo con el que la noción de inteligencia está integrada por múltiples componentes que son relativamente independientes pero que son esenciales para un desarrollo ideal de niños superdotados. Su objetivo general es implementar una propuesta educativa de enriquecimiento extracurricular – EPEEI dirigido al cuidado integral de niños superdotados en edades tempranas, a través de su aplicación en el campo. El método utilizado se desarrolló en dos etapas. La primera etapa estaba compuesta de tres campos de intervención: a Programas de psicología individual para incentivar a los niños de acuerdo a sus fortalezas; b Actividades de apoyo y capacitación para padres sobre el tema de niños superdotados; c Orientación y capacitación docente. La segunda etapa consistió en probar el plan durante un período de aproximadamente 6 meses. De acuerdo a los resultados, se comprobó que los niños superdotados en nuestro contexto, carecen de oportunidades psicopedagógicas que atiendan genuinamente a sus necesidades educacionales especiales. Tanto las escuelas como las familias carecen de la información y capacitación necesarias para los casos identificados. Ellos demuestran desorientación, frustración e ignorancia de los posibles servicios y recursos que podrían ofrecerles apoyo en esa tarea (Por ejemplo: Tecnologias de Información y comunicación.

  14. Experiencia de trabajo en una asociación de apoyo extracurricular a alumnos de altas capacidades

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás Tomás, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Treball final de Màster Universitari en Professor/a d'Educació Secundària Obligatòria i Batxillerat, Formació Professional i Ensenyaments d'Idiomes. Codi: SAP129. Curs acadèmic 2014-2015 Como paso final del Máster Universitario en Profesorado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y Bachiller, Formación Profesional y Enseñanza de Idiomas plasmamos en negro sobre blanco la esencia vivida en una Asociación de apoyo extracurricular para alumnos con Altas Capacidades con la reaIización del presen...

  15. An open-source, self-explanatory touch screen in routine care. Validity of filling in the Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Function Index, the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales in comparison with paper versions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schefte, David B; Hetland, Merete L

    2010-01-01

    The Danish DANBIO registry has developed open-source software for touch screens in the waiting room. The objective was to assess the validity of outcomes from self-explanatory patient questionnaires on touch screen in comparison with the traditional paper form in routine clinical care....

  16. Students' perceptions of peer-organized extra-curricular research course during medical school: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassel Nazha

    Full Text Available Early integration of research education into medical curricula is crucial for evidence-based practice. Yet, many medical students are graduating with no research experience due to the lack of such integration in their medical school programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a peer-organized, extra-curricular research methodology course on the attitudes of medical students towards research and future academic careers. Twenty one medical students who participated in a peer-organized research course were enrolled in three focus group discussions to explore their experiences, perceptions and attitudes towards research after the course. Discussions were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide, and were transcribed and thematically analyzed for major and minor themes identification. Our findings indicate that students' perceptions of research changed after the course from being difficult initially to becoming possible. Participants felt that their research skills and critical thinking were enhanced and that they would develop research proposals and abstracts successfully. Students praised the peer-assisted teaching approach as being successful in enhancing the learning environment and filling the curricular gap. In conclusion, peer-organized extra-curricular research courses may be a useful option to promote research interest and skills of medical students when gaps in research education in medical curricula exist.

  17. Parental employment, family routines and childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Patricia M

    2012-12-01

    Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) data from kindergarten through eighth grade, this paper investigate the relationships among maternal employment, family routines and obesity. More hours worked by the mother tend to be negatively related to positive routines like eating meals as a family or at regular times, or having family rules about hours of television watched. Many of these same routines are significantly related to the probability of being obese, implying that family routines may be a mechanism by which maternal employment intensity affects children's obesity. However, inclusion of family routines in the obesity regression does not appreciably change the estimated effect of maternal employment hours. Thus, the commonly estimated deleterious effect of maternal employment on children's obesity cannot be explained by family routines, leaving the exact mechanisms an open question for further exploration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Parental Influences on Adolescent Involvement in Community Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Anne C.; Elder, Glen H., Jr.; Mekos, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Used data from Iowa Youth and Families Project to examine parental influences on ninth and tenth graders' community activities. Found that although both parental modeling and parental reinforcement made significant differences in the extracurricular activity involvement of their children, parental reinforcement was most consequential when parents…

  19. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Sleep Duration between U.S. and Australian Adolescents: The Effect of School Start Time, Parent-Set Bedtimes, and Extracurricular Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michelle A.; Gradisar, Michael; Lack, Leon C.; Wright, Helen R.; Dewald, Julia F.; Wolfson, Amy R.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective. To test whether sleep duration on school nights differs between adolescents in Australia and the United States and, if so, whether this difference is explained by cultural differences in school start time, parental involvement in setting bedtimes, and extracurricular commitments. Participants. Three hundred eighty-five adolescents…

  20. A cross-cultural comparison of sleep duration between U.S. and Australian adolescents: the effect of school start time, parent-set bedtimes and extracurricular load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, M.A.; Gradisar, M.; Lack, L.C.; Wright, H.R.; Dewald, J.F.; Wolfson, A.R.; Carskadon, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective. To test whether sleep duration on school nights differs between adolescents in Australia and the United States and, if so, whether this difference is explained by cultural differences in school start time, parental involvement in setting bedtimes, and extracurricular commitments.

  1. Online Mentoring as an Extracurricular Measure to Encourage Talented Girls in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics): An Empirical Study of One-on-One versus Group Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Heidrun; Hopp, Manuel; Ziegler, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Online mentoring provides an effective means of extracurricular gifted education for talented girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Comparative studies on the effectiveness of one-on-one versus group mentoring are lacking, however. The authors investigated this question in the context of a Germany-wide online mentoring…

  2. The Effect of Corpus-Based Instruction on Pragmatic Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen; Mossman, Sabrina; Su, Yunwen

    2017-01-01

    This study compares the effect of using corpus-based materials and activities for the instruction of pragmatic routines under two conditions: implementing direct corpus searches by learners during classroom instruction and working with teacher-developed corpus-based materials. The outcome is compared to a repeated-test control group. Pragmatic…

  3. Routine versus selective postoperative nasogastric suction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasogastric suction is a common routine postoperative procedure in abdominal surgery. Yet there is little scientific justification for it. This paper reports a comparision of routine with selective postoperative nasogastric tube suction in evaluating patients undergoing laparotomy. Methods: This was a prospective ...

  4. External Agents' Effect on Routine Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse Hansen, Nicolai

    analyses of naturally occurring interactional routine data in the form of recordings of job interviews in an international oil contractor company. The term interactional routine is used to describe recurrent and recognizable patterns of interaction. The findings suggest that the aspects of alignment...

  5. Routinizing Lexical Phrases on Spoken Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Nazira Binti; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of routinizing lexical phrases to a group of second language learners. A group of proficiency class students were drilled or routinized with semi-fixed and fixed phrases which are commonly used in problem-solving group discussion. Basic frequency counts and interview were carried out to see improvement in…

  6. Routine versus Selective Postoperative Nasogastric Suction In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2005-12-02

    Dec 2, 2005 ... Background: Nasogastric suction is a common routine postoperative procedure in abdominal surgery. Yet there is little scientific justification for it. This paper reports a comparision of routine with selective postoperative nasogastric tube suction in evaluating patients undergoing laparotomy. Methods: This ...

  7. The embeddedness of selfish routines: How routines are replicated in business networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman

    2003-01-01

    Organisational routines may be viewed as replicators of business organisation and lead to the formation of new ventures. This paper discuss this idea, and ilustrates it using two case studies of routine replication in a Danish context......Organisational routines may be viewed as replicators of business organisation and lead to the formation of new ventures. This paper discuss this idea, and ilustrates it using two case studies of routine replication in a Danish context...

  8. Increased Exposure to Rigid Routines Can Lead to Increased Challenging Behavior Following Changes to Those Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Leah E.; Oliver, Chris; Callaghan, Eleanor; Woodcock, Kate A.

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with preference for routine and challenging behavior following changes to routines. We examine individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome, who show elevated levels of this behavior, to better understand how previous experience of a routine can affect challenging behavior elicited by disruption to…

  9. Development of girl-students’ physical qualities at extracurricular cheer-dance classes (cheer-dance show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyatnickaya D.V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out and substantiate methodic of cheer-dance means’ usage in extracurricular trainings of girl students. Material: in experiment 450 girl-students of 17-20 years’ age participated. Results: we generalized theoretical knowledge and practical experience in selection, content and organization of girl students’ physical education. We presented the data of comparative analysis of girl students’ physical condition and (sportswomen and not sportswomen. We noted significant interest to physical education, in which the offered methodic is used. It was found that demands in health strengthening can be formed by means of dance kinds of cheer-leading (cheer-dance and cheer-dance show. Conclusions: We have found prospects of girl students’ physical education perfection. It permits to work out different variants of realization of educational health related strategy.

  10. Extra-curricular methods for improving the quality of the staff training in the university of civil engineering (psychological content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magera Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High technologies in architecture and construction change the world around. Professional trainings for the creators of the artificial environment (engineers and architects have an effect on people’s life but practically they don’t take into account the human nature of the final user and his own psychological features. In this article there are presented the results of the psychological services in the University of civil engineering from 2006 to 2017 as extra-curricular methods for the general competences formation and development. There are also described the methods of works and their specifics, some difficulties and perspectives. There are explained the reasons for psychological service at the university of civil engineering. There are also taken into account the global risks and dangers affecting the study content of civil engineering.

  11. Enhancing the Clinical Reasoning Skills of Postgraduate Students in Internal Medicine Through Medical Nonfiction and Nonmedical Fiction Extracurricular Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, H S; Chacko, Thomas V; Murthy, K A Sudharshana; Gowdappa, H Basavana

    2016-12-01

    To improve the clinical reasoning skills of postgraduate students in internal medicine through 2 kinds of extracurricular books: medical nonfiction and nonmedical fiction. Clinical reasoning is difficult to define, understand, observe, teach, and measure. This is an educational innovation under an experimental framework based on a cognitive intervention grounded in constructivist and cognitivist theories. This study was conducted from June 1, 2014, through May 31, 2015. It was a pre-post, randomized, controlled, prospective, mixed-methods, small-group study. The intervention was through medical nonfiction and nonmedical fiction books. The process was structured to ensure that the students would read the material in phases and reflect on them. Clinical reasoning (pretests and posttests) was quantitatively assessed using the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) and clinical reasoning exercises (CREs) and their assessment using a rubric. A qualitative design was used, and face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted. Posttest total scores (DTI=188.92; CREs=53.92) were higher for the study group after the intervention compared with its own pretest scores (DTI=165.25; CREs=41.17) and with the pretest (DTI=159.27; CRE=40.73) and posttest (DTI=166.91; CREs=41.18) scores of the control group. Interviews with the study group confirmed that the intervention was acceptable and useful in daily practice. We introduced, evaluated, and proved an approach to teaching-learning clinical reasoning based on the assumption that the clinical reasoning skills of postgraduate students in internal medicine can be enhanced through 2 kinds of extracurricular books and that fun as well as interest will enhance learning. This study is not only about teaching-learning clinical reasoning but also about the humanities in medical education. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Total Laboratory Automation of Routine Hemostasis Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Da Rin, Giorgio; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether preanalytical management of coagulation samples through an open total laboratory automation system may impair the reliability of routine hemostasis tests...

  13. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  14. Continuous and routine eeg in intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Ney, JP; Van Der Goes, DN; Nuwer, MR; Nelson, L; Eccher, MA

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of intensive care unit continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring on inpatient mortality, hospital charges, and length of stay. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a dataset representing 20% of inpatient discharges in nonfederal US hospitals. Adult discharge records reporting mechanical ventilation and EEG (routine EEG or cEEG) were included. cEEG was compared with routine EEG alone in association with th...

  15. Effectiveness of routine psychotherapy: Method matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Andrew A; Youn, Soo Jeong; Xiao, Henry; Castonguay, Louis G; Hayes, Jeffrey A; Locke, Benjamin D

    2017-11-02

    Though many studies have shown that psychotherapy can be effective, psychotherapy available in routine practice may not be adequate. Several methods have been proposed to evaluate routine psychological treatments. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the combined utility of complementary methods, change-based benchmarking, and end-state normative comparisons, across a range of self-reported psychological symptoms. Benchmarks derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and normative comparisons were used to evaluate the effectiveness of psychotherapy in a large (N = 9895) sample of clients in university counseling centers (UCCs). Overall, routine psychotherapy was associated with significant improvement across all symptoms examined. For clients whose initial severity was similar to RCT participants, the observed pre-post effect sizes were equivalent to those in RCTs. However, treatment tended to lead to normative end-state functioning only for those clients who were moderately, but not severely, distressed at the start of psychotherapy. This suggests that although psychotherapy is associated with an effective magnitude of symptom improvement in routine practice, additional services for highly distressed individuals may be necessary. The methods described here comprise a comprehensive analysis of the quality of routine care, and we recommend using both methods in concert. Clinical or methodological significance of this article: This study examines the effectiveness of routine psychotherapy provided in a large network of counseling centers. By comparing multiple established methods to define outcomes in this sample we provide a detailed understanding of typical outcomes. The findings show that, across several different problem areas, routine psychotherapy provided substantial benefit, particularly to clients in the most distress. However, there is room to improve, especially by increasing the number of clients who return to normal functioning by the end of

  16. 2012 Military Family Life Project (MFLP): Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    274 b. Counseling through some other source .............................................. 276 c. Extracurricular activities (e.g...of the war ................................. 288 i. Stable household routine (e.g., regular family meals, continued participation in extracurricular ...coping, and adaptation – inventories for research and practice. (pp. 357-389). Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Publishers. Research Triangle

  17. Cultural Responsiveness and Routines: When Center and Home Don't Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses cultural responsiveness and routines of child care centers that do not match what families are accustomed to at home. It can be difficult to discuss cultural differences in some routine caregiving activities because of the standards, rules, regulations, best practices, and health concerns that those trained in early…

  18. Intervención psicoeducativa en alumnos de altas capacidades: Diseño de un programa de intervención extracurricular

    OpenAIRE

    García Hernando, Irene Patricia

    2012-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo es proponer un programa de enriquecimiento extracurricular a través del cual poder abordar las necesidades de los alumnos con altas capacidades, pero no sin antes ofrecer una fundamentación teórica de la superdotación que ponga las bases para llevar a cabo dicho programa. Grado en Educación Primaria

  19. A Correlational Study of Extracurricular Involvement and Homework Performance of Third Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel; Moulden, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    There are many opportunities for students to participate in nonacademic activities. These activities can include: sports, clubs, private lessons, and religious activities. Participation in these activities enriches students' lives by encouraging social skills. Yet, if students are involved in activities requiring many hours of participation, does…

  20. Are Routine Interventions Necessary in Normal Birth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yu Chen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Routine interventions during labor and birth, such as perineal shaving and enemas before vaginal delivery, continuous intrapartum electronic fetal monitoring (EFM, and episiotomy are prevalent in Taiwan, but they may not always be necessary. Numerous studies investigating these interventions have failed to find absolute benefits for women with uncomplicated and low-risk pregnancies. No evidence-based benefits support routine perineal shaving or enemas during labor for reducing the risk of perineal wound infection or neonatal infection. The use of EFM is associated with an increased rate of operative interventions (vacuum, forceps, cesarean delivery but does not result in a significant decrease in the incidence of perinatal death or cerebral palsy. Routine episiotomy does not have demonstrable advantages over restrictive episiotomy in the frequency or severity of perineal damage or pelvic relaxation.

  1. The (Proper) Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2012-01-01

    Sidney Winter (2011), Brian Pentland (2011), and Geoffrey Hodgson and Thorbjørn Knudsen (2011) take issue with the arguments in Teppo Felin and Nicolai J. Foss (2011), along with more generally critiquing the ‘microfoundations project’ related to routines and capabilities. In this rejoinder we...... argue that the responses of our critics reinforce a number of the points stated in our writings on the routines and capabilities literature. In response to their many points we address the following key issues in the debate: (1) lack of construct clarity; (2) universal mechanisms or comparative...

  2. Absorptive routines and international patent performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando E. García-Muiña

    2017-04-01

    We enrich the treatment of the absorptive capacity phases including the moderating effects between routines associated to the traditional potential-realized absorptive capacities. Taking into account external knowledge search strategies, the deeper external relationships, the better transference and appropriation of specific external knowledge. Nevertheless, when the moderating role of assimilation is included, cooperation agreements appear as the most efficient source of external knowledge. Finally, we show that technological tools let firms store and structure the information making easier its use for international patenting. This positive effect is reinforced in the presence of exploitation routines, since technological knowledge will better fit to the industry's key factors of success.

  3. Conversational routines in English convention and creativity

    CERN Document Server

    Aijmer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    It is surprising how much of everyday conversation consists of repetitive expressions such as 'thank you', 'sorry', would you mind?' and their many variants. However commonplace they may be, they do have important functions in communication.This thorough study draws upon original data from the London-Lund Corpus of Spoken English to provide a discoursal and pragmatic account of the more common expressions found in conversational routines, such as apologising, thanking, requesting and offering.The routines studied in this book range from conventionalized or idiomatized phrases t

  4. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  5. An Examination of Latino Students' Homework Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Homework appears to be positively associated with better student outcomes. Although some researchers have explored the connection between time spent on homework and minority student achievement, few have examined the homework routines of Latino youth. Interviews with Latino high school students show that they have some difficulty completing daily…

  6. Improving care coordination using organisational routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim

    2016-01-01

    be replicated, the way they are influenced by the organisation and the way they influence health care professionals. Design/methodology/approach: Theory of routines is systematically applied to the concept of care pathways in order to develop theoretically derived propositions. Findings: Care pathways mirror...

  7. libvaxdata: VAX data format conversion routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lawrence M.

    2005-01-01

    libvaxdata provides a collection of routines for converting numeric data-integer and floating-point-to and from the formats used on a Digital Equipment Corporation1 (DEC) VAX 32-bit minicomputer (Brunner, 1991). Since the VAX numeric data formats are inherited from those used on a DEC PDP-11 16-bit minicomputer, these routines can be used to convert PDP-11 data as well. VAX numeric data formats are also the default data formats used on DEC Alpha 64-bit minicomputers running OpenVMS The libvaxdata routines are callable from Fortran or C. They require that the caller use two's-complement format for integer data and IEEE 754 format (ANSI/IEEE, 1985) for floating-point data. They also require that the 'natural' size of a C int type (integer) is 32 bits. That is the case for most modern 32-bit and 64-bit computer systems. Nevertheless, you may wish to consult the Fortran or C compiler documentation on your system to be sure. Some Fortran compilers support conversion of VAX numeric data on-the-fly when reading or writing unformatted files, either as a compiler option or a run-time I/O option. This feature may be easier to use than the libvaxdata routines. Consult the Fortran compiler documentation on your system to determine if this alternative is available to you. 1Later Compaq Computer Corporation, now Hewlett-Packard Company

  8. Community Pharmacies As Possible Centres For Routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Pharmacies As Possible Centres For Routine Immunization. R I Aderemi-Williams, C I Igwilo. Abstract. Background: Nigeria has embraced the primary healthcare movement and has committed its resources to the provision of cost effective community based primary healthcare strategy which recognizes the need ...

  9. Value of routine polysomnography in bariatric surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raaff, C.A.L.; Pierik, A.S.; Coblijn, U.K.; de Vries, N.; Bonjer, H.J.; van Wagensveld, B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), present in 60–70 % of bariatric surgery patients, is a potentially life-threatening condition when not detected and managed appropriately. The best available method to identify the severity of OSA is polysomnography. However, routine polysomnography

  10. ROUTINE ANTENATAL SYPHILIS SCREENING IN SOUTH WEST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    years (± 5.34) and the mean gestational age 26.4 weeks. (±6.36). The modal parity was 0. Only three patients were found to be reactive for syphilis giving a prevalence of 0.13%. Conclusion: The sero- prevalence value in this study is quite low and may justify the call to discontinue routine antena- tal syphilis screening.

  11. Routinely available cotrimoxazole prophylaxis and occurrence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To examine the influence of cotrimoxazole (CTM) prophylaxis on incidence of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTis) and diarrhoea. Design. A prospective observational cohort study. Morbidity and feeding data on infants born to HN-infected mothers were collected routinely at. clink visits at 1 week, 6 weeks ...

  12. Daily medication routine of adolescents with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Cardoso de Paula

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of the daily medication routine of adolescents with HIV/AIDS of ages 13 to 19 years, followed at a reference service. This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed with 23 adolescents, using a quantitative approach. Data were collected using a form during appointments at the outpatient clinic. Univariate analysis revealed: females, in the initial phase of adolescence, and vertical transmission. The highlights were: lack of assiduity to appointments; unprotected sex; and consumption of alcohol. Regarding the daily medication routine, subjects depend on their parents or guardians, use strategies to remember to take the medications, and are unaware about the laboratory test for disease management and treatment. There is a need for educative intervention using information and communication technology, such as the Internet, to promote health and autonomy among adolescents. Descriptors: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Adolescent Health; Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active; Nursing.

  13. Favor Asking and ESL: Something to Break the Routine: A Collaborative Writing Activity; Using E-Mail Assignments and Online Correction in ESL Instruction; Tips for facilitating Full-Time Employment in TESOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tamara; Iannacone, Vince; Melby-Mauer, Jean; Tanner, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    The tips discussed here center around favor asking and English as a Second Language, a collaborative writing activity, e-mail assignments nd online correction, and facilitating full-time employment in TESOL (Author/VWL)

  14. Routine jejunostomy tube feeding following esophagectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eden, Hanneke W. J.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Luyer, Misha D. P.; Steenhagen, Elles; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A. P.; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is an important problem following esophagectomy. A surgically placed jejunostomy secures an enteral feeding route, facilitating discharge with home-tube feeding and long-term nutritional support. However, specific complications occur, and data are lacking that support its use over other enteral feeding routes. Therefore routine jejunostomy tube feeding and discharge with home-tube feeding was evaluated, with emphasis on weight loss, length of stay and re-admissions. Methods Consecutive patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer, with gastric tube reconstruction and jejunostomy creation, were analyzed. Two different regimens were compared. Before January 07, 2011 patients were discharged when oral intake was sufficient, without tube feeding. After that discharge with home-tube feeding was routinely performed. Logistic regression analysis corrected for confounders. Results Some 236 patients were included. The median duration of tube feeding was 35 days. Reoperation for a jejunostomy-related complication was needed in 2%. The median body mass index (BMI) remained stable during tube feeding. The BMI decreased significantly after stopping tube feeding: from 25.6 (1st–3rd quartile 23.0–28.6) kg/m2 to 24.4 (22.0–27.1) kg/m2 at 30 days later [median weight loss: 3.0 (1.0–5.3) kg; 3.9% (1.5–6.3%)]. Weight loss was not affected by the duration of tube feeding duration. Routine home-tube feeding did not affect weight loss, admission time or the readmission rate. Conclusions Weight loss following esophagectomy occurs once that tube feeding is stopped, independently from the time interval after esophagectomy. Moreover routine discharge with home-tube feeding does not reduce length of stay or readmissions. These findings question the value of routine jejunostomy placement and emphasize the need for further research. PMID:28815083

  15. ASSESMENT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Tripathi

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to find out the association between school-based physical activity, including physical education and academic performance among school-aged youth. To better understand these connections, this research paper first finds out the independent variables upon which academic performance depends. Study is from a range of physical activity contexts, including school-based physical education, recess, classroom-based physical activity and extracurricular physical activity. In his attempt...

  16. Motivos de abandono na prática de ginástica artística no contexto extracurricular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila LOPES

    Full Text Available Resumo O Esporte consiste na principal opção para a prática de atividades físicas entre as crianças e os jovens. Apesar do grande interesse desse público às práticas esportivas, a literatura aponta alto índice de abandono. Motivados por essa conjuntura, o objetivo desse estudo foi verificar o motivo de abandono, mais especificamente, na prática de Ginástica Artística (GA no contexto das atividades extracurriculares. Entrevistamos praticantes meninas de GA que apresentavam histórico de abandono dessa prática esportiva por determinado período de tempo. Para o tratamento dos dados, optamos pela Análise de Conteúdo proposta por BARDIN. Constatamos que fatores intrínsecos e extrínsecos estão vinculados ao processo de abandono da prática desse esporte. Entretanto, os fatores extrínsecos sobrepuseram àqueles intrínsecos, o que evidencia que o ambiente e as condições situacionais e interpessoais exercem maior influência sobre o afastamento das ginastas. Assim, ressaltamos a importância da atenção dos profissionais a esses aspectos para garantir que as atividades atendam às necessidades e aos anseios das ginastas.

  17. Students Who Demonstrate Strong Talent and Interest in STEM Are Initially Attracted to STEM through Extracurricular Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenfeld, Cara L.; Bases, Jessica; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    What early experiences attract students to pursue an education and career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)? Does hands-on research influence them to persevere and complete a major course of academic study in STEM? We evaluated survey responses from 149 high school and undergraduate students who gained hands-on research experience in the 2007–2013 Aspiring Scientists Summer Internship Programs (ASSIP) at George Mason University. Participants demonstrated their strong interest in STEM by volunteering to participate in ASSIP and completing 300 h of summer research. The survey queried extracurricular experiences, classroom factors, and hands-on projects that first cultivated students’ interest in the STEM fields, and separately evaluated experiences that sustained their interest in pursuing a STEM degree. The majority of students (65.5%, p talent and interest in STEM, community-based programs that create awareness about STEM for both children and their family members may be key components for igniting long-term academic interest in STEM. PMID:25452491

  18. Youth Activity Involvement, Neighborhood Adult Support, Individual Decision Making Skills, and Early Adolescent Delinquent Behaviors: Testing a Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Hugh F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines a cross-sectional structural equation model of participation in youth activities, neighborhood adult support, individual decision making skills, and delinquent behavior in urban middle school youths (n = 2611). Results indicate extracurricular activity participation had both direct and indirect associations with delinquent…

  19. Update: routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2008-June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report contains an update through June 2013 on the results of screening for HIV infection among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the Armed Forces. Among civilian applicants, annual rates of prevalence of HIV infection showed a continuing downward trend. Rates among black, non-Hispanic applicants were higher than other racial/ethnic groups but have declined sharply since 2008. Among service members, annual rates have varied by service and component, with higher rates in the Army and Navy and lower rates in the Marine Corps and Air Force. Members of the Army and Air Force Reserves have had consistently higher rates than members of their respective active components. For both civilian applicants and service members, rates among men are notably higher than among women. The possible roles of unprotected sex and pre-deployment behaviors and the associated challenges to prevention of HIV infection are discussed.

  20. Probability and statistics with integrated software routines

    CERN Document Server

    Deep, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Probability & Statistics with Integrated Software Routines is a calculus-based treatment of probability concurrent with and integrated with statistics through interactive, tailored software applications designed to enhance the phenomena of probability and statistics. The software programs make the book unique.The book comes with a CD containing the interactive software leading to the Statistical Genie. The student can issue commands repeatedly while making parameter changes to observe the effects. Computer programming is an excellent skill for problem solvers, involving design, prototyping, data gathering, testing, redesign, validating, etc, all wrapped up in the scientific method.See also: CD to accompany Probability and Stats with Integrated Software Routines (0123694698)* Incorporates more than 1,000 engaging problems with answers* Includes more than 300 solved examples* Uses varied problem solving methods

  1. Routine Support to Parents and Stressors in Everyday Domains: Associations With Negative Affect and Cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Jyoti; Zarit, Steven H; Almeida, David M

    2017-03-30

    Adult children are involved a myriad of roles including providing routine (non-caregiving) support to a parent. Yet we know little about whether providing routine support to a parent is stressful and whether it has any associations with stressors in other life domains. We use daily diary data (N = 127; Study Days = 424) from the National Study of Daily Experiences to determine whether providing routine support to an older parent is associated with higher negative affect and salivary cortisol. Results confirm that providing routine support and experiencing stressors at work were independently associated with negative affect and greater cortisol output. Stress reactions were not amplified, however, on days when adult children concurrently provided support to a parent and reported work stressors. Cutting back usual activities at work or home elevated negative affect but were not associated with an upsurge of cortisol production. Findings lend support to the caregiving career framework for understanding even casual routine assistance provided to a parent.

  2. Primary culture media for routine urine processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, J C; Lucia, B; Clark, E.; Berman, M.; Goldstein, J.; D'Amato, R F

    1982-01-01

    It has been recommended that routine microbiological processing of urine specimens include quantitative plating onto blood agar medium along with a selective and differential agar such as MacConkey agar for gram-negative organisms. Few data have been published to justify this combination. To evaluate the validity of this recommendation 2,553 midstream, clean-voided urine samples were quantitatively plated onto blood agar, MacConkey agar, and colistin-nalidixic acid agar, which is a selective ...

  3. Exploring the Relationship between Adolescent Activities and Choice of Graduate School Discipline: Implications for Creativity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephanie A.; Hong, Eunsook

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between adolescent extra-curricular activities and choice of graduate-education field was examined among students from three fields of study, science (n = 12), art (n = 12), and education (n = 14), using qualitative and quantitative methods. Results of profile analysis indicated that the different majors participated in…

  4. Self-management support in routine primary care by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westland, Heleen; Schröder, Carin D; de Wit, Jessica; Frings, Judith; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-09-27

    To examine how and to what extent self-management support, including behaviour change support, is provided by primary care nurses in routine consultations with chronically ill patients. Observational study design. Routine consultations of primary care nurses in the Netherlands with chronically ill patients were audio-taped and analysed. The analysis identified health topics addressed according to health care standards, self-management topics addressed using a validated set of topics, and behaviour change techniques (BCTs) using the Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy v1. Seventy-eight routine consultations of 17 primary care nurses with chronically ill patients were included in the analysis. Nurses addressed both health topics and self-management topics in brief, fragmented, and often inconsistent manners. Dietary intake and physical activity were the most frequently addressed topics. Nurses applied 21 BCTs to target behaviour change, but the use of these techniques was mainly inconsistent and implicit. The most consistently used BCTs were review behaviour goal(s) (56.4%) and feedback on behaviour (51.3%). Nurses addressed both health topics and self-management topics in their routine consultations. The duration, frequency, and number of addressed topics differed throughout the consultations. Nurses tended to prioritize the monitoring and optimization of patients' medical treatment and provided limited self-management support. Nurses seldom deepened their focus on behaviour change and infrequently used effective techniques to support this change. Adoption of self-management in primary care, including behaviour change, might be enhanced if nurses consistently and explicitly use effective BCTs in their consultations. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Primary care nurses play a pivotal role in self-management support for patients with a chronic condition. Adequate self-management support requires nurses to activate patients and enhance

  5. Parent routines for managing cystic fibrosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bishop, Meredith

    2014-06-01

    Management of cystic fibrosis (CF) is burdensome and adherence is often suboptimal. Family routines are associated with adherence and health outcomes in other disease populations. Few studies have examined routines in CF. The study's aim was to describe parent experiences developing and utilizing CF care routines. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 25 parents of children under 13 years of age with CF were analyzed using phenomenological analysis. Three domains emerged: parent experiences developing a routine, support systems facilitating maintenance of routines, and challenges with maintaining care routines. Parents found routines difficult to establish, used trial and error, encountered barriers, and found support helpful to manage care demands. Some parents chose to deviate from their routine. Providing anticipatory guidance to promote the use of care routines and strategies to manage potential challenges may facilitate use of routines and improve CF management.

  6. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  7. Students who demonstrate strong talent and interest in STEM are initially attracted to STEM through extracurricular experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeter-Adams, Amy; Frankenfeld, Cara L; Bases, Jessica; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A

    2014-01-01

    What early experiences attract students to pursue an education and career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)? Does hands-on research influence them to persevere and complete a major course of academic study in STEM? We evaluated survey responses from 149 high school and undergraduate students who gained hands-on research experience in the 2007-2013 Aspiring Scientists Summer Internship Programs (ASSIP) at George Mason University. Participants demonstrated their strong interest in STEM by volunteering to participate in ASSIP and completing 300 h of summer research. The survey queried extracurricular experiences, classroom factors, and hands-on projects that first cultivated students' interest in the STEM fields, and separately evaluated experiences that sustained their interest in pursuing a STEM degree. The majority of students (65.5%, p STEM, while hands-on lab work was stated as sustaining their interest in STEM (92.6%). Based on these findings collected from a cohort of students who demonstrated a strong talent and interest in STEM, community-based programs that create awareness about STEM for both children and their family members may be key components for igniting long-term academic interest in STEM. © 2014 A. VanMeter-Adams et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Cost-utility of routine cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryynänen Olli-Pekka

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If decisions on health care spending are to be as rational and objective as possible, knowledge on cost-effectiveness of routine care is essential. Our aim, therefore, was to evaluate the cost-utility of routine cataract surgery in a real-world setting. Methods Prospective assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL of patients undergoing cataract surgery. 219 patients (mean (SD age 71 (11 years entering cataract surgery (in 87 only first eye operated, in 73 both eyes operated, in 59 first eye had been operated earlier filled in the 15D HRQoL questionnaire before and six months after operation. Direct hospital costs were obtained from a clinical patient administration database and cost-utility analysis performed from the perspective of the secondary care provider extrapolating benefits of surgery to the remaining statistical life-expectancy of the patients. Results Mean (SD utility score (on a 0–1 scale increased statistically insignificantly from 0.82 (0.13 to 0.83 (0.14. Of the 15 dimensions of the HRQoL instrument, only seeing improved significantly after operation. Mean utility score improved statistically significantly only in patients reporting significant or major preoperative seeing problems. Of the subgroups, only those whose both eyes were operated during follow-up showed a statistically significant (p Conclusion Mean utility gain after routine cataract surgery in a real-world setting was relatively small and confined mostly to patients whose both eyes were operated. The cost of cataract surgery per quality-adjusted life year gained was much higher than previously reported and associated with considerable uncertainty.

  9. Relations of participation in organized activities to smoking and drinking among Japanese youth: contextual effects of structural social capital in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the effect of school-level structural social capital on smoking and drinking among Japanese youth. Self-administered anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 3248 students at 29 high schools across Okinawa, Japan in 2008. Structural social capital was measured by students' participation in organized activities: student council, extracurricular activities, volunteer activities, community sports clubs, and youth associations. Contextual-level social capital was measured by aggregated school-level individual responses. At the individual level, extracurricular activity participation was negatively associated with smoking and drinking, whereas participation in youth associations was positively associated with smoking and drinking. School-level extracurricular activity participation was negatively associated with smoking among boys, whereas school-level participation in youth associations was positively associated with smoking among boys and girls and drinking among boys. This study suggests that structural social capital measured by participation in organized activities, especially extracurricular activities, might be an important way for youths to attain good health. This study also supports the idea that particular type of activities, such as youth associations, can lead to the so-called "dark side of social capital".

  10. Should nylon corneal sutures be routinely removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H.; Bosanquet, R.

    1991-01-01

    Three groups of patients who had undergone cataract extraction through a corneal incision closed with 10/0 nylon sutures one, two, and three years previously were recalled to determine the incidence of suture related complications. Broken corneal sutures were found in 87.5% of patients after two years and 90% after three years and were causing symptoms in over half the patients. It is recommended that 10/0 nylon corneal sutures be routinely removed no later than one year after surgery. Images PMID:1751460

  11. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Al-Ansari

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students’ preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics.

  12. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M; ElRefae, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    ...) and the factors affecting this participation. The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia...

  13. Vitalizing Creative Learning in Science and Technology through an Extracurricular Club: A Perspective Based on Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Hwang, Ming-Yueh

    2013-01-01

    A case study was undertaken in a junior high school that had won the highest award of the National PowerTech Contest in Taiwan. In the contest, students were required to create their own wooden robot (mechatronics project) in the morning and compete in the afternoon, in order to better avoid the intervention of parents and teachers in the process.…

  14. The Educational Expansion and Persistent Inequality: The Effects of Extra-curricular Activities on Educational and Labor Market Outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yool

    2015-01-01

    Sociology and social stratification researchers have long been concerned with the issue of educational inequality, as education is considered a key tool for achieving social mobility and has been shown to be a powerful determinant of an individual's opportunities and quality of life in modern society (Blau and Duncan 1967; Hout 1988; Fischer and Hout 2006). Given the significant role that education plays in determining social mobility, there has emerged a dynamic of competition between social...

  15. Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Literacy: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to live up to Elaine Richardson's dictum that educators and researchers must address "the total linguistic, cultural, and historical background of the learner" (19), basic writing scholarship has addressed a wealth of competencies that basic writers bring with them to the university. The literate lives they lead beyond the…

  16. Practical recommendations for the implementation of health technologies to enhance physical fitness of students in extracurricular classes during non-traditional gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomenko E.V.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop practical recommendations for extracurricular classes nontraditional kinds of gymnastics to improve the organization of physical education teachers in schools. Material : in the experiment involved 358 students. Analyzed the available literature data. Results : a comparative analysis of physical fitness of students and practical recommendations for the non-traditional occupations gymnastics. Been a significant interest in physical education classes. Found that the main ways of improving physical education students may be the formation of the need for strengthening health facilities fitness aerobics, shaping, pilates. Conclusions : highlights the need to structure the problems they need and develop appropriate solutions.

  17. Estrategias extracurriculares para el fortalecimiento de la creatividad en los estudiantes de la carrera de Psicología Clínica UTA

    OpenAIRE

    López Castro, Walter Javier

    2016-01-01

    1. Introducción.-- 2. Planteamiento de la Propuesta de Trabajo.-- 3. Marco Teórico.-- 4.Metodología.-- 5. Resultados.-- 6. El presente trabajo tiene por objetivo principal investigar la implementación de estrategias extracurriculares que ejercen influencia en el desarrollo de la creatividad en los estudiantes universitarios de la carrera de Psicología Clínica de la UTA. El número de participantes para el desarrollo de la presente tesis comprende a 45 estudiantes, los cuales serán seleccion...

  18. Percepções de Estudantes Universitários sobre a Realização de Atividades Extracurriculares na Graduação

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Clarissa Tochetto de; Santos, Anelise Schaurich dos; Dias, Ana Cristina Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Resumo O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar o que induz os estudantes universitários a buscarem a realização de atividades extracurriculares, em que tipo de atividades se envolvem e como avaliam esse envolvimento. Participaram desta pesquisa 24 estudantes de dois cursos de graduação (Psicologia e Economia) de uma universidade pública do sul do Brasil. As informações foram coletadas por meio de uma entrevista semiestruturada individual e foram submetidas à análise de conteúdo temática. As i...

  19. Gestión del proyecto extracurricular del área musical en centros educativos de educación primaria y su incidencia en la comunidad educativa

    OpenAIRE

    Chacón Astúa, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    El presente artículo realiza un análisis sobre los factores de gestión de los proyectos extracurriculares del área musical que inciden en las organizaciones educativas y la manera en que los gestores emplean estos recursos para elevar la calidad de vida y la calidad educativa de los estudiantes de cada centro educativo, orientando los retos pedagógicos hacia un proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje contextualizado a los cambios y necesidades de la población estudiantil, con el fin de mejorar la pr...

  20. Barriers to and enablers of physical activity in patients with COPD following a hospital admission: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Olivia; Kumar, Saravana; Johnston, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a persistent blockage of airflow, prompting episodes of shortness of breath, commonly leading to hospitalization. Hospitalization may lead to a decline in physical activity following discharge. Physical activity has been shown to improve symptoms of COPD and reduce readmissions, and to decrease morbidity and mortality. This study aims to explore, from the perspectives of people with COPD, the barriers to and enablers of participation in physical activity following hospitalization for COPD. Methods This study had a qualitative descriptive design and included semistructured interviews with 28 adult COPD patients who had been admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of exacerbation of COPD. Results A plethora of barriers to but fewer enablers of participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation were identified for this cohort of people. The main barriers identified were health-related (comorbidities, COPD symptoms, and physical injury or illness) environment-related (weather, transport, and finance), and self-related. The main enabling factors reported were access to health professionals and equipment, social support, routine and extracurricular activities, personal goals and motivation, and the effect of physical activity and “feeling better”. Conclusion This research provides a snapshot of the barriers to and enablers of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation in people with COPD. It is evident that there are significant barriers which hinder the ability of people with COPD to undertake and continue participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. While there are some enablers that may counter these barriers, it is clear that health professionals dealing with people suffering from COPD need to actively recognize and address barriers to physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. Hospital admission may create an opportunity for implementation