WorldWideScience

Sample records for extracting thermal energy

  1. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascari, Matthew [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  2. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  3. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yixuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a. In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics.

  4. Essential oil extraction with concentrating solar thermal energy

    OpenAIRE

    Veynandt, François

    2015-01-01

    Material complementari del cas estudi "Essential oil extraction with concentrating solar thermal energy”, part component del llibre "Case studies for developing globally responsible engineers" Peer Reviewed

  5. Waveguide-based extraction of near-field electromagnetic radiation: a new method for thermal energy conversion?

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Zsolt L

    2016-01-01

    Energy in a useful form is a vital resource and hence there is a continuous strive to improve existing technologies and to find new ones that address that basic need. The conversion of thermal energy is the primary source of generating electrical energy from a broad range of sources such as, for example coal, oil, natural gas, solar, geothermal, and nuclear energy. A common need in all cases is the ability to efficiently extract the generated electromagnetic and thermal energy and to convert it to electricity. The current methods of thermal energy extraction are based on heat engines, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic conversion. In this report a method based on the direct extraction of Electromagnetic energy from the thermal near-field through the use of optical waveguides, is presented.

  6. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  7. Analysis of the thermal energy requirements for the extraction of leaf protein concentrate from some green plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangka, Julius K. [Dschang Univ., Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, Dschang (Cameroon)

    2003-12-01

    Extraction of protein from the leaves of green plants is very important because of the high cost of conventional forms of protein such as meat, milk and fish. In order to design machinery for this extraction, and also to embark on leaf protein concentrate extraction, it is necessary to measure and analyse the energy requirements to carry out each process involved in the extraction, using different plant species. Experiments were carried out to determine the amount of crude protein, and the thermal energy required to extract leaf protein concentrate, from juices obtained from the leaves of some plant species. Leaves from the following plants were selected: cassava (Manihot esculanta), Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), gliricidia (Gliricidia maculata) and thorny tree (Hura crepetans). The leaves from the plant species were macerated in a laboratory pulper. Juice was obtained from the samples using perforated cylinders and a hydraulic press. The specific heat capacity of the juices was determined using the cooling curve method. The values of the heat capacities were used to calculate the amount of thermal energy required to raise the temperature of each juice from its normal temperature of about 25 deg C to a total protein coagulation temperature of about 80 deg C. The crude protein content of the extract was determined using the Kjeldal method. Results indicate that the green coagulum extracted from all the juices all have a protein content of at least 37%. The thermal energy required to coagulate protein from the juices ranges from 1.59 kJ kg{sup -1} for Hura crepetans to 2.7 kJ kg{sup -1} for Vernonia amygdalina. The energy requirement to obtain crude protein (CP) ranges from 8 kJ kg{sup -1} [CP] with Bura crepetans to 182 kJ kg{sup -1} [CP] with Vernonia amygdalina. Both results are statistically significant at the 0.01 confidence interval. It is concluded that the choice of plant species can significantly lower the thermal energy

  8. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  9. Thermal energy storage test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behavior of prototype thermal energy storage units (TES) in both heating and cooling modes is determined. Improved and advanced storage systems are developed and performance standards are proposed. The design and construction of a thermal cycling facility for determining the thermal behavior of full scale TES units is described. The facility has the capability for testing with both liquid and air heat transport, at variable heat input/extraction rates, over a temperature range of 0 to 280 F.

  10. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability

  11. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. D.; Kannberg, L. D.; Raymond, J. R.

    1984-05-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) using heat or cold available from surplus, waste, climatic, or cogeneration sources show great promise to reduce peak demand, reduce electric utility load problems, and contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems. Heated and chilled water can be injected, stored, and recovered from aquifers. Geologic materials are good thermal insulators, and potentially suitable aquifers are distributed throughout the United States. Potential energy sources for use in an aquifer thermal energy storage system include solar heat, power plant cogeneration, winter chill, and industrial waste heat source. Topics covered include: (1) the U.S. Department of Energy seasonal thermal energy storage program; (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology; (3) alternative STES technology; (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage; and (5) economic assessment.

  12. Thermal energy transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, C. M.; Thiele, C. L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    For use in combination with a heat engine, a thermal energy transformer is presented. It is comprised of a flux receiver having a first wall defining therein a radiation absorption cavity for converting solar flux to thermal energy, and a second wall defining an energy transfer wall for the heat engine. There is a heat pipe chamber interposed between the first and second walls having a working fluid disposed within the chamber and a wick lining the chamber for conducting the working fluid from the second wall to the first wall. Thermal energy is transferred from the radiation absorption cavity to the heat engine.

  13. Thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The planning and implementation of activities associated with lead center management role and the technical accomplishments pertaining to high temperature thermal energy storage subsystems are described. Major elements reported are: (1) program definition and assessment; (2) research and technology development; (3) industrial storage applications; (4) solar thermal power storage applications; and (5) building heating and cooling applications.

  14. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage for Seasonal Thermal Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostampour, Vahab; Bloemendal, Martin; Keviczky, Tamas

    2017-04-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems allow storing large quantities of thermal energy in subsurface aquifers enabling significant energy savings and greenhouse gas reductions. This is achieved by injection and extraction of water into and from saturated underground aquifers, simultaneously. An ATES system consists of two wells and operates in a seasonal mode. One well is used for the storage of cold water, the other one for the storage of heat. In warm seasons, cold water is extracted from the cold well to provide cooling to a building. The temperature of the extracted cold water increases as it passes through the building climate control systems and then gets simultaneously, injected back into the warm well. This procedure is reversed during cold seasons where the flow direction is reversed such that the warmer water is extracted from the warm well to provide heating to a building. From the perspective of building climate comfort systems, an ATES system is considered as a seasonal storage system that can be a heat source or sink, or as a storage for thermal energy. This leads to an interesting and challenging optimal control problem of the building climate comfort system that can be used to develop a seasonal-based energy management strategy. In [1] we develop a control-oriented model to predict thermal energy balance in a building climate control system integrated with ATES. Such a model however cannot cope with off-nominal but realistic situations such as when the wells are completely depleted, or the start-up phase of newly installed wells, etc., leading to direct usage of aquifer ambient temperature. Building upon our previous work in [1], we here extend the mathematical model for ATES system to handle the above mentioned more realistic situations. Using our improved models, one can more precisely predict system behavior and apply optimal control strategies to manage the building climate comfort along with energy savings and greenhouse gas reductions

  15. Near-field energy extraction with hyperbolic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiawei; Liu, Baoan; Li, Pengfei; Ng, Li Yen; Shen, Sheng

    2015-02-11

    Although blackbody radiation described by Planck's law is commonly regarded as the maximum of thermal radiation, thermal energy transfer in the near-field can exceed the blackbody limit due to the contribution from evanescent waves. Here, we demonstrate experimentally a broadband thermal energy extraction device based on hyperbolic metamaterials that can significantly enhance near-field thermal energy transfer. The thermal extractor made from hyperbolic metamaterials does not absorb or emit any radiation but serves as a transparent pipe guiding the radiative energy from the emitter. At the same gap between an emitter and an absorber, we observe that near-field thermal energy transfer with thermal extraction can be enhanced by around 1 order of magnitude, compared to the case without thermal extraction. The novel thermal extraction scheme has important practical implications in a variety of technologies, e.g., thermophotovoltaic energy conversion, radiative cooling, thermal infrared imaging, and heat assisted magnetic recording.

  16. Waste energy harvesting mechanical and thermal energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ling Bing, Kong; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    Waste Energy Harvesting overviews the latest progress in waste energy harvesting technologies, with specific focusing on waste thermal mechanical energies. Thermal energy harvesting technologies include thermoelectric effect, storage through phase change materials and pyroelectric effect. Waste mechanical energy harvesting technologies include piezoelectric (ferroelectric) effect with ferroelectric materials and nanogenerators. The book aims to strengthen the syllabus in energy, materials and physics and is well suitable for students and professionals in the fields.

  17. Thermal energy storage test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1981-03-01

    Two loops making up the facility, using either air or liquid as the thermal transport fluid, are described. These loops will be capable of cycling residential-size thermal energy storage units through conditions simulating solar or off-peak electricity applications to evaluate the unit's performance. Construction of the liquid cycling loop was completed, and testing of thermal stratification techniques for hot and cold water is reported.

  18. Optimal Extraction of Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabi, Kamal; Scherer, Charles, R.

    1977-06-01

    This study is concerned with the optimal extraction of energy from a hot water geothermal field. In view of the relative "commercial" availability of the many energy sources alternative to geothermal, it is possible that a socially "best" extraction policy may not include producing geothermal energy as fast as the current technology will permit. Rather, a truly "optimal" policy will depend on, among other things, the costs and value of geothermal energy in the future and the analogous values of other energy sources. Hence, a general approach to this problem would make the policy contingent on pertinent information on alternative sources. A good example of this approach is given in Manne's (1976) Energy Technology Assessment Model, where he points out that "Each energy source has its own cost parameters and introduction date, but is interdependent with other components of the energy sector." (Manne (1976), p. 379). But by their large dimensions, such relativity macro-analyses tend to preclude a close look at the specific technology of a process is important in developing meaningful resource management models, we substitute for a macro model the increasing value over time of the energy extracted. In this contact we seek an extraction rate (and an economic life) that maximizes the net discounted value of the energy extracted. [DJE-2005

  19. Underground thermal energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kun Sang

    2014-01-01

    Summarizing several decades of development in UTES-strategically vital in combating global warming-this book, which includes current statistics and real-world applications, forms an excellent introduction to this widely used method of energy conservation.

  20. Local Thermal Insulating Materials For Thermal Energy Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local Thermal Insulating Materials For Thermal Energy Storage. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... In this paper the thermal properties of selected potential local materials ...

  1. Thermal energy storage testing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhals, R. J.; Lin, C. P.; Kuehlert, H. F.; Anderson, S. H.

    1981-03-01

    Development of a prototype testing facility for performance evaluation of electrically heated thermal energy storage units is described. Laboratory apparatus and test procedures were evaluated by means of measurements and analysis. A 30kW central unit and several smaller individual room-size units were tested.

  2. Thermal energy storage testing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhals, R. J.; Anderson, S. H.; Stevens, L. W.; Laster, W. R.; Elter, M. R.

    Development of a prototype testing facility for performance evaluation of electrically heated thermal energy storage units is discussed. Laboratory apparatus and test procedures are being evaluated by means of measurements and analysis. Testing procedures were improved, and test results were acquired for commercially available units. A 30 kW central unit and several smaller individual room-size units were tested.

  3. Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

    1995-01-26

    Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

  4. Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugurlan, Maria; Tuffner, Francis K; Chassin, David P.

    2016-09-13

    Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage device includes a reservoir configured to hold a thermal energy storage medium, a temperature control system configured to adjust a temperature of the thermal energy storage medium, and a state observation system configured to provide information regarding an energy state of the thermal energy storage device at a plurality of different moments in time.

  5. Thermal energy storage program description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimers, E. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1989-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored applied research, development, and demonstration of technologies aimed at reducing energy consumption and encouraging replacement of premium fuels (notably oil) with renewable or abundant indigenous fuels. One of the technologies identified as being able to contribute to these goals is thermal energy storage (TES). Based on the potential for TES to contribute to the historic mission of the DOE and to address emerging energy issues related to the environment, a program to develop specific TES technologies for diurnal, industrial, and seasonal applications is underway. Currently, the program is directed toward three major application targets: (1) TES development for efficient off-peak building heating and cooling, (2) development of advanced TES building materials, and (3) TES development to reduce industrial energy consumption.

  6. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  7. Thermal Profiling of Residential Energy Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, A; Rajagopal, R

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology for informing targeted demand-response (DR) and marketing programs that focus on the temperature-sensitive part of residential electricity demand. Our methodology uses data that is becoming readily available at utility companies-hourly energy consumption readings collected from "smart" electricity meters, as well as hourly temperature readings. To decompose individual consumption into a thermal-sensitive part and a base load (non-thermally-sensitive), we propose a model of temperature response that is based on thermal regimes, i.e., unobserved decisions of consumers to use their heating or cooling appliances. We use this model to extract useful benchmarks that compose thermal profiles of individual users, i.e., terse characterizations of the statistics of these users' temperature-sensitive consumption. We present example profiles generated using our model on real consumers, and show its performance on a large sample of residential users. This knowledge may, in turn, inform the DR program by allowing scarce operational and marketing budgets to be spent on the right users-those whose influencing will yield highest energy reductions-at the right time. We show that such segmentation and targeting of users may offer savings exceeding 100% of a random strategy.

  8. Seasonal sensible thermal energy storage solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gabriela SOCACIU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal energy storage can be defined as the temporary storage of thermal energy at high or low temperatures. Thermal energy storage is an advances technology for storing thermal energy that can mitigate environmental impacts and facilitate more efficient and clean energy systems. Seasonal thermal energy storage has a longer thermal storage period, generally three or more months. This can contribute significantly to meeting society`s need for heating and cooling. The objectives of thermal energy storage systems are to store solar heat collected in summer for space heating in winter. This concept is not new; it is been used and developed for centuries because is playing an important role in energy conservation and contribute significantly to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the gas emissions to the atmosphere.

  9. Energy from ocean thermal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R.

    1980-02-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) transforms the solar heating of the ocean surface into electrical energy, either transmitting it to shore or using it to manufacture energy-intensive products such as aluminum, ammonia, hydrogen or magnesium at sea. Open-cycle systems, requiring extremely large turbines and degasifiers, are not thought to be as advanced as closed-cycle systems which use heat exchangers (either shell-and-tube or plate) that are made of titanium, stainless steel or aluminum alloys, which must minimize corrosion and biofouling, and that use ammonia, propane or fluorocarbons as working fluids. OTEC platform configurations include ship shapes and submersibles, such as spar buoys, and require cold-water pipes 1,000 m long, made of such materials as elastomers, lightweight concrete and fiberglass-reinforced plastic.

  10. Thermal performance and heat transport in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Doornenbal, P.J.; Drijver, B.C.; Gaans, van P.F.M.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is used for seasonal storage of large quantities of thermal energy. Due to the increasing demand for sustainable energy, the number of ATES systems has increased rapidly, which has raised questions on the effect of ATES systems on their surroundings as well as t

  11. Thermal extraction: enhancing thermal emission of finite size macroscopic blackbody to far-field vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Torbjorn Skauli Gang; Wang, Hailiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of far-field thermal radiation had directly led to the discovery of quantum mechanics a century ago, and is of great current practical importance for applications in energy conversions, radiative cooling, and thermal control. It is commonly assumed that for any macroscopic thermal emitter, its maximal emitted power within any given frequency range cannot exceed that of a blackbody with the same surface area. In contrast to such conventional wisdom, here we propose, and experimentally demonstrate, that the emitted power from a finite size macroscopic blackbody to far field vacuum can be significantly enhanced, within the constraint of the second law of thermodynamics. To achieve such an enhancement, the thermal body needs to have internal electromagnetic density of states (DOS) greater than that of vacuum, and one needs to provide a thermal extraction mechanism to enable the contributions of all internal modes to far field radiation.

  12. SPS extraction kicker magnet thermal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Timmins, M

    2004-01-01

    As the SPS accelerator will be used for the CNGS project and as LHC injector, the proton beams passing through its extraction kickers will have a much higher intensity than in the past. The image currents generated by this beam may provoke a temperature increase in the magnet's ferrite core to temperatures above the Curie temperature, unless the heat produced is effectively removed. A further complication arises from the fact that a high voltage is applied to the ferrites. The solution adopted consists in transferring the heat via Aluminium Nitride insulators to a water cooling circuit. The heat transfer analysis and the calculated thermal distribution of the magnet are presented.

  13. Thermal Energy Harvesting from Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woias, P.; Schule, F.; Bäumke, E.; Mehne, P.; Kroener, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present the measurement of temperature differences between the ambient air and the body temperature of a sheep (Heidschnucke) and its applicability for thermoelectric energy harvesting from livestock, demonstrated via the test of a specially tailored TEG system in a real-life experiment. In three measurement campaigns average temperature differences were found between 2.5 K and 3.5 K. Analytical models and FEM simulations were carried out to determine the actual thermal resistance of the sheep's fur from comparisons with the temperature measurements. With these data a thermoelectric (TEG) generator was built in a thermally optimized housing with adapted heats sink. The whole TEG system was mounted to a collar, including a data logger for recording temperature and TEG voltage. First measurements at the neck of a sheep were accomplished, with a calculated maximal average power output of 173 μW at the TEG. Taking the necessity of a low-voltage step-up converter into account, an electric output power of 54 μW is available which comes close to the power consumption of a low-power VHF tracking system.

  14. Thermal energy management process experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal energy management processes experiment (TEMP) will demonstrate that through the use of two-phase flow technology, thermal systems can be significantly enhanced by increasing heat transport capabilities at reduced power consumption while operating within narrow temperature limits. It has been noted that such phenomena as excess fluid puddling, priming, stratification, and surface tension effects all tend to mask the performance of two-phase flow systems in a 1-g field. The flight experiment approach would be to attack the experiment to an appropriate mounting surface with a 15 to 20 meter effective length and provide a heat input and output station in the form of heaters and a radiator. Using environmental data, the size, location, and orientation of the experiment can be optimized. The approach would be to provide a self-contained panel and mount it to the STEP through a frame. A small electronics package would be developed to interface with the STEP avionics for command and data handling. During the flight, heaters on the evaporator will be exercised to determine performance. Flight data will be evaluated against the ground tests to determine any anomalous behavior.

  15. Solar energy thermalization and storage device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J.F.

    A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent is described. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

  16. Temperature Distribution and Thermal Performance of an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sayantan

    2017-04-01

    Energy conservation and storage has become very crucial to make use of excess energy during times of future demand. Excess thermal energy can be captured and stored in aquifers and this technique is termed as Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Storing seasonal thermal energy in water by injecting it into subsurface and extracting in time of demand is the principle of an ATES system. Using ATES systems leads to energy savings, reduces the dependency on fossil fuels and thus leads to reduction in greenhouse gas emission. This study numerically models an ATES system to store seasonal thermal energy and evaluates the performance of it. A 3D thermo-hydrogeological numerical model for a confined ATES system is presented in this study. The model includes heat transport processes of advection, conduction and heat loss to confining rock media. The model also takes into account regional groundwater flow in the aquifer, geothermal gradient and anisotropy in the aquifer. Results show that thermal injection into the aquifer results in the generation of a thermal-front which grows in size with time. Premature thermal-breakthrough causes thermal interference in the system when the thermal-front reaches the production well and consequences in the fall of system performance and hence should be avoided. This study models the transient temperature distribution in the aquifer for different flow and geological conditions. This may be effectively used in designing an efficient ATES project by ensuring safety from thermal-breakthrough while catering to the energy demand. Based on the model results a safe well spacing is proposed. The thermal energy discharged by the system is determined and strategy to avoid the premature thermal-breakthrough in critical cases is discussed. The present numerical model is applied to simulate an experimental field study which is found to approximate the field results quite well.

  17. Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2016-05-03

    Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage apparatus controller includes processing circuitry configured to access first information which is indicative of surpluses and deficiencies of electrical energy upon an electrical power system at a plurality of moments in time, access second information which is indicative of temperature of a thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time, and use the first and second information to control an amount of electrical energy which is utilized by a heating element to heat the thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time.

  18. Potential energy savings and thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Rudbeck, Claus Christian; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe

    1996-01-01

    The simulation results on the energy saving potential and influence on indoor thermal comfort by replacement of common windows with aerogel windows as well as commercial low-energy windows are described and analysed.......The simulation results on the energy saving potential and influence on indoor thermal comfort by replacement of common windows with aerogel windows as well as commercial low-energy windows are described and analysed....

  19. Capacitive technology for energy extraction from chemical potential differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos Sales, B.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis introduces the principle of Capacitive energy extraction based on Donnan Potential (CDP) to exploit salinity gradients. It also shows the fundamental characterization and improvements of CDP. An alternative application of this technology aimed at thermal gradients was tested.  

  20. Thermal energy and the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Anthonie W J; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Life has evolved on Earth with electromagnetic radiation (light), fermentable organic molecules, and oxidizable chemicals as sources of energy. Biological use of thermal energy has not been observed although heat, and the thermal gradients required to convert it into free energy, are ubiquitous and were even more abundant at the time of the origin of life on Earth. Nevertheless, Earth-organisms sense thermal energy, and in suitable environments may have gained the capability to use it as energy source. It has been proposed that the first organisms obtained their energy by a first protein named pF(1) that worked on a thermal variation of the binding change mechanism of today's ATP sythase enzyme. Organisms using thermosynthesis may still live where light or chemical energy sources are not available. Possible suitable examples are subsurface environments on Earth and in the outer Solar System, in particular the subsurface oceans of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

  1. Capacitive technology for energy extraction from chemical potential differences

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos Sales, B.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis introduces the principle of Capacitive energy extraction based on Donnan Potential (CDP) to exploit salinity gradients. It also shows the fundamental characterization and improvements of CDP. An alternative application of this technology aimed at thermal gradients was tested.   Chapter 2 introduces the principle and initial tests. The entropy increase of mixing two solutions of different salt concentrations can be harnessed to generate electrical energy. Worldwide, the potent...

  2. Hybrid energy harvesting using active thermal backplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the concept of a new hybrid energy harvesting system by combing solar cells with magneto-thermoelectric generator (MTG, i.e., thermal energy harvesting). The silicon solar cell can easily reach high temperature under normal operating conditions. Thus the heated solar cell becomes rapidly less efficient as the temperature of solar cell rises. To increase the efficiency of the solar cell, air or water-based cooling system is used. To surpass conventional cooling devices requiring additional power as well as large working space for air/water collectors, we develop a new technology of pairing an active thermal backplane (ATB) to solar cell. The ATB design is based on MTG technology utilizing the physics of the 2nd order phase transition of active ferromagnetic materials. The MTG is cost-effective conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and is fundamentally different from Seebeck TEG devices. The ATB (MTG) is in addition to being an energy conversion system, a very good conveyor of heat through both conduction and convection. Therefore, the ATB can provide dual-mode for the proposed hybrid energy harvesting. One is active convective and conductive cooling for heated solar cell. Another is active thermal energy harvesting from heat of solar cell. These novel hybrid energy harvesting device have potentially simultaneous energy conversion capability of solar and thermal energy into electricity. The results presented can be used for better understanding of hybrid energy harvesting system that can be integrated into commercial applications.

  3. Energy efficient thermal management of data centers

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Energy Efficient Thermal Management of Data Centers examines energy flow in today's data centers. Particular focus is given to the state-of-the-art thermal management and thermal design approaches now being implemented across the multiple length scales involved. The impact of future trends in information technology hardware, and emerging software paradigms such as cloud computing and virtualization, on thermal management are also addressed. The book explores computational and experimental characterization approaches for determining temperature and air flow patterns within data centers. Thermodynamic analyses using the second law to improve energy efficiency are introduced and used in proposing improvements in cooling methodologies. Reduced-order modeling and robust multi-objective design of next generation data centers are discussed. This book also: Provides in-depth treatment of energy efficiency ideas based on  fundamental heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, controls, and computer science Focus...

  4. Romania needs a strategy for thermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leca Aureliu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy sector in Romania consists of three sub-sectors: electricity, natural gas and heat. Among these, the sub-sector of thermal energy is in the most precarious situation because it has been neglected for a long time. This sub-sector is particularly important both due to the amount of final heat consumption (of over 50% of final energy consumption, and to the fact that it has a direct negative effect on the population, industry and services. This paper presents the main directions for developing a modern strategy of the thermal energy sub-sector, which would fit into Romania’s Energy Strategy that is still in preparation This is based on the author’s 50 years of experience in this field that includes knowledge about the processes and the equipment of thermal energy, expertise in the management and restructuring of energy companies and also knowledge of the specific legislation. It is therefore recommended, following the European regulations and practices, the promotion and upgrading of district heating systems using efficient cogeneration, using trigeneration in Romania, modernizing buildings in terms of energy use, using of renewable energy sources for heating, especially biomass, and modernizing the energy consumption of rural settlements.

  5. Evaluation of New Thermally Conductive Geopolymer in Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Matěj; Uhlík, Jan; Nosek, Jaroslav; Lachman, Vladimír; Hladký, Radim; Franěk, Jan; Brož, Milan

    This paper describes an evaluation of a newly developed thermally conductive geopolymer (TCG), consisting of a mixture of sodium silicate and carbon micro-particles. The TCG is intended to be used as a component of high temperature energy storage (HTTES) to improve its thermal diffusivity. Energy storage is crucial for both ecological and economical sustainability. HTTES plays a vital role in solar energy technologies and in waste heat recovery. The most advanced HTTES technologies are based on phase change materials or molten salts, but suffer with economic and technological limitations. Rock or concrete HTTES are cheaper, but they have low thermal conductivity without incorporation of TCG. It was observed that TCG is stable up to 400 °C. The thermal conductivity was measured in range of 20-23 W m-1 K-1. The effect of TCG was tested by heating a granite block with an artificial fissure. One half of the fissure was filled with TCG and the other with ballotini. 28 thermometers, 5 dilatometers and strain sensors were installed on the block. The heat transport experiment was evaluated with COMSOL Multiphysics software.

  6. Energy Extraction for the LHC Superconducting Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Schmidt, R; Sonnemann, F

    2001-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the LHC will be powered in about 1700 electrical circuits. The energy stored in circuits, up to 1.3 GJ, can potentially cause severe damage of magnets, bus bars and current leads. In order to protect the superconducting elements after a resistive transition, the energy is dissipated into a dump resistor installed in series with the magnet chain that is switched into the circuit by opening current breakers. Experiments and simulation studies have been performed to identify the LHC circuits that need energy extraction. The required values of the extraction resistors have been computed. The outcome of the experimental results and the simulation studies are presented and the design of the different energy extraction systems that operate at 600 A and at 13 kA is described.

  7. Solar Thermal Energy; Energia Solar Termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Martinez, M.; Cuesta-Santianes, M. J.; Cabrera Jimenez, J. A.

    2008-07-01

    Approximately, 50 % of worldwide primary energy consumption is done in the form of heat in applications with a temperature lower than 250 degree centigree (low-medium temperature heat). These data clearly demonstrate the great potential of solar thermal energy to substitute conventional fossil fuels, which are becoming more expensive and are responsible for global warming. Low-medium temperature solar thermal energy is mainly used to obtain domestic hot water and provide space heating. Active solar thermal systems are those related to the use of solar thermal collectors. This study is dealing with low temperature solar thermal applications, mainly focusing on active solar thermal systems. This kind of systems has been extensively growing worldwide during the last years. At the end of 2006, the collector capacity in operation worldwide equalled 127.8 GWth. The technology is considered to be already developed and actions should be aimed at favouring a greater market penetration: diffusion, financial support, regulations establishment, etc. China and USA are the leading countries with a technology based on evacuated tube collectors and unglazed collectors, respectively. The rest of the world markets are dominated by the flat glazed collectors technology. (Author) 15 refs.

  8. Thermal stability of liquid antioxidative extracts from pomegranate peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research was carried out to assess the potential of using the natural antioxidants in pomegranate peel extracts as replacement for synthetic antioxidants. As a result the thermal stability of pomegranate peel extract products during sterilization and storage, and its effect on industrial, color...

  9. Thermal energy recycling fuel cell arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, Paul R.

    2017-04-11

    An example fuel cell arrangement includes a fuel cell stack configured to receive a supply fluid and to provide an exhaust fluid that has more thermal energy than the supply fluid. The arrangement also includes an ejector and a heat exchanger. The ejector is configured to direct at least some of the exhaust fluid into the supply fluid. The heat exchanger is configured to increase thermal energy in the supply fluid using at least some of the exhaust fluid that was not directed into the supply fluid.

  10. Thermal energy recycling fuel cell arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Paul R.

    2017-04-11

    An example fuel cell arrangement includes a fuel cell stack configured to receive a supply fluid and to provide an exhaust fluid that has more thermal energy than the supply fluid. The arrangement also includes an ejector and a heat exchanger. The ejector is configured to direct at least some of the exhaust fluid into the supply fluid. The heat exchanger is configured to increase thermal energy in the supply fluid using at least some of the exhaust fluid that was not directed into the supply fluid.

  11. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  12. Modeling energy flexibility of low energy buildings utilizing thermal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Heller, Alfred; Rode, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    the load shifting potential of an apartment of a low energy building in Copenhagen is assessed, utilizing the heat storage capacity of the thermal mass when the heating system is switched off for relieving the energy system. It is shown that when using a 4-hour preheating period before switching off...... of the external envelope and the thermal capacity of the internal walls as the main parameters that affect the load shifting potential of the apartment....... to match the production patterns, shifting demand from on-peak hours to off-peak hours. Buildings could act as flexibility suppliers to the energy system, through load shifting potential, provided that the large thermal mass of the building stock could be utilized for energy storage. In the present study...

  13. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  14. Extracting Minerals from Seawater: An Energy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Bardi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of recovering minerals from seawater has been proposed as a way of counteracting the gradual depletion of conventional mineral ores. Seawater contains large amounts of dissolved ions and the four most concentrated metal ones (Na, Mg, Ca, K are being commercially extracted today. However, all the other metal ions exist at much lower concentrations. This paper reports an estimate of the feasibility of the extraction of these metal ions on the basis of the energy needed. In most cases, the result is that extraction in amounts comparable to the present production from land mines would be impossible because of the very large amount of energy needed. This conclusion holds also for uranium as fuel for the present generation of nuclear fission plants. Nevertheless, in a few cases, mainly lithium, extraction from seawater could provide amounts of metals sufficient for closing the cycle of metal use in the economy, provided that an increased level of recycling can be attained.

  15. Applications and challenges for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannberg, L. D.; Tomlinson, J. T.

    1991-04-01

    New thermal energy storage (TES) technologies are being developed and applied as society strives to relieve increasing energy and environmental stresses. Applications for these new technologies range from residential and district heating and cooling using waste and solar energy, to high-temperature energy storage for power production and industrial processes. In the last two decades there has been great interest and development of heat storage systems, primarily for residential and commercial buildings. While development has continued, the rate of advancement has slowed with current technology considered adequate for electrically charged heat storage furnaces. Use of chill storage for building diurnal cooling has received substantial development.

  16. Thermal Insulation Strips Conserve Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Launching the space shuttle involves an interesting paradox: While the temperatures inside the shuttle s main engines climb higher than 6,000 F hot enough to boil iron for fuel, the engines use liquid hydrogen, the second coldest liquid on Earth after liquid helium. Maintained below 20 K (-423 F), the liquid hydrogen is contained in the shuttle s rust-colored external tank. The external tank also contains liquid oxygen (kept below a somewhat less chilly 90 K or -297 F) that combines with the hydrogen to create an explosive mixture that along with the shuttle s two, powdered aluminum-fueled solid rocket boosters allows the shuttle to escape Earth s gravity. The cryogenic temperatures of the main engines liquid fuel can cause ice, frost, or liquefied air to build up on the external tank and other parts of the numerous launch fueling systems, posing a possible debris risk when the ice breaks off during launch and causing difficulties in the transfer and control of these cryogenic liquid propellants. Keeping the fuel at the necessary ultra-cold temperatures while minimizing ice buildup and other safety hazards, as well as reducing the operational maintenance costs, has required NASA to explore innovative ways for providing superior thermal insulation systems. To address the challenge, the Agency turned to an insulating technology so effective that, even though it is mostly air, a thin sheet can prevent a blowtorch from igniting a match. Aerogels were invented in 1931 and demonstrate properties that make them the most extraordinary insulating materials known; a 1-inch-thick piece of aerogel provides the same insulation as layering 15 panes of glass with air pockets in between. Derived from silica, aluminum oxide, or carbon gels using a supercritical drying process - resulting in a composition of almost 99-percent air - aerogels are the world s lightest solid (among 15 other titles they hold in the Guinness World Records), can float indefinitely on water if treated to be

  17. Biogeochemical aspects of aquifer thermal energy storage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    During the process of aquifer thermal energy storage the in situ temperature of the groundwater- sediment system may fluctuate significantly. As a result the groundwater characteristics can be considerably affected by a variety of chemical, biogeochemical and microbiological reactions. The inter

  18. Thermodynamics of relativistic quantum fields: extracting energy from gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the quantum thermodynamical properties of localised relativistic quantum fields that can be used as quantum thermal machines. We study the efficiency and power of energy transfer between the classical degrees of freedom, such as the energy input due to motion or to an impinging gravitational wave, and the excitations of the confined quantum field. We find that the efficiency of energy transfer depends dramatically on the input initial state of the system. Furthermore, we investigate the ability to extract the energy and to store it in a battery. This process is inefficient in optical cavities but is significantly enhanced when employing trapped Bose Einstein Condensates. Finally, we apply our techniques to a setup where an impinging gravitational wave excites the phononic modes of a Bose Einstein Condensate. We find that, in this case, the amount of energy transfer to the phonons increases with time and quickly approaches unity. These results suggest that, in the future, it might be possible to...

  19. Energy Loss of Proton in Extraction Window

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Bao-jie; ZENG; Zi-qiang

    2015-01-01

    The particle is transported in vacuum in accelerator,and is exported through extraction windows.The Kapton foil is used in a 3 MeV proton accelerator.The energy loss of 3 MeV proton is calculated when it comes through Kapton foil of different thicknesses with Monte Carlo method.The energy loss of 3 MeV proton in

  20. Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gabriela SOCACIU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage (TES systems provide several alternatives for efficient energy use and conservation. Phase change materials (PCMs for TES are materials supplying thermal regulation at particular phase change temperatures by absorbing and emitting the heat of the medium. TES in general and PCMs in particular, have been a main topic in research for the last 30 years, but although the information is quantitatively enormous, it is also spread widely in the literature, and difficult to find. PCMs absorb energy during the heating process as phase change takes place and release energy to the environment in the phase change range during a reverse cooling process. PCMs possesses the ability of latent thermal energy change their state with a certain temperature. PCMs for TES are generally solid-liquid phase change materials and therefore they need encapsulation. TES systems using PCMs as a storage medium offers advantages such as high TES capacity, small unit size and isothermal behaviour during charging and discharging when compared to the sensible TES.

  1. Low temperature thermal-energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segaser, C.S.; Christian, J.E.

    1979-03-01

    This report evaluates currently available techniques and estimated costs of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) devices applicable to Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES) installations serving communities ranging in size from approximately 3000 (characterized by an electrical load requirement of 2 MWe) to about 100,000 population (characterized by an electrical load requirement of 100 MWe). Thermal energy in the form of either hotness or coldness can be stored in a variety of media as sensible heat by virtue of a change in temperature of the material, or as latent heat of fusion in which the material changes from the liquid phase to the solid phase at essentially a constant temperature. Both types of material are considered for TES in ICES applications.

  2. Solar thermal extraction of copper from sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Guesdon, C.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2003-03-01

    With the aim to develop a solar-driven process for the extraction of copper from sulfide concentrates re-search on the decomposition of copper sulfides under inert atmospheres has been initiated. Thermogravimetric measurements on chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) revealed that copper is formed already at 1823 K. Chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}) also disintegrates at this temperature, although at a lower rate. Copper and iron have been identified in the solid residue. The results confirm the feasibility of copper extraction by direct decomposition of sulfides under atmospheric pressure. The decomposition under inert atmosphere prevents generation of SO{sub 2}, and is beneficial to the removal of volatile impurities. Chemical equilibrium calculations for CuFeS{sub 2} contaminated with enargite (Cu{sub 3}AsS{sub 4}) have shown that the absence of an oxidic slag allows for a complete evaporation of arsenic and subsequent separation. (author)

  3. Thermal diffractive corrections to Casimir energies

    CERN Document Server

    Kabat, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We study the interplay of thermal and diffractive effects in Casimir energies. We consider plates with edges, oriented either parallel or perpendicular to each other, as well as a single plate with a slit. We compute the Casimir energy at finite temperature using a formalism in which the diffractive effects are encoded in a lower dimensional non-local field theory that lives in the gap between the plates. The formalism allows for a clean separation between direct or geometric effects and diffractive effects, and makes an analytic derivation of the temperature dependence of the free energy possible. At low temperatures, with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the plates, we find that diffractive effects make a correction to the free energy which scales as T^6 for perpendicular plates, as T^4 for slits, and as T^4 log T for parallel plates.

  4. Thermal stability of anthocyanin extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. in the presence of beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourtzinos, Ioannis; Makris, Dimitris P; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina; Kalogeropoulos, Nick; Michali, Iliana; Karathanos, Vaios T

    2008-11-12

    The thermal stability of anthocyanin extract isolated from the dry calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. was studied over the temperature range 60-90 degrees C in aqueous solutions in the presence or absence of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). The results indicated that the thermal degradation of anthocyanins followed first-order reaction kinetics. The temperature-dependent degradation was adequately modeled by the Arrhenius equation, and the activation energy for the degradation of H. sabdariffa L. anthocyanins during heating was found to be approximately 54 kJ/mol. In the presence of beta-CD, anthocyanins degraded at a decreased rate, evidently due to their complexation with beta-CD, having the same activation energy. The formation of complexes in solution was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance studies of beta-CD solutions in the presence of the extract. Moreover, differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the inclusion complex of H. sabdariffa L. extract with beta-CD in the solid state was more stable against oxidation as compared to the free extract, as the complex remained intact at temperatures 100-250 degrees C where the free extract was oxidized. The results obtained clearly indicated that the presence of beta-CD improved the thermal stability of nutraceutical antioxidants present in H. sabdariffa L. extract, both in solution and in solid state.

  5. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. J., E-mail: hay@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Schiff, J. [Department of Mathematics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  6. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, Michael J; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2015-01-01

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Deep submicron PDSOI thermal resistance extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianhui, Bu; Jinshun, Bi; Linmao, Xi; Zhengsheng, Han

    2010-09-01

    Deep submicron partially depleted silicon on insulator (PDSOI) MOSFETs with H-gate were fabricated based on the 0.35 μm SOI process developed by the Institute of Microelectronics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Because the self-heating effect (SHE) has a great influence on SOI, extractions of thermal resistance were done for accurate circuit simulation by using the body-source diode as a thermometer. The results show that the thermal resistance in an SOI NMOSFET is lower than that in an SOI PMOSFET; and the thermal resistance in an SOI NMOSFET with a long channel is lower than that with a short channel. This offers a great help to SHE modeling and parameter extraction.

  8. Microencapsulated PCM thermal-energy storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawlader, M.N.A.; Uddin, M.S. [National Univ. of Singapore, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Singapore (Singapore); Khin, Mya Mya [National Univ. of Singapore, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Singapore (Singapore)

    2003-02-01

    The application of phase-change materials (PCM) for solar thermal-energy storage capacities has received considerable attention in recent years due to their large storage capacity and isothermal nature of the storage process. This study deals with the preparation and characterization of encapsulated paraffin-wax. Encapsulated paraffin particles were prepared by complex coacervation as well as spray-drying methods. The influence of different parameters on the characteristics and performance of a microencapsulated PCM in terms of encapsulation efficiency, and energy storage and release capacity has been investigated. The distribution of particle size and the morphology of microencapsulated PCM were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the coacervation method, the optimum homogenizing time is 10 min and the amount of cross-linking agent is 6-8 mI. Results obtained from a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) show that microcapsules prepared either by coacervation or the spray-drying method have a thermal energy storage/release capacity of about 145-240 J/g. Hence, encapsulated paraffin wax shows a good potential as a solar-energy storage material. (Author)

  9. Energy Address Delivery Technologies and Thermal Transformations in Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdo O.G.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, energetic and technical paradoxes in food nanotechnologies and traditional approaches to evaluation of energy recourses using are considered. Hypotheses of improvement of food production energy technologies are formulated. Classification of principles of address delivery of energy to food raw materials elements is given. We had substantiated the perspective objectives for heat-pumps installations and biphasic heat-transfer systems. The energy efficiency of new technolo-gies is compared on base of the number of energy impact. Principles of mass transfer modeling in ex-traction, dehydration and pasteurization combined processes are considered by food production exam-ple. The objectives of mathematical modeling of combined hydrodynamic and heat and mass transfer processes in modern energy technologies are set. The fuel energy conversion diagrams for drying, in-novative installations on the base of thermal siphons, heat pumps and electromagnetic energy genera-tors are represented. In this article, we illustrate how electromagnetic field, biphasic heat-transfer sys-tems and heat pumps can be effective tools for energy efficiency technologies.

  10. Thermal energy in dry snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkogler, W.; Sovilla, B.; Lehning, M.

    2015-09-01

    Avalanches can exhibit many different flow regimes from powder clouds to slush flows. Flow regimes are largely controlled by the properties of the snow released and entrained along the path. Recent investigations showed the temperature of the moving snow to be one of the most important factors controlling the mobility of the flow. The temperature of an avalanche is determined by the temperature of the released and entrained snow but also increases by frictional processes with time. For three artificially released avalanches, we conducted snow profiles along the avalanche track and in the deposition area, which allowed quantifying the temperature of the eroded snow layers. This data set allowed to calculate the thermal balance, from release to deposition, and to discuss the magnitudes of different sources of thermal energy of the avalanches. For the investigated dry avalanches, the thermal energy increase due to friction was mainly depending on the effective elevation drop of the mass of the avalanche with a warming of approximately 0.3 °C per 100 vertical metres. Contrarily, the temperature change due to entrainment varied for the individual avalanches, from -0.08 to 0.3 °C, and depended on the temperature of the snow along the path and the erosion depth. Infrared radiation thermography (IRT) was used to assess the surface temperature before, during and just after the avalanche with high spatial resolution. This data set allowed to identify the warmest temperatures to be located in the deposits of the dense core. Future research directions, especially for the application of IRT, in the field of thermal investigations in avalanche dynamics are discussed.

  11. Thermal energy in dry snow avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Steinkogler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Avalanches can exhibit many different flow regimes from powder clouds to slush flows. Flow regimes are largely controlled by the properties of the snow released and entrained along the path. Recent investigations showed the temperature of the moving snow to be one of the most important factors controlling the mobility of the flow. The temperature of an avalanche is determined by the temperature of the released and entrained snow but also increases by frictional and collisional processes with time. For three artificially released avalanches, we conducted snow profiles along the avalanche track and in the deposition area, which allowed quantifying the temperature of the eroded snow layers. Infrared radiation thermography (IRT was used to assess the surface temperature before, during and just after the avalanche with high spatial resolution. This data set allowed to calculate the thermal balance, from release to deposition, and to discuss the magnitudes of different sources of thermal energy of the avalanches. We could confirm that, for the investigated dry avalanches, the thermal energy increase due to friction was mainly depending on the elevation drop of the avalanche with a warming of approximately 0.5 °C per 100 height meters. Contrary, warming due to entrainment was very specific to the individual avalanche and depended on the temperature of the snow along the path and the erosion depth ranging from nearly no warming to a maximum observed warming of 1 °C. Furthermore, we could observe the warmest temperatures are located in the deposits of the dense core. Future research directions, especially for the application of IRT, in the field of thermal investigations in avalanche dynamics are discussed.

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M. Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  13. Commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattrup, M.P.; Weijo, R.O.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. The purpose of the study was to develop and screen a list of potential entry market applications for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Several initial screening criteria were used to identify promising ATES applications. These include the existence of an energy availability/usage mismatch, the existence of many similar applications or commercial sites, the ability to utilize proven technology, the type of location, market characteristics, the size of and access to capital investment, and the number of decision makers involved. The in-depth analysis identified several additional screening criteria to consider in the selection of an entry market application. This analysis revealed that the best initial applications for ATES are those where reliability is acceptable, and relatively high temperatures are allowable. Although chill storage was the primary focus of this study, applications that are good candidates for heat ATES were also of special interest. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

    1979-11-01

    The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

  15. Photo-generated carriers lose energy during extraction from polymer-fullerene solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Melianas, Armantas

    2015-11-05

    In photovoltaic devices, the photo-generated charge carriers are typically assumed to be in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. In conventional materials, this assumption is experimentally justified as carrier thermalization completes before any significant carrier transport has occurred. Here, we demonstrate by unifying time-resolved optical and electrical experiments and Monte Carlo simulations over an exceptionally wide dynamic range that in the case of organic photovoltaic devices, this assumption is invalid. As the photo-generated carriers are transported to the electrodes, a substantial amount of their energy is lost by continuous thermalization in the disorder broadened density of states. Since thermalization occurs downward in energy, carrier motion is boosted by this process, leading to a time-dependent carrier mobility as confirmed by direct experiments. We identify the time and distance scales relevant for carrier extraction and show that the photo-generated carriers are extracted from the operating device before reaching thermal equilibrium.

  16. Demonstration of EnergyNest thermal energy storage (TES) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoivik, Nils; Greiner, Christopher; Tirado, Eva Bellido; Barragan, Juan; Bergan, Pâl; Skeie, Geir; Blanco, Pablo; Calvet, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the experimental results from the EnergyNest 2 × 500 kWhth thermal energy storage (TES) pilot system installed at Masdar Institute of Science & Technology Solar Platform. Measured data are shown and compared to simulations using a specially developed computer program to verify the stability and performance of the TES. The TES is based on a solid-state concrete storage medium (HEATCRETE®) with integrated steel tube heat exchangers cast into the concrete. The unique concrete recipe used in the TES has been developed in collaboration with Heidelberg Cement; this material has significantly higher thermal conductivity compared to regular concrete implying very effective heat transfer, at the same time being chemically stable up to 450 °C. The demonstrated and measured performance of the TES matches the predictions based on simulations, and proves the operational feasibility of the EnergyNest concrete-based TES. A further case study is analyzed where a large-scale TES system presented in this article is compared to two-tank indirect molten salt technology.

  17. District Energy Corporation SW 40th Street Thermal Energy Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davlin, Thomas [District Energy Corporation, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2014-06-06

    The overall deliverable from the project is the design, construction and commissioning of a detention facility heating and cooling system that minimizes ownership costs and maximizes efficiency (and therefore minimizes environmental impact). The primary deliverables were the proof of concept for the application of geothermal systems for an institutional facility and the ongoing, quarterly system operating data downloads to the Department of Energy . The primary advantage of geothermal based heat pump systems is the higher efficiency of the system compared to a conventional chiller, boiler, cooling tower based system. The higher efficiency results in a smaller environmental foot print and lower energy costs for the detention facility owner, Lancaster County. The higher efficiency for building cooling is primarily due to a more constant compressor condensing temperature with the geothermal well field acting as a thermal “sink” (in place of the conventional system’s cooling tower). In the heating mode, Ground Couple Heat Pump (GCHP) systems benefits from the advantage of a heat pump Coefficient of Performance (COP) of approximately 3.6, significantly better than a conventional gas boiler. The geothermal well field acting as a thermal “source” allows the heat pumps to operate efficiently in the heating mode regardless of ambient temperatures. The well field is partially located in a wetland with a high water table so, over time, the project will be able to identify the thermal loading characteristics of a well field located in a high water table location. The project demonstrated how a large geothermal well field can be installed in a wetland area in an economical and environmentally sound manner. Finally, the SW 40th Street Thermal Energy Plant project demonstrates the benefits of providing domestic hot water energy, as well as space heating, to help balance well filed thermal loading in a cooling dominated application. During the period of August 2012 thru

  18. Development of MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Scott R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Bannuru, Thirumalesh; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slo; Datskos, Panos G.

    2011-06-01

    The efficient conversion of waste thermal energy into electrical energy is of considerable interest due to the huge sources of low-grade thermal energy available in technologically advanced societies. Our group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a new type of high efficiency thermal waste heat energy converter that can be used to actively cool electronic devices, concentrated photovoltaic solar cells, computers and large waste heat producing systems, while generating electricity that can be used to power remote monitoring sensor systems, or recycled to provide electrical power. The energy harvester is a temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy harvester that can be used to generate electrical energy from thermal waste streams with temperature gradients of only a few degrees. The approach uses a resonantly driven pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that potentially has energy conversion efficiencies several times those of any previously demonstrated pyroelectric or thermoelectric thermal energy harvesters. The goals of this effort are to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating high conversion efficiency MEMS based pyroelectric energy converters that can be fabricated into scalable arrays using well known microscale fabrication techniques and materials. These fabrication efforts are supported by detailed modeling studies of the pyroelectric energy converter structures to demonstrate the energy conversion efficiencies and electrical energy generation capabilities of these energy converters. This paper reports on the modeling, fabrication and testing of test structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal-to-electrical energy harvesters.

  19. MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Scott R; Datskos, Panagiotis G

    2013-08-27

    A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending between a first surface and a second surface, where the first surface includes a temperature difference from the second surface. The layered pyroelectric capacitor includes a conductive, bimetal top electrode layer, an intermediate pyroelectric dielectric layer and a conductive bottom electrode layer. In addition, a pair of proof masses is affixed at a distal end of the layered pyroelectric capacitor to face the first surface and the second surface, wherein the proof masses oscillate between the first surface and the second surface such that a pyroelectric current is generated in the pyroelectric capacitor due to temperature cycling when the proof masses alternately contact the first surface and the second surface.

  20. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  1. Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : impacts of soil heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Impacts of heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation Wijbrand Sommer
    PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, NL (2015)
    ISBN 978-94-6257-294-2 Abstract Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is

  2. Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : impacts of soil heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Impacts of heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation Wijbrand Sommer
    PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, NL (2015)
    ISBN 978-94-6257-294-2 Abstract Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is

  3. Optimization of energy extraction in transverse galloping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Sanz-Andres, A.

    2013-11-01

    A numerical method to analyse the stability of transverse galloping based on experimental measurements, as an alternative method to polynomial fitting of the transverse force coefficient Cz, is proposed in this paper. The Glauert-Den Hartog criterion is used to determine the region of angles of attack (pitch angles) prone to present galloping. An analytic solution (based on a polynomial curve of Cz) is used to validate the method and to evaluate the discretization errors. Several bodies (of biconvex, D-shape and rhomboidal cross sections) have been tested in a wind tunnel and the stability of the galloping region has been analysed with the new method. An algorithm to determine the pitch angle of the body that allows the maximum value of the kinetic energy of the flow to be extracted is presented.

  4. Optimization for operating modes based on simulation of seasonal underground thermal energy storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun ZHAO; Yan CHEN; Xinguo LI

    2008-01-01

    A simulation was performed, which concerned the feasibility of seasonal underground thermal energy storage (UTES) in Tianjin, China. The investigated sys-tem consisted of 8 boreholes. In summer, residual solar thermal energy was emitted into the soil surrounding the borehole heat exchangers through which the stored energy was extracted in winter with a ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) to provide a proper heating temperature. A simulation study was performed to study the influence of system operation modes on thermal recovery based on the experimental data of a GCHP system, local met-eorological conditions and soil properties in Tianjin. The results indicate a thermal recovery ratio of less than 67% and different temperature distributions under three modes. Finally, an operation mode was suggested based on both lower loss and better thermal recovery in the UTES.

  5. Optimizing Ice Thermal Storage to Reduce Energy Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher L.

    Energy cost for buildings is an issue of concern for owners across the U.S. The bigger the building, the greater the concern. A part of this is due to the energy required to cool the building and the way in which charges are set when paying for energy consumed during different times of the day. This study will prove that designing ice thermal storage properly will minimize energy cost in buildings. The effectiveness of ice thermal storage as a means to reduce energy costs lies within transferring the time of most energy consumption from on-peak to off-peak periods. Multiple variables go into the equation of finding the optimal use of ice thermal storage and they are all judged with the final objective of minimizing monthly energy costs. This research discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, energy demand, and the total energy cost. A tool for optimal design of ice thermal storage is developed, considering variables such as chiller and ice storage sizes and charging and discharge times. The simulations take place in a four-story building and investigate the potential of Ice Thermal Storage as a resource in reducing and minimizing energy cost for cooling. The simulations test the effectiveness of Ice Thermal Storage implemented into the four-story building in ten locations across the United States.

  6. Energy Partitions and Evolution in a Purely Thermal Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D; Gary, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free-free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally-deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to ne...

  7. Chemically and Thermally Stable High Energy Density Silicone Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal energy storage systems with 300 ? 1000 kJ/kg energy density through either phase changes or chemical heat absorption are sought by NASA. This proposed effort...

  8. Modeling elements of energy systems for thermal energy transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurygin A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heating industrial facilities and the residential sector in recent years is the economic and technical challenge. It has been noted that the efficiency of the heat generating equipment depends not only on its sophistication, fuel type, but also on work of the distributing network taking into account the thermal, hydraulic losses, characteristics and modes of use of heating objects – buildings and technological processes. Possibility of supplying maximum heat flow from the heating system considering mismatch of highs and types of resources consumed from individual consumers should be provided by the right choice of energy equipment set, as well as bandwidth of transport systems and possibility of its regulation. It is important not just to configure the system to work effectively in the current mode (usually at the maximum load, but in the entire load range, as the calculated mode often takes a relatively small portion of the operating time. Thus, the efficiency of heating systems is largely determined by the method used for its control, including the possibility of regulating the main units and elements of the system. The paper considers the factors affecting the system efficiency. Mathematical models of the system elements allowing adjust the amount of released heat energy for consumers have been presented. Separately the mathematical model of the control system of electric drive vehicles used in the system has been considered and implemented.

  9. Thermal energy storage subsystems (a collection of quarterly reports)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Five quarterly reports are presented, covering the progress made in the development, fabrication, and delivery of three Thermal Energy Storage Subsystems. The design, development, and progress toward the delivery of three subsystems are discussed. The subsystem uses a salt hydrate mixture for thermal energy storage. Included are the program schedules, technical data, and other program activities from October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1977.

  10. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a

  11. Investigation of Solar and Solar-Gas Thermal Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zupa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the investigation of solar thermal sources of electrical and heat energy as well as the investigation of hybrid solar-gas thermal sources of electrical and heat energy (so called photothermal sources. Photothermal sources presented here utilize computer-controlled injection of the conversion fluid into special capillary porous substance that is adjusted to direct temperature treatment by the concentrated thermal radiation absorption.

  12. Batteries for efficient energy extraction from a water salinity difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mantia, Fabio; Pasta, Mauro; Deshazer, Heather D; Logan, Bruce E; Cui, Yi

    2011-04-13

    The salinity difference between seawater and river water is a renewable source of enormous entropic energy, but extracting it efficiently as a form of useful energy remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a device called "mixing entropy battery", which can extract and store it as useful electrochemical energy. The battery, containing a Na(2-x)Mn(5)O(10) nanorod electrode, was shown to extract energy from real seawater and river water and can be applied to a variety of salt waters. We demonstrated energy extraction efficiencies of up to 74%. Considering the flow rate of river water into oceans as the limiting factor, the renewable energy production could potentially reach 2 TW, or ∼13% of the current world energy consumption. The mixing entropy battery is simple to fabricate and could contribute significantly to renewable energy in the future.

  13. Batteries for Efficient Energy Extraction from a Water Salinity Difference

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2011-04-13

    The salinity difference between seawater and river water is a renewable source of enormous entropic energy, but extracting it efficiently as a form of useful energy remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a device called "mixing entropy battery", which can extract and store it as useful electrochemical energy. The battery, containing a Na2-xMn 5O10 nanorod electrode, was shown to extract energy from real seawater and river water and can be applied to a variety of salt waters. We demonstrated energy extraction efficiencies of up to 74%. Considering the flow rate of river water into oceans as the limiting factor, the renewable energy production could potentially reach 2 TW, or ∼13% of the current world energy consumption. The mixing entropy battery is simple to fabricate and could contribute significantly to renewable energy in the future. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgun, E; Grossman, JC

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  15. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  16. Alternative biomass sources for thermal energy generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensen, Torge; Müller, Sönke; Dresen, Boris; Büscher, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    of Bottrop-Kirchhellen in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. This region consists of nature reserves, forests, farmland and a few villages. To present a qualitative comparison between simulated and true biomass volume, we conducted field work by mapping the spatial extent of the desired biomass occurrences in the area. First results indicate a qualitative match of about 75%. Our research highlights the small-scale biomass features that have not been incorporated in previous biomass estimates. With the regular trimming and the accompanied raw material that becomes available, a new sector of thermal energy generation can be outlined. An automated quantification using satellite and GIS data will allow a regular monitoring of the vegetation growth and an assessment of the transport routes and costs as well as the location of the prospective power plants. In the endeavour of creating a sustainable energy supply, these biomass units should not be neglected, especially since the usage of the traditional units is limited due to competing interests in food production and nature conservation.

  17. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2016-07-11

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.

  18. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-14

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.

  19. Residential building thermal performance energy efficiency in Yangtze River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王厚华; 庄燕燕; 吴伟伟

    2009-01-01

    Using energy consumption software VisualDOE4.0,simulation was carried out on the energy consumption of a typical residential building in Yangtze River basin,with a focus on thermal performance of envelope each component and application of total heating recovery equipment. The effects of thermal performance of building envelope each component on energy efficiency ratio were analyzed. Comprehensive measures schemes of energy saving were designed by the orthogonal experiment. The energy efficiency ratios of different envelopes combination schemes were gained. Finally,the optimize combination scheme was confirmed. With the measurement dates,the correctness of the simulation dates was completely verified.

  20. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  1. Potential Applications of Concentrated Solar Thermal Technologies in the Australian Minerals Processing and Extractive Metallurgical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell'Amico, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The Australian minerals processing and extractive metallurgy industries are responsible for about 20% of Australia's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article reviews the potential applications of concentrated solar thermal (CST) energy in the Australian minerals processing industry to reduce this impact. Integrating CST energy into these industries would reduce their reliance upon conventional fossil fuels and reduce GHG emissions. As CST technologies become more widely deployed and cheaper, and as fuel prices rise, CST energy will progressively become more competitive with conventional energy sources. Some of the applications identified in this article are expected to become commercially competitive provided the costs for pollution abatement and GHG mitigation are internalized. The areas of potential for CST integration identified in this study can be classed as either medium/low-temperature or high-temperature applications. The most promising medium/low-grade applications are electricity generation and low grade heating of liquids. Electricity generation with CST energy—also known as concentrated solar power—has the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions out of all the potential applications identified because of the 24/7 dispatchability when integrated with thermal storage. High-temperature applications identified include the thermal decomposition of alumina and the calcination of limestone to lime in solar kilns, as well as the production of syngas from natural gas and carbonaceous materials for various metallurgical processes including nickel and direct reduced iron production. Hybridization and integration with thermal storage could enable CST to sustain these energy-intensive metallurgical processes continuously. High-temperature applications are the focus of this paper.

  2. Analysis on energy consumption index system of thermal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, J. B.; Zhang, N.; Li, H. F.

    2017-05-01

    Currently, the increasingly tense situation in the context of resources, energy conservation is a realistic choice to ease the energy constraint contradictions, reduce energy consumption thermal power plants has become an inevitable development direction. And combined with computer network technology to build thermal power “small index” to monitor and optimize the management system, the power plant is the application of information technology and to meet the power requirements of the product market competition. This paper, first described the research status of thermal power saving theory, then attempted to establish the small index system and build “small index” monitoring and optimization management system in thermal power plant. Finally elaborated key issues in the field of small thermal power plant technical and economic indicators to be further studied and resolved.

  3. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  4. Ultrasound Energy Effect on Solvent Extraction of Amaranth Seed Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Il; Chung, Ki Won; Lee, Seung Bum; Hong, In Kwon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kyung Ai [Seoul Metropolitan Government Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been widely applied to cleaning, medical appliances, extraction, etc. And ultrasonic energy can be applied to solvent extraction of plant oil from amaranth seed. Amaranth seed oil contains small amount of squalene. Squalene is polyunsaturated branched hydrocarbon, which is an essential part of the human body. In this study, the seed oil was extracted from amaranth seed by ultrasonic solvent extraction process. Ultrasonic irradiation time was 1, 3 ,5, 10, 20 and 30 min and extraction temperature was 20, 30, and 40 degree C. And ultrasonic power was 390 W and 520 W. The extracted amounts of amaranth seed oil and squalene were increased with the increase of ultrasonic power and irradiation time. Using ultrasonic energy in solvent extraction, extraction time was very shorten. The optimum extraction temperature was 30 degree C, it was caused that ultrasonic energy effects were increased in the matters of low temperature. The maximum extracted amount of amaranth seed oil was 0.746 g and squalene was 37.54 mg per 10 g amaranth seed at 30 degree C. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Potential energy savings and thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Rudbeck, Claus Christian; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe

    1996-01-01

    Results of simulations carried out on four different buildings with common windows, commercial low-energy windows and xerogel windows are presented. The results are the annual energy consumption for space heating and the indoor air temperature level....

  6. Solar photovoltaic/thermal (hybrid) energy project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, D. B.

    1981-09-01

    Development of photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) collectors and residential heat pump systems is reported. Candidate collector and residential heat pump systems were evaluated using the TRNSYS computer program. It is found that combined heat pump and PV array is a promising method for achieving economical solar cooling. Where the cooling load is dominant, exclusively PV collectors rather than PV/T collectors are preferred. Where the heating load is dominant, the thermal component of PV/T collectors makes a significant contribution to heating a residence. PV/T collectors were developed whose combined efficiency approaches the efficiency of a double glazed, exclusively thermal collector. The design and operational problems of air source heat pumps are reviewed. Possible effects of compressor startup transients on PV power system operation are discussed.

  7. Extraction study on uranyl nitrate for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, R.; Nath, G.

    2017-07-01

    Due to the ever-growing demand of energy nuclear reactor materials and the nuclear energy are now considered to be the most critical materials and source of energy for future era. Deposition of nuclear wastes in different industry, nuclear power sector are very much toxic in open environment which are hazardous to living being. There are different methods for extraction and reprocessing of these materials which are cost effective and tedious process. Ultrasonic assisted solvent extraction process is a most efficient and economical way for extraction of such type materials. The presence of third phase in mixing of extractants-diluent pair with aqueous phase imposes the problems in extraction of nuclear reactor materials. The appropriate solvent mixture in proper concentration is an important step in the solvent extraction process. Study of thermo-physical properties helps in selecting an optimum blend for extraction process. In the present work, the extraction of uranium with the binary mixture of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) and Kerosene was investigated and discussed with the variation of ultrasonic frequency for different temperatures. The result shows that the low frequency and low temperature is suitable environment for extraction. The extraction of uranium by this method is found to be a better result for extraction study in laboratory scale as well as industrial sector.

  8. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajo Sulejmanovic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to reduce in usage of fossil fuels and would help protection of an environment and reduce effects of global warming, etc.

  9. Analyzing Control Challenges for Thermal Energy Storage in Foodstuffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Larsen, Lars F. S.; Skovrup, Morten Juel

    2012-01-01

    We consider two important challenges that arise when thermal energy is to be stored in foodstuffs. We have previously introduced economic optimizing MPC schemes that both reduce operating costs and offer flexible power consumption in a future Smart Grid. The goal is to utilize the thermal capacity...

  10. Solar Thermal Energy Storage in a Photochromic Macrocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasceanu, Alexandru; Broman, Søren L; Hansen, Anne S; Skov, Anders B; Cacciarini, Martina; Kadziola, Anders; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2016-07-25

    The conversion and efficient storage of solar energy is recognized to hold significant potential with regard to future energy solutions. Molecular solar thermal batteries based on photochromic systems exemplify one possible technology able to harness and apply this potential. Herein is described the synthesis of a macrocycle based on a dimer of the dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene (DHA/VHF) photo/thermal couple. By taking advantage of conformational strain, this DHA-DHA macrocycle presents an improved ability to absorb and store incident light energy in chemical bonds (VHF-VHF). A stepwise energy release over two sequential ring-closing reactions (VHF→DHA) combines the advantages of an initially fast discharge, hypothetically addressing immediate energy consumption needs, followed by a slow process for consistent, long-term use. This exemplifies another step forward in the molecular engineering and design of functional organic materials towards solar thermal energy storage and release.

  11. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  12. Extracting Energy from Black Hole through Transition Region

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L X

    2000-01-01

    A new scenario for extracting energy from a Kerr black hole is proposed. With magnetic field lines connecting plasma particles inside the ergosphere with remote loads, the frame dragging twists the field lines so that energy and angular momentum are extracted from the plasma particles. If the magnetic field is strong enough, the energy extracted from the particles can be so large that the particles have negative energy as they fall into the black hole. So effectively the energy is extracted from the black hole. The particles inside the ergosphere can be continuously replenished with accretion from a disk surrounding the black hole, so a transition region with sufficient amount of plasma is formed between the black hole's horizon and the inner edge of the disk. Thus the energy can be continuously extracted from the black hole through the transition region. This may be the most efficient way for extracting energy from a Kerr black hole: in principle almost all of the rotational energy (up to $\\approx 29%$ of th...

  13. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  14. Design Considerations of a Solid State Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Houssainy, Sammy; Thacker, Ariana; Ip, Peggy; Ismail, Walid; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    With the growing governmental restrictions on carbon emission, renewable energies are becoming more prevalent. A reliable use of a renewable source however requires a built-in storage to overcome the inherent intermittent nature of the available energy. Thermal design of a solid state energy storage has been investigated for optimal performance. The impact of flow regime, laminar vs. turbulent, on the design and sizing of the system is also studied. The implications of low thermal conductivity of the storage material are discussed and a design that maximizes the round trip efficiency is presented. This study was supported by Award No. EPC-14-027 Granted by California Energy Commission (CEC).

  15. Smart Building: Decision Making Architecture for Thermal Energy Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Uribe, Oscar; San Martin, Juan Pablo; Garcia-Alegre, María C.; Santos, Matilde; Guinea, Domingo

    2015-01-01

    Smart applications of the Internet of Things are improving the performance of buildings, reducing energy demand. Local and smart networks, soft computing methodologies, machine intelligence algorithms and pervasive sensors are some of the basics of energy optimization strategies developed for the benefit of environmental sustainability and user comfort. This work presents a distributed sensor-processor-communication decision-making architecture to improve the acquisition, storage and transfer of thermal energy in buildings. The developed system is implemented in a near Zero-Energy Building (nZEB) prototype equipped with a built-in thermal solar collector, where optical properties are analysed; a low enthalpy geothermal accumulation system, segmented in different temperature zones; and an envelope that includes a dynamic thermal barrier. An intelligent control of this dynamic thermal barrier is applied to reduce the thermal energy demand (heating and cooling) caused by daily and seasonal weather variations. Simulations and experimental results are presented to highlight the nZEB thermal energy reduction. PMID:26528978

  16. On the non-thermal energy content of cosmic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Vazza, Franco; Brüggen, Marcus; Gheller, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    1) Background: the budget of non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is not well constrained, owing to the observational and theoretical difficulties in studying these diluted plasmas on large scales. 2) Method: we use recent cosmological simulations with complex physics in order to connect the emergence of non-thermal energy to the underlying evolution of gas and dark matter. 3) Results: the impact of non-thermal energy (e.g. cosmic rays, magnetic fields and turbulent motions) is found to increase in the outer region of galaxy clusters. Within numerical and theoretical uncertainties, turbulent motions dominate the budget of non-thermal energy in most of the cosmic volume. 4) Conclusion: assessing the distribution non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is crucial to perform high-precision cosmology in the future. Constraining the level of non-thermal energy in cluster outskirts will improve our understanding of the acceleration of relativistic particles by cosmic shocks and of the origin of extragalactic magneti...

  17. Smart Building: Decision Making Architecture for Thermal Energy Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Oscar Hernández; Martin, Juan Pablo San; Garcia-Alegre, María C; Santos, Matilde; Guinea, Domingo

    2015-10-30

    Smart applications of the Internet of Things are improving the performance of buildings, reducing energy demand. Local and smart networks, soft computing methodologies, machine intelligence algorithms and pervasive sensors are some of the basics of energy optimization strategies developed for the benefit of environmental sustainability and user comfort. This work presents a distributed sensor-processor-communication decision-making architecture to improve the acquisition, storage and transfer of thermal energy in buildings. The developed system is implemented in a near Zero-Energy Building (nZEB) prototype equipped with a built-in thermal solar collector, where optical properties are analysed; a low enthalpy geothermal accumulation system, segmented in different temperature zones; and an envelope that includes a dynamic thermal barrier. An intelligent control of this dynamic thermal barrier is applied to reduce the thermal energy demand (heating and cooling) caused by daily and seasonal weather variations. Simulations and experimental results are presented to highlight the nZEB thermal energy reduction.

  18. Smart Building: Decision Making Architecture for Thermal Energy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Hernández Uribe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Smart applications of the Internet of Things are improving the performance of buildings, reducing energy demand. Local and smart networks, soft computing methodologies, machine intelligence algorithms and pervasive sensors are some of the basics of energy optimization strategies developed for the benefit of environmental sustainability and user comfort. This work presents a distributed sensor-processor-communication decision-making architecture to improve the acquisition, storage and transfer of thermal energy in buildings. The developed system is implemented in a near Zero-Energy Building (nZEB prototype equipped with a built-in thermal solar collector, where optical properties are analysed; a low enthalpy geothermal accumulation system, segmented in different temperature zones; and an envelope that includes a dynamic thermal barrier. An intelligent control of this dynamic thermal barrier is applied to reduce the thermal energy demand (heating and cooling caused by daily and seasonal weather variations. Simulations and experimental results are presented to highlight the nZEB thermal energy reduction.

  19. estec2007 - 3rd European solar thermal energy conference. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-12-14

    The sessions of the 'estec2007 - 3{sup rd} European Solar Thermal Energy Conference held in Freiburg, Germany have the following titles: The solar thermal sector at a turning point; Cooling and Process Heat, Country reports Europe; Standards and Certification; Country reports outside Europe; Awareness raising and marketing; Domestic hot water and space heating; Domestic hot water and space heating; Quality Assurance and Solar Thermal Energy Service Companies; Collectors and other key technical issues; Policy - Financial incentives; Country Reports; Marketing and Awareness Raising; Quality Assurance Measures/Monistoring; Standards and Certification; Collectors; Domestic Hot Water and Space Heating; Industrial Process Heat; Storage; Solar Cooling. (AKF)

  20. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  1. Energy conservation in dissipative processes: Teacher expectations and strategies associated with imperceptible thermal energy

    CERN Document Server

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis; Scherr, Rachel E

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that many students and some teachers do not consistently apply the conservation of energy principle when analyzing mechanical scenarios. In observing elementary and secondary teachers engaged in learning activities that require tracking and conserving energy, we find that challenges to energy conservation often arise in dissipative scenarios in which kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy (e.g., a ball rolls to a stop). We find that teachers expect that when they can see the motion associated with kinetic energy, they should be able to perceive the warmth associated with thermal energy. Their expectations are violated when the warmth produced is imperceptible. In these cases, teachers reject the idea that the kinetic energy transforms to thermal energy. Our observations suggest that apparent difficulties with energy conservation may have their roots in a strong and productive association between forms of energy and their perceptible indicators. We see teachers resolve these ch...

  2. Nanoscale Based ThermalMagnetic Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    from thermal to magnetic Thermomagnetic cycle  cycle HdM(T,H) Reversible phase transformation Ferromagnetic Paramagnetic Qout Wout = Device...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Project goal: Thermomagnetic Efficiency of 30~50% of Carnot Seebeck device: Efficiency is...1959 Elliot 1984 Kirol 1988 Solomon 2007 UCLA Materials affect performance Regeneration 75 % of Carnot Multi-ferroic and small scale 55% of

  3. Thermal Energy Transfer Through All Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    correlate to a histological status or disease process. A positive response only expresses that there is a viable nerve fibers located within the pulp...al. in vivo study reported that TFE expressed the greatest thermal change through gold, all porcelain crowns and porcelain fused to metal crowns with...placement of a thermocouple probe with a diameter of 0.5mm, and to verify 14 uniform enamel-dentin thickness on the facial surface of all samples

  4. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, Cindy

    2012-08-31

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  5. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  6. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: III. Non thermal Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Campi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Konter, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which RHESSI data of 193 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 yrs of the SDO) mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power law slope and flux, and the thermal/nonthermal cross-over energy. From these parameters we calculate the total non thermal energy in electrons with two different methods: (i) using the observed cross-over energy as low-energy cutoff, and (ii) using the low-energy cutoff predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. We find commensurable ranges of the low-energy or 21+/-6 keV for the cross-over method, and 18+/-6 keV for the warm-target model. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies and thermal energies in the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios: E_nt=0.07 E_mag, and E_th=0.74 E_Na,...

  7. Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongyong; Tao, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hao; Ye, Qinxian; Hu, Hang; Song, Chengyi; Chen, Zhaoping; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

  8. Energy Extraction from the Einstein-Born-Infeld Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The energy extraction from a Einstein-Born-Infeld (EBI) black hole is addressed determining the extension of the ergosphere as well as the extractable energy using the irreducible mass concept. These results are compared with the Reissner-Nordstrom (RN) ones; RN is the linear electromagnetic counterpart of the BI black hole. It turns out that for a fixed charge Q, more energy can be extracted from the RN black hole than from the EBI one. The extreme case is investigated as well, presenting remarkable features, for instance that more energy can be extracted from extreme EBI black holes than from extreme RN, however, extreme EBI black holes lack of a linear electromagnetic black hole limit.

  9. Energy compensation of slow extracted beams with RF acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Souda, Hikaru; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Noda, Koji

    2016-03-01

    In a conventional carbon-ion radiotherapy facility, a carbon-ion beam is typically accelerated up to an optimum energy, slowly extracted from a synchrotron ring by a resonant slow extraction method, and ultimately delivered to a patient through a beam-delivery system. At Japan's Gunma University, a method employing slow-beam extraction along with beam-acceleration has been adopted. This method slightly alters the extracted-beam's energy owing to the acceleration component of the process, which subsequently results in a residual-range variation of approximately 2 mm in water-equivalent length. However, this range variation does not disturb a distal dose distribution with broad-beam methods such as the single beam-wobbling method. With the pencil-beam 3D scanning method, however, such a range variation disturbs a distal dose distribution because the variation is comparable to slice thickness. Therefore, for pencil-beam 3D scanning, an energy compensation method for a slow extracted beam is proposed in this paper. This method can compensate for the aforementioned energy variances by controlling net energy losses through a rotatable energy absorber set fixed between the synchrotron exit channel and the isocenter. Experimental results demonstrate that beam energies can be maintained constant, as originally hypothesized. Moreover, energy-absorber positions were found to be significantly enhanced by optimizing beam optics for reducing beam-size growth by implementation of the multiple-scattering effect option.

  10. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome

    insulated buildings (R > 5 m2.K/W). In case of single-storey building with a low level of insulation, the effectiveness of radiant terminals is lower due to the larger back losses, and an air-based terminal might be more energy-efficient than a radiant terminal (in terms of delivered energy). Regarding...... is based on both radiation and convection. Radiant terminals have the advantage of making use of low grade sources (i.e. low temperature heating and high temperature cooling), thus decreasing the primary energy consumption of buildings. But there is a lack of knowledge on the heat transfer from...... beam. The higher the air change rate and the warmer the outdoor air, the larger the savings achieved with a radiant cooling terminals. Therefore radiant terminals have a large potential of energy savings for buildings with high ventilation rates (e.g. shop, train station, industrial storage). Among...

  11. A critical review on energy, exergy, exergoeconomic and economic (4-E analysis of thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing energy supply, demand has created an interest towards the plant equipment efficiency and the optimization of existing thermal power plants. Also, a thermal power plant dependency on fossil fuel makes it a little bit difficult, because of environmental impacts has been always taken into consideration. At present, most of the power plants are going to be designed by the energetic performance criterion which is based on the first law of thermodynamics. Sometimes, the system energy balance is not sufficient for the possible finding of the system imperfections. Energy losses taking place in a system can be easily determined by using exergy analysis. Hence, it is a powerful tool for the measurement of energy quality, thereby helps to make complex thermodynamic systems more efficient. Nowadays, economic optimization of plant is also a big problem for researchers because of the complex nature. At a viewpoint of this, a comprehensive literature review over the years of energy, exergy, exergoeconomic and economic (4-E analysis and their applications in thermal power plants stimulated by coal, gas, combined cycle and cogeneration system have been done thoroughly. This paper is addressed to those researchers who are doing their research work on 4-E analysis in various thermal power plants. If anyone extracts an idea for the development of the concept of 4-E analysis using this article, we will achieve our goal. This review also indicates the scope of future research in thermal power plants.

  12. ENERGY PARTITIONS AND EVOLUTION IN A PURELY THERMAL SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free–free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to nearly their original values. We discuss possible scenarios to explain this behavior.

  13. Magneto-Thermo-Triboelectric Generator (MTTG) for thermal energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kwang Yeop; Lee, James; Lee, Dong-Gun

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel thermal energy harvesting system using triboelectric effect. Recently, there has been intensive research efforts on energy harvesting using triboelectric effect, which can produce surprising amount of electric power (when compared to piezoelectric materials) by rubbing or touching (i.e, electric charge by contact and separation) two different materials together. Numerous studies have shown the possibility as an attractive alternative with good transparency, flexibility and low cost abilities for its use in wearable device and smart phone applications markets. However, its application has been limited to only vibration source, which can produce sustained oscillation with maintaining contact and separation states repeatedly for triboelectric effect. Thus, there has been no attempt toward thermal energy source. The proposed approach can convert thermal energy into electricity by pairing triboelectric effect and active ferromagnetic materials The objective of the research is to develop a new manufacturing process of design, fabrication, and testing of a Magneto-Thermo-Triboelectric Generator (MTTG). The results obtained from the approach show that MTTG devices have a feasible power energy conversion capability from thermal energy sources. The tunable design of the device is such that it has efficient thermal capture over a wide range of operation temperature in waste heat.

  14. Combination of aquifer thermal energy storage and enhanced bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Zhuobiao; Gaans, van Pauline; Smit, Martijn; Rijnaarts, Huub; Grotenhuis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    To meet the demand for sustainable energy, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is widely used in the subsurface in urban areas. However, contamination of groundwater, especially with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), is often being encountered. This is commonly seen as an impedime

  15. Measuring energy expenditure in sports by thermal video analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Larsen, Ryan Godsk; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of human energy expenditure in sports and exercise contributes to performance analyses and tracking of physical activity levels. The focus of this work is to develop a video-based method for estimation of energy expenditure in athletes. We propose a method using thermal video analysis...

  16. Preparation, thermal properties and thermal reliability of microencapsulated n-eicosane as novel phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Cemil; Sari, Ahmet; Karaipekli, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    This study deals with preparation, characterization, thermal properties and thermal reliability of n-eicosane microcapsules as novel phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy storage. The microcapsulated PCMs were prepared by coating n-eicosane with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) shell. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and particle size distribution (PSD) analysis were used to characterize the PMMA/eicosane microcapsules as microcapsulated PCMs. The PSD analysis indicated that the average diameter of microcapsules was found to be 0.70 {mu}m under the stirring speed of 2000 rpm. Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the microcapsules were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) methods. From DSC analysis, the melting and freezing temperatures and the latent heats of the microcapsules were measured as 35.2 C and 34.9 C, 84.2 and -87.5 J/g, respectively. TGA analysis indicated that PMMA/eicosane microcapsules degrade in three steps at considerably high temperatures. Accelerated thermal cycling tests have been also applied to show the thermal reliability of the microcapsules. All results showed that thermal properties make the PMMA/eicosane microcapsules potential PCM for thermal energy storage. (author)

  17. Study of thermal energy storage using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weast, T. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Ananth, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of fluid bed heat exchangers (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES) in waste heat recovery applications is assessed by analysis of two selected conceptual systems, the rotary cement kiln and the electric arc furnace. It is shown that the inclusion of TES in the energy recovery system requires that the difference in off-peak and on-peak energy rates be large enough so that the value of the recovered energy exceeds the value of the stored energy by a wide enough margin to offset parasitic power and thermal losses. Escalation of on-peak energy rates due to fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  18. Identification and management of potential problems in aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, F.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Allen, D.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    There is renewed interest in alternative renewable energy sources because of high energy prices, shortages in peak load electrical supplies, and environmental considerations. Worldwide efforts are being made to extract thermal energy from the ground for heating and cooling individual dwellings and industrial and institutional complexes. Aquifer thermal energy storage systems offer a viable option. Often, there is a poor understanding of the problems associated with the well field, resulting in resistance in the consideration and implementation of the technology. Well-field problems include pressure build-up in the reinjection wells resulting in reduced flow conditions. Other problems associated with well-field configuration include wellbore clogging due to sediment accumulation, scaling, degassing or bio-fouling. These problems are often associated with changes in temperature and pressure. The authors examined these problems and presented guidelines to assist in the identification and management of the potential problems. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Wave energy extraction using decommisioned ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansour, A.E.; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Paik, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    to scrap naval vessels in 2002 was $33.4 million. Now apparently the Navy sinks naval vessels by bombs and torpedos. Scrapping can cause pollution, health hazards, accidents and threat to the ecosystem. Can a “polluting” ship about to be scrapped be used to generate clean wave energy? Maybe! It is possible...

  20. Renewable Energy Essentials: Concentrating Solar Thermal Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) is a re-emerging market. The Luz Company built 354 MWe of commercial plants in California, still in operations today, during 1984-1991. Activity re-started with the construction of an 11-MW plant in Spain, and a 64-MW plant in Nevada, by 2006. There are currently hundreds of MW under construction, and thousands of MW under development worldwide. Spain and the United States together represent 90% of the market. Algeria, Egypt and Morocco are building integrated solar combined cycle plants, while Australia, China, India, Iran, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and the United Arab Emirates are finalising or considering projects. While trough technology remains the dominant technology, several important innovations took place over 2007-2009: the first commercial solar towers, the first commercial plants with multi-hour capacities, the first Linear Fresnel Reflector plants went into line.

  1. Energy, Power and Thermal Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    and space force. 4 AFRL’s Core Areas of Expertise Space Vehicles Materials Directed Energy Munitions Propulsion Human Effectiveness Information...model ionic/electronic transport in a “ Phthalocyanine Complex” • Results validated through synthesis processes SOFC Stack Development - increased power...Watt power generation • Magnetic materials • Thermoelectric power generation • Mega-Watt power generation ‒ Superconducting and conventional

  2. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  3. Improving Energy Efficiency In Thermal Oil Recovery Surface Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy Nadella, Narayana

    2010-09-15

    Thermal oil recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Stimulation (CSS), Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) and In-situ Combustion are being used for recovering heavy oil and bitumen. These processes expend energy to recover oil. The process design of the surface facilities requires optimization to improve the efficiency of oil recovery by minimizing the energy consumption per barrel of oil produced. Optimization involves minimizing external energy use by heat integration. This paper discusses the unit processes and design methodology considering thermodynamic energy requirements and heat integration methods to improve energy efficiency in the surface facilities. A design case study is presented.

  4. Energy beyond food: foraging theory informs time spent in thermals by a large soaring bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L C Shepard

    Full Text Available Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus. Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered.

  5. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome

    the terminal towards the space and on the parameters influencing the effectiveness of terminals. Therefore the comfort conditions and energy consumption of four types of terminals (active chilled beam, radiant floor, wall and ceiling) have been compared for a typical office room, both numerically...... beam. The higher the air change rate and the warmer the outdoor air, the larger the savings achieved with a radiant cooling terminals. Therefore radiant terminals have a large potential of energy savings for buildings with high ventilation rates (e.g. shop, train station, industrial storage). Among...... comfort, a similar global level has been observed for the radiant and air-based terminals in both numerical and experimental investigations. But the different terminals did not achieve the same uniformity in space. The active chilled beam theoretically achieves the most uniform comfort conditions (when...

  6. Thermal Energy Generation in the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Frederick J

    2014-01-01

    We show that a recently introduced class of electromagnetic composite particles can explain some discrepancies in observations involving heat and helium released from the earth. Energy release during the formation of the composites and subsequent nuclear reactions involving the composites are described that can quantitatively account for the discrepancies and are expected to have implications in other areas of geophysics, for example, a new picture of heat production and volcanism in the earth is presented.

  7. Modeling Pumped Thermal Energy Storage with Waste Heat Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarr, Miles L. Lindsey

    This work introduces a new concept for a utility scale combined energy storage and generation system. The proposed design utilizes a pumped thermal energy storage (PTES) system, which also utilizes waste heat leaving a natural gas peaker plant. This system creates a low cost utility-scale energy storage system by leveraging this dual-functionality. This dissertation first presents a review of previous work in PTES as well as the details of the proposed integrated bottoming and energy storage system. A time-domain system model was developed in Mathworks R2016a Simscape and Simulink software to analyze this system. Validation of both the fluid state model and the thermal energy storage model are provided. The experimental results showed the average error in cumulative fluid energy between simulation and measurement was +/- 0.3% per hour. Comparison to a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model showed energy of a recently proposed Pumped Thermal Energy Storage and Bottoming System (Bot-PTES) that uses ammonia as the working fluid. This analysis focused on the effects of hot thermal storage utilization, system pressure, and evaporator/condenser size on the system performance. This work presents the estimated performance for a proposed baseline Bot-PTES. Results of this analysis showed that all selected parameters had significant effects on efficiency, with the evaporator/condenser size having the largest effect over the selected ranges. Results for the baseline case showed stand-alone energy storage efficiencies between 51 and 66% for varying power levels and charge states, and a stand-alone bottoming efficiency of 24%. The resulting efficiencies for this case were low compared to competing technologies; however, the dual-functionality of the Bot-PTES enables it to have higher capacity factor, leading to 91-197/MWh levelized cost of energy compared to 262-284/MWh for batteries and $172-254/MWh for Compressed Air Energy Storage.

  8. Extraction of thermal parameters of microbolometer infrared detectors using electrical measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Xu, Gu; Chen, G. X.; Sridhar, U.

    1998-10-01

    The performance of microbolometer infrared sensors is typically characterized by its thermal time constant, heat capacitance, and thermal conductance. Therefore, the determination of these parameters accurately and efficiently is of considerable interest for the design and operation of microbolometer infrared sensors. Usually, the thermal time constant is obtained by measuring the frequency response of microbolometers under infrared excitation and the thermal conductance and capacity are extracted using electrical measurement. In this paper, a technique is described to extract all three parameters using a single electrical measurement. In the measurement, we have employed a Wheatstone Bridge consisting of a bolometer and three reference resistors. The resistance of the bolometer changes as a result of self-heating under an external bias which in turn generates an output voltage across the Bridge. The time dependence of the output voltage was used to extract thermal parameters of the bolometer. We believe this technique is useful in determining the thermal parameters of microbolometer based sensors.

  9. Thermal energy storage using phase change materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the use of solid‐liquid phase change materials to store significant amounts of energy in the latent heat of fusion. The proper selection of materials for different applications is covered in detail, as is the use of high conductivity additives to enhance thermal diffusivity. Dr. Fleischer explores how applications of PCMS have expanded over the past 10 years to include the development of high efficiency building materials to reduce heating and cooling needs, smart material design for clothing, portable electronic systems thermal management, solar thermal power plant design and many others. Additional future research directions and challenges are also discussed.

  10. Buffer thermal energy storage for a solar Brayton engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been completed on the application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine. To aid in the study, a computer program was written for complete transient/stead-state Brayton cycle performance. The results indicated that thermal storage can afford a significant decrease in the number of engine shutdowns as compared to operating without thermal storage. However, the number of shutdowns does not continuously decrease as the storage material weight increases. In fact, there appears to be an optimum weight for minimizing the number of shutdowns.

  11. Thermal energy harvesting for application at MEMS scale

    CERN Document Server

    Percy, Steven; McGarry, Scott; Post, Alex; Moore, Tim; Cavanagh, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the history of thermal heat generators and focuses on the potential for these processes using micro-electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) technology for this application. The main focus is on the capture of waste thermal energy for example from industrial processes, transport systems or the human body to generate useable electrical power.  A wide range of technologies is discussed, including external combustion heat cycles at MEMS ( Brayton, Stirling and Rankine), Thermoacoustic, Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs), Multiferroics, Thermionics, Pyroelectric, Seebeck, Alkali Metal Thermal, Hydride Heat Engine, Johnson Thermo Electrochemical Converters, and the Johnson Electric Heat Pipe.

  12. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: II. Thermal Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, M J; Ryan, D; Caspi, A; McTiernan, J M; Warren, H P

    2015-01-01

    We present the second part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and CMEs that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO during the first 3.5 years of its mission. In this Paper II we compute the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution functions and associated multi-thermal energies, using a spatially-synthesized Gaussian DEM forward-fitting method. The multi-thermal DEM function yields a significantly higher (by an average factor of $\\approx 14$), but more comprehensive (multi-)thermal energy than an isothermal energy estimate from the same AIA data. We find a statistical energy ratio of $E_{th}/E_{diss} \\approx 2\\%-40\\%$ between the multi-thermal energy $E_{th}$ and the magnetically dissipated energy $E_{diss}$, which is an order of magnitude higher than the estimates of Emslie et al.~2012. For the analyzed set of M and X-class flares we find the following physical parameter ranges: $L=10^{8.2}-10^{9.7}$ cm for the length scale of the flare areas, $T_p=10^{5.7}-...

  13. Thermal indoor environment and energy consumption in a plus-energy house: cooling season measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    . The house was cooled by a floor cooling system and was ventilated with a mechanical ventilation system. Different operative temperature set-points and different ventilation rates were tested. Operative temperature at a representative location inside the occupied zone was used as an indicator of the thermal...... the floor cooling system) and increasing the ventilation rate provided a better thermal indoor environment but with increased energy consumption. The thermal indoor environment and energy performance of the house can be improved with decreased glazing area, increased thermal mass, installation of solar......The present study is concerned with the thermal indoor environment and HVAC system energy consumption of a detached, one-story, single family, plus-energy house during a cooling season. The house was located in Denmark and it has been used as a full-scale experimental facility for one year...

  14. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of microencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Cemil; Sari, Ahmet; Karaipekli, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey); Uzun, Orhan [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    This study is focused on the preparation, characterization, and determination of thermal properties of microencapsulated docosane with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as phase change material for thermal energy storage. Microencapsulation of docosane has been carried out by emulsion polymerization. The microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Thermal properties and thermal stability of MEPCM were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). DSC analysis indicated that the docosane in the microcapsules melts at 41.0 C and crystallizes at 40.6 C. It has latent heats of 54.6 and -48.7 J/g for melting and crystallization, respectively. TGA showed that the MEPCM degraded in three distinguishable steps and had good chemical stability. Accelerated thermal cycling tests also indicated that the MEPCM had good thermal reliability. Based on all these results, it can be concluded that the microencapsulated docosane as MEPCMs have good potential for thermal energy storage purposes such as solar space heating applications. (author)

  15. Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

  16. Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Metal hydride-based thermal energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J.; Fang, Zhigang

    2017-10-03

    The invention provides a thermal energy storage system comprising a metal-containing first material with a thermal energy storage density of about 1300 kJ/kg to about 2200 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; a metal-containing second material with a thermal energy storage density of about 200 kJ/kg to about 1000 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; and a hydrogen conduit for reversibly transporting hydrogen between the first material and the second material. At a temperature of 20.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal is converted to the hydride. At a temperature of 0.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal hydride is converted to the metal and hydrogen. The disclosed metal hydride materials have a combination of thermodynamic energy storage densities and kinetic power capabilities that previously have not been demonstrated. This performance enables practical use of thermal energy storage systems for electric vehicle heating and cooling.

  18. Black hole energy extraction via stationary scalar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Gerow, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    We study scalar field configurations around Kerr black holes with a time-independent energy-momentum tensor. These stationary `scalar clouds', confined near the black hole (BH) by their own mass or a mirror at fixed radius, exist at the threshold for energy extraction via superradiance. Motivated by the electromagnetic Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism, we explore whether scalar clouds could serve as a proxy for the force-free magnetosphere in the BZ process. We find that a stationary energy-extracting scalar cloud solution exists when the reflecting mirror is replaced by a semi-permeable surface which allows the cloud to radiate some energy to infinity while maintaining self-sustained superradiance. The radial energy flux displays the same behaviour for rapidly rotating holes as magnetohydrodynamic simulations predict for the BZ mechanism.

  19. Atmospheric water on Mars, energy estimates for extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tom

    1991-01-01

    The Mars atmosphere is considered as a resource for water to support a human expedition. Information obtained from the Viking mission is used to estimate the near-surface water vapor level. The variability over the diurnal cycle is examined and periods of greatest water abundance are identified. Various methods for extracting atmospheric water are discussed including energy costs and the means for optimizing water extraction techniques.

  20. Thermal and microwave energy for shrimp processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M.R.R.; Novak, A.F.

    1975-12-01

    Gulf Coast shrimp were processed by 2450 MHz microwave energy and conventional boiling to determine if differences existed in organoleptic evaluation and vitamin retention. Chemical tests for vitamin A and ..beta..-carotene, and microbiological assays for niacin, thiamine, riboflavin, and pantothenic acid were used to determine vitamin retention. Statistical analyses of all results were accomplished with the use of a 360 IBM computer. Results of the organoleptic tests showed no significant difference between the two processes; the only significant difference was among the judges, showing evidence of an untrained test panel which is typical of the consuming public. Vitamin A was not found in the tailmeat and thereafter samples were analyzed for ..beta..-carotene, one of the most important provitamins A. Apparent percent retentions were calculated from the mean values of the replicas for each vitamin and varied between 77.48 and 115.0 percent for different vitamins and processes and were based on values found for the raw control. The highest value, 115.0 percent, was found in the microwave samples assayed for thiamine, and was probably caused by thiaminase found in raw shrimp, which is responsible for destruction of thiamine.

  1. Advanced phase change composite by thermally annealed defect-free graphene for thermal energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Guoqing; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Yao, Tiankai; Lu, Fengyuan; Shao, Dali; Hu, Tao; Wang, Gongkai; Ran, Guang; Lian, Jie

    2014-09-10

    Organic phase change materials (PCMs) have been utilized as latent heat energy storage and release media for effective thermal management. A major challenge exists for organic PCMs in which their low thermal conductivity leads to a slow transient temperature response and reduced heat transfer efficiency. In this work, 2D thermally annealed defect-free graphene sheets (GSs) can be obtained upon high temperature annealing in removing defects and oxygen functional groups. As a result of greatly reduced phonon scattering centers for thermal transport, the incorporation of ultralight weight and defect free graphene applied as nanoscale additives into a phase change composite (PCC) drastically improve thermal conductivity and meanwhile minimize the reduction of heat of fusion. A high thermal conductivity of the defect-free graphene-PCC can be achieved up to 3.55 W/(m K) at a 10 wt % graphene loading. This represents an enhancement of over 600% as compared to pristine graphene-PCC without annealing at a comparable loading, and a 16-fold enhancement than the pure PCM (1-octadecanol). The defect-free graphene-PCC displays rapid temperature response and superior heat transfer capability as compared to the pristine graphene-PCC or pure PCM, enabling transformational thermal energy storage and management.

  2. Thermal condensate structure and cosmological energy density of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Capolupo, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of thermal vacuum condensate for scalar and fermion fields. We analyze the thermal states at the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and we show that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor density of photon fields reproduces the energy density and pressure of the CMB. We perform the computations in the formal framework of the thermo field dynamics. We also consider the case of neutrinos and thermal states at the temperature of the neutrino cosmic background. Consistency with the estimated lower bound of the sum of the active neutrino masses is verified. In the boson sector, non trivial contribution to the energy of the universe is given by particles of masses of the order of $10^{-4}eV$ compatible with the ones of the axion-like particles. The fractal self-similar structure of the thermal radiation is also discussed and related to the coherent structure of the thermal vacuum.

  3. Thermal Condensate Structure and Cosmological Energy Density of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Capolupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study thermal vacuum condensate for scalar and fermion fields. We analyze the thermal states at the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB and we show that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor density of photon fields reproduces the energy density and pressure of the CMB. We perform the computations in the formal framework of the Thermo Field Dynamics. We also consider the case of neutrinos and thermal states at the temperature of the neutrino cosmic background. Consistency with the estimated lower bound of the sum of the active neutrino masses is verified. In the boson sector, nontrivial contribution to the energy of the universe is given by particles of masses of the order of 10−4 eV compatible with the ones of the axion-like particles. The fractal self-similar structure of the thermal radiation is also discussed and related to the coherent structure of the thermal vacuum.

  4. Energy requirements for wet solvent extraction of lipids from microalgal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory J O

    2016-04-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae requires energy efficient processes for extracting and converting triacylglyceride lipids to fuel, compatible with coproduction of protein feeds and nutraceuticals. Wet solvent extraction involves mechanical cell rupture, lipid extraction via solvent contacting, physical phase separation, thermal solvent recovery, and transesterification. A detailed analysis of the effect of key process parameters on the parasitic energy demand of this process was performed. On a well-to-pump basis, between 16% and 320% of the resultant biodiesel energy was consumed depending solely on the process parameters. Highly positive energy balances can be achieved, but only if a correctly designed process is used. This requires processing concentrated biomass (ca 25%w/w) with a high triacylglyceride content (ca 30%w/w), and an efficient extraction process employing a non-polar solvent, low solvent-to-paste ratio, and efficient energy recovery. These requirements preclude many laboratory scale processes and polar co-solvents as viable options for large-scale biofuel production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hot Thermal Storage in a Variable Power, Renewable Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    where cost effective, increase the utilization of distributed electric power generation through wind, solar, geothermal , and biomass renewable...molten salt. On a grid scale, off-peak electricity, converted by ohmic heating, and thermal energy from a concentrated solar power (CSP) plant ...heat energy originating from renewable sources explored. These heat sources are waste heat from the chilling plant , wind electric power from the wind

  6. Evaluation of the pH and thermal stabilities of rosella anthocyanin extracts under solar light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahtan A. Askar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin is considered as an unstable pigment, undergoes gradual degradation processes throughout the storage or use. The degradation of Rosella anthocyanin extract (RAE in different pH solutions was studied under solar light and compared with solutions kept in the dark. It appears that RAE solutions under solar light were suffering rapid degradation than those kept in the dark. Moreover, RAE samples at higher pH values showed faster rates of degradation than those with lower pH values. A mechanism for degradation was suggested through the formation of hydroxyl radical which is responsible for demineralization process. It is also appears that as the initial concentration of the dye increases, the requirement needed for degradation increased as well. The thermal degradation behavior of RAE at temperature range 25–60 °C under solar light showed first order kinetics with low activation energies.

  7. Thermal energy storage. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-09-01

    The cited reports of federally-funded research concern thermal energy storage. The citations cover the design of equipment, performance evaluation, theory, materials used, and experimental design. This updated bibliography contains 240 citations, 128 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  8. Fuels and chemicals from biomass using solar thermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giori, G.; Leitheiser, R.; Wayman, M.

    1981-01-01

    The significant nearer term opportunities for the application of solar thermal energy to the manufacture of fuels and chemicals from biomass are summarized, with some comments on resource availability, market potential and economics. Consideration is given to the production of furfural from agricultural residues, and the role of furfural and its derivatives as a replacement for petrochemicals in the plastics industry.

  9. Local thermal energy as a structural indicator in glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberg, Jacques; Lerner, Edan; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-07-01

    Identifying heterogeneous structures in glasses—such as localized soft spots—and understanding structure-dynamics relations in these systems remain major scientific challenges. Here, we derive an exact expression for the local thermal energy of interacting particles (the mean local potential energy change caused by thermal fluctuations) in glassy systems by a systematic low-temperature expansion. We show that the local thermal energy can attain anomalously large values, inversely related to the degree of softness of localized structures in a glass, determined by a coupling between internal stresses—an intrinsic signature of glassy frustration—anharmonicity and low-frequency vibrational modes. These anomalously large values follow a fat-tailed distribution, with a universal exponent related to the recently observed universal ω4ω4 density of states of quasilocalized low-frequency vibrational modes. When the spatial thermal energy field—a “softness field”—is considered, this power law tail manifests itself by highly localized spots, which are significantly softer than their surroundings. These soft spots are shown to be susceptible to plastic rearrangements under external driving forces, having predictive powers that surpass those of the normal modes-based approach. These results offer a general, system/model-independent, physical/observable-based approach to identify structural properties of quiescent glasses and relate them to glassy dynamics.

  10. Design tool for the thermal energy potential of asphalt pavements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Oversloot, H.P.; Bondt, A. de; Jansen, R.; Rij, H. van

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a design tool for the calculation of the thermal energy potential of a so-called asphalt collector. Two types of numerical models have been developed and validated against experimental results from a full-scale test-site. The validation showed to be a tedious

  11. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  12. Thermal Parameter Extraction of a Multilayered System by a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, M.; Depriester, M.; Mascot, M.; Longuemart, S.; Fasquelle, D.; Carru, J. C.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2013-09-01

    Submicron multilayer systems are nowadays used in many common applications such as electronic systems, fuel cells, etc. A knowledge of the layer’s thermal properties are of main interest for thermal management in such systems. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate thermal parameters of a commercially available multilayered system (Pt-Ti-SiO-Si) using the photothermal radiometry technique. Here, a genetic algorithm is used for extracting thermal parameters of this typical four-layer wafer system. The obtained results can be used as a reference for thermal studies of thin layers coated on the top of such wafers, where they act as a deposition substrate.

  13. Enhancing Low-Grade Thermal Energy Recovery in a Thermally Regenerative Ammonia Battery Using Elevated Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2015-02-13

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. A thermally regenerative ammonia battery (TRAB) is a new approach for converting low-grade thermal energy into electricity by using an ammonia electrolyte and copper electrodes. TRAB operation at 72°C produced a power density of 236±8 Wm-2, with a linear decrease in power to 95±5 Wm-2 at 23°C. The improved power at higher temperatures was due to reduced electrode overpotentials and more favorable thermodynamics for the anode reaction (copper oxidation). The energy density varied with temperature and discharge rates, with a maximum of 650 Whm-3 at a discharge energy efficiency of 54% and a temperature of 37°C. The energy efficiency calculated with chemical process simulation software indicated a Carnot-based efficiency of up to 13% and an overall thermal energy recovery of 0.5%. It should be possible to substantially improve these energy recoveries through optimization of electrolyte concentrations and by using improved ion-selective membranes and energy recovery systems such as heat exchangers.

  14. Segmentation techniques for extracting humans from thermal images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A pedestrian detection system for underground mine vehicles is being developed that requires the segmentation of people from thermal images in underground mine tunnels. A number of thresholding techniques are outlined and their performance on a...

  15. The Application of Thermal Plasma to Extraction Metallurgy and Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Various applications of thermal plasma to extraction metallurgy and related fields are surveyed, chiefly on the basis of documents published during the past two or three years. Applications to melting and smelting, to thermal decomposition, to reduction, to manufacturing of inorganic compounds, and to other fields are considered.

  16. Thermal energy storage - overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Nicole; Bauer, Thomas; Martin, Claudia; Eck, Markus; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems.

  17. Experimental Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Extraction from a Pulsed Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    specific heat capacity, that would result in a 24% loss in energy for ionization. Second, the water and aqueous NaCl were added prior to detonation . This...Experimental Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Extraction from a Pulsed Detonation THESIS Kaz I. Teope, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENY-MS-15-M-224 DEPARTMENT OF THE... DETONATION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force

  18. Flexible hybrid energy cell for simultaneously harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Hulin; Zhu, Guang; Lee, Sangmin; Lin, Zong-Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-01-22

    We report the first flexible hybrid energy cell that is capable of simultaneously or individually harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies to power some electronic devices. For having both the pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties, a polarized poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film-based nanogenerator (NG) was used to harvest thermal and mechanical energies. Using aligned ZnO nanowire arrays grown on the flexible polyester (PET) substrate, a ZnO-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) heterojunction solar cell was designed for harvesting solar energy. By integrating the NGs and the solar cells, a hybrid energy cell was fabricated to simultaneously harvest three different types of energies. With the use of a Li-ion battery as the energy storage, the harvested energy can drive four red light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  19. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Tison, R. R.; Marianowski, L. G.

    1980-02-01

    The results of comparative screening studies of candidate molten carbonate salts as phase change materials (PCM) for advanced solar thermal energy storage applications at 540 to 870 C (1004 to 1600 F) and steam Rankine electric generation at 400 to 540 C (752 to 1004 F) are presented. Alkali carbonates are attractive as latent heat storage materials because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, low corrosivity, moderate cost, and safe and simple handling requirements. Salts were tested in 0.1 kWhr lab scale modules and evaluated on the basis of discharge heat flux, solidification temperature range, thermal cycling stability, and compatibility with containment materials. The feasibility of using a distributed network of high conductivity material to increase the heat flux through the layer of solidified salt was evaluated. The thermal performance of an 8 kWhr thermal energy storage (TES) module containing LiKCO3 remained very stable throughout 5650 hours and 130 charge/discharge cycles at 480 to 535 C (896 to 995 F). A TES utilization concept of an electrical generation peaking subsystem composed of a multistage condensing steam turbine and a TES subsystem with a separate power conversion loop was defined. Conceptual designs for a 100 MW sub e TES peaking system providing steam at 316 C, 427 C, and 454 C (600 F, 800 F, and 850 F) at 3.79 million Pa (550 psia) were developed and evaluated. Areas requiring further investigation have also been identified.

  20. Thermal comfort and energy-efficient cooling of nonresidential buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Kalz, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    This book supports HVAC planners in reducing the cooling energy demand, improving the indoor environment and designing more cost-effective building concepts. High performance buildings have shown that it is possible to go clearly beyond the energy requirements of existing legislation and obtaining good thermal comfort. However, there is still a strong uncertainty in day-to-day practice due to the lack of legislative regulations for mixed-mode buildings which are neither only naturally ventilated nor fully air-conditioned, but use a mix of different low-energy cooling techniques. Based on the f

  1. Performance maps for the control of thermal energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finck, Christian; Li, Rongling; Zeiler, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Predictive control in building energy systems requires the integration of the building, building system, and component dynamics. The prediction accuracy of these dynamics is crucial for practical applications. This paper introduces performance maps for the control of water tanks, phase change mat...... material tanks, and thermochemical material tanks. The results show that these performance maps can fully account for the dynamics of thermal energy storage tanks.......Predictive control in building energy systems requires the integration of the building, building system, and component dynamics. The prediction accuracy of these dynamics is crucial for practical applications. This paper introduces performance maps for the control of water tanks, phase change...

  2. Solar thermal energy as a topic in secondary mathematics classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, A.; Brinkmann, K. [EnviPro Environmental Process Engineering Prof. Dr. Klaus Brinkmann, Iserlohn (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    One of the most effective methods to achieve a sustainable change of our momentary existing power supply system to a system mainly based on renewable energy conversion is the education of our children. For this purpose the compulsory school subject mathematics appears to be suitable. In order to promote renewable energy issues in mathematics classrooms, the authors have developed a special didactical concept to open this field for students, as well as for their teachers. The aim of this paper is to present firstly an overview of our concept and secondly examples of problems to the special topic of solar thermal energy, developed on the basis of our concept. (orig.)

  3. Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

  4. Thermal comfort in residential buildings: Comfort values and scales for building energy simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, Leen; D' haeseleer, William [Division of Applied Mechanics and Energy Conversion, University of Leuven (K.U.Leuven), Celestijnenlaan 300 A, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dear, Richard de [Division of Environmental and Life Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Hensen, Jan [Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Vertigo 6.18, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Building Energy Simulation (BES) programmes often use conventional thermal comfort theories to make decisions, whilst recent research in the field of thermal comfort clearly shows that important effects are not incorporated. The conventional theories of thermal comfort were set up based on steady state laboratory experiments. This, however, is not representing the real situation in buildings, especially not when focusing on residential buildings. Therefore, in present analysis, recent reviews and adaptations are considered to extract acceptable temperature ranges and comfort scales. They will be defined in an algorithm, easily implementable in any BES code. The focus is on comfortable temperature levels in the room, more than on the detailed temperature distribution within that room. (author)

  5. Thermal energy storage for solar applications: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, C.

    1979-03-01

    This report presents an overview of current technology and programs including some economic studies in low, intermediate, and high temperatre thermal energy storage for solar applications and an assessment of key problem areas. Previous studies of the economic role of storage for solar home heating and stand-alone electric plants are examined first and factors which affect the economics of storage are discussed. Next, the costs and storage capacities of representative sensible and latent heat storage materials are summarized. Various modes of operation are also presented for thermal storage by reversible chemical reactions, but this technology is at such an immature stage of development that its economic and technical potential are not clearly understood. Some new ideas in containers and heat exchangers are reviewed to illustrate possible innovative approaches to reducing storage costs. A more detailed examination is then made of reversible reaction storage, and gas-solid reactions are shown to have desirable attributes for solar energy storage. However, there are problems with heat transfer and heat exchanger for these systems that must be solved to make such systems more economically attractive. The DOE programs in thermal energy storage are reviewed in light of this review, and recommendations are made for future program directions which appear at this time to have the greatest potential impact on reducing technical and economic barriers to thermal storage utilization.

  6. Thermal Storage Systems Assessment for Energy Sustainability in Housing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania I. Lagunes Vega

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve greater enhancements in energy sustainability for housing, the function and efficiency of two different passive cooling systems were studied: encapsulated water in recycled bottles of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET and polystyrene plates, in comparison with standard concrete slab systems, which are customarily used in housing. Experiments were placed over a tile surface, in which temperature changes were monitored for a period of 20 days from 08:00 to 20:00. The efficiency of passive thermal storage systems was endorsed through statistical analysis using the “SPSS” software. This resulted in a 17% energy saving, thus promoting energy sustainability in housing units, which reduces the use of electrical appliances required to stabilize conditions to achieve optimum thermal comfort for the human body inside a house, therefore, reducing electrical power consumption, CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and generating savings. Due to the complexity of a system with temperature changes, a fractal analysis was performed for each experimental system, using the “Benoit” software (V.1.3 with self-compatible tools of rescaled range (R/S and a wavelets method, showing that the thermal fluctuations on the tiles with the thermal storage system adapt to the rescaled range analysis and the regular tiles adapt to the wavelets method.

  7. Thermal energy storage for CSP (Concentrating Solar Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Py Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The major advantage of concentrating solar power before photovoltaic is the possibility to store thermal energy at large scale allowing dispatchability. Then, only CSP solar power plants including thermal storage can be operated 24 h/day using exclusively the solar resource. Nevertheless, due to a too low availability in mined nitrate salts, the actual mature technology of the two tanks molten salts cannot be applied to achieve the expected international share in the power production for 2050. Then alternative storage materials are under studies such as natural rocks and recycled ceramics made from industrial wastes. The present paper is a review of those alternative approaches.

  8. Thermal energy storage for CSP (Concentrating Solar Power)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Py, Xavier; Sadiki, Najim; Olives, Régis; Goetz, Vincent; Falcoz, Quentin

    2017-07-01

    The major advantage of concentrating solar power before photovoltaic is the possibility to store thermal energy at large scale allowing dispatchability. Then, only CSP solar power plants including thermal storage can be operated 24 h/day using exclusively the solar resource. Nevertheless, due to a too low availability in mined nitrate salts, the actual mature technology of the two tanks molten salts cannot be applied to achieve the expected international share in the power production for 2050. Then alternative storage materials are under studies such as natural rocks and recycled ceramics made from industrial wastes. The present paper is a review of those alternative approaches.

  9. Nanoparticles for heat transfer and thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Timofeeva, Elena V.; Moravek, Michael

    2015-07-14

    An article of manufacture and method of preparation thereof. The article of manufacture and method of making the article includes an eutectic salt solution suspensions and a plurality of nanocrystalline phase change material particles having a coating disposed thereon and the particles capable of undergoing the phase change which provides increase in thermal energy storage. In addition, other articles of manufacture can include a nanofluid additive comprised of nanometer-sized particles consisting of copper decorated graphene particles that provide advanced thermal conductivity to heat transfer fluids.

  10. Cyclotrons with fast variable and/or multiple energy extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Baumgarten

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility in principle of stripping extraction in combination with reverse bends in isochronous separate-sector cyclotrons (and/or fixed field alternating gradient accelerators. If one uses reverse bends between the sectors (instead of or in combination with drifts and places stripper foils at the sector exit edges, the stripped beam has a reduced bending radius and it should be able to leave the cyclotron within the range of the valley—even if the beam is stripped at less than full energy. We are especially interested in stripping of H_{2}^{+}, as it doubles the charge to mass ratio of the ions. However the method could be applied to other ions or ionized molecules as well. For the production of proton beams by stripping extraction of an H_{2}^{+} beam, we discuss possible designs for three types of machines: First, a low-energy cyclotron for the simultaneous production of several beams at multiple energies—for instance 15, 30, and 70 MeV—thus allowing beam delivery on several isotope production targets. In this case it can be an advantage to have a strong energy dependence of the direction of the extracted beam. Second, we consider a fast variable-energy proton machine for cancer therapy that should allow extraction (of the complete beam at all energies in the range of about 70 MeV to about 250 MeV into the same beam line. Third, we consider a high-intensity high-energy machine, where the main design goals are extraction with low losses, low activation of components, and high reliability. Especially if such a machine is considered for an accelerator driven system (ADS, this extraction mechanism has advantages: Beam trips by the failure of electrostatic elements could be avoided and the turn separation would be less critical, which allows operation at lower main cavity voltages. This would in turn reduce the number of rf trips. The price that has to be paid for these advantages is an increase in size and/or field

  11. Sludge thermal oxidation processes: mineral recycling, energy impact, and greenhouse effect gases release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibelin, Eric

    2003-07-01

    Different treatment routes have been studied for a mixed sludge: the conventional agricultural use is compared with the thermal oxidation processes, including incineration (in gaseous phase) and wet air oxidation (in liquid phase). The interest of a sludge digestion prior to the final treatment has been also considered according to the two major criteria, which are the fossil energy utilisation and the greenhouse effect gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) release. Thermal energy has to be recovered on thermal processes to make these processes environmentally friendly, otherwise their main interest is to extract or destroy micropollutants and pathogens from the carbon cycle. In case of continuous energy recovery, incineration can produce more energy than it consumes. Digestion is especially interesting for agriculture: according to these two schemes, the energy final balance can also be in excess. As to wet air oxidation, it is probably one of the best way to minimize greenhouse effect gases emission. (author)

  12. Application of hybrid microwave thermal extraction techniques for mulberry root bark

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Cheng-Chi; Yau Her-Terng

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is the extraction of compounds from the mulberry root bark using a hybrid microwave thermal process. The shearing mechanism and an integrated circulation system, which increases the rate of contact between the solvent and extractive, are studied. The results are analyzed by the Taguchi method and verified by high performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore, the optimal operating parameters of the extraction of mulberry root b...

  13. Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. From Molecular Electronics to Solar Thermal Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine Tetzschner

    The Sun's signicant resource potential provides a solution for the world's increasing energy demand in a sustainable and responsible manner. However, the intrinsic property of the on-o cycles of the solar irradiation, i.e. daynight, sunny-cloudy, and summer-winter, constitutes a signicant challenge...... for the utilization of solar energy. An eective technology for storing the solar energy is required. This thesis focuses on solar thermal energy storage in molecules, since it oers a very compact and eective storage method. The rst chapter after the introduction of the thesis, chapter two, introduces the fundamental...... properties of the molecule, i.e. the electronic behaviour of the molecule in dierent environments, which is a key property for investigations of solar energy storage. The main focus of the research is on the electron transport in the Coulomb blockade regime. The third chapter goes into the challenge...

  15. Thermal energy storage for sustainable energy consumption : fundamentals, case studies and design

    CERN Document Server

    Paksoy, Halime

    2007-01-01

    We all share a small planet. Our growing thirst for energy already threatens the future of our earth. Fossil fuels - energy resources of today - are not evenly distributed on the earth. 10 per cent of the world's population exploits 90 per cent of its resources. Today's energy systems rely heavily on fossil fuel resources which are diminishing ever faster. The world must prepare for a future without fossil fuels. Thermal energy storage provides us with a flexible heating and/or cooling tool to combat climate change through conserving energy and increasing energy while utilizing natural renewab

  16. Electrical characterization of a buckling thermal energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trioux, E.; Rufer, L.; Monfray, S.; Skotnicki, T.; Muralt, P.; Basrour, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the electrical characterizations of a novel concept for thermal energy harvesting at micro scale. The devices presented here are based on a two-step transduction combining thermo-mechanical and piezoelectric conversion. The piezoelectric layer is directly integrated into a buckling bilayer plate made of aluminium and aluminium nitride. For the first time, we have characterized the structures electrically and we have investigated their output power during the buckling. Firstly, we have used an insulating tip to make the plate buckle in order to have an estimation of the output power due to piezoelectric contribution only, and to eliminate any pyroelectric contribution that might be present during the thermal actuation. Then, we heated up the structure and we collected the output signal with an instrumentation amplifier in order to measure the voltage generated during the buckling. The output power during the mechanical and the thermal buckling is compared in the paper.

  17. Applying sub-band energy extraction to noise cancellation of ultrasonic NDT signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi ZHANG; Pei-wen QUE; Wei LIANG

    2008-01-01

    In ultrasonic non-destructive tests,the echo signal at the flaw is highly complex due to the interference of multiple echoes with random amplitudes and phases,and is disturbed by all kinds of noises,such as thermal noise,digitalization noise,and structure noise.In this paper,the ultrasonic signal was decomposed by empirical mode decomposition (EMD) to obtain the intrinsic mode function (IMF) components according to ultrasonic defect echo signals occuring at the corresponding time,and the energy of the ultrasonic signal was concentrated.The IMF component selection criterion based on sub-band energy extraction was proposed to extract the ultrasonic signal component accurately and automatically from IMF components.When the selected IMF components were filtered by a band pass filter,the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was enhanced greatly.

  18. Seasonal thermal energy storage in shallow geothermal systems: thermal equilibrium stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowamooz Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the study of seasonal heat storage in shallow geothermal installations in unsaturated soils for which hydrothermal properties such as degree of saturation and thermal conductivity vary with time throughout the profile. In the model, a semi-analytical model which estimates time-spatial thermal conductivity is coupled with a 2D cylindrical heat transfer modeling using finite difference method. The variation of temperature was obtained after 3 heating and cooling cycles for the different types of loads with maximum thermal load of qmax = 15 W.m−1 with variable angular frequency (8 months of heating and 4 months of cooling.and constant angular frequency (6 months of heating and 6 months of cooling to estimate the necessary number of cycles to reach the thermal equilibrium stage. The results show that we approach a thermal equilibrium stage where the same variation of temperature can be observed in soils after several heating and cooling cycles. Based on these simulations, the necessary number of cycles can be related to the total applied energy on the system and the minimum number of cycles is for a system with the total applied energy of 1.9qmax.

  19. Survey of solar thermal energy storage subsystems for thermal/electric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segaser, C. L.

    1978-08-01

    A survey of the current technology and estimated costs of subsystems for storing the thermal energy produced by solar collectors is presented. The systems considered were capable of producing both electricity and space conditioning for three types of loads: a single-family detached residence, an apartment complex of 100 units, and a city of 30,000 residents, containing both single-family residences and apartments. Collector temperatures will be in four ranges: (1) 100 to 250/sup 0/F (used for space heating and single-cycle air conditioners and organic Rankine low-temperature turbines); (2) 300 to 400/sup 0/F (used for dual-cycle air conditioners and low-temperature turbines); (3) 400 to 600/sup 0/F (using fluids from parabolic trough collectors to run Rankine turbines); (4) 800 to 1000/sup 0/F (using fluids from heliostats to run closed-cycle gas turbines and steam Rankine turbines). The solar thermal energy subsystems will require from 60 to 36 x 10/sup 5/ kWhr (2.05 x 10/sup 5/ to 1.23 x 10/sup 10/ Btu) of thermal storage capacity. In addition to sensible heat and latent heat storage materials, several other media were investigated as potential thermal energy storage materials, including the clathrate and semiclathrate hydrates, various metal hydrides, and heat storage based on inorganic chemical reactions.

  20. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Laura [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Smith, Paul [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Rizea, Steven [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Van Ryzin, Joe [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Morgan, Charles [Planning Solutions, Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States); Noland, Gary [G. Noland and Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Pavlosky, Rick [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Thomas, Michael [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-30

    predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

  1. An assessment methodology for thermal energy storage evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Drost, M.K.; Spanner, G.E.; Williams, T.A.

    1987-11-01

    This report documents an assessment methodology for evaluating the cost, performance, and overall economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The methodology was developed by Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program personnel at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use by PNL and other TES concept evaluators. The methodology is generically applicable to all TES concepts; however, specific analyses may require additional or more detailed definition of the ground rules, assumptions, and analytical approach. The overall objective of the assessment methodology is to assist in preparing equitable and proper evaluations of TES concepts that will allow developers and end-users to make valid decisions about research and development (R and D) and implementation. The methodology meets this objective by establishing standard approaches, ground rules, assumptions, and definitions that are analytically correct and can be consistently applied by concept evaluators. 15 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Thermal vacancy formation energies of random solid solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, H. B.; Hu, Q. M.; Du, J.; Yan, A. R.; Liu, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Vacancy mechanism plays a dominant role in the atomic migration when a close-packed disordered alloy undergoes ordering transition. However, the calculation of thermal vacancy formation energies (VFEs) of random solid solutions is usually cumbersome due to the difficulty in considering various local atomic environments. Here, we propose a transparent way that combines coherent potential approximation and supercell-local cluster expansion to investigate VFEs of random solid solutions. This met...

  3. Dish concentrators for solar thermal energy: Status and technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Point-focusing concentrators under consideration for solar thermal energy use are reviewed. These concentrators differ in such characteristics as optical configuration, optical materials, structure for support of the optical elements and of the receiver, mount, foundation, drive, controls and enclosure. Concentrator performance and cost are considered. Technology development is outlined, including wind loads and aerodynamics; precipitation, sand, and seismic considerations; and maintenance and cleaning.

  4. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program. FY 1977 program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    An overview is given of the ongoing research, development, and demonstration efforts. Each of the DOE's Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion projects funded during fiscal year 1977 (October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1977) is described and each project's status as of December 31, 1977 is reflected. These projects are grouped as follows: program support, definition planning, engineering development, engineering test and evaluation, and advanced research and technology. (MHR)

  5. Literature review of market studies of thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattrup, M.P.

    1988-02-01

    This report presents the results of a review of market studies of thermal energy storage (TES). This project was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). PNL staff reviewed and consolidated the findings of existing TES market studies conducted in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. The purpose of this project was to review and assess previous work and to use the information obtained to help provide direction for future technology transfer planning activities and to identify additional economic research needed within those three sectors. 37 refs.

  6. Thermal engineering cuts energy use to speed production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-05-01

    This article gives details of energy saving designs in manufacturing processes implemented by Mannings Thermal and Environmental Engineers of Southport. Descriptions are given of reduced energy consumption and increased production resulting from the thermoforming tool presses used in producing car trim; the introduction of heating units to preheat moulding tools in the production of high performance rubber seals; the simultaneous controlled heating of several metal tools with low voltage ceramic heating elements set in the brickwork housing having a motorised insulated cover forming a sealed heating chamber; and the conversion of a brick lined hearth furnace from electric to gas using hard wearing firebricks, gas burners, and forced cooling system. (UK)

  7. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devendraa Siingh; Shubha Singh; R P Singh

    2006-02-01

    In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and -value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the disturbed conditions when the magnetosphere is depleted in electron density, the resonance energy of the electron enhances by an order of magnitude at higher latitudes, whereas the effect is small at low latitudes. An attempt is made to explain the enhanced wave activity observed during magnetic storm periods.

  8. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  9. Experimental measurements of thermal properties of high-temperature refractory materials used for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Ansary, Hany; Abdel-Khalik, Said; Golob, Matthew; Danish, Syed Noman; Saeed, Rageh; Djajadiwinata, Eldwin; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    This paper builds on studies conducted on thermal energy storage (TES) systems that were built as a part of the work performed for a DOE-funded SunShot project titled "High Temperature Falling Particle Receiver". In previous studies, two small-scale TES systems were constructed for measuring heat loss at high temperatures that are compatible with the falling particle receiver concept, both of which had shown very limited heat loss. Through the course of those studies, it became evident that there was a lack of information about the thermal performance of some of the insulating refractory materials used in the experiments at high temperatures, especially insulating firebrick and perlite concrete. This work focuses on determining the thermal conductivities of those materials at high temperatures. The apparatus consists of a prototype cylindrical TES bin built with the same wall construction used in previous studies. An electric heater is placed along the centerline of the bin, and thermocouples are used to measure temperature at the interfaces between all layers. Heat loss is measured across one of the layers whose thermal conductivity had already been well established using laboratory experiments. This value is used to deduce the thermal conductivity of other layers. Three interior temperature levels were considered; namely, 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C. Results show that the thermal conductivity of insulating firebrick remains low (approximately 0.22 W/m.K) at an average layer temperature as high as 640°C, but it was evident that the addition of mortar had an impact on its effective thermal conductivity. Results also show that the thermal conductivity of perlite concrete is very low, approximately 0.15 W/m.K at an average layer temperature of 360°C. This is evident by the large temperature drop that occurs across the perlite concrete layer. These results should be useful for future studies, especially those that focus on numerical modeling of TES bins.

  10. Extracting black-hole's rotational energy: the generalized Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Lasota, J -P; Abramowicz, M; Tchekhovskoy, A; Narayan, R

    2014-01-01

    In the case involving particles the necessary and sufficient condition for the Penrose process to extract energy from a rotating black hole is absorption of particles with negative energies and angular momenta. No torque at the black hole horizon occurs. In this article we consider the case of arbitrary fields or matter described by an unspecified, general energy-momentum tensor and show that the necessary and sufficient condition for extraction of black-hole's rotational energy is analogous to that in mechanical Penrose process: absorption of negative energy and negative angular momentum. We also show that a necessary condition for the Penrose process to occur is for the Noether current (the conserved energy-momentum density vector) to be spacelike or past-directed (timelike or null) on some part of the horizon. In the particle case our general criterion for the occurrence of a Penrose process reproduces the standard result. In the case of relativistic jet-producing "magnetically arrested disks" we show that...

  11. Semi-flexible bimetal-based thermal energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Boisseau, S; Monfray, S; Puscasu, O; Skotnicki, T; 10.1088/0964-1726/22/2/025021

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a new semi-flexible device able to turn thermal gradients into electricity by using a curved bimetal coupled to an electret-based converter. In fact, a two-steps conversion is carried out: (i) a curved bimetal turns the thermal gradient into a mechanical oscillation that is then (ii) converted into electricity thanks to an electrostatic converter using electrets in Teflon (r). The semi-flexible and low cost design of these new energy converters pave the way to mass production over large areas of thermal energy harvesters. Raw output powers up to 13.46uW per device were reached on a hot source at 60{\\deg}C and forced convection. Then, a DC-to-DC flyback converter has been sized to turn the energy harvesters' raw output powers into a viable supply source for an electronic circuit (DC-3V). At the end, 10uW of directly usable output power were reached with 3 devices, which is compatible with Wireless Sensor Networks powering applications. Please cite as : S Boisseau et al 2013 Smart Mater. S...

  12. Thermal energy conversion by coupled shape memory and piezoelectric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Dmitry; Lebedev, Gor; Cugat, Orphee; Delamare, Jerome; Viala, Bernard; Lafont, Thomas; Gimeno, Leticia; Shelyakov, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    This work gives experimental evidence of a promising method of thermal-to-electric energy conversion by coupling shape memory effect (SME) and direct piezoelectric effect (DPE) for harvesting quasi-static ambient temperature variations. Two original prototypes of thermal energy harvesters have been fabricated and tested experimentally. The first is a hybrid laminated composite consisting of TiNiCu shape memory alloy (SMA) and macro fiber composite piezoelectric. This composite comprises 0.1 cm3 of active materials and harvests 75 µJ of energy for each temperature variation of 60 °C. The second prototype is a SME/DPE ‘machine’ which uses the thermally induced linear strains of the SMA to bend a bulk PZT ceramic plate through a specially designed mechanical structure. The SME/DPE ‘machine’ with 0.2 cm3 of active material harvests 90 µJ over a temperature increase of 35 °C (60 µJ when cooling). In contrast to pyroelectric materials, such harvesters are also compatible with both small and slow temperature variations.

  13. A thermal storage capacity market for non dispatchable renewable energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennouna, El Ghali; Mouaky, Ammar; Arrad, Mouad; Ghennioui, Abdellatif; Mimet, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-01

    Due to the increasingly high capacity of wind power and solar PV in Germany and some other European countries and the high share of variable renewable energy resources in comparison to fossil and nuclear capacity, a power reserve market structured by auction systems was created to facilitate the exchange of balance power capacities between systems and even grid operators. Morocco has a large potential for both wind and solar energy and is engaged in a program to deploy 2000MW of wind capacity by 2020 and 3000 MW of solar capacity by 2030. Although the competitiveness of wind energy is very strong, it appears clearly that the wind program could be even more ambitious than what it is, especially when compared to the large exploitable potential. On the other hand, heavy investments on concentrated solar power plants equipped with thermal energy storage have triggered a few years ago including the launching of the first part of the Nour Ouarzazate complex, the goal being to reach stable, dispatchable and affordable electricity especially during evening peak hours. This paper aims to demonstrate the potential of shared thermal storage capacity between dispatchable and non dispatchable renewable energies and particularly CSP and wind power. Thus highlighting the importance of a storage capacity market in parallel to the power reserve market and the and how it could enhance the development of both wind and CSP market penetration.

  14. Electron thermal self-energy in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, D

    1995-01-01

    Using the general form of the static energy solutions to the Dirac equation with a magnetic field, we calculate a general self-energy matrix in the Furry-picture. In the limit of high temperatures, but even higher magnetic fields, a self-consistent dispersion relation is solved. In contrast to the high temperature limit, this merely results in a small mass shift. The electron anomalous magnetic moment is calculated. The contribution from thermal fermions is found to be different from the corresponding contribution using perturbation theory and plane-wave external states. In the low temperature limit the self-energy is shown to exhibit de Haas--van Alphen oscillations. In the limit of low temperatures and high densities, the self-energy becomes very large.

  15. Numerical Modeling of a Shallow Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catolico, N.; Ge, S.; Lu, N.; McCartney, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) combined with solar thermal energy harvesting is an economic technological system to garner and store energy as well as an environmentally-sustainable alternative for the heating of buildings. The first community-scale BTES system in North America was installed in 2007 in the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC), about 35 miles south of Calgary, Canada. The BTES system involves direct circulation of water heated from solar thermal panels in the summer into a storage tank, after which it is circulate within an array of 144 closed-loop geothermal heat exchangers having a depth of 35 m and a spacing of 2.5 m. In the winter the circulation direction is reversed to supply heat to houses. Data collection over a six year period indicates that this system can supply more than 90% of the winter heating energy needs for 52 houses in the community. One major challenge facing the BTES system technology is the relatively low annual efficiency, i.e., the ratio of energy input and output is in the range of 15% to 40% for the system in Drake Landing. To better understand the working principles of BTES and to improve BTES performance for future applications at larger scales, a three-dimensional transient coupled fluid and heat transfer model is established using TOUGH2. The time-dependent injection temperatures and circulation rate measured over the six years of monitoring are used as model input. The simulations are calibrated using soil temperature data measured at different locations over time. The time-dependent temperature distributions within the borehole region agree well with the measured temperatures for soil with an intrinsic permeability of 10e-19 m2, an apparent thermal conductivity of 2.03 W/m°C, and a volumetric heat capacity of 2.31 MJ/m-3°C. The calibrated model serves as the basis for a sensitivity analysis of soil and operational parameters on BTES system efficiency preformed with TOUGH2. Preliminary results suggest 1) BTES

  16. Energy extraction from Kerr black holes by rigidly rotating strings

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a rigidly rotating string can extract the rotational energy from a rotating black hole. We consider Nambu-Goto strings stationary with respect to a co-rotating Killing vector with an uniform angular velocity $\\omega$ in the Kerr spacetime. We show that a necessary condition of the energy-extraction process is that an effective horizon on the string worldsheet, which corresponds to the inner light surface, is inside the ergosphere of the Kerr black hole and the angular velocity $\\omega$ is less than that of the black hole $\\Omega_\\mathrm{h}$. Furthermore, we discuss global configurations of such strings in both of a slow-rotation limit and the extremal Kerr case.

  17. Energy model development and heating energy investigation of the Nested Thermal Envelope Design (NTED(TM))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Elizabeth Erin

    Space heating accounts for approximately 60% of residential energy use in Canada. Minimizing envelope heat losses is one approach to reducing this percentage. Preliminary research investigated the energy-saving potential of an innovative design, referred to as Nested Thermal Envelope Design (NTED(TM)). The concept involves one insulated building inside another with dual thermal zones. Conservative modeling results from this work showed heating energy reductions of 74%. This research developed a new NTED(TM) simulation model to provide increased accuracy and gain a more complete understanding of the potential heating energy savings. The working performance was also investigated by modeling occupied-building operation. The resulting model has shown that the NTED(TM) design yields savings of 85% relative to a benchmark R-2000 building. These results improve on the preliminary values and reinforce the merit of the design as a means of achieving significant reductions in residential energy use.

  18. Thermal properties of a novel nanoencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuensanta, Mónica, E-mail: monica.fuensanta@aidico.es [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Paiphansiri, Umaporn [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores, E-mail: md.romero@aidico.es [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Guillem, Celia; López-Buendía, Ángel M. [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Landfester, Katharina [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-08-10

    Highlights: • A paraffin wax RT80 was encapsulated in styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer as polymer shell using miniemulsion polymerization process to obtain a novel nanoencapsulated PCM with 80 °C melting temperature. • Nano-PCMs have high compact structure, spherical morphology and thermal stability. • The nano-PCMs have potential applications as thermal energy storage materials. - Abstract: A novel nanoencapsulation of a paraffine type phase change material, RT80, in a styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer shell using the miniemulsion polymerization process was carried out. General characteristics of the RT80 nanoparticles in terms of thermal properties, morphology, chemical composition and particle size distribution were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The influence of different monomers (styrene, butyl acrylate) and the surfactant/paraffin mass ratios on nanoparticles properties such as thermal capacity, particle size and morphology were systematically investigated. In all cases studied, encapsulation efficiency was close to 80 wt% with a particle size distribution between 52 and 112 nm and regular spherical shape and uniform structure. The amount of encapsulated paraffin achieved was comprised between 8 and 20%. Melting and crystallization heats were found to be approximately 5–25 J g{sup −1}, mainly depending on surfactant/paraffin mass ratio. Melting temperature of RT80 nanoparticles slightly decreased (1–7 °C) respect to the raw RT80. In addition, the encapsulated RT80 nanoparticles show thermal stability even after 200 thermal (heat-cooling) cycles.

  19. Thermal Energy Harvesting Using Pyroelectric and Piezoelectric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Miwon; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a prototype of a thermal energy harvesting mechanism using both pyroelectric and piezoelectric effect. Thermal energy is one of abundant energy sources from various processes. Waste heat from a chip on a circuit board of the electronic device involves temperature differences from a few degrees C to over 100 °C. Therefore, 95 °C of a heat reservoir was used in this study. A repetitive time-dependant temperature variation is applied by a linear sliding table. The influence of heat conditions was investigated, by changing velocity and frequency of this linear sliding table. This energy harvesting mechanism employs Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5H), a bimetal beam and two neodymium magnets. The pyroelectric effect is caused by a time-dependent temperature variation, and the piezoelectric effect is caused by stress from deformation of the bimetal. A maximum power output 0.54 μW is obtained at an optimal condition when the load resistance is 610 kΩ.

  20. Testing of High Thermal Cycling Stability of Low Strength Concrete as a Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete has the potential to become a solution for thermal energy storage (TES integrated in concentrating solar power (CSP systems due to its good thermal and mechanical properties and low cost of material. In this study, a low strength concrete (C20 is tested at high temperatures up to 600 °C. Specimens are thermally cycled at temperatures in the range of 400–300 °C, 500–300 °C, and 600–300 °C, which TES can reach in operation. For comparison, specimens also cycled at temperature in the range of 400–25 °C (room temperature, 500–25 °C, and 600–25 °C. It is found from the test results that cracks are not observed on the surfaces of concrete specimens until the temperature is elevated up to 500 °C. There is mechanical deterioration of concrete after exposure to high temperature, especially to high thermal cycles. The residual compressive strength of concrete after 10 thermal cycles between 600 °C and 300 °C is about 58.3%, but the specimens remain stable without spalling, indicating possible use of low strength concrete as a TES material.

  1. Thermal energy storage to minimize cost and improve efficiency of a polygeneration district energy system in a real-time electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Kody M.; Kim, Jong Suk; Cole, Wesley J.; Kapoor, Kriti; Mojica, Jose L.; Hedengren, John D.; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2016-10-01

    District energy systems can produce low-cost utilities for large energy networks, but can also be a resource for the electric grid by their ability to ramp production or to store thermal energy by responding to real-time market signals. In this work, dynamic optimization exploits the flexibility of thermal energy storage by determining optimal times to store and extract excess energy. This concept is applied to a polygeneration distributed energy system with combined heat and power, district heating, district cooling, and chilled water thermal energy storage. The system is a university campus responsible for meeting the energy needs of tens of thousands of people. The objective for the dynamic optimization problem is to minimize cost over a 24-h period while meeting multiple loads in real time. The paper presents a novel algorithm to solve this dynamic optimization problem with energy storage by decomposing the problem into multiple static mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) problems. Another innovative feature of this work is the study of a large, complex energy network which includes the interrelations of a wide variety of energy technologies. Results indicate that a cost savings of 16.5% is realized when the system can participate in the wholesale electricity market.

  2. Energy Efficiency Enhancement of Photovoltaics by Phase Change Materials through Thermal Energy Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV panels convert a certain amount of incident solar radiation into electricity, while the rest is converted to heat, leading to a temperature rise in the PV. This elevated temperature deteriorates the power output and induces structural degradation, resulting in reduced PV lifespan. One potential solution entails PV thermal management employing active and passive means. The traditional passive means are found to be largely ineffective, while active means are considered to be energy intensive. A passive thermal management system using phase change materials (PCMs can effectively limit PV temperature rises. The PCM-based approach however is cost inefficient unless the stored thermal energy is recovered effectively. The current article investigates a way to utilize the thermal energy stored in the PCM behind the PV for domestic water heating applications. The system is evaluated in the winter conditions of UAE to deliver heat during water heating demand periods. The proposed system achieved a ~1.3% increase in PV electrical conversion efficiency, along with the recovery of ~41% of the thermal energy compared to the incident solar radiation.

  3. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Ramana G. [The University of Alabama

    2013-10-23

    go/no-go goals stipulated by the DOE for this project. Energy densities of all salt mixtures were higher than that of the current solar salt. The salt mixtures costs have been estimated and TES system costs for a 2 tank, direct approach have been estimated for each of these materials. All estimated costs are significantly below the baseline system that used solar salt. These lower melt point salts offer significantly higher energy density per volume than solar salt – and therefore attractively smaller inventory and equipment costs. Moreover, a new TES system geometry has been recommended A variety of approaches were evaluated to use the low melting point molten salt. Two novel changes are recommended that 1) use the salt as a HTF through the solar trough field, and 2) use the salt to not only create steam but also to preheat the condensed feedwater for Rankine cycle. The two changes enable the powerblock to operate at 500°C, rather than the current 400°C obtainable using oil as the HTF. Secondly, the use of salt to preheat the feedwater eliminates the need to extract steam from the low pressure turbine for that purpose. Together, these changes result in a dramatic 63% reduction required for 6 hour salt inventory, a 72% reduction in storage volume, and a 24% reduction in steam flow rate in the power block. Round trip efficiency for the Case 5 - 2 tank “direct” system is estimated at >97%, with only small losses from time under storage and heat exchange, and meeting RFP goals. This attractive efficiency is available because the major heat loss experienced in a 2 tank “indirect” system - losses by transferring the thermal energy from oil HTF to the salt storage material and back to oil to run the steam generator at night - is not present for the 2 tank direct system. The higher heat capacity values for both LMP and HMP systems enable larger storage capacities for concentrating solar power.

  4. Thermal Energy Optimization of Building Integrated Semi-Transparent Photovoltaic Thermal Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ekoe A Akata Aloys Martial; Donatien Njomo; Basant Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) : The concept where the photovoltaic element assumes the function of power generation and the role of the covering component element has the potential to become one of the principal sources of renewable energy for domestic purpose. In this paper, a Building integrated semitransparent photovoltaic thermal system (BISPVT) system having fins at the back sheet of the photovoltaic module has been simulated. It has been observed that this system produces high...

  5. Design of a high temperature subsurface thermal energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi

    Solar thermal energy is taking up increasing proportions of future power generation worldwide. Thermal energy storage technology is a key method for compensating for the inherent intermittency of solar resources and solving the time mismatch between solar energy supply and electricity demand. However, there is currently no cost-effective high-capacity compact storage technology available (Bakker et al., 2008). The goal of this work is to propose a high temperature subsurface thermal energy storage (HSTES) technology and demonstrate its potential energy storage capability by developing a solar-HSTES-electricity generation system. In this work, main elements of the proposed system and their related state-of-art technologies are reviewed. A conceptual model is built to illustrate the concept, design, operating procedure and application of such a system. A numerical base model is built within the TOUGH2-EOS1 multiphase flow simulator for the evaluation of system performance. Additional models are constructed and simulations are done to identify the effect of different operational and geological influential factors on the system performance. Our work shows that when the base model is run with ten years operation of alternate injection and production processes - each for a month - with a thermal power input of 10.85 MW, about 83% of the injected thermal energy could be recovered within each working cycle from a stabilized HSTES system. After the final conversion into electrical energy, a relative (compared with the direct use of hot water) electricity generation efficiency of 73% is obtained. In a typical daily storage scenario, the simulated thermal storage efficiency could exceed 78% and the relative electricity generation efficiency is over 66% in the long run. In a seasonal storage scenario, these two efficiencies reach 69% and 53% respectively by the end of the simulation period of 10 years. Additional simulations reveal a thinner storage aquifer with a higher

  6. Numerical modeling of Thermal Response Tests in Energy Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A.; Toledo, M.; Moffat, R.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, thermal response tests (TRT) are used as the main tools for the evaluation of low enthalpy geothermal systems such as heat exchangers. The results of TRT are used for estimating thermal conductivity and thermal resistance values of those systems. We present results of synthetic TRT simulations that model the behavior observed in an experimental energy pile system, which was installed at the new building of the Faculty of Engineering of Universidad de Chile. Moreover, we also present a parametric study to identify the most influent parameters in the performance of this type of tests. The modeling was developed using the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, which allows the incorporation of flow and heat transport processes. The modeled system consists on a concrete pile with 1 m diameter and 28 m deep, which contains a 28 mm diameter PEX pipe arranged in a closed circuit. Three configurations were analyzed: a U pipe, a triple U and a helicoid shape implemented at the experimental site. All simulations were run considering transient response in a three-dimensional domain. The simulation results provided the temperature distribution on the pile for a set of different geometry and physical properties of the materials. These results were compared with analytical solutions which are commonly used to interpret TRT data. This analysis demonstrated that there are several parameters that affect the system response in a synthetic TRT. For example, the diameter of the simulated pile affects the estimated effective thermal conductivity of the system. Moreover, the simulation results show that the estimated thermal conductivity for a 1 m diameter pile did not stabilize even after 100 hours since the beginning of the test, when it reached a value 30% below value used to set up the material properties in the simulation. Furthermore, we observed different behaviors depending on the thermal properties of concrete and soil. According to the simulations, the thermal

  7. PCM/ graphite foam composite for thermal energy storage device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C. X.; Ma, X. L.; Yang, L.

    2015-07-01

    Numerical studies are proposed to predict and investigate the thermal characteristics of a thermal storage device consists of graphite foam matrix saturated with phase change material, PCM. The composite (graphite foam matrix saturated with PCM) is prepared by impregnation method under vacuum condition, and then is introduced into a cylindrical shell and tube device while it experiences its heat from an inner tube fluid. The two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed using the volume averaging technique; while the phases change process is modelled using the enthalpy porosity method. A series of numerical calculations have been done in order to analyze the influence of fluid operating conditions on the melting process of the paraffin/graphite foam. The results are given in terms of temperature or liquid fraction time history in paraffin/graphite foam composite, which show that the heat transfer rate of the device is effectively improved due to the high thermal conductivity of graphite foams. Therefore, paraffin/graphite foam composite can be considered as suitable candidates for latent heat thermal energy storage device.

  8. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2014-01-01

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-par...

  9. Energy-Dependent Timing of Thermal Emission in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Rajmal; Rajpurohit, Arvind Singh; Aschwanden, Markus J; 10.1007/s11207-011-9754-1

    2011-01-01

    We report solar flare plasma to be multi-thermal in nature based on the theoretical model and study of the energy-dependent timing of thermal emission in ten M-class flares. We employ high-resolution X-ray spectra observed by the Si detector of the "Solar X-ray Spectrometer" (SOXS). The SOXS onboard the Indian GSAT-2 spacecraft was launched by the GSLV-D2 rocket on 8 May 2003. Firstly we model the spectral evolution of the X-ray line and continuum emission flux F(\\epsilon) from the flare by integrating a series of isothermal plasma flux. We find that multi-temperature integrated flux F(\\epsilon) is a power-law function of \\epsilon with a spectral index (\\gamma) \\approx -4.65. Next, based on spectral-temporal evolution of the flares we find that the emission in the energy range E= 4 - 15 keV is dominated by temperatures of T= 12 - 50 MK, while the multi-thermal power-law DEM index (\\gamma) varies in the range of -4.4 and -5.7. The temporal evolution of the X-ray flux F(\\epsilon,t) assuming a multi-temperature ...

  10. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  11. Economic Evaluation of a Solar Charged Thermal Energy Store for Space Heating

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A thermal energy store corrects the misalignment of heating demand in the winter relative to solar thermal energy gathered in the summer. This thesis reviews the viability of a solar charged hot water tank thermal energy store for a school at latitude 56.25N, longitude -120.85W

  12. Economic Evaluation of a Solar Charged Thermal Energy Store for Space Heating

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A thermal energy store corrects the misalignment of heating demand in the winter relative to solar thermal energy gathered in the summer. This thesis reviews the viability of a solar charged hot water tank thermal energy store for a school at latitude 56.25N, longitude -120.85W

  13. Thermal energy storage. [by means of chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The principles involved in thermal energy storage by sensible heat, chemical potential energy, and latent heat of fusion are examined for the purpose of evolving selection criteria for material candidates in the low ( 0 C) and high ( 100 C) temperature ranges. The examination identifies some unresolved theoretical considerations and permits a preliminary formulation of an energy storage theory. A number of candidates in the low and high temperature ranges are presented along with a rating of candidates or potential candidates. A few interesting candidates in the 0 to 100 C region are also included. It is concluded that storage by means of reactions whose reversibility can be controlled either by product removal or by catalytic means appear to offer appreciable advantages over storage with reactions whose reversability cannot be controlled. Among such advantages are listed higher heat storage capacities and more favorable options regarding temperatures of collection, storage, and delivery. Among the disadvantages are lower storage efficiencies.

  14. Butterfly micro bilayer thermal energy harvester geometry with improved performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trioux, E.; Monfray, S.; Basrour, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the recent progress of a new technology to scavenge thermal energy, implying a double-step transduction through thermal buckling of a bilayer aluminum nitride / aluminum bridge and piezoelectric transduction. A completely new scavenger design is presented, improving greatly its final performance. The butterfly shape reduces the overall device mechanical rigidity, which leads to a decrease of buckling temperatures compared to previously studied rectangular plates. In a first time we compared performances of rectangular and butterfly plates with an equal thickness of Al and AlN. In a second time, with a thicker Al layer than AlN layer, we will study only butterfly structure in terms of output power and buckling temperatures, and compare it to the previous stack.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy thermal energy storage research activities review: 1989 Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.W. [ed.] [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomlinson, J.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1989-03-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers the opportunity for the recovery and re-use of heat currently rejected to the ambient environment. Further, through the ability of TES to match an energy supply with a thermal energy demand, TES increases efficiencies of energy systems and improves capacity factors of power plants. The US Department of Energy has been the leader in TES research, development, and demonstration since recognition in 1976 of the need for fostering energy conservation as a component of the national energy budget. The federal program on TES R and D is the responsibility of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution within the US Department of Energy (DOE). The overall program is organized into three program areas: diurnal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat for use in residential and commercial buildings on a daily cycle; industrial--relating primarily to higher temperature heat for use in industrial and utility processes on an hourly to daily cycle; seasonal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat or chill for use in residential complexes (central supply as for apartments or housing developments), commercial (light manufacturing, processing, or retail), and industrial (space conditioning) on a seasonal to annual cycle. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, E. Bruce [Thermal Energy Corporation, Houston, TX (United States); Brown, Tim [Thermal Energy Corporation, Houston, TX (United States); Mardiat, Ed [Burns and McDonnell Engineering Company, Inc., Kansas City, MI (United States)

    2011-12-31

    To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nation's best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission providing top quality medical care and instruction without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power

  17. Feasibility study of thermal energy harvesting using lead free pyroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Hasanul; Sarker, Md Rashedul H.; Shahriar, Shaimum; Arif Ishtiaque Shuvo, Mohammad; Delfin, Diego; Hodges, Deidra; (Bill Tseng, Tzu-Liang; Roberson, David; Love, Norman; Lin, Yirong

    2016-05-01

    Energy harvesting has significant potential for applications in energizing wireless sensors and charging energy storage devices. To date, one of the most widely investigated materials for mechanical and thermal energy harvesting is lead zirconate titanate (PZT). However, lead has detrimental effects on the environment and on health. Hence, alternative materials are required for this purpose. In this paper, a lead free material, lithium niobate (LNB) is investigated as a potential material for pyroelectric energy harvesting. Although its theoretical pyroelectric properties are lower compared to PZT, it has better properties than other lead free alternatives such as ZnO. In addition, LNB has a high Curie temperature of about 1142 °C, which makes it applicable for high temperature energy harvesting, where other pyroelectric ceramics are not suitable. Herein, an energy harvesting and storage system composed of a single crystal LNB and a porous carbon-based super-capacitor was investigated. It is found that with controlled heating and cooling, a single wafer of LNB (75 mm diameter and 0.5 mm thickness) could generate 437.72 nW cm-3 of power and it could be used to charge a super-capacitor with a charging rate of 2.63 mV (h cm3)-1.

  18. Experimental study of influence of inlet geometry on thermal stratification in thermal energy storage during charging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švarc Petr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Various analyses of charging processes of real single-medium thermal energy storage were applied in this work. Two different inlet geometries of direct intakes into thermal energy storage were investigated for the process of charging in Richardson numbers 0.4 and 15. Temperature distributions for both cases are shown and compared in selected time steps. Several simple methods for assessment of an ability to maintain and support thermal stratification during charging processes were compared with exergy analysis.

  19. Low energy ion beam induced changes in structural and thermal properties of polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheem, A. M. Abdel; Atta, A.; Maksoud, M. I. A. Abdel

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study is extended for obtaining relation between the collision of ion beam with polycarbonate polymer (PC) and the introduced modification of technological applications. Polycarbonate films are irradiated by a 6 keV argon ion beam extracted from locally design cold cathode ion source with different ion fluences. The films are characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Mechanical tester, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The increase in ion beam irradiation leads to an increase in the tensile strength and reduction in elongation at break for PC. TGA Analysis shows that the thermal decomposition temperature of irradiated polycarbonate changes with ion fluence. The DSC graphs show improvements in thermal stability with increase in the activation energy after ion beam irradiation. Ion penetration depths and distributions of scattered atoms are calculated using SRIM Monte Carlo simulation programs.

  20. ANALYSIS OF THERMAL-CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF BIOMASS ENERGY PELLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Gluvakov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern life conditions, when emphasis is on environmental protection and sustainable development, fuels produced from biomass are increasingly gaining in importance, and it is necessary to consider the quality of end products obtained from biomass. Based on the existing European standards, collected literature and existing laboratory methods, this paper presents results of testing individual thermal - chemical properties of biomass energy pellets after extrusion and cooling the compressed material. Analysing samples based on standard methods, data were obtained on the basis of which individual thermal-chemical properties of pellets were estimated. Comparing the obtained results with the standards and literature sources, it can be said that moisture content, ash content and calorific values are the most important parameters for quality analysis which decide on applicability and use-value of biomass energy pellets, as biofuel. This paper also shows the impact of biofuels on the quality of environmental protection. The conclusion provides a clear statement of quality of biomass energy pellets.

  1. Selection of materials with potential in sensible thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.I.; Martinez, M.; Segarra, M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martorell, I.; Cabeza, L.F. [GREA Innovacio Concurrent, Edifici CREA, Universitat de Lleida, Pere de Cabrera s/n, 25001 Lleida (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Thermal energy storage is a technology under investigation since the early 1970s. Since then, numerous new applications have been found and much work has been done to bring this technology to the market. Nevertheless, the materials used either for latent or for sensible storage were mostly investigated 30 years ago, and the research has lead to improvement in their performance under different conditions of applications. In those years a significant number of new materials were developed in many fields other than storage and energy, but a great effort to characterize and classify these materials was done. Taking into account the fact that thousands of materials are known and a large number of new materials are developed every year, the authors use the methodology for materials selection developed by Prof. Ashby to give an overview of other materials suitable to be used in thermal energy storage. Sensible heat storage at temperatures between 150 and 200 C is defined as a case study and two different scenarios were considered: long term sensible heat storage and short term sensible heat storage. (author)

  2. Discharge Flux Variability in Stored Thermal Energy Cookstoves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael James

    A thermal analysis and test is performed to determine flux and temperature variability for Phase change thermal energy to investigation feasibility of use in a Stored Thermal Energy Cookstove (STEC). The phase change material (PCM) NaNO3-KNO3 Eutectic (52:48) Solar Salt is identified for energy storage in STEC due to a melting temperature of 222°C which is deemed appropriate for use in cooking up to temperatures of 200°C +/- 20°C. 1-D planar and cylindrical analytical multiphase solutions are correlated with a transient non-linear ANSYS Finite Element Model (FEM). 1-D idealized models of planar and cylindrical analytical multiphase solutions show the flux stability of cylindrical solidification is twice that of planar solidification. Flux drops a linear average of 0.5%/min in the last half hour of a one hour cooking session in cylindrical solidification vs 1%/min in planar solidification under a constant temperature (dirichlet) boundary condition of 42°C below the melting point of the PCM. Solidification progresses more quickly in the planar case yielding a solid PCM thickness of 3.3 cm after one hour vs 2.4 cm in the cylindrical case. A test is performed on a simplified simple STEC apparatus to investigate cooling rates of the cooking surface while boiling water. 0.5L of water is brought to boil from room temperature with a linear average cooking surface flux of 21,000 W/m2 and a cooking surface cooling rate of 3.8°C/min. Results show increasing the thermal conductivity of the PCM and reducing the total thickness of the solidifying PCM layer before and after discharge will reduce cooling rates, improve stability of the flux delivery device, and increase feasibility of use. Pursuing lower flux cooking and non-cooking applications may increase likelihood of adoption by reducing thermal gradients during discharge. A proposal to explore further development of STEC to aid adoption is discussed.

  3. Thermal dynamic simulation of wall for building energy efficiency under varied climate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejin; Zhang, Yujin; Hong, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at different kind of walls in five cities of different zoning for thermal design, using thermal instantaneous response factors method, the author develops software to calculation air conditioning cooling load temperature, thermal response factors, and periodic response factors. On the basis of the data, the author gives the net work analysis about the influence of dynamic thermal of wall on air-conditioning load and thermal environment in building of different zoning for thermal design regional, and put forward the strategy how to design thermal insulation and heat preservation wall base on dynamic thermal characteristic of wall under different zoning for thermal design regional. And then provide the theory basis and the technical references for the further study on the heat preservation with the insulation are in the service of energy saving wall design. All-year thermal dynamic load simulating and energy consumption analysis for new energy-saving building is very important in building environment. This software will provide the referable scientific foundation for all-year new thermal dynamic load simulation, energy consumption analysis, building environment systems control, carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy -saving walls building. Based on which, we will not only expediently design system of building energy, but also analyze building energy consumption and carry through scientific energy management. The study will provide the referable scientific foundation for carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy saving walls building.

  4. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage application to the brick/ceramic industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, D.R.

    1976-10-01

    An initial project to study the technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in the three major consumer markets, namely, the residential, commercial and industrial sectors is described. A major objective of the study was to identify viable TES applications from which a more concise study could be launched, leading to a conceptual design and in-depth validation of the TES energy impacts. This report documents one such program. The brick/ceramic industries commonly use periodic kilns which by their operating cycle require time-variant energy supply and consequently variable heat rejection. This application was one of the numerous TES opportunities that emerged from the first study, now available from the ERDA Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identified as Report No. COO-2558-1.

  5. Promotion of solar thermal energy - guide and comparison of experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballot, E. [ALTER Alsace (France)

    2004-01-01

    One of the objectives of the guide is to analyse the methods of the various partners of the project (Germany, Cyprus, Town of Barcelona and France) and to make a list with the most important ones, which could eventually be reproduced and adapted in other regions. Also, try to find out the problems that the various partners encounter (lack of information, technical and financial tools...), look for the best ways for developing the solar thermal energy and try to find out some answers from the stake holders of this domain and from our partners. (author)

  6. Thermal energy storage systems using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, V.; Weast, T. E.; Ananth, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The viability of using fluidized bed heat exchangers (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES) in applications with potential for waste heat recovery was investigated. Of the candidate applications screened, cement plant rotary kilns and steel plant electric arc furnaces were identified, via the chosen selection criteria, as having the best potential for successful use of FBHX/TES system. A computer model of the FBHX/TES systems was developed and the technical feasibility of the two selected applications was verified. Economic and tradeoff evaluations in progress for final optimization of the systems and selection of the most promising system for further concept validation are described.

  7. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Field Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M. C.

    1982-12-01

    The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Field Test Facility became operational. Experiments demonstrated that the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer will accept injection of 300 gpm (18.9 1 sec (-1)) at reasonable pressures with a heat buildup in the injection well of about 44 psi (31.6 m) over 8 days. Heating of the ground water caused precipitation of carbonate in the piping and injection well, but with proper water conditioning, the system will work satisfactorily at elevated temperatures.

  8. Customer attitudes toward thermal-energy-storage heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, H. N.

    1981-06-01

    Attitudes among users of thermal energy storage (TES) heating systems were studied. A customer acceptance survey exploring attitudes and levels of satisfaction, face to face contacts between utility representatives and users, and a survey of pertinent published information are investigated. It is found that: (1) TES heating systems are installed for economic reasons by customers who can afford higher initial costs and understand the concept of lower total cost; and (2) attitudes toward TES are positive. The TES systems are not regarded more favorably than conventional systems, however, and it is likely that lower electric heating bills are responsible for the favorable perceptions of most TES users.

  9. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  10. Azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes as high-energy density solar thermal fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpak, Alexie M; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-08-10

    Solar thermal fuels, which reversibly store solar energy in molecular bonds, are a tantalizing prospect for clean, renewable, and transportable energy conversion/storage. However, large-scale adoption requires enhanced energy storage capacity and thermal stability. Here we present a novel solar thermal fuel, composed of azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes, with the volumetric energy density of Li-ion batteries. Our work also demonstrates that the inclusion of nanoscale templates is an effective strategy for design of highly cyclable, thermally stable, and energy-dense solar thermal fuels.

  11. Heat exchange studies on coconut oil cells as thermal energy storage for room thermal conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutjahja, I. M.; Putri, Widya A.; Fahmi, Z.; Wonorahardjo, S.; Kurnia, D.

    2017-07-01

    As reported by many thermal environment experts, room air conditioning might be controlled by thermal mass system. In this paper we discuss the performance of coconut oil cells as room thermal energy storage. The heat exchange mechanism of coconut oil (CO) which is one of potential organic Phase Change Material (PCM) is studied based on the results of temperature measurements in the perimeter and core parts of cells. We found that the heat exchange performance, i.e. heat absorption and heat release processes of CO cells are dominated by heat conduction in the sensible solid from the higher temperature perimeter part to the lower temperature core part and heat convection during the solid-liquid phase transition and sensible liquid phase. The capability of heat absorption as measured by the reduction of air temperature is not influenced by CO cell size. Besides that, the application of CO as the thermal mass has to be accompanied by air circulation to get the cool sensation of the room’s occupants.

  12. Thermal Impact of Medium Deep Borehole Thermal Energy Storage on the Shallow Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Schulte, Daniel O.; Rühaak, Wolfram; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Borehole heat exchanger arrays are a well-suited and already widely applied method for exploiting the shallow subsurface as seasonal heat storage. However, in most of the populated regions the shallow subsurface also comprises an important aquifer system used for drinking water production. Thus, the operation of shallow geothermal heat storage systems leads to a significant increase in groundwater temperatures in the proximity of the borehole heat exchanger array. The magnitude of the impact on groundwater quality and microbiology associated with this temperature rise is controversially discussed. Nevertheless, the protection of shallow groundwater resources has priority. Accordingly, water authorities often follow restrictive permission policies for building such storage systems. An alternative approach to avoid this issue is the application of medium deep borehole heat exchanger arrays instead of shallow ones. The thermal impact on shallow aquifers can be significantly reduced as heat is stored at larger depth. Moreover, it can be further diminished by the installation of a thermally insulating materials in the upper section of the borehole heat exchangers. Based on a numerical simulation study, the advantageous effects of medium deep borehole thermal energy storage are demonstrated and quantified. A finite element software is used to model the heat transport in the subsurface in 3D, while the heat transport in the borehole heat exchangers is solved analytically in 1D. For this purpose, an extended analytical solution is implemented, which also allows for the consideration of a thermally insulating borehole section.

  13. Low-energy thermal processing technology of foamed concrete products in landfills using solar energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauzhanov Nabi Tokmurzaevich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the comprehensive research and industrial development there is a new method developed for accelerating the hardening of foamed products using thermal heating of products by soft modes, which allows to receive high quality material and organize energy-efficient and environmentally friendly production of foam concrete products.

  14. Recovery of thermal energy from the freshwater supply system; Gewinnung thermischer Energie aus dem Trinkwasserversorgungsnetz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plath, Michael [DVGW-Forschungsstelle an der Technischen Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany); Roettger, Sven [Wasserverband Suederdithmarschen, Nindorf (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Recovery of thermal energy from freshwater, which is then discharged, is not a new concept. The contribution presents a system in which the freshwater is recirculated into the freshwater supply system. A number of safety measures are incorporated in order to prevent contamination of the freshwater as well as closed-cycle circulation. (orig.)

  15. Energy Spectrum Extraction and Optimal Imaging via Dual-Energy Material Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2015-01-01

    Inferior soft-tissue contrast resolution is a major limitation of current CT scanners. The aim of the study is to improve the contrast resolution of CT scanners using dual-energy acquisition. Based on dual-energy material decomposition, the proposed method starts with extracting the outgoing energy spectrum by polychromatic forward projecting the material-selective images. The extracted spectrum is then reweighted to boost the soft-tissue contrast. A simulated water cylinder phantom with inserts that contain a series of six solutions of varying iodine concentration (range, 0-20 mg/mL) is used to evaluate the proposed method. Results show the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean energy difference between the extracted energy spectrum and the spectrum acquired using an energy-resolved photon counting detector(PCD), are 0.044 and 0.01 keV, respectively. Compared to the method using the standard energy-integrating detectors, dose normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) for the proposed method are improved fro...

  16. Mapping Thermal Energy Resource Potentials from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Neugebauer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater heat recovery via heat exchangers and heat pumps constitutes an environmentally friendly, approved and economically competitive, but often underestimated technology. By introducing the spatial dimension in feasibility studies, the results of calculations change considerably. This paper presents a methodology to estimate thermal energy resource potentials of wastewater treatment plants taking spatial contexts into account. In close proximity to settlement areas, wastewater energy can ideally be applied for heating in mixed-function areas, which very likely have a continuous heat demand and allow for an increased amount of full-load hours compared to most single-use areas. For the Austrian case, it is demonstrated that the proposed methodology leads to feasible results and that the suggested technology might reduce up to 17% of the Austrian global warming potential of room heating. The method is transferrable to other countries as the input data and calculation formula are made available. A broad application of wastewater energy with regard to spatial structures and spatial development potentials can lead to (1 increasing energy efficiency by using a maximum of waste heat and (2 a significant reduction of (fossil energy consumption which results in a considerable reduction of the global warming potential of the heat supply (GWP if electricity from renewables is used for the operation of heat pumps.

  17. A novel application of concentrated solar thermal energy in foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, J; Harikesavan, V; Eshwanth, A

    2016-05-01

    Scrap preheating in foundries is a technology that saves melting energy, leading to economic and environmental benefits. The proposed method in this paper utilizes solar thermal energy for preheating scrap, effected through a parabolic trough concentrator that focuses sunlight onto a receiver which carries the metallic scrap. Scraps of various thicknesses were placed on the receiver to study the heat absorption by them. Experimental results revealed the pattern with which heat is gained by the scrap, the efficiency of the process and how it is affected as the scrap gains heat. The inferences from them gave practical guidelines on handling scraps for best possible energy savings. Based on the experiments conducted, preheat of up to 160 °C and a maximum efficiency of 70 % and a minimum efficiency of 40 % could be achieved across the time elapsed and heat gained by the scrap. Calculations show that this technology has the potential to save around 8 % of the energy consumption in foundries. Cumulative benefits are very encouraging: 180.45 million kWh of energy savings and 203,905 t of carbon emissions cut per year across the globe. This research reveals immense scope for this technology to be adopted by foundries throughout the world.

  18. Cyclotrons with Fast Variable and/or Multiple Energy Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarten, C

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the principle possibility of stripping extraction in combination with reverse bends in isochronous separate sector cyclotrons (and/or FFAGs). If one uses reverse bends between the sectors (instead of drifts) and places stripper foils at the sector exit edges, the stripped beam has a reduced bending radius and it should be able to leave the cyclotron within the range of the reverse bend - even if the beam is stripped at less than full energy. We are especially interested in $H_2^+$-cyclotrons, which allow to double the charge to mass ratio by stripping. However the principle could be applied to other ions or ionized molecules as well. For the production of proton beams by stripping extraction of an $H_2^+$-beam, we discuss possible designs for three types of machines: First a low-energy cyclotron for the simultaneous production of several beams at multiple energies - for instance 15 MeV, 30 MeV and 70 MeV - thus allowing to have beam on several isotope production targets. In this case it is desired ...

  19. Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Thermal energy storage for the Stirling engine powered automobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. T. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    A thermal energy storage (TES) system developed for use with the Stirling engine as an automotive power system has gravimetric and volumetric storage densities which are competitive with electric battery storage systems, meets all operational requirements for a practical vehicle, and can be packaged in compact sized automobiles with minimum impact on passenger and freight volume. The TES/Stirling system is the only storage approach for direct use of combustion heat from fuel sources not suitable for direct transport and use on the vehicle. The particular concept described is also useful for a dual mode TES/liquid fuel system in which the TES (recharged from an external energy source) is used for short duration trips (approximately 10 miles or less) and liquid fuel carried on board the vehicle used for long duration trips. The dual mode approach offers the potential of 50 percent savings in the consumption of premium liquid fuels for automotive propulsion in the United States.

  1. Improvement of Pyroelectric Cells for Thermal Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Chih Ciou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes trenching piezoelectric (PZT material in a thicker PZT pyroelectric cell to improve the temperature variation rate to enhance the efficiency of thermal energy-harvesting conversion by pyroelectricity. A thicker pyroelectric cell is beneficial in generating electricity pyroelectrically, but it hinders rapid temperature variations. Therefore, the PZT sheet was fabricated to produce deeper trenches to cause lateral temperature gradients induced by the trenched electrode, enhancing the temperature variation rate under homogeneous heat irradiation. When the trenched electrode type with an electrode width of 200 μm and a cutting depth of 150 μm was used to fabricate a PZT pyroelectric cell with a 200 μm thick PZT sheet, the temperature variation rate was improved by about 55%. Therefore, the trenched electrode design did indeed enhance the temperature variation rate and the efficiency of pyroelectric energy converters.

  2. Thermal energy storage for a space solar dynamic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faget, N. M.; Fraser, W. M., Jr.; Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, NASA has employed solar photovoltaic devices for long-duration missions. Thus, the Skylab system has operated with a silicon photovoltaic array and a nickel-cadmium electrochemical system energy storage system. Difficulties regarding the employment of such a system for the larger power requirements of the Space Station are related to a low orbit system efficiency and the large weight of the battery. For this reason the employment of a solar dynamic power system (SDPS) has been considered. The primary components of an SDPS include a concentrating mirror, a heat receiver, a thermal energy storage (TES) system, a thermodynamic heat engine, an alternator, and a heat rejection system. The heat-engine types under consideration are a Brayton cycle engine, an organic Rankine cycle engine, and a free-piston/linear-alternator Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to a system description, TES integration concepts, and a TES technology assessment.

  3. Dish concentrators for solar thermal energy - Status and technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons are presented of point-focusing, or 'dish' solar concentrator system features, development status, and performance levels demonstrated to date. In addition to the requirements of good optical efficiency and high geometric concentration ratios, the most important future consideration in solar thermal energy dish concentrator design will be the reduction of installed and lifetime costs, as well as the materials and labor costs of production. It is determined that technology development initiatives are needed in such areas as optical materials, design wind speeds and wind loads, structural configuration and materials resistance to prolonged exposure, and the maintenance of optical surfaces. The testing of complete concentrator systems, with energy-converting receivers and controls, is also necessary. Both reflector and Fresnel lens concentrator systems are considered.

  4. A THERMAL-HYDRAULIC SYSTEM FOR THE CONVERSION AND THE STORAGE OF ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITRAN Tudor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes the concept design of a thermal-hydraulic system that converts the thermal energy (from the geothermal water, from the cooling water of power equipment, from exhaust gasses, and so. in hydrostatic energy, that is stored in a hydraulic accumulator. The hydraulic energy can be converted into electrical energy when needed.

  5. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  6. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, H.R. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  7. Study on Tetradecane Nanoemulsion for Thermal Energy Transportation and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumoto, Koji; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi

    Phase change emulsion (PCE) is a novel fluid used for heat storage and transfer. It has the following characteristics: higher apparent specific heat and higher heat transfer ability in the phase-change temperature range as compared to the conventional single-phase heat transfer fluids. In particular, oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions are latent heat storage materials that have low melting points, thus offering attractive opportunities for heat transfer enhancement and thermal energy transportation and storage. In this paper, milky white oil-in-water emulsions have been formed using water, Tween 80, Span 80, and tetradecane by low-energy emulsification methods (e.g., the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method). The relations between the component ratios of the emulsions and both the particle diameters and the stability of the resulting emulsions have been determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and vibration viscometry. The results show that the apparent viscosity of the nanoemulsion is lower than that of an emulsion, which was prepared with the same mixing ratio of surfactant and concentration of phase change material. Moreover, the surfactant concentration is found to contribute to the stability of the phase change nanoemulsion. Results indicate that the phase change nanoemulsion is a promising material for thermal storage applications.

  8. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  9. Utilizing Ocean Thermal Energy in a Submarine Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Chao, Yi

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system would exploit the ocean thermal gradient for recharging the batteries in a battery-powered unmanned underwater vehicle [UUV (essentially, a small exploratory submarine robot)] of a type that has been deployed in large numbers in research pertaining to global warming. A UUV of this type travels between the ocean surface and depths, measuring temperature and salinity. The proposed system is related to, but not the same as, previously reported ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems that exploit the ocean thermal gradient but consist of stationary apparatuses that span large depth ranges. The system would include a turbine driven by working fluid subjected to a thermodynamic cycle. CO2 has been provisionally chosen as the working fluid because it has the requisite physical properties for use in the range of temperatures expected to be encountered in operation, is not flammable, and is much less toxic than are many other commercially available refrigerant fluids. The system would be housed in a pressurized central compartment in a UUV equipped with a double hull (see figure). The thermodynamic cycle would begin when the UUV was at maximum depth, where some of the CO2 would condense and be stored, at relatively low temperature and pressure, in the annular volume between the inner and outer hulls. The cycle would resume once the UUV had ascended to near the surface, where the ocean temperature is typically greater than or equals 20 C. At this temperature, the CO2 previously stored at depth in the annular volume between the inner and outer hulls would be pressurized to approx. equals 57 bar (5.7 MPa). The pressurized gaseous CO2 would flow through a check valve into a bladder inside the pressurized compartment, thereby storing energy of the relatively warm, pressurized CO2 for subsequent use after the next descent to maximum depth.

  10. Thermally responsive polymer electrolytes for inherently safe electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jesse C.

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), supercapacitors and Li-ion batteries have emerged as premier candidates to meet the rising demands in energy storage; however, such systems are limited by thermal hazards, thermal runaway, fires and explosions, all of which become increasingly more dangerous in large-format devices. To prevent such scenarios, thermally-responsive polymer electrolytes (RPEs) that alter properties in electrochemical energy storage devices were designed and tested. These RPEs will be used to limit or halt device operation when temperatures increase beyond a predetermined threshold, therefore limiting further heating. The development of these responsive systems will offer an inherent safety mechanism in electrochemical energy storage devices, while preserving the performance, lifetimes, and versatility that large-format systems require. Initial work focused on the development of a model system that demonstrated the concept of RPEs in an electrochemical device. Aqueous electrolyte solutions of polymers exhibiting properties that change in response to temperature were developed for applications in EDLCs and supercapacitors. These "smart materials" provide a means to control electrochemical systems where polymer phase separation at high temperatures affects electrolyte properties and inhibits device performance. Aqueous RPEs were synthesized using N-isopropylacrylamide, which governs the thermal properties, and fractions of acrylic acid or vinyl sulfonic acids, which provide ions to the solution. The molecular properties of these aqueous RPEs, specifically the ionic composition, were shown to influence the temperature-dependent electrolyte properties and the extent to which these electrolytes control the energy storage characteristics of a supercapacitor device. Materials with high ionic content provided the highest room temperature conductivity and electrochemical activity; however, RPEs with low ionic content provided the highest "on

  11. Efficient Solar-Thermal Energy Harvest Driven by Interfacial Plasmonic Heating-Assisted Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Yang, Chao; Liu, Yanming; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Deng, Tao

    2016-09-07

    The plasmonic heating effect of noble nanoparticles has recently received tremendous attention for various important applications. Herein, we report the utilization of interfacial plasmonic heating-assisted evaporation for efficient and facile solar-thermal energy harvest. An airlaid paper-supported gold nanoparticle thin film was placed at the thermal energy conversion region within a sealed chamber to convert solar energy into thermal energy. The generated thermal energy instantly vaporizes the water underneath into hot vapors that quickly diffuse to the thermal energy release region of the chamber to condense into liquids and release the collected thermal energy. The condensed water automatically flows back to the thermal energy conversion region under the capillary force from the hydrophilic copper mesh. Such an approach simultaneously realizes efficient solar-to-thermal energy conversion and rapid transportation of converted thermal energy to target application terminals. Compared to conventional external photothermal conversion design, the solar-thermal harvesting device driven by the internal plasmonic heating effect has reduced the overall thermal resistance by more than 50% and has demonstrated more than 25% improvement of solar water heating efficiency.

  12. An Experimental Study of Pile-Supported OWC-Type Breakwaters: Energy Extraction and Vortex-Induced Energy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrating wave energy converters with breakwaters is a promising concept for wave energy utilization. On the basis of fulfilling the wave protection demands, pile-supported Oscillating Water Column (OWC-type breakwaters can also meet the local needs of electricity far from the lands. In the present study, the wave energy extraction and vortex-induced energy loss of pile-supported OWC-type breakwaters were analyzed based on a two-point measurement method. The importance of energy extraction and vortex-induced energy loss on the wave energy dissipation of pile-supported OWC-type breakwaters were experimentally investigated. It was found that the trends of energy extraction and vortex-induced energy loss were generally correlated. The effects of the pneumatic damping induced by top opening affected the vortex-induced energy loss more than the energy extraction. Results showed that a larger pneumatic damping was preferable for the purpose of increasing energy extraction, whereas for a smaller pneumatic damping the vortex-induced energy loss was more important to the energy dissipation. With increasing draft, the energy extraction decreased, but the vortex-induced energy loss complementally contributed to the total energy dissipation and made the energy dissipation at the same level as that for a shallower draft.

  13. Transformation and removal of wood extractives from pulp mill sludge using wet oxidation and thermal hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Robinson, Murray; Smit, Anne-Marie; Wijeyekoon, Suren; Gapes, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    In order to remove wood extractive compounds from pulp mill sludge and thereby enhancing anaerobic digestibility, samples were subjected to either oxidative hydrothermal treatment (wet oxidation) or non-oxidative hydrothermal treatment (thermal hydrolysis). Treatments were carried out at 220 °C with initial pressure of 20 bar. More than 90% destruction of extractive compounds was observed after 20 min of wet oxidation. Wet oxidation eliminated 95.7% of phenolics, 98.6% fatty acids, 99.8% resin acids and 100% of phytosterols in 120 min. Acetic acid concentration increased by approximately 2 g/l after 120 min of wet oxidation. This has potential for rendering sludge more amenable to anaerobic digestion. In contrast thermal hydrolysis was found to be ineffective in degrading extractive compounds. Wet oxidation is considered to be an effective process for removal of recalcitrant and inhibitive compounds through hydrothermal pre-treatment of pulp mill sludge.

  14. Thermal Properties of Simulated and High-Level Waste Solutions Used for the Solvent Extraction Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-06-27

    Researchers measured the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of supernate from a blend of Tank 37H and 44F, of a simulant of this blend, and of a simulant specifically designed for solvent extraction experiments. The measured heat capacity of the blend from the Tanks 37H and 44F equaled 0.871 cal/(g degrees C). The simulant of this blend produced an identical result. The heat capacity of the simulant designed for solvent extraction testing equaled 0.859 cal/(g degrees C). All three solutions have thermal conductivities in the range of 0.54 to 0.6 Watts/(m degrees C). The slight variation in the thermophysical properties of these solutions successfully explains the different flowmeter readings observed during the real waste demonstration of the solvent extraction technology.

  15. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, D.R.

    1976-02-01

    This study provides a first-look at the system elements involved in: (1) creating a market; (2) understanding and deriving the requirements; (3) performing analytical effort; (4) specifying equipment; and (5) synthesizing applications for a thermal energy storage (TES) function. The work reviews implicated markets, energy consumption patterns, TES technologies, and applications. Further, several concepts are developed and evaluated in some detail. Key findings are: (1) there are numerous technical opportunities for TES in the residential and industrial market sectors; (2) apart from sensible heat storage and transfer, significant R and D is required to fully exploit the superior heat densities of latent heat-based TES systems, particularly at temperatures above 600/sup 0/F; (3) industrial energy conservation can be favorably impacted by TES where periodic or batch-operated unit functions characterize product manufacturing processes, i.e. bricks, steel, and ceramics; and (4) a severe data shortage exists for describing energy consumption rates in real time as related to plant process operations--a needed element in designing TES systems.

  16. Thermal utilisation of solar energy: Croatian National Energy Program SUNEN, 1998-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankovic, Bernard; Jedrisko, Claudia [Rijeka Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Rijeka (Croatia); Hrastnik, Branimir [Energy Inst. `Hrvoje Pozar`, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-01-01

    In the paper, thermal use of solar energy as well as prospects and problems of its utilisation in Croatia have been given. The National Solar Energy Program, SUNEN, has been established to stimulate the usage of solar energy. The main goals of the program are the assessment of technical and economically viable solar potential in order to define real objectives and tasks to provide use of exploitable indigenous clean and renewable energy potential. The Program addresses benefits, the most promising solar applications and solar potential. Much attention has been given to identification of obstacles and barriers in the process of solar technology dissemination. SUNEN is an initiative to increase solar energy use and to become more compatible with the present renewable energy sources policy in EU and Mediterranean countries. The program proposes twelve different types of thermal solar energy systems, which could be multiplied up to 28 000 installations until the year 2010 with annual heat recovery of approximately 1,5 TWh (5,4 PJ). (Author)

  17. Measurements of the interfacial fracture energy of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, L.L.; Barber, B; Jordan, E.H.; Gell, M.

    1998-10-13

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines for improved durability and performance for more than 15 years. In this study, chevron-notched sandwich specimens proposed recently by Shaw are chosen for the study of the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of several metal/oxide and metal/silicide interfaces. The main advantages of this test specimen are: (1) it provides a rigorous fracture mechanics quantification for the bimaterial interface; (2) the fracture energy obtained arises mainly from the chemical bonding at the interface; (3) the test specimen is easy to fabricate (either diffusion or adhesive bonding), and the test is easy to implement (e.g., neither fatigue precracking nor crack length monitoring is needed); (4) no special compliance calibration of specimens is necessary because previously developed compliance calibrations for homogeneous materials can be utilized directly; (5) the test specimen is suitable for the fracture energy measurement of a single interface as well as for interfacial regions composed of several discrete interfaces, which is often the case for TBCs; and (6) the test method allows the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs to be found independent of the poorly characterized TBCs' elastic modulus as to which there is great uncertainty (e.g., the modulus in tension may be different then in compression). As will be shown in this study, all the aforementioned advantages are maintained for TBCs. Furthermore, the failure location using the chevron notched sandwich specimen duplicates the service failure mode. Thus, the data obtained can be utilized directly for lifetime prediction modeling.

  18. Simulated thermal energy demand and actual energy consumption in refurbished and non-refurbished buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, C. A.; Visa, I.; Duta, A.

    2016-08-01

    The EU legal frame imposes the Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB) status to any new public building starting with January 1st, 2019 and for any other new building starting with 2021. Basically, nZEB represents a Low Energy Building (LEB) that covers more than half of the energy demand by using renewable energy systems installed on or close to it. Thus, two steps have to be followed in developing nZEB: (1) reaching the LEB status through state- of-the art architectural and construction solutions (for the new buildings) or through refurbishing for the already existent buildings, followed by (2) implementing renewables; in Romania, over 65% of the energy demand in a building is directly linked to heating, domestic hot water (DHW), and - in certain areas - for cooling. Thus, effort should be directed to reduce the thermal energy demand to be further covered by using clean and affordable systems: solar- thermal systems, heat pumps, biomass, etc. or their hybrid combinations. Obviously this demand is influenced by the onsite climatic profile and by the building performance. An almost worst case scenario is approached in the paper, considering a community implemented in a mountain area, with cold and long winters and mild summers (Odorheiul Secuiesc city, Harghita county, Romania). Three representative types of buildings are analysed: multi-family households (in blocks of flats), single-family houses and administrative buildings. For the first two types, old and refurbished buildings were comparatively discussed.

  19. Technical use of solar energy: Conversion from solar to thermal energy, solar cooling and thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, A.; Fisch, N.; Hahne, E.; Kraus, K.; Seemann, D.; Seifert, B.; Sohns, J.; Schetter, G.; Schweigerer, W.

    1983-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies in the field of solar energy utilization are reviewed. Specific topics considered are: flat plate water collectors, solar absorbers, air collectors, solar absorption cooling, solar simulators, aquifiers, latent heat stores, and space heating systems.

  20. Analysis of thermal energy harvesting using ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallart, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.lallart@insa-lyon.fr; Wang, Liuqing; Sebald, Gaël; Petit, Lionel; Guyomar, Daniel

    2014-09-05

    This Letter aims at giving a preliminary investigation of the thermal energy harvesting capabilities of a technique using the temperature-dependent permeability of ferromagnetic materials. The principles lie in the modification of the magnetic field caused by the variation of the permeability due to the temperature change, hence generating a voltage across a coil surrounding the circuit. The technique can be made truly passive by the use of magnets for applying bias magnetic field. Theoretical results, validated by experimental measurements, show a voltage output of 1.2 mV at optimal load of 2 Ω under 60 K temperature variation in 5 s (with a maximum slope of 25 K s{sup −1}). Further improvements, such as the use of low resistivity coil and magnet with high remnant magnetic field, indicate that it is possible to convert up to 7.35 μJ cm{sup −3} K{sup −2} cycle{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic materials show a sharp change in their permeability near the Curie temperature. • A bias magnetic field permits changing the magnetic flux with the temperature. • The variable magnetic flux can be converted into electrical energy by using a coil. • Theoretical and experimental measurements show an energy density up to 7.35 μJ cm{sup −3} K{sup −2} cycle{sup −1}. • Optimization issues should focus on coil quality and global magnetic reluctance variation.

  1. Thermal energy storage systems using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weast, T.; Shannon, L.

    1980-06-01

    A rotary cement kiln and an electric arc furnace were chosen for evaluation to determine the applicability of a fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES). Multistage shallow bed FBHX's operating with high temperature differences were identified as the most suitable for TES applications. Analysis of the two selected conceptual systems included establishing a plant process flow configuration, an operational scenario, a preliminary FBHX/TES design, and parametric analysis. A computer model was developed to determine the effects of the number of stages, gas temperatures, gas flows, bed materials, charge and discharge time, and parasitic power required for operation. The maximum national energy conservation potential of the cement plant application with TES is 15.4 million barrels of oil or 3.9 million tons of coal per year. For the electric arc furnance application the maximum national conservation potential with TES is 4.5 million barrels of oil or 1.1 million tons of coal per year. Present time of day utility rates are near the breakeven point required for the TES system. Escalation of on-peak energy due to critical fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  2. Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

  3. Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

  4. Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

  5. Energy Extraction from a Slider-Crank Wave Energy under Irregular Wave Conditions: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Yuanrui; Karayaka, H. Bora; Yan, Yanjun; Zhang, James Z.; Muljadi, Eduard; Yu, Yi-Hsiang

    2015-08-24

    A slider-crank wave energy converter (WEC) is a novel energy conversion device. It converts wave energy into electricity at a relatively high efficiency, and it features a simple structure. Past analysis on this particular WEC has been done under regular sinusoidal wave conditions, and suboptimal energy could be achieved. This paper presents the analysis of the system under irregular wave conditions; a time-domain hydrodynamics model is adopted and a rule-based control methodology is introduced to better serve the irregular wave conditions. Results from the simulations show that the performance of the system under irregular wave conditions is different from that under regular sinusoidal wave conditions, but a reasonable amount of energy can still be extracted.

  6. Thermal reservoir sizing for adiabatic compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kere, Amelie; Goetz, Vincent; Py, Xavier; Olives, Regis; Sadiki, Najim [Perpignan Univ. (France). PROMES CNRS UPR 8521; Mercier-Allart, Eric [EDF R et D, Chatou (France)

    2012-07-01

    Despite the operation of the two existing industrial facilities to McIntosh (Alabama), and for more than thirty years, Huntorf (Germany), electricity storage in the form of compressed air in underground cavern (CAES) has not seen the development that was expected in the 80s. The efficiency of this form of storage was with the first generation CAES, less than 50%. The evolving context technique can significantly alter this situation. The new generation so-called Adiabatic CAES (A-CAES) is to retrieve the heat produced by the compression via thermal storage, thus eliminating the necessity of gas to burn and would allow consideration efficiency overall energy of the order of 70%. To date, there is no existing installation of A-CAES. Many studies describe the principal and the general working mode of storage systems by adiabatic compression of air. So, efficiencies of different configurations of adiabatic compression process were analyzed. The aim of this paper is to simulate and analyze the performances of a thermal storage reservoir integrated in the system and adapted to the working conditions of a CAES.

  7. Inhibition of thermal induced protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Rauf, Abdul; Ben Hadda, Taibi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the in vitro inhibition of protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides including 20β hydroxy-1-oxo(22R)-witha-2,5,24 trienolide (1), (20R,22R-14α,20α)-dihydroxy-1-oxowitha-2,5,16,24 tetraenolide (2). The results showed that the extract/fractions of the plant evoked profound inhibitory effect on thermal-induced protein denaturation. The chloroform fraction caused the most dominant attenuation of 68% at 500 μg/mL. The bioactivity-guided isolation from chloroform fraction led to the isolation of compounds 1 and 2 that showed profound protein inhibition with 78.05% and 80.43% effect at 500 μg/mL and thus strongly complimented the activity of extract/fractions. In conclusion, extract/fractions of W. somnifera possessed strong inhibition of protein denaturation that can be attributed to these isolated withanolides.

  8. Parametric analysis of a packed bed thermal energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Loroño, Iñaki; Faik, Abdessamad; Uriz, Irantzu; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Even if the packed bed thermal energy storage concept has been introduced as a promising technology in the concentrated solar power field in the last years, its full deployment in commercial plants presents a clear improvement potential. In order to overcome the under-development of this storage technology, this work attempts to show the great capabilities of packed bed heat storage units after a successful design and operational parametric optimization procedure. The obtained results show that a correct design of this type of facilities together with a successful operation method, allow to increase significantly the storage capacity reaching an overall efficiency higher than 80 %. The design guideline obtained as a result of this work could open new objectives and applications for the packed bed storage technology as it represents a cost-effective and highly performing storage alternative.

  9. Flight experiment of thermal energy storage. [for spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, David

    1989-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) enables a solar dynamic system to deliver constant electric power through periods of sun and shade. Brayton and Stirling power systems under current considerations for missions in the near future require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1300+ K range. TES materials that meet these requirements fall into the fluoride family of salts. Salts shrink as they solidify, a change reaching 30 percent for some salts. Hot spots can develop in the TES container or the container can become distorted if the melting salt cannot expand elsewhere. Analysis of the transient, two-phase phenomenon is being incorporated into a three-dimensional computer code. The objective of the flight program is to verify the predictions of the code, particularly of the void location and its effect on containment temperature. The four experimental packages comprising the program will be the first tests of melting and freezing conducted under microgravity.

  10. PCM-impregnated polymer microcomposites for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Philip

    1990-07-01

    The encapsulation of phase change materials (PCMs) into the micropores of an ordered polymer film was investigated. Paraffin wax and high density polyethylene wax were infiltrated successfully into extruded films of the ordered polymer PBZT by a solvent exchange technique to yield microcomposites with PCM levels on the order of 40 volume percent. These microcomposite films exhibit excellent mechanical stability under cyclic freeze-thaw conditions. However, their thermal energy storage capacities, as characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, decrease significantly following freeze-thaw cycling. It appears that the ultrastructure of the PBZT and the thinness of the film (which results in high cooling rates during freeze-thaw cycling) promote the retention of the amorphous form of the PCM rather than the crystalline form. Since the amorphous form of the PCM does not contribute to the latent heat of fusion, the heat storage capacity of the microcomposite is reduced.

  11. Estimation of the energy release and thermal properties of ejected clasts from explosive eruptions using a thermal imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Cárdenas-Sánchez, E.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal images were obtained at Popocatépetl, central Mexico, during the period of high lava-dome destruction activity between 1998 and 2002. Similarly, thermal cameras have operated at Colima volcano, western Mexico during episodes of similar explosive activity in 2005 and 2007. We have developed a method to estimate the relative thermal energy release among explosions, and the degree of conversion into mechanical energy spent in the fragmentation of the ejecta, based on the cooling rate inferred from successive thermal images obtained immediately after each explosion. The thermal imaging cameras were located at about 11 km from the crater at Popocatépetl, and at about 6 km from the crater at Colima. The selected explosions threw significant amounts of hot debris on the volcano flanks. The cooling rate was then measured on selected pixels of the thermal images, and compared with different possible distributions of fragment sizes considering weighted averages of fragments in the pixels. The optimal fitting of fragment distributions reveals the degree of fragmentation of individual explosions, and along with a model for the cooling process, permitted to estimate the relative thermal energy release on the area covered by the image. Additionally, the results indicate that the radiative thermal conductivity plays a significant role on the outer shell of the fragments, suggesting a free mean path of thermal infrared photons that may reach several millimeters or even a few centimeters.

  12. Effect of Set-point Variation on Thermal Comfort and Energy Use in a Plus-energy Dwelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    are allowed to drift, and it also allows the occupants to benefit from adaptive opportunities.This study presents the results of thermal environment measurements and energy use in a single-family dwelling during a one year period. A radiant floor heating and cooling system was used to condition the indoor......When designing buildings and space conditioning systems, the occupant thermal comfort, health, and productivity are the main criteria to satisfy. However, this should be achieved with the most energy-efficient space conditioning systems (heating, cooling, and ventilation). Control strategy, set......-points, and control dead-bands have a direct effect on the thermal environment in and the energy use of a building. The thermal environment in and the energy use of a building are associated with the thermal mass of the building and the control strategy, including set-points and control dead-bands. With thermally...

  13. Assessing District Energy Systems Performance Integrated with Multiple Thermal Energy Storages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Behnaz

    The goal of this study is to examine various energy resources in district energy (DE) systems and then DE system performance development by means of multiple thermal energy storages (TES) application. This study sheds light on areas not yet investigated precisely in detail. Throughout the research, major components of the heat plant, energy suppliers of the DE systems, and TES characteristics are separately examined; integration of various configurations of the multiple TESs in the DE system is then analysed. In the first part of the study, various sources of energy are compared, in a consistent manner, financially and environmentally. The TES performance is then assessed from various aspects. Then, TES(s) and DE systems with several sources of energy are integrated, and are investigated as a heat process centre. The most efficient configurations of the multiple TESs integrated with the DE system are investigated. Some of the findings of this study are applied on an actual DE system. The outcomes of this study provide insight for researchers and engineers who work in this field, as well as policy makers and project managers who are decision-makers. The accomplishments of the study are original developments TESs and DE systems. As an original development the Enviro-Economic Function, to balance the economic and environmental aspects of energy resources technologies in DE systems, is developed; various configurations of multiple TESs, including series, parallel, and general grid, are developed. The developed related functions are discharge temperature and energy of the TES, and energy and exergy efficiencies of the TES. The TES charging and discharging behavior of TES instantaneously is also investigated to obtain the charging temperature, the maximum charging temperature, the charging energy flow, maximum heat flow capacity, the discharging temperature, the minimum charging temperature, the discharging energy flow, the maximum heat flow capacity, and performance

  14. Thermal Analysis of a Thermal Energy Storage Unit to Enhance a Workshop Heating System Driven by Industrial Residual Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wenqiang Sun; Zuquan Zhao; Yanhui Wang

    2017-01-01

    .... However, the majority of applicable waste heat resources are high-grade or stable thermal energy, while the low-grade or unstable waste heat resources, especially low-temperature industrial residual water (IRW...

  15. Thermal Properties of Cement-Based Composites for Geothermal Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaohua; Memon, Shazim Ali; Yang, Haibin; Dong, Zhijun; Cui, Hongzhi

    2017-04-27

    Geothermal energy piles are a quite recent renewable energy technique where geothermal energy in the foundation of a building is used to transport and store geothermal energy. In this paper, a structural-functional integrated cement-based composite, which can be used for energy piles, was developed using expanded graphite and graphite nanoplatelet-based composite phase change materials (CPCMs). Its mechanical properties, thermal-regulatory performance, and heat of hydration were evaluated. Test results showed that the compressive strength of GNP-Paraffin cement-based composites at 28 days was more than 25 MPa. The flexural strength and density of thermal energy storage cement paste composite decreased with increases in the percentage of CPCM in the cement paste. The infrared thermal image analysis results showed superior thermal control capability of cement based materials with CPCMs. Hence, the carbon-based CPCMs are promising thermal energy storage materials and can be used to improve the durability of energy piles.

  16. Detailed energy saving performance analyses on thermal mass walls demonstrated in a zero energy house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L. [School of Architecture, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Hurt, R.; Correia, D.; Boehm, R. [Center for Energy Research, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    An insulated concrete wall system{sup 1}1 was used on exterior walls of a zero energy house. Its thermal functions were investigated using actual data in comparison to a conventional wood frame system. The internal wall temperature of massive systems changes more slowly than the conventional wall constructions, leading to a more stable indoor temperature. The Energy10 simulated equivalent R-value and DBMS of the mass walls under actual climate conditions are, respectively, 6.98 (m{sup 2} C)/W and 3.39. However, the simulated heating energy use was much lower for the massive walls while the cooling load was a little higher. Further investigation on the heat flux indicates that the heat actually is transferred inside all day and night, which results in a higher cooling energy consumption. A one-dimensional model further verified these analyses, and the calculated results are in good agreement with the actual data. We conclude that the thermal mass wall does have the ability to store heat during the daytime and release it back at night, but in desert climates with high 24-h ambient temperature and intense sunlight, more heat will be stored than can be transferred back outside at night. As a result, an increased cooling energy will be required. (author)

  17. Optimization and spatial pattern of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Valstar, J.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is a cost-effective technology that enables the reduction of energy use and CO2 emissions associated with the heating and cooling of buildings by storage and recovery of large quantities of thermal energy in the subsurface. Reducing the distance between wells in

  18. Initial Study Of Potency Thermal Energy Using OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) As A Renewable Energy For Halmahera Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawina, Y. O.; Sugianto, D. N.; Alifdini, I.

    2017-02-01

    The Blue Energy is the one of renewable energy. Indonesia as a maritime country has many potention to implement this Blue energy, but it still an advance technology to convert this energy into the electricity. The concept of OTEC with Land Based System is to boost the cost effectiveness of ocean technology. OTEC Land based system which is integrated with the cooling system, water desalination systems, aquaculture, and agriculture. Geographically Halmahera district is located in the Eastern Province of North Maluku. Halmahera is the one of remote island in Indonesia that still lack of electricity. By processing the Argo Float data in 2013-2015 using ODV (Ocean Data View) software, shows the difference of ocean temperature in Halmahera sea surface the range is 29°C. In depth of 1000 m, the sea temperature ranging from 2°C. The Electrical potential of OTEC a long 55 km Halmahera beach are around 93,1% as potential source of OTEC technology. The electricity OTEC prediction is 5,12 MW. Capacity factor of OTEC is 0.857, means that Halmahera have electrical potential for applying OTEC for each year is 35,88 GWh/year.

  19. Automatic Metadata Extraction - The High Energy Physics Use Case

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, Joseph; Rajman, Martin

    Automatic metadata extraction (AME) of scientific papers has been described as one of the hardest problems in document engineering. Heterogeneous content, varying style, and unpredictable placement of article components render the problem inherently indeterministic. Conditional random fields (CRF), a machine learning technique, can be used to classify document metadata amidst this uncertainty, annotating document contents with semantic labels. High energy physics (HEP) papers, such as those written at CERN, have unique content and structural characteristics, with scientific collaborations of thousands of authors altering article layouts dramatically. The distinctive qualities of these papers necessitate the creation of specialised datasets and model features. In this work we build an unprecedented training set of HEP papers and propose and evaluate a set of innovative features for CRF models. We build upon state-of-the-art AME software, GROBID, a tool coordinating a hierarchy of CRF models in a full document ...

  20. Scaling of Superconducting Switches for Extraction of Magnetic Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2010-01-01

    In certain cases it is necessary to extract the energy from a superconducting magnet when it quenches, in order to limit the heat generated by the event and thus prevent irreversible damage. This is usually achieved by opening a contact breaker across a resistor in the circuit feeding the magnet. For the heavy currents used to excite large magnets such switches incorporate sophisticated devices to limit arcing during the operation; besides being quite large and expensive, such switches have a limited lifetime. It is therefore interesting to consider the use of superconducting switches to perform this function, the advantage being that such switches would (i) not require maintenance and (ii) would be housed within the cryogenic environment of the magnet, and thus avoid permanent diversion of the current in and out of that environment to the mechanical switch (which operates at room temperature). However, practical switches for such an application are made up of superconductor in a metal matrix, and it is conve...

  1. Antioxidant Activity and Thermal Stability of Oleuropein and Related Phenolic Compounds of Olive Leaf Extract after Separation and Concentration by Salting-Out-Assisted Cloud Point Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulos, Konstantinos; Katsoyannos, Evangelos; Chatzilazarou, Arhontoula

    2014-04-08

    A fast, clean, energy-saving, non-toxic method for the stabilization of the antioxidant activity and the improvement of the thermal stability of oleuropein and related phenolic compounds separated from olive leaf extract via salting-out-assisted cloud point extraction (CPE) was developed using Tween 80. The process was based on the decrease of the solubility of polyphenols and the lowering of the cloud point temperature of Tween 80 due to the presence of elevated amounts of sulfates (salting-out) and the separation from the bulk solution with centrifugation. The optimum conditions were chosen based on polyphenols recovery (%), phase volume ratio (Vs/Vw) and concentration factor (Fc). The maximum recovery of polyphenols was in total 95.9%; Vs/Vw was 0.075 and Fc was 15 at the following conditions: pH 2.6, ambient temperature (25 °C), 4% Tween 80 (w/v), 35% Na₂SO₄ (w/v) and a settling time of 5 min. The total recovery of oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, verbascoside and apigenin-7-O-glucoside, at optimum conditions, was 99.8%, 93.0%, 87.6%, 99.3% and 100.0%, respectively. Polyphenolic compounds entrapped in the surfactant-rich phase (Vs) showed higher thermal stability (activation energy (Ea) 23.8 kJ/mol) compared to non-entrapped ones (Ea 76.5 kJ/mol). The antioxidant activity of separated polyphenols remained unaffected as determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method.

  2. Antioxidant Activity and Thermal Stability of Oleuropein and Related Phenolic Compounds of Olive Leaf Extract after Separation and Concentration by Salting-Out-Assisted Cloud Point Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatopoulos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A fast, clean, energy-saving, non-toxic method for the stabilization of the antioxidant activity and the improvement of the thermal stability of oleuropein and related phenolic compounds separated from olive leaf extract via salting-out-assisted cloud point extraction (CPE was developed using Tween 80. The process was based on the decrease of the solubility of polyphenols and the lowering of the cloud point temperature of Tween 80 due to the presence of elevated amounts of sulfates (salting-out and the separation from the bulk solution with centrifugation. The optimum conditions were chosen based on polyphenols recovery (%, phase volume ratio (Vs/Vw and concentration factor (Fc. The maximum recovery of polyphenols was in total 95.9%; Vs/Vw was 0.075 and Fc was 15 at the following conditions: pH 2.6, ambient temperature (25 °C, 4% Tween 80 (w/v, 35% Na2SO4 (w/v and a settling time of 5 min. The total recovery of oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, verbascoside and apigenin-7-O-glucoside, at optimum conditions, was 99.8%, 93.0%, 87.6%, 99.3% and 100.0%, respectively. Polyphenolic compounds entrapped in the surfactant-rich phase (Vs showed higher thermal stability (activation energy (Ea 23.8 kJ/mol compared to non-entrapped ones (Ea 76.5 kJ/mol. The antioxidant activity of separated polyphenols remained unaffected as determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method.

  3. Pressurized liquid extraction of Aglaonema sp. iminosugars: Chemical composition, bioactivity, cell viability and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, S; Martín-Ortiz, A; Carrero-Carralero, C; Ramos, S; Sanz, M L; Soria, A C

    2016-08-01

    Pressurized liquid extraction of Aglaonema sp. iminosugars has been optimized. A single cycle under optimal conditions (80mg, 100°C, 2min) was enough to extract ⩾96% of most iminosugars. Further incubation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for 5h removed coextracted interfering low molecular weight carbohydrates from extracts of different Aglaonema cultivars. A complete characterization of these extracts was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: three iminosugars were tentatively identified for the first time; α-homonojirimycin and 2,5-dideoxy-2,5-imino-d-mannitol were the major iminosugars determined. α-Glucosidase inhibition activity, cell viability and thermal stability of Aglaonema extracts were also evaluated. Extracts with IC50 for α-glucosidase activity in the 0.010-0.079mgmL(-1) range showed no decrease of Caco-2 cell viability at concentrations lower than 125μgmL(-1) and were stable at 50°C for 30days. These results highlight the potential of Aglaonema extracts as a source of bioactives to be used as functional ingredients.

  4. Design Novel 3D Nano Architectures for Developing Ultra Fast Thermal Energy Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0036 Design novel 3D nano-architectures for developing ultra fast thermal energy storage materials...ultra fast thermal energy storage materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA8655-12-1-2014 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S...ANSI Std. Z39.18 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Project Title : Design novel 3D nano-architectures for developing ultra fast thermal energy storage

  5. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  6. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M [eds.

    1979-02-01

    The purpose for this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in solar heating systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating system, and stand-alone domestic hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  7. Enhanced photovoltaic energy conversion using thermally based spectral shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, David M.; Lenert, Andrej; Chan, Walker R.; Bhatia, Bikram; Celanović, Ivan; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-06-01

    Solar thermophotovoltaic devices have the potential to enhance the performance of solar energy harvesting by converting broadband sunlight to narrow-band thermal radiation tuned for a photovoltaic cell. A direct comparison of the operation of a photovoltaic with and without a spectral converter is the most critical indicator of the promise of this technology. Here, we demonstrate enhanced device performance through the suppression of 80% of unconvertible photons by pairing a one-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitter with a tandem plasma-interference optical filter. We measured a solar-to-electrical conversion rate of 6.8%, exceeding the performance of the photovoltaic cell alone. The device operates more efficiently while reducing the heat generation rates in the photovoltaic cell by a factor of two at matching output power densities. We determined the theoretical limits, and discuss the implications of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit. Improving the performance of an unaltered photovoltaic cell provides an important framework for the design of high-efficiency solar energy converters.

  8. THERMAL AND THERMODYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A DYE POWDER FROM LIQUID TURMERIC EXTRACTS BY SPRAY DRYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Yazmin Coronel Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of sorption isotherms and glass transition temperature (Tg and the thermal properties of a dye powder obtained from turmeric extracts using spray drying. The sorption isotherms were evaluated at 15, 25 and 35 ºC using the dynamic gravimetric method, wherein the isotherm data of the experiment were fit to GAB and BET models. Likewise, the Tg was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was used to determine the mass loss, and the thermal properties (heat capacity, diffusivity and thermal conductivity were determined using transient flow method. The results demonstrated that the GAB model best fit the adsorption data. The DSC analysis presented a glass transition temperature of 65.35 ºC and a loss of volatiles at 178.07 ºC. The TGA analysis indicated a considerable mass loss starting at 193 ºC, resulting in degradation of the product. The thermal properties demonstrated a heat capacity of 2.45 J/g ºC, a thermal conductivity of 0.164 ±0.001 W/mK and a thermal diffusivity of 8.7x10-8 ± 0.000 m2/s

  9. Review on thermal performance of phase change energy storage building envelope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; ZHANG YinPing; XlAO Wei; ZENG RuoLang; ZHANG QunLi; DI HongFa

    2009-01-01

    Improving the thermal performance of building envelope is an important way to save building energy consumption. The phase change energy storage building envelope is helpful to effective use of renewable energy, reducing building operational energy consumption, increasing building thermal comfort, and reducing environment pollution and greenhouse gas emission. This paper presents the concept of ideal energy-saving building envelope, which is used to guide the building envelope material selection and thermal performance design. This paper reviews some available researches on phase change building material and phase change energy storage building envelope. At last, this paper presents some current problems needed further research.

  10. Experimental DC extraction of the thermal resistance of bipolar transistors taking into account the Early effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessandro, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents three methods to experimentally extract the thermal resistance of bipolar transistors taking into account the Early effect. The approaches are improved variants of recently-proposed techniques relying on common-base DC measurements. The accuracy is numerically verified by making use of a compact model calibrated on I-V characteristics of state-of-the-art SOG BJTs and SiGe:C HBTs.

  11. Worker health and safety in solar thermal power systems. III. Thermal energy storage subsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullman, A.Z.; Sokolow, B.B.; Daniels, J.; Hurt, P.

    1979-10-01

    The effects of the use of thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems in solar thermal power systems (STPS) on operating failures and on worker health and safety are examined. Revelant near- and medium-term designs for TES subsystems are reviewed. Generic failure events are considered by an event tree methodology. Three generic categories of initiating events are identified which can lead to release of storage fluids and other hazards. Three TES subsystem designs are selected for, and subjected to, analysis. A fluid release event tree for a sensible heat TES subsystem using mixed media organic oil/crushed rock and sand, designed for the Barstow, CA, 10 MWe pilot plant, is developed. Toxicology and flammability hazards are considered. The effect of component failures, including ullage and fluid maintenance units, on subsystem safety is considered. A latent heat subsystem using NaNO/sub 3//NaOH as the working medium is studied, and relevant failure events delineated. Mechanical equipment failures including the scraped wall heat exchangers, are examined. Lastly, a thermochemical TES subsystem using SO/sub 2//SO/sub 3/ interconversion is considered. Principle hazards identified include mechanical failures and storage fluid release. The integrity of the system is found to depend on catalyst and heat exchanger reliability. Dynamic response to off-normal system events is considered.

  12. Energy extraction from the biologic battery in the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Patrick P; Lysaght, Andrew C; Bandyopadhyay, Saurav; Chandrakasan, Anantha P; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2012-12-01

    Endocochlear potential (EP) is a battery-like electrochemical gradient found in and actively maintained by the inner ear. Here we demonstrate that the mammalian EP can be used as a power source for electronic devices. We achieved this by designing an anatomically sized, ultra-low quiescent-power energy harvester chip integrated with a wireless sensor capable of monitoring the EP itself. Although other forms of in vivo energy harvesting have been described in lower organisms, and thermoelectric, piezoelectric and biofuel devices are promising for mammalian applications, there have been few, if any, in vivo demonstrations in the vicinity of the ear, eye and brain. In this work, the chip extracted a minimum of 1.12 nW from the EP of a guinea pig for up to 5 h, enabling a 2.4 GHz radio to transmit measurement of the EP every 40-360 s. With future optimization of electrode design, we envision using the biologic battery in the inner ear to power chemical and molecular sensors, or drug-delivery actuators for diagnosis and therapy of hearing loss and other disorders.

  13. High-Frequency Dynamic Analysis of Plates in Thermal Environments Based on Energy Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy density governing equation to analyze the high-frequency dynamic behavior of plates in thermal environments is derived in this paper, in which the thermal effects are considered to change the membrane stress state and temperature dependent material properties of plates. Then the thermal effects on the energy reflection and transmission coefficients are dealt with hereof. Based on the above, an EFEM (energy finite element method based approximate approach for the energy analysis of coupled plates under nonuniform thermal environments is proposed. The approach could be conducted by three steps: (1 thermal analysis, (2 thermal stress analysis, and (3 forming element matrixes, joint matrixes, and the whole EFEM formulation for the energy analysis. The same mesh model is used for all the three steps. The comparison between EFEM results and classical modal superposition method results of simply supported plates in various uniform thermal environments and coupled plates in nonuniform thermal environments demonstrated that the derived energy governing equation and the proposed approach described well the smooth time- and locally space-averaged energy density. It is found that the distributions and levels of energy density are affected by thermal effects, and the variation trends are related to exciting frequency.

  14. APPLICATION OF ULTRASOUND THERMAL PROCESS ON EXTRACTING FLAVOR AND CAFFEINE OF COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, our focus is the use of ultrasound thermal process to extract flavor and caffeine from coffee. The different operating conditions for extraction experiments are executed and the results are also compared. The results show that coffee flavor is not enhanced with the increase of temperature because the volatile degree of coffee flavor components is quick and easy to be reached at high temperatures. From the experimental results, it can be found that using low vibration frequency is better than using high vibration frequency. Also, caffeine will be reached into the saturated state at the 15th second of the extracting time and the quantity of caffeine augments with the increase of temperature.

  15. Fuzzy Linguistic Knowledge Based Behavior Extraction for Building Energy Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic

    2013-08-01

    Significant portion of world energy production is consumed by building Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) units. Thus along with occupant comfort, energy efficiency is also an important factor in HVAC control. Modern buildings use advanced Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control schemes to realize these goals. However, since the performance of HVAC units is dependent on many criteria including uncertainties in weather, number of occupants, and thermal state, the performance of current state of the art systems are sub-optimal. Furthermore, because of the large number of sensors in buildings, and the high frequency of data collection, large amount of information is available. Therefore, important behavior of buildings that compromise energy efficiency or occupant comfort is difficult to identify. This paper presents an easy to use and understandable framework for identifying such behavior. The presented framework uses human understandable knowledge-base to extract important behavior of buildings and present it to users via a graphical user interface. The presented framework was tested on a building in the Pacific Northwest and was shown to be able to identify important behavior that relates to energy efficiency and occupant comfort.

  16. Zero-Point Energy Leakage in Quantum Thermal Bath Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Fabien; Bronstein, Yael; Dammak, Hichem; Depondt, Philippe; Finocchi, Fabio; Hayoun, Marc

    2016-12-13

    The quantum thermal bath (QTB) has been presented as an alternative to path-integral-based methods to introduce nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations. The method has proved to be efficient, yielding accurate results for various systems. However, the QTB method is prone to zero-point energy leakage (ZPEL) in highly anharmonic systems. This is a well-known problem in methods based on classical trajectories where part of the energy of the high-frequency modes is transferred to the low-frequency modes leading to a wrong energy distribution. In some cases, the ZPEL can have dramatic consequences on the properties of the system. Thus, we investigate the ZPEL by testing the QTB method on selected systems with increasing complexity in order to study the conditions and the parameters that influence the leakage. We also analyze the consequences of the ZPEL on the structural and vibrational properties of the system. We find that the leakage is particularly dependent on the damping coefficient and that increasing its value can reduce and, in some cases, completely remove the ZPEL. When using sufficiently high values for the damping coefficient, the expected energy distribution among the vibrational modes is ensured. In this case, the QTB method gives very encouraging results. In particular, the structural properties are well-reproduced. The dynamical properties should be regarded with caution although valuable information can still be extracted from the vibrational spectrum, even for large values of the damping term.

  17. Method and apparatus for low-loss storage of thermal energy and for low-loss withdrawal of the stored thermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U.

    1980-08-26

    A mehtod is described for low-loss thermal energy storage in and withdrawal from a heat accumulator connected with an energy source and a heat consumer in a circulatory system through which a heat-carrying flow medium circulates. The method consits of passing the flow medium through the energy source so as to withdraw thermal energy from the energy source and effect absorption of the thermal energy by the flow medium, guiding the flow medium in respective layers within the heat accumulator in a direction from the center of the heat accumulator toward the periphery thereof so as to store the thermal energy in a heat storage mass disposed in the heat accumulator; and guiding the flow medium in the layers thereof through the heat accumulator in a direction from the periphery of the heat accumulator to the center thereof, and passing the flow medium from the heat accumulator through the consumer so as to withdraw thermal energy therefrom and transfer it to the consumer.

  18. Ambient Temperature Based Thermal Aware Energy Efficient ROM Design on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Rishita; Bansal, Neha; Bansal, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal aware design is currently gaining importance in VLSI research domain. In this work, we are going to design thermal aware energy efficient ROM on Virtex-5 FPGA. Ambient Temperature, airflow, and heat sink profile play a significant role in thermal aware hardware design life cycle. Ambient...

  19. A comparison of techniques for extracting emissivity information from thermal infrared data for geologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Simon J.; Gabell, A. R.; Green, A. A.; Kealy, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    This article evaluates three techniques developed to extract emissivity information from multispectral thermal infrared data. The techniques are the assumed Channel 6 emittance model, thermal log residuals, and alpha residuals. These techniques were applied to calibrated, atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) data acquired over Cuprite, Nevada in September 1990. Results indicate that the two new techniques (thermal log residuals and alpha residuals) provide two distinct advantages over the assumed Channel 6 emittance model. First, they permit emissivity information to be derived from all six TIMS channels. The assumed Channel 6 emittance model only permits emissivity values to be derived from five of the six TIMS channels. Second, both techniques are less susceptible to noise than the assumed Channel 6 emittance model. The disadvantage of both techniques is that laboratory data must be converted to thermal log residuals or alpha residuals to facilitate comparison with similarly processed image data. An additional advantage of the alpha residual technique is that the processed data are scene-independent unlike those obtained with the other techniques.

  20. Quality Assessment of Roof Planes Extracted from Height Data for Solar Energy Systems by the EAGLE Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Schuffert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels and the upwards trend in energy costs over time, many countries—especially in Europe—have begun to modify their energy policies aiming to increase that percentage obtained from renewable energies. The EAGLE (FP7 program, European Commission has developed a web-based platform to promote renewable energy systems (RES in the public and private sectors, and to deliver a comprehensive information source for all interested users. In this paper, a comprehensive quality assessment of extracted roof planes suitable for solar energy installations (photovoltaic, solar thermal from height data derived automatically from both LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging and aerial images will be presented. A shadow analysis is performed regarding the daily path of the sun including the shading effects of nearby objects (chimneys, dormers, vegetation, buildings, topography, etc.. A quality assessment was carried out for both LiDAR and aerial images of the same test sites in UK and Germany concerning building outline accuracy, extraction rate of roof planes and the accuracy of their geometric parameters (inclination and aspect angle, size. The benefit is an optimized system to extract roof planes for RES with a high level of detail, accuracy and flexibility (concerning different commonly available data sources including an estimation of quality of the results which is important for individual house owners as well as for regional applications by governments or solar energy companies to judge their usefulness.

  1. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  2. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  4. Analysis of thermal energy storage for a pharmaceutical company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henze, Gregor P. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (US). Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering (CEAE); Biffar, Bernd; Wienecke, Marcus [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH und Co. KG, Biberach (Germany); Becker, Martin P. [Biberach Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany). Dept. of Architectural and Energy Engineering

    2009-07-01

    A pharmaceutical facility located in Southern Germany is experiencing a trend of growing cooling loads to be met by the chilled water plant composed of ten chillers of greatly varying cost effectiveness. With a capacity shortfall inevitable, the question arises whether to install an additional chiller or improve the utilization of the existing chillers, in particular those with low operating costs per unit cooling, through the addition of a chilled water thermal energy storage (TES) system. To provide decision support in this matter, an optimization environment was developed and validated that adopts mixed integer programming as the approach to optimizing the chiller dispatch for any load condition, while an overarching dynamic programming based optimization approach optimizes the charge/discharge strategy of the TES system. In this fashion, the chilled water plant optimization is decoupled but embedded in the TES control optimization. The approach was selected to allow for arbitrary constraints and optimization horizons, while ensuring a global optimum to the problem. The results show that a relatively small TES tank provides significant economic and operational benefits. Yet, in order to facilitate long-term supply security, a larger TES tank capacity was decided on and the TES system was constructed in 2008. (orig.)

  5. Energy spectrum of thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid helium-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Varga, E.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent preliminary experiments [A. Marakov et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 094503 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094503] using triplet-state He2 excimer molecules as tracers of the motion of the normal fluid have shown that, in thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid 4He, small-scale turbulence in the superfluid component is accompanied, above a critical heat flux, by partially coupled large-scale turbulence in both fluids, with an energy spectrum proportional to k-m, where m is greater than the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Here we report the results of a more detailed study of this spectrum over a range of temperatures and heat fluxes using the same experimental technique. We show that the exponent m varies systematically with heat flux but is always greater than 5/3. We interpret this as arising from the steady counterflow, which causes large-scale eddies in the two fluids to be pulled in opposite directions, giving rise to dissipation by mutual friction at all wave numbers, mutual friction tending also to oppose the effect of the counterflow. Comparison of the experimental results with a simple theory suggests that this process may be more complicated than we might have hoped, but experiments covering a wider range of heat fluxes, which are technically very difficult, will probably be required before we can arrive at a convincing theory.

  6. Practical considerations for solar energy thermally enhanced photo-luminescence (TEPL) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Nimrod; Manor, Assaf; Kurtulik, Matej; Sabapathy, Tamilarasan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2017-04-01

    While single-junction photovoltaics (PV's) are considered limited in conversion efficiency according to the Shockley-Queisser limit, concepts such as solar thermo-photovoltaics aim to harness lost heat and overcome this barrier. We claim the novel concept of Thermally Enhanced Photoluminescence (TEPL) as an easier route to achieve this goal. Here we present a practical TEPL device where a thermally insulated photo-luminescent (PL) absorber, acts as a mediator between a photovoltaic cell and the sun. This high temperature absorber emits blue-shifted PL at constant flux, then coupled to a high band gap PV cell. This scheme promotes PV conversion efficiencies, under ideal conditions, higher than 62% at temperatures lower than 1300K. Moreover, for a PV and absorber band-gaps of 1.45eV (GaAs PV's) and 1.1eV respectively, under practical conditions, solar concentration of 1000 suns, and moderate thermal insulation; the conversion efficiencies potentially exceed 46%. Some of these practical conditions belong to the realm of optical design; including high photon recycling (PR) and absorber external quantum efficiency (EQE). High EQE values, a product of the internal QE of the active PL materials and the extraction efficiency of each photon (determined by the absorber geometry and interfaces), have successfully been reached by experts in laser cooling technology. PR is the part of emitted low energy photons (in relation to the PV band-gap) that are reabsorbed and consequently reemitted with above band-gap energies. PV back-reflector reflectivity, also successfully achieved by those who design the cutting edge high efficiency PV cells, plays a major role here.

  7. Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

    2013-09-26

    The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

  8. Effect of Activation Energies on Thermal Explosion in the Interior of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Amos Oladele Popoola

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Literatures have shown that thermal processes in the interior of the earth and the classical thermal explosion are analogous and that combustion processes are characterized by ignition and explosion. The heat released during the thermal explosion that occurs in the interior of the earth requires more attention. Approach: The study investigated the role of activation energies ratio in the thermal explosion that occurs in the earth interior during gravitat...

  9. Thermal Energy Storage in Molten Salts: Overview of Novel Concepts and the DLR Test Facility (TESIS)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    At present, two-tank molten salt storage systems are the established commercially available concept for solar thermal power plants. Due to their very low vapour pressure and comparatively high thermal stability, molten salts are preferred as the heat transfer fluid and storage medium. Therefore, the development of alternative, more cost-effective concepts is an important step in making thermal energy storage more competitive for industrial processes and solar thermal applications. The pape...

  10. Thermal-Work Strain and Energy Expenditure during Marine Rifle Squad Operations in Afghanistan (August 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-10

    TECHNICAL REPORT NO. T15-7 DATE August 2015 ADA THERMAL-WORK STRAIN AND ENERGY EXPENDITURE ...USARIEM TECHNICAL REPORT T15-7 THERMAL-WORK STRAIN AND ENERGY EXPENDITURE DURING MARINE RIFLE SQUAD OPERATIONS IN AFGHANISTAN...0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for

  11. Performance of modified greenhouse dryer with thermal energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this attempt, the main goal is to do annual performance, environomical analysis, energy analysis and exergy analysis of the modified greenhouse dryer (MGD operating under active mode (AM and passive mode (PM. Thermal storage is being applied on the ground of MGD. It is applied in three different ways namely barren floor, floor covered with black PVC sheet (PVC and Black Coated. Experimental study of dryers in no-load conditions reveals that floor covered with a black PVC sheet is more conducive for drying purpose than other floors. The MGD under AM is found to be more effective as compared to PM for tomato and capsicum, which are high moisture content crops. For medium moisture content crop (potato chips, both dryers show relatively similar drying performance. Crops dried inside the greenhouse dryer are found to be more nutrient than open sun dried crops. The payback period of the modified greenhouse dryer under passive mode is found to be 1.11 years. However, for the active mode of the modified greenhouse dryer is only 1.89 years. The embodied energy of the passive mode of the dryer is a 480.277 kWh and 628.73 kWh for the active mode of the dryer. The CO2 emissions per annum for passive and active mode greenhouse dryers are found to be 13.45 kg and 17.6 kg respectively. The energy payback time, carbon mitigation and carbon credit have been calculated based type of crop dried. The range of exergy efficiency is 29%–86% in MGD under PM and 30%–78% in the MGD under AM. The variation of Heat utilization factor (HUF for MGD under PM is 0.12–0.38 and 0.26–0.53 for MGD under AM. The range of co-efficient of performances (COP for MGD under PM is 0.55–0.87 and 0.58–0.73 for MGD under AM.

  12. Preheating Cold Gas Thruster Flow Through a Thermal Energy Storage Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2013- October 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preheating Cold Gas Thruster Flow Through a Thermal Energy... Gas Thruster Flow through a Thermal Energy Storage Conversion System Michael R. Reid1 United States Air Force, Colorado Springs, CO, 80840 David B...specific impulse relative to a cold gas flow. Electric propulsion systems, the primary competitor to solar thermal propulsion systems, rely on the rather

  13. Integrated photovoltaic-thermal solar energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A combined photovoltaic/thermal collector has been built and is now being tested. Initial tests have concentrated on evaluating the thermal efficiency of the collector before and after the silicon cells are mounted. With likely improvements in bonding between cells and receiver and in the absorptivity of the cells, thermal efficiencies greater than 50% can be expected for the combined receiver operating at 100 C.

  14. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHP-THERMAL SCHEMES IN CONTEXTS OF THE CONSOLIDATED ENERGY SYSTEM OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the structural specifics of the Belarus Consolidated Energy System capacities in view of their ongoing transfer to the combined-cycle technology, building the nuclear power plant and necessity for the generating capacity regulation in compliance with the load diagram. With the country’s economic complex energy utilization pattern being preserved, the generating capacities are subject to restructuring and the CHP characteristics undergo enhancement inter alia a well-known increase of the specific electricity production based on the heat consumption. Because of this the steam-turbine condensation units which are the traditional capacity regulators for the energy systems with heat power plants dominance are being pushed out of operation. In consequence of this complex of changes the issue of load diagram provision gains momentum which in evidence is relevant to the Consolidated Energy System of Belarus. One of the ways to alleviate acuteness of the problem could be the specific electric energy production cut on the CHP heat consumption with preserving the heat loads and without their handover to the heat generating capacities of direct combustion i.e. without fuel over-burning. The solution lies in integrating the absorption bromous-lithium heat pump units into the CHP thermal scheme. Through their agency low-temperature heat streams of the generator cooling, the lubrication and condensation heat-extraction of steam minimal passing to the condenser systems are utilized. As a case study the authors choose one of the CHPs in the conditions of which the corresponding employment of the said pumps leads to diminution of the fuel-equivalent specific flow-rate by 20−25 g for 1 kW⋅h production and conjoined electric energy generation capacity lowering. The latter will be handed over to other generating capacities, and the choice of them affects economic expediency of the absorption bromous-lithium heat pump-units installation

  16. Preparation, thermal properties and thermal reliabilities of microencapsulated n-octadecane with acrylic-based polymer shells for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Xiaolin [Advanced Materials Institute and Clearer Production Key Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Guolin; Chu, Xiaodong; Li, Xuezhu [Advanced Materials Institute and Clearer Production Key Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Tang, Guoyi, E-mail: tanggy@tsinghua.edu.cn [Advanced Materials Institute and Clearer Production Key Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer n-Octadecane was encapsulated by p(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and p(butyl acrylate). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microcapsules using divinylbenzene as crosslinking agent have better quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microcapsule with butyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene has highest latent heat. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microcapsule with butyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene has greatest thermal stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase change temperatures and enthalpies of the microcapsules varied little after thermal cycle. - Abstract: Microencapsulation of n-octadecane with crosslinked p(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and p(butyl acrylate) (PBA) as shells for thermal energy storage was carried out by a suspension-like polymerization. Divinylbenzene (DVB) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) were employed as crosslinking agents. The surface morphologies of the microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal properties, thermal reliabilities and thermal stabilities of the as-prepared microPCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The microPCMs prepared by using DVB exhibit greater heat capacities and higher thermal stabilities compared with those prepared by using PETA. The thermal resistant temperature of the microPCM with BMA-DVB polymer was up to 248 Degree-Sign C. The phase change temperatures and latent heats of all the as-prepared microcapsules varied little after 1000 thermal cycles.

  17. Forest treatment residues for thermal energy compared with disposal by onsite burning: Emissions and energy return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Greg; Calkin, David [Human Dimensions Science Program, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, PO Box 7669, 200 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59807 (United States); Loeffler, Dan [The University of Montana, College of Forestry and Conservation, PO Box 7669, 200 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59807 (United States); Chung, Woodam [The University of Montana, College of Forestry and Conservation, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Mill residues from forest industries are the source for most of the current wood-based energy in the US, approximately 2.1% of the nation's energy use in 2007. Forest residues from silvicultural treatments, which include limbs, tops, and small non-commercial trees removed for various forest management objectives, represent an additional source of woody biomass for energy. We spatially analyzed collecting, grinding, and hauling forest residue biomass on a 515,900 ha area in western Montana, US, to compare the total emissions of burning forest residues in a boiler for thermal energy with the alternatives of onsite disposal by pile-burning and using either natural gas or 2 distillate oil to produce the equivalent amount of useable energy. When compared to the pile-burn/fossil fuel alternatives, carbon dioxide emissions from the bioenergy alternative were approximately 60%, methane emissions were approximately 3%, and particulate emissions less than 10 {mu}m were 11% and 41%, respectively, for emission control and no-control boilers. Emissions from diesel consumption for collecting, grinding, and hauling biomass represented less than 5% of the total bioenergy emissions at an average haul distance of 136 km. Across the study area, an average 21 units of bioenergy were produced for each unit of diesel energy used to collect, grind, and haul biomass. Fossil fuel energy saved by the bioenergy alternative relative to the pile-burn/fossil fuel alternatives averaged 14.7-15.2 GJ t{sup -1} of biomass. (author)

  18. Multi-Fluid Geo-Energy Systems for Bulk and Thermal Energy Storage and Dispatchable Renewable and Low-Carbon Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Randolph, J.; Saar, M. O.; Hao, Y.; Sun, Y.; Bielicki, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Integrating renewable energy sources into electricity grids requires advances in bulk and thermal energy storage technologies, which are currently expensive and have limited capacity. We present an approach that uses the huge fluid and thermal storage capacity of the subsurface to harvest, store, and dispatch energy from subsurface (geothermal) and surface (solar, nuclear, fossil) thermal resources. CO2 captured from fossil-energy systems and N2 separated from air are injected into permeable formations to store pressure, generate artesian flow of brine, and provide additional working fluids. These enable efficient fluid recirculation, heat extraction, and power conversion, while adding operational flexibility. Our approach can also store and dispatch thermal energy, which can be used to levelize concentrating solar power and mitigate variability of wind and solar power. This may allow low-carbon, base-load power to operate at full capacity, with the stored excess energy being available to addresss diurnal and seasonal mismatches between supply and demand. Concentric rings of horizontal injection and production wells are used to create a hydraulic divide to store pressure, CO2, N2, and thermal energy. Such storage can take excess power from the grid and excess thermal energy, and dispatch that energy when it is demanded. The system is pressurized and/or heated when power supply exceeds demand and depressurized when demand exceeds supply. Supercritical CO2 and N2 function as cushion gases to provide enormous pressure-storage capacity. Injecting CO2 and N2 displaces large quantities of brine, reducing the use of fresh water. Geologic CO2 storage is a crucial option for reducing CO2 emissions, but valuable uses for CO2 are needed to justify capture costs. The initial "charging" of our system requires permanently isolating large volumes of CO2 from the atmosphere and thus creates a market for its disposal. Our approach is designed for locations where a permeable

  19. Energy from CO2 using capacitive electrodes - a model for energy extraction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Garcia, J M; Dykstra, J E; Biesheuvel, P M; Hamelers, H V M

    2015-03-15

    A model is presented for the process of harvesting electrical energy from CO2 emissions using capacitive cells. The principle consists of controlling the mixing process of a concentrated CO2 gas stream with a dilute CO2 gas stream (as, for example, exhaust gas and air), thereby converting part of the released mixing energy into electrical energy. The model describes the transient reactive transport of CO2 gas absorbed in water or in monoethanolamine (MEA) solutions, under the assumption of local chemical equilibrium. The model combines the selective transport of ions through ion-exchange membranes, the accumulation of charge in the porous carbon electrodes and the coupling between the ionic current and the produced electrical current and power. We demonstrate that the model can be used to calculate the energy that can be extracted by mixing concentrated and dilute CO2 containing gas streams. Our calculation results for the process using MEA solutions have various counterintuitive features, including: 1. When dynamic equilibrium is reached in the cyclical process, the electrical charge in the anode is negative both during charging and discharging; 2. Placing an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) in the system is not required, the energy per cycle is just as large with or without an AEM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of space heating and domestic hot water systems with compact thermal energy storage. Compact thermal energy storage: Material development for System Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, J.H.; Quinnell, J.; Burch, J.; Zondag, H.A.; Boer, R. de; Finck, C.J.; Cuypers, R.; Cabeza, L.F.; Heinz, A.; Jahnig, D.; Furbo, S.; Bertsch, F.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term, compact thermal energy storage (TES) is essential to the development of cost-effective solar and passive building-integrated space heating systems and may enhance the annual technical and economic performance of solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems. Systems should provide high energy st

  1. Review of electrochemical energy conversion and storage for ocean thermal and wind energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, A. R.; Donley, S. W.

    A literature review on electrochemical storage techniques related to ocean thermal (OTEC) and wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is presented. Battery use for WECS is foreseen because of siting size, variable capacity, quiet operation, and high efficiency; high cost and the necessity for further input voltage regulation is noted, as are prospects for technology transfer from existing programs for photovoltaic panel battery development. Fuel cells, which can run on hydrogen, ammonia, methanol, naphtha, etc., are encouraging because capacity increases are possible by simple addition of more fuel, and high thermal efficiency. Electrolytic use is seen as a cheap replacement source of electricity for metals refining and brine electrolysis. Systems of energy 'bridges' for OTEC plants, to transmit power to users, are reviewed as redox-flow, lithium-water-air, and aluminum batteries, fuel cells, electrolytic hydrogen, methane, and ammonia production, and the use of OTECs as power sources for floating factories. Directions of future research are indicated, noting that WECS will be in commercial production by 1985, while OTEC is far term, around 2025.

  2. Thermal Description of Particle Production in Au-Au Collisions at STAR Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2013-01-01

    The hadron ratios measured in central Au-Au collisions are analysed by means of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model over a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies ranging from 7.7 to 200 GeV as offered by the STAR Beam Energy Scan I (BES-I). We restrict the discussion on STAR BES-I, because of large statistics and over all homogeneity of STAR measurements (one detector) against previous experiments. Over the last three decades, various heavy-ion experiments utilizing different detectors (different certainties) have been carried out. Regularities in produced particles at different energies haven been studied. The temperature and baryon chemical potential are deduced from fits of experimental ratios to thermal model calculations assuming chemical equilibrium. We find that the resulting freeze-out parameters using single hard-core value and point-like constituents of HRG are identical. This implies that the excluded-volume comes up with no effect on the extracted parameters. We compare the results wit...

  3. Performance Evaluation of Various Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage of A Solar Cooker via Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Tarwidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, thermal performance of various phase change materials (PCMs used as thermal energy storage in a solar cooker has been investigated numerically. Heat conduction equations in cylindrical domain are used to model heat transfer of the PCMs. Mathematical model of phase change problem in the PCM storage encompasses heat conduction equations in solid and liquid region separated by moving solid-liquid interface. The phase change problem is solved by reformulating heat conduction equations with emergence of moving boundary into an enthalpy equation. Numerical solution of the enthalpy equation is obtained by implementing Godunov method and verified by analytical solution of one-dimensional case. Stability condition of the numerical scheme is also discussed. Thermal performance of various PCMs is evaluated via the stored energy and temperature history. The simulation results show that phase change material with the best thermal performance during the first 2.5 hours of energy extraction is shown by erythritol. Moreover, magnesium chloride hexahydrate can maintain temperature of the PCM storage in the range of 110-116.7°C for more than 4 hours while magnesium nitrate hexahydrate is effective only for one hour with the PCM storage temperature around 121-128°C. Among the PCMs that have been tested, it is only erythritol that can cook 10 kg of the loaded water until it reaches 100°C for about 3.5 hours. Article History: Received June 22nd 2016; Received in revised form August 26th 2016; Accepted Sept 1st 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Tarwidi, D., Murdiansyah, D.T, Ginanja, N. (2016 Performance Evaluation of Various Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage of A Solar Cooker via Numerical Simulation. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(3, 199-210. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.3.199-210

  4. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  5. Extraction of thermal Green's function using diffuse fields: a passive approach applied to thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Margherita; Sternini, Simone; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Mariani, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In the field of non-destructive evaluation, defect detection and visualization can be performed exploiting different techniques relying either on an active or a passive approach. In the following paper the passive technique is investigated due to its numerous advantages and its application to thermography is explored. In previous works, it has been shown that it is possible to reconstruct the Green's function between any pair of points of a sensing grid by using noise originated from diffuse fields in acoustic environments. The extraction of the Green's function can be achieved by cross-correlating these random recorded waves. Averaging, filtering and length of the measured signals play an important role in this process. This concept is here applied in an NDE perspective utilizing thermal fluctuations present on structural materials. Temperature variations interacting with thermal properties of the specimen allow for the characterization of the material and its health condition. The exploitation of the thermographic image resolution as a dense grid of sensors constitutes the basic idea underlying passive thermography. Particular attention will be placed on the creation of a proper diffuse thermal field, studying the number, placement and excitation signal of heat sources. Results from numerical simulations will be presented to assess the capabilities and performances of the passive thermal technique devoted to defect detection and imaging of structural components.

  6. Seawater pump study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program. Final report. [For ocean thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The pumping power required to move cold seawater and warm seawater through an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant is a significant portion of the plant power output; therefore, seawater pump performance, sizing, and cost information are very influential inputs into any power plant system design optimizations. The analysis and evaluation of large seawater pumping systems selected specifically for the OTEC application are provided with a view toward judging the impact of pump selection on overall OTEC power plant performance. A self-contained bulb, direct drive, axial flow pump was found to have a distinct advantage in performance and arrangement flexibility. A design of a pump operating at a net total head rise of 3.5 meters and a flow capacity of 100 m/sup 3//s is presented including pump blade geometry (profiles), pump diffuser geometry, and pump/diffuser configuration and performance. Results are presented in terms of the geometric and power requirements of several related pump designs over a range of seawater capacity from 25 m/sup 3//s to 100 m/sup 3//s. Summary analysis and evaluations include pump design weights and cost estimates.

  7. The influence of thermal insulation position in building exterior walls on indoor thermal comfort and energy consumption of residential buildings in Chongqing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Yu, W.; Zhao, X.; Dai, W.; Ruan, Y.

    2016-08-01

    This paper focused on the influence of using position of thermal insulation materials in exterior walls on the indoor thermal comfort and building energy consumption of residential building in Chongqing. In this study, four (4) typical residential building models in Chongqing were established, which have different usage of thermal insulation layer position in exterior walls. Indoor thermal comfort hours, cooling and heating energy consumption of each model were obtained by using a simulation tool, Energyplus. Based on the simulation data, the influence of thermal insulation position on indoor thermal comfort and building energy consumption in each season was analyzed. The results showed that building with internal insulation had the highest indoor thermal comfort hours and least cooling and heating energy consumption in summer and winter. In transitional season, the highest indoor thermal comfort hours are obtained when thermal insulation is located on the exterior side.

  8. Pedestrian detection in thermal images: An automated scale based region extraction with curvelet space validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, A.; Faheema, A. G. J.; Deodhare, Dipti

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection is a key problem in night vision processing with a dozen of applications that will positively impact the performance of autonomous systems. Despite significant progress, our study shows that performance of state-of-the-art thermal image pedestrian detectors still has much room for improvement. The purpose of this paper is to overcome the challenge faced by the thermal image pedestrian detectors, which employ intensity based Region Of Interest (ROI) extraction followed by feature based validation. The most striking disadvantage faced by the first module, ROI extraction, is the failed detection of cloth insulted parts. To overcome this setback, this paper employs an algorithm and a principle of region growing pursuit tuned to the scale of the pedestrian. The statistics subtended by the pedestrian drastically vary with the scale and deviation from normality approach facilitates scale detection. Further, the paper offers an adaptive mathematical threshold to resolve the problem of subtracting the background while extracting cloth insulated parts as well. The inherent false positives of the ROI extraction module are limited by the choice of good features in pedestrian validation step. One such feature is curvelet feature, which has found its use extensively in optical images, but has as yet no reported results in thermal images. This has been used to arrive at a pedestrian detector with a reduced false positive rate. This work is the first venture made to scrutinize the utility of curvelet for characterizing pedestrians in thermal images. Attempt has also been made to improve the speed of curvelet transform computation. The classification task is realized through the use of the well known methodology of Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The proposed method is substantiated with qualified evaluation methodologies that permits us to carry out probing and informative comparisons across state-of-the-art features, including deep learning methods, with six

  9. Aerial visible-thermal infrared hyperspectral feature extraction technology and its application to object identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie-lin, Zhang; Jun-hu, Wang; Mi, Zhou; Yan-ju, Huang; Ding, Wu

    2014-03-01

    Based on aerial visible-thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging system (CASI/SASI/TASI) data, field spectrometer data and multi-source geological information, this paper utilizes the hyperspectral data processing and feature extraction technology to identify uranium mineralization factors, the spectral features of typical tetravalent, hexavalent uranium minerals and mineralization factors are established, and hyperspectral logging technology for drill cores and trench also are developed, the relationships between radioactive intensity and spectral characteristics are built. Above methods have been applied to characterize uranium mineralization setting of granite-type and sandstone-type uranium deposits in south and northwest China, the successful outcomes of uranium prospecting have been achieved.

  10. Thermal alteration of water extractable organic matter in climosequence soils from the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fernanda; Russell, David; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw

    2016-11-01

    In the next decades, the influence of wildfires in controlling the cycling and composition of soil organic matter (SOM) globally and in the western U.S. is expected to grow. While the impact of fires on bulk SOM has been extensively studied, the extent at which heating of soil affects the soluble component of SOM remains unclear. Here we investigated the thermal transformations of water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) by examining the changes in the distribution of carbon (C) functional groups in WEOM from soils heated at low and intermediate temperatures. WEOM (exported from soils to rivers in the Sierra Nevada and beyond.

  11. Study on pyrolysis gas in thermal extraction of Bai Yinhua lignite with industrial washing oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y. M.; Lian, X. P.; Zhao, F. Y.; Xu, Y. Q.; Hu, Y. Q.; Yuan, Z. K.; Hao, X. R.

    2016-08-01

    Industrial washing oil as solvent, pyrolysis gas produced from Bai Yinhua lignite during thermal extraction was studied by gas chromatography. The effects of temperature and solvent coal ration on coal pyrolysis gas were investigated. The results showed that: Pyrolysis gas produced mainly in CO, CO2, O2, H2, CH4, and so on, in which the total amount of oxygen containing compounds nearly 40%, significant effects of deoxidation was achieved. The increase of heat extraction temperature can significantly increase the degree of bond breaking and the gas formation rate, the gas yield and the rate of oxygen increase significantly, while the gas yield increases with the decrease of the solvent coal ration.

  12. An integrated Building-to-Grid model for evaluation of energy arbitrage value of Thermal Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar, Muhammad Bashar; Andrade-Cabrera, Carlos; Neu, Olivier; O'Malley, Mark; Burke, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal Electric Storage (TES) has emerged as a promising technology for enhancing the flexibility of the built environment to participate in active Demand Side Management (DSM). These devices allow the decoupling of intra-day scheduling of electric power demand from the time of thermal energy end-use. Therefore, if enabled with communication with the grid, these devices can facilitate load shifting and energy arbitrage. This study evaluates the energy arbitrage value of smart TES devices in ...

  13. Program definition and assessment overview. [for thermal energy storage project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of a program level assessment of thermal energy storage technology thrusts for the near and far term to assure overall coherent energy storage program is considered. The identification and definition of potential thermal energy storage applications, definition of technology requirements, and appropriate market sectors are discussed along with the necessary coordination, planning, and preparation associated with program reviews, workshops, multi-year plans and annual operating plans for the major laboratory tasks.

  14. Waste-to-Energy Thermal Destruction Identification for Forward Operating Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited TECHNICAL REPORT TR-NAVFAC-EXWC-EV-1703 JULY 2016 WASTE -TO- ENERGY THERMAL DESTRUCTION...To) 2015-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Waste -to- Energy Thermal Destruction Identification for Forward Operating Bases 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...successfully integrating the sub-processes together and meeting the expeditionary requirements of each service branch. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Waste to Energy

  15. Picrocrocin kinetics in aqueous saffron spice extracts (Crocus sativus L.) upon thermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ana M; Carmona, Manuel; Jarén-Galán, Manuel; Mosquera, M Isabel Mínguez; Alonso, Gonzalo L

    2011-01-12

    The kinetics of picrocrocin degradation in aqueous extracts of saffron upon thermal treatment from 5 to 70 °C have been studied, together with the degradation of purified picrocrocin in water at 100 °C. The best fits to experimental data were found for a second-order kinetics model. Picrocrocin showed high stability with half-life periods (t(1/2)) ranging from >3400 h at 5 °C in saffron extracts to 9 h in the experiments with purified picrocrocin at 100 °C. In saffron extracts, the evolution of the rate constant (k) with temperature showed maximum values at 35 °C, and filtration of the extracts contributed to picrocrocin stability. In the case of purified picrocrocin, the generation of safranal in the first 5 h (yield up to 7.4%) was confirmed. Spectrometric parameters used in saffron quality control (E(1cm)(1%) 257 nm and ΔΕ(pic)) were not appropriate for documenting the evolution of picrocrocin.

  16. Energy and thermal analysis of glazed office buildings using a dynamic energy simulation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirazis, H.; Blomsterberg, A. [Lund Inst. of Technology, Lund (Sweden). Div. of Energy and Building Design

    2005-07-01

    energy consumption, given improvements in solar shading and glazing techniques. The addition of a second facade may solve issues concerning thermal comfort, and it was anticipated that future research will concentrate on analyses of glazed buildings with double skin facades using advanced daylighting simulations. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 6 figs.

  17. Numerical simulation of the process of geothermal low-potential ground energy extraction in Perm region (Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomaryov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research is to study the interaction of energy foundations with the ground mass and to develop methods for their construction on the example of the city of Perm. Field studies of ground were carried out in a specially chosen pilot site to determine temperature distribution in the ground mass, change of ground-water level and physical-mechanical and thermal-physical characteristics of the ground mass. The diagrams of depth temperature distribution in the ground and its seasonal variations were obtained on the results of monitoring, and also the average groundwater level. To carry out numerical simulation, software-complex “GeoStudio” was selected. Its basic differential equation is the fundamental heat conduction equation with an internal heat source. The purpose of the numerical simulation was quantitative evaluation of the thermal energy extracted from different energy foundations under soil conditions in the city of Perm. By results of the spent numerical experiments the equations of regress and nomographs dependences of size of received thermal energy on geometrical parameters of the projected power bases to hydro-geological and climatic conditions of the Perm region are constructed.

  18. The Significance of Temperature Based Approach Over the Energy Based Approaches in the Buildings Thermal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albatayneh, Aiman; Alterman, Dariusz; Page, Adrian; Moghtaderi, Behdad

    2017-05-01

    The design of low energy buildings requires accurate thermal simulation software to assess the heating and cooling loads. Such designs should sustain thermal comfort for occupants and promote less energy usage over the life time of any building. One of the house energy rating used in Australia is AccuRate, star rating tool to assess and compare the thermal performance of various buildings where the heating and cooling loads are calculated based on fixed operational temperatures between 20 °C to 25 °C to sustain thermal comfort for the occupants. However, these fixed settings for the time and temperatures considerably increase the heating and cooling loads. On the other hand the adaptive thermal model applies a broader range of weather conditions, interacts with the occupants and promotes low energy solutions to maintain thermal comfort. This can be achieved by natural ventilation (opening window/doors), suitable clothes, shading and low energy heating/cooling solutions for the occupied spaces (rooms). These activities will save significant amount of operating energy what can to be taken into account to predict energy consumption for a building. Most of the buildings thermal assessment tools depend on energy-based approaches to predict the thermal performance of any building e.g. AccuRate in Australia. This approach encourages the use of energy to maintain thermal comfort. This paper describes the advantages of a temperature-based approach to assess the building's thermal performance (using an adaptive thermal comfort model) over energy based approach (AccuRate Software used in Australia). The temperature-based approach was validated and compared with the energy-based approach using four full scale housing test modules located in Newcastle, Australia (Cavity Brick (CB), Insulated Cavity Brick (InsCB), Insulated Brick Veneer (InsBV) and Insulated Reverse Brick Veneer (InsRBV)) subjected to a range of seasonal conditions in a moderate climate. The time required for

  19. Heat transfer characteristics of thermal energy storage system using PCM capsules. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regin, A. Felix; Solanki, S.C.; Saini, J.S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India)

    2008-12-15

    Thermal energy storage has recently attracted increasing interest related to thermal applications such as space and water heating, waste heat utilization, cooling and air-conditioning. Energy storage is essential whenever there is a mismatch between the supply and consumption of energy. Use of phase change material (PCM) capsules assembled as a packed bed is one of the important methods that has been proposed to achieve the objective of high storage density with higher efficiency. A proper designing of the thermal energy storage systems using PCMs requires quantitative information about heat transfer and phase change processes in PCM. This paper reviews the development of available latent heat thermal energy storage technologies. The different aspects of storage such as material, encapsulation, heat transfer, applications and new PCM technology innovation have been carried out. (author)

  20. Advanced thermal energy management: A thermal test bed and heat pipe simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    Work initiated on a common-module thermal test simulation was continued, and a second project on heat pipe simulation was begun. The test bed, constructed from surplus Skylab equipment, was modeled and solved for various thermal load and flow conditions. Low thermal load caused the radiator fluid, Coolanol 25, to thicken due to its temperature avoided by using a regenerator-heat-exchanger. Other possible solutions modeled include a radiator heater and shunting heat from the central thermal bus to the radiator. Also, module air temperature can become excessive with high avionics load. A second preoject concerning advanced heat pipe concepts was initiated. A program was written which calculates fluid physical properties, liquid and vapor pressure in the evaporator and condenser, fluid flow rates, and thermal flux. The program is directed to evaluating newer heat pipe wicks and geometries, especially water in an artery surrounded by six vapor channels. Effects of temperature, groove and slot dimensions, and wick properties are reported.

  1. Wind Energy to Thermal and Cold Storage – A Systems Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xydis, George

    2013-01-01

    In this paper wind energy to thermal and cold storage scenarios were examined to enable high wind integration through converting renewable electricity excess into thermal or cooling energy, saving part of the energy used in an area and eliminating the need to possibly build a new coal fired plant....... Case studies in Crete Island (not interconnected to the power grid of Greek mainland) with onshore wind power installed were investigated. The aim of this work was to review the options for greater integration of renewables into the grid and the main idea was to analyze the wind to thermal and to cold...

  2. Urbach's rule derived from thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1978-01-01

    The exponential absorption edge (known as Urbach's rule) observed in most materials is interpreted in terms of thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy. The main contribution to the temperature shift of the band-gap energy is due to the temperature-dependent self-energies of the electrons...... and holes interacting with the phonons. Since the phonon number is fluctuating in thermal equilibrium, the band-gap energy is also fluctuating resulting in an exponential absorption tail below the average band-gap energy. These simple considerations are applied to derive Urbach's rule at high temperatures...

  3. The Evaluation of Feasibility of Thermal Energy Storage System at Riga TPP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The installation of thermal energy storage system (TES provides the optimisation of energy source, energy security supply, power plant operation and energy production flexibility. The aim of the present research is to evaluate the feasibility of thermal energy system installation at Riga TPP–2. The six modes were investigated: four for non-heating periods and two for heating periods. Different research methods were used: data statistic processing, data analysis, analogy, forecasting, financial method and correlation and regression method. In the end, the best mode was chosen – the increase of cogeneration unit efficiency during the summer.

  4. Thermal dileptons from coarse-grained transport as fireball probes at SIS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galatyuk, Tetyana; Seck, Florian [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Stroth, Joachim [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Utilizing a coarse-graining method to convert hadronic transport simulations of Au+Au collisions at SIS energies into local temperature, baryon and pion densities, we compute the pertinent radiation of thermal dileptons based on an in-medium ρ spectral function that describes available spectra at ultrarelativistic collision energies. In particular, we analyze how far the resulting yields and slopes of the invariant-mass spectra can probe the lifetime and temperatures of the fireball. We find that dilepton radiation sets in after the initial overlap phase of the colliding nuclei of about 7 fm/c, and lasts for about 13 fm/c. This duration closely coincides with the development of the transverse collectivity of the baryons, thus establishing a direct correlation between hadronic collective effects and thermal EM radiation, and supporting a near local equilibration of the system. This fireball ''lifetime'' is substantially smaller than the typical 20-30 fm/c that naive considerations of the density evolution alone would suggest. We furthermore find that the total dilepton yield radiated into the invariant-mass window of M = 0.3-0.7 GeV/c{sup 2} normalized to the number of charged pions, follows a relation to the lifetime found earlier in the (ultra-)relativistic regime of heavy-ion collisions, and thus corroborates the versatility of this tool. The spectral slopes of the invariant-mass spectra above the φ -meson mass provide a thermometer of the hottest phases of the collision, and agree well with the maximal temperatures extracted from the coarse-grained hadron spectra. (orig.)

  5. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of starch microencapsulated fatty acids as phase change materials thermal energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable starch-oil composites can be prepared from renewable resources by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous slurries of starch and vegetable oils or other hydrophobic materials. Fatty acids such as stearic acid are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage applica...

  6. Thermal solar energy in Spain. State of the art and objectives; Energie solaire thermique en Espagne. Etat actuel et objectifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, Jaouen

    2006-07-01

    According the Kyoto protocol, Spain has to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions at 330 millions of tons (a decrease of 18 % from the level of 2003). From the european commission policy, the energy resources will be of 12 % of renewable energies. In this context, Spain developed an energy policy in favor of the solar energy. This document provides information on: the energy market in Spain, the thermal solar energy operating, the CO{sub 2} emissions, the state of the art in the domain in spain, the 2010 objectives, the programs and the assistance, some data on the solar market in comparison with the Europe. (A.L.B.)

  7. Technical Feasibility Study of Thermal Energy Storage Integration into the Conventional Power Plant Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek D. Wojcik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current load balance in the grid is managed mainly through peaking fossil-fuelled power plants that respond passively to the load changes. Intermittency, which comes from renewable energy sources, imposes additional requirements for even more flexible and faster responses from conventional power plants. A major challenge is to keep conventional generation running closest to the design condition with higher load factors and to avoid switching off periods if possible. Thermal energy storage (TES integration into the power plant process cycle is considered as a possible solution for this issue. In this article, a technical feasibility study of TES integration into a 375-MW subcritical oil-fired conventional power plant is presented. Retrofitting is considered in order to avoid major changes in the power plant process cycle. The concept is tested based on the complete power plant model implemented in the ProTRAX software environment. Steam and water parameters are assessed for different TES integration scenarios as a function of the plant load level. The best candidate points for heat extraction in the TES charging and discharging processes are evaluated. The results demonstrate that the integration of TES with power plant cycle is feasible and provide a provisional guidance for the design of the TES system that will result in the minimal influence on the power plant cycle.

  8. Visual information without thermal energy may induce thermoregulatory-like cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Jun'ya; Nishimura, Takayuki; Watanuki, Shigeki

    2013-12-28

    Human core body temperature is kept quasi-constant regardless of varying thermal environments. It is well known that physiological thermoregulatory systems are under the control of central and peripheral sensory organs that are sensitive to thermal energy. If these systems wrongly respond to non-thermal stimuli, it may disturb human homeostasis. Fifteen participants viewed video images evoking hot or cold impressions in a thermally constant environment. Cardiovascular indices were recorded during the experiments. Correlations between the 'hot-cold' impression scores and cardiovascular indices were calculated. The changes of heart rate, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were significantly correlated with the 'hot-cold' impression scores, and the tendencies were similar to those in actual thermal environments corresponding to the impressions. The present results suggest that visual information without any thermal energy can affect physiological thermoregulatory systems at least superficially. To avoid such 'virtual' environments disturbing human homeostasis, further study and more attention are needed.

  9. Preparation, thermal properties and thermal reliability of palmitic acid/expanded graphite composite as form-stable PCM for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, Ahmet; Karaipekli, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2009-05-15

    This study is focused on the preparation and characterization of thermal properties and thermal reliability of palmitic acid (PA)/expanded graphite (EG) composite as form-stable phase change material (PCM). The maximum mass fraction of PA retained in EG was found as 80 wt% without the leakage of PA in melted state even when it is heated over the melting point of PA. Therefore, the PA/EG (80/20 w/w%) composite was characterized as form-stable PCM. From differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, the melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the form-stable PCM were measured as 60.88 and 60.81 C and 148.36 and 149.66 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test showed that the composite PCM has good thermal reliability although it was subjected to 3000 melting/freezing cycles. Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic investigation indicated that it has good chemical stability after thermal cycling. Thermal conductivities of PA/EG composites including different mass fractions of EG (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) were also measured. Thermal conductivity of form-stable PA/EG (80/20 w/w%) composite (0.60 W/mK) was found to be 2.5 times higher than that of pure PA (0.17 W/mK). Moreover, the increase in thermal conductivity of PA was confirmed by comparison of the melting and freezing times of pure PA with that of form-stable composite. Based on all results, it was concluded that the form-stable PA/EG (80/20 w/w%) has considerable latent heat energy storage potential because of its good thermal properties, thermal and chemical reliability and thermal conductivity. (author)

  10. Thermal properties of natural nanostructured hydroxyapatite extracted from fish bone waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, T. M.; Nogueira, E. S.; Weinand, W. R.; Lima, W. M.; Steimacher, A.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.

    2007-04-01

    In a previous study, natural hydroxyapatite (HAp) from the bones of Brazilian river fish was calcined at 900 °C (4-12 h), and optical characterization using the near infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy technique enabled the establishment of 8 h as the best calcination time for nanostructure stabilization when milled in a high-energy milling device [T. M. Coelho, E. S. Nogueira, W. R. Weinand, W. M. Lima, A. Steimacher, A. N. Medina, M. L. Baesso, and A. C. Bento, J. Appl. Phys. 100, 094312 (2006)]. The fish wastes used were from species such as pintado (Pseudoplatystoma corruscans), jaú (Paulicea lutkeni), and cachara (Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum). In this study, the characterization of the thermal properties of the same natural HAp is discussed for samples milled from 0 to 32 h, with nanostructures from 80 to 24 nm. The powders were pressed into disks at 350 MPa and sintered for 4 h at 1000 °C. Thermophysical parameters were obtained by thermal wave interferometry and nonadiabatic relaxation calorimetry. Results for thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity showed that the parameters increase with milling time, although they present a transition (a plateau) in the interval from 8 to 16 h. Two different slopes were observed and this was interpreted as being due to the size of the crystallites, which fall rapidly, dropping from 80 nm to near 22 nm when milling time is increased from 0 to 16 h, and forming agglomerates up to 32 h.

  11. Improvement of energy performances of existing buildings by application of solar thermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić-Furundžić Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of energy performances of the existing buildings in the suburban settlement Konjarnik in Belgrade, by the application of solar thermal systems is the topic presented in this paper. Hypothetical models of building improvements are created to allow the benefits of applying solar thermal collectors to residential buildings in Belgrade climate conditions to be estimated. This case study presents different design variants of solar thermal collectors integrated into a multifamily building envelope. The following aspects of solar thermal systems integration are analyzed in the paper: energy, architectural, ecological and economic. The results show that in Belgrade climatic conditions significant energy savings and reduction of CO2 emissions can be obtained with the application of solar thermal collectors.

  12. Thermal Performance Benchmarking; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Gilbert

    2015-06-09

    This project proposes to seek out the SOA power electronics and motor technologies to thermally benchmark their performance. The benchmarking will focus on the thermal aspects of the system. System metrics including the junction-to-coolant thermal resistance and the parasitic power consumption (i.e., coolant flow rates and pressure drop performance) of the heat exchanger will be measured. The type of heat exchanger (i.e., channel flow, brazed, folded-fin) and any enhancement features (i.e., enhanced surfaces) will be identified and evaluated to understand their effect on performance. Additionally, the thermal resistance/conductivity of the power module’s passive stack and motor’s laminations and copper winding bundles will also be measured. The research conducted will allow insight into the various cooling strategies to understand which heat exchangers are most effective in terms of thermal performance and efficiency. Modeling analysis and fluid-flow visualization may also be carried out to better understand the heat transfer and fluid dynamics of the systems.

  13. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'en

    2017-03-16

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  14. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'En

    2017-03-01

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  15. Investigation of Methods to Predict Thermal Stratification and Its Effect on Solar Energy System Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    cooling system was projected. The storage tank model used was a six-segment tank similar to that used in past TRNSYS simulations with the exception...It necesay md identify byr block number) energy storage thermal stratification 20L 4BGTNACT (Can~oe M Mees~ eb N momeiny=1 "OffiuifybY block nmmbar...A) This report describes a study to identify characteristics which induce thermal stratification in liquid thermal storage , and to evaluate solar

  16. 40 CFR 74.47 - Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy-combustion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and End of Year Compliance § 74.47 Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy... seeking to transfer allowances based on the replacement of thermal energy. (3) Contents. Each thermal... energy plan, the Administrator will annually transfer allowances to the compliance account of each...

  17. Energy Address Delivery Technologies and Thermal Transformations in Food Production

    OpenAIRE

    Burdo O.G.; Sit M.L.; Zikov A.V.; Reznychenco D.N.; Juravleov A.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, energetic and technical paradoxes in food nanotechnologies and traditional approaches to evaluation of energy recourses using are considered. Hypotheses of improvement of food production energy technologies are formulated. Classification of principles of address delivery of energy to food raw materials elements is given. We had substantiated the perspective objectives for heat-pumps installations and biphasic heat-transfer systems. The energy efficiency of new technolo-gies i...

  18. Performance Analysis of Thermal Energy System with Linear System Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping LI; Chunfa ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    The paper addresses the system performance of coal-fired power unit with changed auxiliary system or other local heat disturbance. The idea of state space model is imported and the universal formula for the calculation of system performance output is deduced on the system state equation. Two important vector of system are worked out under linear system assumption and transform. The transfer matrix is the characteristics of system itself and is constant for a similar condition, which greatly facilitates the analysis. The concept of thermal disturbance vector is proposed to construct the thermal disturbance input easily. The method can be helpful for analyzing any thermal disturbance input satisfying the assumption and also for supplementing the correction means of performance test. An example of 600MW power unit is presented to demonstrate its availability.

  19. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M. R., E-mail: mrvasquez@coe.upd.edu.ph [Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50–100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  20. Energy distributions exhibited during thermal runaway of commercial lithium ion batteries used for human spaceflight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayathi, Sandeep; Walker, William; Doughty, Daniel; Ardebili, Haleh

    2016-10-01

    Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries provide low mass and energy dense solutions necessary for space exploration, but thermal related safety concerns impede the utilization of Li-ion technology for human applications. Experimental characterization of thermal runaway energy release with accelerated rate calorimetry supports safer thermal management systems. 'Standard' accelerated rate calorimetry setup provides means to measure the addition of energy exhibited through the body of a Li-ion cell. This study considers the total energy generated during thermal runaway as distributions between cell body and hot gases via inclusion of a unique secondary enclosure inside the calorimeter; this closed system not only contains the cell body and gaseous species, but also captures energy release associated with rapid heat transfer to the system unobserved by measurements taken on the cell body. Experiments include Boston Power Swing 5300, Samsung 18650-26F and MoliCel 18650-J Li-ion cells at varied states-of-charge. An inverse relationship between state-of-charge and onset temperature is observed. Energy contained in the cell body and gaseous species are successfully characterized; gaseous energy is minimal. Significant additional energy is measured with the heating of the secondary enclosure. Improved calorimeter apparatus including a secondary enclosure provides essential capability to measuring total energy release distributions during thermal runaway.

  1. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  2. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  3. Performance analysis of different ORC configurations for thermal energy and LNG cold energy hybrid power generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; Wang, Shujia; Xu, Fuquan; Lin, Kui

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a thermal energy and Liquefied natural gas (LNG) cold energy hybrid power generation system. Performances of four different Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) configurations (the basic, the regenerative, the reheat and the regenerative-reheat ORCs) are studied based on the first and the second law of thermodynamics. Dry organic fluid R245fa is selected as the typical working fluid. Parameter analysis is also conducted in this paper. The results show that regeneration could not increase the thermal efficiency of the thermal and cold energy hybrid power generation system. ORC with the reheat process could produce more specific net power output but it may also reduce the system thermal efficiency. The basic and the regenerative ORCs produce higher thermal efficiency while the regenerative-reheat ORC performs best in the exergy efficiency. A preheater is necessary for the thermal and cold energy hybrid power generation system. And due to the presence of the preheater, there will be a step change of the system performance as the turbine inlet pressure rises.

  4. Smart heat guide: designing efficiently with ambient thermal energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fremouw, M.

    2012-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. There are a few issues in our current energy use. We do not know how long the finite primary sources will last. The process of energy conversion makes very inefficient use of the primary energy sources. There

  5. Low-temperature thermal energy storage program annual operating plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Eissenberg, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The LTTES program operating plans for FY 1978 are described in terms of general program objectives and the technical activities being implemented to achieve these objectives. The program structure provides emphasis on several principal thrusts; namely, seasonal thermal storage, daily/short-term thermal storage, and waste heat recovery and reuse. A work breakdown structure (WBS) organizes the efforts being carried out in-house or through subcontract within each thrust area. Fiscal data are summarized in respect to thrust area, individual efforts, and funding source.

  6. Performance results of a solar greenhouse combining electrical and thermal energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Campen, J.B.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Performance results are given of a new type of greenhouse, which combines reflection of near infrared radiation (NIR) with electrical power generation using hybrid photovoltaic cell/thermal collector modules. Besides the generation of electrical and thermal energy, the reflection of the NIR will res

  7. An improved method for upscaling borehole thermal energy storage using inverse finite element modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tordrup, Karl Woldum; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Bjørn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Dimensioning of large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is inherently uncertain due to the natural variability of thermal conductivity and heat capacity in the storage volume. We present an improved method for upscaling a pilot BTES to full scale and apply the method to an operational...

  8. Performance results of a solar greenhouse combining electrical and thermal energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Campen, J.B.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Performance results are given of a new type of greenhouse, which combines reflection of near infrared radiation (NIR) with electrical power generation using hybrid photovoltaic cell/thermal collector modules. Besides the generation of electrical and thermal energy, the reflection of the NIR will

  9. Regional thermal and electric energy output of salt-gradient solar ponds in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. J.; Lin, E. I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Salt-gradient solar pond thermal and electrical energy output was calculated for each of twelve regions within the United States as part of an effort to assess solar pond applicability and extent of requisite physical resources on a regional basis. The energy output level is one of the key factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar ponds. Calculated thermal energy output ranges from 6.9 Wt/sq m in Fairbanks, Alaska, to 73.1 Wt/sq m in Daggett, California, at an energy extraction temperature of 45 C. The output ranges from 0.0 Wt/sq m in Fairbanks to 63.2 Wt/sq m in Daggett at 60 C. Electrical energy output ranges from 0.0 We/sq m in Fairbanks to 3.11 We/sq m in Daggett. Although these estimates constitute a reasonable basis for regional comparison, site-specific analysis must be performed for an actual application design.

  10. Candidate thermal energy storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of candidate thermal energy storage system elements were identified as having the potential for the successful application of solar industrial process heat. These elements which include storage media, containment and heat exchange are shown.

  11. The thermal energy of a scalar field on a unidimensional Riemann surface

    CERN Document Server

    Elizalde, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss some controverted aspects of the evaluation of the thermal energy of a scalar field on a unidimensional Riemann surface. The calculations are carried out using a generalised zeta function approach.

  12. Collection and dissemination of thermal energy storage system information for the pulp and paper industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edde, H.

    1981-01-01

    The collection and dissemination of thermal energy storage (TES) system technology for the pulp and paper industry with the intent of reducing fossil fuel usage is discussed. The study plan is described and a description presented of example TES systems.

  13. Thermal compression waves. 2: Mass adjustment and vertical transfer of the total energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Melville E.; Pielke, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    A fully compressible model is used to simulate the mass adjustment that occurs in response to a prescribed heat source. Results illustrate the role that thermal compression waves have in this process. The vertical mass transport associated with compression waves decreases rapidly with height. Most of the mass transport occurs in the horizontal, with the vertical structure of the disturbance similar to that of a Lamb wave. The vertical transfer of total energy in a thermally driven mixed layer is also examined. It is shown that the upward transport of total energy is accomplished by a compression effect rather than by the exchange of warm and cold air by buoyant thermals. Model results are analyzed to determine budgets of total energy, mass and entropy. It is demonstrated that buoyant thermals are predominantly responsible for a transfer of entropy, rather than total energy. In the light of these results the notion of 'heat transport' in a fluid is discussed.

  14. Microencapsulation of coco fatty acid mixture for thermal energy storage with phase change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozonur, Y.; Mazman, M.; Paksoy, H.O.; Evilya, H. [Cukurova University, Adana (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-07-01

    Thermal energy storage systems provide several alternatives for efficient energy use and energy conservation. Microcapsules of natural coco fatty acid mixture were prepared to be used as phase change materials for thermal energy storage. The coacervation technique was used for the microencapsulation process. Several alternatives for the capsule wall material were tried. The microcapsules were characterized according to their geometric profiles, phase transition temperatures, mean particle sizes, chemical stabilities, and their thermal cycling. The diameters of microcapsules prepared in this study were about 1 mm. Coco fatty acid mixtures have kept their geometrical profiles even after 50 thermal cycles for melting and freezing operations in temperature range from 22 to 34{sup o}C. It was found that gelatin+gum Arabic mixture was the best wall material for microencapsulating coco fatty acid mixtures. (author)

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research supporting Thermal Bypass Air Barrier requirements. Since these were adopted in the 2009 IECC, close to one million homes have been mandated to include this vitally important energy efficiency measure.

  16. Thermal emissions and climate change: Cooler options for future energy technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cowern, Nick E. B.; Ahn, Chihak

    2008-01-01

    Global warming arises from 'temperature forcing', a net imbalance between energy fluxes entering and leaving the climate system and arising within it. Humanity introduces temperature forcing through greenhouse gas emissions, agriculture, and thermal emissions from fuel burning. Up to now climate projections, neglecting thermal emissions, typically foresee maximum forcing around the year 2050, followed by a decline. In this paper we show that, if humanity's energy use grows at 1%/year, slower ...

  17. Reducing Display Bottle Cooler Energy Consumption Using PCM As Active Thermal Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Beek, Marcel van; de Jong, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The final results of an analytical and experimental study in reducing the energy consumption of a display bottle cooler using Phase Change Material (PCM) as an active thermal storage are presented. The objective of the study was to design and built a 350 dm3 glass door bottle cooler having an appliance energy consumption reduction of over 75% compared to state of the art bottle coolers (2010 figures). Calculation results show that active thermal storage using PCM can be effectively applied to...

  18. Thermal emissions and climate change: Cooler options for future energy technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cowern, Nick E.B.; Ahn, Chihak

    2008-01-01

    Global warming arises from 'temperature forcing', a net imbalance between energy fluxes entering and leaving the climate system and arising within it. Humanity introduces temperature forcing through greenhouse gas emissions, agriculture, and thermal emissions from fuel burning. Up to now climate projections, neglecting thermal emissions, typically foresee maximum forcing around the year 2050, followed by a decline. In this paper we show that, if humanity's energy use grows at 1%/year, slower ...

  19. Wave propagation and thermodynamic losses in packed-bed thermal reservoirs for energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript for a paper published in Applied Energy Volume 130, 1 October 2014, Pages 648–657, DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.02.071 This paper presents a numerical and theoretical analysis of thermal wave propagation in packed bed thermal reservoirs for energy storage applications. In such reservoirs, the range of temperatures encountered is usually such that the solid storage medium will exhibit significant changes in specific heat capacity. This in turn result...

  20. Performance characteristics of a thermal energy storage module - A transient PCM/forced convection conjugate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a thermal energy storage module is simulated numerically. The change of phase of the phase-change material (PCM) and the transient forced convective heat transfer for the transfer fluid with low Prandtl numbers are solved simultaneously as a conjugate problem. A parametric study and a system optimization are conducted. The numerical results show that module geometry is crucial to the design of a space-based thermal energy storage system.

  1. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  2. Thermal Properties of Cement-Based Composites for Geothermal Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Bao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal energy piles are a quite recent renewable energy technique where geothermal energy in the foundation of a building is used to transport and store geothermal energy. In this paper, a structural–functional integrated cement-based composite, which can be used for energy piles, was developed using expanded graphite and graphite nanoplatelet-based composite phase change materials (CPCMs. Its mechanical properties, thermal-regulatory performance, and heat of hydration were evaluated. Test results showed that the compressive strength of GNP-Paraffin cement-based composites at 28 days was more than 25 MPa. The flexural strength and density of thermal energy storage cement paste composite decreased with increases in the percentage of CPCM in the cement paste. The infrared thermal image analysis results showed superior thermal control capability of cement based materials with CPCMs. Hence, the carbon-based CPCMs are promising thermal energy storage materials and can be used to improve the durability of energy piles.

  3. Legal and regulatory issues affecting the aquifer thermal energy storage concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1980-10-01

    A number of legal and regulatory issus that potentially can affect implementation of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) concept are examined. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  4. Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallenius, Janne [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, KTH, AlbaNova University Centre, Stockholm 10691 (Sweden) and Department of Neutron Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: janne@neutron.kth.se; Olsson, Paer [Department of Neutron Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Lagerstedt, Christina [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, KTH, AlbaNova University Centre, Stockholm 10691 (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    By fitting a potential of modified Finnis-Sinclair type to the thermal expansion of ferromagnetic Fe and paramagnetic Cr, stability of the <1 1 0> self-interstitial atom is obtained. The resulting potentials are relatively hard, yielding high SIA formation energies. Less hard potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show that the formation energy of the <1 1 1> SIA depends on distances in-between the 2nd and 3rd neighbour. By raising the value of the pair potential in this region, the energy difference with respect to the <110> configuration calculated with VASP in the PAW approximation can be reproduced.

  5. Panax red ginseng extract regulates energy expenditures by modulating PKA dependent lipid mobilization in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hae-Mi; Kang, Young-Ho; Yoo, Hanju; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Chang, Eun-Ju; Song, Youngsup

    2014-05-16

    Regulation of balance between lipid accumulation and energy consumption is a critical step for the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Here, we show that Panax red ginseng extract treatments increased energy expenditures and prevented mice from diet induced obesity. Panax red ginseng extracts strongly activated Hormone Specific Lipase (HSL) via Protein Kinase A (PKA). Since activation of HSL induces lipolysis in WAT and fatty acid oxidation in brown adipose tissue (BAT), these results suggest that Panax red ginseng extracts reduce HFD induced obesity by regulating lipid mobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An analytical study of heat exchanger effectiveness and thermal performance in a solar energy storage system with PCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.C.Y.; Kwok, C.C.K.; Lin, S.; Vatistas, G.H.

    1984-05-01

    Solar thermal energy storage systems can be categorized based on materials that store either as sensible heat or as latent heat of fusion. For convenience, the latter are designated as phase change materials (PCM). It is a fairly well accepted fact that PCM storage devices usually require less storage volume. In a recent paper, heat exchanger effectiveness for PCM storage units was theoretically derived and presented in chart form. The heat exchanger considered was a shell-and-tube type, viz., the shell side filled with PCM and the tube side with heating or cooling fluid. The PCM heat storage system presented here, however, involves both heating and cooling fluids with a PCM in the middle composed of rectangular channels. This system may be used to store the thermal energy absorbed by a solar collector for the purpose of heating a building. The thermal energy carried by a hot fluid coming from the solar collector can be transferred through the upper surface I. The thermal energy stored in the system can be extracted through the lower surface II by a cold fluid circulating through the building. In order to transfer heat to the melting PCM, the temperature of the hot fluid must be higher than the melting point of the PCM, T /SUB m/ , and to remove heat from the solidifying PCM, the temperature of the cold fluid must be lower than T /SUB m/ . Therefore, the melting point of the PCM presents a limitation of the temperature of both the hot and cold fluids. This temperature limitation is more or less similar to the temperature restriction of a parallel-flow heat exchanger, in which the final temperature of the cold fluid can never reach the outlet temperature of the hot fluid.

  7. Preparation and characterization of phase change material for thermal energy storage in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tommy Y.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the developing of novel form-stable composite phase change material (PCM) by incorporation of paraffin into lightweight aggregate through vacuum impregnation. The macro-encapsulated Paraffin-lightweight aggregate is a chemical compatible, thermal stable and thermal reliable PCM material for thermal energy storage applications in buildings. The 28 days compressive strength of NWAC using PCM-LWA is 33 - 53 MPa, which has an opportunity for structural purpose. Scanning electronic microscopic images indicated the paraffin can be held inside the porous structure of the aggregate. Thermal performance test showed that the cement paste panel with composite PCM can reduce the indoor temperature.

  8. Detailed partial load investigation of a thermal energy storage concept for solar thermal power plants with direct steam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, M.; Hübner, S.; Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Direct steam generation enables the implementation of a higher steam temperature for parabolic trough concentrated solar power plants. This leads to much better cycle efficiencies and lower electricity generating costs. For a flexible and more economic operation of such a power plant, it is necessary to develop thermal energy storage systems for the extension of the production time of the power plant. In the case of steam as the heat transfer fluid, it is important to use a storage material that uses latent heat for the storage process. This leads to a minimum of exergy losses during the storage process. In the case of a concentrating solar power plant, superheated steam is needed during the discharging process. This steam cannot be superheated by the latent heat storage system. Therefore, a sensible molten salt storage system is used for this task. In contrast to the state-of-the-art thermal energy storages within the concentrating solar power area of application, a storage system for a direct steam generation plant consists of a latent and a sensible storage part. Thus far, no partial load behaviors of sensible and latent heat storage systems have been analyzed in detail. In this work, an optimized fin structure was developed in order to minimize the costs of the latent heat storage. A complete system simulation of the power plant process, including the solar field, power block and sensible and latent heat energy storage calculates the interaction between the solar field, the power block and the thermal energy storage system.

  9. Thermal Analysis of a Thermal Energy Storage Unit to Enhance a Workshop Heating System Driven by Industrial Residual Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Various energy sources can be used for room heating, among which waste heat utilization has significantly improved in recent years. However, the majority of applicable waste heat resources are high-grade or stable thermal energy, while the low-grade or unstable waste heat resources, especially low-temperature industrial residual water (IRW, are insufficiently used. A thermal energy storage (TES unit with paraffin wax as a phase change material (PCM is designed to solve this problem in a pharmaceutical plant. The mathematical models are developed to simulate the heat storage and release processes of the TES unit. The crucial parameters in the recurrence formulae are determined: the phase change temperature range of the paraffin wax used is 47 to 56 °C, and the latent heat is 171.4 kJ/kg. Several thermal behaviors, such as the changes of melting radius, solidification radius, and fluid temperature, are simulated. In addition, the amount of heat transferred, the heat transfer rate, and the heat storage efficiency are discussed. It is presented that the medicine production unit could save 10.25% of energy consumption in the investigated application.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Microencapsulated Hexadecane Used for Thermal Energy Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Long ZOU; Zhi Cheng TAN; Xiao Zheng LAN; Li Xian SUN; Tao ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Polyurea microcapsules about 2.5 μm in diameter containing phase change material for thermal energy storage application were synthesized and characterized by interfacial polycondensation method with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate and ethylenediamine as monomers in an emulsion system. Hexadecane was used as a phase change material and OP, which is nonionic surfactant, and used as an emulsifier. The chemical structure and thermal behavior of the microcapsules were investigated by FTIR and thermal analysis respectively. The results show encapsulated hexadecane has a good potential as a solar energy storage material.

  11. Extraction of Oil from an Aqueous Emulsion by Coupling Thermal Swing with a Capillary Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saheli; Caram, Hugo; Gupta, Ramesh; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2016-10-11

    Separation of oil from water is an area of increasing interest because of the ever-increasing emphasis on reducing discharge of oily wastewater streams and for managing accidental oil spills. While several methods to separate oil from water are available, the current methods often require elaborate processing steps and/or have low extraction rates. Here, we report two simple and potentially inexpensive methods of separating oil from aqueous emulsions. The first method employs hydrophobized glass wool in a pressure-driven capillary pump, while the second method employs novel zeolite pellets the exterior surface of which is hydrophobic. These pellets selectively absorb oil from an aqueous emulsion, which can subsequently be recovered using thermal swing with hot fluid at a temperature far below the boiling point of the oil. Separation of oil with a very high yield (ca. 97%) appears possible using a combination of the two methods.

  12. Mechanical and thermal properties of polylactic acid composites reinforced with cellulose nanoparticles extracted from kenaf fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabchi, Mohammad Reza; Khalid, Mohammad; Thevy Ratnam, Chantara; Walvekar, Rashmi

    2016-12-01

    Different approaches have been attempted to use biomass as filler for production of biodegradable polymer composites. In this study, cellulose nanoparticles (CNP) extracted from kenaf fibres were used to produce polylactic acid (PLA) based biodegradable nanocomposites. CNP concentration was varied from 1-5 wt. % and blended with PLA using Brabender twin-screw compounder. Effects of CNP loading on the mechanical, thermal and dynamic properties of PLA were investigated. Studies on the morphological properties and influence of CNP loading on the properties of CNP/PLA nanocomposite were also conducted. The results show an adequate compatibility between CNP and PLA matrix. Moreover, addition of 3 wt. % of CNP improved the PLA tensile strength by 25%.

  13. Intramode and Fermi relaxation in CO2, their influence on multiple-pass, short-pulse energy extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooth, R.A.; van der Pol, J.A.; Haselhoff, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    Analytical, experimental and numerical results concerning the influence of intramode and Fermi relaxation on multiple-pass, nanosecond-pulse energy extraction are presented. Multiple-pass energy extraction experiments show satisfactory agreement with the analytical and numerical calculations which

  14. Development of Equipment to Separate Nonthermal and Thermal Effects of Radio Frequency Energy on Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.J. Geveke; M. Kozempel; C. Brunkhorst

    1999-11-01

    A radio frequency (RF) dielectric heater has been developed for isolating thermal and nonthermal effects of RF energy on microorganisms in liquid foods. The modified heater enables the simultaneous application of RF energy and removal of thermal energy from the liquids. A double-pipe heat exchanger is an integral part of the heater. The outer pipe is made of Teflon. The inner pipe is made of stainless steel that is grounded in the RF circuit. Liquid food flows through the annular region between the two concentric pipes. Cooling water flows through the stainless steel pipe. The food in the annular region absorbs the RF energy. Concurrently, the cooling water flowing in the inner pipe removes the thermal energy from the food, thus controlling the temperature.

  15. Community biomass handbook. Volume I: thermal wood energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Becker; E. Lowell; D. Bihn; R. Anderson; S. Taff

    2014-01-01

    This handbook and financial app is a guide to help communities quickly determine if biomass energy projects might work for them so that this option is not overlooked. Its purpose is as a screening tool designed to save significant time, resources, and investment by weeding out those wood energy projects that may never come to fruition from those that have a chance of...

  16. Peak-load pricing and thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Twenty papers were presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 19 papers. One paper was processed previously for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Fifteen of the papers were processed for inclusion in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (LCL)

  17. Development of Thermal Bridging Factors for Use in Energy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-20

    of between about 0.1 and 2 per inch): wood, gypsum, dense polymers (nylon, polyvinyl chloride [PVC,] fiber- glass), sealants, rubber ERDC/CERL TR...is often required where the system stops to fill the space that a symmetrical extrusion would assume would be filled by an IGU or thin spandrel...20-gauge steel flashing still acts as a TB- replacing with thermally non-conductive polymer or thinner stainless improves the performance. ERDC/CERL

  18. Design of a Protection Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Material Coupled to a Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, D.; Falcoz, Q.; Ferrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is the key for a stable electricity production in future Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. This work presents a study on the thermal protection of the central receiver of CSP plant using a tower which is subject to considerable thermal stresses in case of cloudy events. The very high temperatures, 800 °C at design point, impose the use of special materials which are able to resist at high temperature and high mechanical constraints and high level of concentrated solar flux. In this paper we investigate a TES coupling a metallic matrix drilled with tubes of Phase Change Material (PCM) in order to store a large amount of thermal energy and release it in a short time. A numerical model is developed to optimize the arrangement of tubes into the TES. Then a methodology is given, based from the need in terms of thermal capacity, in order to help the choice of the geometry.

  19. Experimental measurements of thermal properties for Mexican building materials to simulate thermal behavior to save energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Galan, Jesus; Almanza, Rafael; Rodriguez, Neftali [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Ingenieria

    2008-07-01

    One of the main factors that determine the reliability of building's thermal design is the values of thermal and heat transfer properties used during this process. In order to optimizing such thermal design process, there is little information available of the most utilized building materials in Mexico; hence, some measurements were carried out. We present thermal conductivity experimental results for: red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete. Furthermore, experimental data of convective heat transfer coefficients are reported on: red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete walls. Kondratyev methodology was used for thermal conductivity estimations. Kondratyev methodology is based on the cooling off of bodies in regular state analysis. Thermal conductivity values were: red brick k{sub L} = 0.906 W/mC, tepetate k{sub T} = 0.648 W/mC, adobe k{sub A} = 0.570 W/mC, and concrete k{sub C} = 1.918 W/mC. Red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete test walls of 0.46 x 0.56 and 0.06 m thick, were manufactured, as well as a prototype of testing for mounting the walls, in order to evaluate their convective heat transfer coefficients. Measurements were carried out at the Institute of Engineering-UNAM Wind-Tunnel, for an air velocities interval of 2-10 m/s. Reported values for convective coefficients fluctuate on 16-134 W/m{sup 2}2 C, depending on material and position wall, as well as air velocity. (orig.)

  20. Thermal energy storage in buildings using PCM. Computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudhair, A.M.; Farid, M.M.; Chen, J.J.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Bansal, P.K. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the results of phase changing material, RT20, impregnated up to 26%-wt into the gypsum wallboards to produce a significant thermal storage medium (PCMGW). A full-scale test facility using the PCMGW was monitored for two years, and was modeled using the thermal building simulation package, SUNREL, to evaluate the latent heat storage performance of the PCM treated wallboards. Measured and simulated results showed that the use of PCMGW met two needs: quick absorption of solar heat for use during off-sunshine hours and avoid overheating during sunshine hours. The PCMGWs effectively smoothed out diurnal daily fluctuations of indoor air temperatures on sunny days and, therefore, providing thermal comfort. Although the benefits of PCMGW were clearly demonstrated, it was necessary to optimize the melting point and quantity of the PCM and to highlight the importance of showing how many days the PCM could effectively minimize the indoor temperature fluctuation. In a 90-day period during summer, a PCM of with a melting range of 18 C - 22 C could be fully utilized for 39% and partially utilized for 55.5% of the summer days when there is either partial melting or partial freezing. There is no benefit for only 5.5% of the summer days when the PCM remains either in the solid or liquid state. These percentages show that the decision of using 26%-wt RT20 with the melting range of 18-22 C is a practical and realistic one. (orig.)

  1. Energy dashboard for real-time evaluation of a heat pump assisted solar thermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, David Allen

    The emergence of net-zero energy buildings, buildings that generate at least as much energy as they consume, has lead to greater use of renewable energy sources such as solar thermal energy. One example is a heat pump assisted solar thermal system, which uses solar thermal collectors with an electrical heat pump backup to supply space heating and domestic hot water. The complexity of such a system can be somewhat problematic for monitoring and maintaining a high level of performance. Therefore, an energy dashboard was developed to provide comprehensive and user friendly performance metrics for a solar heat pump system. Once developed, the energy dashboard was tested over a two-week period in order to determine the functionality of the dashboard program as well as the performance of the heating system itself. The results showed the importance of a user friendly display and how each metric could be used to better maintain and evaluate an energy system. In particular, Energy Factor (EF), which is the ratio of output energy (collected energy) to input energy (consumed energy), was a key metric for summarizing the performance of the heating system. Furthermore, the average EF of the solar heat pump system was 2.29, indicating an efficiency significantly higher than traditional electrical heating systems.

  2. Thermally activated building systems in context of increasing building energy efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Branislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the possible ways to provide heating to the building is to use thermally activated building systems. This type of heating, besides providing significant increase in building energy efficiency, allows using low-temperature heating sources. In this paper, special attention is given to opaque part of the building façade with integrated thermally activated building systems. Due to fact that this type of system strongly depends on temperature of this construction-thermal element and type and thickness of other materials of the façade, influence of these parameters on energy efficiency was analyzed in this paper. Since the simplest and most promising way of using geothermal energy is to use it directly, for our analysis this source of energy was selected. Building energy needs for heating were obtained for real residential multi-family building in Serbia by using EnergyPlus software. The building with all necessary input for simulation was modeled in Google SketchUp with aid of Open Studio Plug-in. Obtained results were compared with measured heating energy consumption. The results show that thermally activated building systems represent good way to increase building energy efficiency and that applying certain temperatures within this element, low-energy house standard can be achieved.

  3. The impact of indoor thermal conditions, system controls and building types on the building energy demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corgnati, Stefano Paolo; Fabrizio, Enrico; Filippi, Marco [Dipartimento di Energetica (DENER), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    It is possible to evaluate the energy demand as well as the parameters related to indoor thermal comfort through building energy simulation tools. Since energy demand for heating and cooling is directly affected by the required level of thermal comfort, the investigation of the mutual relationship between thermal comfort and energy demand (and therefore operating costs) is of the foremost importance both to define the benchmarks for energy service contracts and to calibrate the energy labelling according to European Directive 2002/92/CE. The connection between indoor thermal comfort conditions and energy demand for both heating and cooling has been analyzed in this work with reference to a set of validation tests (office buildings) derived from a European draft standard. Once a range of required acceptable indoor operative temperatures had been fixed in accordance with Fanger's theory (e.g. -0.5 < PMV < -0.5), the effective hourly comfort conditions and the energy consumptions were estimated through dynamic simulations. The same approach was then used to quantify the energy demand when the range of acceptable indoor operative temperatures was fixed in accordance with de Dear's adaptive comfort theory. (author)

  4. Thermal mass impact on energy performance of a low, medium and heavy mass building in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Bojan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy mass materials used in building structures and architecture can significantly affect building energy performance and occupant comfort. The purpose of this study was to investigate if thermal mass can improve the internal environment of a building, resulting in lower energy requirements from the mechanical systems. The study was focused on passive building energy performance and compared annual space heating and cooling energy requirements for an office building in Belgrade with several different applications of thermal mass. A three-dimensional building model was generated to represent a typical office building. Building shape, orientation, glazing to wall ratio, envelope insulation thickness, and indoor design conditions were held constant while location and thickness of building mass (concrete was varied between cases in a series of energy simulations. The results were compared and discussed in terms of the building space heating and cooling energy and demand affected by thermal mass. The simulation results indicated that with addition of thermal mass to the building envelope and structure: 100% of all simulated cases experienced reduced annual space heating energy requirements, 67% of all simulated cases experienced reduced annual space cooling energy requirements, 83% of all simulated cases experienced reduced peak space heating demand and 50% of all simulated cases experienced reduced peak space cooling demand. The study demonstrated that there exists a potential for reducing space heating and cooling energy requirements with heavy mass construction in the analyzed climate region (Belgrade, Serbia.

  5. Geomechanical characterization of the Upper Carboniferous under thermal stress for the evaluation of a High Temperature - Mine Thermal Energy Storage (HT-MTES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Florian; Brüggemann, Nina; Bracke, Rolf; Alber, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this R&D project is to create a technically and economically feasible conceptual model for a High Temperature - Mine Thermal Energy Storage (HT-MTES) for the energetic reuse of a mine on the example of the Prosper-Haniel coal mine in Bottrop, Germany. This project is funded by the "Initiative Energy Storage" program of the German Federal Ministries BMWi, BMU and BMBF. At the end of 2018, the last operative coal mine in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany (Prosper-Haniel), is going to be closed down, plugged and abandoned. Large amounts of subsurface infrastructures, resembled mainly by open parts of former galleries and mining faces are going to be flooded, after the mine is closed down and therefore have the potential to become an enormous geothermal reservoir for a seasonal heat storage. During the summer non-used (waste) heat from solar thermal power plants, garbage incineration, combined heat and power plants (CHP) or industrial production processes can be stored within dedicated drifts of the mine. During the winter season, this surplus heat can be extracted and directly utilized in commercial and/or residential areas. For the evaluation of such a HT-MTES within a former coal mine, the corresponding geomechanical parameters of the Upper Carboniferous under thermal stress needs to be evaluated. Therefore the main rock types of the Upper Carboniferous (claystone, siltstone and sandstone) are subject to a geomechanical characterization before and after thermal cyclic loadings of temperatures up to 200 °C. The samples have been collected directly from the coal mine Prosper-Haniel within a depth range of 1000 - 1200 m. Unconfined compressive and tensile strengths, as well as triaxial tests were performed at room temperature. Furthermore, a range of petrophysical properties like density, thin-section analysis and P-wave velocities were determined. First results show an indication that the overall strength properties of the samples are not effected by

  6. Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, D. Yogi [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2012-09-04

    The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 300°C - 450°C) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

  7. On the transition from photoluminescence to thermal emission and its implication on solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) is a fundamental light-matter interaction, which conventionally involves the absorption of energetic photon, thermalization and the emission of a red-shifted photon. Conversely, in optical-refrigeration the absorption of low energy photon is followed by endothermic-PL of energetic photon. Both aspects were mainly studied where thermal population is far weaker than photonic excitation, obscuring the generalization of PL and thermal emissions. Here we experimentally study endothermic-PL at high temperatures. In accordance with theory, we show how PL photon rate is conserved with temperature increase, while each photon is blue shifted. Further rise in temperature leads to an abrupt transition to thermal emission where the photon rate increases sharply. We also show how endothermic-PL generates orders of magnitude more energetic photons than thermal emission at similar temperatures. Relying on these observations, we propose and theoretically study thermally enhanced PL (TEPL) for highly eff...

  8. Experimental investigation of performances of microcapsule phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Liu, X.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Fang, G.

    2010-02-15

    Performances of microcapsule phase change material (MPCM) for thermal energy storage are investigated. The MPCM for thermal energy storage is prepared by a complex coacervation method with gelatin and acacia as wall materials and paraffin as core material in an emulsion system. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the microstructure of the MPCM. In thermal analysis, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was employed to determine the melting temperature, melting latent heat, solidification temperature, and solidification latent heat of the MPCM for thermal energy storage. The SEM micrograph indicates that the MPCM has been successfully synthesized and that the particle size of the MPCM is about 81 {mu}m. The DSC output results show that the melting temperature of the MPCM is 52.05 C, the melting latent heat is 141.03 kJ/kg, the solidification temperature is 59.68 C, and the solidification latent heat is 121.59 kJ/kg. The results prove that the MPCM for thermal energy storage has a larger phase change latent heat and suitable phase change temperature, so it can be considered as an efficient thermal energy storage material for heat utilizing systems. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Thermal performance analysis of a thermocline thermal energy storage system with FLiNaK molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Cheng, M. S.; Zhao, B. C.; Dai, Z. M.

    2017-01-01

    A thermocline thermal storage unit with a heat transfer fluid (HTF) of high-temperature molten salt is considered as one of the most promising methods of thermal storage due to its lower cost and smaller size. The main objective of this work is to analyze the transient behavior of the available molten salt FLiNaK used as the HTF in heat transfer and heat storage in a thermocline thermal energy storage (TES) system. Thermal characteristics including temperature profiles influenced by different inlet velocities of HTF and different void fractions of porous heat storage medium are analyzed. The numerical investigation on the heat storage and heat transfer characteristics of FLiINaK has been carried out. A comparison between two different molten salts, FLiNaK and Hitec, has been explored in this paper with regards to their charging and discharging operations. The results indicate the system with FLiNaK has a greater energy storage capability, a shorter charging time and a higher output power. The numerical investigation reveals heat storage and heat transfer characteristics of the thermocline TES system with FLiNaK, and provide important references for molten salt selection of the TES system in the future.

  10. Economic Dispatch for Power System Included Wind and Solar Thermal Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saoussen BRINI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of technologies of alternative energy, the electric power network can be composed of several renewable energy resources. The energy resources have various characteristics in terms of operational costs and reliability. In this study, the problem is the Economic Environmental Dispatching (EED of hybrid power system including wind and solar thermal energies. Renewable energy resources depend on the data of the climate such as the wind speed for wind energy, solar radiation and the temperature for solar thermal energy. In this article it proposes a methodology to solve this problem. The resolution takes account of the fuel costs and reducing of the emissions of the polluting gases. The resolution is done by the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA method and the simulations have been made on an IEEE network test (30 nodes, 8 machines and 41 lines.

  11. Opportunities for switchable solvents for lipid extraction from wet algal biomass: an energy evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Ying; Schuur, Boelo; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Algae are considered an important sustainable feedstock for lipid extraction to produce food ingredients, cosmetics, pharmaceutical products and biofuels. Next to the costs for cultivation, this route is especially hindered by the energy intensity of drying algae prior to extraction and solvent

  12. The EROI of U.S. offshore energy extraction. A net energy analysis of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gately, Mark [The Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, University of Vermont, 617 Main Street Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

    2007-08-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service estimated that 49% of the oil and 57% of the natural gas yet to be discovered offshore in the United States are located in the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf region. While the existence of these energy resources is critical to the nation's future economic well being, of equal importance is the amount of already extracted energy that will be required to deliver the new fuel to society in a useful form. The difference between the two energy quantities is the net supply. In many respects, net energy is the most relevant measure of fuel supply because it represents the energy available to produce final-demand economic goods and services. Unfortunately, there currently exists no standard procedure for determining net energy, and so the data are extremely limited and inconsistent. In this paper, we present an 'energy return on investment', or 'EROI'-based approach. EROI is defined as the ratio of gross energy produced by an energy supply process to the total, direct plus indirect, energy cost of its production. If the EROI of an energy supply process is known, then it's net energy output can be derived easily given gross production data. We specify an empirical computer model programmed to simulate the productivity dynamics of offshore energy extraction in the Gulf of Mexico and estimate the EROI of the 'offshore process' over a twenty-year period (1985-2004). At the conclusion of the simulation, the model calculates the EROI of the process to range from 10 to 25, depending on how energy costs have been defined. In comparison, it has been estimated that the EROI of U.S. domestic petroleum extraction in the 1930s was approximately 100. (author)

  13. TESVE model for design of soil vapor extraction systems with thermal enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghuman, A. [Lowney Associates, Mountain View, CA (United States); Wong, K. [Air Force, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Singh, S. [URS Consultants, Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a popular and effective technology for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), from the subsurface soils. The performance of SVE systems is based on three key parameters: the rate of mass removal, the time required to achieve cleanup goals, and the cost of cleanup. These performance parameters depend on physical and chemical factors such as the rate and pattern of air flow through the affected soils, contaminant type, and the degree of partitioning between the vapor-, liquid-, dissolved- and adsorbed- phase. The effectiveness of SVE can be enhanced by raising the soil temperature. This is done using various methods including electrical heating, and hot air volatilization. TESVE (Thermally-Enhanced Soil Vapor Extraction), a multi-component, non-isothermal, three dimensional software model, is a powerful tool in evaluating the feasibility of SVE, optimizing design, predicting performance, and, ultimately reducing cleanup costs. The TESVE model was run for a SVE site at McClellan Air Force Base, California. Four SVE design scenarios were modeled for removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) from the subsurface soil.

  14. Study of Thermal Activated CO2 Extraction Processes from Carbonate Apatites Using Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Kuznetsov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of carbonate in the structure of carbonate-containing apatites (CCA is an actual problem due to the similarity of such systems to natural apatites of mammalian bone tissue. The search of the optimal synthesis procedures was also carried out in order to obtain carbonate apatites with the highest rate of carbonate ions incorporation into the apatite structure. The analysis of carbonate-group temperature behavior in apatites of various origin helps to understand their structural and functional roles in biologically relevant apatite materials. The thermal extraction and accumulation of CO2 from biogenic and geological apatites is also of interest for the further carbon isotope analysis with accelerating mass-spectrometry. X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy as well as self-proposed gas chromatography method with thermo-programmed probe extraction were used for carbonate temperature behavior study. This new method allows determining CO2 concentration released from CCA during annealing. The defined changes in carbonate apatite structure depending on synthesis procedure were observed.

  15. Thermal modelling of borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores; Zur thermischen Modellierung von Erdwaermesonden und Erdsonden-Waermespeichern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Dan

    2011-07-15

    The thermal use of the underground for heating and cooling applications can be done with borehole heat exchangers. This work deals with the further development of the modelling of thermal transport processes inside and outside the borehole as well as with the application of the further developed models. The combination of high accuracy and short computation time is achieved by the development of three-dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for borehole heat exchangers. Short transient transport processes can be calculated by the developed model with a considerable higher dynamic and accuracy than with known models from literature. The model is used to evaluate measurement data of a thermal response test by parameter estimation technique with a transient three-dimensional model for the first time. Clear advantages like shortening of the test duration are shown. The developed borehole heat exchanger model is combined with a three-dimensional description of the underground in the Finite-Element-Program FEFLOW. The influence of moving groundwater on borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores is then quantified.

  16. Excavation-drier method of energy-peat extraction reduces long-term climatic impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvan, N.; Silvan, K.; Laine, J. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Parkano (Finland)], e-mail: niko.silvan@metla.fi; Vaisanen, S.; Soukka, R. [Lappeenranta Univ.of Techology (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    Climatic impacts of energy-peat extraction are of increasing concern due to EU emissions trading requirements. A new excavation-drier peat extraction method has been developed to reduce the climatic impact and increase the efficiency of peat extraction. To quantify and compare the soil GHG fluxes of the excavation drier and the traditional milling methods, as well as the areas from which the energy peat is planned to be extracted in the future (extraction reserve area types), soil CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured during 2006-2007 at three sites in Finland. Within each site, fluxes were measured from drained extraction reserve areas, extraction fields and stockpiles of both methods and additionally from the biomass driers of the excavation-drier method. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), described at a principal level in ISO Standards 14040:2006 and 14044:2006, was used to assess the long-term (100 years) climatic impact from peatland utilisation with respect to land use and energy production chains where utilisation of coal was replaced with peat. Coal was used as a reference since in many cases peat and coal can replace each other in same power plants. According to this study, the peat extraction method used was of lesser significance than the extraction reserve area type in regards to the climatic impact. However, the excavation-drier method seems to cause a slightly reduced climatic impact as compared with the prevailing milling method. (orig.)

  17. A thermally regenerative ammonia-based battery for efficient harvesting of low-grade thermal energy as electrical power

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Thermal energy was shown to be efficiently converted into electrical power in a thermally regenerative ammonia-based battery (TRAB) using copper-based redox couples [Cu(NH3)4 2+/Cu and Cu(ii)/Cu]. Ammonia addition to the anolyte (2 M ammonia in a copper-nitrate electrolyte) of a single TRAB cell produced a maximum power density of 115 ± 1 W m-2 (based on projected area of a single copper mesh electrode), with an energy density of 453 W h m-3 (normalized to the total electrolyte volume, under maximum power production conditions). Adding a second cell doubled both the voltage and maximum power. Increasing the anolyte ammonia concentration to 3 M further improved the maximum power density to 136 ± 3 W m-2. Volatilization of ammonia from the spent anolyte by heating (simulating distillation), and re-addition of this ammonia to the spent catholyte chamber with subsequent operation of this chamber as the anode (to regenerate copper on the other electrode), produced a maximum power density of 60 ± 3 W m-2, with an average discharge energy efficiency of ∼29% (electrical energy captured versus chemical energy in the starting solutions). Power was restored to 126 ± 5 W m-2 through acid addition to the regenerated catholyte to decrease pH and dissolve Cu(OH)2 precipitates, suggesting that an inexpensive acid or a waste acid could be used to improve performance. These results demonstrated that TRABs using ammonia-based electrolytes and inexpensive copper electrodes can provide a practical method for efficient conversion of low-grade thermal energy into electricity.

  18. Cooling process of the LHC energy extraction resistors

    CERN Document Server

    Peón-Hernández, G; Coelingh, G J; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

    2003-01-01

    The energy stored in all the LHC dipoles, about 11 GJ, can potentially cause severe damage to the magnets, bus bars and current leads. In order to protect the superconducting elements after a resistive transition, the energy is dissipated into dump resistors switched in series with the magnet chains. This paper describes the cooling process of the resistors and explains the choice process for the main components of the cooling equipment.

  19. Predictions of the maximum energy extracted from salinity exchange inside porous electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, M.L.; Jiménez, M.L.; Fernández, M M; Fernández, M.M.; Ahualli, S.; Iglesias, G.; Delgado, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    Capacitive energy extraction based on double layer expansion (CDLE) is the name of a new method devised for extracting energy from the exchange of fresh and salty water in porous electrodes. It is based on the change of the capacitance of electrical double layers (EDLs) at the electrode/solution interface when the concentration of the bulk electrolyte solution is modified. The use of porous electrodes provides huge amounts of surface area, but given the typically small pore size, ...

  20. On the energy dependence of proton beam extraction with a bent crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, Gianluigi; Fidecaro, Giuseppe; Gyr, Marcel; Herr, Werner; Klem, J T; Mikkelsen, U; Weisse, E

    1998-01-01

    Proton beam extraction from the CERN SPS by means of a bent silicon crystal is reported at three different energies, 14 GeV, 120 GeV and 270 GeV. The experimental results are compared to computer simulations which contain a sound model of the SPS accelerator as well as the channeling phenomena in bent crystals. The overall energy dependence of crystal assisted proton beam extraction is understood and provides the basis to discuss such a scheme for future accelerators.

  1. CHANGE OF PARADIGM IN UNDERGROUND HARD COAL MINING THROUGH EXTRACTION AND CAPITALIZATION OF METHANE FOR ENERGY PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu PLESEA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Besides oil and gas, coal is the most important fossil fuel for energy production. Of the energy mixture of our country, the internal production gas share is 80% of the required annual consumption, of about 14 billion cubic meters, the rest of 20% being insured by importing, by the Russian company Gazprom. The share of coal in the National Power System (NPS is of 24% and is one of the most profitable energy production sources, taking into account the continuous increase of gas price and its dependence on external suppliers. Taking into account the infestation of the atmosphere and global warming as effect of important release of greenhouse gas and carbon dioxide as a result of coal burning for energy production in thermal power plants, there is required to identify new solutions for keeping the environment clean. Such a solution is presented in the study and analysis shown in the paper and is the extraction and capitalization of methane from the coal deposits and the underground spaces remaining free after mine closures. Underground methane extraction is considered even more opportune because, during coal exploitation, large quantities of such combustible gas are released and exhausted into the atmosphere by the degasification and ventilation stations from the surface, representing and important pollution factor for the environment, as greenhouse gas with high global warming potential (high GWP of about 21 times higher than carbon dioxide.

  2. Modeling of piezoelectric energy extraction in a thermoacoustic engine with multi-pole time-domain impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeffrey; Scalo, Carlo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out the first high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulation of a complete thermoacoustic engine with piezoelectric energy extraction. The standing-wave thermoacoustic piezoelectric (TAP) engine model comprises a 51 cm long cylindrical resonator, containing a thermoacoustic stack on one end and capped by a PZT-5A piezoelectric diaphragm on the other end, tuned to the frequency of the thermoacoustically-amplified mode (388 Hz). A multi-pole broadband time-domain impedance model has been adopted to accurately simulate the measured electromechanical properties of the piezoelectric diaphragm. Simulations are first carried out from quasi-quiescent conditions to a limit cycle, with varying temperature gradients and stack configurations. Stack geometry and boundary layers are fully resolved. Acoustic energy extraction is then activated, achieving a new limit cycle at lower pressure amplitudes. The scaling of the modeled electrical power output and attainable thermal-to-electric energy conversion efficiencies are discussed. Limitations of extending a quasi-one-dimensional linear approximation based on Rott's theory to a (low amplitude) limit cycle are discussed, as well as nonlinear effects such as thermoacoustic energy transport and viscous dissipation.

  3. ON BOARD OF SHIPS THERMAL ENERGY RECOVERY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beazit ALI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper are presented at first the energy recovery conditions used at the moment on board of ships and the restrictions which do not allow the achievement of higher recovery ratios. The authors suggest a new type of recovery plant by vaporization of water by means of expansion and they show its advantages in the considerably increase of energy recovery ratio from burnt gases from the cooling water of marine engine

  4. PEB: thermal oriented architectural modeling for building energy efficiency regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Leclercq, Pierre; Juchmes, Roland; Delfosse, Vincent; Safin, Stéphane; Dawans, Arnaud; Dawans, Adrien

    2011-01-01

    As part of the overhauling of the building energy efficiency regulations (following European directive 2002/91/CE), the Wallonia and Brussels-Capital Region commissioned the LUCID to develop an optional 3D graphic encoding module to be integrated with the core energy efficiency computation engine developed by Altran Europe. Our contribution consisted mostly in analyzing the target users’ needs and representations (ergonomics, UI, interactions) and implementing a bespoke 3D CAD modeler dedicat...

  5. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Mantha; A K Mohanty; P Satyamurthy

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically ∼ 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth-eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of ∼ 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  6. Thermal energy storage – overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Pfleger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage (TES is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems.

  7. Energy shift of H-atom electrons due to Gibbons-Hawking thermal bath

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic shift of energy levels of H-atom electrons is determined by calculating an electron coupling to the Gibbons-Hawking electromagnetic field thermal bath. Energy shift of electrons in H-atom is determined in the framework of the non-relativistic quantum mechanics.

  8. Impact energy analysis of HSLA specimens after simulated welding thermal cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarždić, I.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents impact energy results of specimens made from high strength fine grained steel TStE 420 after thermal cycle simulation. These results are obtained by examining Charpy specimens. Metallographic analysis is performed, hardness is measured and total impact energy is divided into ductile and brittle components.

  9. Thermal energy storage technologies for sustainability systems design, assessment and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaiselvam, S

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage Technologies for Sustainability is a broad-based overview describing the state-of-the-art in latent, sensible, and thermo-chemical energy storage systems and their applications across industries. Beginning with a discussion of the efficiency and conservation advantages of balancing energy demand with production, the book goes on to describe current state-of-the art technologies. Not stopping with description, the authors also discuss design, modeling, and simulation of representative systems, and end with several case studies of systems in use.Describes how thermal energ

  10. Process and Economic Optimisation of a Milk Processing Plant with Solar Thermal Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Fabian; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the integration of solar thermal systems for process energy use. A shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy could be beneficial both from environmental and economic perspectives, after the process itself has been optimised and efficiency measures have been implemented...... of the collector field and tank. The results show that solar thermal heat can considerably reduce the operating costs of the dairy factory, even in the North European climate. For the analysed factory the optimal process streams to be partially fuelled by solar energy was found to be hot air to the spray, where...

  11. Thermal and structural stability of medium energy target carrier assembly for NOvA at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Ader, C.; Anderson, K.; Hylen, J.; Martens, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The NOvA project will upgrade the existing Neutrino at Main Injector (NuMI) project beamline at Fermilab to accommodate beam power of 700 kW. The Medium Energy (ME) graphite target assembly is provided through an accord with the State Research Center of Russia Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP) at Protvino, Russia. The effects of proton beam energy deposition within beamline components are considered as thermal stability of the target carrier assembly and alignment budget are critical operational issues. Results of finite element thermal and structural analysis involving the target carrier assembly is provided with detail regarding the target's beryllium windows.

  12. Statement of work for solar thermal power systems and photovoltaic solar-energy systems technical support services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Work is broken down in the following areas: solar thermal central receiver systems analysis; advanced solar thermal systems analysis and engineering; thermal power systems support; total energy systems mission analysis; irrigation and small community mission analysis; photovoltaics mission analysis; Solar Thermal Test Facility and Central Receiver Pilot Plant systems engineering. (LEW)

  13. Impact of façade window design on energy, daylighting and thermal comfort in nearly zero-energy houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhoutteghem, Lies; Skarning, Gunnlaug Cecilie Jensen; Hviid, Christian Anker;

    2015-01-01

    a solution space defined by targets for daylighting and thermal comfort. In contrast with existing guidelines, the results show an upper limit for energy savings and utilisation of solar gains in south-oriented rooms. Instead, low U-values are needed in both north- and south oriented rooms before large......Appropriate window solutions are decisive for the design of 'nearly zero-energy' buildings with healthy and comfortable indoor environment. This paper focuses on the relationship between size, orientation and glazing properties of façade windows for different side-lit room geometries in Danish...... 'nearly zero-energy' houses. The effect of these parameters on space heating demand, daylighting and thermal environment is evaluated by means of EnergyPlus and DAYSIM and presented in charts illustrating how combinations of design parameters with minimum space heating demand can be selected within...

  14. Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

    1981-05-01

    The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

  15. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  16. Innovative thermal energy harvesting for future autonomous applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfray, Stephane

    2013-12-01

    As communicating autonomous systems market is booming, the role of energy harvesting will be a key enabler. As example, heat is one of the most abundant energy sources that can be converted into electricity in order to power circuits. Harvesting systems that use wasted heat open new ways to power autonomous sensors when the energy consumption is low, or to create systems of power generators when the conversion efficiency is high. The combination of different technologies (low power μ-processors, μ-batteries, radio, sensors...) with new energy harvesters compatible with large varieties of use-cases with allow to address this booming market. Thanks to the conjunction of ultra-low power electronic development, 3D technologies & Systems in Package approaches, the integration of autonomous sensors and electronics with ambient energy harvesting will be achievable. The applications are very wide, from environment and industrial sensors to medical portable applications, and the Internet of things may also represent in the future a several billions units market.

  17. EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1981-06-01

    The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

  18. EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1981-06-01

    The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

  19. Thermal and Energy Performance of Conditioned Building Due To Insulated Sloped Roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, Suhandi Syiful; Ahmed, Azni Zain; Zakaria, Nor Zaini; Ibrahim, Norhati

    2010-07-01

    For low-rise buildings in equatorial region, the roof is exposed to solar radiation longer than other parts of the envelope. Roofs are to be designed to reject heat and moderate the thermal impact. These are determined by the design and construction of the roofing system. The pitch of roof and the properties of construction affect the heat gain into the attic and subsequently the indoor temperature of the living spaces underneath. This finally influences the thermal comfort conditions of naturally ventilated buildings and cooling load of conditioned buildings. This study investigated the effect of insulated sloping roof on thermal energy performance of the building. A whole-building thermal energy computer simulation tool, Integrated Environmental Solution (IES), was used for the modelling and analyses. A building model with dimension of 4.0 m × 4.0 m × 3.0 m was designed with insulated roof and conventional construction for other parts of the envelope. A 75 mm conductive insulation material with thermal conductivity (k-value) of 0.034 Wm-1K-1 was installed underneath the roof tiles. The building was modelled with roof pitch angles of 0° , 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and simulated for the month of August in Malaysian climate conditions. The profile for attic temperature, indoor temperature and cooling load were downloaded and evaluated. The optimum roof pitch angle for best thermal performance and energy saving was identified. The results show the pitch angle of 0° is able to mitigate the thermal impact to provide the best thermal condition with optimum energy savings. The maximum temperature difference between insulated and non-insulted roof for attic (AtticA-B) and indoor condition (IndoorA-B) is +7.8 °C and 0.4 °C respectively with an average energy monthly savings of 3.9 %.

  20. Solar energy conversion systems engineering and economic analysis radiative energy input/thermal electric output computation. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, G.

    1982-09-01

    The direct energy flux analytical model, an analysis of the results, and a brief description of a non-steady state model of a thermal solar energy conversion system implemented on a code, SIRR2, as well as the coupling of CIRR2 which computes global solar flux on a collector and SIRR2 are presented. It is shown how the CIRR2 and, mainly, the SIRR2 codes may be used for a proper design of a solar collector system. (LEW)

  1. Energy comparison between solar thermal power plant and photovoltaic power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Urška; Avsec, Jurij

    2017-07-01

    The combined use of renewable energy and alternative energy systems and better efficiency of energy devices is a promising approach to reduce effects due to global warming in the world. On the basis of first and second law of thermodynamics we could optimize the processes in the energy sector. The presented paper shows the comparison between solar thermal power plant and photovoltaic power plant in terms of energy, exergy and life cycle analysis. Solar thermal power plant produces electricity with basic Rankine cycle, using solar tower and solar mirrors to produce high fluid temperature. Heat from the solar system is transferred by using a heat exchanger to Rankine cycle. Both power plants produce hydrogen via electrolysis. The paper shows the global efficiency of the system, regarding production of the energy system.

  2. The principle of seasonal thermal energy storage; Das Prinzip des saisonalen Thermospeichers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenbach, R.; Arslan, U.; Rueckert, A. [Darmstadt Univ. (Germany). Inst. und Versuchsanstalt fuer Geotechnik

    1998-03-01

    The principle of seasonal thermal energy storage is based on the use of soil and groundwater for energy storage. Thermal energy (e.g. solar energy, waste heat from processes, or heat contained in seepage water) is fed into the foundation soil, where it is stored until required. On the other hand, cold can be stored during the winter season and used for cooling in summer. Optimisation means that heat is removed from the soil during the winter season, so that the soil will cool down. The cooled-down soil can then be used for cooling purposes in the summer season; at the same time, excess heat is fed back into the soil, so that the original temperature level for winter operation is regained. Heat is supplied and removed via heat exchangers or energy piles. The storage volume is defined as the soil volume containing heat exchangers or energy piles. The contribution discusses the theoretical fundamentals of heat transfer. (orig./AKF)

  3. Thermodynamic Analysis, Simulation and Optimization on Energy Savings of Ideal Internal Thermally Coupled Distillation Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘兴高; 马龙华; 钱积新

    2000-01-01

    Internal thermally coupled distillation columns (ITCDIC) are the frontier of distillation energy saving research. In this paper, a novel energy saving model of ideal ITCDIC and a simulation algorithm are presented,upon which a series of comparative studies on energy savings with conventional distillation columns are carried out. Furthermore, we present an optimization model of ideal ITCDIC, which can be used to achieve the maximum energy saving and find the optimal design parameters directly. The binary system of benzene-toluene is adopted for the illustrative example of simulation and optimization. The results show that the maximum energy saving of ITCDIC is 52.25% (compared with energy consumption of conventional distillation under the minimum reflux ratio operation); the optimal design parameters are obtained, where the rectifying section pressure and the feed thermal condition are Pr=0.3006 MPa and q=0.5107 respectively.

  4. Technical challenges and future direction for high-efficiency metal hydride thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patrick A.; Corgnale, Claudio; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore; Hardy, Bruce; Sheppard, Drew; Buckley, Craig; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in thermal energy storage (TES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, which allow for continuous operation when sunlight is unavailable. Thermochemical energy storage materials have the advantage of much higher energy densities than latent or sensible heat materials. Furthermore, thermochemical energy storage systems based on metal hydrides have been gaining great interest for having the advantage of higher energy densities, better reversibility, and high enthalpies. However, in order to achieve higher efficiencies desired of a thermal storage system by the US Department of Energy, the system is required to operate at temperatures >600 °C. Operation at temperatures >600 °C presents challenges including material selection, hydrogen embrittlement and permeation of containment vessels, appropriate selection of heat transfer fluids, and cost. Herein, the technical difficulties and proposed solutions associated with the use of metal hydrides as TES materials in CSP applications are discussed and evaluated.

  5. Energy extraction from ocean currents and waves: Mapping the most promising locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, A.; Hamlington, P.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2012-12-01

    Concerns about fossil fuel supplies and an ever-increasing demand for energy have prompted the search for alternative power sources. One option is the ocean, a power-dense and renewable source of energy, but its capacity to meet human energy demands is poorly understood. Although raw wave energy resources have been investigated at many scales, there is still substantial uncertainty regarding how much useful power can be extracted. Even less is known about the energy available in ocean currents, especially on a global scale. Moreover, no studies have attempted to examine wave and current energy simultaneously while at the same time taking into account geographical, environmental, and technical factors that can substantially limit the amount of extractable energy. In this study, we use high fidelity oceanographic model data to assess the availability, recoverability, and value of energy in ocean wind waves and currents. Global wave energy transport, coastal wave energy flux, and current energy are calculated and mapped using the model data. These maps are then incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) in order to assess the U.S. recoverable ocean energy resource. In the GIS, the amount of recoverable energy is estimated by combining the power output from realistic wave and current energy farms with physical and ecological data such as bathymetry and environmentally protected areas. This holistic approach is then used to examine the distribution and value of extractable wave and current energy along the U.S. coast. The results support previous studies that show that the U.S. West Coast has large potential for wave energy extraction and that the Florida Strait has high potential for current energy extraction. We also show that, at any particular location, the amount of available ocean energy is only one factor of many that determines the ultimate feasibility and value of the energy. We outline ways in which the GIS framework used in this assessment can be

  6. Technical Note: Fast two-dimensional GC-MS with thermal extraction for anhydro-sugars in fine aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fast two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC-MS) method that uses heart-cutting and thermal extraction (TE) and requires no chemical derivatization is developed for the determination of anhydro-sugars in fine aerosols. Evaluation of the TE-GC-GC-MS method shows high average rela...

  7. Energy Efficient Bioethanol Purification by Heat Pump Assisted Extractive Distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Anton A.; Luo, Hao; Bildea, Costin Sorin

    2015-01-01

    The purification of bioethanol fuel requires an energy demanding separation process to concentrate the diluted streams obtained in the fermentation stage and to overcome the azeotropic behaviour of ethanol-water mixture. The classic separation sequence consists of three distillation columns that

  8. Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1980-11-01

    Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

  9. Templated assembly of photoswitches significantly increases the energy-storage capacity of solar thermal fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucharski, TJ; Ferralis, N; Kolpak, AM; Zheng, JO; Nocera, DG; Grossman, JC

    2014-04-13

    Large-scale utilization of solar-energy resources will require considerable advances in energy-storage technologies to meet ever-increasing global energy demands. Other than liquid fuels, existing energy-storage materials do not provide the requisite combination of high energy density, high stability, easy handling, transportability and low cost. New hybrid solar thermal fuels, composed of photoswitchable molecules on rigid, low-mass nanostructures, transcend the physical limitations of molecular solar thermal fuels by introducing local sterically constrained environments in which interactions between chromophores can be tuned. We demonstrate this principle of a hybrid solar thermal fuel using azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes. We show that, on composite bundling, the amount of energy stored per azobenzene more than doubles from 58 to 120 kJ mol(-1), and the material also maintains robust cyclability and stability. Our results demonstrate that solar thermal fuels composed of molecule-nanostructure hybrids can exhibit significantly enhanced energy-storage capabilities through the generation of template-enforced steric strain.

  10. Templated assembly of photoswitches significantly increases the energy-storage capacity of solar thermal fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, Timothy J; Ferralis, Nicola; Kolpak, Alexie M; Zheng, Jennie O; Nocera, Daniel G; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale utilization of solar-energy resources will require considerable advances in energy-storage technologies to meet ever-increasing global energy demands. Other than liquid fuels, existing energy-storage materials do not provide the requisite combination of high energy density, high stability, easy handling, transportability and low cost. New hybrid solar thermal fuels, composed of photoswitchable molecules on rigid, low-mass nanostructures, transcend the physical limitations of molecular solar thermal fuels by introducing local sterically constrained environments in which interactions between chromophores can be tuned. We demonstrate this principle of a hybrid solar thermal fuel using azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes. We show that, on composite bundling, the amount of energy stored per azobenzene more than doubles from 58 to 120 kJ mol(-1), and the material also maintains robust cyclability and stability. Our results demonstrate that solar thermal fuels composed of molecule-nanostructure hybrids can exhibit significantly enhanced energy-storage capabilities through the generation of template-enforced steric strain.

  11. Transformation, Conversion, Storage, Transportation of thermal energy by thermochemical processes and thermo-hydraulic processes

    OpenAIRE

    Stitou, Driss

    2013-01-01

    The research presented aims to meet the major challenges of sustainable management and rational use of energy (transport and storage of heat energy), to develop thermodynamic analysis tools and propose appropriate solutions for minimizing environmental impacts resulting from the transformation or conversion of thermal energy. The different developed themes are based on three axes. The first part concerns the development of thermodynamic analysis tools for the assessment, design and optimizati...

  12. Multisource thermal model to the transverse momentum spectra in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Li, BC; Liu, F; Wen, XJ

    2016-01-01

    In an improved multisource thermal model, we systematically investigate the transverse momentum spectra in pp collisions at high energies ranging from 62.4 GeV to 7 TeV. The results are compared with the experimental data in RHIC and LHC. Based on the collision energy dependence of the source-excitation factors, we estimate the transverse momentum spectra in pp collisions at higher energies, potential future pp colliders operating at 33 and 100 TeV.

  13. Collision geometry dependence of the thermal excitation-energy deposition in 8-15 GeV/c hadron-Au reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Soltz, R A; Klay, J L; Heffner, M; Beaulieu, L; Lefort, T; Kwiatkowski, K; Viola, V E

    2008-01-01

    The mean number of primary hadron-nucleon scatterings () and mean impact parameter () are extracted from the distribution of fast protons in 14.6 GeV p-Au and 8.0 GeV pi-Au and pbar-Au collisions. The mean excitation energy per residue nucleon (E*/A) and fast and thermal light particle multiplicities are studied as a function of collision geometry.

  14. Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qui, Songgang [Temple University; Galbraith, Ross [Infinia

    2013-01-23

    This final report summarizes the final results of the Phase II Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation project being performed by Infinia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FC36-08GO18157 during the project period of September 1, 2009 - August 30, 2012. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the practicality of integrating thermal energy storage (TES) modules, using a suitable thermal salt phase-change material (PCM) as its medium, with a dish/Stirling engine; enabling the system to operate during cloud transients and to provide dispatchable power for 4 to 6 hours after sunset. A laboratory prototype designed to provide 3 kW-h of net electrical output was constructed and tested at Infinia's Ogden Headquarters. In the course of the testing, it was determined that the system's heat pipe network - used to transfer incoming heat from the solar receiver to both the Stirling generator heater head and to the phase change salt - did not perform to expectations. The heat pipes had limited capacity to deliver sufficient heat energy to the generator and salt mass while in a charging mode, which was highly dependent on the orientation of the device (vertical versus horizontal). In addition, the TES system was only able to extract about 30 to 40% of the expected amount of energy from the phase change salt once it was fully molten. However, the use of heat pipes to transfer heat energy to and from a thermal energy storage medium is a key technical innovation, and the project team feels that the limitations of the current device could be greatly improved with further development. A detailed study of manufacturing costs using the prototype TES module as a basis indicates that meeting DOE LCOE goals with this hardware requires significant efforts. Improvement can be made by implementing aggressive cost-down initiatives in design and materials

  15. Energy recovery efficiency and cost analysis of VOC thermal oxidation pollution control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warahena, Aruna S K; Chuah, Yew Khoy

    2009-08-01

    Thermal oxidation of VOC is extremely energy intensive, and necessitates high efficiency heat recovery from the exhaust heat. In this paper, two independent parameters heat recovery factor (HRF) and equipment cost factor (ECF) are introduced. HRF and ECF can be used to evaluate separately the merits of energy efficiency and cost effectiveness of VOC oxidation systems. Another parameter equipment cost against heat recovery (ECHR) which is a function of HRF and ECF is introduced to evaluate the merit of different systems for the thermal oxidation of VOC. Respective cost models were derived for recuperative thermal oxidizer (TO) and regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO). Application examples are presented to show the use and the importance of these parameters. An application examples show that TO has a lower ECF while RTO has a higher HRF. However when analyzed using ECHR, RTO would be of advantage economically in longer periods of use. The analytical models presented can be applied in similar environmental protection systems.

  16. Impact of thermal and intermediate energy neutrons on the semiconductor memories for the CERN accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchetto, Matteo; Gerardin, Simone

    A wide quantity of SRAM memories are employed along the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the main CERN accelerator, and they are subjected to high levels of ionizing radiations which compromise the reliability of these devices. The Single Event Effect (SEE) qualification for components to be used in the complex high-energy accelerator at CERN relies on the characterization of two cross sections: 200-MeV protons and thermal neutrons. However, due to cost and time constraints, it is not always possible to characterize the SEE response of components to thermal neutrons, which is often regarded as negligible for components without borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG). Nevertheless, as recent studies show, the sensitivity of deep sub-micron technologies to thermal neutrons has increased owing to the presence of Boron 10 as a dopant and contact contaminant. The very large thermal neutron fluxes relative to high-energy hadron fluxes in some of the heavily shielded accelerator areas imply that even comparatively small therm...

  17. Determining an energy-optimal thermal management strategy for electric driven vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchaneck, Andre; Probst, Tobias; Puente Leon, Fernando [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. of Industrial Information Technology (IIIT)

    2012-11-01

    In electric, hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles, thermal management may have a significant impact on vehicle range. Therefore, optimal thermal management strategies are required. In this paper a method for determining an energy-optimal control strategy for thermal power generation in electric driven vehicles is presented considering all controlled devices (pumps, valves, fans, and the like) as well as influences like ambient temperature, vehicle speed, motor and battery and cooling cycle temperatures. The method is designed to be generic to increase the thermal management development process speed and to achieve the maximal energy reduction for any electric driven vehicle (e.g., by waste heat utilization). Based on simulations of a prototype electric vehicle with an advanced cooling cycle structure, the potential of the method is shown. (orig.)

  18. Energy Extraction from Spinning Black Holes via Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, Ramesh; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    It has for long been an article of faith among astrophysicists that black hole spin energy is responsible for powering the relativistic jets seen in accreting black holes. Two recent advances have strengthened the case. First, numerical general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of accreting spinning black holes show that relativistic jets form spontaneously. In at least some cases, there is unambiguous evidence that much of the jet energy comes from the black hole, not the disk. Second, spin parameters of a number of accreting stellar-mass black holes have been measured. For ballistic jets from these systems, it is found that the radio luminosity of the jet correlates with the spin of the black hole. This suggests a causal relationship between black hole spin and jet power, presumably due to a generalized Penrose process.

  19. Molten Boron Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage to Augment Solar Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    Titanium 1941 295 21.9 Zirconium 2128 153 22.7 Chromium 2180 403 93.9 Vanadium 2183 422 30.7 Rhodium 2237 258 150 Boron 2570 4600 27.4 Hafnium ...Beckman, S., Gusman, M, Johnson, S., Processing, Properties and Arc Jet Oxidation of Hafnium Diboride/Silicon Carbide Ultra High Temperature Ceramics...Engineering Data, Vol. 13, No. 2, April 1968, pp. 231-234. 43Mar, R., "High-temperature Thermal Analysis of High Boron Alloys Using Automatic Optical

  20. Second test campaign of a pilot scale latent heat thermal energy storage - Durability and operational strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Pierre; Rougé, Sylvie; Nivelon, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    A Phase Change Material (PCM) thermal energy storage module was tested in the framework of the Alsolen Sup project. Test results prove not only that the equivalent thermal resistance deduced from the first test campaign does not vary after several months and tens of melting and solidification cycles, but also that our modelling approach is valid both for design and non-nominal power rates, even if the model has to be improved to take into account varying water level and temperature stratification.

  1. Assessing energy efficiency of electric car bottom furnaces intended for thermal energization of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhegorodov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with a new concept of electric furnaces for roasting and thermal energization of vermiculite and other minerals with vibrational transportation of a single-layer mass under constant thermal field. The paper presents performance calculation and comparative assessment of energy data for furnaces of different modifications: flame and electric furnaces with three units, furnaces with six units and ones with series-parallel connection of units, and furnaces of new concept.

  2. High efficiency thermal to electric energy conversion using selective emitters and spectrally tuned solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Flood, Dennis J.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1992-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems are attractive possibilities for direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion, but have typically required the use of black body radiators operating at high temperatures. Recent advances in both the understanding and performance of solid rare-earth oxide selective emitters make possible the use of TPV at temperatures as low as 1500 K. Depending on the nature of parasitic losses, overall thermal-to-electric conversion efficiencies greater than 20 percent are feasible.

  3. Pulsed delivery of laser energy in experimental thermal retinal photocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, Michail M.

    1990-06-01

    Retinal lesions produced with a pulsed laser beam of 1-20 kHz frequency and 10-100% duty cycle were compared with lesions produced with a continuous wave (cw) laser of the same peak power and total energy. Photocoagulation was applied to the retina of three black pigmented rabbits using krypton red laser (647.1 nm) equipped with an acousto-optical modulator to convert cw laser emission to a pulsating beam. An optical fiber fed the laser beam into an optical system delivering a collimated beam of predetermined divergence; the animal's eye focused this beam to a 50-pm spot on the retina. Peak power was kept constant at 0.2 W, and energy was kept constant at 20 mJ. After 7 months the animals were sacrificed and retinal tissue examined by light microscopy. The central section of each lesion was identified and photographed. For lesions with the same energy per pulse and the same pulse duration, the most influential factor, in the frequency range of 1-20 kHz, appeared to be the duty cycle: the smaller the duty cycle, the smaller the lesion, and vice versa. In other words, the shorter the time interval between consecutive pulses, the larger were the pulsed laser lesions.

  4. Thermal-to-electric energy conversion using ferroelectric film capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, A. B.; Platonov, R. A.; Soldatenkov, O. I.

    2014-10-01

    The capacitive ferroelectric thermoelectric converter harvesting electrical energy through non-linear capacitance variation caused by changes in temperature is analyzed. The ferroelectric material used was the thin (0.5 μm) Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3 film. On the basis of experimental dependencies of the ferroelectric film permittivity on temperature ranging from 100 K to 350 K under different electric fields up to 80 V/μm, the optimum values of operating temperatures and electric field for the energy harvesting optimization were determined. For the temperature oscillations of ±15 K around room temperature and electric field about 40 V/μm, the harvested energy was estimated as 30 mJ/cm3. It is shown that the use of thin ferroelectric films for rapid capacitance variation versus temperature and microelectromechanical systems for fast temperature modulations may be a relevant solution for creation of small power scale generators for portable electronics.

  5. Thermal-to-electric energy conversion using ferroelectric film capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyrev, A. B.; Platonov, R. A.; Soldatenkov, O. I. [Saint-Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, 5 Professor Popov Street, St-Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-28

    The capacitive ferroelectric thermoelectric converter harvesting electrical energy through non-linear capacitance variation caused by changes in temperature is analyzed. The ferroelectric material used was the thin (0.5 μm) Ba{sub 0.3}Sr{sub 0.7}TiO{sub 3} film. On the basis of experimental dependencies of the ferroelectric film permittivity on temperature ranging from 100 K to 350 K under different electric fields up to 80 V/μm, the optimum values of operating temperatures and electric field for the energy harvesting optimization were determined. For the temperature oscillations of ±15 K around room temperature and electric field about 40 V/μm, the harvested energy was estimated as 30 mJ/cm{sup 3}. It is shown that the use of thin ferroelectric films for rapid capacitance variation versus temperature and microelectromechanical systems for fast temperature modulations may be a relevant solution for creation of small power scale generators for portable electronics.

  6. Analysis of Thermal Energy Storage Tank by ANSYS and Comparison with Experimental Results to Improve its Thermal Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemkumar, N.; Karthikeyan, A.; Shiva Keshava Reddy, Kota; Rajesh, Kona; Anderson, A.

    2017-05-01

    The discontinuous temperament of the solar power forces to consider about the energy storage. This work is to analyze the tank, amount of energy stored and its storage time. The thermal and flow analysis has been done by ANSYS with different set temperature values. The experimentation is done for various encapsulating materials with different phase change material (PCM). Findings: The results obtained from experimental work are compared with ANSYS output. The competence of the TES is calculated and further improvements are made to enhance its performance. During charging process the temperature distribution from heat transfer fluid (HTF) to PCM is maximum in copper encapsulations followed by aluminium encapsulations and brass encapsulations. The comparison shows only when the electrical power as an input source. The efficient way of captivating solar energy could be a better replacement for electrical input.

  7. Micro-solid phase extraction followed by thermal extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass selective detector for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-08-05

    A method of analyzing environmental contaminants in water based on micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) followed by thermal extraction (TE) and a cold-trapping step, coupled with gas chromatography-mass selective detection (GC-MSD) was developed and validated. μ-SPE-TE- GC-MSD was employed in the determination of five polybrominated diphenyl ethers. The μ-SPE sorbent was chitosan-graphene oxide (CS-GO) composite, which was prepared by mixing CS and GO by means of ultrasonication. The CS in the composite was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. After μ-SPE, the analytes in the extract were extracted thermally in a thermal desorption unit tube combined with a cooled injection system, coupled to GC-MSD. The extraction conditions were optimized for the detection of the target compounds in water. This method provided linearity ranges of between 0.1 and 20μgL(-1) (depending on the analytes), with coefficients of determination, r(2), ≥0.9982. The calculated relative recoveries were between 71.52 and 96.15% whereas precision (based on % relative standard deviations) was between 3.54 and 11.36%. The method showed limit of detection and limit of quantification ranges of between 0.007 and 0.016μgL(-1), and between 0.023 and 0.054μgL(-1), for the two groups of analytes, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of the target analytes in water.

  8. Magnetic extraction of energy from black hole accretion disc and its application to astrophysics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Yong-Chn; Wang Ding-Xiong; Gong Xiao-Long

    2005-01-01

    A new configuration of magnetic field (NCMF) in black hole (BH) magnetosphere is proposed by considering the effects of the screw instability. Three mechanisms of extracting energy magnetically are involved in the NCMF: (1)the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process; (2) the magnetic coupling (MC) process; (3) a new scenario (henceforth the DL process) for extracting rotational energy from the disc, which is related to the open field lines connecting the disc with the astrophysical load. The expressions for the powers and torques of the above energy mechanisms are derived by using two kinds of the equivalent circuits. It turns out that the power and efficiency of extracting energy magnetically from the BH accretion disc are all augmented in the NCMF. It is shown that a very steep emissivity can be produced in a NCMF,which is consistent with the recent XMM-Newton observation of the nearby bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15.

  9. Effects of heated seat and foot heater on thermal comfort and heater energy consumption in vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Hajime; Yanagi, Kotaro; Tabata, Koji; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    Subjective experiments involving 12 different conditions were conducted to investigate the effects of heated seats and foot heaters in vehicles on thermal sensation and thermal comfort. The experimental conditions involved various combinations of the operative temperature in the test room (10 or 20°C), a heated seat (on/off) and a foot heater (room operative temperature +10 or +20°C). The heated seat and foot heater improved the occupant's thermal sensation and comfort in cool environments. The room operative temperature at which the occupants felt a 'neutral' overall thermal sensation was decreased by about 3°C by using the heated seat or foot heater and by about 6°C when both devices were used. Moreover, the effects of these devices on vehicle heater energy consumption were investigated using simulations. As a result, it was revealed that heated seats and foot heaters can reduce the total heater energy consumption of vehicles. Statement of Relevance: Subjective experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of heated seats and foot heaters in vehicles on thermal comfort. The heated seat and foot heater improved the occupant's thermal sensation and comfort in cool environments. These devices can reduce the total heater energy consumption in vehicles.

  10. Recent patents on nano-enhanced materials for use in thermal energy storage (TES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Luisa F; Ferrer, Gerard; Barreneche, Camila; Solé, Aran; Juliá, José Enrique

    2016-10-27

    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems using phase change materials (PCM) have been lately studied and are presented as one of the key solutions for the implementation of renewable energies. These systems take advantage of the latent heat of phase change of PCM during their melting/solidification processes to store or release heat depending on the needs and availability. Low thermal conductivity and latent heat are the main disadvantages of organic PCM, while corrosion, subcooling and thermal stability are the prime problems that inorganic PCM present. Nanotechnology can be used to overcome these drawbacks. Nano-enhanced PCM are obtained by the dispersion of nanoparticles in the base material and thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat capacity, within others, can be enhanced. This paper presents a review of the patents regarding the obtaining of nano-enhanced materials for thermal energy storage (TES) in order to realize the development nanotechnologies have gained in the TES field. Patents regarding the synthesis methods to obtain nano-enhanced phase materials (NEPCM) and TES systems using NEPCM have been found and are presented in the paper. The few existing number of patents found is a clear indicator of the recent and thus low development nanotechnology has in the TES field so far. Nevertheless, the results obtained with the reviewed inventions already show the big potential that nanotechnology has in TES and denote a more than probable expansion of its use in the next years.

  11. Microencapsulated n-octacosane as phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, Ahmet; Alkan, Cemil; Karaipekli, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey); Uzun, Orhan [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2009-10-15

    This study deals with preparation and characterization of polymethylmetracrylate (PMMA) microcapsules containing n-octacosane as phase change material for thermal energy storage. The surface morphology, particle size and particle size distribution (PSD) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical characterization of PMMA/octacosane microcapsules was made by FT-IR spectroscopy method. Thermal properties and thermal stability of microencapsulated octacosane were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The melting and freezing temperatures and the latent heats of the microencapsulated octacosane as PCM were measured as 50.6 and 53.2 C, 86.4 and -88.5 J/g, respectively, by DSC analysis. TGA analysis indicated that the microencapsulated octacosane degrade in two steps and had good chemical stability. Thermal cycling test shows that the microcapsules have good thermal reliability with respect to the accelerated thermal cycling. Based on the results, it can be considered that the microencapsulated octacosane have good energy storage potential. (author)

  12. Effect of Activation Energies on Thermal Explosion in the Interior of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Oladele Popoola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Literatures have shown that thermal processes in the interior of the earth and the classical thermal explosion are analogous and that combustion processes are characterized by ignition and explosion. The heat released during the thermal explosion that occurs in the interior of the earth requires more attention. Approach: The study investigated the role of activation energies ratio in the thermal explosion that occurs in the earth interior during gravitational differentiation. The study examined the effects of activation energies on the unsteady, steady and homogenous reactions of the resulting energy equation and provided the numerical and exact solutions of the equations. Results: The results showed that activation energies ratio has different implication in terms of heat release and established the criteria for the blow up to occur in two different homogenous reactions. It was observed that an increase in activation energies ratio increased the maximum temperature of the reactions but reduced the ignition time of the homogenous states. Conclusion: The results imply that for any non-zero second activation energy, ignition time lowers and more heat are released.

  13. Qualitative Screening Method for Impact Assessment of Uncertain Building Geometry on Thermal Energy Demand Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wate, P.; Coors, V.; Robinson, D.; Iglesias, M.

    2016-10-01

    Virtual 3D models of cities are now being extensively employed for the estimation of thermal energy demand at varying spatial and temporal scales. Efforts in preparing and management of the datasets required for the simulations have reached an advanced stage. Thus allowing to perform city scale simulations using simplified thermal energy balance models. However, the uncertainty inherent in datasets and the reliability of their data sources are often not given due consideration. Such consideration to the uncertainty problem would need a paradigm shift in simulation practices from a single value assignment to uncertainty characterization followed by assessment of qualitative and quantitative impact on the simulation results. The proposed study establishes a mechanism to handle the uncertainty arising from the building geometry reconstruction process and its possible consequences on the thermal energy demand calculations.

  14. Radiation Heat Transfer Modeling Improved for Phase-Change, Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Jacqmin, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Spacecraft solar dynamic power systems typically use high-temperature phase-change materials to efficiently store thermal energy for heat engine operation in orbital eclipse periods. Lithium fluoride salts are particularly well suited for this application because of their high heat of fusion, long-term stability, and appropriate melting point. Considerable attention has been focused on the development of thermal energy storage (TES) canisters that employ either pure lithium fluoride (LiF), with a melting point of 1121 K, or eutectic composition lithium-fluoride/calcium-difluoride (LiF-20CaF2), with a 1040 K melting point, as the phase-change material. Primary goals of TES canister development include maximizing the phase-change material melt fraction, minimizing the canister mass per unit of energy storage, and maximizing the phase-change material thermal charge/discharge rates within the limits posed by the container structure.

  15. Influence of Urban Microclimate on Air-Conditioning Energy Needs and Indoor Thermal Comfort in Houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Liao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A long-term climate measurement was implemented in the third largest city of Taiwan, for the check of accuracy of morphing approach on generating the hourly data of urban local climate. Based on observed and morphed meteorological data, building energy simulation software EnergyPlus was used to simulate the cooling energy consumption of an air-conditioned typical flat and the thermal comfort level of a naturally ventilated typical flat. The simulated results were used to quantitatively discuss the effect of urban microclimate on the energy consumption as well as thermal comfort of residential buildings. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for city planning and energy management divisions to study urban sustainability strategies in the future.

  16. Low Molecular Weight Norbornadiene Derivatives for Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quant, Maria; Lennartson, Anders; Dreos, Ambra; Kuisma, Mikael; Erhart, Paul; Börjesson, Karl; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2016-09-05

    Molecular solar-thermal energy storage systems are based on molecular switches that reversibly convert solar energy into chemical energy. Herein, we report the synthesis, characterization, and computational evaluation of a series of low molecular weight (193-260 g mol(-1) ) norbornadiene-quadricyclane systems. The molecules feature cyano acceptor and ethynyl-substituted aromatic donor groups, leading to a good match with solar irradiation, quantitative photo-thermal conversion between the norbornadiene and quadricyclane, as well as high energy storage densities (396-629 kJ kg(-1) ). The spectroscopic properties and energy storage capability have been further evaluated through density functional theory calculations, which indicate that the ethynyl moiety plays a critical role in obtaining the high oscillator strengths seen for these molecules.

  17. Efficient thermal desalination technologies with renewable energy systems: A state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esfahani, Iman Janghorban; Rashidi, Jouan; Ifaei, Pouya; Yoo, ChangKyoo [Center for Environmental Studies, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Due to the current fossil fuel crisis and associated adverse environmental impacts, renewable energy sources (RES) have drawn interest as alternatives to fossil fuels for powering water desalination systems. Over the last few decades the utility of renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, and wind to run desalination processes has been explored. However, the expansion of these technologies to larger scales is hampered by techno-economic and thermo-economic challenges. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the field of renewable energy-powered thermal desalination systems (RE-PTD) to compare their productivity and efficiency through thermodynamic, economic, and environmental analyses. We performed a comparative study using published data to classify RE-PTD systems technologies on the basis of the energy collection systems that they use. Among RE-PTD systems, solar energy powered-thermal desalination systems demonstrate high thermo-environ-economic efficiency to produce fresh water to meet various scales of demand.

  18. A Thermally-Regenerative Ammonia-Based Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Recovery from Waste Heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuping; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce

    2016-04-21

    Large amounts of low-grade waste heat (temperatures energy can be converted to electricity in battery systems. To improve reactor efficiency, a compact, ammonia-based flow battery (AFB) was developed and tested at different solution concentrations, flow rates, cell pairs, and circuit connections. The AFB achieved a maximum power density of 45 W m(-2) (15 kW m(-3) ) and an energy density of 1260 Wh manolyte (-3) , with a thermal energy efficiency of 0.7 % (5 % relative to the Carnot efficiency). The power and energy densities of the AFB were greater than those previously reported for thermoelectrochemical and salinity-gradient technologies, and the voltage or current could be increased using stacked cells. These results demonstrated that an ammonia-based flow battery is a promising technology to convert low-grade thermal energy to electricity.

  19. An evaluation of thermal energy storage options for precooling gas turbine inlet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1992-12-01

    Several approaches have been used to reduce the temperature of gas turbine inlet air. One of the most successful uses off-peak electric power to drive vapor-compression-cycle ice makers. The ice is stored until the next time high ambient temperature is encountered, when the ice is used in a heat exchanger to cool the gas turbine inlet air. An alternative concept would use seasonal thermal energy storage to store winter chill for inlet air cooling. The objective of this study was to compare the performance and economics of seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers with diurnal ice thermal energy storage for gas turbine inlet air cooling. The investigation consisted of developing computer codes to model the performance of a gas turbine, energy storage system, heat exchangers, and ancillary equipment. The performance models were combined with cost models to calculate unit capital costs and levelized energy costs for each concept. The levelized energy cost was calculated for three technologies in two locations (Minneapolis, Minnesota and Birmingham, Alabama). Precooling gas turbine inlet air with cold water supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage system provided lower cost electricity than simply increasing the size of the turbine for meteorological and geological conditions existing in the Minneapolis vicinity. A 15 to 20% cost reduction resulted for both 0.05 and 0.2 annual operating factors. In contrast, ice storage precooling was found to be between 5 and 20% more expensive than larger gas turbines for the Minneapolis location. In Birmingham, aquifer thermal energy storage precooling was preferred at the higher capacity factor and ice storage precooling was the best option at the lower capacity factor. In both cases, the levelized cost was reduced by approximately 5% when compared to larger gas turbines.

  20. Photovoltaic and thermal energy conversion for solar powered satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is provided concerning the most important aspects of present investigations related to a use of solar power satellites (SPS) as a future source of terrestrial energy. General SPS characteristics are briefly considered, early work is reviewed, and a description of current investigations is presented. System options presently under study include a photovoltaic array, a thermionic system, and a closed Brayton cycle. Attention is given to system reference options, basic building blocks, questions of system analysis and engineering, photovoltaic conversion, and the utility interface. It is concluded that an SPS may be cost effective compared to terrestrial systems by 1995.