WorldWideScience

Sample records for extracting actinide metal

  1. Actinide metal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage

  2. Actinide extraction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Dean R [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID

    2010-09-21

    Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

  3. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, Mark L.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage. The objective of this project is to develop novel, substituted diphosphonic acid ligands that can be used for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of actinide ions from solid wastes. Specifically, selected diphosphonic acids, which are known to form extremely stable complexes with actinides in aqueous and organic solution, are to be rendered carbon dioxide-soluble by the introduction of appropriate alkyl- or silicon-containing substituents. The metal complexation chemistry of these new ligands in SC-CO2 will then be investigated and techniques for their use in actinide extraction from porous solids developed

  4. Separations of actinides, lanthanides and other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ensor, Dale D.

    1995-01-01

    An organic extracting solution comprised of a bis(acylpyrazolone or a substituted bis(acylpyrazolone) and an extraction method useful for separating certain elements of the actinide series of the periodic table having a valence of four from one other, and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also useful for separating hexavalent actinides from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals.

  5. Extraction chromatography of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    1978-01-01

    Extraction chromatography of actinides in the oxidation state from 2 to 6 is reviewed. Data on using neutral (tbp), basic (substituted ammonium salts) and acidic [di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA)] extracting agents ketones, esters, alcohols and β-diketones in this method are given. Using the example of actinide separation using D2EHPA, discussed are factors influencing the efficiency of their chromatography separation (nature and particle size of the carrier materials, extracting agents amount on the carrier, temperature and elution rate)

  6. Extraction chromatogrpahy of actinides, ch. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.

    1975-01-01

    This review on extraction chromatography of actinides emphasizes the important usage of neutral (Tributylphosphate), basic (substituted ammonium salts), and acidic (HDEHP) extractants, and their application to separations of actinides in the di-to hexavalent oxidation state. Furthermore, the actinide extraction by ketones, ethers, alcohols and β-diketones is discussed

  7. Hybrid conducting polymer materials incorporating poly-oxo-metalates for extraction of actinides; Materiaux polymeres conducteurs hybrides incorporant des polyoxometallates pour l'extraction d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racimor, D

    2003-09-15

    The preparation and characterization of hybrid conducting polymers incorporating poly-oxo-metalates for extracting actinides is discussed. A study of the coordination of various lanthanide cations (Ce(III), Ce(IV), Nd(III)) by the mono-vacant poly-oxo-metalate {alpha}{sub 2}-[P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}]{sup 10-} showed significant differences according to the cation.. Various {alpha}-A-[PW{sub 9}O{sub 34}(RPO){sub 2}]{sup 5-} hybrids were synthesized and their affinity for actinides or lanthanides was demonstrated through complexation. The first hybrid poly-oxo-metallic lanthanide complexes were then synthesized, as was the first hybrid functionalized with a pyrrole group. The electro-polymerization conditions of this pyrrole remain still to be optimized. Poly-pyrrole materials incorporating {alpha}{sub 2}-[P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}]{sup 10-} or its neodymium or cerium complexes as doping agents proved to be the first conducting polymer incorporating poly-oxo-metalates capable of extracting plutonium from nitric acid. (author)

  8. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joan Brennecke; Mark Dietz; Richard Barrans; Alabert Herlinger

    2003-01-01

    Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effect method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage

  9. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  10. The removal of actinide metals from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.D.; Howell, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A process is specified for removing actinide metals (e.g. uranium) from solutions. The solution is contacted with a substrate comprising the product obtained by reacting an inorganic solid containing surface hydroxyl groups (e.g. silica gel) with a compound containing a silane grouping, a nitrogen-containing group (e.g. an amine) and other specified radicals. After treatment, the actinide metal is recovered from the substrate. (U.K.)

  11. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental photoelectron spectroscopic results for the actinide metals are reviewed and compared with the theoretical picture of the basic electronic structure that has been developed for the actinides during the last decade. In particular the experimental data confirm the change from...... itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  12. Benzene-centred tripodal diglycolamides for the sequestration of trivalent actinides: metal ion extraction and luminescence spectroscopic investigations in a room temperature ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Seraj Ahmad; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar; Leoncini, Andrea; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2017-08-29

    Three benzene-centred tripodal diglycolamide (Bz-T-DGA) ligands, where the diglycolamide (DGA) moieties are attached to a central benzene ring through ethylene spacers (LI), amide groups (LII) or ether linkages (LIII), were evaluated for their extraction behaviour towards trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions in a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), viz. 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide ([C 4 mim][Tf 2 N]). The extraction behaviour of these ligands in [C 4 mim][Tf 2 N] medium was compared with that obtained in the molecular solvent n-dodecane showing an opposite selectivity of LIII > LII > LIvs. LI > LII > LIII. In contrast to the n-dodecane medium, where a solvation extraction mechanism prevailed, a cation exchange mechanism was found to be operative in the RTIL medium. The stoichiometry of the extracted Am 3+ complex was found to be 1 : 2 (metal/ligand) and a nitrate ion was absent in the extracted complex. The luminescence spectroscopy of the Eu 3+ /ligand extracted complexes in the [C 4 mim][Tf 2 N] phase confirmed the absence of water molecules and that all the primary coordination sites of the metal ion are occupied by the ligands. The ligands display very large Pu/U, Am/U and Eu/U separation factor in the RTIL medium.

  13. Solid phase extraction of actinides using graphene oxide beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, R.B.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Separation of actinide ions from dilute nitric acid feed solutions is important from radioactive waste remediation point of view. A large number of separation methods are available in the literature using methods such as precipitation, ion-exchange, solvent extraction, etc. Graphene oxide (GO) are reported to be a very good sorbent for actinide ions from weakly acidic feed solutions. However, it is difficult to handle GO fine particles and any chromatographic separation is bound to be difficult as the sorbent material may be finely dispersed in the aqueous phase. It was thus thought of interest to prepare GO-based resin materials in polyether sulphone (PES) by phase inversion technique. Preparation of resins by phase inversion technique has been found to be quite efficient for metal ion separation including actinide ions. In the present work, GO based PES resin beads were prepared by phase inversion technique and the uptake of actinide and lanthanide ions. In the present work, GO based beads were prepared by phase inversion technique and the uptake of actinide and lanthanide ions (such as Am(III), Eu(III), Th(IV), Pu(IV) and U(VI)) has been studied using radiotracers

  14. Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol

  15. Recent progress in actinide and lanthanide solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Hubert, H.; Benjelloun, N.; Vitorge, P.; Bonnin, M.; Forchioni, A.; Chachaty, C.

    1983-04-01

    Work in progress on actinide solvent extraction is briefly reviewed in this paper. 1 H and 31 P NMR are used to elucidate several fundamental unsolved problems concerning organophosphorous extractants often used in actinides extraction: determination of site of dialkylthiophosphate protonation and addition of basic phosphine oxide to dibutylthiophosphoric acid dimer. Extraction of Am III and Eu from high radioactivity level wastes by tetrasubsituted methylene diamides is investigated. Trivalent actinide-lanthanide group are separated by solvent extraction using soft donor ligand complexes which are more stable. The synergism of dinonylnaphtalene sulfonic acid (HDNNS) associated with several neutral donors like TBP, TOPO, amides are examined in the trivalent and tetravalent actinide extraction

  16. Benzene-centred tripodal diglycolamides for the sequestration of trivalent actinides : Metal ion extraction and luminescence spectroscopic investigations in a room temperature ionic liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, Seraj Ahmad; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar; Leoncini, Andrea; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2017-01-01

    Three benzene-centred tripodal diglycolamide (Bz-T-DGA) ligands, where the diglycolamide (DGA) moieties are attached to a central benzene ring through ethylene spacers (LI), amide groups (LII) or ether linkages (LIII), were evaluated for their extraction behaviour towards trivalent actinide and

  17. Room temperature ionic liquids in actinide separations: extraction, chromatography and complexation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    In view of their large inventory and high radiotoxicities, actinide ion separation has great relevance in the safe management of radioactive wastes. Though solvent extraction based processes using molecular diluents are routinely used for actinide ion separations in nuclear fuel cycle activities, room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based diluents are becoming increasingly popular due to factors such as more efficient extraction, higher metal loading, higher radiation resistance, etc. The fascinating chemistry of the actinide ions in the RTIL based solvent systems due to complex extraction mechanisms makes it a challenging area of research. By suitable tuning of the cationic and anionic parts of the ionic liquids their physical properties such as density, dielectric constant and viscosity can be changed which are considered important in metal ion extraction. Studies on the complexation of the metal ions of interest in ionic liquids are needed to explain some unusually high extraction seen in RTILs. (author)

  18. Supercritical fluid extraction and separation of uranium from other actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Donna L; Mincher, Bruce J; Wai, Chien M

    2014-06-15

    The feasibility of separating U from nitric acid solutions of mixed actinides using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)-modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. The actinides U, Np, Pu, and Am were extracted into sc-CO2 modified with TBP from a range of nitric acid concentrations, in the absence of, or in the presence of, a number of traditional reducing and/or complexing agents to demonstrate the separation of these metals from U under sc-CO2 conditions. The separation of U from Pu using sc-CO2 was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) or oxalic acid (OA) to mitigate Pu extraction, and the separation of U from Np was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1M in the presence of AHA, OA, or sodium nitrite to mitigate Np extraction. Americium was not well extracted under any condition studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  20. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form

  1. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form

  2. Synergistic extraction of actinides : Part I. Hexa-and pentavalent actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.K.; Ramakrishna, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed discussion on the reported literature on the synergistic extraction of hexa- and pentavalent actinide ions, by different combinations of extractants and from different aqueous media, is presented. Structural aspects of the various complexes involved in synergism also are reviewed. A short account of the applications based on synergistic extraction is also given. (author)

  3. Functionalized ionic liquids: new agents for the extraction of actinides/lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouadi, A.; Hesemann, P.; Billard, I.; Gaillard, C.; Gadenne, B.; Moreau, Joel J.E; Moutiers, G.; Mariet, C.; Labet, A.

    2004-01-01

    The potentialities of hydrophobic ionic liquids BumimPF 6 and BumimTf 2 N for their use in the nuclear fuel cycle were investigated, in particular for the liquid liquid extraction. We demonstrate that the use of RTILs in replacement of the organic diluents for actinides partitioning is promising. In our contribution, we present the synthesis of several task-specific ionic liquids. Our results show that grafting metal complexing groups increases the affinity of metals to the IL phase and gives rise to suitable media for the liquid-liquid extraction of actinides. (authors)

  4. A review on solid phase extraction of actinides and lanthanides with amide based extractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Seraj A; Mohapatra, Prasanta K

    2017-05-26

    Solid phase extraction is gaining attention from separation scientists due to its high chromatographic utility. Though both grafted and impregnated forms of solid phase extraction resins are popular, the later is easy to make by impregnating a given organic extractant on to an inert solid support. Solid phase extraction on an impregnated support, also known as extraction chromatography, combines the advantages of liquid-liquid extraction and the ion exchange chromatography methods. On the flip side, the impregnated extraction chromatographic resins are less stable against leaching out of the organic extractant from the pores of the support material. Grafted resins, on the other hand, have a higher stability, which allows their prolong use. The goal of this article is a brief literature review on reported actinide and lanthanide separation methods based on solid phase extractants of both the types, i.e., (i) ligand impregnation on the solid support or (ii) ligand functionalized polymers (chemically bonded resins). Though the literature survey reveals an enormous volume of studies on the extraction chromatographic separation of actinides and lanthanides using several extractants, the focus of the present article is limited to the work carried out with amide based ligands, viz. monoamides, diamides and diglycolamides. The emphasis will be on reported applied experimental results rather than on data pertaining fundamental metal complexation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extraction of tetravalent and hexavalent actinide ions by tetraheptylammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarup, Rajendra; Patil, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    Extraction of Th(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV), U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) by tetraheptylammonium nitrate in Solvesso-100 has been studied from nitric acid medium. Attempts were made to identify the complex species in the organic phase by studying the dependence of the distribution coefficient of the actinide on amine concentration and taking the absorption spectra of the organic phase containing actinide ions. A compound tetraheptylammonium trinitratodioxouranate (VI) has been isolated and characterised. (author)

  6. Actinide ion extraction using room temperature ionic liquids: opportunities and challenges for nuclear fuel cycle applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-02-14

    Studies on the extraction of actinide ions from radioactive feeds have great relevance in nuclear fuel cycle activities, mainly in the back end processes focused on reprocessing and waste management. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based diluents are becoming increasingly popular due to factors such as more efficient extraction vis-à-vis molecular diluents, higher metal loading, higher radiation resistance, etc. The fascinating chemistry of the actinide ions in RTIL based solvent systems due to complex extraction mechanisms makes it a challenging area of research. By the suitable tuning of the cationic and anionic parts of the ionic liquids, their physical properties such as density, dielectric constant and viscosity can be changed which are considered key parameters in metal ion extraction. Aqueous solubility of the RTILs, which can lead to significant loss in the solvent inventory, can be avoided by appending the extractant moieties onto the ionic liquid. While the low vapour pressure and non-flammability of the ionic liquids make them appear as 'green' diluents, their aqueous solubility raises concerns of environmental hazards. The present article gives a summary of studies carried out on actinide ion extraction and presents perspectives of its applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. The article discusses various extractants used for actinide ion extraction and at many places, comparison is made vis-à-vis molecular diluents which includes the nature of the extracted species and the mechanism of extraction. Results of studies on rare earth elements are also included in view of their similarities with the trivalent minor actinides.

  7. Some aspects of synergistic extraction of actinides and lanthanides from mixed aqueous-organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, J.P.; Subramanian, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Various aspects of the synergistic extraction and separation of actinides and lanthanides from mixed aqueous-organic solutions (polar media) have been reviewed. Notable recent developments as well as its current status in solvent extraction systems where the aqueous acidic phase contains an organic solvent which is completely miscible with water, are presented briefly. In general, extraction increases in the presence of an organic component. The less polar the additive, the higher is the tendency to form neutral metal complexes which ultimately brings about an increase in the extraction. In a polar media, synergism has mostly been observed, though antagonism is not uncommon. An attempt has been made to classify the factors that play an important role in polar phase extractions. Also, their influence particularly on the extractability of actinides and lanthanides is discussed. The discussion is limited to the factors affecting the extraction equilibria, effect of dielectric constant of the polar medium, solvation of the extracting agent and to the composition and stability of the metal complex in the organic phase. Hydroxyl (OHsup(-)) bearing organic additives, e.g. alcohols, and solvents not containing the hydroxyl group such as acetone, dimethylsulphoxide, tetrahydrofuran, amides and acetonitrile etc. are the two major classes of organic additives considered in these studies. Generally, synergistic effect in extraction of the ion-association (TBP, TOPO, sulphoxides etc.) or anion exchange (amines etc.) type is relatively more pronounced compared to other extractions. A tabular summary concerning extraction of actinides and lanthanides from polar media is appended for ready reference. (author)

  8. Extraction of DBP and MBP from actinides: application to the recovery of actinides from TBP-sodium carbonate scrub solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Mason, G.W.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.; Leonard, R.A.; Bernstein, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP-Na 2 CO 3 scrub waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory scale counter-current extraction techniques. The process, called the ARALEX process, utilizes 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H 2 MBP) from acidified Na 2 CO 3 scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H 2 MBP to complex actinides and thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The ARALEX process is relatively simple and involves inexpensive and readily available chamicals. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction procedures. One such application is the removal of detergents from laundry or clean-up solutions contaminated with actinides

  9. Extraction characteristics of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in mixtures of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid and carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    Dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) has been shown to be an effective liquid cation exchanger for the extraction of metal ions. This extractant has proven to be successful in the extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in the pH range of 2.0 to 3.0, although it shows little selectivity for individual ions because of its strong acid character. In an effort to improve the selectivity of HDNNS between trivalent lanthanides and actinides, carboxylic acids were added to the organic phase and the effects on the extraction characteristics of HDNNS were investigated. Three carboxylic acids - nonanoic, cyclohexanecarboxylic, and cyclohexanebutyric - were studied with the following metals: Am(III), Cm(III), Ce(III), Eu(III), and Tm(III). The distributions of the metal ions were studied holding the HDNNS concentration constant while varying the carboxylic acid concentrations over a range of 1.0 x 10 -5 M to 1.0 M. Results indicated that the greatest enhancement of the extraction occurred at a carboxylic acid concentration of 1.0 x 10 -2 M with negative effects occurring at 0.5 M and 1.0 M. The effects on the extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and actinides were interpreted in terms of the structural differences of the carboxylic acids, the effect of the carboxylic acids on the HDNNS extraction mechanism, and the ionic properties of the metals studied

  10. Hydrophilic actinide complexation studied by solvent extraction radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg, J.

    1996-10-01

    Actinide migration in the ground water is enhanced by the formation of water soluble complexes. It is essential to the risk analysis of a wet repository to know the concentration of central atoms and the ligands in the ground water, and the stability of complexes formed between them. Because the chemical behavior at trace concentrations often differ from that at macro concentrations, it is important to know the chemical behavior of actinides at trace concentrations in ground water. One method used for such investigations is the solvent extraction radiotracer (SXRT) technique. This report describes the SXRT technique in some detail. A particular reason for this analysis is the claim that complex formation constants obtained by SXRT are less reliable than results obtained by other techniques. It is true that several difficulties are encountered in the application of SXRT technique to actinide solution, such as redox instability, hydrophilic complexation by side reactions and sorption, but it is also shown that a careful application of the SXRT technique yields results as reliable as by any other technique. The report contains a literature survey on solvent extraction studies of actinide complexes formed in aqueous solutions, particularly by using the organic reagent thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) dissolved in benzene or chloroform. Hydrolysis constants obtained by solvent extraction are listed as well as all actinide complexes studied by SX with inorganic and organic ligands. 116 refs, 11 tabs

  11. Development of the Chalmers Grouped Actinide Extraction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halleröd Jenny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several solvents for Grouped ActiNide EXtraction (GANEX processes have been investigated at Chalmers University of Technology in recent years. Four different GANEX solvents; cyclo-GANEX (CyMe4- -BTBP, 30 vol.% tri-butyl phosphate (TBP and cyclohexanone, DEHBA-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 20 vol.% N,N-di-2(ethylhexyl butyramide (DEHBA and cyclohexanone, hexanol-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and hexanol and FS-13-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and phenyl trifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13 have been studied and the results are discussed and compared in this work. The cyclohexanone based solvents show fast and high extraction of the actinides but a somewhat poor diluent stability in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. FS-13-GANEX display high separation factors between the actinides and lanthanides and a good radiolytic and hydrolytic stability. However, the distribution ratios of the actinides are lower, compared to the cyclohexanone based solvents. The hexanol-GANEX is a cheap solvent system using a rather stable diluent but the actinide extraction is, however, comparatively low.

  12. Hydrophilic actinide complexation studied by solvent extraction radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Consultant Group, Vaestra Froelunda (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Actinide migration in the ground water is enhanced by the formation of water soluble complexes. It is essential to the risk analysis of a wet repository to know the concentration of central atoms and the ligands in the ground water, and the stability of complexes formed between them. Because the chemical behavior at trace concentrations often differ from that at macro concentrations, it is important to know the chemical behavior of actinides at trace concentrations in ground water. One method used for such investigations is the solvent extraction radiotracer (SXRT) technique. This report describes the SXRT technique in some detail. A particular reason for this analysis is the claim that complex formation constants obtained by SXRT are less reliable than results obtained by other techniques. It is true that several difficulties are encountered in the application of SXRT technique to actinide solution, such as redox instability, hydrophilic complexation by side reactions and sorption, but it is also shown that a careful application of the SXRT technique yields results as reliable as by any other technique. The report contains a literature survey on solvent extraction studies of actinide complexes formed in aqueous solutions, particularly by using the organic reagent thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) dissolved in benzene or chloroform. Hydrolysis constants obtained by solvent extraction are listed as well as all actinide complexes studied by SX with inorganic and organic ligands. 116 refs, 11 tabs.

  13. Kinetic of liquid-liquid extraction for uranyl nitrate and actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates by amide extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulemonde, V.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 -Marcoule

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of liquid-liquid extraction by amide extractants have been investigated for uranyl nitrate (monoamide extractants), actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates (diamide extractants). The transfer of the metallic species from the aqueous phase to the organic phase was studied using two experimental devices: ARMOLLEX (Argonne Modified Lewis cell for Liquid Liquid Extraction) and RSC (Rotating Stabilized Cell). The main conclusions are: for the extraction of uranyl nitrate by DEHDMBA monoamide, the rate-controlling step is the complexation of the species at the interface of the two liquids. Thus, an absorption-desorption (according to Langmuir theory) reaction mechanism was proposed; for the extraction of actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates in nitric acid media by DMDBTDMA diamide, the kinetic is also limited by interfacial reactions. The behavior of Americium and Europium is very similar as fare as their reaction kinetics are concerned. (author)

  14. Casting of metallic fuel containing minor actinide additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, C.L.; Henslee, S.P.; Sanecki, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A significant attribute of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is the transmutation of long-lived minor actinide fission products. These isotopes require isolation for thousands of years, and if they could be removed from the waste, disposal problems would be reduced. The IFR utilizes pyroprocessing of metallic fuel to separate auranium, plutonium, and the minor actinides from nonfissionable constituents. These materials are reintroduced into the fuel and reirradiated. Spent IFR fuel is expected to contain low levels of americium, neptunium, and curium because the hard neutron spectrum should transmute these isotopes as they are produced. This opens the possibility of using an IFR to trnasmute minor actinide waste from conventional light water reactors (LWRs). A standard IFR fuel is based on the alloy U-20% Pu-10% Zr (in weight percent). A metallic fuel system eases the requirements for reprocessing methods and enables the minor actinide metals to be incorporated into the fuel with simple modifications to the basic fuel casting process. In this paper, the authors report the initial casting experience with minor actinide element addition to an IFR U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel

  15. Actinide extraction by substituted amides or diamides from carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.; Morisseau, J.C.; Hoel, P.; Guillaume, B.

    1987-01-01

    Amides are studied for use in reprocessing, these solvents can be incinerated and radiolytic degradation have no effect on the process. Main research fields are: 1) Monoamides type RCONR 2 allow U (VI) and Pu (IV) extraction like TBP. Ramified R and R' increase the amount of U extracted, the selectivity U/Pu and U + Pu/Fission products. A counter current test gave encouraging results. 2) Diamides for trivalent actinide extraction from radioactive wastes and especially malonamides. Extraction coefficient in function of HNO 3 concentration are measured for Am (III), En (III), Pu (IV), U (VI) and Zr (IV). Zr should be complexed in aqueous phase to avoid extraction with actinides. Selection of solvent is not yet possible but amides are interesting as alternate extractants [fr

  16. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...

  17. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have estimated the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Fr and Ra plus the light actinides Ac through Pu. The underlying self-consistent band-structure calculations were performed by the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method including l quantum numbers s through g......-phonon parameter λ is found to attain its maximum value in Ac, and they predict a transition temperature of 9K for this metal. In the light actinides Th through Pu, λ is found to be of order 0.4 and within a factor of 2 of experiments which is also the accuracy found in studies of the transition metals...

  18. Protactinium and the intersection of actinide and transition metal chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Richard E.; De Sio, Stephanie; Vallet, Valérie

    2018-02-12

    The role of the 5f and 6d orbitals in the chemistry of the actinide elements has been of considerable interest since their discovery and synthesis. Relativistic effects cause the energetics of the 5f and 6d orbitals to change as the actinide series is traversed left to right imparting a rich and complex chemistry. The 5f and 6d atomic states cross in energy at protactinium (Pa), making it a potential intersection between transition metal and actinide chemistries. Herein, we report the synthesis of a Pa-peroxo cluster, A(6)(Pa4O(O-2)(6)F-12) [A = Rb, Cs, (CH3)(4)N], formed in pursuit of an actinide polyoxometalate. Quantum chemical calculations at the density functional theory level demonstrate equal 5f and 6d orbital participation in the chemistry of Pa and increasing 5f orbital participation for the heavier actinides. Periodic changes in orbital character to the bonding in the early actinides highlights the influence of the 5f orbitals in their reactivity and chemical structure.

  19. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  20. Selective solvent extraction of actinides associated to liquid scintillation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardois, C.; Musikas, C.

    1997-01-01

    The problems associated to radioactive waste disposal have acquired a special attention due, particularly, to the element instability and, consequently, to their lixiviation and to their peculiarities which are essential in the radioactivity penetration in the food chains; the other important parameters are the produced amounts and the noxiousnesses. New commercial liquid scintillation counters allow rapid α/β measurements. Associated with liquid-liquid extraction techniques, rapid and selective actinide analyses are possible. Among various actinide extractants, such as amines or organophosphorus compounds, we were particularly interested in tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide (TOPO). Uranium, thorium and americium extractions with (TOPO) in toluene have been investigated. A systematic study of the counting parameters of a PACKARD 2550 TR/AB TM liquid scintillation analyzer is under completion

  1. The effect of high pressures on actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1987-01-01

    The solid state properties of the actinides are controlled by the dualism of the localized and itinerant (delocalized) configuration of the 5f electrons. This dualism allows to define two main subgroups. At ambient pressures the first subgroup, of elements with atomic number 91 to 94, is characterized by 5f electrons in an itinerant state and the second subgroup, atomic number 95 to 98, by 5f electrons in a localized state. The latter means that these electrons have well defined energy levels and do not contribute to the metallic bond. The other two subgroups consist of thorium, as a subgroup of its own because its 5f levels are practically unoccupied in the ground state configuration, and of the five heaviest elements with atomic number 99 to 103. The most remarkable effect of pressure on the actinide metals is that due to closer contact between the lattice atoms, localized 5f electrons can become itinerant, hybridise with the conduction electrons and participate in the metallic bond. In this chapter the high-pressure structural behaviour of actinide metals is reviewed. Section 3 gives an introduction into the techniques of generating and measuring pressure and of determining various physical properties of the actinides under pressure and describes a few high-pressure devices and methods. Sections 4 to 7 treat the high-pressure results for each subgroup separately. In section 8 the results of the preceding sections are brought together in a graphical representation which consists of interconnecting binary phase diagrams of neighbouring actinide metals. 155 refs.; 14 figs.; 7 tabs. (H.W.)

  2. Advances in Metallic Fuels for High Burnup and Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S. L.; Harp, J. M.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Fielding, R. S.; Mariani, R. D.; Carmack, W. J.

    2016-10-01

    Research and development activities on metallic fuels in the US are focused on their potential use for actinide transmutation in future sodium fast reactors. As part of this application, there is a desire to demonstrate a multifold increase in burnup potential. A number of metallic fuel design innovations are under investigation with a view toward significantly increasing the burnup potential of metallic fuels, since higher discharge burnups equate to lower potential actinide losses during recycle. Promising innovations under investigation include: 1) lowering the fuel smeared density in order to accommodate the additional swelling expected as burnups increase, 2) utilizing an annular fuel geometry for better geometrical stability at low smeared densities, as well as the potential to eliminate the need for a sodium bond, and 3) minor alloy additions to immobilize lanthanide fission products inside the metallic fuel matrix and prevent their transport to the cladding resulting in fuel-cladding chemical interaction. This paper presents results from these efforts to advance metallic fuel technology in support of high burnup and actinide transmutation objectives. Highlights include examples of fabrication of low smeared density annular metallic fuels, experiments to identify alloy additions effective in immobilizing lanthanide fission products, and early postirradiation examinations of annular metallic fuels having low smeared densities and palladium additions for fission product immobilization.

  3. Solid phase extraction of actinides using polymeric beads impregnated with TODGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, R.B.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Separation of minor actinides from HLW is necessary prior to the vitrification of the latter in the glass matrix. A number of solvent extraction processes such as TRUEX, TRPO and DIAMEX have been developed which employed CMPO, TRPO and DMDBTDMA, respectively as the extractants for minor actinides. Recently, TODGA has been found to be most efficient extractant of minor actinides due to its ability to form stronger complexes. In view of large solvent inventory in the solvent extraction methods, extraction chromatography based separation methods which utilize very small amounts of the extractant can be used as an alternative technique. However, the main drawback of such separation methods is slow deterioration of the uptake efficiency due to leaching out of the extractants. Therefore, use of extractant blended polymeric beads can have faster metal ion uptake while having longer reusability of the beads. There have been several reports on the preparation of polymeric beads for metal ion sorption. In present paper, uptake of actinide ion by polymeric beads containing four different proportions of TODGA was studied. The polymeric beads were used for the experiments involving the uptake of Am(III) at different nitric acid concentration at tracer scale and the results are listed. It was found that K d values were in the range of 1x10 4 to 2x10 4 in the given range of acidity. The results are in sharp contrast with the results obtained with the extraction chromatographic resin used in a previous study. We have also carried out actinide ion uptake studies involving the kinetics of metal ion sorption, adsorption isotherm and column studies. The metal ion sorption capacities for Eu (III) were found to be 6.6(±0.3), 9.1 (±0.5), 20.4 (±1.2), and 22.3(±1.4), for the above four resins, respectively. Column studies were also carried out using 6 ml of bed volume, columns containing about 0.6 to 0.7 gm of resin. The breaks through profiles were obtained using 0.01 M EDTA as the

  4. Lanthanides and actinides extraction by calixarenes containing CMPO groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Carrera, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French program SPIN concerning the radioactive waste management, researches are performed to develop processes allowing the separation of long-lived radioisotopes in order to their transmutation or their specific conditioning. These studies deal with the extraction and the separation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in acid solution. Many systems ''calixarene-diluent-aqueous phase'' are examined by extraction liquid-liquid and membrane transport. The extraction efficiency and the selectivity of the synthesized calixarene-CMPO and of the CMPO are compared with these cations, as the nitric acid extraction by these molecules. (A.L.B.)

  5. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  6. Development of pyrometallurgical partitioning of actinides from high-level radioactive waste using a reductive extraction step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijikata, Takatoshi; Sakata, Masahiro; Miyashiro, Hajime; Kinoshita, Kensuke; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Tamai, Tadaharu

    1996-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) from reprocessing (Purex) light water reactor spent fuel contains a small number of long-lived nuclides, mainly actinide elements, having half-lives of longer than one million years. If actinide elements could be separated from HLW and transmuted to short-lived nuclides, not only would waste management be much simpler but also public support for nuclear power generation might be easier to obtain. Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan, has proposed a pyrometallurgical process to separate actinides from HLW. When the solvent used in the Purex process is reclaimed by NaCO 3 and NaOH, a waste stream containing sodium with fission products and actinides is produced also. The focus of CRIEPI is the disposal of HLW from both the Purex and the solvent rinse processes. In this concept, HLW is converted to chlorides, the actinides as molten chlorides are reduced by lithium metal and extracted into liquid cadmium, and finally, the actinides are purified by electrorefining. However, in the extraction of actinides into liquid cadmium, some of the rare earth elements are expected to be recovered together with the actinides because of their chemical similarity. Thus, it is necessary to obtain thermodynamic data of the actinides and rare earth elements in molten chlorides and liquid cadmium. The distribution coefficients for uranium, neptunium, and rare earth elements are determined in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt/liquid cadmium (LiCl-KCl system) and molten LiCl-NaCl salt/liquid cadmium (LiCl-NaCl system) systems. The equilibrium distribution of uranium, neptunium, and rare earth elements is also calculated based on the Gibbs energies of formation of the metal chlorides and their activity coefficients in molten salts and cadmium

  7. Synthesis and characterization of tetravalent actinide orthophosphates with alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Yu.F.; Melkaya, R.F.; Spiryakov, V.I.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    A series of double phosphates of formula AM 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , where A = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs; M = U, Np, Pu, is prepared by solid-state reactions. Various polymorphic modifications of AM 2 (PO 4 ) 3 are identified by using X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopic analyses of the products from stepwise annealing. The crystal structure type, thermal stability of the modifications, and nature of the polymorphic transformations depend on the nature of the actinide and alkali metal

  8. Extraction of actinides and fission products ions by non-chelating N,N'-tetraalkyldiamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, M.C.; Musikas, C.

    1986-09-01

    N,N-dialkylmonoamides, are good extractants of metallic ions. They were considered as alternative to TBP in nuclear fuels reprocessing. The present paper deals with the extractive properties of N,N'-tetrabutylglutaramide. N,N'-tetraalkyldiamides of dicarboxylic acids except malonamides do not extract the trivalent actinides and lanthanides from aqueous HNO, solutions probably because there is no favourable ligand conformation to chelate the metallic ions. This feature is interesting for the nuclear fuel reprocessing since the presence of a second amide group could lead to new selectivities and to radiolytic and solvolytic degradation products easier to handle. We will present the investigation results of HNO 3 U(VI), Pu(IV) and fission products extraction by TBGA in toluene from HNO 3 aqueous solution. 5 figs, 6 refs

  9. Development of extraction and separation method of total actinides using TODGA (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yuji; Sugo, Yumi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Takaumi

    2009-05-01

    As a separation step of an innovative chemical separation process (ARTIST process) for treatment of spent nuclear fuel, the condition to extract TRU using TODGA was studied. TODGA has strong affinity with trivalent and tetravalent actinides, so Pu(IV), Am(III), Cm(III) and lanthanide ions can be extracted effectively from nitric acid. The oxidation state of Np and Pu can be changed quantitatively to Np(IV) and Pu(III) using ascorbic acid. After extraction of TRU, it is important to know the appropriate condition of stripping TRU from the organic phase. N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-diglycolamide (TMDGA) has high affinity with An(III) and An(IV) in the aqueous phase. It was found that Np(IV), Pu(IV) and Am(III) could be effectively back-extracted with TMDGA in 0.2M HNO 3 from TODGA/n-dodecane. Using the D values obtained, the chemical separation flow-sheet for actinides and Sr was designed. The flow rate of aqueous and organic phases, and stage number of mixer-settler were determined in order to obtain the optimum condition for TRU and Sr separations. The amounts of metals on each fraction after separation were calculated and TRU extraction process was discussed from the viewpoints of the amount of metal oxide, heat generation and radioactivities. (author)

  10. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Dominic S; Montoya, Velma M

    2009-08-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on capillary extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study, we compare 30-cm long, 4.6 mm i.d. columns to capillary columns (750 microm i.d.) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ((232)Th, (238)U, (237)Np, (239)Pu, and (241)Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as automated separations of actinide materials.

  11. New conceptual process for the extraction of actinides based on oxapentane-diamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Chen; Shuwei Wang

    2007-01-01

    Several diamide derivates were synthesized in our laboratory. The extraction of actinides and some fission products by these compounds were studied. N,N,N',N'-tetra-(2-ethylhexyl)-3-oxa pentanediamide (TEHOPDA) was proven to be a suitable extractant for the removal of actinides from nitric acid solution. The actinides can be stripped from the loaded solvent by the dilute nitric acid. TEHOPDA showed a high loading capacity to actinides and lanthanides with a mixture of n-octanol and kerosene as the diluent. Considering the effective-extraction and easy-stripping of actinides, 0.25 mol/l TEHOPDA - 30% n-octanol + 70% kerosene was selected as the solvent. A cascade extraction experiment was carried out with the simulated dissolver solution of spend fuel as feed. 99.99% U and 99.999% Am, Pu, and Np were extracted in a 4-stage test. Based on the experimental results, a conceptual reprocessing process was proposed. (author)

  12. Selective extraction of actinides by calixarenes: application to bioassay analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulet, B.

    2006-01-01

    In the context of nuclear workers monitoring, the aim of this PhD was to selectively isolate U, Pu, and Am from urine to propose a new analytical procedure to the Medical and Biology Analysis Laboratories. The 1,3,5-OCH 3 -2,4,6-OCH 2 CONHOH-p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene molecule has been selected as a promising extractant for U, Pu, and Am. Its physico-chemical properties and its affinity for UO 2 2+ have been studied through two approaches, one theoretical (molecular modelling at DFT level), and one experimental. The extractions of the three actinides by the hydroxamic calix[6]arene were quantitative in liquid-liquid and solid-liquid systems. Their separation has also been shown possible and efficient. After optimization, the proposed procedure should allow the laboratories to carry out the chemical treatment of urine, before the measurement, in one day instead of the three days needed nowadays. (author)

  13. Experimental and theoretical studies on extraction of actinides and lanthanides by alicyclic H-phosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annam, Suresh; Sivaramakrishna, Akella; Vijayakrishna, Kari [VIT Univ., Tamil Nadu (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Gopakumar, Gopinadhanpillai; Rao, C.V.S. Brahmmananda; Sivaraman, N. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Tamil Nadu (India). Chemistry Group

    2017-06-01

    Three different alicyclic substituents H-phosphonates, namely, dicyclopentyl H-phosphonate, dicyclohexyl H-phosphonate and dimenthyl H-phosphonate were synthesized and used for liquid-liquid extraction of actinide elements (U, Am and Th) and lanthanide (Gd) in n-dodecane from nitric acid medium. The physicochemical properties of the extractants, such as density, viscosity, solubility were determined. At lower acidities, these H-phosphonates exhibit higher distribution values and the extraction following cation exchange mechanism through P-OH group of tri-coordinated phosphite form. At higher acidities (2N), the extraction is primarily via solvation mechanism through P=O group of penta-coordinated phosphonate form. Amongst the three H-phosphonates, examined dimenthyl H-phosphonate showed the best results for the actinide extraction. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were applied to understand the electronic structure of the ligands and the metal complexes. The calculated large complexation energy of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.@2DMnHP is in agreement with the observed trend in experimental distribution ratio data.

  14. Liquid-liquid extraction kinetics of uranyl nitrate and actinides (III)-lanthanides nitrates by extractants with amide function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulemonde, V.

    1995-01-01

    Nowadays, the most important part of electric power is generated by fission energy. But spent fuels have then to be reprocessed. The production of these reprocessed materials separately and with a high purity level is done according to a liquid-liquid extraction process (Purex process) with the use of tributyl phosphate as solvent. Optimization studies concerning the extracting agent have been undertaken. This work gives the results obtained for the uranyl nitrate and the actinides (III)-lanthanides (III) nitrates extraction by extractants with amide function (monoamide for U(VI) and diamide for actinides (III) and lanthanides (III)). The extraction kinetics have been studied in the case of a metallic specie transfer from the aqueous phase towards the organic phase. The experiments show that the nitrates extraction kinetics is limited by the complexation chemical reaction of the species at the interface between the two liquids. An adsorption-desorption interfacial reactional mechanism (Langmuir theory) is proposed for the uranyl nitrate. (O.M.)

  15. The selective extraction of oxidized minor actinides: a possible route for the Actinex program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnet, J.M.; Brossard, P.; Bourges, J.

    1993-01-01

    In the SPIN programme, defined by CEA to improve the management of high level nuclear waste, a part called ACTINEX is specially devoted to the extraction of long-lived alpha emitters and fission products from high level liquid waste issuing from the PUREX process. Concerning the actinides elements, as U and Pu are already recovered, the main objective to reach is now the quantitative extraction of Np and Am. The transmutation of these recovered actinides into short-lived radionuclides is then forecast. This paper deals with the possibilities to define a minor actinides partitioning process based on the selective extraction of actinides oxidized to their oxidation states higher than three. It essentially focuses on americium chemistry. Finally, two general separation scheme for minor actinide partitioning are proposed and discussed. (authors). 5 figs., 13 refs

  16. Extraction of DBP and MBP from actinides: application to the recovery of actinides from TBP--Na2CO3 scrub solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Mason, G.W.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.; Leonard, R.A.; Bernstein, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP--Na 2 CO 3 scrub waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory scale counter-current extraction techniques. The process utilizes 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H 2 MBP) from acidified Na 2 CO 3 scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H 2 MBP to complex actinides and thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The alcohol extraction (ARALEX) process is relatively simple and involves inexpensive and readily available chemicals. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid--liquid extraction procedures

  17. First-principles phase stability, bonding, and electronic structure of actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Söderlind, Per

    2014-01-01

    The actinide elemental metals are scare, often toxic and radio active, causing challenges for both experiments and theory while offering fascinating physics. For practical purposes they are the prevalent building blocks for materials where nuclear properties are of interest. Here, however, we are focusing on fundamental properties of the actinides related to their electronic structure and characteristic bonding in the condensed state. The series of actinides is naturally divided into two segments. First, the set of lighter actinides thorium through plutonium, often referred to as the early actinides, displays a variation of the atomic volume reminiscent of what is seen in transition metals, suggesting a gradual occupation of bonding 5f states. Second, the heavier (late) actinides, Am and onwards, demonstrate volume behaviors comparable to the rare-earth metals that implies nonbonding 5f states. Arguably, one can distinguish plutonium metal as special case lying between these two subsets because it shares some features from both. Therefore, we discuss the early actinides, plutonium metal, and the late actinides separately applying first-principles density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations. The analysis includes successes and failures of the theory to describe primarily phase stability, bonding, and electronic structure

  18. The chemistry of molten salt mixtures: application to the reductive extraction of lanthanides and actinides by a liquid metal; Chimie des melanges de sels fondus. Application a l'extraction reductrice d'actinides et de lanthanides par un metal liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finne, J

    2005-10-15

    The design of a process of An/Ln separation by liquid - liquid extraction can be used for on-line purification of the molten salt in a molten salt nuclear reactor (Generation IV) as well as reprocessing various spent fuels. In order to establish the chemical properties of An and Ln in molten salt mediums, E - pO{sub 2} - diagrams were established for the relevant chemical elements. With the purpose of checking the possibilities of separating the An from Ln, the real activity coefficients in liquid metals were measured. An experimental protocol was developed and validated on the Gd/Ga system. It was then transferred to radioactive environment to measure the activity coefficient of Pu in Ga. The results made it possible to estimate the effectiveness of the Pu extraction and its separation from Gd and Ce. The selectivity was shown to decrease with the temperature and Al and Ga showed a good selectivity between Pu and the Ce in fluoride medium. (author)

  19. Functionalization of mesoporous materials for lanthanide and actinide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Justyna; Giret, Simon; Juère, Estelle; Larivière, Dominic; Kleitz, Freddy

    2016-10-14

    Among the energy sources currently available that could address our insatiable appetite for energy and minimize our CO2 emission, solar, wind, and nuclear energy currently occupy an increasing portion of our energy portfolio. The energy associated with these sources can however only be harnessed after mineral resources containing valuable constituents such as actinides (Ac) and rare earth elements (REEs) are extracted, purified and transformed into components necessary for the conversion of energy into electricity. Unfortunately, the environmental impacts resulting from their manufacture including the generation of undesirable and, sometimes, radioactive wastes and the non-renewable nature of the mineral resources, to name a few, have emerged as challenges that should be addressed by the scientific community. In this perspective, the recent development of functionalized solid materials dedicated to selective elemental separation/pre-concentration could provide answers to several of the above-mentioned challenges. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of mesoporous solid-phase (SP) sorbents designed for REEs and Ac liquid-solid extraction. Particular attention will be devoted to silica and carbon sorbents functionalized with commonly known ligands, such as phosphorus or amide-containing functionalities. The extraction performances of these new systems are discussed in terms of sorption capacity and selectivity. In order to support potential industrial applications of the silica and carbon-based sorbents, their main drawbacks and advantages are highlighted and discussed.

  20. The electrodeposition and rare earths reduction in the molten salt actinides recovery systems using liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, J-B.; Lee, J-H.; Kwon, S-W.; Ahn, B-G.; Woo, M-S.; Lee, B-J.; Kim, E-H.; Park, H-S.; Yoo, J-H.

    2005-01-01

    A pyrochemical partitioning system uses liquid metals such as cadmium and bismuth in order to recover the actinide metals from a molten salt mixture containing rare earth fission product metals. The liquid metals play roles as a cathode in the electrowinning or an extracting phase in the reductive extraction operation. The product resulting from the above operations is metal-cadmium or-bismuth alloy, which should contain the rare earth element amounts as low as possible for a transmutation purpose. In this study, the electrodeposition behaviours of uranium and lanthanide elements such as La, Ce and Nd were investigated for solid molybdenum and liquid cadmium electrodes in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Electrochemical methods used are a cyclic voltammetry (CV) and a chronopotentiometry for monitoring the salt phase and recovering the metals, respectively. The CV graphs for monitoring the oxidizing agent CdCl 2 in the salt phase were obtained. These show a time dependently disappearance of the oxidizing agent corresponding to the formation of UCl 3 by inserting the uranium metal into the salt. Also, a sequential oxidation technique which is added at a controlled amount of the oxidizing agents into the salt phase was applied. It was found that this method is feasible for the selective reduction of the rare earths content in liquid metal alloys. (author)

  1. Kinetic of liquid-liquid extraction for uranyl nitrate and actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates by amide extractants; Cinetique d`extraction liquide-liquide du nitrate d`uranyle et des nitrates d`actinides (III) et de lanthanides (III) par des extractants a fonction amide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulemonde, V. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 -Marcoule (France). Dept. d`Exploitation du Retraitement et de Demantelement

    1995-12-20

    The kinetics of liquid-liquid extraction by amide extractants have been investigated for uranyl nitrate (monoamide extractants), actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates (diamide extractants). The transfer of the metallic species from the aqueous phase to the organic phase was studied using two experimental devices: ARMOLLEX (Argonne Modified Lewis cell for Liquid Liquid Extraction) and RSC (Rotating Stabilized Cell). The main conclusions are: for the extraction of uranyl nitrate by DEHDMBA monoamide, the rate-controlling step is the complexation of the species at the interface of the two liquids. Thus, an absorption-desorption (according to Langmuir theory) reaction mechanism was proposed; for the extraction of actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates in nitric acid media by DMDBTDMA diamide, the kinetic is also limited by interfacial reactions. The behavior of Americium and Europium is very similar as fare as their reaction kinetics are concerned. (author). 89 refs.

  2. Optimization of extraction chromatography separations of trace levels of actinides with ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Dominic S; Plionis, Alexander A; Gonzales, Edward R

    2007-07-01

    The separation of trace level actinides has been evaluated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved through the use of an inductively coupled plasma MS (ICP-MS). The columns that we tested were prepared from a commercial TRU resin. The separation of the actinides was optimized for several parameters including particle size, column length, packing pressure, and eluent flow rate. We also examined the possibility of reducing or eliminating oxalic acid in the eluents in order to improve the performance of the mass spectrometer. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ((232)Th,( 238)U,( 237)Np, (239)Pu,( 243)Am) in less than 4 min. This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  3. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for future nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarization phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  4. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for futur nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarisation phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  5. Application of CMPO containing gels to metal extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.; Brunette, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Immersed in solubility-consistent organic solvents, high polymers can swell and form gels. Choosing the organic solvent among metal extracting solvents, metal extracting gels can be prepared. The advantages of the liquid-gel extraction process, in comparison with the liquid-liquid one, are to allow the extraction of metal cations from diluted aqueous solutions by using high aqueous-organic volume ratios (metal concentration in a few stages) with easy phase separations. Various CMPO (Octyl (phenyl) -N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide) containing gels have been prepared, and the extraction of europium (and related actinides) has been studied

  6. Extraction chromatographic separation of minor actinides from PUREX high-level wastes using CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Iyer, R.H.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Rao, M.K.; Badheka, L.P.; Banerji, A.

    1995-01-01

    An extraction chromatographic technique using octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) adsorbed on chromosorb-102 (CAC) has been tested as an alternative to the TRUEX solvent extraction process, where CMPO has been used as the extracting agent to recover minor actinides from high-activity waste (HAW) solutions of PUREX origin. The batchwise uptake behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Eu(III), Zr(IV), Fe(III), Ru(III), and TcO 4 - from a nitric acid medium by CAC has been studied. The uptake of actinides and lanthanides are higher than those of other fission products and inert materials. The batchwise loading experiments in the presence of Nd(III)/U(VI) have shown that at lower concentrations of these metal ions, the uptake of Pu(IV), U(VI), and Am(III) are reasonably high. Studies on loading of Nd(III), U(VI), and Pu(IV) on a column containing 1.7 g of CAC have shown that Nd(III) (30 mg) and U(VI) (90 mg) could be loaded, while Pu(IV) (∼0.6) was loaded on a small column containing 100 mg of CAC without any break-through. Further, a synthetic HAW solution as such and the actual PUREX HAW solution, after depleting the uranium content by a 30% tributyl-phosphate contact, were loaded on a CAC column. The effluents did not contain any alpha activity above the background level. The activities could subsequently be eluted with 0.0.4 M HNO 3 (americium and rare earths), 0.01 M oxalic acid (plutonium), and 0.25 M Na 2 CO 3 [U(VI)]. The recoveries of these metal ions were found to be >99%

  7. Solid-phase extraction for the enrichment of actinides from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maischak, S.; Fachinger, J.; Modolo, G.

    2003-01-01

    For the destructive characterisation of radioactive waste, the actinides to be analysed must be separated from matrix components, if possible, in an element-specific manner. Microwave pressure digestion is a time-saving digestion method for radioactive waste samples. The partitioning of the actinides from the liquid samples are carried out with the aid of solid-phase extraction. For the experiments, on the one hand, commercially available extraction resins such as actinide, TRU, UTEVA and TEVA Resin TM from Eichrom were used. On the other hand, an extraction resin with Cyanex 301 produced in-house was employed specifically for actinide-lanthanide partitioning. It was possible to separate 99.4% of the lanthanides by a two-stage partitioning process. It is particularly meaningful to perform a prior matrix partitioning with Actinide Resin TM . The extractant, which was eluted from the column together with the actinides, was destroyed oxidatively by means of a newly developed technique using microwave pressure digestion. (orig.)

  8. Thin extractive membrane for monitoring actinides in aqueous streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Vivek; Paul, Sumana; Pandey, Ashok K; Kalsi, P C; Goswami, A

    2013-09-15

    Alpha spectrometry and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are used for monitoring ultra-trace amount of alpha emitting actinides in different aqueous streams. However, these techniques have limitations i.e. alpha spectrometry requires a preconcentration step and SSNTDs are not chemically selective. Therefore, a thin polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) supported on silanized glass was developed for preconcentraion and determination of ultra-trace concentration of actinides by α-spectrometry and SSNTDs. PIMs were formed by spin coating on hydrophobic glass slide or solvent casting to form thin and self-supported membranes, respectively. Sorption experiments indicated that uptakes of actinides in the PIM were highly dependent on acidity of solution i.e. Am(III) sorbed up to 0.1 molL(-1) HNO₃, U(VI) up to 0.5 molL(-1) HNO₃ and Pu(IV) from HNO₃ concentration as high as 4 molL(-1). A scheme was developed for selective sorption of target actinide in the PIM by adjusting acidity and oxidation state of actinide. The actinides sorbed in PIMs were quantified by alpha spectrometry and SSNTDs. For SSNTDs, neutron induced fission-fragment tracks and α-particle tracks were registered in Garware polyester and CR-39 for quantifications of natural uranium and α-emitting actinides ((241)Am/(239)Pu/(233)U), respectively. Finally, the membranes were tested to quantify Pu in 4 molL(-1) HNO3 solutions and synthetic urine samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermochemistry of the alkali metal and alkaline earth-actinide complex oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuger, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief discussion of the various techniques used for the preparation of actinide complex oxides, the present status of the thermochemistry of these compounds is reviewed. Perovskite-related compounds are especially considered as thermodynamic data are available for compounds of several actinides and/or several alkali and alkaline earth metals. The stabilities of the complex oxides are discussed with respect to the parent binary oxides and to the aqueous ions; trends as a function of the size and the alkali or the alkaline earth cation are presented. Suggestions for synthesis of some analogous compounds with heavier actinides are also discussed. (orig./RK)

  10. Complexation of f elements by tripodal ligands containing aromatic nitrogens. Application to the selective extraction of actinides(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wietzke, Raphael

    1999-01-01

    This work initiates a research project, whose aim is the actinides(lll)/lanthanides(III) separation by liquid-liquid extraction. We were interested in the study of the coordination chemistry of lanthanides(III) and uranium(III) (uranium(III) as model for the actinides(III)), with the aim to show differences between the two families and to better understand the coordination properties involved in the extraction process. We studied the lanthanide(III) and uranium(III) complexation with tripodal ligands containing aromatic nitrogens. Several tripodal ligands were synthesized varying the type and the number of the donor atoms. The lanthanide(III) complexes have been characterized in the solid state and in solution (by several techniques: 1 H NMR, ESMS, luminescence, UV spectrophotometry, conductometry). Differences in the coordination were found depending on the nature of the donor atoms. The new ligands, tris(2-pyrazinylmethyl)amine (tpza) et tris(N,N-diethyl-2-carbamoyl-6- pyridylmethyl)amine (tpaa), have shown a selectivity for the actinides(III) with promising results in liquid-liquid extraction. The comparison between the lanthanum(III) and uranium(III) complexes with the ligand tpza showed differences in the bonding nature, which could be attributed to a covalent contribution to the metal-ligand bond. (author) [fr

  11. Lanthanides and actinides extraction by calixarenes containing CMPO groups; Extraction des lanthanides et des actinides au moyen de calixarenes portant des groupements CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Carrera, A

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of the French program SPIN concerning the radioactive waste management, researches are performed to develop processes allowing the separation of long-lived radioisotopes in order to their transmutation or their specific conditioning. These studies deal with the extraction and the separation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in acid solution. Many systems ''calixarene-diluent-aqueous phase'' are examined by extraction liquid-liquid and membrane transport. The extraction efficiency and the selectivity of the synthesized calixarene-CMPO and of the CMPO are compared with these cations, as the nitric acid extraction by these molecules. (A.L.B.)

  12. Actinide recovery using aqueous biphasic extraction: Initial developmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.; Mertz, C.J.; Rollins, A.N.

    1992-08-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less

  13. Actinide recovery using aqueous biphasic extraction: Initial developmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.; Mertz, C.J.; Rollins, A.N.

    1992-08-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less.

  14. Investigation of single-cycle separation process based on forward and backward extractions of actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yuji; Tsubata, Yasuhiro; Shirasu, Noriko; Morita, Keisuke; Suzuki, Tomoya

    2015-01-01

    We have been developing a new partitioning method of high-level radioactive waste by the single-cycle extraction process. This process is composed of the extraction of actinides (An) and fission products (FP, e.g., Pd, Ru, Mo and Tc), and mutual separation by reverse extraction. The extractant employed in this process is required to extract soft, hard acid metals and oxonium anions simultaneously. The NTAamide (N,N,N',N',N”,N”,-hexaoctyl-nitrilotriacetamide) is one of the candidate extractants. After the extraction of An and FP, the mutual separation by reverse-extraction should be set up. Distribution ratios of Pd and Ru, which are obtained by NTAamide extraction, can be suppressed by masking agents, thiourea, systeine, diethylenetriamine, and trisaminoethylamine. The masking of Mo can be performed using methylimino-N,N'-diethylacetamide (MIDEA), NTAamide(C2) and iminodimethylphosphoric acid, and Re can be stripped using an aqueous phase with high pH. The information on extraction and masking for these metals will be utilized in the development of the single-cycle process. (author)

  15. Synthesis and evaluation structure/extracting and complexing properties of new bi-topic ligands for group actinides extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisson, J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this project is to design and study new extractants for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. To decrease the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste, the GANEX process is an option to homogeneously recycle actinides. All actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm) would be extracted together from a highly acidic media and separated from fission products (especially from lanthanides). In this context, fourteen new bi-topic ligands constituted of a nitrogen poly-aromatic unit from the dipyridyl-phenanthroline and dipyridyl-1,3,5-triazine families and functionalized by amid groups were synthesized. Extraction studies performed with some of these ligands confirmed their interest to selectively separate actinides at different oxidation states from an aqueous solution 3M HNO 3 . To determine the influence of ligands structure on cation complexation, a study in a homogenous media (MeOH/H 2 O) has been carried out. Electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to characterize the complexes stoichiometries formed with several cations (Eu 3+ , Nd 3+ , Am 3+ , Pu 4+ and NpO 2 + ). Stability constants, evaluated by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, confirm the selectivity of these ligands toward actinides. Lanthanides and actinides complexes have also been characterized in the solid state by infra-red spectroscopy and X-Ray diffraction. Associated to nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory), a better knowledge of their coordination mode was achieved. (author) [fr

  16. Method for forming an extraction agent for the separation of actinides from lanthanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaehn, John R.; Harrup, Mason K.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.

    2010-04-27

    An extraction agent for the separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides in an acidic media and a method for forming same are described, and wherein the methodology produces a stable regiospecific and/or stereospecific dithiophosphinic acid that can operate in an acidic media having a pH of less than about 7.

  17. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of purex solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of new Polyfunctional Molecules for Group Actinide Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, C.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this project is to design new extracting molecules for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In order to minimize the long-term residual radiotoxicity of the waste, the GANEX process is an option based on homogeneous recycling of actinides. All actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), present in a highly acidic aqueous solution, would be extracted together and separated from fission products (especially from lanthanides) using liquid-liquid extraction. In this context, twenty new bi-topic ligands constituted of a nitrogen poly-aromatic unit functionalized by amide groups were synthesized. Liquid-liquid extraction tests with these ligands dissolved alone in the organic phase show that N, N, N', N'-tetra-alkyl-6, 6''(2, 2':6', 2''-terpyridine)-diamides are able to selectively extract actinides at different oxidation states (Np(V et VI), U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Cm(III)) from an aqueous solution 3M HNO 3 . Nevertheless, actinides(III) are poorly extracted. According to crystallographic structures of complexes with Nd(III) and U(VI) determined by X-rays diffraction, these ligands are penta-dentate. In solution (methanol), complexes stoichiometries (1:1) of Nd(III), U(VI) and Pu(IV) were determined by electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Stability constants, evaluated by UV-visible spectrophotometry in MeOH/H 2 O solutions, confirm the selectivity of ligands toward actinides(III) with respect to lanthanides(III). Associate to nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory), a better knowledge of their coordination mode was achieved. (author)

  19. Actinide chelation: biodistribution and in vivo complex stability of the targeted metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullgren, Birgitta; Jarvis, Erin E; An, Dahlia D; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-01-01

    Because of the continuing use of nuclear fuel sources and heightened threats of nuclear weapon use, the amount of produced and released radionuclides is increasing daily, as is the risk of larger human exposure to fission product actinides. A rodent model was used to follow the in vivo distribution of representative actinides, administered as free metal ions or complexed with chelating agents including diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and the hydroxypyridinonate ligands 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO). Different metabolic pathways for the different metal ions were evidenced, resulting in intricate ligand- and metal-dependent decorporation mechanisms. While the three studied chelators are known for their unrivaled actinide decorporation efficiency, the corresponding metal complexes may undergo in vivo decomposition and release metal ions in various biological pools. This study sets the basis to further explore the metabolism and in vivo coordination properties of internalized actinides for the future development of viable therapeutic chelating agents.

  20. Ten years of experience in extraction chromatographic processes for the recovery, separation and purification of actinides elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Bourges, J.; Koehly, G.

    1984-06-01

    Ten years ago the extraction chromatographic technique was developed for preparative purposes and is now applied for all chemicals separations needed for the production of actinides isotopes. That technique appears to be simple and flexible. It can be used for the production of microgram to kilogram amounts of actinide isotopes. This paper focuses on the experience gained and describes some peculiar production of actinide isotopes solved by using extraction chromatographic technique. After a review of extracting molecules and equipment, treatment of irradiated targets (preparation of Pu 238 and removal of neptunium, production of Am 243 and Cm 244), recovery of actinides from alpha aqueous wastes (preparation of Am 241) and recovery of decay products from aged actinide stocks (recovery of Am 241 from Pu stocks, of U 234 from Pu 238 stocks) are described

  1. Counter current extraction for the partitioning of actinides from PFBR-SHLW using TODGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.A.; Gujar, R.B.; Kumar, Mithilesh; Seshagiri, T.K.; Godbole, S.V.; Manchanda, V.K.; Rajeswari, S.; Antony, M.P.; Srinivasan, T.G.

    2009-01-01

    Counter current extraction for the partitioning of actinides from simulated HLW of PFBR origin was demonstrated with 0.1M TODGA + 0.5M DHOA dissolved in NPH using a 16 stage mixer-settler unit. Results demonstrated that all lanthanides could be quantitatively extracted from the feed solution and quantitatively stripped from the loaded organic phase with 0.2M HNO 3 . The extracted lanthanides are not scrubbed with 0.2M oxalic acid at 5M HNO 3 in the scrubbing cycle. Elements such as Ba, Cd and Sn were not extracted. However, Pd was partially extracted but was scrubbed quantitatively. (author)

  2. Extraction of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides from Californium Campaign Rework Solution Using TODGA-based Solvent Extraction System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benker, Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dryman, Joshua Cory [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report presents the studies carried out to demonstrate the possibility of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides and lanthanides from highly acidic solutions using a neutral ligand-based solvent extraction system. These studies stemmed from the perceived advantage of such systems over cationexchange- based solvent extraction systems that require an extensive feed adjustment to make a low-acid feed. The targeted feed solutions are highly acidic aqueous phases obtained after the dissolution of curium targets during a californium (Cf) campaign. Results obtained with actual Cf campaign solutions, but highly diluted to be manageable in a glove box, are presented, followed by results of tests run in the hot cells with Cf campaign rework solutions. It was demonstrated that a solvent extraction system based on the tetraoctyl diglycolamide molecule is capable of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides from highly acidic solutions. This system was validated using actual feeds from a Cf campaign.

  3. Advances in chemistry of the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morss, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent research accomplishments that elucidate the bonding and reactivity of the actinides are highlighted in this review. Improved syntheses of protactinium and transplutonium metals and compounds have led to determination of physical properties that reveal effects of 5f interactions. Thermodynamic measurements on metals, aqueous ions, and oxides have yielded more systematic understanding of the chemistry of the entire actinide series. Advances in bonding include the preparation of new organoactinide compounds with strong sigma and π metal-carbon and metal-hydrogen bonds; the development of new actinide complexing, sequestering, and extracting agents; and the study of chemical consequences of radioactive decay on oxides and halides. New techniques that impact actinide chemistry are laser fluorescence and photochemistry, radiocoulometry, and pulse radiolysis. Progress has also been made in outlining the basic chemical behavior of the heaviest actinides and the transactinides. (orig.)

  4. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides from light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The neutronics analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWth actinide burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the equilibrium cycle of the reactor and covariance data was taken ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180%, 97%, and 46%, respectively. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  5. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  6. Liquid-liquid extraction of actinides by means of dibutil-N, N-diethylcarbamylphosphanate (DBDECP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzano, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Sarzanini, C.; Volpe, P.; Benzi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of Th(IV), U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III) and Cm(III) by dibutyl-N, N-diethilcarbamoylphosphonate (DBDECP) from notric, hydrochloric and perchloric acid solutions has been studies as a function of a number of parameters. The effect of size and structure of the extractant molecules has been investigated for lower homologues of carbamoyphosphonate. After evaluating the effect of the diluent, the extraction of inorganic acid HNO 3 , HCl and HClO 4 and the dipendence of the distribution ratios of the actinides from organic extractant concentration and aqueous acid concentration has been studied for the DBDECP-xilene system

  7. Partnew - New solvent extraction processes for minor actinides - final report; Partnew - Nouveaux procedes d'extraction par solvant pour les actinides mineurs - rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madic, C.; Testard, F.; Hudson, M.J.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Christiansen, B.; Ferrando, M.; Facchini, A.; Geist, A.; Modolo, G.; Gonzalez-Espartero, A.; Mendoza, J. de

    2004-07-01

    The objectives of the European project PARTNEW were to define solvent extraction processes for the partitioning of the minor actinides, Am and Cm, from the aqueous high active raffinate or high active concentrate issuing the reprocessing of nuclear spent fuels by the PUREX process. Eleven laboratories participated to the research: 1/ CEA-DEN (Marcoule), 2/ CEA-DSM (Saclay), 3/ UREAD (U.K.), 4/ CTU (Sweden), 5/ ITU (Germany), 6/ ENEA (Italy), 7/ PoliMi (Italy), 8/ FZK-INE (Germany), 9/ FZJ-ISR (Germany), 10/ CIEMAT (Spain) and 11/ UAM (Spain). The research was organised into eight work packages (WP): Basic and applied DIAMEX studies, using diamide extractants for the co-extraction of actinides(III) (An(III)) and lanthanides(III) (Ln(III)) nitrates (WP1 and WP2), Basic and applied SANEX studies based on the use of polydentate N-ligands for the An(III)/Ln(III) separation (WP3 and WP4), Basic and applied SANEX studies based on the use of synergistic mixtures made of bis-(chloro-phenyl)-di-thio-phosphinic acid + neutral O-bearing ligand, (WP5 and WP6), Basic SANEX studies for the An(III)/Ln(III) separation, based on the use of new S-bearing ligands, Basic and applied studies for the Am(III)/Cm(III) separation. The work done in the fundamental and applied domains was very fruitful. Several processes have been successfully tested with genuine high active raffinates and concentrate. (authors)

  8. Synthesis and Evaluation of new Polyfunctional Molecules for Group Actinide Extraction; Synthese et evaluation de Nouvelles Molecules Polyfonctionnelles pour la Separation Groupee des Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, C.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this project is to design new extracting molecules for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In order to minimize the long-term residual radiotoxicity of the waste, the GANEX process is an option based on homogeneous recycling of actinides. All actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), present in a highly acidic aqueous solution, would be extracted together and separated from fission products (especially from lanthanides) using liquid-liquid extraction. In this context, twenty new bi-topic ligands constituted of a nitrogen poly-aromatic unit functionalized by amide groups were synthesized. Liquid-liquid extraction tests with these ligands dissolved alone in the organic phase show that N, N, N', N'-tetra-alkyl-6, 6''(2, 2':6', 2''-terpyridine)-diamides are able to selectively extract actinides at different oxidation states (Np(V et VI), U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Cm(III)) from an aqueous solution 3M HNO{sub 3}. Nevertheless, actinides(III) are poorly extracted. According to crystallographic structures of complexes with Nd(III) and U(VI) determined by X-rays diffraction, these ligands are penta-dentate. In solution (methanol), complexes stoichiometries (1:1) of Nd(III), U(VI) and Pu(IV) were determined by electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Stability constants, evaluated by UV-visible spectrophotometry in MeOH/H{sub 2}O solutions, confirm the selectivity of ligands toward actinides(III) with respect to lanthanides(III). Associate to nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory), a better knowledge of their coordination mode was achieved. (author)

  9. Liquid-liquid extraction of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products by use of ionic liquids: from discovery to understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, Isabelle; Ouadi, Ali; Gaillard, Clotilde

    2011-06-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction of actinides and lanthanides by use of ionic liquids is reviewed, considering, first, phenomenological aspects, then looking more deeply at the various mechanisms. Future trends in this developing field are presented.

  10. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have estimated the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Fr and Ra plus the light actinides Ac through Pu. The underlying self-consistent band-structure calculations were performed by the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method including l quantum numbers s through g......, and the electron-phonon parameters were obtained within the rigid-atomic-sphere approximation. The electron-phonon coupling in Fr through Th is found to be dominated by pd and df scattering and in Pa through Pu by pd and fg scattering. At the equilibrium volumes and as a function of atomic number, the electron...... be related to the changeover from an s-to- d to an s-to-f electronic transition and a related change in the topology of the Fermi surface...

  11. Demonstration of pyropartitioning process by using genuine high-level liquid waste. Reductive-extraction of actinide elements from chlorination product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Koichi; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Ougier, Michel; Malmbeck, Rikard; Winckel, Stefaan van

    2009-01-01

    The pyropartitioning process separates the minor actinide elements (MAs) together with uranium and plutonium from the high-level liquid waste generated at the Purex reprocessing of spent LWR fuel and introduces them to metallic fuel cycle. For the demonstration of this technology, a series experiment using 520g of genuine high-level liquid waste was started and the conversion of actinide elements to their chlorides was already demonstrated by denitration and chlorination. In the present study, a reductive extraction experiment in molten salt/liquid cadmium system to recover actinide elements from the chlorination product of the genuine high-level liquid waste was performed. The results of the experiment are as following; 1) By the addition of the cadmium-lithium alloy reductant, almost all of plutonium and MAs in the initial high-level liquid waste were recovered in the cadmium phase. It means no mass loss during denitration, chlorination, and reductive-extraction. 2) The separation factor values of plutonium, MAs, and rare-earth fission product elements versus uranium agreed with the literature values. Therefore, actinide elements will be separated from fission product elements in the actual system. Hence, the pyropartitioning process was successfully demonstrated. (author)

  12. Removal of actinides from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions with bidentate organophosphorus extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; McIsaac, L.D.

    1975-08-01

    The neutral bidentate organophosphorus reagents DBDECMP (dibutyl-N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylenephosphonate) and its dihexyl analogue DHDECMP are candidate extractants for removal of actinides from certain acidic waste streams produced at the U. S. ERDA Hanford and Idaho Falls sites. Various chemical and physical properties including availability, cost, purification, alpha radiolysis, and aqueous phase solubility of DBDECMP and DHDECMP are reviewed. A conceptual flowsheet employing a 15 percent DBDECMP (or DHDECMP)--CCl 4 extractant for removal (and recovery) of Am and Pu from Hanford's Plutonium Reclamation Facility acid waste stream (CAW solution) was successfully demonstrated in laboratory-scale mixer-settler tests; this extraction scheme can be used to produce an actinide-free waste. A 30 percent DBDECMP-xylene flowsheet is being tested at the Idaho Falls site for removal of U, Np, Pu, and Am from Idaho Chemical Processing Plant first-cycle high-level raffinate to produce an actinide-free (less than 10 nCi alpha activity/gram) waste. (auth)

  13. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  14. Separation by liquid-liquid extraction of actinides(III) from lanthanides(III) using new molecules: the picolinamides; Separation par extraction liquide-liquide des actinides(III) des lanthanides(III) par de nouvelles molecules: les picolinamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, P.Y. [CEA Marcoule, Departement de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)]|[Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1996-07-01

    In the field of long-lived radionuclides separation from waste generated during spent fuel reprocessing, the picolinamides have been chosen as potential extractants for the selective extraction of actinides (III) from lanthanides (III). The first studies initiated on the most simple molecule of the picolinamide family, namely 2-pyridinecarboxamide, pointed out that in an aqueous media the complexation stability constant between this ligand and Am(III) is roughly 10 times higher than the ones corresponding to Ln(III). The synthesis of lipophilic derivatives of 2-pyridinecarboxamide leaded to extraction experiments. The extraction of metallic cation by lipophilic picolinamides, according to a solvatation mechanism, is strongly dependent on the nature of the amide function: a primary amide function (group I) leads to a good extraction; on the contrary, there is a decrease for secondary (group II) and tertiary (group III) amide functions. From a theoretical point of view, this work leads finally to the following conclusions: confirmation of the importance of the presence of soft donor atoms within the extractants (nitrogen in our case) for An(III)/Ln(III). Also, sensitivity of this soft donor atom regarding the protonation reaction; prevalence in our case of the affinity of the extractant for the metallic cation over the lipophilia of the extractant to ensure good distribution coefficients. The extraction and Am(III)/Ln(III) separation performances of the picolinamides from pertechnetic media leads to the design of a possible flowsheet for the reprocessing of high level liquid waste, with the new idea of an integrated technetium reflux. (author) 105 refs.

  15. Liquid-liquid extraction kinetics of uranyl nitrate and actinides (III)-lanthanides nitrates by extractants with amide function; Cinetique d`extraction liquide-liquide du nitrate d`uranyle et des nitrates d`actinides (III) et de lanthanides (III) par des extractants a fonction amide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulemonde, V.

    1995-12-20

    Nowadays, the most important part of electric power is generated by fission energy. But spent fuels have then to be reprocessed. The production of these reprocessed materials separately and with a high purity level is done according to a liquid-liquid extraction process (Purex process) with the use of tributyl phosphate as solvent. Optimization studies concerning the extracting agent have been undertaken. This work gives the results obtained for the uranyl nitrate and the actinides (III)-lanthanides (III) nitrates extraction by extractants with amide function (monoamide for U(VI) and diamide for actinides (III) and lanthanides (III)). The extraction kinetics have been studied in the case of a metallic specie transfer from the aqueous phase towards the organic phase. The experiments show that the nitrates extraction kinetics is limited by the complexation chemical reaction of the species at the interface between the two liquids. An adsorption-desorption interfacial reactional mechanism (Langmuir theory) is proposed for the uranyl nitrate. (O.M.). 89 refs.

  16. Actinide Binding by Kläui Ligands: REDOX Speciation and Sorption on an Extraction Chromatography Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2008-12-01

    The sorption of Eu(III) and actinide ions in various oxidation states from nitric acid solutions by an extraction chromatography resin containing 1 wt% of the Kläui ligand Cp*Co[P(O)(OR)2]3– [Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, R = –CH2 CH2CH3] on Amberlite® XAD-7HP was examined. At 0.3 M HNO3 and a metal-to-ligand ratio of 0.07, the relative affinity of the resin for the ions investigated followed the order: tetravalent >> hexavalent > trivalent > pentavalent; however, the relative affinity for the trivalent and hexavalent ions can be reversed, depending on the extent of ligand loading and the nitric acid concentration. The sorption of the tetravalent ions was exceptionally strong in the entire range of nitric acid concentration examined (0.2 to 8 M HNO3). Resin samples loaded with various actinide ions were examined spectrophotometrically. No Np(V) and Pu(III) species were identified on the resin; rather, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) reactions occurred during equilibration, resulting in their complete conversion to M(IV) species bound by the Kläui ligand. Similarly, the sorption behavior of Pu(VI) and Np(VI) was complicated by their reduction to M(IV) upon sorption. The observed REDOX processes were apparently driven by the extremely high affinity of the Kläui ligand for the tetravalent ions. The acid-base properties of the methyl derivative of the Kläui ligand were investigated in aqueous solution, and its pKa was found to be highly dependent upon the solution ionic strength. The binding constants of this ligand with various actinide ions measured in a mixed methanol/carbon tetrachloride solvent exhibited qualitative agreement with the sorption selectivity trends.

  17. Crystal chemistry of actinide pnictides and chalcogenides. Part of the non-metal element in the 5f electron delocalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damien, D.; Charvillat, J.P.; Hery, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The solid state chemistry of the actinide pnictides and chalcogenides was studied to compare the properties of 4f and 5f electrons in semi-metallic compounds. In the actinide metals up to plutonium, the 5f orbitals take a prominent part in the bonding, leading to physical properties and particularly to crystal structures different from those of the rare-earth metals. In chalcogenides and pnictides the actinide elements do not make a uniform series since they can form compounds which are different in composition and crystal structure as well. Two distinct groups are found: the uranium type compounds,and the rare-earth type compounds including those of plutonium, americium and curium. Neptunium is generally an intermediate element giving both types of compounds. The repartition of the actinides into two groups, depends upon the valency state of the actinide element: 4+ cations lead to uranium type chalcogenides and pnictides, while 3+ cations lead to rare-earth type compounds. From a crystallographic point of view, there is no difference between the properties of 4f and 5f electrons when the actinide and lanthanide elements are trivalent. Nevertheless, from a discussion of the variations in the lattice parameters or cell volumes of the actinide chalcogenides or pnictides, it is shown that the 5f electrons up to curium are more delocalized than the 4f ones, and also details about the 5f delocalization processes are given

  18. Separation of gallium and actinides in plutonium nuclear materials by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eitrheim, E.S.; Knight, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of stable gallium in nuclear materials has applications in nuclear fuel characterization and nuclear forensics. The use of positron-emitting gallium isotope 68 Ga as a tracer for Ga recoveries for analyses in materials containing actinides was explored. A radiochemical method for the separation of Ga, Pu, U, Th, and Am using commercially-available extraction chromatography resins was developed and evaluated. The method effectively allows precise determination of Ga yield (97 ± 3 %) in the analysis of stable Ga (spike recovery 101 ± 1 %) and radioactive Pu (radiochemical yield, 82 ± 10 %; spike recovery, 96 ± 3 %), while also providing pure elemental fractions of other actinides relevant to materials encountered in the analysis Pu-containing materials. (author)

  19. Development of the Method for Preparation of Actinide Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Shiokawa, Y.; Hasegawa, K.; Takahashi, M.; Suzuki, K.

    1997-01-01

    The uranium amalgam was quantitatively prepared by electrolysis from the aqueous solution containing acetic acid and sodium acetate using mercury cathode. A bright button or brown porous one of uranium metal was obtained by thermal decomposition of the amalgam. The purity was found to be much higher than commercial grade metal of ca.99.95%. As a result of this work, the simple and easy procedure for preparation of uranium metal with high purity level on the laboratory scale has been developed.

  20. Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.M.; Laintz, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated β-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs

  1. Bi- and polydentate organophosphorous compounds as extractants for actinides from liquid waste (use of effect of anomalous aryl stability increase)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozen, A.M.; Nikolotova, Z.I.; Kartasheva, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    Extraction of actinides (Am) and lanthanides (Eu) from nitric acid liquid wastes by bi-, tri- and polydentate organophosphoric extractants, characteristic of purex-process, and effect of more electronegative aryl groups substitution for alkyl groups in the latter have been studied. The observed increase in distribution factors are explained from the viewpoint of molecular and electronic structure extractants. 10 refs.; 6 figs

  2. Some aspects of the extraction separation of actinides by macrocyclic crown compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, R.K.; Bajpai, D.D.; Shukla, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Selective and effective extraction-separation of U(VI) and Pu(IV) from aqueous nitric acid media by several crown ethers have been investigated in detail. The critical study of various parameters namely aqueous phase acidity, reagent concentration, diluent, period of equilibration, aqueous to organic phase ratio, strippant and diverse ions, have established the conditions for their optimum extraction. Influence of the introduction of sulfur into a crown ether ring forming a mixed sulfur-oxygen containing macrohetrocycle for improved extraction of actinides is also studied. The species extracted appear to be of ion-pair type, UO 2 (CE) 2+ .2NO 3- and Pu(CE) 2 4+ .4NO 3- formed with U(VI) and Pu(IV), respectively. The apparent extraction equilibrium constant, log Kex, into toluene by DC18C6 with U(VI) is 0.44 and 4.44 for Pu(IV). Recovery of actinides from loaded macrocycles is easily accomplished using dilute oxalic acid, perchloric acid, sulphuric acid or sodium carbonate as the strippants. The lack of interference from even appreciable amounts of possible fission product contaminants is a notable feature of this separation procedure. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Development of Separation Process for Minor Actinides Using TDdDGA and New Extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, T.; Tsubata, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Separation process for minor actinides (MA = Am, Cm and Np) has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency using new innovative extractants to improve the partitioning process from the viewpoints of the economy and the reduction of secondary wastes. Phosphorus-free compounds consisting of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen (CHON principle) were applied to the separation steps for MA. At the first step, MA and lanthanide elements (Ln) are recovered from high-level liquid waste by solvent extraction with N,N,N',N'-tetra-dodecyl-diglycolamide (TDdDGA). Trivalent actinides Am and Cm, are separated from RE at the next step by solvent extraction using podand type soft-donor extractant such as N,N,N',N'- tetrakis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)- decane-1,2-diamine (TPDN) or hybrid type extractant such as N-octyl-N-(ptolyl)- 1,10-phenanthroline-2-carboxamide (OctTolPTA). This paper presents the current status of the research and development programme. This study is carried out under the Innovative Nuclear Research and Development Programme by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (authors)

  4. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Metal Chelate: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Liu, Qinli; Hou, Xiongpo; Fang, Tao

    2017-03-04

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), as a new green extraction technology, has been used in extracting various metal species. The solubilities of chelating agents and corresponding metal chelates are the key factors which influence the efficiency of SFE. Other main properties of them such as stability and selectivity are also reviewed. The extraction mechanisms of mainly used chelating agents are explained by typical examples in this paper. This is the important aspect of SFE of metal ions. Moreover, the extraction efficiencies of metal species also depend on other factors such as temperature, pressure, extraction time and matrix effect. The two main complexation methods namely in-situ and on-line chelating SFE are described in detail. As an efficient chelating agent, tributyl phosphate-nitric acid (TBP-HNO 3 ) complex attracts much attention. The SFE of metal ions, lanthanides and actinides as well as organometallic compounds are also summarized. With the proper selection of ligands, high efficient extraction of metal species can be obtained. As an efficient sample analysis method, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is introduced in this paper. Recently, the extraction method combining ionic liquids (ILs) with supercritical fluid has been becoming a novel technology for treating metal ions. The kinetics related to SFE of metal species is discussed with some specific examples.

  5. Optimizing advanced liquid metal reactors for burning actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1994-10-01

    In this report, the process to design an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) for burning the transuranic part of nuclear waste is discussed. The influence of design parameters on ALMR burner performance is studied and the results are incorporated in a design schedule for optimizing ALMRs for burning transuranics. This schedule is used to design a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR burner to burn as much as possible transurancis. The two designs burn equally well. (orig.)

  6. Rapid column extraction method for actinides and strontium in fish and other animal tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell III, S.L.; Faison, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of actinides and radiostrontium in animal tissue samples is very important for environmental monitoring. There is a need to measure actinide isotopes and strontium with very low detection limits in animal tissue samples, including fish, deer, hogs, beef and shellfish. A new, rapid separation method has been developed that allows the measurement of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, curium and strontium isotopes in large animal tissue samples (100-200 g) with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin R , TRU Resin R and DGA Resin R cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alphaspectrometry. Strontium is collected on Sr Resin R from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA). After acid digestion and furnace heating of the animal tissue samples, the actinides and 89/90 Sr are separated using column extraction chromatography. This method has been shown to be effective over a wide range of animal tissue matrices. Vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates is used to minimize sample preparation time. (author)

  7. Presence and Character of the 5f Electrons in the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mårtensson, N.

    1980-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Image level binding energy to the occupation of the 5f orbital is pointed out and used to demonstrate the presence of 5f electrons in the uranium metal. It is suggested that the valence band spectrum of uranium might contain satellites originating from excitations...... to localized 5f-electron configurations. Different kinds of core-hole screenings are discussed for the actinide metals as well as the difference between inner and outer core electron ionizations. Finally, the question of itinerant versus localized 5f behaviour is treated by means of a total energy comparison...

  8. The use of extraction chromatography resins to concentrate actinides and strontium from soil for radiochromatographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roane, J E; DeVol, T A; Leyba, J D; Fjeld, R A

    2003-01-01

    An analytical technique utilizing selective extractant resins to concentrate strontium and actinides from soil followed by separation with radiochromatography was evaluated. The technique was tested using uncontaminated soil samples spiked with a radionuclide tracer solution that were either microwave-aided acid digested or leached with a strong acid. Extraction of the strontium and actinides from the acidified solution was accomplished using a serial arrangement of Sr-Resin and TRU-Resin columns. The combined eluate solutions from the extraction resins were treated with HNO(3) and H(2)O(2) to oxidize residual extractant and eluates prior to separation and analysis of the radionuclides by radiochromatography. Chromatograms obtained with larger soil mass loadings resulted in either incomplete peak resolution of the tracers or had highly variable peak elution times, indicative of an ionic interfering constituent(s). Better separations (e.g., chromatograms that resolved all radioactive constituents) were obtained when the sample mass loading was decreased, but with a concurrent decreased sensitivity for the radionuclides. Elemental analyses of the soil were conducted to provide data on the ionic constituents in unprocessed soil and post-processed soil samples. These results identified aluminum as an interfering contributor to the poor performance exhibited by the radiochromatographic separations.

  9. Radiation chemical behaviour of actinides in extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Fedoseev, D.A.; Bojkova, I.A.; Milovanova, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pu(4) physicochemical state (valent, complex, aggregation states) in γ-irradiated (Esub(γ)=3H10sup(5) Gr) TBP solutions in dodecane in the presence of U(6) macroamounts has been studied. Pu(4) concertration in extractant constitutes 4x10 -3 - 7x10 -3 mol/l, J(6) concentration is from 2x10 -2 up to 1.25x10 -1 mol/l, HNO 3 concentration is approximately equal to 0.5 mol/l. It has been established on the base of analysis of absorption spectrum of γ-irradiated solution that a change of Pu(4) valency does not take place, and plutonium di-n-buthyl-phosphate complex is formed. A decrease of a solution optical density with a growth of γ-irradiation dose testifies on complex formation. Spectrophotometric (SP) titration of allowed one to determine effective (seeming) complexing consU(6) and Pu(4) solut ons has been carried out. SP titration tants of Pu(4) and U(6) with DBPK and some peculiarities of this complexing. Identity of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of absorption spectra of model and γ-irradiated solutions allows one to consider the latter as two-component (in an optical respect) and closed (in the absence of deposits) systems. This permits to use the Firordt equations for the calculation of Pu(4) and U(6) complex concentrations in irradiated systems. Possibility to calculate radiation yields of PU(4) complexes with di-n-buthylphosphate acid for Pu(4) concentrations -2 mol/l both in the presence of this complex and without it has been revealed

  10. Simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions using an extractive scintillating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roane, J E; DeVol, T A

    2002-11-01

    An extractive scintillating resin was evaluated for the simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions. The transuranic extractive scintillating (TRU-ES) resin is composed of an inert macroporous polystyrene core impregnated with organic fluors (diphenyloxazole and 1,4-bis-(4-methyl-5-phenyl-2-oxazolyl)benzene) and an extractant (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in tributyl phosphate). The TRU-ES resin was packed into FEP Teflon tubing to produce a flow cell (0.2-mL free column volume), which is placed into a scintillation detection system to obtain pulse height spectra and time series data during loading and elution of actinides onto/from the resin. The alpha-particle absolute detection efficiencies ranged from 77% to 96.5%, depending on the alpha energy and quench. In addition to the on-line analyses, off-line analyses of the effluent can be conducted using conventional detection methods. The TRU-ES resin was applied to the quantification of a mixed radionuclide solution and two actual waste samples. The on-line characterization of the mixed radionuclide solution was within 10% of the reported activities whereas the agreement with the waste samples was not as good due to sorption onto the sample container walls and the oxidation state of plutonium. Agreement between the on-line and off-line analyses was within 35% of one another for both waste samples.

  11. Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, 203 Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste simulant and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl 2 from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO 3 and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na 2 CO 3 . An experimental flowsheet was designed from the batch contact tests and tested counter-currently using 5.5 cm centrifugal contactors. Results from the counter-current test show that mercury can be removed from the acidic mixed SBW simulant and recovered separately from the actinides

  12. A novel CMPO-functionalized task specific ionic liquid: Synthesis, extraction and spectroscopic investigations of actinide and lanthanide complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohapatra, P.K.; Kandwal, P.; Iqbal, M.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Murali, M.S.; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    A novel CMPO (carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide) based task specific ionic liquid (TSIL) with an NTf2− counter anion was synthesized and evaluated for actinide/lanthanide extraction from acidic feed solutions using several room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The extraction data were compared with

  13. Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media: An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Raymond

    2004-11-03

    The wastes present at DOE long-term storage sites are usually highly alkaline, and because of this, much of the actinides in these wastes are in the sludge phase. Enough actinide materials still remain in the supernatant liquid that they require separation followed by long-term storage in a geological repository. The removal of these metals from the liquid waste stream would permit their disposal as low-level waste and dramatically reduce the volume of high-level wastes.

  14. Selective extraction of actinides by calixarenes: application to bioassay analysis; Extraction selective des actinides par les calixarenes: application a l'analyse radiotoxicologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, B

    2006-01-15

    In the context of nuclear workers monitoring, the aim of this PhD was to selectively isolate U, Pu, and Am from urine to propose a new analytical procedure to the Medical and Biology Analysis Laboratories. The 1,3,5-OCH{sub 3}-2,4,6-OCH{sub 2}CONHOH-p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene molecule has been selected as a promising extractant for U, Pu, and Am. Its physico-chemical properties and its affinity for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} have been studied through two approaches, one theoretical (molecular modelling at DFT level), and one experimental. The extractions of the three actinides by the hydroxamic calix[6]arene were quantitative in liquid-liquid and solid-liquid systems. Their separation has also been shown possible and efficient. After optimization, the proposed procedure should allow the laboratories to carry out the chemical treatment of urine, before the measurement, in one day instead of the three days needed nowadays. (author)

  15. Two novel extraction chromatography resins containing multiple diglycolamide-functionalized ligands: preparation, characterization and actinide uptake properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Seraj A; Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Iqbal, Mudassir; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2014-03-21

    Two extraction chromatography resins were prepared for the first time by impregnating multiple diglycolamide-functionalized ligands such as diglycolamide-calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) on Chromosorb-W, an inert solid support, for the removal of hazardous actinides like Am(III) from radioactive waste solutions at 3M nitric acid. The resins were characterized by SEM, thermal and surface area (BET) analyses. The sorption of Am(III) on the two resins followed pseudo-second order sorption rate kinetics and was exothermic in nature. The sorption of trivalent f-elements proceeded through a chemisorption monolayer phenomenon as analyzed by using several isotherm models. The negative free energy change (ΔG) values of -34.46 and -28.45kJ/mol for T-DGA and C4DGA, respectively, indicate a chemical interaction between the metal ions and the ligands on the surface of the resins. Distribution coefficient measurements of various metal ions showed a selective sorption of trivalent f-elements over hexavalent uranyl ions and other fission product elements. Column studies on breakthrough indicated 0.76 and 0.37mg/g as the breakthrough capacities of the T-DGA and the C4DGA resins, respectively. It was possible to quantitatively elute the loaded metal ion using EDTA solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A contribution to the study of the extraction of mineral acids and of actinide (IV) and (VI) cations by N,N-dialkylamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condamines, N.

    1990-03-01

    N,N-dialkylamides are alternate extractants to tributylphosphate, TBP, for the actinides separation in nuclear fuel reprocessing. N,N-di (2-ethyl hexyl) butyramide and N,N-di (2 ethyl hexyl) isobutyramide are selected for their sufficient extraction and partition ability towards actinides (IV) and (VI) without coextracting fission products. Mechanisms of HNO 3 , UO 2 2+ , Pu 4+ , Th 4+ are investigated. Nitric acid extraction is due to the competitive formation of the species (HNO 3 )L 2 , (HNO 3 )L, (HNO 3 ) 2 L (L: DOBA or DOiBA). An hydrogen bond is the driving force of the transfer. For low acidity media, amides are neutral extractants. Physical interactions, between free ligand and metallic complex, arise for high amide concentrations. Taking into account the non-ideality of the organic medium by a hard spheres mixture model, we estimate that such interactions are far from negligible and very specific to the amide group. Unlike TBP, when increasing acidity, amides behave as anionic extractants. DOBA and DOiBA appear to be satisfactory extractants for fuel reprocessing [fr

  17. The effect of actinides on the microstructural development in a metallic high-level nuclear waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Sinkler, W.; Abraham, D.P.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; McDeavitt, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Waste forms to contain material residual from an electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. One of these waste forms contains waste stainless steel (SS), fission products that are noble to the process (e.g., Tc, Ru, Pd, Rh), Zr, and actinides. The baseline composition of this metallic waste form is SS-15wt.% Zr. The metallurgy of this baseline alloy has been well characterized. On the other hand, the effects of actinides on the alloy microstructure are not well understood. As a result, SS-Zr alloys with added U, Pu, and/or Np have been cast and then characterized, using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction, to investigate the microstructural development in SS-Zr alloys that contain actinides. Actinides were found to congregate non-uniformally in a Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x phase. Apparently, the actinides were contained in varying amounts in the different polytypes (C14, C15, and C36) of the Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x phase. Heat treatment of an actinide-containing SS-15 wt.% Zr alloy showed the observed microstructure to be stable

  18. Two novel extraction chromatography resins containing multiple diglycolamide-functionalized ligands: preparations, characterization and actinide uptake properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Iqbal, M.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Two extraction chromatography resins were prepared for the first time by impregnating multiple diglycolamide-functionalized ligands such as diglycolamide-calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) on Chromosorb-W, an inert solid support, for the removal of hazardous actinides like

  19. Liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and repartition of actinides from nuclear aqueous acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a process for the recovery and distribution of actinides compounds from residual aqueous acid solutions in nuclear plants, and a separation process of AmIII, CmIII, PuIV, NpIV and UVI. Organophosphorous compounds are used as extracting agents [fr

  20. Lanthanide and actinide extractions with cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion derivatives covalently bonded to diglycolyl diamide platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lučaníková, M.; Selucký, P.; Rais, J.; Grüner, Bohumír; Kvíčalová, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2011), s. 89-95 ISSN 2193-2875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668; GA MŠk LC523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Dicarbollides derivatives * TODGA * Liquid-liquid extraction * Lanthanides * Actinides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  1. Partitioning of Minor Actinides from High Active Raffinates using Bis-Diglycol-amides (BisDGA) as new efficient Extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modolo, G.; Vijgen, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute for Energy Research, Safety Research and Reactor Technology, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Espartero, A.G. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040-Madrid (Spain); Prados, P. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid - UAM, carretera de Colmenar Viejo km 15.3, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Mendoza, J. de [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid - UAM, carretera de Colmenar Viejo km 15.3, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Institut Catala d' Investigacio Quimica (ICIQ) Av. Paisos Catalans 16, 43007-Tarragona (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Two new polyamide extractants has been selected, namely UAM-069 and UAM-081, both synthesized at the University of Madrid (UAM), to develop a new separation process. These two ligands are bis-diglycol-amides, consisting of two diglycol-amides moieties grafted on an aromatic platform (UAM-069) or on an aliphatic linker (UAM-081), respectively. The extraction of actinides and fission products was studied from synthetic PUREX raffinate. Actinides(III) and lanthanides(III) are highly extracted from acidities > 1 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. The extraction of Zr, Mo and Pd could be suppressed with complexing agents such as oxalic acid and HEDTA. In the present paper the results of the batch extraction results are presented which serve for the development of a new continuous counter current process to be tested in centrifugal contactors. (authors)

  2. Separation of actinides and lanthanides from nuclear power reactor fuel reprocessing waste by bidentate organophosphorous extractant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hugen; Fu Lichun; Wei Xiufang; Liu Suying; Ye Guoan; Yang Liucheng; Jiang Jincai

    1990-01-01

    A multistage countercurrent extraction process is developed for the removal and recovery of actinides and lanthanides by 30(V)% bidentate organophosphorous extractant DHDECMP in diethyl benzene from 3 mol/l nitric acid solution of simulated nuclear power reactor fuel reprocessing waste. In the R-A extraction cycle (6 extraction stages and 2 scrub stages), the recovery efficiency for U, Np. Pu, Am and Gd is 99.95%, 99.40%, 99.95% 99.99% and 99.70% respectively, and the decontamination factor for fission product elements is DF Zr > 3.6 x 10 3 , DF Nb > 3.7 x 10 3 , DF Ru = 6.8, DF Cs > 3.9 x 10 3 and DF Sr > 2.8 x 10 3 respectively. In the R-B cycle (6 stripping stages) for the stripping of Pu , Am and Gd from organic phase, the stripping efficiency for Pu, Am and Gd is 96.58%, >99.65% and > 99.70% respectively. Finally, in the R-C cycle (6 stripping stages) for the stripping of Np and U, the stripping efficiency for Np is 99.95% whereas that for U is 98.02%

  3. A contribution to the study of the extraction of mineral acids and of actinide (IV) and (VI) cations by N,N-dialkylamides; Contribution a l'etude de l'extraction d'acides mineraux et de cations actinides aux degres d'oxydation (IV) et (VI) par des N,N-dialkylamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condamines, N.

    1990-03-15

    N,N-dialkylamides are alternate extractants to tributylphosphate, TBP, for the actinides separation in nuclear fuel reprocessing. N,N-di (2-ethyl hexyl) butyramide and N,N-di (2 ethyl hexyl) isobutyramide are selected for their sufficient extraction and partition ability towards actinides (IV) and (VI) without coextracting fission products. Mechanisms of HNO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu{sup 4+}, Th{sup 4+} are investigated. Nitric acid extraction is due to the competitive formation of the species (HNO{sub 3})L{sub 2}, (HNO{sub 3})L, (HNO{sub 3}){sub 2}L (L: DOBA or DOiBA). An hydrogen bond is the driving force of the transfer. For low acidity media, amides are neutral extractants. Physical interactions, between free ligand and metallic complex, arise for high amide concentrations. Taking into account the non-ideality of the organic medium by a hard spheres mixture model, we estimate that such interactions are far from negligible and very specific to the amide group. Unlike TBP, when increasing acidity, amides behave as anionic extractants. DOBA and DOiBA appear to be satisfactory extractants for fuel reprocessing.

  4. Comparative evaluation of actinide ion uptake by polymer inclusion membranes containing TODGA as the carrier extractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanty, B N; Raut, D R; Mohapatra, P K; Das, D K; Behere, P G; Afzal, Md

    2014-06-30

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIM) containing TODGA (N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyl diglycolamide) were evaluated for the separation of actinide ions such as Am(3+), Pu(4+), UO2(2+) and Th(4+) from acidic feeds. The PIMs were prepared using cellulose triacetate (CTA) as the polymer matrix and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer along with the diglycolamide carrier extractants and were characterized by conventional techniques such as XRD, thermal analysis and AFM. The PIM composition was optimized by a series of studies which involved variation in the CTA, NPOE and carrier concentration which suggested 58% TODGA, 30% NPOE and 12% CTA to be optimum. The uptake studies were carried out using feed solutions containing varying concentrations of nitric acid and showed the trend: Am(3+)>Pu(4+)>Th(4+)>UO2(2+). Transport studies were carried out in a two-compartment cell where nitric acid concentration the feed was varied (1-3M) while the receiver compartment contained alpha-hydroxy-iso-butyric acid (AHIBA). The actinide ion transport efficiencies with TODGA containing PIMs followed the same trend as seen in the uptake studies. The AFM patterns of the PIMs changed when loaded with Eu(3+) carrier (used as a surrogate for Am(3+)) while the regenerated membranes have displayed comparable morphologies. Diffusion coefficient values were experimentally obtained from the transport studies and were found to be 8.89×10(-8) cm(2)/s for Am(3+) transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Actinides recovery from molten salt/liquid metal system by electrochemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Masatoshi; Koyama, Tadafumi; Kondo, Naruhito; Fujita, Reiko; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical methods were examined for the recovery of actinides from the electrorefiner which is used in pyrometallurgical reprocessing of spent metal fuel for fast reactors. Uranium was successfully collected at the solid steel cathode from both liquid cadmium and molten salt solvents. In electrotransport from liquid cadmium, the behavior of uranium and rare earths was as expected by a computer simulation code based on the diffusion layer model at the interface between the electrolyte and the electrodes. In electroreduction from the molten salt electrolyte, a considerable amount of uranium was reduced at the CdLi anode by direct chemical reduction with lithium, especially at a lower anodic current density. The decrease in collection efficiency of uranium due to the direct chemical reduction would be avoided by maintaining the anode potential higher than the deposition potential of uranium.

  6. Actinide recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Navratil, James D.; Saba, Mark T.

    1987-07-28

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

  7. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  8. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  9. Minor actinide transmutation using minor actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Yoshida, H.; Gunji, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of minor actinide burner reactor is proposed as an efficient way to transmute long-lived minor actinides in order to ease the burden of high-level radioactive waste disposal problem. Conceptual design study of minor actinide burner reactors was performed to obtain a reactor model with very hard neutron spectrum and very high neutron flux in which minor actinides can be fissioned efficiently. Two models of burner reactors were obtained, one with metal fuel core and the other with particle fuel core. Minor actinide transmutation by the actinide burner reactors is compared with that by power reactors from both the reactor physics and fuel cycle facilities view point. (author)

  10. Metals Separation by Liquid Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmary, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    As part of a project focusing on techniques in industrial chemistry, students carry out experiments on separating copper from cobalt in chloride-containing aqueous solution by liquid extraction with triisoctylamine solvent and search the literature on the separation process of these metals. These experiments and the literature research are…

  11. Recent trends in metals extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regel-Rosocka, M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available After near 70 years of practical usage, solvent extraction is a perfectly mastered technique of separation, widely used on an industrial scale for the separation of metals mainly from raw materials. However, currently, in the era of depleting natural resources and increasingly less accessible deposits, environmental restrictions, etc., an increasing interest, both from social and economical constrains, is being directed at the extraction of metals from the secondary sources (such as batteries, electronic scrap. In many cases, solvent extraction, due to its operational characteristics, can be considered as the Best Available Technology for the purpose of separating multielemental metal solutions. This paper provides a brief overview of past achievements and present scenario of solvent extraction investigations and developments, describing some recently commissioned solvent extraction plants, whereas the Skorpion Zinc plant (Namibia for zinc extraction from raw materials and caesium removal from radioactive High Level Wastes (HLWs are told over in detail as case studies. The paper also presents some proposals for the use of liquid-liquid extraction to separate metal ions from secondary sources (e.g. cobalt from industrial waste streams. The review highlights the emerging use of ionic liquids as new extractants for metals, providing an insight into this exciting research field. Despite its detractors, solvent extraction has entered in force into XXI century as a leading separation technology for metals.Después de casi 70 años de uso práctico, la extracción líquido-líquido o extracción con disolventes es una técnica de separación muy evolucionada, utilizándose a escala industrial en el beneficio de metales obtenidos de diversas materias primas. Sin embargo, con el agotamiento de los recursos naturales y el aumento de depósitos minerales de más difícil acceso, restricciones medio ambientales, etc., ha aumentado el interés, tanto desde

  12. Removal of actinides from high activity wastes by solvent extraction: outline of the research work at Ispra J.R.C. laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannone, F.

    1976-07-01

    The development of an advanced waste management alternative such as the actinide nuclear incineration requires an almost quantitative removal of actinides from waste streams. Within the framework of the Ispra JRC Waste Disposal R and D programme, actinide separation studies were directed towards solvent extraction and precipitation methods. To develop a tentative waste partitioning flow-sheet based on solvent extraction, two conceptual process flow-sheet for actinide removal were evaluated on the basis of the currently used actinide recovery processes, i.e. removal after waste adjustment to low-acidity conditions and direct actinide removal from acidic wastes, as they are generated in actual reprocessing plants. No improvements have been devised for actinide recoveries within the conventional Purex reprocessing operations and a currently agreed value has been assumed for neptunium recovery (90%). According to these basic orientations some organic extractants have been selected for testing as promising candidates for waste partitioning and laboratory studies, designed to develop a satisfactory partitioning flow-sheet, have been proposed and described

  13. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    This is a continuing DOE-BES funded project on transition metal and actinide containing species, aimed at the electronic structure and spectroscopy of transition metal and actinide containing species. While a long term connection of these species is to catalysis and environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes, the immediate relevance is directly to other DOE-BES funded experimental projects at DOE-National labs and universities. There are a number of ongoing gas-phase spectroscopic studies of these species at various places, and our computational work has been inspired by these experimental studies and we have also inspired other experimental and theoretical studies. Thus our studies have varied from spectroscopy of diatomic transition metal carbides to large complexes containing transition metals, and actinide complexes that are critical to the environment. In addition, we are continuing to make code enhancements and modernization of ALCHEMY II set of codes and its interface with relativistic configuration interaction (RCI). At present these codes can carry out multi-reference computations that included up to 60 million configurations and multiple states from each such CI expansion. ALCHEMY II codes have been modernized and converted to a variety of platforms such as Windows XP, and Linux. We have revamped the symbolic CI code to automate the MRSDCI technique so that the references are automatically chosen with a given cutoff from the CASSCF and thus we are doing accurate MRSDCI computations with 10,000 or larger reference space of configurations. The RCI code can also handle a large number of reference configurations, which include up to 10,000 reference configurations. Another major progress is in routinely including larger basis sets up to 5g functions in thee computations. Of course higher angular momenta functions can also be handled using Gaussian and other codes with other methods such as DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), etc. We have also calibrated our RECP

  14. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2009-01-01

    This is a continuing DOE-BES funded project on transition metal and actinide containing species, aimed at the electronic structure and spectroscopy of transition metal and actinide containing species. While a long term connection of these species is to catalysis and environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes, the immediate relevance is directly to other DOE-BES funded experimental projects at DOE-National labs and universities. There are a number of ongoing gas-phase spectroscopic studies of these species at various places, and our computational work has been inspired by these experimental studies and we have also inspired other experimental and theoretical studies. Thus our studies have varied from spectroscopy of diatomic transition metal carbides to large complexes containing transition metals, and actinide complexes that are critical to the environment. In addition, we are continuing to make code enhancements and modernization of ALCHEMY II set of codes and its interface with relativistic configuration interaction (RCI). At present these codes can carry out multi-reference computations that included up to 60 million configurations and multiple states from each such CI expansion. ALCHEMY II codes have been modernized and converted to a variety of platforms such as Windows XP, and Linux. We have revamped the symbolic CI code to automate the MRSDCI technique so that the references are automatically chosen with a given cutoff from the CASSCF and thus we are doing accurate MRSDCI computations with 10,000 or larger reference space of configurations. The RCI code can also handle a large number of reference configurations, which include up to 10,000 reference configurations. Another major progress is in routinely including larger basis sets up to 5g functions in thee computations. Of course higher angular momenta functions can also be handled using Gaussian and other codes with other methods such as DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), etc. We have also calibrated our RECP

  15. A novel malonamide grafted polystyrene-divinyl benzene resin for extraction, pre-concentration and separation of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S A; Mohapatra, P K; Manchanda, V K

    2009-01-30

    A new chelating polymeric extraction chromatographic resin was prepared by chemical anchoring of N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-dibutyl malonamide (DMDBMA) with chloromethylated Merrifield resin((R)). The grafted resin exhibited stronger binding for hexavalent and tetravalent actinides such as U(VI), Th(IV) and Pu(IV) over trivalent actinides, viz. Am(III) and Pu(III). Batch studies on solid phase extraction performed over a wide range of acid solution (0.01-6M HNO(3)) revealed that ternary mixer of uranium, americium and plutonium or thorium, americium and plutonium could be separated from each other at 1M HNO(3). Desorption of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from the loaded resin was efficiently carried out using 0.1M alpha-HIBA, 0.25M oxalic acid and 0.01M EDTA, respectively. Quantitative pre-concentration of actinide ions such as Th(IV) and U(VI) was possible from 3M HNO(3) solution. The practical utility of the grafted resin was evaluated by uranium sorption measurements in several successive cycles. The sorption efficiency of the resin with respect to uranyl ion remained unchanged even after 30 days of continuous use. The surface morphology of the resin was monitored with the help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique.

  16. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  17. Titanium Pyrophosphate for Removal of Trivalent Heavy Metals and Actinides Simulated by Retention of Europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Espinosa, Rosa María; Ordoñez-Regil, Eduardo; Fernández-Valverde, Suilma Marisela

    2017-01-01

    This work addresses the synthesis of titanium pyrophosphate, as well as the characterization and evaluation of the sorption process of europium, for removal of trivalent heavy metals and actinides simulate. The evaluation of the surface properties of titanium pyrophosphate was carried out determining the surface roughness and surface acidity constants. The values obtained from the determination of the surface roughness of the synthesized solid indicate that the surface of the material presents itself as slightly smooth. The FITEQL program was used to fit the experimental titration curves to obtain the surface acidity constants: log⁡K+ = 3.59 ± 0.06 and log⁡K− = −3.90 ± 0.05. The results of sorption kinetics evidenced that the pseudo-order model explains the retention process of europium, in which the initial sorption velocity was 8.3 × 10−4 mg g−1 min−1 and kinetic constant was 1.8 × 10−3 g mg min−1. The maximum sorption capacity was 0.6 mg g−1. The results obtained from sorption edge showed the existence of two bidentate complexes on the surface. PMID:28785720

  18. Analysis of evidence for an irreproducible martensite-like behavior in actinide metals and alloys below room temperature. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1976-05-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that a low-temperature, martensite-like behavior may be quite general in actinide metals and their alloys and compounds. There may be no metastable martensitic embryos in an ..cap alpha..-phase structure of high-purity U, Np, and Pu formed by a diffusion-controlled ..beta.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. transformation, and thus no evidence for low-temperature phases. The effect of impurity content on observed low-temperature physical properties of these actinides is noted. It is proposed that impurities may be playing several roles. They may permit an electron redistribution in dilute alloys dependent upon the length of holding time. Experimentally determined values for the electronic contribution to heat capacity and the density of states of U, Np, and Pu should thus vary over a considerable range, as has been observed. Variations in interstitial ordering of impurity atoms with processing may yield stacking variants of each basic close-packed actinide metal structure and thus determine the number and structure of low-temperature phase. 46 references.

  19. The state of the art of partitioning technology for long-lived actinides and fission products by solvent extraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, M.; Koma, Y.; Nomura, K.; Sano, Y.

    1998-04-01

    Japan launched an ambitious long-term program on partitioning and transmutation (P-T) called OMEGA in 1988. Under the program PNC has being carried out its R and D activities. A check and review process based on progress made was conducted in fall 1998 by STA (Science and Technology Agency). This report was prepared to submit the state of R and D activities on partitioning by solvent extraction program in PNC for seven years (1990-1997) to STA. The paper described the progress, the results and future plans on (a) improved PUREX process for the extraction of Np with Pu by valence control, (b) improved TRUEX process for the extraction of minor Actinides and (c) other potential solvents for the extraction of other long-lived FPs from spent fuels. (H. Itami)

  20. Extraction of minor actinides, lanthanides and other fission products by silica-immobilized BTBP/BTPhen ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Ashfaq; Distler, Petr; Harwood, Laurence M; John, Jan; Westwood, James

    2017-04-04

    Novel BTBP [bis-(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine]/BTPhen [bis-(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline] functionalized silica gels have been developed to extract minor actinides, lanthanides and other fission products. BTPhen functionalized silica gel is capable of near-quantitative removal of Am(iii) in the presence of Eu(iii) from aqueous HNO 3 , while BTBP functionalized silica gel is able to remove problematic corrosion and fission products that are found in PUREX raffinates.

  1. Application of liquid metals for the extraction of solid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid metals dissolve several solid metals in considerable amounts at moderate temperatures. The dissolution processes may be based upon simple physical solubility, formation of intermetallic phases. Even chemical reactions are often observed in which non-metallic elements might be involved. Thus, the capacity to dissolve metals and chemical properties of the liquid metals play a role in these processes. Besides the solubility also chemical properties and thermochemical data are of importance. The dissolution of metals in liquid metals can be applied to separate the solutes from other metals or non-metallic phases. Relatively noble metals can be chemically reduced by the liquid phases. Such solution processes can be applied in the extractive metallurgy, for instance to extract metals from metallic waste. The recycling of metals is of high economical and ecological importance. Examples of possible processes are discussed. (author)

  2. Novel diglycolamide functionalized calix[4]arenes for actinide extraction and supported liquid membrane studies: Part II. Role of substituents in the pendent arms and mass transfer modeling I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Iqbal, M.; Kandwal, P.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Several calix[4]arene-functionalized diglycolamide (C4DGA) ligands were evaluated for the extraction as well as supported liquid membrane (SLM) transport of actinides and fission product elements from nitric acid feed solutions. The extraction efficiency of the C4DGA ligands for Am(III) was orders

  3. Complexation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with several novel diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes: solvent extraction, luminescence and theoretical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raut, Dhaval R.; Mohapatra, Prasanta K.; Ansari, Seraj A.; Godbole, Shrikant V.; Iqbal, M.; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Several diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes (DGA–Calix) were evaluated for actinide extraction from acidic feeds. The ligands with four diglycolamide (DGA) pendent arms are significantly more effective extractants than those with two DGA pendent arms. The ligands have a preference for the

  4. Trivalent actinide-lanthanide extraction by DEHPA. Structure of organic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattee, D.; Musikas, C.; Faure, A.; Chachaty, C.

    1985-09-01

    The di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid HDEHDTP is a bidentate ligand with sulphur donor atoms which has a good affinity for soft acids. H 2 O H NMR and light diffraction let us demonstrate that HDEHDTP is a monomer and NaDEHDTP a reverse micelle. When La 3+ replaces Na + , the reverse micelle is preserved. In the same way when TBP expells H 2 O the polymerised state is preserved. Evidence of that is provided by low angle X-ray diffraction; the micelles are shell-shaped and the ions are strongly tied to the ligand. The mechanism of extraction has been determined with traces of metal for HDEHDTP and the synergistic system HDEHDTP, TBP. The substitution of H 2 O by TBP in the complex induces a shortening of the S-metal bound so that the 5f ions better ability to form covalent bounds is settled [fr

  5. Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-06-01

    Following an internal contamination event, the transport of actinide (An) and lanthanide (Ln) metal ions through the body is facilitated by endogenous ligands such as the human iron-transport protein transferrin (Tf). The recognition of resulting metallo-transferrin complexes (M2Tf) by the cognate transferrin receptor (TfR) is therefore a critical step for cellular uptake of these metal ions. A high performance liquid chromatography-based method has been used to probe the binding of M2Tf with TfR, yielding a direct measurement of the successive thermodynamic constants that correspond to the dissociation of TfR(M2Tf)2 and TfR(M2Tf) complexes for Fe(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), Yb(3+), Lu(3+), (232)Th(4+), (238)UO2(2+), and (242)Pu(4+). Important features of this method are (i) its ability to distinguish both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes formed between the receptor and the metal-bound transferrin, and (ii) the requirement for very small amounts of each binding partner ( Th(4+) ~ UO2(2+) ~ Cm(3+) > Ln(3+) ~ Ga(3+) > Yb(3+) ~ Pu(4+). This study substantiates a role for Tf in binding lanthanide fission products and actinides, and transporting them into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  6. Partitioning of actinide from simulated high level wastes arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuels: counter current extraction studies using CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshingkar, D.S.; Chitnis, R.R.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Nair, M.K.T.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Rao, M.K.; Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Iyer, R.H.; Badheka, L.P.; Banerji, A.

    1994-01-01

    High level wastes (HLW) arising from reprocessing of pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) fuels contain actinides like neptunium, americium and cerium which are not extracted in the Purex process. They also contain small quantities of uranium and plutonium in addition to fission products. Removal of these actinides prior to vitrification of HLW can effectively reduce the active surveillance period of final waste form. Counter current studies using indigenously synthesised octyl (phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) were taken up as a follow-up of successful runs with simulated sulphate bearing low acid HLW solutions. The simulated HLW arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuel was prepared based on presumed burnup of 6500 MWd/Te of uranium, 3 years cooling period and 800 litres of waste generation per tonne of fuel reprocessed. The alpha activity of the HLW raffinate after extraction with the CMPO-TBP mixture could be brought down to near background level. (author). 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs

  7. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl - , NO 3 - , C 2 O 4 2- ) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , UO 2 2+ , Fe 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ ) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author) [fr

  8. New molecules for the separation of actinides (III): the picolinamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, P.Y.; Condamines, N.; Berthon, L.; Madic, C.

    1994-01-01

    Minor actinide partitioning from high level liquid wastes produced during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels by the Purex process, requires the design of new extracting molecules. These new extractants must be able to separate, for example, actinides from lanthanides. This separation is very difficult, due to the similar chemical properties of these metallic species, but it can possibly be reached by using extractants with soft donor atoms (N or S). Some new molecules : the picolinamides are investigated in this way. The general chemical formula and the behaviour of these compounds in acidic media are given. (O.L.). 3 refs

  9. New molecules for the separation of actinides (III): the picolinamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, P.Y.; Condamines, N.; Berthon, L.; Madic, C.

    1994-12-31

    Minor actinide partitioning from high level liquid wastes produced during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels by the Purex process, requires the design of new extracting molecules. These new extractants must be able to separate, for example, actinides from lanthanides. This separation is very difficult, due to the similar chemical properties of these metallic species, but it can possibly be reached by using extractants with soft donor atoms (N or S). Some new molecules : the picolinamides are investigated in this way. The general chemical formula and the behaviour of these compounds in acidic media are given. (O.L.). 3 refs.

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopy on actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boge, M.

    1988-01-01

    The wide spatial extend of the 5f electrons leads a broad spectrum of chemical and physical properties, in particular magnetic, in compounds of light actinides. Their behaviour goes from the localized magnetism of lanthanides to the itinerant magnetism often found in transition metals compounds. One parameter which strongly influences the magnetic character is the actinide-actinide distance. Moessbauer spectroscopy of the 59.5 KeV resonance in 237 Np allows a detailed study of local magnetic properties of the Np ion. Some results are presented on compounds of different crystallographic structure, showing the large variety of magnetic properties

  11. Metal-oxygen hybridization and core-level spectra in actinide and rare-earth oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolorenč, Jindřich

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 44 (2016), s. 3007-3012 ISSN 2059-8521 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-05872J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : actinide * lanthanide * oxide * electronic structure * photoemission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. Performance comparison of metallic, actinide burning fuel in lead-bismuth and sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.; Herring, J.S.; Macdonald, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed to ''incinerate'' or ''transmute'' the current inventory of transuranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years. (author)

  13. Mercury extraction by the TRUEX process solvent. II. Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, 203 Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl 2 , from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO 3 and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na 2 CO 3 . Because experiments described here show that mercury can be extracted from SBW and stripped from the solvent, a process has been developed to partition mercury from the actinides in SBW. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Superconductivity in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Lawson, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The trends in the occurrence of superconductivity in actinide materials are discussed. Most of them seem to show simple transition metal behavior. However, the superconductivity of americium proves that the f electrons are localized in that element and that ''actinides'' is the correct name for this row of elements. Recently the superconductivity of UBe 13 and UPt 3 has been shown to be extremely unusual, and these compounds fall in the new class of compounds now known as heavy fermion materials

  15. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of polyhydroxamate chelators for selective complexation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, A.; Jacobs, H.; Koshti, N.; Stark, P.; Huber, V.; Dasaradhi, L.; Caswell, W.; Smith, P.; Jarvinen, G.

    1995-01-01

    Specific chelating polymers targeted for actinides have much relevance to problems involving remediation of nuclear waste. Goal is to develop polymer supported, ion specific extraction systems for removing actinides and other hazardous metal ions from wastewaters. This is part of an effort to develop chelators for removing actinide ions such as Pu from soils and waste streams. Selected ligands are being attached to polymeric backbones to create novel chelating polymers. These polymers and other water soluble and insoluble polymers have been synthesized and are being evaluated for ability to selectively remove target metal ions from process waste streams

  16. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of polyhydroxamate chelators for selective complexation of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, A.; Jacobs, H.; Koshti, N.; Stark, P.; Huber, V.; Dasaradhi, L.; Caswell, W. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, P.; Jarvinen, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Specific chelating polymers targeted for actinides have much relevance to problems involving remediation of nuclear waste. Goal is to develop polymer supported, ion specific extraction systems for removing actinides and other hazardous metal ions from wastewaters. This is part of an effort to develop chelators for removing actinide ions such as Pu from soils and waste streams. Selected ligands are being attached to polymeric backbones to create novel chelating polymers. These polymers and other water soluble and insoluble polymers have been synthesized and are being evaluated for ability to selectively remove target metal ions from process waste streams.

  17. The Properties of Trilaurylmethylammonium Nitrate as an Extractant for Trivalent Actinides. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooyen, J. van

    1970-03-01

    The concept of the group of the actinide elements as a f-type transition series within the periodic system was first launched by G.T. Seaborg in 1944]. In this transition series the filling up of the 5 f electron shell would cause a close similarity with the lanthanide series. This proved to be a very fruitful hypothesis in the prediction of the properties of the new elements americium and curium that soon were discovered. The new hypothesis necessitated a shift of the accepted ideas concerning the place of the elements thorium, protactinium and uranium in the periodic table. In fact, the chemistry of these elements had never been considered to be so closely parallel to that of the lanthanides. On the contrary, the trend in the stability of the oxidation states had been interpreted to indicate that these elements would belong to group IVA, VA and VIA respectively. It is undeniable that there are marked differences in oxidation states between the lanthanide elements and the first six elements of the actinide series. However, physical and chemical investigations both of the newly discovered elements and the elements actinium to uranium disclosed many resemblances with the lanthanides that had not been noticed before in this group. The actinide elements - and more in particular the transuranium elements - have been the subject of a number of monographs covering the discovery, the synthesis, the systematics, the chemistry, and (or) the nuclear properties of these elements. It is for this reason that the scope of the following sections in this chapter will be limited to a summary of the chemistry in sofar as it is relevant to the investigations described in the following chapters, viz., the properties of the elements in aqueous systems and more in particular in those systems containing nitrate ions

  18. Partition of actinides and fission products between metal and molten salt phases: Theory, measurement, and application to IFR pyroprocess development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemical basis of Integral Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing (pyroprocessing) is partition of fuel, cladding, and fission product elements between molten LiCl-KCl and either a solid metal phase or a liquid cadmium phase. The partition reactions are described herein, and the thermodynamic basis for predicting distributions of actinides and fission products in the pyroprocess is discussed. The critical role of metal-phase activity coefficients, especially those of rare earth and the transuranic elements, is described. Measured separation factors, which are analogous to equilibrium constants but which involve concentrations rather than activities, are presented. The uses of thermodynamic calculations in process development are described, as are computer codes developed for calculating material flows and phase compositions in pyroprocessing

  19. Systematic thermodynamic properties of actinide metal-oxygen systems at high temperatures: Emphasis on lower valence states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, R.J.; Chandrasekharaiah, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    The thermodynamic data for the actinide metals and oxides (thorium to curium ) have been assessed, examined for consistency, and compared with the lanthanides. Correlations relating the enthalpies of formation of the solid oxides with the corresponding aquo ions make possible the estimation of the thermodynamic properties of AmO 2 (s) and Am 2 O 3 (s) which are in accordance with vaporization data. The known thermodynamic properties of the substoichiometric dioxides MOsub(2-x)(s) at high temperatures demonstrate the relative stabilities of valence states less than 4+ and lead to the examination of stability requirements for the sesquioxides M 2 O 3 (s) and the monoxides MO(s). Sequential trends in the gaseous metals, monoxides and dioxides are examined, compared, and contrasted with the lanthanides. (author)

  20. Partition of actinides and fission products between metal and molten salt phases: Theory, measurement, and application to IFR pyroprocess development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-10-01

    The chemical basis of Integral Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing (pyroprocessing) is partition of fuel, cladding, and fission product elements between molten LiCl-KCl and either a solid metal phase or a liquid cadmium phase. The partition reactions are described herein, and the thermodynamic basis for predicting distributions of actinides and fission products in the pyroprocess is discussed. The critical role of metal-phase activity coefficients, especially those of rare earth and the transuranic elements, is described. Measured separation factors, which are analogous to equilibrium constants but which involve concentrations rather than activities, are presented. The uses of thermodynamic calculations in process development are described, as are computer codes developed for calculating material flows and phase compositions in pyroprocessing.

  1. Halogen protected cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO functions as anionic extractants for trivalent lanthanide/actinide partitioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Švec, Petr; Selucký, P.; Bubeníková, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2012), s. 103-112 ISSN 0277-5387 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : carboranes * metallaboranes * dicarbollides * CMPR * liquid-liquid extraction * lanthanides * actinides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.813, year: 2012

  2. Refractory metals extraction, processing and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liddell, K.C.; Sadoway, D.R.; Bautista, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following topics regarding refractory metals: process flowsheet development; high temperature extraction processes; chemical and thermal processing; electrolytic processing; preparation of ceramic precursors and application of aqueous chemistry to metal recovery; processing and properties. Some of the metals covered include: hafnium, vanadium, niobium, zirconium, and tantalum

  3. Contribution to the study of diffusion in rare earth metals and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbach, Gabriel.

    1978-07-01

    This work describes several experiments carried out in order to understand the process of self diffusion in rare earth and actinides (self diffusion of body centered cubic γ neptunium, diffusion of gadolinium in body centered delta cerium, measurement of the activation volume of face centered cubic γ cerium). The unstable electronic structure of some elements cannot be correlate with anomalous diffusion properties. In fact the diffusion parameters of neptunium and plutonium are similar (high diffusivity and low activation energy) whereas the electronic structure of neptunium is stable and that of plutonium is temperature dependent. The negative activation volume of the body centered cubic phases of plutonium and cerium does not indicate a particular diffusion mechanism since self diffusion is faster under pressure in face centered cubic γ cerium where a vacancy mechanism is assumed according to earlier results. The vacancy mechanism is the most probable diffusion process in the body centered cubic and compact phases of rare earths and actinides [fr

  4. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr2+, Fe3+, Nd3+, and Am3+, from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  5. Use of two-phase aqueous systems based on water-soluble polymers in thin-layer and extraction chromatography for recovery and separtion of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Shkinev, V.M.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility has been demonstrated of using two-phase aqueous systems based on water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and dextran sulfate, in thin-layer and extraction chromatography for recovery and separation of actinides. A convenient method has been proposed for continuous recovery of 239 Np from 243 Am, originating from differences in sorption of tri- and pentavalent actinides from sulfate solutions containing potassium phosphotungstate by silica gel impregnated with polyethylene glycol. New plates for thin-layer chromatography using water-soluble polymers have been developed. These plates were used to study behavior of americium in various oxidation states in thin sorbent layers

  6. Synthesis and characterization of templated ion exchange resins for the selective complexation of actinide ions. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, G.M.; Uy, O.M.

    1998-01-01

    'The purpose of this research is to develop polymeric extractants for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and body fluids). Selectivity for a specific actinide ion is obtained by providing polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced using a specific actinide ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The polymers will provide useful sequestering agents for removing actinide ions from wastes and will form the basis for a variety of analytical techniques for actinide determinations.'

  7. Overview on extraction kinetics of metal adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.; Daoud, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A overview of extraction kinetics solvent extraction of metal adducts is given. A kinetic regime, diffusional regime, and mixed diffusional-kinetic regime are analysed. The practical applications of kinetics of solvent extraction processes in connection with technical processes and counter-current modelling is discussed. Kinetic studies are essential for the development of new processes and the knowledge of factors governing the mass transfer and mechanism of extraction of metal ions is of major importance in the design, operation, control and optimization of reactors in chemical industry. 23 refs

  8. Solvent extraction of noble metals by formazans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, M.; Hueppe, U.; Kettrup, A.

    1984-01-01

    The extraction properties of ion-pairs composed of quaternary ammonium cations and a sulphonated formazan were compared with those of an unsulphonated formazan, for various solvent media. In dichloromethane the combined system behaves as a 'coloured anion-exchanger', with displacement of the sulphonated formazan, whereas in toluene Pd(II) and Ag(I) are extracted as the metal formazan chelates from aqueous medium. The rates of extraction are remarkably higher than with the simple extractants. Because of the higher stability only the simple chelating extraction systems afford satisfactory separation of Pd(II) from excess of Pt(IV) and of Ag(I) from Cu(II). The extracted metals can be stripped and the extractant regenerated. (author)

  9. Mixed Metal Phosphonate- Phosphate Resins for Separation of Lanthanides from Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearfield, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    As indicated in the previous annual report the goals of this project are to develop procedures for efficient separation of lanthanides from actinides and curium from americium. These processes are required for the nuclear fuel cycle to minimize the waste and recover the valuable actinides. The basis for our study is that we have prepared a group of compounds that are porous and favor the uptake of ions with charges 3+ and 4+ over ions of lesser charge. The general formula for these materials is M(O 3 PC 6 H 4 PO 3 ) 1-x/2 (APO 4 )x·nH 2 O: where M=Zr 4+ , Sn 4+ , A=H, Na, or K and X=O, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, 1.33 and 1.61-3. One of our tasks is to determine which members of this group of compounds are effective in carrying out the required separations. A difficulty in obtaining this required information is that the compounds are amorphous. That is they are not crystalline, therefore we need to resort to synchrotron data to obtain structural data which will be presented in detail. This information will be provided as a separate section.

  10. Mixed Metal Phosphonate- Phosphate Resins for Separation of Lanthanides from Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearfield, Abraham [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-10-24

    As indicated in the previous annual report the goals of this project are to develop procedures for efficient separation of lanthanides from actinides and curium from americium. These processes are required for the nuclear fuel cycle to minimize the waste and recover the valuable actinides. The basis for our study is that we have prepared a group of compounds that are porous and favor the uptake of ions with charges 3+ and 4+ over ions of lesser charge. The general formula for these materials is M(O3PC6H4PO3)1-x/2(APO4)x·nH2O: where M=Zr4+, Sn4+, A=H, Na, or K and X=O, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, 1.33 and 1.61-3. One of our tasks is to determine which members of this group of compounds are effective in carrying out the required separations. A difficulty in obtaining this required information is that the compounds are amorphous. That is they are not crystalline, therefore we need to resort to synchrotron data to obtain structural data which will be presented in detail. This information will be provided as a separate section.

  11. Heavy metals extraction from anaerobically digested sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchioretto, M.M.; Bruning, H.; Loan, N.T.P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the chemical extraction efficiency in the removal of heavy metals from sludge from an activated-sludge system, which receives as influent both industrial and municipal wastewater. Utilizing a series of chemical extractants in a sequential order comprised the first phase of the

  12. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Ashleigh; Lukens, Wayne; Lu, Connie; Arnold, John

    2014-04-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[-(NHCH2PiPr2)C6H4]3 and Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) with a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4]- unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively rare class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) and 3.0319(7) for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using 1H, 1H-1H COSY, 31P and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-Vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  13. Actinides-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  14. Actinides-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  15. Use of electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the study of metal (III) extraction by dialkyl phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, E.; Berthon, L.; Heres, X.; Gannaz, B.; Berthon, C.; Adnet, J.M

    2004-07-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste reprocessing, separation processes of minor actinide from fission product are developed by CEA. In order to understand the mechanism involved in the extraction process, the complexes ligand - metallic cations formed in organic phase has been characterized. This paper deals with the extraction of lanthanides (III) and actinides (III) cations by dialkyl phosphoric acid (the bis- 1,3-dimethyl-butyl-phosphoric acid). The associative properties of the extractant were studied, the complexes (metal-ligand) present in organic phase were identified and the interactions ligand-metal were characterized. The electro-spray ionization -mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to investigate organic solutions, and the results are compared with those obtained by other techniques like NMR, IRTF and distribution ratio studies. (authors)

  16. Selective chelation and extraction of lanthanides and actinides with supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, R.D.; Carleson, T.E.; Harrington, J.D.; Jean, F.; Jiang, H.; Lin, Y.; Wai, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report is made up of three independent papers: (1) Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Thorium and Uranium with Fluorinated Beta-Diketones and Tributyl Phosphate, (2) Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lanthanides with Beta-Diketones and Mixed Ligands, and (3) A Group Contribution Method for Predicting the Solubility of Solid Organic Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Experimental data are presented demonstrating the successful extraction of thorium and uranium using fluorinated beta-diketones to form stable complexes that are extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide. The conditions for extracting the lanthanide ions from liquid and solid materials using supercritical carbon dioxide are presented. In addition, the Peng-Robison equation of state and thermodynamic equilibrium are used to predict the solubilities of organic solids in supercritical carbon dioxide from the sublimation pressure, critical properties, and a centric factor of the solid of interest.

  17. Cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO groups as selective extraction agents for lanthanide and actinide cations from highly acidic nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, B.; Plesek, J.; Baca, J.; Cisarova, I.; Dozol, J.F.; Rouquette, H.; Vinas, C.; Selucky, P.; Rais, J.

    2002-01-01

    A new series of boron substituted cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1-) ion (1) derivatives of the general formula [(8-CMPO-(CH 2 -CH 2 O) 2 -1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )-3,3'-Co] - (CMPO = Ph 2 P(O)-CH 2 C(O)NR, R = C 4 H 9 (3b), -C 12 H 25 (4b), -CH 2 -C 6 H 5 (5b)) was prepared by ring cleavage of the 8-dioxane-cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (2) bi-polar compound by the respective primary amines and by subsequent reaction of the resulting amino derivatives (3a-5a) with the nitrophenyl ester of diphenyl-phosphoryl-acetic acid. The compounds were synthesized with the aim to develop a new class of more efficient extraction agents for liquid/liquid extraction of polyvalent cations, i.e. lanthanides and actinides, from high-level activity nuclear waste. All compounds were characterized by a combination of 11 B NMR, 1 H high field NMR, Mass Spectrometry with Electro-spray and MALDI TOF ionisation, HPLC and other techniques. The molecular structure of the supramolecular Ln 3+ complex of the anion 5b was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystallographic results proved that the Ln(m) atom is bonded to three functionalized cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anions in a charge compensated complex. The cation is tightly coordinated by six oxygen atoms of the CMPO terminal groups (two of each ligand) and by three water molecules completing the metal coordination number to 9. Atoms occupying the primary coordination sphere form a tri-capped trigonal prismatic arrangement. Very high liquid-liquid extraction efficiency of all anionic species was observed. Moreover, less polar toluene can be applied as an auxiliary solvent replacing the less environmentally friendly nitro- and chlorinated solvents used in the current dicarbollide liquid-liquid extraction process. The extraction coefficients are sufficiently high for possible technological applications. (authors)

  18. Investigation of actinide extraction by calixarenes. Application to radio-toxicological analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinse, Christelle

    1999-01-01

    As measurement of uranium in urine is one of the controls performed for a dosimetric survey of workers exposed to risk of internal contamination, this research thesis aimed at the selection of a new ligand able to selectively extract uranium (even traces of uranium) from urine. Optimal extraction conditions have been achieved and an analysis protocol has been proposed. A calixarene compound comprising three carboxylic functions has been chosen as selective ligand for the uranyl ion. Extraction properties of this calixarene have been studied in a two phase system. The influence of complexing anions generally present in urines (such as chloride, sulphate or phosphate ions) has been assessed. This protocol allows uranium to be isolated in a more repeatable, while simpler and quicker way. Moreover, after de-extraction, uranium measurement can be quickly performed by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry) [fr

  19. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  20. Lanthanide and actinide extractions with anionic ligands based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selucky, P.; Rais, J.; Lucanikova, M. [Nuclear Research Inst. plc., Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Gruener, B.; Kvicalova, M. [Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry, v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Husinec-Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Fejfarova, K. [Inst. of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Cisarova, I. [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Compounds were synthesized with the aim to develop efficient extraction agents for liquid-liquid extraction of polyvalent cations, i.e. lanthanides and actinides from high-level activity nuclear waste. Compounds of general formulation [(8-CMPO-(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}O){sub 2}-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 10})(1',2'-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11})-3.3'-Co(III)] with different phosphorus and nitrogen substitution (CMPO={sup 2}R,{sup 3}R P(O)-(CH{sub 2}){sub n}C(O)N{sup 1}R, {sup 1}R = t-octyl, H, Ph, {sup 2}R=Ph, n-octyl, {sup 3}R=Ph, n = 1,2)-(4a to 4e), were prepared and characterized by combination of {sup 11}B NMR, {sup 1}H high field NMR, ESI-M.S., HPLC and other techniques. Molecular structure of the sodium complex of ligand 4a ({sup 1}R = t-octyl, {sup 2}R = {sup 3}R = Ph, n = 1) was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Effect of several modifications in the structure of 4a-4e on the extraction properties was outlined. The study resulted in the definition of ionic ligand with enhanced extraction efficiency for 4a,b (t-octyl and H on the amidic nitrogen atom) and a better solubility of 4a and 4d ({sup 1}R = t-octyl, {sup 2}R = n-Oct, {sup 1}R=Ph, n = 1) in less polar solvents. Low polar mixtures of hydrogenated tetrapropylene (TPH) hexyl methyl ketone (HMK) can be applied as an auxiliary solvent for 4a, selected for detailed studies, replacing thus the polar and less environmentally friendly nitro-, fluoro- and chloro- solvents used in the current dicarbollide liquid-liquid extraction process. Results of the fission products separation from the simulated PUREX feed using 4a are presented inclusive procedures for Eu{sup 3+} stripping. (orig.)

  1. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  2. Recovering actinide values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Mason, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Actinide values are recovered from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorus extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N, N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant can be recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution. (author)

  3. Selective chelation-supercritical fluid extraction of metal ions from waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.N.; Laintz, K.E.; Yonker, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The removal of toxic organics, metals, and radioisotopes from solids or liquids is a major concern in the treatment of industrial and nuclear wastes. For this reason, developing methods for selective separation of toxic metals and radioactive materials from solutions of complex matrix is an important problem in environmental research. Recent developments indicate supercritical fluids are good solvents for organic compounds. Many gases become supercritical fluids under moderate temperatures and pressures. For example, the critical temperature and pressure of carbon dioxide are 31 degrees C and 73 atm, respectively. The high diffusivity, low viscosity, and T-P dependence of solvent strength are some attractive properties of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Since CO 2 offers the additional benefits of stability and non-toxicity, the SFE technique avoids generation of organic liquid waste and exposure of personnel to toxic solvents. While direct extraction of metal ions by supercritical fluids is highly inefficient, these ions when complexed with organic ligands become quite soluble in supercritical fluids. Specific ligands can be used to achieve selective extraction of metal ions in this process. After SFE, the fluid phase can be depressurized for precipitation of the metal chelates and recycled. The ligand can also be regenerated for repeated use. The success of this selective chelation-supercritical fluid extraction (SC-SFE) process depends on a number of factors including the efficiencies of the selective chelating agents, solubilities of metal chelates in supercritical fluids, rate of extraction, ease of regeneration of the ligands, etc. In this report, the authors present recent results on the studies of the solubilities of metal chelates in supercritical CO 2 , experimental ions from aqueous solution, and the development of selective chelating agents (ionizable crown ethers) for the extraction of lanthanides and actinides

  4. Comparative evaluation of DHDECMP [dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-methylphosphonate] and CMPO [octylphenyl-N,N,-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide] as extractants for recovering actinides from nitric acid waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Yarbro, S.L.

    1988-02-01

    Certain neutral, bifunctional organophosphorous compounds are of special value to the nuclear industry. Dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbomoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) are highly selective extractants for removing actinide and lanthanide elements from nitric acid. We obtained these two extractants from newly available commercial sources and evaluated them for recovering Am(III), Pu(IV), and U(VI) from nitric acid waste streams of plutonium processing operations. Variables included the extractant (DHSECMP or CMPO), extractant/tributylphosphate ratio, diluent, nitrate concentration, nitrate salt/nitric acid ratio, fluoride concentration, and contact time. Based on these experimental data, we selected DHDECMP as the perferred extractant for this application. 18 refs., 30 figs

  5. Zirconium(IV)-Benzene Phosphonate Coordination Polymers: Lanthanide and Actinide Extraction and Thermal Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vittorio; Tejada, Juan J; Vega, Daniel; Arrachart, Guilhem; Rey, Cyrielle

    2016-08-15

    Coordination polymers with different P/(Zr + P) molar ratios were prepared by combining aqueous solutions of Zr(IV) and benzenephosphonate derivatives. 1,3,5-Benzenetrisphosphonic acid (BTP) as well as phosphonocarboxylate derivatives in which carboxylate substitutes one or two of the phosphonate groups were chosen as the building blocks. The precipitates obtained on combining the two solutions were not X-ray amorphous but rather were indicative of poorly ordered materials. Hydrothermal treatment did not alter the structure of the materials produced but did result in improved crystalline order. The use of HF as a mineralizing agent during hydrothermal synthesis resulted in the crystallization of at least three relatively crystalline phases whose structure could not be determined owing to the complexity of the diffraction patterns. Gauging from the similarity of the diffraction patterns of all the phases, the poorly ordered precipitates and crystalline materials appeared to have similar underlying structures. The BTP-based zirconium phosphonates all showed a higher selectivity for lanthanides and thorium compared with cations such as Cs(+), Sr(2+), and Co(2+). Substitution of phosphonate groups by carboxylate groups did little to alter the pattern of selectivity implying that selectivity in the system was entirely determined by the -POH group with little influence from the -COOH groups. Samples with the highest phosphorus content showed the highest extraction efficiencies for lanthanide elements, especially the heavy lanthanides such as Dy(3+) and Ho(3+) with separation factors of around four with respect to La(3+). In highly acid solutions (4 M HNO3) there was a pronounced variation in extraction efficiency across the lanthanide series. In situ, nonambient diffraction was performed on ZrBTP-0.8 loaded with Th, Ce, and a complex mixture of lanthanides. In all cases the crystalline Zr2P2O7 pyrophosphate phase was formed at ∼800 °C demonstrating the versatility of

  6. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  7. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  8. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  9. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin T; Castro, Alonso; Montoya, Dennis P; Xu, Ning; Chamberlin, Rebecca M

    2017-05-15

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of nine materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. The microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Grouped actinide separation in advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatz, J.P.; Malmbeck, R.; Ougier, M.; Soucek, P.; Murakamin, T.; Tsukada, T.; Koyama, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at cleaner waste streams (containing only the short-lived fission products) a partitioning and transmutation (P-T) scheme can significantly reduce the quantities of long-lived radionuclides consigned to waste. Many issues and options are being discussed and studied at present in view of selecting the optimal route. The choice is between individual treatment of the relevant elements and a grouped treatment of all actinides together. In the European Collaborative Project ACSEPT (Actinide recycling by Separation and Transmutation), grouped separation options derived from an aqueous extraction or from a dry pyroprocessing route were extensively investigated. Successful demonstration tests for both systems have been carried out in the frame of this project. The aqueous process called GANEX (Grouped Actinide Extraction) is composed of 2 cycles, a first one to recover the major part of U followed by a co-extraction of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm altogether. The pyro-reprocessing primarily applicable to metallic fuels such as the U-Pu-Zr alloy originally developed by the Argonne National Laboratory (US) in the mid 1980s, has also been applied to the METAPHIX fuels containing up to 5% of minor actinides and 5% of lanthanides (e.g. U 60 Pu 20 -Zr 10 Am 2 Nd 3.5 Y 0.5 Ce 0.5 Gd 0.5 ). A grouped actinide separation has been successfully carried out by electrorefining on solid Al cathodes. At present the recovery of the actinides from the alloy formed with Al upon electrodeposition is under investigation, because an efficient P-T cycle requires multiple re-fabrication and re-irradiation. (authors)

  11. RECOVERY OF ACTINIDES FROM AQUEOUS NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, M.

    1963-11-19

    A process of recovering actinides is presented. Tetravalent actinides are extracted from rare earths in an aqueous nitric acid solution with a ketone and back-extracted from the ketone into an aqueous medium. The aqueous actinide solution thus obtained, prior to concentration by boiling, is sparged with steam to reduce its ketone to a maximum content of 3 grams per liter. (AEC)

  12. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2010-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  13. Extracting metals with carbon nanotubes: environmental possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Alguacil, Francisco José; Cerpa Naranjo, Arisbel; Lado Touriño, María Isabel; López, Félix A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the environmental possibilities of using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for extracting metals, taken into account the characteristics of carbon nanotubes to be used as adsorbents and the influence of different factors on the adsorption processes, among them: kind of carbon nanotubes used as adsorbent, particle size, pH of solutions and diameter and length of carbon nanotubes. Also, some images of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force micr...

  14. Insight into the Complexation of Actinides and Lanthanides with Diglycolamide Derivatives : Experimental and Density Functional Theoretical Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Verboom, Willem; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Mohapatra, Prasanta K.

    2017-01-01

    Extraction of actinide (Pu4+, UO2 2+, Am3+) and lanthanide (Eu3+) ions was carried out using different diglycolamide (DGA) ligands with systematic increase in the alkyl chain length from n-pentyl to n-dodecyl. The results show a monotonous reduction in the metal ion extraction efficiency with

  15. Actinide recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.; Chang, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository

  16. Combustion and smoke formation following exposure of actinide metals to explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, R.E.; Church, H.W.; Elrick, R.M.; Parker, D.R.; Nelson, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results from the plutonium aerosol generation experiment (PAGE) program studies indicate that: (1) Significant quantities of metal-bearing aerosols are likely to be formed in an accidental high explosive detonation of a nuclear weapon. Although the explosive charge-to-metal ratio has been reduced in modern weapons, considerable inhalation hazard is still expected due to increased shrapnel formation and streamer combustion. (2) Close-in shrapnel particle sizes and velocities can be estimated by impact sampling techniques. (3) Uranium droplets are a very accurate simulant of plutonium droplets from the standpoint of combustion-related phenomena but do not seem to simulate either the total quantity of aerosol formed from plutonium droplets or its time-dependent generation pattern very well. This is due primarily to the large effect of the explosion of the burning uranium droplets on total aerosol formation which is not observed in the case of plutonium, even though more aerosol is produced per unit time during the actual combustion itself. (4) The formation of chain-like plutonium aerosols from the droplets produced during streamer combustion is expected to produce an unusually active material from the standpoint of inhalation into the lung and ultimate translocation in the body. 16 figures

  17. Separation method of trivalent actinide and rare earth element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koma, Yoshikazu; Watabe, Masayuki; Nemoto, Shin-ichi.

    1997-01-01

    Trivalent actinides and rare earth elements are extracted to a solvent from highly acidic liquid wastes generated upon reprocessing of spent fuels. The concentration of nitric acid in the extracted solvent is reduced. Trivalent actinides and the rare earth elements contained in the solvent at low nitric acid concentration are separated from each other. Trivalent actinides and rare earth elements are extracted into a highly acidic solvent in the extracting step of trivalent actinides and rare earth elements. On the other hand, they can be separated by extraction only at a predetermined pH in the separation step of the rare earth elements and trivalent actinides. In the present invention, trivalent actinides and rare earth elements are separated after removing a predetermined amount of nitric acid from the solution obtained in the trivalent actinide and rare earth element extraction step to provide a proper acidic concentration. Accordingly, they can be separated satisfactorily. (T.M.)

  18. Reactivity of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Hazardous Metal/Actinide Loading During Low Curie Salt Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLIAM, WILMARTH

    2004-11-30

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) in its engineered form (IONSIV (registered) IE-911) continues to be studied for possible use for removing radioactive cesium from several types of waste solutions at the Savannah River Site. This study involved deriving information about spent CST that assists in determining possible disposition alternatives. Results for this work include: After passing 3000 column volumes of a dissolved saltcake simulant containing RCRA hazardous metals, the spent CST passed a TCLP test and is RCRA nonhazardous. The spent CST was found to have transuranic concentrations greater than the TRU limit of 100 nCi/g. The triplicate measurement showed TRU levels greater than 4000 nCi/g. Studies involving simulating storage of ground CST in sludge slurries indicated no detrimental effects on the measured yield stress or viscosity of the slurries when stored for up to 4 months at 50 degrees C. During the storage testing, there was no indication of significant degradation of the C ST as measured by in growth of CST-specific elements in the liquid phase of the slurry. Also, during storage tests minor desorption of cesium from the ground CST material was observed.

  19. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  20. The linear rule of metal extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Li; Yushuang Wang; Zhichun Chen; Shulan Meng

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of experimental results a linear rule for the solvent extraction of rare earths and yttrium over a definite range of acidity and metal ion concentration is found. Relations between the coefficients of the linear rule and initial acidity are presented for the extraction systems: HEH(EHP)-kerosene-HNO 3 -R(NO 3 ) 3 , HEH(EHP)-kerosene-HCl-RCl 3 , D2EHPA-n-heptane-HCl-RCl 3 , HEH(EHP)-n-heptane-HCl-RCl 3 , where R=La-Nd, Sm-Lu, Y; HEH(EHP)=momo(2-ethyl-hexyl)2-ethyl-hexyl phosphonate; D2EHPA=di(2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphoric acid. 3 refs.; 1 tab

  1. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  2. Phoenix type concepts for transmutation of LWR waste minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, M.

    1994-01-01

    A number of variations on the original Phoenix theme were studied. The basic rationale of the Phoenix incinerator is making oxide fuel of the LWR waste minor actinides, loading it in an FFTF-like subcritical core, then bombarding the core with the high current beam accelerated protons to generate considerable energy through spallation and fission reactions. As originally assessed, if the machine is fed with 1600 MeV protons in a 102 mA current, then 8 core modules are driven to transmute the yearly minor actinides waste of 75 1000 MW LWRs into Pu 238 and fission products; in a 2 years cycle the energy extracted is 100000 MW d/T. This performance cannot be substantiated in a rigorous analysis. A calculational consistent methodology, based on a combined execution of the Hermes, NCNP, and Korigen codes, shows, nonetheless that changes in the original Phoenix parameters can upgrade its performance.The original Phoenix contains 26 tons minor actinides in 8 core modules; 1.15 m 3 module is shaped for 40% neutron leakage; with a beam of 102 mA the 8 modules are driven to 100000 MW/T in 10.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinide waste of 15 LWRs; the operation must be assisted by grid electricity. If the 1.15 m 3 module is shaped to allow only 28% leakage, then a beam of 102 mA will drive the 8 modules to 100000 MW/T in 3.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 45 LWRs. Some net grid electricity will be generated. If 25 tons minor actinides are loaded into 5 modules, each 1.72 m 3 in volume and of 24% leakage, then a 97 mA beam will drive the module to 100000 MW/T in 2.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 70 LWRs. A considerable amount of net grid electricity will be generated. If the lattice is made of metal fuel, and 26 tons minor actinides are loaded into 32 small modules, 0.17 m 3 each, then a 102 mA beam will drive the modules to 100000 MW/T in 2 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 72 LWRs. A considerable

  3. Towards an interpretation of the mechanism of the actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation by synergistic solvent extraction with nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands; Vers une interpretation des mecanismes de la separation actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) par extraction liquide-liquide synergique impliquant des ligands polyazotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, N. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France); Universite Henri Poincare, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2000-07-01

    In the field of the separation of long-lived radionuclides from the wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing, aromatic nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands are potential candidates for the selective extraction, alone or in synergistic mixture with acidic extractants, of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides. The first part of this work deals with the complexation of trivalent f cations with various nitrogen-containing ligands (poly-pyridine analogues). Time-resolved laser-induced fluorimetry (TRLIF) and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to determine the nature and evaluate the stability of each complex. Among the ligands studied, the least basic Me-Btp proved to be highly selective towards americium(III) in acidic solution. In the second part, two synergistic systems (nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand and lipophilic carboxylic acid) are studied and compared in regard to the extraction and separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). TRLIF and gamma spectrometry allowed the nature of the extracted complexes and the optimal conditions of efficiency of both systems to be determined. Comparison between these different studies showed that the selectivity of complexation of trivalent f cations by a given nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand could not always be linked to the Am(III)Eu(III) selectivity reached in synergistic extraction. The latter depends on the 'balance' between the acid-basic properties on the one hand, and on the hard-soft characteristics on the other hand, of both components of synergistic system. (author)

  4. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using highly sensitive and advanced laser-based spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been applied for the chemical speciation of actinide in aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. Development of TRLFS technology for the chemical speciation of actinides, Development of laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) system, Application of LIBD technology to investigate dynamic behaviors of actinides dissolution reactions, Development of nanoparticle analysis technology in groundwater using LIBD, Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, Spectroscopic speciation of uranium-ligand complexes in aqueous solution, Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces

  5. Robust membrane systems for actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Bluhm, Elizabeth A.; Abney, Kent D.; Ehler, Deborah S.; Bauer, Eve; Le, Quyen T.; Young, Jennifer S.; Ford, Doris K.; Pesiri, David R.; Dye, Robert C.; Robison, Thomas W.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Redondo, Antonio; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan L.

    2000-01-01

    Our objective in this project is to develop very stable thin membrane structures containing ionic recognition sites that facilitate the selective transport of target metal ions, especially the actinides

  6. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, J.-M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of the actinide series shows the change between transition metal behavior and lanthanide behavior, between constant weak paramagnetism for thorium and strong Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for curium. Curium is shown to be the first metal of the actinide series to be magnetically ordered, its Neel temperature being 52K. The magnetic properties of the actinides depending on all the peripheral electrons, their electronic structure was studied and an attempt was made to determine it by means of a phenomenological model. Attempts were also made to interrelate the different physical properties which depend on the outer electronic structure [fr

  7. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced......The extended spatial distribution of both the transition-metal 3d electrons and the actinide 5f electrons results in a strong interaction between these electron states when the relevant elements are alloyed. A particular interesting feature of this hybridization, which is predicted by single...

  8. Actinide separation by electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, S.P.; Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Grimmett, D.L.; Roy, J.J.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Takahashi, N.

    1995-01-01

    TRUMP-S is a pyrochemical process being developed for the recovery of actinides from PUREX wastes. This paper describes development of the electrochemical partitioning step for recovery of actinides in the TRUMP-S process. The objectives are to remove 99 % of each actinide from PUREX wastes, with a product that is > 90 % actinides. Laboratory tests indicate that > 99 % of actinides can be removed in the electrochemical partitioning step. A dynamic (not equilibrium) process model predicts that 90 wt % product actinide content can be achieved through 99 % actinide removal. Accuracy of model simulation results were confirmed in tests with rare earths. (authors)

  9. Study of extraction kinetics of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) nitrates by the molecule N, N'-dimethyl-N, N'-dibutyl, tetradecylmalonamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldon, M.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of extraction of lanthanides (III) and actinides (III) nitrates by the molecule N, N'-dimethyl - N, N'-dibutyl tetra-decyl malonamide has been investigated. This study was realised with a new constant interfacial-area-stirred cell. During the qualification step of the device it appears that the reduction of the device can lead to hydrolytic perturbations. The main conclusions are: - after the determination of conditions which provide kinetics regime (diffusion of species neglectable), partial orders of the kinetics law have been obtained and lead to the establishment of the law J = k [Nd 3+ ] [NO 3 - ] 3 [diamide] 1 , - interfacial tension measurements and kinetics study in presence of surface-active compounds proved that the chemical limiting reaction for Nd(III) is interfacial, - the results allow to propose an adsorption-desorption reaction mechanism, - a comprehensive study of the extraction kinetics of the lanthanides(III) series and also Am(III) and Cm(III) nitrates has been realised. The lighter lanthanides (La, Ce and Pr) exhibit higher kinetics rate of extraction than the others, which differs from the tendency observed with distribution coefficients which exhibit tetrad effect. The kinetics rate of extraction of Am(III) and Cm(III) is closed to the value of Eu(III). (author)

  10. Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Actinide Targets Extracted from Surrogate Experiments: A Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lesher, S R; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J; Younes, W

    2009-10-01

    The Surrogate nuclear reactions method, an indirect approach for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving difficult-to-measure targets, is reviewed. Focusing on cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides, we review the successes of past and present applications of the method and assess its uncertainties and limitations. The approximations used in the analyses of most experiments work reasonably well for (n,f) cross sections for neutron energies above 1-2 MeV, but lead to discrepancies for low-energy (n,f) reactions, as well as for (n,{gamma}) applications. Correcting for some of the effects neglected in the approximate analyses leads to improved (n,f) results. We outline steps that will further improve the accuracy and reliability of the Surrogate method and extend its applicability to reactions that cannot be approached with the present implementation of the method.

  11. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  12. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; McDowell, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  13. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1987-10-23

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  14. Determination of non-metallic elements in actinide complexes by oxygen flask combustion (OFC): chlorine and fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruikar, P.B.; Nagar, M.S.; Subramanian, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The oxygen flask combustion followed by ion selective electrode measurement has been found to be the most suitable from the point of view of elegance and simplicity for the determination of chlorine and fluorine in actinide complexes. The method has been found to be particularly suitable for glove box adaptation. This report describes the determination of chlorine and fluorine in several uranium complexes, some plutonium complexes and organic analytical standards by this method. The precision and accuracy of the measurements in the milligram level has been found to be quite satisfactory. (author). 16 refs., 11 tabs

  15. Metal scarcity and sustainability, analyzing the necessity to reduce the extraction of scarce metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M. L C M; Driessen, P. P J; Worrell, E.

    2014-01-01

    There is debate whether or not further growth of metal extraction from the earth's crust will be sustainable in connection with geologic scarcity. Will future generations possibly face a depletion of specific metals? We study whether, for which metals and to what extent the extraction rate would

  16. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport

  17. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  18. Malonamide, phosphine oxide and calix[4]arene functionalized ionic liquids: synthesis and extraction of actinides and lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternova, Dariia

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste treatment is a crucial problem nowadays. This work was dedicated to the development of the new extracting systems for radionuclides on the basis of 'green' solvents Ionic Liquids (Ils). For this purpose Ils were functionalized with various extracting patterns: phosphine oxide, carbamoyl phosphine oxide groups and malonamide fragment. Also the calix[4]arene platforms were used for the synthesis of functionalized ionic liquids (Fils) and their precursors. The Fils of both types cationic and anionic have been obtained. The synthesized Fils were tested for the liquid-liquid extraction of radionuclides. lt was found that extraction well occurs due to the extracting patterns, however a charge of a modified ion influences extraction.The various extracting experiments and mathematical modelling have been performed to determine the mechanisms of extraction. These studies showed that each extracting system is characterized by a different set of extracting equilibria, based mostly on cationic exchange. (author)

  19. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  20. Room temperature electrodeposition of actinides from ionic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, David W.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Droessler, Janelle; Kinyanjui, John

    2017-04-25

    Uranic and transuranic metals and metal oxides are first dissolved in ozone compositions. The resulting solution in ozone can be further dissolved in ionic liquids to form a second solution. The metals in the second solution are then electrochemically deposited from the second solutions as room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), tri-methyl-n-butyl ammonium n-bis(trifluoromethansulfonylimide) [Me.sub.3N.sup.nBu][TFSI] providing an alternative non-aqueous system for the extraction and reclamation of actinides from reprocessed fuel materials. Deposition of U metal is achieved using TFSI complexes of U(III) and U(IV) containing the anion common to the RTIL. TFSI complexes of uranium were produced to ensure solubility of the species in the ionic liquid. The methods provide a first measure of the thermodynamic properties of U metal deposition using Uranium complexes with different oxidation states from RTIL solution at room temperature.

  1. SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-09-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the

  2. Saltstone Vault Classification Samples Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit/Actinide Removal Process Waste Stream April 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B and W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B and W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B and W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most

  3. Aggregation of dialkyl-substituted diphosphonic acids and its effect on metal ion extraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Barrans, R. E., Jr.; Ferraro, J. R. Herlinger, A. W.; McAlister, D. R.

    1999-10-22

    Solvent extraction reagents containing the diphosphonic acid group exhibit an extraordinary affinity for tri-, tetra- and hexavalent actinides. Their use has been considered for actinide separation and pre-concentration procedures. Solvent extraction data obtained with P,P{prime}-di(2-ethylhexyl) methane-, ethane- and butanediphosphonic acids exhibit features that are difficult to explain without Knowledge of the aggregation state of the extractants. Information about the aggregation of the dialkyl-substituted diphosphonic acids in aromatic diluents has been obtained using the complementary techniques of vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), infrared spectroscopy and molecular mechanics. The results from these techniques provide an understanding of the aggregation behavior of these extractants that is fully compatible with the solvent extraction data. The most important results and their relevance to solvent extraction are reviewed in this paper.

  4. ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE METAL SOLVENT EXTRACTANTS AND PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, R.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the recovery of uranium from aqueous mineral acidic solutions by solvent extraction. The extractant is a synmmetrical dialkyl pyrophosphate in which the alkyl substituents have a chain length of from 4 to 17 carbon atoms. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dioctyl pyrophosphate. The uranium is precipitated irom the organic extractant phase with an agent such as HF, fluoride salts. alcohol, or ammonia.

  5. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  6. Primary metals extraction by liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, K.N.

    1980-01-01

    The extraction of copper and uranium by liquid membranes is presented. The recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid is described. The development of this process has progressed through three stages, firstly the chemistry of uranium extraction as it pertains to liquid membrane systems. This was followed by continuous extraction tests on fresh black acid and on aged acid. Results on a 1 litre/minute pilot plant demonstrated that the process could be operated with a minimum of feed pretreatment and about 90% of uranium could be extracted. The extraction of copper from copper leach liquors is also described. (U.K.)

  7. Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, F.; Reinoso, R.; Florido, M.C.; Diaz Barrientos, E.; Ajmone-Marsan, F.; Davidson, C.M.; Madrid, L.

    2007-01-01

    Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils. - Dilute HCl extraction is tested as an alternative to the BCR sequential extraction in urban soils

  8. Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, F. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Reinoso, R. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Florido, M.C. [Departamento de Cristalografia, Mineralogia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Diaz Barrientos, E. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Ajmone-Marsan, F. [DI.VA.P.R.A., Chimica Agraria, Universita di Torino, Via Leonardo da Vinci, 44, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino (Italy); Davidson, C.M. [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL, Scotland (United Kingdom); Madrid, L. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: madrid@irnase.csic.es

    2007-06-15

    Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils. - Dilute HCl extraction is tested as an alternative to the BCR sequential extraction in urban soils.

  9. Extraction of complexes of metal ions with pyridine oxyazo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanov, F.I.; Nurtaeva, G.K.; Ergozhin, E.E.

    1983-01-01

    Modern state and prospects of the development of investigas tions in the field of extraction of complexes of metal ions (V, In, Cd, Nb, REE, RU, Ta, U, Zr and others) with pyridine oxyazo compoUnds are analyzed. Application of pyridine oxyazo compounds as extraction-photometric reagents is described. Basic methods of oxyazo compounds preparation are considered along with reagent properties and physical-chemical characteristics. Flow diagrams of ion extraction are presented for the above metals. Mechanisms of complexing reactions for metal ions with pyridine oxyazo compounds and stability of forming complexes are considered in detail. Concrete methods of extraction-photometric separation and element determination permitting to find simultaneously several metal ions with similar properties in the case of their joint presence are described

  10. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  11. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository

  12. Separation of actinides and their transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, M.; Bathelier, M.; Cousin, M.

    1978-08-01

    Neutron irradiation of long-half-life actinides for transmutation into elements with shorter half-life is investigated as a means to reduce the long-term hazards of these actinides. The effectiveness of the method is analysed by applying it to fission product solutions from the first extraction cycle of fuel reprocessing plants. Basic principles, separation techniques and transmutation efficiencies are studied and discussed in detail

  13. Increase in metal extractability after liming of sacrificial sewage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-04-02

    Apr 2, 2005 ... material (organic C of 2.9 to 3.7 %) compared to non-polluted soils (organic C of 0.6 to 1.0 %). The limed soils did ... increased extractability of some of the metals after liming could negatively influence the use of EDTA as an extracting agent ... being a reliable test for predicting plant-available metals (Hooda.

  14. Extraction of metal ions by neutral β-diphosphoramides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1990-01-01

    The extracting ability of β-diphosphoramides of the type R-N[P(O)(NMe 2 ) 2 ] 2 with R=-CH 3 (NIPA), -C 12 H 25 (ODIPA), or -C 16 H 33 (OHDIPA) for metal ions such as lanthanides, uranyl, and the transuranium elements Am(III) and Pu(IV) has been studied. Extraction yields depend on the nature of the ligand, the organic diluent (nitromethane, kerosene, tert-butylbenzene), the concentration of nitric acid in the aqueous phase, and the ligand-to-metal ratio, Q. The results show that the bidentate phosphoramides are very efficient extractants for all of the metals studied, even at low ratios Q. The presence of nitric acid generally enhances the extraction yields. On the other hand, selectivity is rather poor with these ligands. A particular effort has been made to determine the nature of extracted species by NMR spectroscopy

  15. Separation of platinum metals by theirs extraction as sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Ryabushko, O.P.; Ty Van Mak

    1978-01-01

    Separation of platinum metals by means of their sediment in the form of sulfides with subsequent extraction is studied. The optimum conditions of metal sulfide extraction are determined, the metal output dependence from acidness and aqueous phase composition and also the organic solvent nature are investigated. Ruthenium concentration was determined photometrically. Ruthenium sulfide is extracted by butyl spirit from 1-4 normal hydrochloric acid. The maximum extraction grade of 63% is reached in 3.2-normal acid. When the mixture of acetic and hydrochloric acids (2:1) is used for decomposition of ruthenium tiosalts, the grade of ruthenium extraction by amyl spirit or the mixture of anyl and butyl spirits (1:1) constitutes 100%

  16. Metal extraction by amides of carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorovarov, D.I.; Chumakova, G.M.; Rusin, L.I.; Ul'anov, V.S.; Sviridova, R.A.; Sviridov, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Extraction ability of various amides was studied. Data on extraction of rare earths, vanadium, molybdenum, rhenium, uranium, niobium, tantalum by N,N-dibutyl-amides of acetic, nonanic acids and fatly synthetic acids of C 7 -C 9 fractions are presented. Effect of salting-out agents, inorganic acid concentrations on extraction process was studied. Potential ability of using amides of carboxylic acids for extractional concentration of rare earths as well as for recovery and separation of iron, rhenium, vanadium, molybdenum, uranium, niobium, and tantalum was shown

  17. Minor actinide transmutation - a waste management option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    1986-01-01

    The incentive to recycle minor actinides results from the reduction of the long-term α-radiological risk rather than from a better utilization of the uranium resources. Nevertheless, the gain in generated electricity by minor actinide transmutation in a fast breeder reactor can compensate for the costs of their recovery and make-up into fuel elements. Different recycling options of minor actinides are discussed: transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) is possible as long as plutonium is not recycled in light water reactors (LWRs). In this case a minor actinide burner with fuel of different composition has to be introduced. The development of appropriate minor actinide fuels and their properties are described. The irradiation experiments underway or planned are summarized. A review of minor actinide partitioning from the PUREX waste stream is given. From the present constraints of LMFBR technology a reduction of the long-term α-radiological risk by a factor of 200 is deduced relative to that from the direct storage of spent LWR fuel. Though the present accumulation of minor actinides is low, nuclear transmutation may be needed when nuclear energy production has grown. (orig.)

  18. Extraction of certain heavy metals from sewage sludge using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The removal of heavy metal from sludge before disposal or application to farmland is a necessary step to achieve a more safe sludge usage or disposal. Chemical extraction using inorganic acids (nitric, hydrochloric) and organic acids (citric, oxalic) were tested for extraction of chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc from ...

  19. Short communication Increase in metal extractability after liming of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... decreased in extractability (Statistically significant differences could not be determined for the trial due to the trial not having been designed for the results that were obtained). Similar results were reported in the literature for EDTA metal extraction but the phenomenon was not elaborated upon, except for Cr. The increased ...

  20. Study of extraction kinetics of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) nitrates by the molecule N, N'-dimethyl-N, N'-dibutyl, tetradecylmalonamide; Etude des cinetiques d'extraction des nitrates de lanthanides (III) et d'actinides (III) par le malonamide N, N'-dimethyl-N, N'-dibutyl, tetradecylmalonamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldon, M

    1999-07-01

    The kinetics of extraction of lanthanides (III) and actinides (III) nitrates by the molecule N, N'-dimethyl - N, N'-dibutyl tetra-decyl malonamide has been investigated. This study was realised with a new constant interfacial-area-stirred cell. During the qualification step of the device it appears that the reduction of the device can lead to hydrolytic perturbations. The main conclusions are: - after the determination of conditions which provide kinetics regime (diffusion of species neglectable), partial orders of the kinetics law have been obtained and lead to the establishment of the law J = k [Nd{sup 3+}] [NO{sub 3}{sup -}]{sup 3} [diamide]{sup 1}, - interfacial tension measurements and kinetics study in presence of surface-active compounds proved that the chemical limiting reaction for Nd(III) is interfacial, - the results allow to propose an adsorption-desorption reaction mechanism, - a comprehensive study of the extraction kinetics of the lanthanides(III) series and also Am(III) and Cm(III) nitrates has been realised. The lighter lanthanides (La, Ce and Pr) exhibit higher kinetics rate of extraction than the others, which differs from the tendency observed with distribution coefficients which exhibit tetrad effect. The kinetics rate of extraction of Am(III) and Cm(III) is closed to the value of Eu(III). (author)

  1. Comparative evaluation of different extractants towards cloud point extraction of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Neelam; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    The cloud formation behavior of nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 (1,1,3,3-Tetramethylbutyl) phenyl-polyethylene glycol; t-Oct-C 6 H 4 -(OCH 2 CH 2 ) x OH, x = 7-8) was investigated in Na-acetate medium. The effects of organic dopents (often added for metal extractions) such as dibenzoylmethan(DBM), and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) on metal ions (viz. U(VI), Am(III), Sr(II), and Cs(I)) extraction were investigated. Extraction (%) of metal ions followed the order: U(VI) > Am(III) > Sr(II) > Cs(I). (author)

  2. Actinides and the sources of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, B.; Kratz, K.-L.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.

    2004-02-01

    The abundances of the actinide elements in the cosmic rays can provide critical constraints on the major sites of their acceleration. Using recent calculations of the r-process yields in core-collapse supernovae (SNe), we have determined the actinide abundances averaged over various assumed time intervals for their supernovae generation and their cosmic-ray acceleration. Using standard Galactic chemical evolution models, we have also determined the expected actinide abundances in the present interstellar medium. From these two components, we have calculated the U/Th and other actinide abundances expected in the SN-active cores of superbubbles, as a function of their ages and mean metallicity. We calculate the expected actinide abundances in cosmic-rays accelerated by Galactic SNe. We find that the current measurements of actinide/Pt-group and preliminary estimates of the UPuCM/Th ratio in cosmic rays are all consistent with the expected values if superbubble cores have mean metallicities of around three times solar. Future measurements of the abundance ratios will help to solve these questions. First results of experiments performed on the MIR space station (ECCO) and with balloon flights (TIGER) are promising.

  3. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  4. Studies on separation of actinides and lanthanides by extraction chromatography using 2,6-bis-triazinyl pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepika, P.; Sabharwal, K.N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    2,6-bis(5,6-dipropyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (nPr-BTP) was impregnated on XAD-7 resin and the extraction performance of this nPr-BTP/XAD-7 resin was investigated for the uptake of Am(III) and some lanthanides from acidic nitrate solutions. The uptake behaviour of Am(III) and the lanthanides La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Eu(III) and Gd(III) was studied by batch experiments. It was found that the resin exhibited significantly high extraction and selectivity for Am(III) over the lanthanides. Based on the results obtained from batch studies, the separation behaviour of Am(III) from Eu(III) was examined by extraction chromatography using a column packed with the resin. A complete separation between Am(III) and Eu(III) was achieved in the column experiment. (authors)

  5. Multi-podant diglycolamides and room temperature ionic liquid impregnated resins: an excellent combination for extraction chromatography of actinides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gujar, R.B.; Ansari, S.A.; Verboom, Willem; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    Extraction chromatography resins, prepared by impregnating two multi-podant diglycolamide ligands, viz. diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide

  6. Progress in vacuum metal extraction, refining and consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, C.V.; Mukherjee, T.K.; Sharma, B.P.

    1973-01-01

    The unique achievements in the process metallurgy of rare metals in the past quarter century should largely be attributed to advances in vacuum technology. New standards for high purity, increasing demand for pure metals and alloys for established applications, and steady improvement in sophistication and capacity of vacuum furnaces have provided the stimulus for developing and expanding vacuum metal extraction processes, and also exploring totally new processes. The paper discusses the thermochemistry of vacuum metallurgy, carbothermic and metallothermic reduction reactions, consolidation and refining by vacuum arc melting, electron beam melting and high temperature high vacuum sintering, and ultrapurification, with special reference to the reactive and refractory metals of Group IV to VI. (author)

  7. Separation of Minor Actinides by a Single Cycle Approach using Unsymmetrical Diglycolamide and Diglycolamic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Prathibha, T.; Rajeswari, S.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of CHON-extractants, namely unsymmetrical diglycol-amides (UDGA) and diglycolamic acid were developed for the partitioning of minor actinides from high level liquid waste. Group separation of trivalent metal ions (An(III) + Ln(III)) from fast reactor (FR) simulated high-level liquid waste (SHLLW) was demonstrated using UDGA, N,N,-didodecyl-N',N'-dioctyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (D 3 DODGA)without the addition of organic phase modifier in n-dodecane phase. A single-cycle approach has been explored for the separation of trivalent actinides from FR-SHLLW using the solvent phase composed of D 3 DODGA and di-2-ethylhexyl-diglycolamic acid (HDEHDGA), or tetra-bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (TEHDGA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid(HDEHP). A procedure was developed to minimise the extraction of unwanted metal ions by using aqueous soluble complexing agents in FR-SHLLW. Based on the optimised conditions, a counter current mixer-settler run was performed to separate Am(III) from FR-SHLLW using a novel ejector based mixer-settler. Quantitative extraction of trivalent (Am(III) + Ln(III)) was observed in both the systems. Am(III) alone was back extracted from loaded organic phase using a solution of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid - citric acid. The results showed the possibility of selective separation of trivalent actinides alone from high level liquid waste in a single cycle process. (authors)

  8. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    noncomplexing aqueous solution and submission of this scientific breakthrough as a paper in Science; The first-ever co-crystallization of Am(VI) with UO2(NO3)2 ∙ 6H2O, opening the door to a new approach for separating hexavalent actinides as a group; Results showing that three potentially problematic metals will not present risk in ALSEP; Improvement in ALSEP contactor stripping kinetics to acceptable performance; A comparison of centrifugal contactors vs mixer-settlers showing the former performs better in ALSEP stripping; Synthesis of new mixed N,O-donor extractants with enhanced solubility and strength for selective trivalent actinide extraction; Development of computational methods showing promise in prediction of the selectivity of new extractants for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides; An order-of-magnitude improvement in aqueous Am/Eu complexation selectivity of an alternative macrocyclic stripping agent for ALSEP, potentially enabling an option for an Am product stream free from both Ln and Cm. An alternative aqueous combination of dipicolinate complexant and malonate buffer that may present options for ALSEP and TALSPEAK (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) type separations. The ALSEP concept is advancing toward a benchtop flowsheet demonstration planned for FY 2016, and a bench-scale test bed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be employed to demonstrate at least one tandem Am oxidation and separation concept. This report outlines the goals of the STAAR, significance of achieving these goals, STAAR organization around the above aims and questions, recent highlights, and future directions. The report also includes a listing of publications, reports, patents, and dissertations.

  9. Thermodynamic modelling of the extraction of nitrates of lanthanides by CMPO and by CMPO-like calixarene in concentrated nitric acid medium. Application in the optimization of the separation of lanthanides and actinides/lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belair, S.

    2003-01-01

    The separation minor actinides / lanthanides in nitric acid medium is as one of problems of separative chemistry the most delicate within the framework of the processes allowing the recovery of long life radioelements present in the solutions of fission products. Previous studies showed that CMPO-substituted calix[4]arenes presents a better affinity for actinides than for lanthanides. To optimize the operating conditions of separation and to take into account the degree of non-ideality for the concentrated nitric solutions, we adopted a thermodynamic approach. The methodology taken to determine the number and the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in organic phase base on MIKULIN-SERGIEVSKII's model used through a software of data processing of experimental extraction isotherms. These tools are exploited at first on an extraction system engaging the CMPO, extractant reagent of actinides and lanthanides in concentrated nitric medium. The modelling of the system Ln(NO 3 ) 3 -HNO 3 -H 2 O/CMPO comes to confirm the results of several studies. At the same time, they allow to establish working hypotheses aiming at limiting the investigations of our researches towards the most stable complexes formed between lanthanides and CMPO-like calixarene to which the same method is then applied. An analytical expression of the selectivity of separation by the calixarene is established to determine the parameters and physico-chemical variables on which it depends. So, the ratio of the constants of extraction and the value of the activity of water of the system fixes the selectivity of separation of 2 elements. The exploitation of this relation allows to preview the influence of a variation of the concentration of nitric acid. Experiments of extraction confirm these forecasts and inform about the affinity of the calixarene with respect to lanthanides elements and to the americium. (author)

  10. Extraction of cupferronate complexes of certain metals and their reextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadezhda, A.A.; Ivanova, K.P.; Gorbenko, F.P.

    1980-01-01

    The extraction of Fe, Sn, Bi, Cu, Y, Pb, Al, G, Ni, Zn, Cd, Mn cupferronate complexes with isoaml alcohol and their reextraction with acids are studied. Extraction and reextraction are investigated depending on the acidity from the solutions of sulfuric, hydrochloric, nitric and perchloric acids. Cupferron distribution among isoaml alchol and the aqueous solution with various pH is studied. It is established that cuperronates of the metals studied are extracted quantitatively. An effect of the acid anion nature on the extraction of all cupferronates is observed [ru

  11. Metal, bond energy, and ancillary ligand effects on actinide-carbon σ-bond hydrogenolysis. A kinetic and mechanistic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Marks, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    A kineticmechanistic study of actinide hydrocarbyl ligand hydrogenolysis (An-R + H 2 → An-H + RH) is reported. For the complex Cp' 2 TH(CH 2 -t-Bu)(O-t-Bu)(Cp' = eta 5 -Me 5 C 5 ), the rate law is first-order in organoactinide and first-order in H 2 , with k/sub H2/k/sub D2/ = 2.5 (4) and k/sub THF/k/sub toluene/ = 2.9 (4). For a series of complexes, hydrogenolysis rates span a range of ca. 10 5 with Cp' 2 ThCH 2 C(CH 3 ) 2 CH 2 ≅ Cp' 2 U(CH 2 -t-Bu) (too rapid to measure accurately) > Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)[OCH(t-Bu) 2 ] = Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(O-t-Bu) > Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(Cl) > Me 2 Si(Me 4 C 5 ) 2 Th(n-Bu) 2 > Cp' 2 Th(n-Bu) 2 ≅ Cp' 2 ThMe 2 > Cp' 2 Th(Me)(O 3 SCF 3 ) > Cp' 2 Th(n-Bu)[OCG(t-Bu) 2 ] ≅ Cp' 2 Th(Me)[OSiMe 2 (t-Bu)] > Cp' 2 ZrMe 2 = Cp' 2 Th(rho-C 6 H 4 NMe 2 )(O-tu-Bu) > Cp' 2 Th(Ph)(O-t-Bu) > Cp' 2 U(Me)[OCH(t-Bu) 2 ] > Cp' 2 Th(Me)[OCH(t-Bu) 2 ]. In the majority of cases, the rate law is cleanly first-order in organoactinide over 3 or more half-lives. However, for Cp' 2 ThMe 2 → (Cp' 2 ThH 2 ) 2 , an intermediate is observe by NMR that is probably [Cp' 2 Th(Me)(μ-H)] 2 . For Cp' 2 Th(Me)(O 3 SCF 3 ), a follow-up reaction, which consumes Cp' 2 TH(H)(O 3 SCF 3 ) is detected. Variable-temperature kinetic studies yield ΔH** = 3.7 (2) kcalmol and ΔS double dagger = -50.8 (7) eu for Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(O-t-Bu) and ΔH double dagger = 9 (2) kcalmol and ΔS double dagger = -45 (5) eu for Cp' 2 U(Me)[OCH(O-t-Bu) 2

  12. Actinide environmental chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.J.; Nitsche, H.; Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V.

    1995-01-01

    In order to predict release and transport rates, as well as design cleanup and containment methods, it is essential to understand the chemical reactions and forms of the actinides under aqueous environmental conditions. Four important processes that can occur with the actinide cations are: precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation. Precipitation of a solid phase will limit the amount of actinide in solution near the solid phase and have a retarding effect on release and transport rates. Complexation increases the amount of actinide in solution and tends to increase release and migration rates. Actinides can sorb on to mineral or rock surfaces which tends to retard migration. Actinide ions can form or become associated with colloidal sized particles which can, depending on the nature of the colloid and the solution conditions, enhance or retard migration of the actinide. The degree to which these four processes progress is strongly dependent on the oxidation state of the actinide and tends to be similar for actinides in the same oxidation state. In order to obtain information on the speciation of actinides in solution, i.e., oxidation state, complexation form, dissolved or colloidal forms, the use of absorption spectroscopy has become a method of choice. The advent of the ultrasensitive, laser induced photothermal and fluorescence spectroscopies has made possible the detection and study of actinide ions at the parts per billion level. With the availability of third generation synchrotrons and the development of new fluorescence detectors, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is becoming a powerful technique to study the speciation of actinides in the environment, particularly for reactions at the solid/solution interfaces. (orig.)

  13. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  14. Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.

    1987-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

  15. Thermodynamic modelling of the extraction of nitrates of lanthanides by CMPO and by CMPO-like calixarene in concentrated nitric acid medium. Application in the optimization of the separation of lanthanides and actinides/lanthanides; Modelisation thermodynamique de l'extraction de nitrates de lanthanides par le CMPO et par un calixarene-CMPO en milieu acide nitrique concentre. Application a l'optimisation de la separation des lanthanides et des actinides/lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belair, S

    2003-07-01

    The separation minor actinides / lanthanides in nitric acid medium is as one of problems of separative chemistry the most delicate within the framework of the processes allowing the recovery of long life radioelements present in the solutions of fission products. Previous studies showed that CMPO-substituted calix[4]arenes presents a better affinity for actinides than for lanthanides. To optimize the operating conditions of separation and to take into account the degree of non-ideality for the concentrated nitric solutions, we adopted a thermodynamic approach. The methodology taken to determine the number and the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in organic phase base on MIKULIN-SERGIEVSKII's model used through a software of data processing of experimental extraction isotherms. These tools are exploited at first on an extraction system engaging the CMPO, extractant reagent of actinides and lanthanides in concentrated nitric medium. The modelling of the system Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}-HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O/CMPO comes to confirm the results of several studies. At the same time, they allow to establish working hypotheses aiming at limiting the investigations of our researches towards the most stable complexes formed between lanthanides and CMPO-like calixarene to which the same method is then applied. An analytical expression of the selectivity of separation by the calixarene is established to determine the parameters and physico-chemical variables on which it depends. So, the ratio of the constants of extraction and the value of the activity of water of the system fixes the selectivity of separation of 2 elements. The exploitation of this relation allows to preview the influence of a variation of the concentration of nitric acid. Experiments of extraction confirm these forecasts and inform about the affinity of the calixarene with respect to lanthanides elements and to the americium. (author)

  16. Extractive decontamination of heavy metals from CCA contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    of metal extracted at the contact time of 6 h were 10.41, 12.50, 17.71 and 18.75 mg/kg As using oxalic, malonic, citric and ... Levels of the metals in the decontaminated soil after 6 h of washing were found to be below the target value for all ...... recovery of uranium DAE-BRNS Biennial Symposium on Emerging. Trends in ...

  17. Use of sequential extraction to assess metal partitioning in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasalainen, Marika; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2003-01-01

    The state of heavy metal pollution and the mobility of Cd, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Zn were studied in three texturally different agricultural soil profiles near a Cu-Ni smelter in Harjavalta, Finland. The pseudo-total concentrations were determined by an aqua regia procedure. Metals were also determined after division into four fractions by sequential extraction with (1) acetic acid (exchangeable and specifically adsorbed metals), (2) a reducing agent (bound to Fe/Mn hydroxides), (3) an oxidizing agent (bound to soil organic matter) and (4) aqua regia (bound to mineral structures). Fallout from the smelter has increased the concentrations of Cd, Cu and Ni in the topsoil, where 75-90% of Cd, 49-72% of Cu and 22-52% of Ni occurred in the first two fractions. Slight Pb and Zn pollution was evident as well. High proportions of mobile Cd, Cu and Ni also deeper in the sandy soil, closest to the smelter, indicated some downward movement of metals. The hydroxide-bound fraction of Pb dominated in almost all soils and horizons, while Ni, Cr and Zn mostly occurred in mineral structures. Aqua regia extraction is usefully supplemented with sequential extraction, particularly in less polluted soils and in soils that exhibit substantial textural differences within the profiles. - Sequential extraction is most useful with soils with low metal pollutant levels

  18. Extraction of toxic and valuable metals from foundry sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vite T, J.

    1996-01-01

    There were extracted valuable metals from foundry sands such as: gold, platinum, silver, cobalt, germanium, nickel and zinc among others, as well as highly toxic metals such as chromium, lead, vanadium and arsenic. The extraction efficiency was up to 100% in some cases. For this reason there were obtained two patents at the United States, patent number 5,356,601, in October 1994, given for the developed process and patent number 5,376,000, in December 1994, obtained for the equipment employed. Therefore, the preliminary parameters for the installation of a pilot plant have also been developed. (Author)

  19. Molten salt/metal extractions for recovery of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (EFR) is an advanced reactor concept that incorporates metallic driver and blanket fuels, an inherently safe, liquid-sodium-cooled, pool-type, reactor design, and on-site pyrochemical reprocessing (including electrorefining) of spent fuels and wastes. This paper describes a pyrochemical method that is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to recover transuranic elements from the EFR electrorefiner process salt. The method uses multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and cadmium metal at high temperatures. The chemical basis of the salt extraction method, the test equipment, and a test plan are discussed

  20. Study of the selectivity of poly-nitrogenous extracting molecules in the complexation of actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) in solution in anhydrous pyridine; Etude de la selectivite de molecules extractantes polyazotees dans la complexation des actinides (III) et des lanthanides (III) en solution dans la pyridine anhydre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riviere, Ch

    2000-10-05

    The aim of this work is to better understand the factors which contribute to the separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). Polydentate nitrogenous molecules present an interesting selectivity. A thermodynamic study of the complexation in pyridine of lanthanide and uranium by the bipyridine ligand (bipy) has been carried out. The formation constants and the thermodynamic values of the different complexes have been determined. It has been shown that the bipy complexes formation is controlled by the enthalpy and unfavored by the entropy. The conductometry has revealed too a significant difference in the uranium and lanthanides complexation by the bipyridine ligand. The use of the phenanthroline ligand induces a better complexation of the metallic ions but the selectivity is not improved. On the other hand, the decrease of the basicity and the increase of the ligand denticity (for instance in the case of the use of ter-pyridine) favour the selectivity without improving the complexation. The selectivity difference for the complexation of actinides(III) and lanthanides(III) by the different studied ligands (independent systems) has been confirmed by experiments of inter-metals competition. (O.M.)

  1. Size-selective extraction of metal salts: the general principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakshin, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to application of the structural correspondence principle for explaining processes of selective (with respect to ion size) solvent extraction of metal salts from aqueous solutions to organic phase by crown-ethers of different spatial and electronic structure. A study has been made on more than 50 different structures of cyclic and acyclic polyethers, containing aromatic, aliphatic and cycloaliphatic fragments. It is shown that introduction of additional substituents enables to increase extraction selectivity and separate elements with similar chemical properties

  2. Ecotoxicology of heavy metals: Liquid-phase extraction by nanosorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, A.; Romantsova, I.; Babkin, A.; Neskoromnaya, E.; Kucherova, A.; Kashevich, Z.

    2015-11-01

    The paper considers the problem of extreme toxicity heavy metal compounds dissolved in wastewater and liquid emissions of industrial enterprises to living organisms and environment as a whole. The possibility of increasing extraction efficiency of heavy metal ions by sorption materials was demonstrated. The porous space of the latter was modified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during process of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon on metal oxide catalysts. The increasing of the sorption capacity (10-30%) and the sorption rate of nanomodified activated carbons in comparison with standard materials in the example of absorption of Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from aqueous solutions was proven.

  3. Efficiency of Extraction of Trace metals from Blood samples using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficiency of extraction of trace metals using conventional wet acid digestion method (CDM) and microwave induced acid digestion method (MWD) was determined by recovery experiments. The high percentage recoveries obtained from microwave induced acid digestion method make it to be a more efficient method ...

  4. Efficiency of Extraction of Trace metals from Blood samples using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    Efficiency of Extraction of Trace metals from Blood samples using Wet Digestion and. Microwave Digestion Techniques. *1M. I. YAHAYA; A. SHEHU; F.G. DABAI. Department of Applied Chemistry, Federal University Dutsin – Ma, Katsina State, Nigeria. Biology Department, Kebbi State College of Basic and Advanced Studies ...

  5. Research in actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH - , CO 3 2- , PO 4 3- , humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements

  6. Sequential extraction of heavy metals during composting of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Soumia; Hafidi, Mohamed; Merlina, Georges; Revel, Jean-Claude

    2005-05-01

    The major limitation of soil application of sewage sludge compost is the total heavy metal contents and their bioavailability to the soil-plant system. This study was conducted to determine the heavy metal speciation and the influence of changing the physico-chemical properties of the medium in the course of composting on the concentrations, bioavailability or chemical forms of Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni in sewage sludge. Principal physical and chemical properties and FTIR spectroscopical characterization of sludge compost during treatment show the stability and maturity of end product. The total metal contents in the final compost were much lower than the limit values of composts to be used as good soil fertilizer. Furthermore, it was observed by using a sequential extraction procedure in sludge compost at different steps of treatment, that a large proportion of the heavy metals were associated to the residual fraction (70-80%) and more resistant fractions to extraction X-NaOH, X-EDTA, X-HNO3 (12-29%). Less than 2% of metals bound to bioavailable fractions X-(KNO3+H2O). Heavy metal distribution and bioavailability show some changes during composting depending on the metal itself and the physico-chemical properties of the medium. Bioavailable fractions of all elements tend to decrease except Ni-H2O. Zn and mainly Cu present more affinity to organic and carbonate fractions. In contrast, Pb is usually preferentially bound to sulfide forms X-HNO3. Nickel shows a significant decrease of organic form. Significant degrees of correlation were found between heavy metal fractions and changes of some selected variables (e.g. pH, ash, organic matter, humic substance) during the course of composting. Mobile fractions of metals are poorly predictable from the total content. The R2 value was significantly increased by the inclusion of other variables such as the amount of organic matter (OM) and pH.

  7. Unusual transport behaviour of actinide ions with a novel calix(4)arene-tetra-diglycolamide (C4DGA) extractant as the carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohapatra, P.K.; Iqbal, M.; Raut, D.R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2012-01-01

    A calix[4]arene appended with four diglycolamide moieties containing n-octyl groups (C4DGA) was evaluated for the transport of actinide ions such as UO22+, Pu4+, Pu3+, and Am3+ from acidic feed solutions across PTFE flat sheet supported liquid membranes. The supported liquid membrane (SLM) studies

  8. ACTINET-I3 Summer School on Analytical Innovation in the field of actinide recycling - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Nash, K.L.; Puget, P.; Szabo, Z.; Vallet, V.; Berthon, L.; Duhamet, J.; Wipff, G.; Dufreche, J.F.; Walter, P.; Thiebaut, D.; Toulhoat, P.; Aupiais, J.; Amatore, C.

    2011-01-01

    This conference dealt with 3 main topics: analytical innovation in separation processes (hyphenated techniques, analytical chips,...), actinide recycling (extraction, interfaces, processes,...) and chemistry and thermodynamics of actinides. This document is composed of the slides of the presentations

  9. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muske, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements

  10. DWPF Flowsheet Studies with Simulants to Determine Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit Solvent Partitioning and Verify Actinide Removal Process Incorporation Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, C

    2006-01-01

    The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) are scheduled to begin processing salt waste in fiscal year 2007. A portion of the streams generated in the salt processing facilities will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to be incorporated in the glass matrix. Before the streams are introduced, a combination of impact analyses and research and development studies must be performed to quantify the impacts on DWPF processing. The Process Science and Engineering (PS and E) section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing. Simulant Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet studies have been performed using previous composition and projected volume estimates for the ARP sludge/monosodium titanate (MST) stream. Due to changes in the flammability control strategy for DWPF for salt processing, the incorporation strategy for ARP has changed and additional ARP flowsheet tests were necessary to validate the new processing strategy. The last round of ARP testing included the incorporation of the MCU stream and identified potential processing issues with the MCU solvent. The identified issues included the potential carry-over and accumulation of the MCU solvent components in the CPC condensers and in the recycle stream to the Tank Farm. Therefore, DWPF requested SRNL to perform additional MCU flowsheet studies to better quantify the organic distribution in the CPC vessels. The previous MCU testing used a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant since it was anticipated that both of these facilities would begin salt processing during SB4 processing. The same sludge simulant recipe was used in this round of ARP and MCU testing to minimize the number of changes between the two phases of testing so a better comparison could be made. ARP and MCU stream simulants were made for this phase of

  11. Actinide-pnictide (An-Pn) bonds spanning non-metal, metalloid, and metal combinations (An=U, Th; Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rookes, Thomas M.; Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gregson, Matthew; Tuna, Floriana; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2018-01-26

    The synthesis and characterisation is presented of the compounds [An(Tren{sup DMBS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] and [An(Tren{sup TIPS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] [Tren{sup DMBS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiMe{sub 2}Bu{sup t}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi; An=Th, Pn=P, As; Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb; An=Th, Pn=P, As, Sb]. The U-Sb and Th-Sb moieties are unprecedented examples of any kind of An-Sb molecular bond, and the U-Bi bond is the first two-centre-two-electron (2c-2e) one. The Th-Bi combination was too unstable to isolate, underscoring the fragility of these linkages. However, the U-Bi complex is the heaviest 2c-2e pairing of two elements involving an actinide on a macroscopic scale under ambient conditions, and this is exceeded only by An-An pairings prepared under cryogenic matrix isolation conditions. Thermolysis and photolysis experiments suggest that the U-Pn bonds degrade by homolytic bond cleavage, whereas the more redox-robust thorium compounds engage in an acid-base/dehydrocoupling route. (copyright 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  12. An overview on metal cations extraction by azocalixarenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deligoz, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this overview, our main aim is to present the design, preparation, characterization, and extraction/sorption properties of chromogenic azocalix [4] arenes (substituted with different groups) toward metal cations. Azocalixarenes, which contain a conjugated chromophore, i.e. azo (-N=N-) group are synthesized in 'ione-pot' procedures in satisfactory yields. A wide variety of applications is expected by the functionalization of the side arms. Some of them are used to complex with metal ions. These macrocycles due to their bowl-shaped geometry are indeed used as hosts allowing ionic or organic guests to coordinate onto their cavity. The azocalixarene based ionophores are generally applied in various fields such as catalyst recovery, power plant, agriculture, metals finishing, microelectronics, biotechnology processes, rare earths speciation, and potable water purification. Besides these, they find applications in the area of selective ion extractions, receptors, optical devices, chemical sensor devices, the stationary phase for capillary chromatography, ion transport membranes, and luminescence probes etc. This survey is focused to provide overview an of the versatile nature of azocalix[n]arenes as highly efficient extractants for metal ions treated as pollutants. (author)

  13. An Overview on Metal Cations Extraction by Azocalixarenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasalettin Deligöz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this overview, our main aim is to present the design, preparation, characterization, and extraction/sorption properties of chromogenic azocalix[4]arenes (substituted with different groups toward metal cations. Azocalixarenes, which contain a conjugated chromophore, i.e. azo (-N=N- group are synthesized in “one-pot” procedures in satisfactory yields. A wide variety of applications is expected by the functionalization of the side arms. Some of them are used to complex with metal ions. These macrocycles due to their bowl-shaped geometry are indeed used as hosts allowing ionic or organic guests to coordinate onto their cavity. The azocalixarene based ionophores are generally applied in various fields such as catalyst recovery, power plant, agriculture, metals finishing, microelectonics, biotechnology processes, rare earths speciation, and potable water purification. Besides these, they find applications in the area of selective ion extractions, receptors, optical devices, chemical sensor devices, the stationary phase for capillary chromatography, ion transport membranes, and luminescence probes etc. This survey is focused to provide overview an of the versatile nature of azocalix[n]arenes as highly efficient extractants for metal ions treated as pollutants.

  14. Actinides and heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    The actinide series of elements begins with f-shell electrons forming energy bands, contributing to the bonding, and possessing no magnetic moments. At americium the series switches over to localized f electrons with magnetic moments. In metallic compounds this crossover of behavior can be modified and studied. In this continuum of behavior a few compounds on the very edge of localized f-electron behavior exhibit enormous electronic heat capacities at low temperatures. This is associated with an enhanced thermal mass of the conduction electrons, which is well over a hundred times the free electron mass, and is what led to the label heavy fermion for such compounds. A few of these become superconducting at even lower temperatures. The excitement in this field comes from attempting to understand how this heaviness arises and from the likelihood that the superconductivity is different from that of previously known superconductors. The effects of thorium impurities in UBe 13 were studied as a representative system for studying the nature of the superconductivity

  15. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  16. Rapid Computer Aided Ligand Design and Screening of Precious Metal Extractants from TRUEX Raffinate with Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Aurora Sue [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Wall, Nathalie [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Benny, Paul [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Rhodium is the most extensively used metal in catalytic applications; it occurs in mixed ores with platinum group metals (PGMs) in the earth’s crust in low concentrations (0.4 - 10 ppb). It is resistant to aerial oxidation and insoluble in all acids, including aqua regia, making classical purification methods time-consuming and inefficient. To ensure adequate purity, several precipitation and dissolution steps are necessary during separation. Low abundance, high demand, and extensive processing make rhodium the most expensive of all PGMs. From alternative sources, rhodium is also produced in sufficient quantities (0.47 kg per ton initial heavy metal (tIHM)) during the fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors along with other PGMs (i.e., Ag, Pd, Ru). A typical power water reactor operating with UO2 fuel after cooling can generate PGMs in quantities greater than found in the earth’s crust (0.5-2 kg/tIHM). This currently untapped supply of PGMs has the potential to yield $5,000-30,000/tIHM. It is estimated that by the year 2030, the amount of rhodium generated in reactors could exceed natural reserves. Typical SNF processing removes the heavier lanthanides and actinides and can leave PGMs at ambient temperatures in aqueous acidic (Cl⁻ or NO3⁻; pH < 1) solutions at various activities. While the retrieval of these precious metals from SNF would minimize waste generation and improve resource utilization, it has been difficult to achieve thus far. Two general strategies have been utilized to extract Rh(III) from chloride media: ion pairing and coordination complexation. Ion pairing mechanisms have been studied primarily with the tertiary and quaternary amines. Additionally, mixed mechanism extractions have been observed in which ion pairing is the initial mechanism, and longer extraction equilibrium time generated coordination complexes. Very few coordination complexation extraction ligands have been studied. This project approached this problem

  17. Rapid Computer Aided Ligand Design and Screening of Precious Metal Extractants from TRUEX Raffinate with Experimental Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Aurora Sue; Wall, Nathalie; Benny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium is the most extensively used metal in catalytic applications; it occurs in mixed ores with platinum group metals (PGMs) in the earth's crust in low concentrations (0.4 - 10 ppb). It is resistant to aerial oxidation and insoluble in all acids, including aqua regia, making classical purification methods time-consuming and inefficient. To ensure adequate purity, several precipitation and dissolution steps are necessary during separation. Low abundance, high demand, and extensive processing make rhodium the most expensive of all PGMs. From alternative sources, rhodium is also produced in sufficient quantities (0.47 kg per ton initial heavy metal (tIHM)) during the fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors along with other PGMs (i.e. Ag, Pd, Ru). A typical power water reactor operating with UO 2 fuel after cooling can generate PGMs in quantities greater than found in the earth's crust (0.5-2 kg/tIHM). This currently untapped supply of PGMs has the potential to yield $5,000-30,000/tIHM. It is estimated that by the year 2030, the amount of rhodium generated in reactors could exceed natural reserves. Typical SNF processing removes the heavier lanthanides and actinides and can leave PGMs at ambient temperatures in aqueous acidic (Cl - or NO 3 - ; pH < 1) solutions at various activities. While the retrieval of these precious metals from SNF would minimize waste generation and improve resource utilization, it has been difficult to achieve thus far. Two general strategies have been utilized to extract Rh(III) from chloride media: ion pairing and coordination complexation. Ion pairing mechanisms have been studied primarily with the tertiary and quaternary amines. Additionally, mixed mechanism extractions have been observed in which ion pairing is the initial mechanism, and longer extraction equilibrium time generated coordination complexes. Very few coordination complexation extraction ligands have been studied. This project approached this problem through the

  18. Metals separation using solvent extractants on magnetic microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, L.; Pourfarzaneh, M.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation program was initially funded by DOE EM-50 to develop processes for the efficient separation of radionuclides and other hazardous metals. This process has simulated the partnership between industry and ANL for many applications related to hazardous metal problems in industry. In-tank or near-tank hazardous metals separation using magnetic particles promises simple, compact processing at very low costs and employs mature chemical separations technologies to remove and recover hazardous metals from aqueous solutions. The selective chemical extractants are attached to inexpensive magnetic carrier particles. Surfaces of small particles composed of rare earths or ferromagnetic materials are treated to retain chemical extractants (e.g., TBP, CMPO, quaternary amines, carboxylic acid). After selective partitioning of contaminants to the surface layer, magnets are used to collect the loaded particles from the tank. The particles can be regenerated by stripping the contaminants and the selective metals can be recovered and recycled from the strip solution. This process and its related equipment are simple enough to be used for recovery/recycling and waste minimization activities at many industrial sites. Both the development of the process for hazardous and radioactive waste and the transfer of the technology will be discussed

  19. Concentration of heavy metals by predispersed solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, G.H.; Rodarte, A.; Sebba, F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a new method to recover and purify solutions containing dissolved metals. The method depends upon dispersion of the solvent prior to contacting the solution to be extracted. In the past, minutely subdividing the solvent has proven impractical because of the slow rate at which minute particles rise by buoyancy. Now it has become feasible to transport small globules of solvent by a allowing them to attach to much larger gas bubbles, which rise quickly to the surface and separate cleanly. This technique makes possible the removal of metals down to the parts-per-billion range

  20. Studies of the thermodynamics of extraction f-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K. L.

    1998-01-01

    Though they were discovered in the 18th century, practical applications of individual lanthanides were not possible until the development of first ion exchange and later solvent extraction techniques. Today, solvent extraction using lipophilic organophosphorus complexants is the principal separation technique applied for lanthanide production by hydrometallurgy. Separations chemistry (coprecipitation, ion exchange, and solvent extraction) also was central to both the discovery of the individual actinides and to the preparation of samples of sufficient purity to allow elucidation of their chemical/physical properties. Solvent extraction, in the form of the PUREX process, has become the single most important separations process in actinide technology. In this report, the basic thermodynamics of extraction of actinide and lanthanide metal ions is discussed

  1. Treatment of wastewater containing dissolved metals by extraction-flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Flavia Pereira

    2002-02-01

    In this work an alternative process for treating a wastewater containing dissolved metals (uranium and zirconium) is considered. In order to develop this work, a continuous separation unit, characterized by the association of solvent extraction and liquid-liquid flotation is used. Alamina 336 (a mixture of tri-octyl and tri-decyl amines) is used as extractant in the the extraction process, carried out inward the ejector. The splitting of the amine-water emulsion formed is carried out in a continuously operated flotation column (of approximately 2.5 L volume). The solvent extraction results showed that it is possible to reach an efficiency of about 95% for the uranium and zirconium extraction, for a metal in the feed concentration of 10 ppm and for a Q fa /Q fo ratio around 200. An efficiency of about 80% is reached in the flotation column when the liquid flowrate is equal 0.05 Lmin -1 and the air flowrate is equal 3.3 Lmin -1 . (author)

  2. Compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsiao, Shin-Tien

    2008-03-01

    A novel process, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX), was developed to generate micro-sized solvent-coated air bubbles (MSAB) for metal extraction. Through pressurization of solvent with compressed air followed by releasing air-oversaturated solvent into metal-containing wastewater, MSAB were generated instantaneously. The enormous surface area of MSAB makes extraction process extremely fast and achieves very high aqueous/solvent weight ratio (A/S ratio). CASX process completely removed Cr(VI) from acidic electroplating wastewater under A/S ratio of 115 and extraction time of less than 10s. When synthetic wastewater containing Cd(II) of 50mgl(-1) was treated, A/S ratios of higher than 714 and 1190 could be achieved using solvent with extractant/diluent weight ratio of 1:1 and 5:1, respectively. Also, MSAB have very different physical properties, such as size and density, compared to the emulsified solvent droplets, making separation and recovery of solvent from treated effluent very easy.

  3. Enhanced metal extractive behavior using dual mechanism bifunctional polymer: an effective metal chelatogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, D; Subramanian, M S

    2003-11-12

    A new class of chelating polymers using Amberlite XAD-16 (AXAD-16) modified with (N-(3,4-dihydroxy)benzyl)-4-amino,3-hydroxynapthalene-1-sulphonic acid has been developed based on dual mechanism bifunctional polymers, for the extraction of transition and post-transition metal ions. The optimum pH conditions for the quantitative sorption of metal ions were studied. The developed method showed superior extraction qualities with high metal loading capacities of 71, 85, 182, 130 and 46 mg g(-1) for Ni(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II) and Co(II), respectively. The rate of metal ion uptake i.e. kinetics studies performed under optimum levels showed a time duration of metal ion saturation. Desorption of metal ions were effective with 15 ml of 2 M HCl/HNO(3) prior to detection using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The chelating polymer was highly ion-selective in nature even in the presence of large concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions, with a high preconcentrating ability for the metal ions of interest. The developed chelating matrix was tested on its utility with synthetic and real samples like river/sea/tap/well water samples and also with multivitamin/mineral tablets, showed R.S.D. values of <2.5% reflecting on the accuracy and reproducibility of data using the newly developed resin matrix.

  4. Novel thiosalicylate-based ionic liquids for heavy metal extractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyma, Raphlin; Platzer, Sonja [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Jirsa, Franz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Zoology, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kandioller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kandioller@univie.ac.at [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Krachler, Regina; Keppler, Bernhard K. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Six thiosalicylate-based ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids (ILs) were newly synthesized. • ILs showed good extraction of cadmium, copper, and zinc. • Phosphonium ILs showed better extraction efficiencies than their ammonium counterparts. - Abstract: This study aims to develop novel ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids (ILs) with thiosalicylate (TS) derivatives as anions and evaluate their extracting efficiencies towards heavy metals in aqueous solutions. Six ILs were synthesized, characterized, and investigated for their extracting efficacies for cadmium, copper, and zinc. Liquid-liquid extractions of Cu, Zn, or Cd with ILs after 1–24 h using model solutions (pH 7; 0.1 M CaCl{sub 2}) were assessed using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (F-AAS). Phosphonium-based ILs trihexyltetradecylphosphonium 2-(propylthio)benzoate [P{sub 66614}][PTB] and 2-(benzylthio)benzoate [P{sub 66614}][BTB] showed best extraction efficiency for copper and cadmium, respectively and zinc was extracted to a high degree by [P{sub 66614}][BTB] exclusively.

  5. Actinide recycle potential in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The use of metallic fuel in the IFR allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Pyroprocessing, which utilizes high temperatures and molten salt and molten metal solvents, can be advantageously utilized for processing metal fuels because the product is metal suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. The key step in the IFR process is electrorefining, which provides for recovery of the valuable fuel constituents, uranium and plutonium, and for removal of fission products. In the electrorefining operation, uranium and plutonium are selectively transported from an anode to a cathode, leaving impurity elements, mainly fission products, either in the anode compartment or in a molten salt electrolyte. A notable feature of the IFR process is that the actinide elements accompany plutonium through the process. This results in a major advantage in the high-level waste management, because these actinides are automatically recycled back into the reactor for in-situ burning. Based on the recent IFR process development, a preliminary assessment has also been made to investigate the feasibility of further adapting the pyrochemical processes to directly extract actinides from LWR spent fuel. The results of this assessment indicate very promising potential and two most promising flowsheet options have been identified for further research and development. This paper also summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondietti, E.A.; Bogle, M.A.; Brantley, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239 Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  7. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  8. Metal complexes and solvent extraction properties of isonitrosoacetophenone 2-aminobenzoylhydrazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gup, Ramazan; Giziroğlu, Emrah

    2006-11-01

    Three types of copper complexes as well as an oximate-bridged nickel complex with isonitrosoacetophenone 2-aminobenzoylhydrazone (H(2)L) have been prepared in ethanolic solution and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, (1)H NMR, UV-vis and magnetic susceptibility measurement. IR spectra show the ligand coordinates as a neutral, monoanionic and dianionic O,N,N-tridentate acylhydrazoneoxime ligand depending reaction conditions and metal salts employed. The elemental analyses results, spectroscopic and magnetic data are consistent with the formation of mononuclear copper complexes and binuclear complexes with both copper and nickel. The effects of varying pH and solvent on the absorption behavior of both ligand and complexes have been investigated. The extraction ability of acylhydrazoneoxime ligand has been examined by the liquid-liquid extraction of selected transition metal [Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Cr(3+), Hg(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Mn(2+)] cations. The ligand shows strong binding ability toward copper(II) ion.

  9. Recycling of Metal Containing Waste by Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.

    1999-01-01

    Through the years, a large number of liquid-liquid extraction have been proposed for metal waste recovery and recycling(1,2). However, few of them have achieved commercial application. In fact, relatively little information is available on practical operation and economic feasibility. This presentation will give complementary information by describing and comparing three processes, based on the Am MAR hydrometallurgical concept and representing three different modes of operation

  10. Task-specific thioglycolate ionic liquids for heavy metal extraction: Synthesis, extraction efficacies and recycling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzer, Sonja [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kar, Mega [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Leyma, Raphlin; Chib, Sonia; Roller, Alexander [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Jirsa, Franz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Zoology, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006 Johannesburg (South Africa); Krachler, Regina [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); MacFarlane, Douglas R. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kandioller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kandioller@univie.ac.at [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Keppler, Bernhard K. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Thioglycolate-based ionic liquids have been synthesized and their physicochemical properties have been examined. • The developed ionic liquids can efficiently remove Cu(II) and Cd(II). • Loaded ionic liquids can be recycled by application of different stripping protocols. - Abstract: Eight novel task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) based on the thioglycolate anion designed for heavy metal extraction have been prepared and characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, UV-Vis, infrared, ESI-MS, conductivity, viscosity, density and thermal properties. Evaluation of their time-resolved extraction abilities towards cadmium(II) and copper(II) in aqueous solutions have been investigated where distribution ratios up to 1200 were observed. For elucidation of the IL extraction mode, crystals were grown where Cd(II) was converted with an excess of S-butyl thioglycolate. It was found by X-ray diffraction analysis that cadmium is coordinated by five oxygen and one sulfur donor atoms provided by two thioglycolate molecules and one water molecule. Leaching behavior of the hydrophobic ionic liquids into aqueous systems was studied by TOC (total dissolved organic carbon) measurements. Additionally, the immobilization on polypropylene was elucidated and revealed slower metal extraction rates and similar leaching behavior. Finally, recovery processes for cadmium and copper after extraction were performed and recyclability was successfully proven for both metals.

  11. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  12. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  13. Structural and electronic relationships between the lanthanide and actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Boerje

    2000-01-01

    The similarity and difference between the solid state properties of the 4f and 5f transition metals are pointed out. The heavier 5f elements show properties which have direct correspondence to the early 4f transition metals, suggesting a localized behaviour of the 5f electrons for those metals. On the other hand, the fact that Pu metal has a 30% lower volume than its neighbour heavier element, Am, suggests a tremendous difference in the properties of the 5f electrons for this element relative to the heavier actinides. This change in behaviour between Pu and Am can be viewed as a Mott transition within the 5f shell as a function of the atomic number Z. On the metallic 5f side of the Mott transition (i.e., early actinides), the elements show most unusual crystal structures, the common feature being their low symmetry. An analogous behaviour for the lanthanides is found in cerium metal under compression, where structures typical for the light actinides have been observed experimentally. A generalized phase diagram for the actinides is shown to contain features comparable to the individual phase diagram of Ce metal. The crystal structure behaviour of the lanthanides and heavier actinides is determined by the number of 5d (or 6d) electrons in the metallic state, since for these elements the f electrons are localized and nonbonding. For the earlier actinide metals electronic structure calculations - where the 5f orbitals are treated as part of the valence bands - account very well for the observed ground state crystal structures. The distorted structures can be understood as Peierls distortions away from the symmetric bcc structure and originate from strongly bonding 5f electrons occupying relatively narrow 5f states. High pressure is an extremely useful experimental tool to demonstrate the interrelationship between the lanthanides and the actinides

  14. Actinide recycle potential in the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The use of metallic fuel in the IFR allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Based on the recent IFR process development, a preliminary assessment has been made to investigate the feasibility of further adapting pyrochemical processes to directly extract actinides from LWR spent fuel. The results of this assessment indicate very promising potential and two most promising flowsheet options have been identified for further research and development. This paper also summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs

  15. The clearance of Pu and Am from the respiratory system of rodents after the inhalation of oxide aerosols of these actinides either alone or in combination with other metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.; James, A.C.; Brightwell, J.; Rodwell, P.

    1979-01-01

    In this series of studies in rodents the lung clearance and tissue distribution of both plutonium and americium have been measured following their inhalation as mixed actinide oxides either alone or in combination with other metals. The aerosols used were materials to which workers in the nuclear industry may be occupationally exposed or which could be generated in the event of an accident in a reactor core or fuel fabrication plant. The studies showed that, at least for some PuO 2 aerosols, the lung model currently being used by ICRP for estimating tissue doses from inhaled actinides may overestimate, by about a factor of ten, the amount of plutonium translocated to the blood. The presence of oxides of other metals can, however, appreciably influence the clearance of plutonium from the lung. While in some mixtures plutonium dioxide behaves as an insoluble (Class Y) compound and in others as a soluble (Class W) compound, it may also have transportability characteristics between these two extremes. Americium-241 behaves as a soluble (Class W) compound when inhaled as the oxide. However, if it is present in trace quantities in mixed-oxide aerosols its behaviour depends upon that of the materials present in greatest mass. (author)

  16. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  17. Extraction of lithium from sea water with metallic aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takeji

    1980-01-01

    Extraction of lithium from sea water was investigated. It was found that a corrosion product of metallic aluminum immersed in sea water extracts lithium from it selectively. Effects of the temperature and the pH of sea water, and of the initial concentration of lithium in it were examined. On the basis of the analysis of the surface deposit on aluminum, which is a corrosion product of aluminum, the selectivity coefficients were calculated. For the extraction of lithium from natural sea water, the values of K sub(Na)sup(Li), K sub(Mg)sup(Li), K sub(Ca)sup(Li) and K sub(K)sup(Li) were 9.9 x 10 2 , 1.1 x 10, 4.5 x 10 and 4.4 x 10 2 , respectively. (author)

  18. Metal ion extractant in microemulsions: where solvent extraction and surfactant science meet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, C.

    2011-01-01

    The presented work describes the supramolecular structure of mixtures of a hydrophilic surfactant n-octyl-beta-glucoside (C8G1), and the hydrophobic metal ion extractant tributylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane/water as well as in the presence of salts. In the first part, basic solvent extraction system, composed of water, oil and extractant, will be introduced. The focus, however, lies on the extraction of multivalent metal ions from the aqueous phase. During this extraction process and in the following thermodynamic equilibrium, aggregation and phase transition in supramolecular assemblies occur, which are already described in literature. Notably, these reports rest on individual studies and specific conclusions, while a general concept is still missing. We therefore suggest the use of generalized phase diagrams to present the physico-chemical behaviour of (amphiphilic) extractant systems. These phase diagrams facilitated the development of a thermodynamic model based on molecular geometry and packing of the extractant molecules in the oil phase. As a result, we are now in the position to predict size and water content of extractant aggregates and, thus, verify the experimental results by calculation.Consequently, the second part presents a systematic study of the aqueous and organic phase of water/C8G1 and water/oil/TBP mixtures. The focus lies on understanding the interaction between metal ions and both amphiphilic molecules by means of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. We confirmed the assumption that extraction of metal ions is driven by TBP, while C8G1 remains passive. In the third and last part, microemulsions of C8G1, TBP, water (and salt) and n-dodecane are characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and chemical analytics (Karl Fischer, total organic carbon, ICP-OES,...). The co-surfactant behaviour of TBP was highlighted by comparison to the classical n-alcohol (4≤n≤8) co

  19. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  20. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  1. A new look at actinide recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Croff, A.G.; Rawlins, J.A.; Schulz, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will address the justification for reexamination of the value of recovering the minor actinides and certain fission products from spent light-water reactor fuels and describe some of the technical progress that has been made since the major studies of a decade ago. During this time, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have begun establishing detailed criteria and regulations for geologic repositories. An examination of the hazards of waste disposal relative to the EPA release standards reveals that removal of 99.9% of the actinides (Pu, Am, and Np) reduces these hazards quite close to the EPA standards after 300 years' decay of the strontium and cesium. It may be also useful to remove and separately manage and dispose of certain of the long-lived fission products, such as 99 Tc and 129 I. Much additional work is required to fully assess the appropriate target recoveries as the hazards and risks are more closely examined and as the standards are reworked and refined. The two decades before the projected start of the US repository may present a window of opportunity to introduce several better management practices that act to simplify the repository safety issues. From a technical standpoint, significant progress has been made on recovery of the actinides from aqueous wastes though use of the TRUEX process. Additional work is required to demonstrate the application of the process to spent LWR fuels, but it appears straightforward. In addition, work at the Argonne National Laboratory on the liquid-metal reactor metal fuel cycle shows the relative simplicity of recycle of the actinides in that fast reactor cycle. Much work remains to fully demonstrate that actinides from all secondary waste streams can be removed to the target levels from both the aqueous reprocessing of LWR fuel and the pyro processes for the metal-fueled fast reactor. 9 refs., 2 figs

  2. Design and Development of a Continuous-Flow Countercurrent Metal Extraction System to Remove Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neale, Christopher M. U

    1997-01-01

    .... The research focused on eight contaminated soils from Army installations and the metal extraction capabilities of eight extracting agents including HNO3, HCI, fluorosilicic acid, citric acid, EDTA, DTPA, NTA, and NaOH...

  3. Self-interaction corrected local spin density calculations of actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z

    2010-01-01

    We use the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation in order to describe localization-delocalization phenomena in the strongly correlated actinide materials. Based on total energy considerations, the methodology enables us to predict the ground-state valency configuration...... of the actinide ions in these compounds from first principles. Here we review a number of applications, ranging from electronic structure calculations of actinide metals, nitrides and carbides to the behaviour under pressure of intermetallics, and O vacancies in PuO2....

  4. Alkali earth metal extraction by zirconium salt of dibutylphosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zil'berman, B.Ya.; Fedorov, Yu.S.; Shmidt, O.V.; Egorova, O.N.

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP) could be used as a TBP-compatible solvent for the treatment of liquid radwaste containing long-lived radionuclides, strontium in particular. The alkali earth metals behaviour during their extraction with ZS HDBP and the influence of TBP on the extraction properties of ZS HDBP were investigated. The maximum of Sr extraction was observed at the molar ratio of Zr:HDBP = 1:9, which is also optimal for TPE and RE extraction. Distribution coefficients increase in the series Ba 3 ). Increase of nitric acid concentration resulted in a decrease of the Sr distribution coefficient with a slope of -3. The distribution coefficients of Sr showed quadratic dependence on the HDBP concentration. The presence of TBP in the solvent resulted in a minor decrease in Sr extraction, this effect being significantly lower than for TPE and RE during their extraction by ZS HDBP. At the same time, full saturation of solvent with Sr was not reached because of precipitation in the solvent phase. When xylene was used as the polar diluent for TBP, the influence of TBP on Sr extraction by ZS HDBP was not as significant as for the hydrocarbons, and the Sr distribution coefficients were ten times lower. Solvent saturation curves for Sr extraction by 0.4 mol/L ZS HDBP with xylene at Zr:HDBP = 1:9 showed that in the absence of TBP, the maximum solvent loading reached 0.014 mol/L Sr, which corresponded to Zr : Sr = 3:1. The solubility of Ca in the extract was significantly lower than that of Sr. A centrifugal contactor rig trial was carried out with the use of simulated solutions and 0.4 mol/L ZS HDBP in 30 % TBP with Isopar-L as the solvent. The extraction was performed while neutralizing the aqueous solution in the flow to a residual acidity of 0.05-0.2 mol/L, the stripping was performed by using 1-3 mol/L HNO 3 . Sr concentrating of 3 was achieved by purification from Cs of 50-100 during extraction from TPE and RE during selective stripping. Special

  5. Novel extractants with high selectivity for valuable metals in seawater. Calixarene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakoi, Takahiko; Goto, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    Seawater contains various valuable metals such as uranium and lithium. Therefore, attempts are being made to develop highly selective extractants which recognize target metal ions in reclaimed seawater. In this review, we have focused our study on the application of novel cyclic compound calixarene based extractants. A novel host compound calixarene, which is a cyclic compound connecting some phenol rings, is capable of forming several different extractant ring sizes and introducing various kinds of functional groups towards targeting of metal ions in seawater. Therefore, calixarene derivatives are capable of extracting valuable metals such as uranium, alkaline metals, heavy metals, rare earth metals and noble metals selectively by varying structural ring size and functional groups. The novel host compound calixarene has given promising results which line it up as a potential extractant for the separation of valuable metal ions in seawater. (author)

  6. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Z.M.; Ruhter, W.D.; Gunnink, R.

    1990-01-01

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  7. Review of Biohydrometallurgical Metals Extraction from Polymetallic Mineral Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Watling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review has as its underlying premise the need to become proficient in delivering a suite of element or metal products from polymetallic ores to avoid the predicted exhaustion of key metals in demand in technological societies. Many technologies, proven or still to be developed, will assist in meeting the demands of the next generation for trace and rare metals, potentially including the broader application of biohydrometallurgy for the extraction of multiple metals from low-grade and complex ores. Developed biotechnologies that could be applied are briefly reviewed and some of the difficulties to be overcome highlighted. Examples of the bioleaching of polymetallic mineral resources using different combinations of those technologies are described for polymetallic sulfide concentrates, low-grade sulfide and oxidised ores. Three areas for further research are: (i the development of sophisticated continuous vat bioreactors with additional controls; (ii in situ and in stope bioleaching and the need to solve problems associated with microbial activity in that scenario; and (iii the exploitation of sulfur-oxidising microorganisms that, under specific anaerobic leaching conditions, reduce and solubilise refractory iron(III or manganese(IV compounds containing multiple elements. Finally, with the successful applications of stirred tank bioleaching to a polymetallic tailings dump and heap bioleaching to a polymetallic black schist ore, there is no reason why those proven technologies should not be more widely applied.

  8. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency.

  9. Radiochemistry and actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.; Peneloux, A.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of trace amounts of actinide elements by means of radiochemistry, is discussed. The similarities between radiochemistry and actinide chemistry, in the case of species amount by cubic cm below 10 12 , are explained. The parameters which allow to define what are the observable chemical reactions, are given. The classification of radionuclides in micro or macrocomponents is considered. The validity of the mass action law and the partition function in the definition of the average number of species for trace amounts, is investigated. Examples illustrating the results are given

  10. Actinide nanoparticle research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Denecke, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to cover actinide nano research. It is of interest both for fundamental research into the chemistry and physics of f-block elements as well as for applied researchers such as those studying the long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal and developing remediation strategies. The authors cover important issues of the formation of actinide nano-particles, their properties and structure, environmental behavior of colloids and nanoparticles related to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, modeling and advanced methods of characterization at the nano-scale. (orig.)

  11. Method for recovery of actinides from actinide-bearing scrap and waste nuclear material using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asprey, L.B.; Eller, P.G.

    1984-09-12

    Method for recovery of actinides from nuclear waste material containing sintered and other oxides thereof and from scrap materials containing the metal actinides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ to generate the hexafluorides of the actinides present therein. The fluorinating agent, O/sub 2/F/sub 2/, has been observed to perform the above-described tasks at sufficiently low temperatures that there is virtually no damage to the containment vessels. Moreover, the resulting actinide hexafluorides are not detroyed by high temperature reactions with the walls of the reaction vessel. Dioxygen difluoride is readily prepared, stored and transferred to the place of reaction.

  12. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  14. Hydrophilic sulfonated bis-1,2,4-triazine ligands are highly effective reagents for separating actinides(iii) from lanthanides(iii) via selective formation of aqueous actinide complexes† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Procedures and characterization data for all compounds. Tables and graphs of solvent extraction data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc01328c Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Michael J.; Geist, Andreas; Kozhevnikov, Valery N.; Distler, Petr; John, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We report the first examples of hydrophilic 6,6′-bis(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2′-bipyridine (BTBP) and 2,9-bis(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline (BTPhen) ligands, and their applications as actinide(iii) selective aqueous complexing agents. The combination of a hydrophobic diamide ligand in the organic phase and a hydrophilic tetrasulfonated bis-triazine ligand in the aqueous phase is able to separate Am(iii) from Eu(iii) by selective Am(iii) complex formation across a range of nitric acid concentrations with very high selectivities, and without the use of buffers. In contrast, disulfonated bis-triazine ligands are unable to separate Am(iii) from Eu(iii) in this system. The greater ability of the tetrasulfonated ligands to retain Am(iii) selectively in the aqueous phase than the corresponding disulfonated ligands appears to be due to the higher aqueous solubilities of the complexes of the tetrasulfonated ligands with Am(iii). The selectivities for Am(iii) complexation observed with hydrophilic tetrasulfonated bis-triazine ligands are in many cases far higher than those found with the polyaminocarboxylate ligands previously used as actinide-selective complexing agents, and are comparable to those found with the parent hydrophobic bis-triazine ligands. Thus we demonstrate a feasible alternative method to separate actinides from lanthanides than the widely studied approach of selective actinide extraction with hydrophobic bis-1,2,4-triazine ligands such as CyMe4-BTBP and CyMe4-BTPhen. PMID:29142716

  15. Bio-extraction of precious metals from urban solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhabrata; Natarajan, Gayathri; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Reduced product lifecycle and increasing demand for electronic devices have resulted in the generation of huge volumes of electronic waste (e-waste). E-wastes contain high concentrations of toxic heavy metals, which have detrimental effects on health and the environment. However, e-wastes also contain significant concentrations of precious metals such as gold, silver and palladium, which can be a major driving force for recycling of urban waste. Cyanogenic bacteria such as Chromobacterium violaceum generate cyanide as a secondary metabolite which mobilizes gold into solution via a soluble gold-cyanide complex. However, compared to conventional technology for metal recovery, this approach is not effective, owing largely to the low concentration of lixiviants produced by the bacteria. To overcome the challenges of bioleaching of gold from e-waste, several strategies were adopted to enhance gold recovery rates. These included (i) pretreatment of e-waste to remove competing metal ions, (ii) mutation to adapt the bacteria to high pH environment, (iii) metabolic engineering to produce higher cyanide lixiviant, and (iv) spent medium leaching with adjusted initial pH. Compared to 7.1 % recovery by the wild type bacteria, these strategies achieved gold recoveries of 11.3%, 22.5%, 30% and 30% respectively at 0.5% w/v pulp density respectively. Bioleached gold was finally mineralized and precipitated as gold nanoparticles using the bacterium Delftia acidovorans. This study demonstrates the potential for enhancement of biocyanide production and gold recovery from electronic waste through different strategies, and extraction of solid gold from bioleached leachate.

  16. Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

    2014-04-30

    Executive Summary Simbol Materials studied various methods of extracting valuable minerals from geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California, focusing on the extraction of lithium, manganese, zinc and potassium. New methods were explored for managing the potential impact of silica fouling on mineral extraction equipment, and for converting silica management by-products into commercial products.` Studies at the laboratory and bench scale focused on manganese, zinc and potassium extraction and the conversion of silica management by-products into valuable commercial products. The processes for extracting lithium and producing lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide products were developed at the laboratory scale and scaled up to pilot-scale. Several sorbents designed to extract lithium as lithium chloride from geothermal brine were developed at the laboratory scale and subsequently scaled-up for testing in the lithium extraction pilot plant. Lithium The results of the lithium studies generated the confidence for Simbol to scale its process to commercial operation. The key steps of the process were demonstrated during its development at pilot scale: 1. Silica management. 2. Lithium extraction. 3. Purification. 4. Concentration. 5. Conversion into lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products. Results show that greater than 95% of the lithium can be extracted from geothermal brine as lithium chloride, and that the chemical yield in converting lithium chloride to lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products is greater than 90%. The product purity produced from the process is consistent with battery grade lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide. Manganese and zinc Processes for the extraction of zinc and manganese from geothermal brine were developed. It was shown that they could be converted into zinc metal and electrolytic manganese dioxide after purification. These processes were evaluated for their economic potential, and at the present time Simbol

  17. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, C., E-mail: christelle.tamain@cea.fr [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Arab-Chapelet, B. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Rivenet, M. [University Lille Nord de France, Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Grandjean, S. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, F. [University Lille Nord de France, Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-04-15

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O, Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, M{sub 2+x}[Pu{sup IV}{sub 2−x}Pu{sup III}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 5}]·nH{sub 2}O and M{sub 1−x}[Pu{sup III}{sub 1−x}Pu{sup IV}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·H{sub 2}O]·nH{sub 2}O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV–visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds. - Graphical abstract: Two new single crystal growth methods dedicated to actinide oxalate compounds. - Highlights: • Use of diester as oxalate precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Use of actinide oxide as precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Crystal growth of Pu(III) and Am(III) oxalates. • Crystal growth of mixed Pu(III)/Pu(IV) oxalates.

  18. High efficiency metal removal from hexane-extracted algae oil using super and subcritical propane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Hiroshi; Horizoe, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal removal from algae oil was achieved by supercritical propane solvent extraction. • Continuous metal removing process was developed. • Required energy for metal removing was calculated. - Abstract: As a renewable energy source, oil-producing algae have received much attention in recent years. Raw oil, which is normally extracted from algae using solvents such as hexane or ethyl acetate, includes trace metal compounds that rapidly deactivate the hydrogenation catalyst. In this study, metal removal from hexane-extracted algae oil with supercritical and subcritical propane extraction was examined at temperatures from 40 °C to 130 °C and at 6 MPa pressure. The results showed that the metal concentration became decreasing with temperature increasing and metals were not detectable at 114 °C. Using these results, an energy saving process was proposed. Simulation results showed that the metal removal required a mere 3–4% energy consumption compared to a lower heating value of raw oil

  19. The chemistry of the actinide elements. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; Morss, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Chemistry of the Actinide Elements is a comprehensive, contemporary and authoritative exposition of the chemistry and related properties of the 5f series of elements: actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium and the first eleven. This second edition has been completely restructured and rewritten to incorporate current research in all areas of actinide chemistry and chemical physics. The descriptions of each element include accounts of their history, separation, metallurgy, solid-state chemistry, solution chemistry, thermo-dynamics and kinetics. Additionally, separate chapters on spectroscopy, magnetochemistry, thermodynamics, solids, the metallic state, complex ions and organometallic compounds emphasize the comparative chemistry and unique properties of the actinide series of elements. Comprehensive lists of properties of all actinide compounds and ions in solution are given, and there are special sections on such topics as biochemistry, superconductivity, radioisotope safety, and waste management, as well as discussion of the transactinides and future elements

  20. Evaluating the efficacy of a minor actinide burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbin, K.D.; Kessler, S.F.; Nelson, J.V.; Omberg, R.P.; Wootan, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    The efficacy of a minor actinide burner can be evaluated by comparing safety and economic parameters to the support ratio. Minor actinide mass produced per unit time in this number of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) can be burned during the same time period in one burner system. The larger the support ratio for a given set of safety and economic parameters, the better. To illustrate this concept, the support ratio for selected Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) burner core designs was compared with corresponding coolant void worths, a fundamental safety concern following the Chernobyl accident. Results can be used to evaluate the cost in reduced burning of minor actinides caused by LMR sodium void reduction efforts or to compare with other minor actinide burner systems

  1. Actinide oxide photodiode and nuclear battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Milan; Usov, Igor

    2017-12-05

    Photodiodes and nuclear batteries may utilize actinide oxides, such a uranium oxide. An actinide oxide photodiode may include a first actinide oxide layer and a second actinide oxide layer deposited on the first actinide oxide layer. The first actinide oxide layer may be n-doped or p-doped. The second actinide oxide layer may be p-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is n-doped, and the second actinide oxide layer may be n-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is p-doped. The first actinide oxide layer and the second actinide oxide layer may form a p/n junction therebetween. Photodiodes including actinide oxides are better light absorbers, can be used in thinner films, and are more thermally stable than silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide.

  2. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1989-05-30

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

  3. Actinide burning in the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1993-01-01

    During the past few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing the integral fast reactor (IFR), an advanced liquid-metal reactor concept. In the IFR, the inherent properties of liquid-metal cooling are combined with a new metallic fuel and a radically different refining process to allow breakthroughs in passive safety, fuel cycle economics, and waste management. A key feature of the IFR concept is its unique pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing has the potential to radically improve long-term waste management strategies by exploiting the following attributes: 1. Minor actinides accompany plutonium product stream; therefore, actinide recycling occurs naturally. Actinides, the primary source of long-term radiological toxicity, are removed from the waste stream and returned to the reactor for in situ burning, generating useful energy. 2. High-level waste volume from pyroprocessing call be reduced substantially as compared with direct disposal of spent fuel. 3. Decay heat loading in the repository can be reduced by a large factor, especially for the long-term burden. 4. Low-level waste generation is minimal. 5. Troublesome fission products, such as 99 Tc, 129 I, and 14 C, are contained and immobilized. Singly or in combination, the foregoing attributes provide important improvements in long-term waste management in terms of the ease in meeting technical performance requirements (perhaps even the feasibility of demonstrating that technical performance requirements can be met) and perhaps also in ultimate public acceptance. Actinide recycling, if successfully developed, could well help the current repository program by providing an opportunity to enhance capacity utilization and by deferring the need for future repositories. It also represents a viable technical backup option in the event unforeseen difficulties arise in the repository licensing process

  4. Application of monocarboxylic acids for the extraction of metal ions-literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzozka, Z.; Rozycki, C.

    1980-01-01

    In the paper there is presented a literature review concerning the application of monocarboxylic acids for extraction of metal ions. The following problems are discussed: characteristic of monocarboxylic acids and their mixtures, the equilibria between the acid solution in organic solvent and aqueous phase, the mechanism of acid partition, complexes of carboxylic acids and metal ions in aqueous phase, mechanism of extraction by means of carboxylic acids as well as the problems concerning the extraction of individual metal ions. Data about the extraction of metal ions are presented in table. The 138 references are given. (author)

  5. Extraction of bioavailable proportion of metals in aerosol and street dust

    OpenAIRE

    Coufalík, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The determination of total contents and bioavailable proportions of selected metals in street dust, urban aerosol and emissions from biofuel combustion was performed in this research. Extraction solutions simulating body fluids evinced significantly different extraction ability.

  6. Study of the actinide-lanthanide separation from nuclear waste by a new pyrochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemort, F.

    1997-01-01

    The theoretical extraction and separation of platinoids, actinides and lanthanides is allowed by thermodynamic using two adapted reducing agents: zinc and magnesium. Thereby, a pyrochemical method for the nuclear waste processing has been devised. The high temperature handling of the elements in fluoride forms and their processing by a reactive metallic phase required special precautions. The study of the behavior of matter in exploratory systems allowed the development of an experimental technology for the treatment and contacting of phases. The thermodynamical analysis of the experimental results shows the feasibility of the process. A model was developed to predict the distribution coefficients of zirconium, uranium and lanthanum as a function of the system composition. An estimation method was proposed in order to evaluate the distribution coefficients in diluted solution of all the actinides and lanthanides existing in the fission products between LiF CaF 2 and Zn-Mg at 720 deg C. Coupled with the experimental results, the estimates results may be extrapolated to concentrated solutions allowing predictions of the separation of all actinides and lanthanides. The rapidity of element transfer is induced by a thermal effect caused by the high exothermicity of the reduction by magnesium. The kinetic coefficients have been linked with the reduction enthalpy of each element. Moreover, the kinetics seem limited by chemical reaction and not by mass transfer. (author)

  7. JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Jacquelyn C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finstad, Casey C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonald, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sonya M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05

    The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

  8. Use of fast-spectrum reactors for actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1991-01-01

    Finally, Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) pyroprocessing has been developed only in recent years and it appears to have potential as a relatively uncomplicated, effective actinide recovery process. In fact, actinide recycling occurs naturally in the IFR fuel cycle. Although still very much developmental, the entire IFR fuel cycle will be demonstrated on prototype-scale in conjunction with the EBR-II and its refurbished Fuel Cycle Facility starting in late 1991. A logical extension to this work, therefore, is to establish whether this IFR pyrochemical processing can be applied to extracting actinides from LWR spent fuel. This paper summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  9. European Europart integrated project on actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Hudson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This poster presents the objectives of EUROPART, a scientific integrated project between 24 European partners, mostly funded by the European Community within the FP6. EUROPART aims at developing chemical partitioning processes for the so-called minor actinides (MA) contained in nuclear wastes, i.e. from Am to Cf. In the case of dedicated spent fuels or targets, the actinides to be separated also include U, Pu and Np. The techniques considered for the separation of these radionuclides belong to the fields of hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy, as in the previous FP5 programs named PARTNEW and PYROREP. The two main axes of research within EUROPART will be: The partitioning of MA (from Am to Cf) from high burn-up UO x fuels and multi-recycled MOx fuels; the partitioning of the whole actinide family for recycling, as an option for advanced dedicated fuel cycles (and in connection with the studies to be performed in the EUROTRANS integrated project). In hydrometallurgy, the research is organised into five Work Packages (WP). Four WP are dedicated to the study of partitioning methods mainly based on the use of solvent extraction methods, one WP is dedicated to the development of actinide co-conversion methods for fuel or target preparation. The research in pyrometallurgy is organized into four WP, listed hereafter: development of actinide partitioning methods, study of the basic chemistry of trans-curium elements in molten salts, study of the conditioning of the wastes, some system studies. Moreover, a strong management team will be concerned not only with the technical and financial issues arising from EUROPART, but also with information, communication and benefits for Europe. Training and education of young researchers will also pertain to the project. EUROPART has also established collaboration with US DOE and Japanese CRIEPI. (authors)

  10. Extraction of spiked metals from contaminated coastal sediments: a comparison of different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2003-11-01

    Various extraction methods have been developed to assess metal bioavailability from sediments. In this study, we compared the extraction of Cd, Cr, and Zn from contaminated sediments using different extractants (normal seawater, acidic seawater of pH = 5. seawater with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS], and gut digestive fluids collected in vitro from deposit-feeding peanut worm Sipunculus nudus) coupled with concurrent metal speciation measurements. The influences of sediment aging on metal extraction were also examined using radiotracer-spiked techniques. Sediments aging up to 100 d did not significantly affect the partitioning of spiked Cd and Cr in different geochemical phases, but the spiked Zn was partitioned more into the reducible fraction and less into the carbonate phase with increasing sediment aging. There was a major difference in the partitioning into different geochemical phases between the spiked metals and the native metals within the 100-d sediment aging. The difference between the spiked and native Cd and Zn extraction using gut juices was somewhat smaller than the strong geochemical contrast. Metals bound with the anoxic sediments were hardly extracted by different extractants. There was a significant relationship between the extraction of spiked Cd and its distribution in the exchangeable phase (positive correlation) or in the reducible phase (negative correlation). For Cr and Zn, extraction was not correlated with their partitioning in any of the geochemical phases. Further, extraction of all three metals by digestive gut fluids was not correlated with the concentrations of simultaneously extractable metals (SEM), nor with the difference between SEM and acid volatile sulfide (AVS). Our study suggests that there were large differences in extraction among metals using different extractants and only Cd extraction was significantly related to its geochemical speciation in sediments.

  11. Applicability of a valence fluctuation model to the observed physical property response of actinide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the physical property behavior of the light actinide elements, U, Np, and Pu, and certain of their alloys, is like that of known mixed-valence, R.E. metallic compounds. It is inferred that interconfiguration fluctuation (ICF) theory should also be applicable to actinide materials

  12. Actinide recycling in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Wiese, H.W.; Krieg, B.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is an assessment of the transmutation of long-lived actinides and fission products and the incineration of plutonium for reducing the risk potential of radioactive waste from reactors in comparison to direct waste disposal. The contribution gives an interim account on homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling of 'risk nuclides' in thermal and fast reactors. Important results: - A homogeneous 5 percent admixture of minor actinides (MA) from N4-PWRs to EFR fuel would allow a transmutation not only of the EFR MA, but in addition of the MA from 5 or 6 PWRs of equal power. However, the incineration is restricted by safety considerations. - LWR have only a very low MA incineration potential, due to their disadvantageous neutron capture/fission ratio. - In order to keep the Cm inventory at a low level, it is advantageous to concentrate the Am heterogeneously in particular fuel elements or rods. (orig./HP)

  13. Extraction of metal ions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-inorganic salt two-phase systems in the presence of inorganic extractants: correlation between extraction behaviour and stability constants of extracted species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Laura; Bulgariu, Dumitru

    2008-07-04

    The use of aqueous polyethylene glycol-inorganic salt two-phase systems for the extraction of metal ions has a great potential due to their durability, non-toxicity and relative low cost. The aqueous phases can be easily separated by centrifugation, and the operation is possible in a range of experimental conditions. The experimental results have shown that for a given aqueous two-phase system, the extraction behaviour of metal ions in presence of inorganic extractants is mainly dependent on the stability of extracted species. In this paper we review our results obtained at metal ion extraction using inorganic extractants and discuss three major types of extraction behaviours.

  14. Accumulation of some metals by legumes and their extractability from acid mine spoils. [USA - Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.W.; Ibeabuchi, I.O.; Sistani, K.R.; Shuford, J.W. (Alabama A M University, Normal, AL (USA). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science)

    A greenhouse study was conducted to investigate the growth (dry matter yield) of selected legume cover crops; phytoaccumulation of metals such as Zn, Mn, Pb, Cu, Ni, and Al; the extractability of heavy metals from three different Alabama acid mine spoils. The spoils were amended based on soil test recommended levels of N, P, K, Ca and Mg prior to plant growth. Metals were extracted by three extractants (Mehlich 1, DTPA, and 0.1 M HCl) and values correlated with their accumulation by the selected legumes. Among the cover crops, kobe lespedeza {ital Lespedeza striata} (Thung.) Hook and Arn, sericea lespedeza {ital Lespedeza cuneata} (Dum.) G. Don, and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) did not survive the stressful conditions of the spoils. However, cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) followed by Bragg' soybean {ital Glycine max} (L.) Merr. generally produced the highest dry matter yield while accumulating the largest quantity of metals, except Al, from spoils. The extractability of most metals from the spoils was generally in the order of: 0.1 MHCl {gt} DTPA. Mehlich 1 did not extract Pb and 0.1 M HCl did not extract Ni, whereas DTPA extracted all the metals in a small amount relative to HCl and Mehlich 1. All the extractants were quite effective in removing plant-available Zn from the spoils. In general, the extractants' ability to predict plant-available metals depended on the crop species, spoil type, and extractant used. 28 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Actinides: why are they important biologically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, P.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: actinide elements in energy systems; biological hazards of the actinides; radiation protection standards; and purposes of actinide biological research with regard to toxicity, metabolism, and therapeutic regimens

  16. Analysis of Supercritical-Extracted Chelated Metal Ions From Mixed Organic-Inorganic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Organic and inorganic contaminants of an environmental sample are analyzed by the same GC-MS instrument by adding an oxidizing agent to the sample to oxidize metal or metal compounds to form metal ions. The metal ions are converted to chelate complexes and the chelate complexes are extracted into a supercritical fluid such as CO2. The metal chelate extract after flowing through a restrictor tube is directly injected into the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer, preferably containing a refractory metal filament such as rhenium to fragment the complex to release metal ions which are detected. This provides a fast, economical method for the analysis of metal contaminants in a sample and can be automated. An organic extract of the sample in conventional or supercritical fluid solvents can be detected in the same mass spectrometer, preferably after separation in a supercritical fluid chromatograph.

  17. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications.

  18. Polymer Inclusion Membrane Containing a Tripodal Diglycolamide Ligand: Actinide Ion Uptake and Transport Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahanty, B.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Raut, D.R.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, M.; Verboom, Willem

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA)-based polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing a C-pivot tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) as the carrier extractant and 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer shows potential for the uptake of actinides from acidic feed solutions. The uptake of actinides

  19. Extraction and Binding Efficiency of Calix[8]arene Derivative Toward Selected Transition Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imdadullah Qureshi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have explored the extraction efficiency as well as binding ability of calix[8]arene derivative (3 for selected transition metal ions (Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+ and Cu2+. Picrate salt solutions of these metals were used in the liquid-liquid extraction experiments. It is apparent from the results that ligand 3 shows appreciable high extraction of transition metal cations, with the relative order Pb2+>Cu2+>Ni2+>Co2+>Cd2+ being observed. Highest extraction efficiency has been observed for Pb2+ and Cu2+ i.e. 95 and 91% respectively. The significant extraction and complexation ability for these metal ions may be attributed to the nature, size, structure and geometry of both ligand and metal ions.

  20. Liquid-liquid extraction of divalent transition metal ions with a novel bis-β-ketoester extraction reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmuro, Satoshi; Kishi, Hiromasa; Yoshihara, Nobutoshi; Kokusen, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    Solvent extraction is a very effective method for the separation of metal ions. N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-phenylmethyl)-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmetyl)-1,2-ethanediamine derivatives have been researched for solvent extraction of metal ions. In this study. We synthesized a bis-β-ketoester ligand and evaluated its selectivity in extracting divalent transition metal ions. The ligand, hexane-1,6-diyl bis (4,4,4-trifluoro-3-oxobutanoate) (H2hdfob or H2L) was synthesized in one step by transesterification of ethyl 4,4,4-trifluoroacetoacetate with 1,6-hexanediol. The multidentate ligand H2hdfob successfully extracted divalent transition metal ions into its organic phase. The relationship between logD, which is a distribution ratio (D), and pH or log[H2L]o exhibited linear relationships with slopes of approximately +2 and +1, respectively. Based on these results, we proposed a mechanism of extraction with H2hdfob. Extraction with tetradentate H2hdfob provides a new method for enhancing selectivity of divalent metal ions, in comparison to other bidentate ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-17

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP).

  2. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  3. Modified sequential extraction for biochar and petroleum coke: Metal release potential and its environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gunten, Konstantin; Alam, Md Samrat; Hubmann, Magdalena; Ok, Yong Sik; Konhauser, Kurt O; Alessi, Daniel S

    2017-07-01

    A modified Community Bureau of Reference (CBR) sequential extraction method was tested to assess the composition of untreated pyrogenic carbon (biochar) and oil sands petroleum coke. Wood biochar samples were found to contain lower concentrations of metals, but had higher fractions of easily mobilized alkaline earth and transition metals. Sewage sludge biochar was determined to be less recalcitrant and had higher total metal concentrations, with most of the metals found in the more resilient extraction fractions (oxidizable, residual). Petroleum coke was the most stable material, with a similar metal distribution pattern as the sewage sludge biochar. The applied sequential extraction method represents a suitable technique to recover metals from these materials, and is a valuable tool in understanding the metal retaining and leaching capability of various biochar types and carbonaceous petroleum coke samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The correlation of metal content in medicinal plants and their water extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Saša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of some medicinal plants and their water extracts from South East Serbia is determined on the basis of metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry. The two methods were used for the preparation of water extracts, to examine the impact of the preparation on the content of metals in them. Content of investigated metals in both water extracts is markedly lower then in medicinal plants, but were higher in water extract prepared by method (I, with exception of lead content. The coefficients of extraction for the observed metal can be represented in the following order: Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. Correlation coefficients between the metal concentration in the extract and total metal content in plant material vary in the range from 0.6369 to 0.9956. This indicates need the plants to be collected and grown in the unpolluted area and to examine the metal content. The content of heavy metals in the investigated medicinal plants and their water extracts is below the maximum allowable values, so they are safe to use.

  5. Actinide coordination chemistry: towards the limits of the periodic table; Chimie de coordination des actinides: vers les frontieres du tableau periodique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, C.; Moisy, P. [CEA Marcoule (DEN/DRCP/SCPS), 30 (France); Simoni, E. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    2009-05-15

    Actinide elements represent a distinct chemical family at the bottom of the periodic table. Among the major characteristics of this 14 element family is their high atomic numbers and their radioactivity. Actinide chemistry finds its roots in the history of the 20. century and plays a very important role in our contemporary world. Energetic as well as technical challenges are facing the development of nuclear energy. In this pedagogical introduction to actinide chemistry, the authors draw a comparison between the actinides family and the chemistry of two other families, lanthanides and transition metals. This article focuses on molecular and aqueous chemistry. It has been based on class notes aiming to present an overview of the chemical diversity of actinides, and its future challenges for modern science. (authors)

  6. Heavy metal ion extraction of crownether compounds with supercritical CO2 fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. H.; Ko, M. S.; Kim, H. W.; Park, K. H.; Kim, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    Benzocrownether-diarylethene derivatives (5BCD, 6BCD) were synthesized and utilized to extract metal ions into supercritical CO 2 . In order to enhance the CO 2 -phillicity and the extraction capability, synthesized compounds have both perfluoro unit and benzocrown moiety and were compared with dicyclohexano 18-crown-6(DC18C6). With minimal amount of water and counter ions such as perfluorooctanesulphonic acid or perfluorooctanic acid, their metal ion(Sr 2+ , Co +2 , Na + ) extraction efficiency was investigated. 5BCD, 6BCD showed more than 50% extraction for Sr +2 , Na + ions and their extraction efficiency was better than that of DC18C6 compound

  7. R and D for actinide partitioning and recovery of valuables from high level waste using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchanda, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the context of growing world population with rapidly increasing energy needs and the threat of global warming due to CO 2 emission (caused by fossil fuel burning), the nuclear energy may be an attractive option particularly in the developing countries. Recycling of fuel is a unique feature of nuclear power technology which makes it a favourable choice with respect to conservation of energy resources. Steady growth of global fuel reprocessing activities (6000 tHM/annum) implies a vital role of separation science in developing efficient procedures for the separation and purification of actinides and in devising safe procedures for the management of nuclear waste arising at different stages of the PUREX process. High Level Waste (HLW) comprising of the concentrate of the raffinate of the co-extraction cycle (with over 95% of the total radioactivity produced in the burn up process in reactor) need to be isolated from the biosphere. There is a consensus among the waste management technologists that the safest route to achieve this, is to deposit it in a stable geological formation after it's immobilization in suitable glass/Synroc matrix. It ensures that any risk from exposure due to accidental intervention or natural disturbance is minimized. Risk perception is essentially due to the large radiological toxicity associated with alpha emitters like 237 Np, 241 Am, 243 Am and 245 Cm. Isotopes of Pu (left unrecovered) present in HLW also contribute towards radiological toxicity. In view of the high cost involved and the need for continuous surveillance, several countries are considering modifying their reprocessing schemes to partition (isolate) long-lived actinides from HLW. Since the volume of the actinide oxides (which retain major fraction of the radio toxicity of HLW) is significantly lower as compared to the other metal oxides present in HLW, such an approach is expected to reduce the cost of immobilization as well as of disposal (in geological repository) and

  8. Simple method for preparation of secondary amides of phosphorylacetic acids and their use for actinide extraction and sorption from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyushin, O.I.; Sharova, E.V.; Odinets, I.L.; Lenevich, S.V.; Mastruykova, T.A.; Morgalyuk, V.P.; Tananaev, I.G.; Pribylova, G.V.; Myasoedova, G.V.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    An effective method of synthesis of secondary alkylamides of phosphorylacetic acids (APA), based on amidation of ethyl esters of phosphorylacetic acids with primary aliphatic amines, was developed. Extraction of americium(III) complexes with APA solutions in dichloroethane and uranium(VI) sorption by sorbents with non-covalently fixed APA from nitric acid solutions were studied. In the course of americium(III) extraction there is no correlation between Am III distribution factor and APA structure, whereas during uranium(VI) sorption a dependence of U VI extraction degree on the complexing agent structure is observed [ru

  9. EXTRACTION, RECOVERY, AND BIOSTABILITY OF EDTA FOR REMEDIATION OF HEAVY METAL-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825549C052)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelation removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil is seen as a viable remediation technique. A useful chelating agent should be strong, reusable, and biostable during metal extraction and recovery operations. This work tested the extraction, recovery, and biostability o...

  10. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lumetta, Gregg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  11. A novel mechanism for the extraction of metals from water to ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Camiel H C; Sánchez, Antonio; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Kobrak, Mark N

    2013-11-11

    We present a novel mechanism for the extraction of metals from aqueous phases to room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) by use of a high-temperature salt as an extraction agent. The mechanism capitalizes on the fact that charged metal complexes are soluble in ILs; this allows for extraction of charged complexes rather than the neutral species, which are formed by conventional approaches. The use of a well-chosen extraction agent also suppresses the competing ion-exchange mechanism, thus preventing degradation of the ionic liquid. The approach permits the use of excess extractant to drive the recovery of metals in high yield. This work presents both a thermodynamic framework for understanding the approach and experimental verification of the process in a range of different ILs. The method has great potential value in the recovery of metals, water purification and nuclear materials processing. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Surplus Cost Potential as a Life Cycle Impact Indicator for Metal Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa D.M. Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the evaluation of product life cycles, methods to assess the increase in scarcity of resources are still under development. Indicators that can express the importance of an increase in scarcity of metals extracted include surplus ore produced, surplus energy required, and surplus costs in the mining and the milling stage. Particularly the quantification of surplus costs per unit of metal extracted as an indicator is still in an early stage of development. Here, we developed a method that quantifies the surplus cost potential of mining and milling activities per unit of metal extracted, fully accounting for mine-specific differences in costs. The surplus cost potential indicator is calculated as the average cost increase resulting from all future metal extractions, as quantified via cumulative cost-tonnage relationships. We tested the calculation procedure with 12 metals and platinum-group metals as a separate group. We found that the surplus costs range six orders of magnitude between the metals included, i.e., between $0.01–$0.02 (iron and $13,533–$17,098 (rhodium USD (year 2013 per kilogram of metal extracted. The choice of the reserve estimate (reserves vs. ultimate recoverable resource influenced the surplus costs only to a limited extent, i.e., between a factor of 0.7 and 3.2 for the metals included. Our results provide a good basis to regularly include surplus cost estimates as resource scarcity indicator in life cycle assessment.

  13. The solvent extraction of alkali metal ions with β-diketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Megumu; Niina, Syozo; Shimoji, Noboru

    1974-01-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate effects of solvent and chelating-agent on the solvent extraction of alkali metal ions by seven β-diketones, acetylacetone (Acac), benzoylacetone (BzA), dipivaloylmethane (DPM), dibenzoylmethane (DBM), thenoyltrifluoloacetone (TTA), benzoyltrifluoroacetone (BFA) and hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA), and to separate lithium from alkali metals. The extraction of alkali metals increase with increasing donor power of the solvent: i.e., benzene Na>K>Rb>Cs, which is also the order in which the adduct formation of these β-diketone chelates with donor solvents increase. The adduct formations between β-diketone chelates of alkali metals and donor solvents markedly enhance the solubilities of the chelates in solvents and, consequently, the extractabilities of alkali metals with β-diketones. Lithium was extracted with TTA in ether at such a low base concentration that sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium were hardly extracted, and this enabled to separate lithium from other metals by the use of rubidium hydroxide (0.02 M). An attempt has been made to isolate alkali metal β-diketone chelates and some chelates have been obtained as crystals. The infrared absorption bands arising from C=O and C.=C of TTA shift to lower frequencies in the alkali metal chelates with TTA, and consequently, β-diketones is suggested to coordinate to alkali metal as a bidentate ligand. (JPN)

  14. Metal extraction from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen using low pH solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA A. CUCULOVIC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of metals (K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Ba, Zn, Mn and Sr from dry Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen was performed using solutions similar to acid rain (solution A – H2SO4–HNO3–(NH42SO4 and solution B – H2SO4–HNO3–(NH42SO4–NH4NO3. The pH values of these solutions were 2.00, 2.58, 2.87, 3.28, and 3.75. Five consecutive extractions were performed with each solution. In all solutions, the extracted metal content, except Cu and Ca, was the highest in the first extract. The highest percentage of the metals desorbed in the first extraction was obtained using solutions with low pH values, 2.00, 2.58, and 2.87. The lowest percentage in the first extraction was obtained using solutions with pH 3.28 and 3.75, indicating influence of the H+ ion on the extraction. According to the results obtained, the investigated metals form two groups. The first group includes K, Al, Ca, Mg, and Fe. They were extracted in each of the five extractions at each of the pH values. The second group includes Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Sr, which were not all extracted at each pH value. The first group yielded three types of extraction curves when the logarithms of extracted metal amounts were plotted as a function of the number of successive extractions. These effects indicate that three different positions (centres of metal ion accumulation exist in the lichen (due to sorption, complex formation, or other processes present in the tissues.

  15. Actinide AMS at DREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khojasteh, Nasrin B.; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Scharf, Andreas; Ziegenruecker, Rene [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Pavetich, Stefan [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); ANU, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclides such as {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu were introduced into the environment by atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, reactor accidents (Chernobyl, Fukushima), releases from nuclear reprocessing facilities (Sellafield, La Hague), radioactive waste disposal, and accidents with nuclear devices (Palomares, Thule) [1]. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method to measure these actinides. The DREsden AMS (DREAMS) facility is located at a 6 MV accelerator, which is shared with ion beam analytics and implantation users, preventing major modifications of the accelerator and magnetic analyzers. DREAMS was originally designed for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, and {sup 129}I. To modify the system for actinide AMS, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) beamline at the high-energy side has been installed and performance tests are on-going. Ion beam and detector simulations are carried out to design a moveable ionization chamber. Especially, the detector window and anode dimensions have to be optimized. This ionization chamber will act as an energy detector of the system and its installation is planned as closely as possible to the stop detector of the TOF beamline for highest detection efficiency.

  16. Recovery of actinides from TBP-Na2Co3 scrub-waste solutions: the ARALEX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.; Mason, G.W.; Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.

    1979-08-01

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP-Na 2 CO 3 scrub-waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory-scale countercurrent extraction techniques. The process, called the ARALEX process, uses 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H 2 MBP) from acidified Na 2 CO 3 scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds, which also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H 2 MBP to complex actinides. Thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds (e.g., detergents) that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction procedures. 20 figures, 6 tables

  17. Actinide physicochemical data assessment and selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    There is a continuing need to have reliable physicochemical data of actinide compounds and actinide elements in aqueous solution available for nuclear engineers and scientists. These data are needed for all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle - from the behavior of actinides in reactor fuels at high temperature and pressure to actinide behavior in geologic depository environments. This paper summarizes the status of actinide physicochemical data assessment and selection. The topics to be covered include data assessment of chemical thermodynamic properties and solubilities of actinide compounds and solution equilibria of the actinides

  18. Chemistry of solvent extraction of rare metals by quaternary ammonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.I.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the liquid-liquid extraction of Ti, Nb,Ta, Cr(VI), Mo(VI), W(VI), U(VI), Th(lV), Sc, Y and lanthanoids, as well as mineral acids and alkaline metals, using quaternary ammonium salts, alone, and with mixtures of other classes of extractants is reported. The composition of extracted compounds and the mechanism of their extraction are discussed

  19. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  20. Evaluation of cationite efficiency during extraction of heavy metal ions from diluted solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Gomelya, Nikolai; Ivanova, Veronika; Galimova, Valentina; Nosachova, Julia; Shabliy, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Ion exchange is one of the methods that has been successfully employed in industry for extracting heavy metals from wastewater. We conducted research into ion-exchange processes of extraction of heavy metal ions on the weak- and strong-acid cationites from distilled and tap water. Heavy metal ion concentration was less than 1 mg/dm3. We established that in all cases efficiency of water treatment decreased at a decrease in the starting concentration of a metal. The process took place regardles...

  1. Review on calixarene-type macrocycles and metal extraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper gives an overview on the current state of solvent extraction studies with derivatized [1.n]-metacyclophanes and related compounds. 122 References from the last ten years are discussed and data on extractability, extraction equilibria, and complex formation are presented in graphical form. (author) 122 refs

  2. Review on calixarene-type macrocycles and metal extraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, R. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-12-01

    This paper gives an overview on the current state of solvent extraction studies with derivatized [1.n]-metacyclophanes and related compounds. 122 References from the last ten years are discussed and data on extractability, extraction equilibria, and complex formation are presented in graphical form. (author) 122 refs.

  3. Evaluation of actinide biosorption by microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happel, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional methods for removing metals from aqueous solutions include chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical treatment and evaporation. The removal of radionuclides from aqueous waste streams has largely relied on ion exchange methods which can be prohibitively costly given increasingly stringent regulatory effluent limits. The use of microbial cells as biosorbants for heavy metals offers a potential alternative to existing methods for decontamination or recovery of heavy metals from a variety of industrial waste streams and contaminated ground waters. The toxicity and the extreme and variable conditions present in many radionuclide containing waste streams may preclude the use of living microorganisms and favor the use of non-living biomass for the removal of actinides from these waste streams. In the work presented here, we have examined the biosorption of uranium by non-living, non-metabolizing microbial biomass thus avoiding the problems associated with living systems. We are investigating biosorption with the long term goal of developing microbial technologies for the remediation of actinides.

  4. Lithium actinide recycle process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.K.; Pierce, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Several pyrochemical processes have been developed in the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne Laboratory for recovery of actinide elements from LWR spent fuel. The lithium process was selected as the reference process from among the options. In this process the LWR oxide spent fuel is reduced by lithium at 650{degrees}C in the presence of molten LiCl. The Li{sub 2}O formed during the reduction process is soluble in the salt. The spent salt and lithium are recycled after the Li{sub 2}O is electrochemically reduced. The oxygen is liberated as CO{sub 2} at a carbon anode or oxygen at an inert anode. The reduced metal components of the LWR spent fuel are separated from the LiCL salt phase and introduced into an electrorefiner. The electrorefining step separates the uranium and transuranium (TRU) elements into two product streams. The uranium product, which comprises about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass, may be enriched for recycle into the LWR fuel cycle, stored for future use in breeder reactors, or converted to a suitable form for disposal as waste. The TRU product can be recycled as fast reactor fuel or can be alloyed with constituents of the LWR cladding material to produce a stable waste form.

  5. Extraction and solubility characteristics of metal aliphatic carboxylates in a hexane medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshio; Sugai, Mikio; Ohshima, Yozo; Ogawa, Nobuaki; Matsuo, Shigeki.

    1994-01-01

    Extractions of 30 metal ions with aliphatic carboxylic acids into hexane were carried out to understand their extraction behavior. Results were expressed in an area-graph form for metal partitions among the three (aqueous, organic and/or solid) phases in the range pH 1-9. The difference in half-extraction pH (pH 1/2 ) between various metals can be explained by the electrostatic effect (hard acids) and the polarizability. According to the solubility of the metal complexes into organic phase, the thirty metal ions were divided into two groups. The metal ions with high ionic potential (group A) were generally extractable by every carboxylic acid tested. The large size metal ions (group B) precipitated at the liquid/liquid interface by n-aliphatic carboxylic acids and were perfectly extracted by 2-ethylhexanoic acid. We propose that this difference in the group B is caused by interface-coagulation through inter-molecular hydrophobic bond formation in the former, while the branched chain in the carboxylic acid weakens the interaction in the latter. For group A, therefore, most of the extracted species would be origomers so that no coagulation would occur. (author)

  6. Experimental studies of narrow band effects in the actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    In many actinide metallic systems the f-electrons exhibit band behavior. This is a consequence of direct f-f wave function overlap or hybridization of f-electrons with s-, p-, and d-electrons. The f-bands can be responsible for large electronic densities of states at the Fermi level which may lead to band magnetism of various types. Although the concept of valence instabilities must be approached cautiously especially in the light actinides, it would not be surprising to observe them in the future, especially in Am compounds.

  7. Experimental studies of narrow band effects in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    In many actinide metallic systems the f-electrons exhibit band behavior. This is a consequence of direct f-f wave function overlap or hybridization of f-electrons with s-, p-, and d-electrons. The f-bands can be responsible for large electronic densities of states at the Fermi level which may lead to band magnetism of various types. Although the concept of valence instabilities must be approached cautiously especially in the light actinides, it would not be surprising to observe them in the future, especially in Am compounds

  8. Complexes of actinides with naturally occuring organic substances - Literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, U.; Allard, B.

    1983-02-01

    Properties of naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids and their formation of actinide complexes are reviewed. Actinides in all the oxdation states III, IV, V and VI would form complexes with many humic and fulvic acids, comparable in strength to the hydroxide and carbonate complexes. Preliminary experiments have shown, that the presence of predominantly humic acid complexes would significantly reduce the sorption of americium on geologic media. This does not, however, necessarily lead to a potentially enhanced mobility under environmental conditions, since humic and fulvic acids carrying trace metals also would be strongly bound to e.g. clayish material. (author)

  9. Concentration of actinides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.

    1976-06-01

    Considerable concern is now being expressed over the discharge of actinides into the environment. This report presents a brief review of the chemistry of the actinides and examines the evidence for interaction of the actinides with some naturally-occurring chelating agents and other factors which might stimulate actinide concentration in the food chain of man. This report also reviews the evidence for concentration of actinides in plants and for uptake through the gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  10. Possible applications of crown-ethers to metal extraction using liquid membrane technology - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, M.

    1990-01-01

    Ether-crowns, discovered in 1967 by J.C. PEDERSEN, exhibit attractive complexive and extractive properties, enhanced in various fields, such as analytical chemistry, chemical synthesis, field of biology, or extractive chemistry. The investigations carried out on these macrocyclic compounds are continually increasing, as show in international literature. Among the focus of interest, the applications to metal extraction are extensively studied with crown compounds present in liquid phase or impregnated on supports (membranes or resins). The goal of this paper is to describe the application of crown-ethers to metal extraction, using liquid membrane processes. 69 refs

  11. Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong Austin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-28

    The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

  12. Fusion barrier characteristics of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Sridhar, K. N.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied fusion barrier characteristics of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations. After the calculation of fusion barrier heights and positions, we have searched for their parameterization. We have achieved the empirical formula for fusion barrier heights (VB), positions (RB), curvature of the inverted parabola (ħω) of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations (6 actinides with the simple inputs of mass number (A) and atomic number (Z) of projectile-targets.

  13. Actinide analytical program for characterization of Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.J.; Winters, W.I.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this program has been to develop faster, more accurate methods for the concentration and determination of actinides at their maximum permissible concentration (MPC) levels in a controlled zone. These analyses are needed to characterize various forms of Hanford high rad waste and to support characterization of products and effluents from new waste management processes. The most acceptable methods developed for the determination of 239 Pu, 238 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am, and 243 Cm employ solvent extraction with the addition of tracer isotopes. Plutonium and neptunium are extracted from acidified waste solutions into Aliquat-336. Americium and curium are then extracted from the waste solution at the same acidity into dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylenephosphonate (DHDECMP). After back extraction into an aqueous matrix, these actinides are electrodeposited on steel disks for alpha energy analysis. Total uranium and total thorium are also isolated by solvent extraction and determined spectrophotometrically

  14. Metal Cationization Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Compounds Containing Multiple Oxygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kenneth D.; Spencer, Sandra E.; Glish, Gary L.

    2017-06-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization is an ambient ionization technique that allows real-time sampling of liquid samples, including organic aerosols. Similar to electrospray ionization, the composition of the electrospray solvent used in extractive electrospray ionization can easily be altered to form metal cationized molecules during ionization simply by adding a metal salt to the electrospray solvent. An increase in sensitivity is observed for some molecules that are lithium, sodium, or silver cationized compared with the protonated molecule formed in extractive electrospray ionization with an acid additive. Tandem mass spectrometry of metal cationized molecules can also significantly improve the ability to identify a compound. Tandem mass spectrometry of lithium and silver cationized molecules can result in an increase in the number and uniqueness of dissociation pathways relative to [M + H]+. These results highlight the potential for extractive electrospray ionization with metal cationization in analyzing complex aerosol mixtures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Study of the actinide-lanthanide separation from nuclear waste by a new pyrochemical process; Etude de la separation actinides-lanthanides des dechets nucleaires par un procede pyrochimique nouveau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemort, F. [CEA Marcoule, Departement de Retraitement, des Dechets et du Demantelement, 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)]|[Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-01-01

    The theoretical extraction and separation of platinoids, actinides and lanthanides is allowed by thermodynamic using two adapted reducing agents: zinc and magnesium. Thereby, a pyrochemical method for the nuclear waste processing has been devised. The high temperature handling of the elements in fluoride forms and their processing by a reactive metallic phase required special precautions. The study of the behavior of matter in exploratory systems allowed the development of an experimental technology for the treatment and contacting of phases. The thermodynamical analysis of the experimental results shows the feasibility of the process. A model was developed to predict the distribution coefficients of zirconium, uranium and lanthanum as a function of the system composition. An estimation method was proposed in order to evaluate the distribution coefficients in diluted solution of all the actinides and lanthanides existing in the fission products between LiF CaF{sub 2} and Zn-Mg at 720 deg C. Coupled with the experimental results, the estimates results may be extrapolated to concentrated solutions allowing predictions of the separation of all actinides and lanthanides. The rapidity of element transfer is induced by a thermal effect caused by the high exothermicity of the reduction by magnesium. The kinetic coefficients have been linked with the reduction enthalpy of each element. Moreover, the kinetics seem limited by chemical reaction and not by mass transfer. (author) 66 refs.

  16. Selective extraction and detection of noble metal based on ionic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the dramatic increase in economic growth, noble metals have been extensively utilized for wide range of industries and economic activities. Gold is one of the noble metals, which used in various applications because of its unique properties. However, various reports have mentioned that gold species may cause an ...

  17. Novel complexing agents for the efficient separation of actinides and remediation of actinide-contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baisden, P.; Kadkhodayan, B.

    1996-01-01

    Research into the coordination chemistry of transactinide elements should provide us with new fundamental knowledge about structure, geometry, and stability of these metal complexes. Our approach involves the design, synthesis, and characterization of open-quotes expanded porphyrinclose quotes macrocyclic ligands which coordinate the actinide metal cations with high thermodynamic affinity and kinetic stability. We can use the knowledge from understanding the fundamental coordination chemistry of these elements as a stepping stone to heavy metal detoxification, radioactive waste cleanup, and possibly radioactive isotope separation. The critical components of this research endeavor, along with the viability of metal complex formation, will be correlated to ring size and core geometry of the ligand and, the atomic radius, oxidation state, coordination geometry and coordination number of the transactinium metal ion. These chelating agents may have certain applications to the solution of some radioactive waste problems if they can be attached to polymer supports and used to chemically separate the radioactive components in waste

  18. Fuel/target concepts for transmutation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Haas, D.; Konings, R.J.M.; Somers, J.

    2001-01-01

    Four different concepts for fuels and targets for transmutation of (minor) actinides are discussed in the present paper. These include thorium-based mixed oxides, inert matrix mixed oxide, and composites based on mixtures oxide powders (CERCER) or mixtures of oxide and metal powders (CERMET). Fabrication methods have been investigated, especially taking account of the specific requirements for handling significant quantities of minor actinides (dust-free processes, remote handling). The processes tested at ITU are based on sol-gel and infiltration (INRAM) techniques or combination thereof. The processes are being validated first using cerium and then plutonium as simulant for the minor actinides, before the actual fabrication of Am- and Cm-containing materials begins in earnest following the completion of the construction of specially designed shielded cells (the MA-lab). (author)

  19. Solvent systems containing diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes in room temperature ionic liquid for metal ion extraction: studies with simulated high-level wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, A.; Mohapatra, Prasanta K.; Iqbal, M.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of actinide ions such as Am(III), Pu(IV), Np(IV), U(VI) and Pu(VI) was studied from simulated high-level waste (SHLW) solutions using several diglycolamide-functionalised calix[4]arene (Calix-DGA) ligands dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [C8mim][NTf2]. The

  20. Current Compensation of Hydrogen Ion Beam Extracted from PIG with Metal-Hydride Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisko, V.N.; Sereda, I.N.; Klochko, E.V.; Tseluyko, A.F.; Afanas'eva, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of extracted hydrogen ion beam compensation from reflective discharge with metal-hydride cathode that sufficiently widens the possible field of applying plasma sources of such type is found. The evolution of energy distribution function of ions extracted along the axial direction from reflective discharge with metal-hydride cathode depending on external parameters of the discharge is investigated. The electron distribution functions which compensate hydrogen ion beam are determined

  1. Relativistic studies in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, P.; Gonis, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this review the theoretical background is given for a relativistic description for actinide systems. A short introduction is given of the density functional theory which forms the basis for a fully relativistic single-particle theory. A section on the Dirac Hamiltonian is followed by a brief summary on group theoretical concepts. Single site scattering is presented such that formal extensions to the case of the presence of an internal (external) magnetic field and/or anisotropic scattering are evident. Multiple scattering is discussed such that it can readily be applied also to the problem of dislocations. In connection with the problem of selfconsistency particular attention is drawn to the use of complex energies. Finally the various theoretical aspects discussed are illustrated through the results of numerical calculations. 101 refs.; 37 figs.; 5 tabs

  2. Neutronics design study on a minor actinide burner for transmuting spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    1998-08-01

    A liquid metal reactor was designed for the primary purpose of burning the minor actinide waste from commercial light water reactors. The design was constrained to maintain acceptable safety performance as measured by the burnup reactivity swing, the doppler coefficient, and the sodium void worth. Sensitivity studies were performed for homogeneous and decoupled core designs, and a minor actinide burner design was determined to maximize actinide consumption and satisfy safety constraints. One of the principal innovations was the use of two core regions, with a fissile plutonium outer core and an inner core consisting only of minor actinides. The physics studies performed here indicate that a 1200 MWth core is able to transmute the annual minor actinide inventory of about 16 LWRs and still exhibit reasonable safety characteristics. (author). 34 refs., 22 tabs., 14 figs

  3. The Extraction of Heavy Metals by Means of a New Electrolytic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiragossian, Z. G.; Martoyan, G. A.; Injeyan, S. G.; Tonikyan, S. G.; Nalbandyan, G. G.

    2003-01-01

    The extraction of metals in known metallurgical methods is pursued on the basis of separating as much as possible the desired metal's content from the ore concentrate, in the most economical manner. When these principles are also applied to the extraction of heavy metals, the related environmental factors do not readily meet with requirements. Today, an acceptable extraction technology for metals must satisfy the need to produce the deep separation of metals from their source in both economical and environmentally safe manner. This pertains to the direction of our ongoing research and development, among others in the field of environmental remediation. Earlier, we successfully addressed in an environmentally safe manner the selective extraction of radioactive isotopes from liquid radioactive wastes, produced at Armenia's Metzamor Nuclear Power Plant and implemented a functioning LRW station at the NPP. Currently, we extended our new electrodialysis-based electrolytic method in a laboratory scale, for the extraction and deep separation of different metals, including the heavy metals. Our new method, its efficiency, economy and full compliance with environmental issues will be presented

  4. Thermosensitive gels incorporating polythioether units for the selective extraction of class b metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayama, K; Morita, Y; Iwatsuki, S

    2010-10-22

    Novel temperature-responsive copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and monoaza-tetrathioether derivative, were synthesized for the selective extraction of soft metal ions such as silver(I), copper(I), gold(III) and palladium(II) ion. The ratio between N-isopropylacrylamide group and monoaza-tetrathioether group in the copolymer was determined. The ratio between N-isopropylacrylamide group and monoaza-tetrathioether group varied in the range of 66:1-187:1. Each lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer solution was determined spectrophotometrically by the relative absorbance change at 750 nm via temperature of the polymer solution. Metal ion extraction using the copolymer with appropriate counter anions such as picrate ion, nitrate or perchlorate ion was examined. Soft metal ions such as silver(I), copper(I), gold(III) and palladium(II) ion were extracted selectively into the solid polymer phase. The extraction efficiency of a metal ion such as silver ion increased as the increase of the ratio of the monoaza-tetrathioether group to N-isopropylacrylamide group in the polymer. The quantitative extraction of class b metal ions as well as the liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions with monoaza-tetrathioether molecule was performed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Specific heat of actinide compounds at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novion, C. de.

    1975-01-01

    Actinide compounds show phenomena of self-heating and recovery of self-irradiation induced defects which imply the development of apparatus and special methods for the measurement of their specific heat at low temperature. The case of insulating or semiconductor compounds is considered, with emphasis on the oxides MO 2 . The problem of 5f electrons in metallic compounds, then pure metals and the self-irradiation problems are examined [fr

  6. Projected benefits of actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, C.; Goldstein, M.

    1976-05-01

    Possible benefits that could accrue from actinide separation and transmutations are presented. The time frame for implementing these processes is discussed and the expected benefits are qualitatively described. These benefits are provisionally quantified in a sample computation

  7. Environmental research on actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  8. Improved ion extraction from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source by a metal-dielectric-extraction electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K.E.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the experiment was to study the influence and the physics of the boundary region (between the plasma and the extraction potential) with direct impact on the source ion-beam output. A specially processed high-emissive metal-dielectric structure was installed on the extraction electrode of the Frankfurt 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS), forming a so-called metal-dielectric- (MD) extraction electrode. The emissive layer of the disk faced the plasma; its inner hole was about the size of the normal extraction hole of the ECRIS. The output of the ECRIS in the presence of the MD electrode was compared with the outputs for the standard configuration (overall stainless-steel plasma chamber) and with the same plasma chamber with the radial wall covered by a highly electron emissive MD liner that raise the plasma electron density and temperature. The charge state distributions of the argon ions extracted from the source show an important increase of the ion beam for the high charge states as compared to the standard situation whereas the low charge states are less reduced than in the case of the presence of a MD liner. Due to the special position of the dielectric layer, the MD electrode introduces a new effect, which is connected to its property of becoming a positively charged surface under electron and ion bombardment. The MD electrode creates a quasiconfinement of the peripheral ions in the extraction, those ions that are normally lost to a conducting extraction electrode

  9. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  10. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1978. [Advanced solvent extraction; accidents; pyrochemical; radwaste in metal matrix; waste migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M. J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R. E.

    1979-12-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported include development of centrifugal contactors for Purex processes. Tricaprylmethyl-ammonium nitrate and di-n-amyl-n-amylphosphonate are being evaluated as Thorex extractants. Dispersion of uranium and plutonium by fires, and mechanisms for subdividing and dispersing liquids and solids were reviewed. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program, a facility for testing containment materials is under construction; a flowsheet for carbide fuel processing has been designed and studies of carbide reactions in bismuth are underway; salt transport processes are being studied; process-size refractory metal vessels are being fabricated; the feasibility of AIROX reprocessing is being determined; the solubility of UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 2/ + fission products, and PuO/sub 2/ in molten alkali metal nitrates, has been investigated; a flowsheet was developed for reprocessing actinide oxides in molten salts; preparation of Th-U carbide from the oxide is being studied; new flowsheets based on the Dow Aluminum Pyrometallurgical process for reprocessing of spent uranium metal fuel have been prepared; the chloride volitility processing of thorium-based fuels is being studied; the reprocessing of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in KCl-LiCl-ThCl/sub 4/-Th is being studied; and a flowsheet for processing spent nuclear fuel in molten tin has been constructed. Leach rates of simulated encapsulated waste forms in a metal matrix were studied. Nine criteria for handling waste cladding hulls were established. Strontium and tin migration in glauconite columns was measured. Radioactive Sr in a stream of water moved through oolitic limestone as rapidly as water, but in a stream of water equilibrated with the limestone, Sr moved through the limestone one-tenth as fast. Migration of trace quantities of Cs and I through kaolinite was studied. 88 figures, 53 tables.

  11. Recycle of LWR actinides to an IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Large quantities of actinide elements are present in irradiated light water reactor fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission to capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high energy neutrons in metal-fueled integral fast reactors (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel may represent valuable resource for the expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, the removal of TRU elements from spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of high level waste facilities by reducing the heat load and may increase the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirement. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. Two pyrochemical processes, that is, salt transport process and blanket processing study, are discussed in this paper. Also the experimental studies are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Investigation of metal ion extraction and aggregate formation combining acidic and neutral organophosphorous reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, A.D.; Nilsson, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, 916 Engineering Tower, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States); Ellis, R.; Antonio, M. [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200 9700 South Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439-4831 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate how varying mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl phosphate (HDBP) results in enhanced extraction of lanthanum(III), La{sup 3+}, and dysprosium(III), Dy{sup 3+}. Water and metal ion extraction were carefully monitored as a function of TBP:HDBP mole ratio.In addition to these techniques, EXAFS was used to determine the coordination environment of the metal ion in this system. To produce the necessary signal, a concentration of 1.25*10{sup -3} M La{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} was used. Although previous studies of synergistic extraction of metal cations using combinations of neutral and acidic reagents explain the enhanced extraction by increased dehydration of the metal ion and the formation of mixed extractant complexes, our evidence for the increased water extraction coupled with the aggregate formation suggests a reverse micellar aspect to synergism in the system containing TBP and HDBP. It is quite possible that both of these phenomena contribute to our system behavior. The EXAFS data shows that, based on coordination numbers alone, several possible structures may exist. From this study, we cannot provide a definitive answer as to the nature of extraction in this system or the exact complex formed during extraction.

  13. Removal of heavy metal contamination from peanut skin extracts by waste biomass adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenols are a rapidly increasing portion of the nutraceutical and functional food marketplace. Peanut skins are a waste product which have potential as a low-cost source of polyphenols. Extraction and concentration of peanut skin extracts can cause normally innocuous levels of the heavy metal co...

  14. Quantitative Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Trace-Metal Determination: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, Isela; Costas, Marta; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Gil, Sandra; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is introduced to upper-level analytical chemistry students as a simple strategy focused on sample preparation for trace-metal determination in biological tissues. Nickel extraction in seafood samples and quantification by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are carried out by a team of four…

  15. Liquid-phase extraction coupled with metal-organic frameworks-based dispersive solid phase extraction of herbicides in peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Wang, Zhibing; Zhang, Liyuan; Nian, Li; Lei, Lei; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-phase extraction coupled with metal-organic frameworks-based dispersive solid phase extraction was developed and applied to the extraction of pesticides in high fatty matrices. The herbicides were ultrasonically extracted from peanut using ethyl acetate as extraction solvent. The separation of the analytes from a large amount of co-extractive fat was achieved by dispersive solid-phase extraction using MIL-101(Cr) as sorbent. In this step, the analytes were adsorbed on MIL-101(Cr) and the fat remained in bulk. The herbicides were separated and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental parameters, including type and volume of extraction solvent, ultrasonication time, volume of hexane and eluting solvent, amount of MIL-101(Cr) and dispersive solid phase extraction time, were optimized. The limits of detection for herbicides range from 0.98 to 1.9 μg/kg. The recoveries of the herbicides are in the range of 89.5-102.7% and relative standard deviations are equal or lower than 7.0%. The proposed method is simple, effective and suitable for treatment of the samples containing high content of fat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Actinide recovery from combustible waste: the Ce(IV)-NHO3 system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.H.; Childs, E.L.; Kochen, R.L.; Schmunk, R.H.; Smith, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    Actinides in ash can be leached effectively by refluxing with Ce(IV) in HNO 3 ; solubilization of actinide in ash was greater than or equal to 95% at ash concentrations to 30 g/l in stirred leachant. Plutonium and americium were the actinides present in the ash. Solubilized plutonium and americium were recovered from Ce(IV)-HNO 3 solution by solvent extraction. Extraction of plutonium into 30% tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane gave 99.99% recovery. The plutonium-depleted solution was then extracted with 30% dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamolylmethylenephosphonate (DHDECMP). Americium recovery was 99.64%. The Ce(IV)-HNO 3 system was compared with the HF-HNO 3 system now in common use. Advantages of the former included less equipment corrosion, no volatilization of silica, safe oxidation of carbon residues, minimal secondary waste (Ce is recycled), and better solubilization of actinide in the initial contact. However, additional contacts do not significantly improve solubilization, and a small fraction of actinide is not solubilized with Ce(IV)-HNO 3 that can be solubilized by HF-HNO 3 . The effect of the fission product ruthenium on the dissolution of actinides in the Ce(IV)-HNO 3 system was investigated briefly, and a method for removing the ruthenium electrolytically was developed. Several process flowsheets were also considered. Actinide recovery requirements will suggest which of these might best be used. 6 figures, 7 tables

  17. Actinide recovery from combustible waste: the Ce(IV)-NHO/sub 3/ system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G. H.; Childs, E. L.; Kochen, R. L.; Schmunk, R. H.; Smith, C. M.

    1979-09-14

    Actinides in ash can be leached effectively by refluxing with Ce(IV) in HNO/sub 3/; solubilization of actinide in ash was greater than or equal to 95% at ash concentrations to 30 g/l in stirred leachant. Plutonium and americium were the actinides present in the ash. Solubilized plutonium and americium were recovered from Ce(IV)-HNO/sub 3/ solution by solvent extraction. Extraction of plutonium into 30% tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane gave 99.99% recovery. The plutonium-depleted solution was then extracted with 30% dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamolylmethylenephosphonate (DHDECMP). Americium recovery was 99.64%. The Ce(IV)-HNO/sub 3/ system was compared with the HF-HNO/sub 3/ system now in common use. Advantages of the former included less equipment corrosion, no volatilization of silica, safe oxidation of carbon residues, minimal secondary waste (Ce is recycled), and better solubilization of actinide in the initial contact. However, additional contacts do not significantly improve solubilization, and a small fraction of actinide is not solubilized with Ce(IV)-HNO/sub 3/ that can be solubilized by HF-HNO/sub 3/. The effect of the fission product ruthenium on the dissolution of actinides in the Ce(IV)-HNO/sub 3/ system was investigated briefly, and a method for removing the ruthenium electrolytically was developed. Several process flowsheets were also considered. Actinide recovery requirements will suggest which of these might best be used. 6 figures, 7 tables.

  18. Separation and recovery of heavy metals from waste water using synergistic solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Limei; Xu, Zheng; Sun, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal wastewater pollution is one of the three major water pollutions in the world. The zinc hydrometallurgy smelting process usually discharge large quantities of heavy metal wastewater into the environment. In this paper, a synergistic solvent extraction process has been developed to recover copper, nickel, zinc and cadmium respectively from calcium and magnesium. The synergistic organic system contained 0.50 M Versatic 10 and 0.5 M Mextral 984H in DT100. Adjusting pH to 2.0 at 40 °C, the copper will be extracted preferentially with the extraction rate more than 99%. Continuing to adjust pH to 4.2 at 40 °C, the nickel will be extracted secondly with an extraction rate more than 98%; the zinc and cadmium in raffinate could be extracted separately while pH is about 6.5.

  19. Actinide chemistry and electronuclear cycle: contribution of synchrotron radiation; Chimie des actinides et cycle electronucleaire L'apport du rayonnement synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, Ch. [CEA Marcoule, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Departement de Radiochimie et Chimie des Procedes, SCPS, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2011-07-01

    The topics related to actinide chemistry involved in the civil nuclear industry follow the electronuclear cycle: mining-enrichment, physical chemistry of the nuclear fuel, behavior in reactors, selective extraction for fuel reprocessing, storage, environmental impact, and human toxicology. In order to characterize the actinide properties, dedicated synchrotron beam lines are necessary, although scarce. This article focuses on synchrotron studies related to the elaboration of the nuclear fuel, its reprocessing, the storage in glass matrices and the bio-environmental impact. (author)

  20. POLY(AMINOMETHYLENEPHOSPHONIC ACID FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M’hamed Kaid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaminododecyltetramethylenetetraphosphonic acid (DADTMTPA has been investigated in liquid - liquid extraction of Zn (II and Cu (II in acetate media. The extraction of both cations was carried out in different media with the addition of CH3COONa, CH3COOH, HCl and H2SO4 at different pH values. The maximum extraction yield for copper is 70% after addition of 10 mg of sodium acetate and for zinc is 30% after addition of acetic acid at pHi = 5.5, in one step.

  1. Calculations in solvent extraction of rare earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadanandam, R.; Sharma, A.K.; Fonseca, M.F.; Hubli, R.C.; Suri, A.K.; Singh, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with calculation of number of countercurrent stages in solvent extraction of rare earths both under total reflux and partial reflux conditions to achieve a given degree of purification and recovery. The use of Fenske's equation normally used for separation by distillation is proposed to calculate the number of stages required under total reflux, replacing relative volatility by separation factor. Kremser's equations for extraction and scrubbing are used to calculate the number of stages in extraction and scrubbing modules under partial reflux conditions. McCabe-Thiele's approach is also adopted to arrive at the number of scrubbing stages. (author)

  2. Solvent extraction, membranes, and ion exchange in hydrometallurgical dilute metals separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Bae, J.H.; Lee, C.K.

    1987-01-01

    The separation methods which are used in the hydro-metallurgical field are reviewed and compared. Some processes in solvent extraction in use for recovery of crucial metals which are important to the US defense and economy are presented. Various commercial extractants are reviewed and categorized. Other methods such as liquid membranes and ions exchange resins used for dilute metal ions separation are summarized. These methods are compared with solvent extraction. Problems to overcome in the future development of these separation methods are also identified and discussed in this paper

  3. Investigation on thermodynamics of solvent extraction of metals: Pt.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jiufang; Zhou Xunan; Li Yigui; Teng Teng

    1986-01-01

    The extraction of UO 2 Cl 2 from HCl solution with 30%, 40% and 50% (V/V) trioctyl amine-toluene is studied. The activity coefficients of HCl and UO 2 Cl 2 in aqueous phase are calculated by Pitzer's equation and improved Frank-Thompson's equation. The activity coefficients of each compound in organic phase are obtained as follows: water-by Karl Fischer titration method and Pitzer's equation; diluent-by head space method; extractant and extracted compounds-by thermodynamic method. From the data obtained, the extraction thermodynamic equilibrium constants are calculated to be 1.46 x 10 3 and (2.48-3.79) x 10 5 for HCl respectively

  4. The study of heavy metals leaching from waste foundry sands using a one-step extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożym Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of leaching test which are used to evaluate the effect of foundry waste disposal on the environment (TCLP, SPLP, ASTM at al.. Because the spent foundry sand are usually deposited at the ground level and they have a similar structure to the soil, survey mobility of metals using the same methods seems appropriate. One-step extraction allows for the evaluation of the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil and waste. Waste foundry sands have been successfully used as a component in manufactured soils in U.S., but concern over metal contamination must be eliminated before considering this direction of use. The study evaluated the leaching of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni from deposited waste foundry sands. The overall, as well as heavy metals were extracted by different type of extractants: H2O, CH3COOH, HCl, EDTA, MgCl2 and NaCOOH. These extractants are most commonly used to study the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil and waste. In the present study applicable standards and methodology described in the literature in analysis were used. The results allowed to evaluate the bioavailability of metals leached from those wastes.

  5. Method for fluorination of actinide fluorides and oxyfluorides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, P.G.; Malm, J.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    The present invention relates generally to methods of fluorination and more particularly to the use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ for the preparation of actinide hexafluorides, and for the extraction of deposited actinides and fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof from reaction vessels. The experiments set forth hereinabove demonstrate that the room temperature or below use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ will be highly beneficial for the preparation of pure actinide hexafluorides from their respective tetrafluorides without traces of HF being present as occurs using other fluorinating agents: and decontamination of equipment previously exposed to actinides: e.g., walls, feed lines, etc.

  6. Light element thermodynamics related to actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, I.; Johnson, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The accumulation of waste from the last five decades of nuclear reactor development has resulted in large quantities of materials of very diverse chemical composition. An electrometallurgical (EM) method is being developed to separate the components of the waste into several unique streams suitable for permanent disposal and an actinide stream suitable for retrievable storage. The principal types of nuclear wastes are spent oxide or metallic fuel. Since the EM module requires a metallic feed, and oxygen interferes with its operation, the oxide fuel has to be reduced prior to EM treatment. Further, the wastes contain, in addition to oxygen, other light elements (first- and second-row elements) that may also interfere with the operation of the EM module. The extent that these light elements interfere with the operation of the EM module has been determined by chemical thermodynamic calculations. (orig.)

  7. Actinides in the Source of Cosmic Rays and the Present Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.; Kratz, K. -L.

    2003-01-01

    The abundances of the actinide elements in the cosmic rays can provide critical constraints on the major sites of their acceleration. Using recent calculations of the r-process yields in core collapse supernovae, we have determined the actinide abundances averaged over various assumed time intervals for their supernova generation and their cosmic-ray acceleration. Using standard Galactic chemical evolution models, we have also determined the expected actinide abundances in the present interstellar medium. From these two components, we have calculated the U/Th and other actinide abundances expected in the supernova-active cores of superbubbles, as a function of their ages and mean metallicity resulting from dilution with interstellar cloud debris. Then, using observations of the fractions of Galactic supernovae that occur in superbubbles and in the rest of the interstellar medium, we calculate the expected actinide abundances in cosmic rays accelerated by Galactic supernovae. We find that the current measurements of actinide/Pt-group and preliminary estimates of the UPuCm/Th ratio in cosmic rays are all consistent with the expected values if superbubble cores have mean metallicities of around 3 times solar. Such metallicities are quite comparable to the superbubble core metallicities inferred from other cosmic-ray observations. Future, more precise measurements of these ratios with experiments such as ECCO are needed to provide a better measure of the mean source metallicity sampled by the local Galactic cosmic rays. Measurements of the cosmic- ray actinide abundances have been favorably compared with the protosolar ratio, inferred from present solar system abundances, to infer that the cosmic rays are accelerated from the general interstellar medium. We suggest, however, that such an inference is not valid because the expected actinide abundances in the present interstellar medium are very different from the protosolar values, which sampled the interstellar medium

  8. Comparison of metals extractability from Al/Fe-based drinking water treatment residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhui; Bai, Leilei; Pei, Yuansheng; Wendling, Laura A

    2014-12-01

    Recycling of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) as environment amendments has attracted substantial interest due to their productive reuse concomitant with waste minimization. In the present study, the extractability of metals within six Al/Fe-hydroxide-comprised WTRs collected throughout China was investigated using fractionation, in vitro digestion and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The results suggested that the major components and structure of the WTRs investigated were similar. The WTRs were enriched in Al, Fe, Ca, and Mg, also contained varying quantities of As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, V, and Zn, but Ag, Hg, Sb, and Se were not detected. Most of the metals within the WTRs were largely non-extractable using the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) procedure, but many metals exhibited high bioaccessibility based on in vitro digestion. However, the WTRs could be classified as non-hazardous according to the TCLP assessment method used by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Further analysis showed the communication factor, which is calculated as the ratio of total extractable metal by BCR procedure to the total metal, for most metals in the six WTRs, was similar, whereas the factor for Ba, Mn, Sr, and Zn varied substantially. Moreover, metals in the WTRs investigated had different risk assessment code. In summary, recycling of WTRs is subject to regulation based on assessment of risk due to metals prior to practical application.

  9. Actinides and rare earths complexation with adenosine phosphate nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostapha, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorus compounds are important molecules in both nuclear industry and living systems fields. Indeed, several extractants of organophosphorus compounds (such as TBP, HDEHP) are used in the nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and in the biological field. For instance, the nucleotides are organophosphates which play a very important role in various metabolic processes. Although the literature on the interactions of actinides with inorganic phosphate is abundant, published studies with organophosphate compounds are generally limited to macroscopic and / or physiological approaches. The objective of this thesis is to study the structure of several organophosphorus compounds with actinides to reach a better understanding and develop new specific buildings blocks. The family of the chosen molecules for this procedure consists of three adenine nucleotides mono, bi and triphosphate (AMP, adenosine monophosphate - ADP, adenosine diphosphate - ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and an amino-alkylphosphate (AEP O-phosphoryl-ethanolamine). Complexes synthesis was conducted in aqueous and weakly acidic medium (2.8-4) for several lanthanides (III) (Lu, Yb, Eu) and actinides (U (VI), Th (IV) and Am (III)). Several analytical and spectroscopic techniques have been used to describe the organization of the synthesized complexes: spectrometric analysis performed by FTIR and NMR were used to identify the functional groups involved in the complexation, analysis by ESI-MS and pH-metric titration were used to determine the solution speciation and EXAFS analyzes were performed on Mars beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, have described the local cation environment, for both solution and solid compounds. Some theoretical approaches of DFT were conducted to identify stable structures in purpose of completing the experimental studies. All solid complexes (AMP, ADP, ATP and AEP) have polynuclear structures, while soluble ATP complexes are mononuclear. For all synthesized complexes, it has been

  10. Final Project Report for ER15351 ''A Study of New Actinide Zintl Ions Materials''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter K. Dorhout

    2007-01-01

    The structural chemistry of actinide main-group metal materials provides the fundamental basis for the understanding of structural coordination chemistry and the formation of materials with desired or predicted structural features. The main-group metal building blocks, comprising sulfur-group, phosphorus-group, or silicon-group elements, have shown versatility in oxidation state, coordination, and bonding preferences. These building blocks have allowed us to elucidate a series of structures that are unique to the actinide elements, although we can find structural relationships to transition metal and 4f-element materials. In the past year, we investigated controlled metathesis and self-propagating reactions between actinide metal halides and alkali metal salts of main-group metal chalcogenides such as K-P-S salts. Ternary plutonium thiophosphates have resulted from these reactions at low temperature in sealed ampules. we have also focused efforts to examine reactions of Th, U, and Pu halide salts with other alkali metal salts such as Na-Ge-S and Na-Si-Se and copper chloride to identify if self-propagating reactions may be used as a viable reaction to prepare new actinide materials and we prepared a series of U and Th copper chalcogenide materials. Magnetic measurements continued to be a focus of actinide materials prepared in our laboratory. We also contributed to the XANES work at Los Alamos by preparing materials for study and for comparison with environmental samples

  11. Extraction of certain heavy metals from sewage sludge using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Introduction. Sewage sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants contains organic compounds, ... treatment is a feasible option, especially when it is applied as a pre-treatment aiming at heavy metals removal. .... As regarded cationic macroelments, calcium is the most abundant, followed by magnesium, potassium.

  12. Molecular and electronic structure of actinide hexa-cyanoferrates; Structure moleculaire et electronique des hexacyanoferrates d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhoure, I

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the actinide-ligand bond properties. To this end, the hexacyanoferrate entities have been used as pre-organized ligand. We have synthesized, using mild chemistry, the following series of complexes: An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Th, U, Np, Pu); Am{sup III}[Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O; Pu {sup III}[Co{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O and K(H?)An{sup III}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Pu, Am). The metal oxidation states have been obtained thanks to the {nu}{sub CN}, stretching vibration and to the actinide L{sub III} absorption edge studies. As Prussian Blue, the An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Np, Pu) are class II of Robin and Day compounds. X-ray Diffraction has shown besides that these complexes crystallize in the P6{sub 3}/m space group, as the isomorphic LaKFe(CN){sub 6}.4H{sub 2}O complex used as structural model. The EXAFS oscillations at the iron K edge and at the An L{sub III} edge allowed to determine the An-N, An-O, Fe-C and Fe-N distances. The display of the multiple scattering paths for both edges explains the actinide contribution absence at the iron edge, whereas the iron signature is present at the actinide edge. We have shown that the actinide coordination sphere in actinides hexa-cyanoferrates is comparable to the one of lanthanides. However, the actinides typical behavior towards the lanthanides is brought to the fore by the An{sup IV} versus Ln{sup III} ions presence in this family of complexes. Contrarily to the 4f electrons, the 5f electrons influence the electronic properties of the compounds of this family. However, the gap between the An-N and Ln-N distances towards the corresponding metals ionic radii do not show any covalence bond evolution between the actinide and lanthanide series. (author)

  13. Extraction of metal ions by melts of chelate-forming reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanov, F.I.; Leonov, V.A.; Stefanov, A.V.; Gibalo, I.M.

    1977-01-01

    Extraction has been studied of some ions of 4B and 5B subgroup metals (Zr,Hf,Nb and Ta) with the use of melts of chelate-forming reagents (8-oxyquinoline, benzoylacetone, dibenzoylmethane) depending on various factors: hydrogen ion concentration, metal ion, reagent, masking compounds and the ratio between phases. It has been established that in the case of extraction with a melt of 8-oxyquinoline under optimum extraction conditions (pH=5-6) zirconium, hafnium, niobium, and tantalum are extracted quantitatively (to 1.10 -8 g-at/l); extraction with melts of benzoylacetone and dibenzoylmethane yields zirconium, hafnium, and niobium in amounts to nx10 -6 g-at/l. The study of the effect of complexing compounds has shown that tartaric acid does not affect the extraction of Zr,Hf,Nb and Ta; oxalic acid inhibits the extraction of Hf and Ta and does not affect the extraction of Nb. Citric acid does not affect the extraction of Hf, Nb, Ta and somewhat decreases the extraction of Zr

  14. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  15. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, L.M.; Wilk, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  16. Extractive decontamination of heavy metals from CCA contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the mobilization and extraction of As, Cr and Cu from chromated copper arsenate (CCA) contaminated soil obtained from a wood treatment factory site by four organic acids are presented and discussed. The CCA contaminated soil (pH = 5.91, carbon = 0.32, CEC = 47.84 meq/100 g) was found to contain 39.55 ...

  17. Lunar Oxygen Production and Metals Extraction Using Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Matthew; Paley, Mark Steven; Donovan, David N.; Karr, Laurel J.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results indicate that ionic liquids are promising media for the extraction of oxygen from lunar regolith. IL acid systems can solubilize regolith and produce water with high efficiency. IL electrolytes are effective for water electrolysis, and the spent IL acid media are capable of regeneration.

  18. Proceedings of the symposium Actinides 2006 - Basic Science, Applications and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobaum, Kerri J.M.; Chandler, Elaine A.; Havela, Ladislav; Maple, M. Brian; Neu, Mary P.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings from the September 2006 symposium includes papers presented on experimental and modeling work with the intention of broadening understanding of the field of actinide research. Actinides have gained attention recently because of their roles in the threat of nuclear terrorism (e.g., 'dirty bombs') and the use of nuclear power to offset fossil fuel consumption. Actinide science is the study of the elements with atomic numbers in the range of 90 to 103, which includes uranium and plutonium. Beyond the well-known nuclear reactions of these heavy radioactive metals, the large electron clouds with 5f electrons in the outer shell yield fascinating and complex chemistries, crystal structures, and physical properties. Traditionally, actinide research has been divided among three scientific disciplines: chemistry (nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry); physics (condensed matter physics and electronic structure); and materials science (metallurgy). Modern actinide research, however, has become an interdisciplinary blend of these traditional fields, and it also incorporates developing fields such as environmental chemistry and superconductivity. Improved scientific understanding of actinides is needed for development of materials for actinide detection and nuclear fuels, and for safer management of nuclear waste. Recently, there has been a resurgence of actinide science at national laboratories and universities. The current multidisciplinary approach to actinide science lays the groundwork for understanding the connection between the 5f electronic structure and observed chemical reactions and physical properties such as structural phase transformations and novel ground states. This work provides many opportunities for new researchers in actinide science. These proceedings gather 25 selected papers among the 53 presentations given at this symposium

  19. Concepts for immobilized extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of cleaning actinides from geomedia. In the past actinides were often released to the ground because of their tendency to bind tightly to forms of geomedia, and in addition spills have occurred over time. To remediate these areas involves finding ways to either guarantee the retention of the actinides in the geomedia, or finding ways to extract them and leave the soils clean. One possible way to clean soils is to wash them, which in order to extract actinides means the use of ligands which bind competitively with actinides in the presence of soil fractions. An array of organic ligands is known which bind with actinides, but the larger problem of handling these ligands in a manner which allows concentration of the actinides is still open. The author addresses work to bind such ligands to different types of matrices which can then be used in packed extraction columns to remove actindes from flow streams, and finally concentrated, by using minimal volume backflushing to extract the actinides from the column

  20. Evaluation of Diazatetraoxa Cryptand as Extractant for Transition Metals and Pb2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsev Dilber

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The extractability of metal cations such as Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ from aqueous phase to organic phase with 19-nitro-6,7,15,16,23,24-hexahydro-13H,26H-14,25-propanotribenzo-[b,I,o][1,4,11,14,7,18]-tetraoxadiazacycloikocine was investigated by means of UV-vis spectrophotometer. The aqueous phase and the organic phase contained metal picrate and the ligands, respectively. Chloroform and dichloromethane were the organic solvents. The effect of pH on the percent extraction was evaluated between 2.0 and 5.5 for both organic solvents. The range at which high percent extraction of the ligand was obtained was between pH 5.0 to 5.5 for both solvents. The most effective transport was observed for Mn2+ with 84.69 % picrate among the tested metal picrates with dichloromethane at pH 5.5. The extraction constant values (log Kex were determined for extracted metal complexes at the most effective extraction pH.

  1. Chelant extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils using new selective EDTA derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Jun-Min; Huang, Xiong-Fei; Xia, Bing; Su, Cheng-Yong; Luo, Guo-Fan; Xu, Yao-Wei; Wu, Ying-Xin; Mao, Zong-Wan; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2013-11-15

    Soil washing is one of the few permanent treatment alternatives for removing metal contaminants. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and its salts can substantially increase heavy metal removal from contaminated soils and have been extensively studied for soil washing. However, EDTA has a poor utilization ratio due to its low selectivity resulting from the competition between soil major cations and trace metal ions for chelation. The present study evaluated the potential for soil washing using EDTA and three of its derivatives: CDTA (trans-1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid), BDTA (benzyldiaminetetraacetic acid), and PDTA (phenyldiaminetetraacetic acid), which contain a cylcohexane ring, a benzyl group, and a phenyl group, respectively. Titration results showed that PDTA had the highest stability constants for Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) and the highest overall selectivity for trace metals over major cations. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the EDTA derivatives at extracting Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Ca(2+), and Fe(3+) from a contaminated soil. At pH 7.0, PDTA extracted 1.5 times more Cu(2+) than did EDTA, but only 75% as much Ca(2+). Although CDTA was a strong chelator of heavy metal ions, its overall selectivity was lower and comparable to that of EDTA. BDTA was the least effective extractant because its stability constants with heavy metals were low. PDTA is potentially a practical washing agent for soils contaminated with trace metals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Some activities in the United States concerning the physics aspects of actinide waste recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1976-01-01

    This review paper briefly discusses the reactor types being considered in the United States for the purpose of actinide waste recycling. The reactor types include thermal reactors operating on the 3.3% 235 U- 238 U and the 233 U- 232 Th fuel cycles, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, reactors fueled entirely by actinide wastes, gaseous fuel reactors and fusion reactors. This paper also discusses cross section measurements in progress or planned toward providing basic data for testing the recycle concept. (author)

  3. Some activities in the United States concerning the physics aspects of actinide waste recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1975-01-01

    Reactor types being considered in the United States for the purpose of actinide waste recycling are discussed briefly. The reactor types include thermal reactors operating on the 3.3 percent 235 U-- 238 U and the 233 U-- 232 Th fuel cycles, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, reactors fueled entirely by actinide wastes, gaseous fuel reactors, and fusion reactors. Cross section measurements in progress or planned toward providing basic data for testing the recycle concept are also discussed

  4. Effect of sulphate and chloride ions on the solvent extraction of some metal ions with liquid cation exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Junji; Nishimura, Sanji

    1977-01-01

    The extraction of the metal ions from sulphate and chloride solutions with Versatic Acid 911 and di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid in benzene was investigated in order to clarify the effect of sulphate and chloride ions on the extraction. Sulphate and chloride ions are not extracted into the organic phase, and they affect metal extraction only by forming the complexes with metal ions in the aqueous phase. The extent of the effect on metal extraction is determined by the kind of metal ions and anionic ligands, and the concentration of ligand ions. Therefore, the difference in extraction behaviour may be explained by the complexing ability of the various anionic ligands present in the aqueous phase. Formation constants of the complexes between metal ions and anionic ligands were computed from these distribution data. (auth.)

  5. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS Edward C. Schneider...United States Government. AFIT-ENP-14-M-33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS...33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES Edward C. Schneider, BS Captain, USAF Approved

  6. Synthesis of crescent aromatic oligoamides with preorganized chelating groups and their extraction towards transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xinshi; Chen, Long; Yang, Yongan; He, Youzhou; Zou, Shuliang; Feng, Wen; Yang, Yuanyou; Liu, Ning; Liao, Jiali; Yuan, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three crescent aromatic oligoamides were designed and synthesized. ► Selective Hg 2+ removal was achieved with high efficiency in solvent extraction. ► The stoichiometry of the extracted species was approximately 1:1 (L:M). ► The extraction constant (log K ex ) was determined to be 10.2. - Abstract: Three crescent aromatic oligoamides 1–3 with their backbones rigidified by intramolecular hydrogen bonds were designed and synthesized. The liquid–liquid extraction by these compounds has been investigated using UV–vis spectrometry towards Pb 2+ picrate and some transition metal picrates including Ag + , Hg 2+ , Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ salts. The results revealed higher selectivity and efficiency towards Hg 2+ over other metal cations; pentameric ligand 1 with six oxygen donor atoms provided the highest extractability of 83.3%, while dimeric ligand 3 extracted almost exclusively Hg 2+ . The stoichiometry of the extracted complex between ligand 1 and Hg 2+ , and the extraction constant (log K ex ) were determined in solvent extraction.

  7. Nuclear waste forms for actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    The disposition of actinides, most recently 239Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. Because actinides (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms for the immobilization of actinides. Mineralogic and geologic studies provide excellent candidate phases for immobilization and a unique database that cannot be duplicated by a purely materials science approach. The “mineralogic approach” is illustrated by a discussion of zircon as a phase for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. PMID:10097054

  8. Thin layers in actinide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouder, T.

    1998-01-01

    Surface science research at the ITU is focused on the synthesis and surface spectroscopy studies of thin films of actinides and actinide compounds. The surface spectroscopies used are X-ray and ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS, respectively), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Thin films of actinide elements and compounds are prepared by sputter deposition from elemental targets. Alloy films are deposited from corresponding alloy targets and could be used, in principle, as replicates of these targets. However, there are deviations between alloy film and target composition, which depend on the deposition conditions, such as pressure and target voltage. Mastering of these effects may allow us to study stoichiometric film replicates instead of thick bulk compounds. As an example, we discuss the composition of U-Ni films prepared from a UNi 5 target. (orig.)

  9. Solvent extraction applied to the recovery of heavy metals from galvanic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J E; Paiva, A P; Soares, D; Labrincha, A; Castro, F

    2005-04-11

    In this study, a hydrometallurgical treatment involving the solvent extraction and recovery of some heavy metals from a sulphuric acid leach solution of galvanic sludge, using di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-phosphinic acid (Cyanex 272), both diluted in kerosene, has been investigated. The preliminary tests revealed the necessity to remove other metal species than zinc and nickel, contained in the leach solution, and therefore, processes to cement copper and precipitate chromium were then applied to finally obtain a Zn and Ni pregnant solution prior to solvent extraction. For the experimental conditions studied, Cyanex 272 showed a good recovery of Zn after the stripping stage using H2SO4, but D2EHPA effectively promoted a higher Zn extraction than Cyanex 272 did. The dependence of the solvent extraction method on variables such as pH, contact time and concentration of extractant, as well as the effect of different concentrations of sulphuric acid on stripping, are discussed. The discussion also includes the previous conditions developed to separate the main interfering metallic species from the leach solution in order to improve the extraction and recovery of zinc by solvent extraction. The final objective has been to achieve a solution as pure as possible to recover nickel sulphate.

  10. Actinides and Life's Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uranium- and thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3rd by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  11. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  12. Assessment of metal bioavailability in the vineyard soil-grapevine system using different extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Vázquez, Francisco A; Pérez Cid, Benita; Río Segade, Susana

    2016-10-01

    This study was focused on the assessment of single and sequential extraction methods to predict the bioavailability of metals in the vineyard soil-grapevine system. The modified BCR sequential extraction method and two single-step extraction methods based on the use of EDTA and acetic acid were applied to differently amended vineyard soils. The variety effect was studied on the uptake of metals by leaves and grapes. Most of the elements studied (Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn and Pb) were weakly mobilized from vineyard soils, with the exception of Cu and Mn. The determination of total metal content in leaves and grapes showed a different accumulation pattern in the two parts of the vine. A significant relationship was observed, for all the elements studied except for Fe, between the content bioavailable in the soil and the accumulated in both leaves and grapes (R=0.602-0.775, p<0.01). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF Ln/Am obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as a Zr

  14. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF{sub Ln/Am} obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as

  15. Metal nanoparticles (other than gold or silver) prepared using plant extracts for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasca, Roxana-Diana; Santa, Szabolcs; Racz, Levente Zsolt; Racz, Csaba Pal

    2016-12-01

    There are many modalities to prepare metal nanoparticles, but the reducing of the metal ions with plant extracts is one of the most promising because it is considerate less toxic for the environment, suitable for the use of those nanoparticles in vivo and not very expensive. Various metal ions have been already studied such as: cobalt, copper, iron, platinum, palladium, zinc, indium, manganese and mercury and the number of plant extracts used is continuously increasing. The prepared systems were characterized afterwards with a great number of methods of investigation: both spectroscopic (especially UV-Vis spectroscopy) and microscopic (in principal, electron microscopy-TEM) methods. The applications of the metal nanoparticles obtained are diverse and not completely known, but the medical applications of such nanoparticles occupy a central place, due to their nontoxic components, but some diverse industrial applications do not have to be forgotten.

  16. Acidic extraction and precipitation of heavy metals from biomass incinerator cyclone fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kröppl M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass incineration is increasingly used for the generation of heat and/or electricity. After incineration two ash fractions remain. Bottom ashes (the coarser ash fraction can usually be used as fertilizing agent on fields as it contains valuable elements for soils and plants and only minor concentrations of heavy metals. Fly ashes (the finer ash fraction are in most cases disposed as their heavy metal concentrations are too high for a usage as soil enhancer. In this study highly heavy metal contaminated fly ash has been cleaned through extraction with hydrochloric acid. The heavy metals were removed from the extract by precipitation with sodium hydroxide. After the cleaning procedure the ash can be pelletized and be returned to the soils.

  17. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  18. Electrochemical separation of actinides and fission products in molten salt electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Fusselman, S.P. [Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Molten salt electrochemical separation may be applied to accelerator-based conversion (ABC) and transmutation systems by dissolving the fluoride transport salt in LiCl-KCl eutectic solvent. The resulting fluoride-chloride mixture will contain small concentrations of fission product rare earths (La, Nd, Gd, Pr, Ce, Eu, Sm, and Y) and actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm). The Gibbs free energies of formation of the metal chlorides are grouped advantageously such that the actinides can be deposited on a solid cathode with the majority of the rare earths remaining in the electrolyte. Thus, the actinides are recycled for further transmutation. Rockwell and its partners have measured the thermodynamic properties of the metal chlorides of interest (rare earths and actinides) and demonstrated separation of actinides from rare earths in laboratory studies. A model is being developed to predict the performance of a commercial electrochemical cell for separations starting with PUREX compositions. This model predicts excellent separation of plutonium and other actinides from the rare earths in metal-salt systems.

  19. Actinides and environmental interfaces: striving for molecular-level understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heino Nitsche

    2005-01-01

    enhanced second harmonic generation can probe the electronic (UV-vis region) structure of metal species adsorbed at a surface or interface. Infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy probes the infrared vibrational spectrum of molecules adsorbed at the interface. SHG/SFG studies will greatly assist with understanding reactivity at interfaces of oxides and soil organic matter with heavy metals and radionuclides/actinides. Time-resolved Laser-fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is a highly sensitive tool for actinides that absorb light and de-excite by fluorescence emission, e.g., U(VI) and Cm(III), to probe changes in actinide speciation and coordination environment in solution. This method can also be used to differentiate whether adsorbed species form surface complexes or surface precipitates. Recently, it was shown that the intense synchrotron radiation can change the oxidation states of redox-sensitive actinide samples which may cause erroneous results, and low temperature measurements are now used to alleviate this shortcoming. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy is composed of two component spectroscopies, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) which provide element specific oxidation state and local structure information, respectively. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy) provides information on the chemical environment of particular actinide, in particular bond lengths and the number of neighboring atoms. Combining both methods, detailed knowledge of the different processes resulting from the interaction of the selected actinides with environmental interfaces can be gained. XANES and EXAFS measurements and TRLFS studies to obtain molecular-level mechanistic details of actinide interaction with common environmental solutions and interfaces will be presented together with first SHG/SFG characterization results of model systems for environmental interfaces

  20. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn O' Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  1. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  2. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoyan, G A; Karamyan, G G; Vardan, G A

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given. (paper)

  3. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  4. Development and Testing of Diglycolamide Functionalized Mesoporous Silica for Sorption of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Jennifer A; Mason, Harris E; Bowers, Jon; Bruchet, Anthony; Uribe, Eva C; Kersting, Annie B; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-09-23

    Sequestration of trivalent actinides and lanthanides present in used nuclear fuel and legacy wastes is necessary for appropriate long-term stewardship of these metals, particularly to prevent their release into the environment. Organically modified mesoporous silica is an efficient material for recovery and potential subsequent separation of actinides and lanthanides because of its high surface area, tunable ligand selection, and chemically robust substrate. We have synthesized the first novel hybrid material composed of SBA-15 type mesoporous silica functionalized with diglycolamide ligands (DGA-SBA). Because of the high surface area substrate, the DGA-SBA was found to have the highest Eu capacity reported so far in the literature of all DGA solid-phase extractants. The sorption behavior of europium and americium on DGA-SBA in nitric and hydrochloric acid media was tested in batch contact experiments. DGA-SBA was found to have high sorption of Am and Eu in pH 1, 1 M, and 3 M nitric and hydrochloric acid concentrations, which makes it promising for sequestration of these metals from used nuclear fuel or legacy waste. The kinetics of Eu sorption were found to be two times slower than that for Am in 1 M HNO3. Additionally, the short-term susceptibility of DGA-SBA to degradation in the presence of acid was probed using (29)Si and (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The material was found to be relatively stable under these conditions, with the ligand remaining intact after 24 h of contact with 1 M HNO3, an important consideration in use of the DGA-SBA as an extractant from acidic media.

  5. Evaluation of Diazatetraoxa Cryptand as Extractant for Transition Metals and Pb2+

    OpenAIRE

    Gülsev Dilber; Halit Kantekin; Dilek Başaran; Ümmühan Ocak; Miraç Ocak

    2014-01-01

    The extractability of metal cations such as Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ from aqueous phase to organic phase with 19-nitro-6,7,15,16,23,24-hexahydro-13H,26H-14,25-propanotribenzo-[b,I,o][1,4,11,14,7,18]-tetraoxadiazacycloikocine was investigated by means of UV-vis spectrophotometer. The aqueous phase and the organic phase contained metal picrate and the ligands, respectively. Chloroform and dichloromethane were the organic solvents. The effect of pH on the percent extraction was evaluated ...

  6. Trajectory calculations of the extraction region of a liquid-metal ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.; Seliger, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    In the ion-extraction region of a liquid-metal (LM) source, several phenomena occur (e.g., electrostatic-lens action, axial and transverse space-charge interactions) that have major effects on the performance of the source. In an effort to better understand these effects, a trajectory analysis was made of the ion-extraction region. The trajectory calculations showed an appreciable increase in beam divergence at a Ga + source current of only 5 μA

  7. The effect of tannins and pH on the corrosion of metals in wood extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    Tannins and pH are often cited as factors that affect the corrosiveness of wood yet there are few data to confirm these statements. The purpose of this paper is to systematically investigate the effect of tannins and pH on corrosion of metals in wood. Four wood species known to vary in both their pH and extractives were chosen and extracted with water. The pH, tannin...

  8. Extractability of metals and ecotoxicity of soils from two old wood impregnation sites in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eija; Joutti, Anneli; Räisänen, Marja-Liisa; Lintinen, Petri; Martikainen, Esko; Lehto, Olli

    2004-06-29

    Four metal-contaminated soil samples were classified using physical methods, extracted by selective extraction procedures and analyzed for chemical concentrations. De-ionized water, 0.01 mol/l barium chloride, 1 mol/l ammonium acetate and concentrated nitric acid were used as extraction solutions. Ecotoxicity of water extracts and soil samples was analyzed in order to describe the bioavailability of the contaminants. Samples from old wood impregnation plants contained high amounts of As, Cu, Cr and Zn, which originated from chromated copper arsenate, ammoniacal copper-zinc arsenate, and ammoniacal copper quaternary compound. Total As concentrations of the heavily contaminated samples varied from 752 to 4340 mg/kg, Cu concentrations from 339 to 2330 mg/kg, Cr concentrations from 367 to 2,140 mg/kg and Zn concentrations from 79 to 966 mg/kg. The extractabilities of metals differed according to soil type, extractant and element. Cu and Zn were proposed to cause the highest toxicity in the water extracts of the soils. Ecotoxicity tests displayed rather high differences in sensitivity both for water extracts and for solid soil samples. Reproduction of Enchytraeus sp. was the most sensitive and seed germination of Lactuca sativa the least sensitive and the other tests were in decreasing order of sensitivity: Folsomia candida>reverse electron transport>MetPLATE>Toxichromotest>Allium cepa root growth>Lemna sp. growth. As a conclusion, polluted soils rich in sand retain heavy metals with less firm bindings, particularly in the case of Cu and Zn, than soils rich in clay, indicating that chemical methods for measuring the bioavailability of metals need to be optimized taking into account the soil type, acidity, redox state and the individual contaminants. Copryright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Burning actinides in very hard spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.H.; Shirley, G.W.; Prichard, A.W.; Trapp, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The major unresolved problem in the nuclear industry is the ultimate disposition of the waste products of light water reactors. The study demonstrates the feasibility of designing a very hard spectrum actinide burner reactor (ABR). A 1100 MW/sub t/ ABR design fueled entirely with actinides reprocessed from light water reactor (LWR) wastes is proposed as both an ultimate disposal mechanism for actinides and a means of concurrently producing usable power. Actinides from discharged ABR fuel are recycled to the ABR while fission products are routed to a permanent repository. As an integral part of a large energy park, each such ABR would dispose of the waste actinides from 2 LWRs

  10. One-Electron Physics of the Actinides

    OpenAIRE

    Toropova, A.; Marianetti, C. A.; Haule, K.; Kotliar, G.

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the one-electron physics of the actinides. Various LMTO basis sets are analyzed in order to determine a robust bare Hamiltonian for the actinides. The hybridization between f- an spd- states is compared with the f-f hopping in order to understand the Anderson-like and Hubbard-like contributions to itineracy in the actinides. We show that both contributions decrease strongly as one move from the light actinides to the heavy actinides, while the Anderson-like c...

  11. Optimization of metals extraction using cyanex series and NaDDC reagents in liquid/supercritical CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, M. S.; Kim, S. H.; Park, K. H.; Kim, H. D.; Kim, H. W. [Kyunghee Univ., Youngin (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    In this research, extraction of small fraction of radioactive elements from mixed contaminated working dress has been conducted by organic solvent extraction, but use of organic solvents has created secondary wastes. In this study, liquid/supercritical fluid CO{sub 2}, an environmentally friendly solvent, was used to extract five metals(Co, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn). Using five metals selective ligand Cyanex-272 and NaDDC, the most optimized extraction conditions were founded 20 .deg. C, 100atm and complexed ratio(Cyanex-272: 100mg, NaDDC:5mg). The results suggest the possibility of utilizing supercritical fluid technology for extraction of metals from contaminated working dress.

  12. Liquid membrane extraction techniques for trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndungu, Kuria

    1999-04-01

    In this thesis, liquid-membrane-based methods for the analysis of trace metal species in samples of environmental and biological origin were developed. By incorporating extracting reagents in the membrane liquid, trace metal ions were selectively separated from humic-rich natural waters and urine samples, prior to their determination using various instrumental techniques. The extractions were performed in closed flow systems thus allowing easy automation of both the sample clean-up and enrichment. An acidic organophosphorus reagent (DEHPA) and a basic tetraalkylammonium reagent (Aliquat-336) were used as extractants in the membrane liquid to selectively extract and enrich cationic and anionic metal species respectively. A speciation method for chromium species was developed that allowed the determination of cationic Cr(III) species and anionic CR(VI) species in natural water samples without the need of a chromatographic separation step prior to their detection. SLM was also coupled on-line to potentiometric stripping analysis providing a fast and sensitive method for analysis of Pb in urine samples. A microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction (MMLLE) method was developed for the determination of organotin compounds in natural waters that reduced the number of manual steps involved in the LLE of organotin compounds prior to their CC separation. Clean extracts obtained after running unfiltered humic-rich river water samples through the MMLLE flow system allowed selective determination of all the organotin compounds in a single run using GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) 171 refs, 9 figs, 4 tabs

  13. Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, G.E.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) 1 and Integral Fast Reactor (IF) 2 technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle

  14. Bio-processing of solid wastes and secondary resources for metal extraction – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-chun; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Review focuses on bio-extraction of metals from solid wastes of industries and consumer goods. ► Bio-processing of certain effluents/wastewaters with metals is also included in brief. ► Quantity/composition of wastes are assessed, and microbes used and leaching conditions included. ► Bio-recovery using bacteria, fungi and archaea is highlighted for resource recycling. ► Process methodology/mechanism, R and D direction and scope of large scale use are briefly included. - Abstract: Metal containing wastes/byproducts of various industries, used consumer goods, and municipal waste are potential pollutants, if not treated properly. They may also be important secondary resources if processed in eco-friendly manner for secured supply of contained metals/materials. Bio-extraction of metals from such resources with microbes such as bacteria, fungi and archaea is being increasingly explored to meet the twin objectives of resource recycling and pollution mitigation. This review focuses on the bio-processing of solid wastes/byproducts of metallurgical and manufacturing industries, chemical/petrochemical plants, electroplating and tanning units, besides sewage sludge and fly ash of municipal incinerators, electronic wastes (e-wastes/PCBs), used batteries, etc. An assessment has been made to quantify the wastes generated and its compositions, microbes used, metal leaching efficiency etc. Processing of certain effluents and wastewaters comprising of metals is also included in brief. Future directions of research are highlighted.

  15. A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase transfer protocol for the highly efficient extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; Cao, Hongbin; Yang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase-transfer protocol is developed for the extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous solution to a hydrocarbon phase, which calls for first mixing the aqueous metal ion solution with an ethanolic solution of 1-dodecanethiol, and then extracting the coordination compounds formed between noble metal ions and 1-dodecanethiol into a non-polar organic solvent. A number of characterization techniques, including inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis demonstrate that this protocol could be applied to extract a wide variety of noble metal ions from water to dichloromethane with an efficiency of >96%, and has high selectivity for the separation of the noble metal ions from other transition metals. It is therefore an attractive alternative for the extraction of noble metals from water, soil, or waste printed circuit boards. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Conception, synthesis and application of tripodands in actinide/lanthanide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobet, Josselin

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the synthesis of C, H, O and N containing compounds able to separate '4f' and '5f' elements by liquid/liquid extraction. In a first part, the literature's study allow us to point out actinide and lanthanide ions actual nature and the different ways offered by organic chemistry to share two metallic ions between two liquid phases. On one hand, these trivalent cations' high coordination numbers drive us to synthesize tripodands with hard sites which were fitted for complexation. On the other hand, it appeared that carboxylate or even less-hard site like pyridine chelate selectively actinides, allowing separation. In a second part, 60 ligands were synthesized. In each of the ligands families, a structural parameter changes (site nature, distance between two neighbouring sites, sites respective orientation, lipophilicity and rigidity). 2,2-dihydroxymethyl-dodecanol and 1,3,5- tri(chlorocarbonyl) benzene were chosen as core. O-alkylation and amidation reactions were also peculiarly studied. Rekker's proceeding for lipophilicity calculation was used in order to establish a structure-activity relationship. In a third part, extraction assays with radioactive effluents ( 152 Eu and 241 Am) point out extraction and separation abilities of our compounds. Different operating ways were used according as ligand is soluble in aqueous or organic phase. Organic phase-soluble compounds were compared to DcH18C6, pyridine ones to 2,4,6-tri(2-pyridyl)-l,3,5-triazine (TPTZ) and carboxylate ones to diethylenetriamine-tetracetic acid (DTPA, Talspeak proceeding). The third phase phenomenon was encountered and studied. Influence of salt, pH and organic phase were also studied. (author) [fr

  17. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  18. Cobalt extraction in ammoniacal solution: Electrochemical effect of metallic iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Lee, J. W.; Kim, H. S.; Pickering, H. W.

    1983-12-01

    The dissolution behavior of iron and cobalt in ammoniacal ammonium carbonate solution has been investigated with the aid of Eh-pH diagrams for the Fe-NH3-H2O-CO3 and Co-NH3-H2O-CO3 systems, and electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potential measurements and potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization experiments. The polarization measurements indicate that both Fe and Co electrodes show active and passive behavior, and that Co dissolves at a more oxidizing potential than does Fe (e.g., E = -0.34 V (SHE) for Co and E = -0.52 V for Fe at a dissolution rate of 1 mA cm-2). The active and passive current densities for Co are both greater than for Fe. In sintered Fe-Co mixtures, the presence of Fe shifts the potential of the maximum current to less noble values and also lowers the magnitude of this current. In addition there is practically no cobalt dissolution when the potential exceeds 0.6 V (SHE). It is suggested that the well-known poor recovery of cobalt from reductive-roasted ferruginous oxide ores may be partly related to the dissolution behavior of a metallic alloy phase containing both iron and cobalt.

  19. Actinides and fission products partitioning from high level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Mitiko

    1999-01-01

    The presence of small amount of mixed actinides and long-lived heat generators fission products as 137 Cs and 90 Sr are the major problems for safety handling and disposal of high level nuclear wastes. In this work, actinides and fission products partitioning process, as an alternative process for waste treatment is proposed. First of all, ammonium phosphotungstate (PWA), a selective inorganic exchanger for cesium separation was chosen and a new procedure for synthesizing PWA into the organic resin was developed. An strong anionic resin loaded with tungstate or phosphotungstate anion enables the precipitation of PWA directly in the resinous structure by adding the ammonium nitrate in acid medium (R-PWA). Parameters as W/P ratio, pH, reactants, temperature and aging were studied. The R-PWA obtained by using phosphotungstate solution prepared with W/P=9.6, 9 hours digestion time at 94-106 deg C and 4 to 5 months aging time showed the best capacity for cesium retention. On the other hand, Sr separation was performed by technique of extraction chromatography, using DH18C6 impregnated on XAD7 resin as stationary phase. Sr is selectively extracted from acid solution and >99% was recovered from loaded column using distilled water as eluent. Concerning to actinides separations, two extraction chromatographic columns were used. In the first one, TBP(XAD7) column, U and Pu were extracted and its separations were carried-out using HNO 3 and hydroxylamine nitrate + HNO 3 as eluent. In the second one, CMP0-TBP(XAD7) column, the actinides were retained on the column and the separations were done by using (NH 4 ) 2 C 2 O 4 , DTPA, HNO 3 and HCl as eluent. The behavior of some fission products were also verified in both columns. Based on the obtained data, actinides and fission products Cs and Sr partitioning process, using TBP(XAD7) and CMP0-TBP(XAD7) columns for actinides separation, R-PWA column for cesium retention and DH18C6(XAD7) column for Sr isolation was performed

  20. Availability of heavy metals in contaminated soil evidenced by chemical extractants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ligia de Souza Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals have been accumulating in Brazilian soils, due to natural processes, such as atmospheric deposition, or human industrial activities. For certain heavy metals, when in high concentrations in the soil, there is no specific extractant to determine the availability of these elements in the soil. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the availability of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn for rice and soybeans, using different chemical extractants. In this study we used seven soil samples with different levels of contamination, in completely randomized experimental design with four replications. We determined the available concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn extracted by Mehlich-1, HCl 0.1 mol L-1, DTPA, and organic acid extractants and the contents in rice and soybeans, which extracts were analyzed by ICP-OES. It was observed that Mehlich-1, HCl 0.1 mol L-1 and DTPA extractants were effective to assess the availability of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn for rice and soybeans. However, the same was not observed for the organic acid extractant.

  1. Heavy metal complexation by N-acyl(thio)urea-funtionalized cavitand: synthesis, extraction and potentiometric studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinoso garcia, M.M.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David; Malinowska, Elz˙bieta; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Wojciechowska, Dorota

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis and binding properties of resorcinarene-based cavitands functionalized with N-acylthiourea moieties towards different cations are described. Extraction studies with metal (Pb2+, Cu2+, Ag+, Hg2+, Cd2+, Eu3+, Fe3+, K+, Na+, and Ca2+) picrates and the incorporation in ion selective

  2. Offshore iron sand extraction in New Zealand: Potential trace metal exposure of benthic and pelagic biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopel, Kay; Pook, Chris; Wilson, Peter; Robertson, John

    2017-10-15

    Plans to exploit an offshore source of iron sand in South Taranaki Bight (STB), New Zealand, caused concerns that such exploitation may expose benthic and pelagic biota to elevated trace metal concentrations. We conducted dilute-acid extractions and standard elutriate tests to investigate the potential of this exploitation to (1) create a new seafloor with elevated trace metal content, (2) mobilise trace metals during iron sand extraction and, (3) enrich the returning process seawater, which feeds iron sand through mills, with trace metals. We found that recruits of freshly uncovered sediment may encounter higher-than-natural concentrations of cadmium, nickel and chromium (but not of copper, lead, and zinc) and propose to investigate the bioavailability of these metals. Elutriate test with raw and milled iron sand revealed that, for nickel and copper, dilution of the process seawater may be required to meet the local water quality guideline. We argue that this dilution can be achieved by adjustment of the mass and seawater balance of the offshore extraction process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of sequential and single extraction in order to estimate environmental impact of metals from fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to simulate leaching of metals from fly ash in different environmental conditions using ultrasound and microwave-assisted extraction techniques. Single-agent extraction and sequential extraction procedures were used to determine the levels of different metals leaching. The concentration of metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, As, Be in fly ash extracts were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Single-agent extractions of metals were conducted during sonication times of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 min. Single-agent extraction with deionized water was also undertaken by exposing samples to microwave radiation at the temperature of 50°C. The sequential extraction was undertaken according to the BCR procedure which was modified and applied to study the partitioning of metals in coal fly ash. The microwave-assisted sequential extraction was performed at different extraction temperatures: 50, 100 and 150°C. The partitioning of metals between the individual fractions was investigated and discussed. The efficiency of the extraction process for each step was examined. In addition, the results of the microwave-assisted sequential extraction are compared to the results obtained by standard ASTM method. The mobility of most elements contained in fly ash is markedly pH sensitive. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172030, br. 176006 i br. III43009

  4. Macroporous monoliths for trace metal extraction from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Yanfeng; Mayes, Richard; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana R.; Binder, Andrew; Brown, Suree; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-29

    The viability of seawater-based uranium recovery depends on the uranium adsorption rate and capacity, since the concentration of uranium in the oceans is relatively low (3.3 μgL⁻¹). An important consideration for a fast adsorption is to maximize the adsorption properties of adsorbents such as surface areas and pore structures, which can greatly improve the kinetics of uranium extraction and the adsorption capacity simultaneously. Following this consideration, macroporous monolith adsorbents were prepared from the copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) and N,N’-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBAAm) based on a cryogel method using both hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers. The monolithic sorbents were tested with simulated seawater containing a high uranyl concentration (–6 ppm) and the uranium adsorption results showed that the adsorption capacities are strongly influenced by the ratio of monomer to the crosslinker, i.e., the density of the amidoxime groups. The preliminary seawater testing indicates the high salinity content of seawater does not hinder the adsorption of uranium.

  5. Actinide science with soft x-ray synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuh, D.

    2002-01-01

    Several workshops, some dating back more than fifteen years, recognised both the potential scientific impact and opportunities that would be made available by the capability to investigate actinide materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/soft X-ray region of the synchrotron radiation (SR) spectrum. This spectral region revolutionized the approach to surface materials chemistry and physics nearly two decades ego. The actinide science community was unable to capitalize on these SR methodologies for the study of actinide materials until recently because of radiological safety concerns. ,The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL is a third-generation light source providing state-of-the-art performance in the VUV/soft X-ray region. Along with corresponding improvements in detector and vacuum technology, the ALS has rendered experiments with small amounts of actinide materials possible. In particular, it has been the emergence and development of micro-spectroscopic techniques that have enabled investigations of actinide materials at the ALS. The primary methods for the experimental investigation of actinide materials in the VUV/soft X-ray region are the complementary photoelectron spectroscopies, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) techniques. Resonant photo-emission is capable of resolving the 5f electron contributions to actinide bonding and can be used to characterise the electronic structure of actinide materials. This technique is clearly a most important methodology afforded by the tunable SR source. Core level and valence band photoelectron spectroscopies are valuable for the characterisation of the electronic properties of actinide materials, as well as for general analytical purposes. High-resolution core-level photo-emission and resonant photo-emission measurements from the a (monoclinic) and δ (FCC) allotropic phases of plutonium metal have been collected on beam line 7.0 at the ALS and the spectra show

  6. Electrochemical study of actinide nitrides in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Osamu; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo; Kato, Tetsuya

    2003-01-01

    Nitride fuels for advanced fast breeder reactors, transmutation of minor actinides and Pu burning fast reactors have been contemplated because of their high thermal conductivity and high melting point. Research on the pyro-chemical reprocessing of nitride fuels has been conducted at the JAERI based on chlorine molten salt electro-refining to obtain fundamental data of redox reactions and pyro-chemistry for minor actinides such as NpN, AmN, CmN and their solid solutions. Experiments on anodic dissolution of UN, PuN and NpN in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts were made with cyclic voltamogram measurements and redox reactions of each actinide nitride were analyzed to show mechanisms of chlorine nitrides formation and establish optimum conditions of actinide metal recovery onto solid cathode. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Biosorption of Metals from Multi-Component Bacterial Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Tsertsvadze, L A; Petriashvili, Sh G; Chutkerashvili, D G; Kirkesali, E I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Gundorina, S F

    2002-01-01

    The method of extraction of metals from industrial solutions by means of economical and easy to apply biosorbents in subtropics such as products of tea manufacturing, moss, microorganisms is described. The multi-component solutions obtained in the process of leaching of ores, rocks and industrial wastes by peat suspension were used in the experiments. The element composition of sorbent biomass and solutions was investigated by epithermal neutron activation analysis and by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained evidence that the used biosorbents are applicable for extraction of the whole set of heavy metals and actinides (U, Th, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Li, Rb, Sr, Cd, As, Co and others) from industrial solutions.

  8. Towards to Extraction of Nanodispersed Noble Metals From Natural Black Graphite Shales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Mikhailenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical approach based on the density functional theory and the pseudopotential method was applied to consider diffusion and accumulation of Au, Pt, and Pd in graphite. It is shown that Pt atoms migrate easily inside graphite. They can stop at structure defects and accumulate there, attracting each other and forming plate clusters. Atoms of gold do not penetrate into graphite but link with edge atoms of broken graphite crystallites, forming three-dimensional metallic particles. Palladium behavior is intermediate between platinum and gold. Addition of silicon into graphite can promote the extraction of noble metals because Si atoms force out Pt, Pd, and Au atoms from their bonded states. Last effect can be used as a mechanism of striking off metals from graphite and their extraction from shales

  9. Effect of metal salts on antibacterial activity of zingiber officinale roscoe extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohail, T.; Yaqeen, Z.; Imran, H.; Rehman, Z.; Fatima, N.

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of ethanol extract of Zingiber Officinale Roscoe (ginger) and its combination with different salts like CuSO/sub 4/, ZnSO/sub 4/ and MnCl/sub 2/ was investigated. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested by agar diffusion method. The results showed that ethanol extract of Zingiber Officinale gave the maximum zone of inhibition at 50 mg/ml concentrations against Escherichia coli among Gram negative bacteria and against Staphylococcus aureus in Gram positive bacteria. However antibacterial activity of the ginger and metal salts combination was greater than activity of ethanol extract. These investigations indicate that though ethanol extract has antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, ginger and metal salts complex has more inhibitory effect on microorganisms. Antibacterial activity was also compared with standard drug ampicillin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ginger extract and metal salts complexes against all test organisms ranged from 0.3125 to 2.5 mg/ml. (author)

  10. Separation of actinides and long-lived fission products from high-level radioactive wastes (a review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolarik, Z.

    1991-11-01

    The management of high-level radioactive wastes is facilitated, if long-lived and radiotoxic actinides and fission products are separated before the final disposal. Especially important is the separation of americium, curium, plutonium, neptunium, strontium, cesium and technetium. The separated nuclides can be deposited separately from the bulk of the high-level waste, but their transmutation to short-lived nuclides is a muchmore favourable option. This report reviews the chemistry of the separation of actinides and fission products from radioactive wastes. The composition, nature and conditioning of the wastes are described. The main attention is paid to the solvent extraction chemistry of the elements and to the application of solvent extraction in unit operations of potential partitioning processes. Also reviewed is the behaviour of the elements in the ion exchange chromatography, precipitation, electrolysis from aqueous solutions and melts, and the distribution between molten salts and metals. Flowsheets of selected partitioning processes are shown and general aspects of the waste partitioning are shortly discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58±6mgkg(-1) for REEs comprising 44±8mgkg(-1) for light REEs, 11±2mgkg(-1) for heavy REEs and 3±1mgkg(-1) for Scandium (Sc) and 3±1.0mgkg(-1) of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Recycling of rare earth metals from fluorescent lamps was conducted by ionic liquid-mediated extraction. • Acid leaching from a waste phosphor powder was carried out using sulfuric and nitric acids. • An ionic liquid was used as extracting solvent for the rare earth metals. • Selective extraction of rare earth metals from leach solutions was attained. •The extracting ionic liquid phase was recyclable in the recovery process. -- Abstract: The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid–liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system

  13. Complexation behavior of trivalent actinides and lanthanides with 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid based ligands: insight from density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2012-08-21

    We have investigated the complexation behavior of preorganized 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) based ligands with trivalent lanthanides and actinides using density functional theory with various GGA type exchange-correlation functionals and different basis sets. New ligands have been designed from PDA through functionalization with soft donor atoms such as sulfur, resulting in mono-thio-dicarboxylic acids (TCA/TCA1) and di-thio-dicarboxylic acid (THIO). It has been found that selectivity in terms of complexation energy of actinides over lanthanides is the maximum with TCA1 where the metal-ligand binding is through the O atoms. This unusual feature where a softer actinide metal ion is bonded strongly with hard donor oxygen atoms has been explained using the popular chemical concepts, viz., Pearson's Hard-Soft-Acid-Base (HSAB) principle and the frontier orbital theory of chemical reactivity as proposed by Fukui. Detailed analysis within the framework of the HSAB principle indicates that the presence of softer nitrogen atoms in the phenanthroline moiety (which also act as donors to the metal ion) has a profound influence in changing the soft nature of the actinide ion, which in turn binds with the hard oxygen atoms in a stronger way as compared to the valence isoelectronic lanthanide ion. Also, the trends in the variation of calculated values of the metal-ligand bond distances and the corresponding complex formation energies have been rationalized using the Fukui reactivity indices corresponding to the metal ions and the donor sites. All the calculations have also been done in the presence of solvent. The "intra-ligand synergistic effect" demonstrated here for PDA or TCA1 with soft and hard donor centers might be very important in designing new ligands for selective extraction of various metal ions in a competitive environment. However, for TCA and THIO ligands with only soft donor centers, "intra-ligand synergism" may not be very efficient although

  14. Influence of a Heterocyclic Nitrogen-Donor Group on the Coordination of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides by Aminopolycarboxylate Complexants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Travis S; Heathman, Colt R; Jansone-Popova, Santa; Ivanov, Alexander S; Roy, Santanu; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Zalupski, Peter R

    2018-02-05

    The novel metal chelator N-2-(pyridylmethyl)diethylenetriamine-N,N',N″,N″-tetraacetic acid (DTTA-PyM) was designed to replace a single oxygen-donor acetate group of the well-known aminopolycarboxylate complexant diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) with a nitrogen-donor 2-pyridylmethyl. Potentiometric, spectroscopic, computational, and radioisotope distribution methods show distinct differences for the 4f and 5f coordination environments and enhanced actinide binding due to the nitrogen-bearing heterocyclic moiety. The Am 3+ , Cm 3+ , and Ln 3+ complexation studies for DTTA-PyM reveal an enhanced preference, relative to DTPA, for trivalent actinide binding. Fluorescence studies indicate no changes to the octadentate coordination of trivalent curium, while evidence of heptadentate complexation of trivalent europium is found in mixtures containing EuHL (aq) complexes at the same aqueous acidity. The denticity change observed for Eu 3+ suggests that complex protonation occurs on the pyridyl nitrogen. Formation of the CmHL (aq) complex is likely due to the protonation of an available carboxylate group because the carbonyl oxygen can maintain octadentate coordination through a rotation. The observed suppressed protonation of the pyridyl nitrogen in the curium complexes may be attributed to stronger trivalent actinide binding by DTTA-PyM. Density functional theory calculations indicate that added stabilization of the actinide complexes with DTTA-PyM may originate from π-back-bonding interactions between singly occupied 5f orbitals of Am 3+ and the pyridyl nitrogen. The differences between the stabilities of trivalent actinide chelates (Am 3+ , Cm 3+ ) and trivalent lanthanide chelates (La 3+ -Lu 3+ ) are observed in liquid-liquid extraction systems, yielding unprecedented 4f/5f differentiation when using DTTA-PyM as an aqueous holdback reagent. In addition, the enhanced nitrogen-donor softness of the new DTTA-PyM chelator was perturbed by

  15. Influence of a Heterocyclic Nitrogen-Donor Group on the Coordination of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides by Aminopolycarboxylate Complexants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heathman, Colt R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jansone-Popova, Santa [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Alexander S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roy, Santanu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zalupski, Peter R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Here, the novel metal chelator N-2-(pyridylmethyl)diethylenetriamine-N,N',N",N"-tetraacetic acid (DTTA-PyM) was designed to replace a single oxygen-donor acetate group of the well-known aminopolycarboxylate complexant diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) with a nitrogen-donor 2-pyridylmethyl. Potentiometric, spectroscopic, computational, and radioisotope distribution methods show distinct differences for the 4f and 5f coordination environments and enhanced actinide binding due to the nitrogen-bearing heterocyclic moiety. The Am3+, Cm3+, and Ln3+ complexation studies for DTTA-PyM reveal an enhanced preference, relative to DTPA, for trivalent actinide binding. Fluorescence studies indicate no changes to the octadentate coordination of trivalent curium, while evidence of heptadentate complexation of trivalent europium is found in mixtures containing EuHL(aq) complexes at the same aqueous acidity. The denticity change observed for Eu3+ suggests that complex protonation occurs on the pyridyl nitrogen. Formation of the CmHL(aq) complex is likely due to the protonation of an available carboxylate group because the carbonyl oxygen can maintain octadentate coordination through a rotation. The observed suppressed protonation of the pyridyl nitrogen in the curium complexes may be attributed to stronger trivalent actinide binding by DTTA-PyM. Density functional theory calculations indicate that added stabilization of the actinide complexes with DTTA-PyM may originate from π-back-bonding interactions between singly occupied 5f orbitals of Am3+ and the pyridyl nitrogen. The differences between the stabilities of trivalent actinide chelates (Am3+, Cm3+) and trivalent lanthanide chelates (La3+–Lu3+) are observed in liquid–liquid extraction systems, yielding unprecedented 4f/5f differentiation when using DTTA

  16. Realtime automatic metal extraction of medical x-ray images for contrast improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangl, Martin; Hellwagner, Hermann; Spielvogel, Christian; Bischof, Horst; Szkaliczki, Tibor

    2006-03-01

    This paper focuses on an approach for real-time metal extraction of x-ray images taken from modern x-ray machines like C-arms. Such machines are used for vessel diagnostics, surgical interventions, as well as cardiology, neurology and orthopedic examinations. They are very fast in taking images from different angles. For this reason, manual adjustment of contrast is infeasible and automatic adjustment algorithms have been applied to try to select the optimal radiation dose for contrast adjustment. Problems occur when metallic objects, e.g., a prosthesis or a screw, are in the absorption area of interest. In this case, the automatic adjustment mostly fails because the dark, metallic objects lead the algorithm to overdose the x-ray tube. This outshining effect results in overexposed images and bad contrast. To overcome this limitation, metallic objects have to be detected and extracted from images that are taken as input for the adjustment algorithm. In this paper, we present a real-time solution for extracting metallic objects of x-ray images. We will explore the characteristic features of metallic objects in x-ray images and their distinction from bone fragments which form the basis to find a successful way for object segmentation and classification. Subsequently, we will present our edge based real-time approach for successful and fast automatic segmentation and classification of metallic objects. Finally, experimental results on the effectiveness and performance of our approach based on a vast amount of input image data sets will be presented.

  17. Recent development in computational actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jun

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the Manhattan project in World War II, actinide chemistry has been essential for nuclear science and technology. Yet scientists still seek the ability to interpret and predict chemical and physical properties of actinide compounds and materials using first-principle theory and computational modeling. Actinide compounds are challenging to computational chemistry because of their complicated electron correlation effects and relativistic effects, including spin-orbit coupling effects. There have been significant developments in theoretical studies on actinide compounds in the past several years. The theoretical capabilities coupled with new experimental characterization techniques now offer a powerful combination for unraveling the complexities of actinide chemistry. In this talk, we will provide an overview of our own research in this field, with particular emphasis on applications of relativistic density functional and ab initio quantum chemical methods to the geometries, electronic structures, spectroscopy and excited-state properties of small actinide molecules such as CUO and UO 2 and some large actinide compounds relevant to separation and environment science. The performance of various density functional approaches and wavefunction theory-based electron correlation methods will be compared. The results of computational modeling on the vibrational, electronic, and NMR spectra of actinide compounds will be briefly discussed as well [1-4]. We will show that progress in relativistic quantum chemistry, computer hardware and computational chemistry software has enabled computational actinide chemistry to emerge as a powerful and predictive tool for research in actinide chemistry. (authors)

  18. SACSESS – the EURATOM FP7 project on actinide separation from spent nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourg Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of actinides by their separation from spent nuclear fuel, followed by transmutation in fast neutron reactors of Generation IV, is considered the most promising strategy for nuclear waste management. Closing the fuel cycle and burning long-lived actinides allows optimizing the use of natural resources and minimizing the long-term hazard of high-level nuclear waste. Moreover, improving the safety and sustainability of nuclear power worldwide. This paper presents the activities striving to meet these challenges, carried out under the Euratom FP7 collaborative project SACSESS (Safety of Actinide Separation Processes. Emphasis is put on the safety issues of fuel reprocessing and waste storage. Two types of actinide separation processes, hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical, are considered, as well as related aspects of material studies, process modeling and the radiolytic stability of solvent extraction systems. Education and training of young researchers in nuclear chemistry is of particular importance for further development of this field.

  19. Enrichment and solubility of trace metals associated with magnetic extracts in industrially derived contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S G; Wang, H Y; Chen, Y Y

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic fractions (MFs) in industrially derived contaminated soils were extracted with a magnetic separation procedure. Total, soluble, and bioaccessible Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the MFs and non-magnetic fractions (NMFs) were analyzed using aqua regia and extraction tests, such as deionized water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and gastric juice simulation (GJST) test. Compared with the non-magnetic fractions, soil MFs were enriched with Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni. Extraction tests indicated that soil MFs contained higher water, TCLP, and GJST-extractable Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the soil NMFs. The TCLP-extractable Pb concentration in the MFs exceeded the USEPA hazardous waste criteria, suggesting that soil MFs have a potentially environmental pollution risk. Solubility of trace metals was variable in the different extraction tests, which has the order of GJST > TCLP > water. TCLP test showed Cu and Zn were more mobile than Cr and Pb while bioaccessibility of trace metal defined by GJST test showed the order of Cu ≈ Cr ≈ Zn > Pb. These findings suggested that the MFs in the industrially derived contaminated soils had higher possibility of polluting water bodies, and careful environmental impact assessment was necessary.

  20. CONTINUOUS CHELATION-EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION OF METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.R.; Hicks, T.E.; Rubin, B.; Crandall, H.W.

    1959-12-01

    A continuous process is presented for separating metal values and groups of metal values from each other. A complex mixture. e.g., neutron-irradiated uranium, can be resolved into component parts. In the present process the values are dissolved in an acidic solution and adjusted to the proper oxidation state. Thenceforth the solution is contacted with an extractant phase comprising a fluorinated beta -diketone in an organic solvent under centain pH conditions whereupon plutonium and zirconium are extracted. Plutonium is extracted from the foregoing extract with reducing aqueous solutions or under specified acidic conditions and can be recovered from the aqueous solution. Zirconium is then removed with an oxalic acid aqueous phase. The uranium is recovered from the residual original solution using hexone and hexone-diketone extractants leaving residual fission products in the original solution. The uranium is extracted from the hexone solution with dilute nitric acid. Improved separations and purifications are achieved using recycled scrub solutions and the "self-salting" effect of uranyl ions.

  1. Systematic study of neutron induced reactions of the actinide nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M. [Akadehmiya Navuk Belarusi, Minsk (Belarus). Inst. Radyyatsyjnykh Fizika-Khimichnykh Prablem; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki

    1996-06-01

    A statistical theory is used for the calculation of the neutron-induced reaction cross sections of actinide nuclides from 10 keV up to 20 MeV. Available experimental data bases for major actinides were extensively used to develop theoretical tools for consistent evaluation of neutron data of minor actinides. The approach employed up to the second chance fission threshold is based on the full-scale Hauser-Feshbach theory, a phenomenological modelling of level densities, the giant dipole resonance model for gamma-ray emission, the double-humped fission barrier model and the coupled channel optical model calculations. The pairing, collective and shell effects are introduced into the level density model for equilibrium and saddle point deformations. Step-like structures observed in fission cross section of {sup 235}U around 1 MeV incident neutron energies are interpreted as due to pairing effects. Pairing correlation parameters are adjusted to fit the fission cross section slope in the first plateau region. The level density collective effect inclusion influences drastically the extracted experimental fission barrier parameters due to the inner saddle point asymmetry. The shell effects dumping is manifested as a consistent fit of fission data above the second chance fission threshold. In case of minor actinides, fission data fits are used as a constraint for capture and inelastic scattering cross section predictions. The capture cross sections were analyzed with the allowance for (n,{gamma}n`) and (n,{gamma}f) reactions. To fit the high-energy tails in the (n,2n) reaction, the pre-equilibrium processes in the neutron channel were included. All these effects were modelled, and the model parameters were obtained using major actinides neutron data. The resulted parameter systematics were applied for analysis of available data and prediction of capture, inelastic scattering, (n,2n), (n,3n) reaction and fission cross sections. (J.P.N.). 87 refs.

  2. Extraction of metal ions using chemically modified silica gel: a PIXE analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jal, P K; Dutta, R K; Sudarshan, M; Saha, A; Bhattacharyya, S N; Chintalapudi, S N; K Mishra, B

    2001-08-30

    Organic ligand with carboxyhydrazide functional group was immobilised on the surface of silica gel and the metal binding capacity of the ligand-embedded silica was investigated. The functional group was covalently bonded to the silica matrix through a spacer of methylene groups by sequential reactions of silica gel with dibromobutane, malonic ester and hydrazine in different media. Surface area value of the modified silica was determined. The changes in surface area were correlated with the structural change of the silica surface due to chemical modifications. A mixture solution of metal ions [K(I),Cr(III),Co(II),Ni(II),Cu(II),Zn(II),Hg(II) and U(VI)] was treated with the ligand-embedded silica in 10(-3) M aqueous solution. The measurement of metal extraction capacity of the silica based ligand was done by multielemental analysis of the metal complexes thus formed by using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique.

  3. Speciation of heavy metals in untreated sewage sludge by using microwave assisted sequential extraction procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Muhammad K; Kazi, Tasneem G; Arain, Muhammad B; Afridi, Hassan I; Jalbani, Nusrat; Kandhro, Ghulam A; Shah, Abdul Q; Baig, Jameel A

    2009-04-30

    A fast microwave assisted extraction procedure was developed and optimized for their eventual exploitation in the three-stage sequential extraction procedure proposed by modified BCR protocol (the community Bureau of Reference now the European Union "Measurement and Testing Programme"). The effects of the microwave treatment on the extraction of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn from untreated sewage sludge collected from Hyderabad city (Pakistan) were compared with those obtained from sequential BCR extraction procedure. In sequential BCR method, each extraction step takes 16 h, where as with the use of compromised microwave conditions, extraction steps could be completed in about 120 s, for each step, respectively. Extractable Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni obtained by both comparable methodologies were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), while for Cu and Zn flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used. The validations of both extraction techniques were compared by the analysis of certified reference material of soil amended with sewage sludge (BCR 483). The results of the partitioning study of untreated waste water sewage sludge, indicate that more easily mobilized forms (step 1) were predominant for Cd, Ni and Zn (28.3, 28.4 and 43.7%), in contrast, the largest amount of Cd and Pb (66.4 and 72.8%) was associated with the iron/manganese oxide while Cr and Ni (71.2 and 38.7%) in organic matter/sulphide fractions. The overall metal recoveries in steps 1-3 (excluding residual step) were 95.3-104% of those obtained with the sequential BCR protocol. The accuracy of the proposed microwave extraction method (expressed as %R.S.D.) was lower than 10% for all metals.

  4. A kinetic approach to evaluate the association of acid volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals in aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, A.; Meerman, E.; Gillissen, F.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (¿SEM) method is widely used for evaluating potential bioavailability of heavy metals in soil and sediment. It is also criticized, because the requirement that AVS and SEM metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) are associated in the

  5. Column Extraction and Separation of Some Metal Ions by Diethylenetriamine Polysiloxane Immobilized Ligand System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizam M. El-Ashgar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An extraction chromatographic solid porous polysiloxane functionalized by chelating diethylenetriamine ligand of the general formula P-(CH23-NH(CH22NH(CH22NH2, (Where P represents [Si-O]n siloxane network has been evaluated for the separation of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II from aqueous solutions. The chromatographic parameters of the separation method have been optimized. The ligand system retained Co(II, Cu(II and Zn(II effectively when used as a metal ion extractant by controlling the pH value. The ligand system also shows a good separation of a mixture of metal ions Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II when used as chromatographic stationary phase. The optimum separation pH values were 4.5, 4 for Co(II and Ni(II respectively, while a solution of 0.1 M HNO3 was used to elute Cu(II. Metal ions were also preconcentrated at pH 5.5. The chemisorbed metal ions were regenerated from the solid extractant using 0.5 M HCl.

  6. Comparison of three sequential extraction protocols for the fractionation of potentially toxic metals in coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyiola, Aderonke Oluwabukola; Olayinka, Kehinde O; Alo, Babajide I

    2011-01-01

    In the determination of the best sequential extraction procedures (SEP) for the speciation of metals in sediment samples from the Lagos lagoon system, three sequential extraction procedures were compared for the fractionation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn. The SEP compared included a modified Tessier's procedure carried out in five steps, while the two other procedures were the three-step original Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) and the modified BCR techniques (four steps). Quantification of the metal concentration was achieved with a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results obtained by the three methods were compared, and the modified BCR and Tessier SEP were found to extract more Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn in the reducible phase and therefore a decrease in the oxidizable phase than the original BCR SEP. The most mobile elements were found to be Cd, Pb, and Zn. These are of environmental concern, as these potentially toxic metals could be easily released into the aquatic environment with consequent ingestion by aquatic organisms, thereby entering the food chain. The mass balance (percent recovery) was found to be between 85% and 115% in most cases. Prior to the comparison, the analytical performance of the laboratory was tested using a secondary reference material, GLAURM, using the three-step modified BCR procedure. The results showed high reliability of the analytical performance of the laboratory for all the metals considered.

  7. Changes in thermal plasticity of low grade coals during selective extraction of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Ю. Бажин

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As the world oil market tends to be highly volatile, the coal becomes a primary source of organic raw materials for chemical and metallurgical industries. Fossil coals can accumulate high amounts of elements and mixtures quite often reaching commercially valuable concentrations. Reserves of scandium and other rare elements in coal deposits in Siberia alone are sufficient to satisfy the expected global demand for several decades. This study is intended to solve complex tasks associated with extraction of metal oxides using the developed enrichment method to ensure the required thermal plasticity determining the quality and properties of metallurgical coke.Laboratory experiments have been conducted for the enrichment of high-ash coals containing the highest concentrations of metals. Thermal plasticity values have been determined with the help of Gieseler plastometer . Using modern technologies and equipment individual deposits can be turned into profitable production of enriched coking coals with concurrent extraction of rare metals. It has been proven that the highest commercial potential lies with the extraction of scandium and some other rare metals in the form of oxides from the coal.

  8. Actinide behavior in the Integral Fast Reactor. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ( 237 Np, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 243 Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and weapons grade plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for seven day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  9. Prediction of extraction ability during metal complexing with organic phosphorus extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozen, A.M.; Krupnov, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of thermodynamic parameters of complexing of neutral organic phosphorus compounds (phosphates, phosphine oxides and diphosphine dioxides with different substituents) with seven acceptors of different strength have been made. It is shown that in a wide range of the complexes strength change the entropy contribution of the Gibbs energy of complexing depends but slightly both on the ligand basicity and on the acceptor nature. It is ascertained that this reaction series is isoentropic for any Lewis acid. Practicability of the previously used correlation between extractability and complexing enthalpy has been proved. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Evaluation of extractant-coated magnetic microparticles for the recovery of hazardous metals from waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process was developed earlier at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This compact process was designed for the separation of transuranics (TRU) and radionuclides from the liquid waste streams that exist at many DOE sites, with an overall reduction in waste volume requiring disposal. The MACS process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractant/ion exchange materials with magnetic separation to provide an efficient chemical separation. Recently, the MACS process has been evaluated with acidic organophosphorus extractants for hazardous metal recovery from waste solutions. Moreover, process scale-up design issues have been addressed with respect to particle filtration and recovery. Two acidic organophosphorus compounds have been investigated for hazardous metal recovery, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (Cyanexreg-sign 272) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanexreg-sign 301). Coated onto magnetic microparticles, these extractants demonstrated superior recovery of hazardous metals from solution, relative to what was expected on the basis of results from solvent extraction experiments. The results illustrate the diverse applications of MACS technology for dilute waste streams. Preliminary process scale-up experiments with a high-gradient magnetic separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have revealed that very low microparticle loss rates are possible

  11. Process for separating actinides and lanthanides present in the trivalent state in an acid aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, Richard; Musikas, Claude; Ranarivelo, Hubert.

    1982-01-01

    In this process the actinides are selectively extracted with an organic solvent comprising a system of extractants made up of an acid organophosphorus compound comprising at least one atom of electron giving sulfur (e.g. dialkyl dithiophosphoric acid) and a neutral organophosphorus compound comprising at least one atom of electron giving oxygen. (e.g. T.B.P. or phosphine oxide) [fr

  12. Comparison of Gastric versus Gastrointestinal PBET Extractions for Estimating Oral Bioaccessibility of Metals in House Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Boros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral bioaccessibility estimates for six metals which are prevalent as contaminants in Canada (zinc, lead, cadmium, copper, nickel, and chromium are investigated for house dust using the simple gastric phase versus the two-phase physiologically-based extraction technique (PBET. The purpose is to determine whether a complete gastrointestinal (GI assay yields a more conservative (i.e., higher estimate of metal bioaccessibility in house dust than the gastric phase alone (G-alone. The study samples include household vacuum dust collected from 33 homes in Montreal, Canada, plus four certified reference materials (NIST 2583, NIST 2584, NIST 2710 and NIST 2710a. Results indicate that percent bioaccessibilities obtained using G-alone are generally greater than or equivalent to those obtained using the complete GI simulation for the six studied metals in house dust. Median bioaccessibilities for G-alone/GI in household vacuum dust samples (n = 33 are 76.9%/19.5% for zinc, 50.4%/6.2% for lead, 70.0%/22.4% for cadmium, 33.9%/30.5% for copper and 28.5%/20.7% for nickel. Bioaccessible chromium is above the detection limit in only four out of 33 samples, for which G-alone results are not significantly different from GI results (p = 0.39. It is concluded that, for the six studied metals, a simple G-alone extraction provides a conservative and cost-effective approach for estimating oral bioaccessibility of metals in house dust.

  13. Comparison of Gastric versus Gastrointestinal PBET Extractions for Estimating Oral Bioaccessibility of Metals in House Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Kristina; Fortin, Danielle; Jayawardene, Innocent; Chénier, Marc; Levesque, Christine; Rasmussen, Pat E

    2017-01-18

    Oral bioaccessibility estimates for six metals which are prevalent as contaminants in Canada (zinc, lead, cadmium, copper, nickel, and chromium) are investigated for house dust using the simple gastric phase versus the two-phase physiologically-based extraction technique (PBET). The purpose is to determine whether a complete gastrointestinal (GI) assay yields a more conservative (i.e., higher) estimate of metal bioaccessibility in house dust than the gastric phase alone (G-alone). The study samples include household vacuum dust collected from 33 homes in Montreal, Canada, plus four certified reference materials (NIST 2583, NIST 2584, NIST 2710 and NIST 2710a). Results indicate that percent bioaccessibilities obtained using G-alone are generally greater than or equivalent to those obtained using the complete GI simulation for the six studied metals in house dust. Median bioaccessibilities for G-alone/GI in household vacuum dust samples ( n = 33) are 76.9%/19.5% for zinc, 50.4%/6.2% for lead, 70.0%/22.4% for cadmium, 33.9%/30.5% for copper and 28.5%/20.7% for nickel. Bioaccessible chromium is above the detection limit in only four out of 33 samples, for which G-alone results are not significantly different from GI results ( p = 0.39). It is concluded that, for the six studied metals, a simple G-alone extraction provides a conservative and cost-effective approach for estimating oral bioaccessibility of metals in house dust.

  14. Liquid phase micro-extraction: Towards the green methodology for ultratrace metals determination in aquatic ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-López J. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are normally found, in natural waters, in very low concentrations. Some of them are essential for life in low level; however, in higher level they are toxic. Therefore, analyzing their bio-available fraction is of main interest. Standard methodology is based in the collection of a number of samples from a water body. Collected samples must be stored, pre-treated and then analyzed. Pre-treatment usually involves pre-concentrating the metal, with the corresponding risk of contamination or loss of analyte. This way, punctual information is obtained from every sampling campaign. As an alternative, passive sampling techniques allow the continuous and coupled sampling-pre-treatment for heavy metals analysis, giving a better approach in the characterization of the studied water body. Liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME is a green analytical alternative for liquid-liquid extraction that promotes a reduction of sample volume, solvent needed and waste generation. Using these systems, polypropylene hollow fibers (HF with pores in their walls can be used. A few micro-liters of organic solvent are supported in the pores. The sample is placed in the outer part of the fiber and a receiving phase is placed in its inner part, allowing continuous liquid extraction of the metal from the sample. Several fibers with different physical features have been employed to analyzed total concentration and bio-availability of some heavy metals (Ag, Ni, Cu in natural water samples. Thanks to fibers configuration, devices for passive sampling based in HF-LPME could be designed. Advantages of this methodology over existing ones are supported because the receiving phase is liquid. As a consequence, retained metals do not need to be eluted from the acceptor prior to instrumental analysis.

  15. Extraction of metals from ores by bacterial leaching: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The principal organism effecting bacterial leaching of ferrous and sulfide ores is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, though other thiobacilli and other bacteria may be involved. The process depends on (a) direct solubilization of metal sulfides by bacterial oxidation; (b) dissolution of metal sulfides or oxides by ferric iron produced by bacterial pyrite oxidation. Mining spoil dumps and low grade ores can be leached for copper or uranium by cheap low-level technology. Dump leaching enables maximum recovery of valuable metal from any ore, but makes possible exploitation of very low grade Cu and U ores. Continuous extraction processes are possible where a continuously growing bacterial culture is fed with pyritic ores (or FeSO 4 or other sulfide) and continuous metal solubilization proceeds. Intimate contact between the bacteria and the ore to be leached (especially with uranium oxide ores) is not always necessary: leaching of UO 2 ores probably depends only on ferric iron reaction with the ore. Degradation of pyrite-containing rocks may also be developed as part of future recovery processes for petroleum from oil shales. Two-stage leaching systems present the best prospect for developing a higher-level technology for metal extraction. State 1: bacterial generation of Fe 3+ from pyrite or a Fe 2+ source; Stage 2: chemical leaching of ore by Fe 3+ in acid solution. Two-stage processes can be surface processes using crushed or milled ores or can be applied to underground solution mining, when an ore (e.g. uranium) can be leached by pumping Fe 3+ solutions through shattered underground deposits, metal recovered (e.g. solvent extraction) and Fe 3+ regenerated by bacterial oxidation at the surface. The use of controlled continuous microbial cultures to generate either bacteria or ferric iron is outlined

  16. Association of solvent extraction and liquid-liquid flotation processes for metal recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Flavia P.; Mendonca, Luciano A. de; Massarani, Giulio

    2000-01-01

    From the batch solvent extraction process, in this work it has been carried out a preliminary study aiming the determination of the optimal operating conditions for zirconium recovery (10 ppm) using alamine 336 (tricaprylylamine) as extractor. The results have shown that the extraction takes place instantaneously (5s of manual agitation) and that at pH around 2.0 the extraction efficiency is up to 98-99% for an aqueous/organic phase volumetric ratio of 10. Based on these results, it is proposed to evaluate the possibility of using of a pioneering technology for metal recovery at low concentrations, using a experimental set-up that associates standard solvent extraction process with liquid-liquid flotation process. (author)

  17. Extraction of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash with organic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerven, T; Cooreman, H; Imbrechts, K; Hindrix, K; Vandecasteele, C

    2007-02-09

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash often cannot be recycled as construction material in Flanders, because leaching of Cu exceeds the limit value of 0.5mg/kg. Leaching of other components such as Mo and Sb is critical as well, but limit values for these elements are to date only informal. A treatment technique was investigated to lower pollutant leaching: extraction with solutions of organic complexants to remove Cu. Six different solutions were used, of which washing with citric acid and ammonium citrate decreases Cu leaching to below the limit value. Extraction was then performed with different concentrations of ammonium citrate. Subsequent washing of the extracted material with distilled water appears to be vital to remove all residual ammonium citrate. Extraction with a 0.2M solution of ammonium citrate followed by three washing steps decreases metal leaching to below the limit values.

  18. Sequential extraction for the speciation of some heavy metals in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemberyova, M.; Zwaik, A.A.H.; Farkasovska, I.

    1998-01-01

    The five step sequential extraction for speciation of copper and nickel originally designed for sediments has been applied to soil samples. The extractant solutions were: 1 mol/l ammonium acetate, 1 mol/l hydroxylammonium chloride in 25% acetic acid (1:1), 0.1 mol/l hydrochlorid acid, 0.5 mol/l sodium hydroxide and 8 mol/l nitric acid. The residue was decomposed by HF and HNO 3 . Using this procedure the metal fraction bound to the organic matter can be distinguished. The concentrations of analytes were determined in the soil extracts by FAAS and ETAAS. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the sum of the contents of copper and nickel in soil extracts with the total certified values of CRMs of soils. The overall recovery values for nickel was 84-105% and for copper 105-114%. (author)

  19. Preparation of isotopes and sources of actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Bourges, J.; Koehly, G.

    1984-09-01

    As the C.E.A. possesses no isotopic separation facility, the productions of isotopes of actinide elements are performed: a) by neutron irradiation and chemical treatment of special targets, b) by milking decay products from stocks of aged actinide elements, c) by chemical treatment of alpha active wastes. These productions concern the following isotopes: 233 U, 238 Pu, 242 Pu, 243 Cm, 242 Cm, 244 Cm (a); 228 Th, 229 Th, 234 U, 237 U, 239 Np, 240 Pu, 241 Am, 248 Cm (b); 237 Np, 241 Am (c). These isotopes are produced to satisfy French and international needs and are sent to users in various forms: solutions, metals, oxides, fluorides, or in different sources forms. The preparation of the sources represents an important field of activities divided into two parts: 1/Industrial sources: production of large series of different sources, 2/ Scientific sources: production of sources suitable for a specific scientific problem. A large overview of these activities is given

  20. Actinide-specific sequestering agents and decontamination applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Raymond, Kenneth N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-04-07

    With the commercial development of nuclear reactors, the actinides have become very important industrial elements. A major concern of the nuclear industry is the biological hazard associated with nuclear fuels and their wastes. The acute chemical toxicity of tetravalent actinides, as exemplified by Th(IV), is similar to Cr(III) or Al(III). However, the acute toxicity of 239Pu(IV) is similar to strychnine, which is much more toxic than any of the non-radioactive metals such as mercury. Although the more radioactive isotopes of the transuranium elements are more acutely toxic by weight than plutonium, the acute toxicities of 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm are nearly identical in radiation dose, ~100 μCi/kg in rodents. Finally and thus, the extreme acute toxicity of 239Pu is attributed to its high specific activity of alpha emission.