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Sample records for extractable organic halogens

  1. Organic halogens in landfill leachates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, C.; Christensen, J. B.; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke

    2000-01-01

    Using a group parameter, total organic halogens (TOX), high TOX concentrations were found in leachates and leachate contaminated groundwaters at two Danish mixed sanitary and hazardous waste sites. With commonly used screening procedures for organic contaminants, the individual halogenated organi...

  2. Organic halogen compounds in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    There are 20 research reports on selected problems concerning the analysis, the occurence, and the behaviour of a wide spectrum of organic halogen compounds. The work was carried out in the framework of the project 'Organic Halogen Compounds in the Environment', financed by the BMFT, between 1975 and 1978. (orig.) [de

  3. Organic halogens in spruce forest throughfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öberg, G.; Johansen, C.; Grøn, C.

    1998-01-01

    . No relationship between the position of the collectors and the forest edge or dominating wind-direction was found, suggesting that dry deposition was not a major source. The concentration of organic halogens was related to that of organic carbon and decreased from the tree-trunk and outwards. In addition......, the concentrations were higher during the growing season than during the dormant season. This indicates that the major part of the organic carbon and organic halogens in spruce forest throughfall originates from canopy leachates or other internal sources. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.......Deposition of dissolved organic halogens by throughfall was determined in a small spruce forest site in Denmark (56 degrees 28'N, 8 degrees 24'E). The mean annual deposition of dissolved organic halogens was 377 g ha(-1)yr(-1), and larger than the general deposition by precipitation...

  4. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  5. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward

  6. Is halogen content the most important factor in the removal of halogenated trace organics by MBR treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Faisal I; Tadkaew, Nichanan; McDonald, James A; Khan, Stuart J; Nghiem, Long D

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between physicochemical properties (namely halogen content and hydrophobicity) of halogenated trace organics and their removal efficiencies by a laboratory scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) under stable operating conditions. The reported results demonstrated a combined effect of halogen content and hydrophobicity on the removal. Compounds with high halogen content (>0.3) were well removed (>85%) when they possessed high hydrophobicity (Log D>3.2), while those with lower Log D values were also well removed if they had low halogen content (BIOWIN index (which is based on only biodegradation) or a more specific index such as the halogen content (which captures a chemical aspect) appeared insufficient to predict the removal efficiency of halogenated compounds in MBR. Experimental data confirmed that the ratio of halogen content and Log D, which incorporates two important physico-chemical properties, is comparatively more suitable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Halogenation processes of secondary organic aerosol and implications on halogen release mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ofner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive halogen species (RHS, such as X·, X2 and HOX containing X = chlorine and/or bromine, are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or from salt pans, and salt lakes. Despite many studies of RHS reactions, the potential of RHS reacting with secondary organic aerosol (SOA and organic aerosol derived from biomass-burning (BBOA has been neglected. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organohalogen compounds or halogenated organic matter in the tropospheric boundary layer and can influence physicochemical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

    Model SOA from α-pinene, catechol, and guaiacol was used to study heterogeneous interactions with RHS. Particles were exposed to molecular chlorine and bromine in an aerosol smog-chamber in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to RHS, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans. Subsequently, the aerosol was characterized in detail using a variety of physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. Fundamental features were correlated with heterogeneous halogenation, which results in new functional groups (FTIR spectroscopy, changes UV/VIS absorption, chemical composition (ultrahigh resolution mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS, or aerosol size distribution. However, the halogen release mechanisms were also found to be affected by the presence of organic aerosol. Those interaction processes, changing chemical and physical properties of the aerosol are likely to influence e.g. the ability of the aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei, its potential to adsorb other gases with low-volatility, or its contribution to radiative forcing and ultimately the Earth's radiation balance.

  8. Characterization of halogenated DBPs and identification of new DBPs trihalomethanols in chlorine dioxide treated drinking water with multiple extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiarui; Zhang, Xiangru; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Xiaohu; Gong, Tingting

    2017-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) is a widely used alternative disinfectant due to its high biocidal efficiency and low-level formation of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. A major portion of total organic halogen (TOX), a collective parameter for all halogenated DBPs, formed in ClO 2 -treated drinking water is still unknown. A commonly used pretreatment method for analyzing halogenated DBPs in drinking water is one-time liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), which may lead to a substantial loss of DBPs prior to analysis. In this study, characterization and identification of polar halogenated DBPs in a ClO 2 -treated drinking water sample were conducted by pretreating the sample with multiple extractions. Compared to one-time LLE, the combined four-time LLEs improved the recovery of TOX by 2.3 times. The developmental toxicity of the drinking water sample pretreated with the combined four-time LLEs was 1.67 times higher than that pretreated with one-time LLE. With the aid of ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, a new group of polar halogenated DBPs, trihalomethanols, were detected in the drinking water sample pretreated with multiple extractions; two of them, trichloromethanol and bromodichloromethanol, were identified with synthesized standard compounds. Moreover, these trihalomethanols were found to be the transformation products of trihalomethanes formed during ClO 2 disinfection. The results indicate that multiple LLEs can significantly improve extraction efficiencies of polar halogenated DBPs and is a better pretreatment method for characterizing and identifying new polar halogenated DBPs in drinking water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Rational design of organic semiconductors for texture control and self-patterning on halogenated surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Ward, Jeremy W.; Li, Ruipeng; Obaid, Abdulmalik; Payne, Marcia M.; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Anthony, John Edward; Amassian, Aram; Jurchescu, Oana D.

    2014-01-01

    new materials. Here, the influence of the interactions at the interface between a halogenated organic semiconductor (OSC) thin film and a halogenated self-assembled monolayer on the formation of the crystalline texture directly affecting

  10. Biogas from MSW landfill: Composition and determination of chlorine content with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, M.D.; Font, R.; Aracil, I.

    2013-01-01

    An exhaustive characterization of the biogas from some waste disposal facilities has been carried out. The analysis includes the main components (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen) as well as trace components such as hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and VOCs (volatile organic compounds) including siloxanes and halogenated compounds. VOCs were measured by GC/MS (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry) using two different procedures: thermal desorption of the Tenax TA and Carbotrap 349 tubes and SPME (Solid Phase Micro-Extraction). A method has been established to measure the total halogen content of the biogas with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique. The equipment used to analyze the samples was a Total Organic Halogen Analyzer (TOX-100). Similar results were obtained when comparing the TOX (Total Organic Halogen) values with those obtained by GC/MS. The halogen content in all the samples was under 22 mg Cl/Nm 3 which is below the limit of 150 mg/Nm 3 proposed in the Spanish Regulations for any use of the biogas. The low chlorine content in the biogas studied, as well as the low content of other trace compounds, makes it suitable for use as a fuel for electricity generating engines

  11. Halogen bonding: A new retention mechanism for the solid phase extraction of perfluorinated iodoalkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xiaoqing; Shen Qianjin; Zhao Xiaoran; Gao Haiyue; Pang Xue; Jin Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Halogen bonding (XB) is firstly utilised in solid phase extraction. ► The perfluorinated iodine alkanes can be extracted by C-I⋯Cl − halogen bonding. ► The C-I⋯Cl − halogen bond is well characterised by spectroscopy methods. ► The analytes with strong halogen-bonding abilities can be selectively extracted. - Abstract: For the first time, halogen-bonding interaction is utilised in the solid phase extraction of perfluorinated iodoalkane (PFI). Nine PFIs, as model analytes, were tested, and analyses by UV, 19 F NMR and Raman spectroscopies demonstrate that the PFIs are extracted by a strong anion exchange (SAX) sorbent from n-hexane due to the C-I⋯Cl − halogen-bonding interactions. The results also show that the adsorptivities of SAX for the diiodoperfluoro-alkanes (diiodo-PFIs) were much stronger than those for the perfluoroalkyl iodides (monoiodo-PFIs). Specifically, the recoveries for 1,6-diiodoperfluorohexane and 1,8-diiodoperfluorooctane were higher than 80% when 100 mL of sample spiked with a 5 ng mL −1 analyte mixture was extracted. Interestingly, SAX had no adsorption for hexafluorobenzene at all, which is known to be unable to form a halogen bond with Cl − . The analytical performance of the halogen bond-based SPE-GC–MS method for the diiodo-PFIs was also examined in soil samples. The sorbent SAX enabled the selective extraction of four diiodo-PFIs successfully from soil samples. The recoveries of the diiodo-PFIs extracted from 5 g soil sample at the 100 ng g −1 spike level were in the range of 73.2–93.8% except 26.8% for 1,2-diiodoperfluoroethane. The limit of detection varied from 0.02 to 0.04 ng g −1 in soil samples. Overall, this work reveals the great application potential of halogen bonding in the field of solid phase extraction to selectively extract compounds with strong halogen-bonding abilities.

  12. Tuning the viscosity of halogen free bulk heterojunction inks for inkjet printed organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, C.A.; Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Slaats, T.W.L.; Andriessen, R.; Groen, P.

    2015-01-01

    For the solution processing of organic photovoltaics on an industrial scale, the exclusion of halogenated solvents is a necessity. However, the limited solubility of most semiconducting polymer/fullerene blends in non-halogenated solvents results in ink formulations with low viscosities which poses

  13. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, R.; Rodriguez, I.; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 μL. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L -1 , depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated

  14. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Rodriguez, I. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)], E-mail: qnisaac@usc.es; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2007-09-05

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 {mu}L. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L{sup -1}, depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated.

  15. PATTERN RECOGNITION STUDIES OF HALOGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING CONDUCTING POLYMER SENSOR ARRAYS. (R825323)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct measurement of volatile and semivolatile halogenated organic compounds of environmental interest was carried out using arrays of conducting polymer sensors. Mathematical expressions of the sensor arrays using microscopic polymer network model is described. A classical, non...

  16. Halogenated organic compounds in archived whale oil: A pre-industrial record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuten, Emma L.; Reddy, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    To provide additional evidence that several halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) found in environmental samples are natural and not industrially produced, we analyzed an archived whale oil sample collected in 1921 from the last voyage of the whaling ship Charles W. Morgan. This sample, which pre-dates large-scale industrial manufacture of HOCs, contained two methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs), five halogenated methyl bipyrroles (MBPs), one halogenated dimethyl bipyrrole (DMBP), and tentatively one dimethoxylated polybrominated biphenyl (diMeO-PBB). This result indicates, at least in part, a natural source of the latter compounds. - Nine halogenated organic compounds have been detected in archived whale oil from the early 1920s

  17. Halogenated organic compounds in archived whale oil: A pre-industrial record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuten, Emma L. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: emma.teuten@plymouth.ac.uk; Reddy, Christopher M. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: creddy@whoi.edu

    2007-02-15

    To provide additional evidence that several halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) found in environmental samples are natural and not industrially produced, we analyzed an archived whale oil sample collected in 1921 from the last voyage of the whaling ship Charles W. Morgan. This sample, which pre-dates large-scale industrial manufacture of HOCs, contained two methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs), five halogenated methyl bipyrroles (MBPs), one halogenated dimethyl bipyrrole (DMBP), and tentatively one dimethoxylated polybrominated biphenyl (diMeO-PBB). This result indicates, at least in part, a natural source of the latter compounds. - Nine halogenated organic compounds have been detected in archived whale oil from the early 1920s.

  18. Organic halogen compounds and surface water pollution; Composti organoalogenati alifatici e contaminazione delle acque superficiali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocchioni, M.; Pellegrini, M. G.; Grappasonni, I.; Nacciarriti, L.; Bernacchia, G. [Camerino, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Igienistiche e Sanitarie-Ambientali

    1997-03-01

    A brief review of the effects of halogenated organic compounds on the fluvial ecosystem is followed by results from a detailed monitoring of these substances in all the Marches Region rivers. The results show generally modest concentrations, except for sporadic peaks for chloroform. Sites revealing significant concentrations of halogenated organic compounds also manifested a worsening of the biological quality of the waters with lessening of E.B.I. Attention is drawn to the negative effects of indiscriminate chlorination of purification plant outputs, as this practice often fails to resolve infective problems and in itself adds toxicity to the watercourse.

  19. Rational design of organic semiconductors for texture control and self-patterning on halogenated surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Ward, Jeremy W.

    2014-05-15

    Understanding the interactions at interfaces between the materials constituting consecutive layers within organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) is vital for optimizing charge injection and transport, tuning thin-film microstructure, and designing new materials. Here, the influence of the interactions at the interface between a halogenated organic semiconductor (OSC) thin film and a halogenated self-assembled monolayer on the formation of the crystalline texture directly affecting the performance of OTFTs is explored. By correlating the results from microbeam grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (μGIWAXS) measurements of structure and texture with OTFT characteristics, two or more interaction paths between the terminating atoms of the semiconductor and the halogenated surface are found to be vital to templating a highly ordered morphology in the first layer. These interactions are effective when the separating distance is lower than 2.5 dw, where dw represents the van der Waals distance. The ability to modulate charge carrier transport by several orders of magnitude by promoting "edge-on" versus "face-on" molecular orientation and crystallographic textures in OSCs is demonstrated. It is found that the "edge-on" self-assembly of molecules forms uniform, (001) lamellar-textured crystallites which promote high charge carrier mobility, and that charge transport suffers as the fraction of the "face-on" oriented crystallites increases. The role of interfacial halogenation in mediating texture formation and the self-patterning of organic semiconductor films, as well as the resulting effects on charge transport in organic thin-film transistors, are explored. The presence of two or more anchoring sites between a halogenated semiconductor and a halogenated self-assembled monolayer, closer than about twice the corresponding van der Waals distance, alter the microstructure and improve electrical properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Integrated analysis of halogenated organic pollutants in sub-millilitre volumes of venous and umbilical cord blood sera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimalt, Joan O.; Carrizo, Daniel; Otero, Raquel; Vizcaino, Esther [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAeA-CSIC), Department of Environmental Chemistry, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Howsam, Mike [Universite de Lille 2, Centre Universitaire de Mesure et d' Analyse, Faculte de Pharmacie, Lille (France); Rodrigues de Marchi, Mary Rosa [Institute of Chemistry UNESP, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    A rapid, robust and economical method for the analysis of persistent halogenated organic compounds in small volumes of human serum and umbilical cord blood is described. The pollutants studied cover a broad range of molecules of contemporary epidemiological and legislative concern, including polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polychlorobenzenes (CBs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), DDTs, polychlorostyrenes (PCSs) and polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Extraction and clean-up with n-hexane and concentrated sulphuric acid was followed with analysis by gas chromatography coupled to electron capture (GC-ECD) and GC coupled to negative ion chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-NICI-MS). The advantages of this method rest in the broad range of analytes and its simplicity and robustness, while the use of concentrated sulphuric acid extraction/clean-up destroys viruses that may be present in the samples. Small volumes of reference serum between 50 and 1000{mu}L were extracted and the limits of detection/quantification and repeatability were determined. Recoveries of spiked compounds for the extraction of small volumes ({>=}300 {mu}L) of the spiked reference serum were between 90% and 120%. The coefficients of variation of repeatability ranged from 0.1-14%, depending on the compound. Samples of 4-year-old serum and umbilical cord blood (n=73 and 40, respectively) from a population inhabiting a village near a chloro-alkali plant were screened for the above-mentioned halogenated pollutants using this method and the results are briefly described. (orig.)

  1. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Halogenated organic species over the tropical South American rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gebhardt

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of the halogenated trace gases methyl chloride, methyl bromide and chloroform were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean and about 1000 km of pristine tropical rainforest in Suriname and French Guyana (3–6° N, 51–59° W in October 2005. In the boundary layer (0–1.4 km, maritime air masses, advected over the forest by southeasterly trade winds, were measured at various distances from the coast. Since the organohalogens presented here have relatively long atmospheric lifetimes (0.4–1.0 years in comparison to the advection times from the coast (1–2 days, emissions will accumulate in air traversing the rainforest. The distributions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide and chloroform were analyzed as a function of time the air spent over land and the respective relationship used to determine net fluxes from the rainforest for one week within the long dry season.

    Net fluxes from the rainforest ecosystem have been calculated for methyl chloride and chloroform as 9.5 (±3.8 2σ and 0.35 (±0.15 2σμg m-2 h−1, respectively. No significant flux was observed for methyl bromide within the limits of these measurements.

    The global budget of methyl chloride contains large uncertainties, in particular with regard to a possible source from tropical vegetation. Our measurements are used in a large-scale approach to determine the net flux from a tropical ecosystem to the planetary boundary layer. The obtained global net flux of 1.5 (±0.6 2σ Tg yr-1 for methyl chloride is at the lower end of current estimates for tropical vegetation sources, which helps to constrain the range of tropical sources and sinks (0.82 to 8.2 Tg yr-1 from tropical plants, 0.03 to 2.5 Tg yr-1 from senescent/dead leaves and a sink of 0.1 to 1.6 Tg yr-1 by soil uptake. Nevertheless, these results show that the contribution of the rainforest ecosystem is the major source in the

  3. Large area inkjet printing for organic photovoltaics and organic light emitting diodes using non-halogenated ink formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Slaats, M.W.L.; Groen, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of laboratory scale solution processing of organic electronics to large area roll-to-roll production requires the use of up-scalable deposition techniques. Furthermore, industrial production demands the omission of halogenated and other harmful solvents. Here, the authors discuss large

  4. Halogens in pore water of peat bogs – the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Biester

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Halogens are strongly enriched in peat and peatlands and such they are one of their largest active terrestrial reservoir. The enrichment of halogens in peat is mainly attributed to the formation of organohalogens and climatically controlled humification processes. However, little is known about release of halogens from the peat substrate and the distribution of halogens in the peat pore water. In this study we have investigated the distribution of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water of three pristine peat bogs located in the Magellanic Moorlands, southern Chile. Peat pore waters were collected using a sipping technique, which allows in situ sampling down to a depth greater than 6m. Halogens and halogen species in pore water were determined by ion-chromatography (IC (chlorine and IC-ICP-MS (bromine and iodine. Results show that halogen concentrations in pore water are 15–30 times higher than in rainwater. Mean concentrations of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water were 7–15 mg l−1, 56–123 μg l−1, and 10–20 μg l−1, which correspond to mean proportions of 10–15%, 1–2.3% and 0.5–2.2% of total concentrations in peat, respectively. Organobromine and organoiodine were the predominant species in pore waters, whereas chlorine in pore water was mostly chloride. Advection and diffusion of halogens were found to be generally low and halogen concentrations appear to reflect release from the peat substrate. Release of bromine and iodine from peat depend on the degree of peat degradation, whereas this relationship is weak for chlorine. Relatively higher release of bromine and iodine was observed in less degraded peat sections, where the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC was also the most intensive. It has been concluded that the release of halogenated dissolved organic matter (DOM is the predominant mechanism of iodine and bromine release from peat.

  5. Gas-liquid partitioning of halogenated volatile organic compounds in aqueous cyclodextrin solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondo, Daniel; Barankova, Eva [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dohnal, Vladimir, E-mail: dohnalv@vscht.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Binding of halogenated VOCs with cyclodextrins examined through g-l partitioning. > Complex stabilities reflect host-guest size matching and hydrophobic interaction. > Presence of halogens in the guest molecule stabilizes the binding. > Thermodynamic origin of the binding varies greatly among the systems studied. > Results obey the guest-CD global enthalpy-entropy compensation relationship. - Abstract: Gas-liquid partitioning coefficients (K{sub GL}) were measured for halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), namely 1-chlorobutane, methoxyflurane, pentafluoropropan-1-ol, heptafluorobutan-1-ol, {alpha},{alpha},{alpha}-trifluorotoluene, and toluene in aqueous solutions of natural {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {gamma}-cyclodextrins (CDs) at temperatures from (273.35 to 326.35) K employing the techniques of headspace gas chromatography and inert gas stripping. The binding constants of the 1:1 inclusion complex formation between the VOCs and CDs were evaluated from the depression of the VOCs volatility as a function of CD concentration. The host-guest size matching and the hydrophobic interaction concept were used to rationalize the observed widely different affinity of the VOC-CD pairs to form the inclusion complex. The enthalpic and entropic component of the standard Gibbs free energy of complex formation as derived from the temperature dependence of the binding constant indicate the thermodynamic origin of the binding to vary greatly among the systems studied, but follow the global enthalpy-entropy compensation relationships reported previously in the literature.

  6. Radiocarbon content of synthetic and natural semi-volatile halogenated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, C.M.; Xu Li; Eglinton, T.I.; Boon, J.P.; Faulkner, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    New developments in molecular-level 14 C analysis techniques enable clues about natural versus commercial synthesis of trace organic contaminants. - Some halogenated organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), have been suggested to have natural sources but separating these compounds from their commercially synthesized counterparts is difficult. Molecular-level 14 C analysis may be beneficial since most synthetic compounds are manufactured from petrochemicals ( 14 C-free) and natural compounds should have 'modern' or 'contemporary' 14 C levels. As a baseline study, we measured, for the first time, the 14 C abundance in commercial PCB and PBDE mixtures, a number of organochlorine pesticides, as well as one natural product 2-(3', 5'-dibromo-2'-methoxyphenoxy)-3,5-dibromoanisole. The latter compound was isolated from a marine sponge and is similar in structure to a PBDE. All of the synthetic compounds were 14 C-free except for the pesticide toxaphene, which had a modern 14 C abundance, as did the brominated natural compound. The result for toxaphene was not surprising since it was commercially synthesized by the chlorination of camphene derived from pine trees. These results suggest that measuring the 14 C content of halogenated organic compounds may be quite useful in establishing whether organic compounds encountered in the environment have natural or synthetic origins (or both) provided that any synthetic counterparts derive from petrochemical feedstock

  7. Identifying bioaccumulative halogenated organic compounds using a nontargeted analytical approach: seabirds as sentinels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Millow

    Full Text Available Persistent organic pollutants (POPs are typically monitored via targeted mass spectrometry, which potentially identifies only a fraction of the contaminants actually present in environmental samples. With new anthropogenic compounds continuously introduced to the environment, novel and proactive approaches that provide a comprehensive alternative to targeted methods are needed in order to more completely characterize the diversity of known and unknown compounds likely to cause adverse effects. Nontargeted mass spectrometry attempts to extensively screen for compounds, providing a feasible approach for identifying contaminants that warrant future monitoring. We employed a nontargeted analytical method using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS to characterize halogenated organic compounds (HOCs in California Black skimmer (Rynchops niger eggs. Our study identified 111 HOCs; 84 of these compounds were regularly detected via targeted approaches, while 27 were classified as typically unmonitored or unknown. Typically unmonitored compounds of note in bird eggs included tris(4-chlorophenylmethane (TCPM, tris(4-chlorophenylmethanol (TCPMOH, triclosan, permethrin, heptachloro-1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrrole (MBP, as well as four halogenated unknown compounds that could not be identified through database searching or the literature. The presence of these compounds in Black skimmer eggs suggests they are persistent, bioaccumulative, potentially biomagnifying, and maternally transferring. Our results highlight the utility and importance of employing nontargeted analytical tools to assess true contaminant burdens in organisms, as well as to demonstrate the value in using environmental sentinels to proactively identify novel contaminants.

  8. Halogenating reaction activity of aromatic organic compounds during disinfection of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Gaimei; Chen Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    The halogenating reactions of five aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) with aqueous chlorine (HOCl/OCl - ) and aqueous bromine (HOBr/OBr - ) were studied with an aim to compare the formation properties of haloacetic acids (HAAs) for the corresponding chlorination or bromination reactions of AOCs, respectively. The experiment results indicated that the HAAs substitution efficiency for the bromination reactions of AOCs was greater than that for the chlorination reactions, and the formation of HAAs had a strong dependence on the chemical structure of AOCs. The chlorination or bromination reaction activities for the AOCs with electron donating functional groups were higher than that for them with electron withdrawing functional groups. The kinetic experiments indicated that the reactions of aqueous bromine with phenol were faster than those of aqueous chlorine with phenol and the halogen consumption exhibited rapid initial and slower consumption stages for the reactions of phenol with aqueous chlorine and bromine, respectively. In addition, the HAAs production for the chlorination reaction of phenol decreased with the increase of pH. These conclusions could provide the valuable information for the effective control of the disinfection by-products during drinking water treatment operation

  9. Impact of bromide on halogen incorporation into organic moieties in chlorinated drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J; Allard, S; Gruchlik, Y; McDonald, S; Joll, C A; Heitz, A

    2016-01-15

    The impact of elevated bromide concentrations (399 to 750 μg/L) on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs), namely trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), in two drinking water systems was investigated. Bromine was the main halogen incorporated into all of the DBP classes and into organic carbon, even though chlorine was present in large excess to maintain a disinfectant residual. Due to the higher reactivity of bromine compared to chlorine, brominated DBPs were rapidly formed, followed by a slower increase in chlorinated DBPs. Higher bromine substitution and incorporation factors for individual DBP classes were observed for the chlorinated water from the groundwater source (lower concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)), which contained a higher concentration of bromide, than for the surface water source (higher DOC). The molar distribution of adsorbable organic bromine to chlorine (AOBr/AOCl) for AOX in the groundwater distribution system was 1.5:1 and almost 1:1 for the surface water system. The measured (regulated) DBPs only accounted for 16 to 33% of the total organic halogen, demonstrating that AOX measurements are essential to provide a full understanding of the formation of halogenated DBPs in drinking waters. In addition, the study demonstrated that a significant proportion (up to 94%) of the bromide in source waters can be converted AOBr. An evaluation of AOBr and AOCl through a second groundwater treatment plant that uses conventional treatment processes for DOC removal produced 70% of AOX as AOBr, with 69% of the initial source water bromide converted to AOBr. Exposure to organobromine compounds is suspected to result in greater adverse health consequences than their chlorinated analogues. Therefore, this study highlights the need for improved methods to selectively reduce the bromide content in source waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel enhancement of thin-form-factor galvanic cells: Probing halogenated organic oxidizers and metal anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas-Valencia, Andres M.; Adornato, Lori; Short, R. Timothy; Langebrake, Larry [SRI International, Engineering and Systems Division, Marine Technology Program, 140 Seventh Avenue South, St Petersburg, FL 33701 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The work reported herein demonstrates a novel method to improve the overall performance of thin-form-factor galvanic cells, fabricated via micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) processes. Use of solid, low cost, cyclic-halogenated, organic catholyte materials permits water activation of cells consisting of metal anode and catalytic platinum positive electrodes. Similar cells, employing aluminum and zinc anodes, have been activated using sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solutions, i.e. bleach, in the past. The oxidizers chosen for this study (bromo-, chloro- and iodo-succinimides, and sodium dichloroisocyanuric acid) supply the cathode's oxy-halogenated ions when in contact with water. Zinc, magnesium and aluminum anodes are utilized to fabricate galvanic cells. A comparison between these anodes, coupled with various oxidizers, is included herein. Results using aluminum anode cells show that, even though the utilization efficiency of the catholyte reagents is low (faradic efficiencies between 16 and 19%), the performance of the new water-activated cells (6 cm x 6 cm x 0.25 cm) is superior when compared to those activated with bleach. For instance, operational lives of 6 h (activation with 10% NaClO solution) increase to more than 30 h using the new approach, with a 100-ohm-load. It is also shown that specific energies of 90-110 Wh kg{sup -1} (calculated to include both reagent and packaging mass) could be obtained using the described approach with current draws between 10 and 20 mA. The specific energies obtained suggest that novel MEMS-type cells could have much broader application than low-current, bleach-activated cells. (author)

  11. Decomposition of halogenated organic chemicals in ionic liquid by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, A.; Taguchi, M.; Kojima, T.; Nagaishi, R.; Hiratsuka, H.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Halogenated organic chemicals such as polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorobiphenyls and hexachlorobenzene are widely spread in water environment. These pollutants are persistent against advanced oxidation treatments such as ozone/UV, ozone/hydrogen peroxide, ionizing radiation and photocatalysts. The ionizing radiation, however, can also produce homogeneously and quantitatively reducing species in water. On the other hand, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have unique properties such as nonflammable, high polarity, low melting point, hydrophobicity and wide electrochemical window. The combined method of reduction by ionizing radiation and RTILs is investigated as a new environmental conservation technology. Experimental: Chlorophenol (CP) is selected as model chemicals having the main frame of halogenated organic chemicals. Each o - , m - and p-CP were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray in each diethylmethyl(2-methoxy-ethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (DEMMA- TFSI), diethylmethyl(2-methoxyethyl)-ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DEMMA-BF4), methanol and ethanol as solvent. Decomposition of CP and formation of irradiation products were studied using HPLC, LC-MS and ion chromatography. Results and discussion: Concentration of CP in each solution decreased as a function of dose. G-value was estimated from the slope at the primary stage of the decomposition curve. The G(-CP) and G(Phenol) were shown in Table 1. G(-CP) in the aliphatic alcohols was 0.21 to 0.37, which is lower than G-value of reducing species in the alcohols, e.g. G=1.0 to 1.5 for solvated electron. Since the rate constant for reaction of CP with hydrated electron is 1.3 x 10 9 mol -1 ·dm 3 ·s -1 , the reverse reaction is considered to attribute. G(-CP) in DEMMA-TFSI or DEMMA-BF4 was about 2 to 3 times higher than that in each alcohol. Lifetime of the reducing species in RTILs would be longer than that in each alcohol. G(-CP) in DEMMA-TFSI decreased by adding acetone or oxygen

  12. Evaluation of trace organic contaminants in ultra-pure water production processes by measuring total organic halogen formation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Kohei; Iwase, Yoko

    1984-01-01

    A new procedure for the determination of organic substances in water with high accuracy and high sensitivity was proposed, in which a hypochlorite is added to water, and the resultant total amount of organic halogen compounds (TOX formation potential) was measured, and it was applied to the evaluation of trace organic contaminants in ultra-pure water production process. In this investigation, the TOX formation potential of the raw water which was to be used for the ultra-pure water production process, intermediately treated water and ultra-pure water was measured to clarify the behavior of organic substances in the ultra-pure water production process and to demonstrate the usefulness of this procedure to evaluate trace organic contaminants in water. The measurement of TOX formation potential requires no specific technical skill, and only a short time, and gives accurate results, therefore, it is expected that the water quality control in the ultra-pure water production process can be performed more exactly by applying this procedure. (Yoshitake, I.)

  13. The gas-chromatographic and gas-chromatographic-mass-spectrometric identification of halogen-containing organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaspov, B. V.; Zenkevich, I. G.; Rodin, A. A.

    1989-09-01

    The problem of identifying halogen-containing organic compounds in their gas-chromatographic and gas-chromatographic-mass-spectrometric (GC-MS) determination in different materials has been examined. Particular attention has been paid not to the complete characterisation of methods for carrying out this analysis but to the most important problem of increasing the selectivity at the stages of sampling, separation, and interpretation of the gas-chromatographic and GC-MS information. The bibliography contains 292 references.

  14. Determination of inorganic arsenic in algae using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction followed by hydride generation atomic flourescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate, stable and fast analysis of toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in complicated and arsenosugar-rich algae matrix is always a challenge. Herein, a novel analytical method for iAs in algae was reported, using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by hydrid...

  15. Exhaled human breath measurement method for assessing exposure to halogenated volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, J D; Lindstrom, A B

    1997-05-01

    The organic constituents of exhaled human breath are representative of blood-borne concentrations through gas exchange in the blood/breath interface in the lungs. The presence of specific compounds can be an indicator of recent exposure or represent a biological response of the subject. For volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sampling and analysis of breath is preferred to direct measurement from blood samples because breath collection is noninvasive, potentially infectious waste is avoided, and the measurement of gas-phase analytes is much simpler in a gas matrix rather than in a complex biological tissue such as blood. To exploit these advantages, we have developed the "single breath canister" (SBC) technique, a simple direct collection method for individual alveolar breath samples, and adapted conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytical methods for trace-concentration VOC analysis. The focus of this paper is to describe briefly the techniques for making VOC measurements in breath, to present some specific applications for which these methods are relevant, and to demonstrate how to estimate exposure to example VOCs on the basis of breath elimination. We present data from three different exposure scenarios: (a) vinyl chloride and cis-1,2-dichloroethene from showering with contaminated water from a private well, (b) chloroform and bromodichloromethane from high-intensity swimming in chlorinated pool water, and (c) trichloroethene from a controlled exposure chamber experiment. In all cases, for all subjects, the experiment is the same: preexposure breath measurement, exposure to halogenated VOC, and a postexposure time-dependent series of breath measurements. Data are presented only to demonstrate the use of the method and how to interpret the analytical results.

  16. Environmental health sciences center task force review on halogenated organics in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinzer, M; Schaumburg, F; Klein, E

    1978-06-01

    The disinfection of drinking water by chlorination has in recent years come under closer scrutiny because of the potential hazards associated with the production of stable chlorinated organic chemicals. Organic chemical contaminants are common to all water supplies and it is now well-established that chlorinated by-products are obtained under conditions of disinfection, or during tertiary treatment of sewage whose products can ultimately find their way into drinking water supplies. Naturally occurring humic substances which are invariably present in drinking waters are probably the source of chloroform and other halogenated methanes, and chloroform has shown up in every water supply investigated thus far.The Environmental Protection Agency is charged with the responsibility of assessing the public health effects resulting from the consumption of contaminated drinking water. It has specifically undertaken the task of determining whether organic contaminants or their chlorinated derivatives have a special impact, and if so, what alternatives there are to protect the consumer against bacterial and viral diseases that are transmitted through infected drinking waters. The impetus to look at these chemicals is not entirely without some prima facie evidence of potential trouble. Epidemiological studies suggested a higher incidence of cancer along the lower Mississippi River where the contamination from organic chemicals is particularly high. The conclusions from these studies have, to be sure, not gone unchallenged.The task of assessing the effects of chemicals in the drinking water is a difficult one. It includes many variables, including differences in water supplies and the temporal relationship between contamination and consumption of the finished product. It must also take into account the relative importance of the effects from these chemicals in comparison to those from occupational exposure, ingestion of contaminated foods, inhalation of polluted air, and many

  17. Remediation of sandy soils contaminated with hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons by soil vapour extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergaria, José Tomás; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria da Conceição M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents the study of the remediation of sandy soils containing six of the most common contaminants (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene) using soil vapour extraction (SVE). The influence of soil water content on the process efficiency was evaluated considering the soil type and the contaminant. For artificially contaminated soils with negligible clay contents and natural organic matter it was concluded that: (i) all the remediation processes presented efficiencies above 92%; (ii) an increase of the soil water content led to a more time-consuming remediation; (iii) longer remediation periods were observed for contaminants with lower vapour pressures and lower water solubilities due to mass transfer limitations. Based on these results an easy and relatively fast procedure was developed for the prediction of the remediation times of real soils; 83% of the remediation times were predicted with relative deviations below 14%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationship between centrifugation and drying of sludge and the organic halogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Hrich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on determination of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX concentration in the digested sludge from the sewage treatment plant and the losses of this component during dewatering and drying of sludge. Drying of the sludge from wastewater treatment plant is not extended too much in Czech Republic. In this work, the AOX are monitored, because AOX is one of the limits restraining use of the sludge on an agricultural land. Another reason is technological demand for using the sludge in cement processing, because chlorine in AOX can cause decrease in a heat transfer effect in a cement kiln. It is clear from the results that both centrifuged and dried sludge from the sewage treatment plant Brno fulfilled limits for using sludge on agriculture land. They can also be composted, in case they meet other requirements. If not, it is a possibility of co-incineration in cement kiln. In such case, limit for total chlorine including the AOX is required too. This limit was not exceeded. Another aim was to calculate a mass balance of AOX during the centrifugation and drying processes. It was found out, that after centrifugation the main part of AOX remained in the centrifuged sludge (96.4 %. The rest was drawn-off with reject water. 60 % of AOX in the reject water were dissolved compounds. A similar situation occurred during the drying process. More than 99 % of AOX was bound in the dried sludge. The air and vaporised water contained such quantity of AOX, which corresponded with the amount of the dust in the air and the amount of particles of sludge in vaporised water.

  19. Reactive and organic halogen species in three different European coastal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Peters

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of three field campaigns using active longpath DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy for the study of reactive halogen species (RHS BrO, IO, OIO and I2. Two recent field campaigns took place in Spring 2002 in Dagebüll at the German North Sea Coast and in Spring 2003 in Lilia at the French Atlantic Coast of Brittany. In addition, data from a campaign in Mace Head, Ireland in 1998 was partly re-evaluated. During the recent field campaigns volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs were determined by a capillary gas chromatograph coupled with an electron capture detector and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (GC/ECD-ICPMS in air and water. Due to the inhomogeneous distribution of macroalgae at the German North Sea Coast we found a clear connection between elevated levels of VHOCs and the appearance of macroalgae. Extraordinarily high concentrations of several VHOCs, especially CH3I and CH3Br of up to 1830 pptv and 875 pptv, respectively, were observed at the coast of Brittany, demonstrating the outstanding level of bioactivity there. We found CH2I2 at levels of up to 20 pptv, and a clear anti-correlation with the appearance of IO. The IO mixing ratio reached up to 7.7±0.5 ppt(pmol/mol during the day, in reasonable agreement with model studies designed to represent the meteorological and chemical conditions in Brittany. For the two recent campaigns the DOAS spectra were evaluated for BrO, OIO and I2, but none of these species could be clearly identified (average detection limits around 2 ppt, 3 ppt, 20 ppt, resp., significantly higher in individual cases. Only in the Mace Head spectra evidence was found for the presence of OIO. Since macroalgae under oxidative stress are suggested to be a further source for I2 in the marine boundary layer, we re-analyzed spectra in the 500–600 nm range taken during the 1998 PARFORCE campaign in Mace Head, Ireland, which had not previously been analyzed for I2. We

  20. Reactive and Organic Halogen Species in Three Different European Coastal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, U.; Peters, C.; Pechtl, S.

    2005-12-01

    Within this contribution results of three field campaigns using active longpath DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) for the study of reactive halogen species (RHS) BrO, IO, OIO and I2 are presented. Two recent field campaigns took place in Spring 2002 in Dagebuell at the German North Sea Coast and 2003 in Lilia at the French Atlantic Coast of Brittany. Both sites represent coastal environments, characterized by extended intertidal zones and a moderately polluted atmosphere, with NO2 levels of up to 8 ppb. However, the sites show strong differences in their respective bioactivity. A great variety of macroalgae appeared over extended areas in Brittany, whereas algae were localized in small and rare spots at the German North Sea Coast. During these field campaigns volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs) were determined by GC/ECD-ICPMS in air and water. Due to the spatial distribution of macroalgae at the German North Sea Coast clear evidence was for a connection between elevated levels of VHOCs and the appearance of macroalgae. Extraordinarily high concentrations of several VHOCs, specially CH3I and CH3Br of up to 1830 pptv and 875 pptv, respectively, were observed at the coast of Brittany, demonstrating the outstanding level of bioactivity there. CH2I2, an important source species for reactive iodine in the atmosphere due its short photolytic lifetime of only a few minutes, could be detected of up to 20 pptv. The IO mixing ratio reached up to 7.7±0.5 ppt (pmol/mol) during the day, in reasonable agreement with model studies designed to represent the meteorological and chemical conditions in Brittany. Since macroalgae under oxidative stress are suggested to be a further source for I2 in the marine boundary layer, spectra in the 500-600 nm range were re-analyzed taken during the 1998 PARFORCE campaign in Mace Head, Ireland, which had not previously been analyzed for I2. Molecular iodine could be clearly identified above the detection limit (~20

  1. Labelling of some iodinated organic compounds by halogen exchange in organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaba, E.; Suhybani, A.Al-; Khowaiter, S.Al-; Abdel-Wahid, M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a general method for labelling Rose Bengal in an organic medium. An isotopic exchange technique with interactive iodine as carrier for radioiodine is used. The effect of temperature, carrier, pH of the solvent and solvent are investigated. The optimum conditions for maximum yield of exchange are: .0.2 micro mole carrier inactive iodine per one micro mole of Rose Bengal, reaction mixture is 10ml ethyl alcohol 96% as a solvent for Rose Bengal and 3ml of ether or carbon tetrachloride containing the inactive and radioiodine. In case of ether, the reaction is slow and is completed in two hours with maximum yield of 90% at boiling temperature. Addition of 175 λ of 1 M acetate buffer with carbon tetrachloride gave a yield of 90% in one hour. This method can be applied successfully to label any iodinated organic compound, such as hypuran, thyroxine, tyrosine or aliphatic fatty acids, for application in nuclear medicine. 10 Ref

  2. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

    2008-01-01

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S and GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S and GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more

  3. Removal of halogenated organic compounds in landfill gas by top covers containing zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Winther, K.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Transformation of gaseous CCl3F and CCl4 by zero-valent iron was studied in systems unsaturated with water under anaerobic conditionssin an N2 gas and in a landfill gas atmosphere. The transformation was studied in batch as well as flow-through column tests. In both systems, the transformation....... During continuous aerobic conditions, the transformation of CCl3F decreased toward zero. Model calculations show that use of zero-valent iron in landfill top covers is a potential treatment technology for emission reduction of halogenated trace compounds from landfills....

  4. Basic aspects of photocatalytic detoxification of organic halogens by TiO2 nanocrystallites. Photolytic and radiolytic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabani, J.

    1998-01-01

    Various forms of TiO 2 (nanocrystallites in colloid solutions, powders and layers) are considered as promising photocatalysts for detoxification of persistent organic chemicals which are present as pollutants in waste water effluents from industrial manufacturers and even from regular households. Such pollutants penetrate and reach water sources and must be removed or destroyed in order to prevent damage to people or to the environment. Some of the toxins, such as organic halogenated compounds is difficult to remove by moderate chemical redox reactions, but can be mineralized by a free radical mechanism. Pilot plants for detoxification of industrial wastes on TiO 2 surface are currently being tested in several countries. In view of this recent development it is of particular interest to investigate yields of the reactive intermediates and reaction mechanisms of reactions of representative organic substrates. Such work is presently going on in many laboratories. In the present contribution we focus on the nature of the primary oxidizing species and the possible ways to increase photolytic yields, with particular attention to chain reactions in organic halogen compounds. Although the work concerns photocatalysis, radiation chemistry may provide useful results regarding kinetic parameters and comparative tests. Thus, comparison between photocatalytic (TiO 2 ), radiolytic and chemical hydroxylations of phenol provides evidence that the reactive hydroxylation agent is an OH· radical adsorbed to the TiO 2 surface. The initial photochemical products are conduction band electrons and valence band holes in the TiO 2 nanocrystallites, which become 'trapped' within less than 30 ps. (author)

  5. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, J.G.; Meznarich, H.K.; Olsen, J.R.; Ross, G.A.; Stauffer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively

  6. Isostructurality and non-isostructurality in the series of halogenated organic crystal substances. The structure of Hal-aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grineva, O.V.; Zorkij, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Local characteristics and the type of intermolecular Hal-aggregates (ensembles of contacting halogen atoms of adjacent molecules) present in chemically similar halogenated crystal substances, differing only in the nature of Hal atoms, are compared. 23 series of halogenated hydrocarbons, including 57 crystal structures were considered. A clearly pronounced specificity of Hal-aggregates for compounds with a low and intermediate content of halogen was revealed. It was found that, as a rule, coordination number of Hal atom by Hal adjacent atoms increases in the series F-Cl-Br-I [ru

  7. Biogeochemistry of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, P.; Gruden, C.; McCormick, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons originate from both natural and industrial sources. Whereas direct anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and biosphere are often easy to assess, particularly when they are tied to major industrial activities, the attribution of emissions to other human activities (e.g., biomass burning), diffuse sources (e.g., atmospheric discharge, run off), and natural production (e.g., soils, fungi, algae, microorganisms) are difficult to quantify. The widespread occurrence of both alkyl and aryl halides in groundwater, surface water, soils, and various trophic food chains, even those not affected by known point sources, suggests a substantial biogeochemical cycling of these compounds (Wania and Mackay, 1996; Adriaens et al., 1999; Gruden et al., 2003). The transport and reactive fate mechanisms controlling their reactivity are compounded by the differences in sources of alkyl-, aryl-, and complex organic halides, and the largely unknown impact of biogenic processes, such as enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter, fungal production of halogenated hydrocarbons, and microbial or abiotic transformation reactions (e.g., Asplund and Grimvall, 1991; Gribble, 1996; Watling and Harper, 1998; Oberg, 2002). The largest source may be the natural halogenation processes in the terrestrial environment, as the quantities detected often exceed the amount that can be explained by human activities in the surrounding areas ( Oberg, 1998). Since biogeochemical processes result in the distribution of a wide range of halogenated hydrocarbon profiles, altered chemical structures, and isomer distributions in natural systems, source apportionment (or environmental forensics) can often only be resolved using multivariate statistical methods (e.g., Goovaerts, 1998; Barabas et al., 2003; Murphy and Morrison, 2002).This chapter will describe the widespread occurrence of halogenated hydrocarbons, interpret their distribution and biogeochemical cycling in light of

  8. Determination of adsorbable organic halogens in surface water samples by combustion-microcoulometry versus combustion-ion chromatography titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinani, Aziz; Sa Lhi, Hacène; Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Kinani, Said

    2018-03-02

    Adsorbable Organic Halogen (AOX) is an analytical parameter of considerable interest since it allows to evaluate the amount of organohalogen disinfection by-products (OXBPs) present in a water sample. Halogen speciation of AOX into adsorbable organic chlorine, bromine and iodine, respectively AOCl, AOBr and AOI, is extremely important since it has been shown that iodinated and brominated organic by-products tend to be more toxic than their chlorinated analogues. Chemical speciation of AOX can be performed by combustion-ion chromatography (C-IC). In the present work, the effectiveness of the nitrate wash according to ISO 9562 standard method protocol to eliminate halide ions interferences was firstly examined. False positive AOX values were observed when chloride concentration exceeded 100 ppm. The improvements made to the washing protocol have eliminated chloride interference for concentrations up to 1000 ppm. A C-IC method for chemical speciation of AOX into AOCl, AOBr, and AOI has been developed and validated. The most important analytical parameters were investigated. The following optimal conditions were established: an aqueous solution containing 2.4 mM sodium bicarbonate/2.0 mM sodium carbonate, and 2% acetone (v/v) as mobile phase, 2 mL of aqueous sodium thiosulfate (500 ppm) as absorption solution, 0.2 mL min -1 as water inlet flow rate for hydropyrolysis, and 10 min as post-combustion time. The method was validated according to NF T90-210 standard method. Calibration curves fitted through a quadratic equation show coefficients of determination (r 2 ) greater than 0.9998, and RSD less than 5%. The LOQs were 0.9, 4.3, and 5.7 μg L -1 Cl for AOCl, AOBr, and AOI, respectively. The accuracy, in terms of relative error, was within a ± 10% interval. The applicability of the validated method was demonstrated by the analysis of twenty four water samples from three rivers in France. The measurements reveals AOX amounts above 10

  9. Chemical cleaning-associated generation of dissolved organic matter and halogenated byproducts in ceramic MBR: Ozone versus hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Liu, Hang; Han, Jiarui; Zhang, Xiangru; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2018-04-24

    This study characterized the dissolved organic matter (DOM) and byproducts generated after the exposure of activated sludge to ozone and NaClO in ceramic MBR. It was found that NaClO triggered more significant release of DOM than ozone. Proteins with the molecular weight greater than 20 kDa and humic acid like-substances were the principal components of DOM generated by NaClO, while ozone was found to effectively degrade larger biopolymers to low molecular weight substances. The results showed that more than 80% of DOM generated by NaClO and ozone could pass through the 0.2-μm ceramic membrane. Furthermore, total organic chlorine (TOCl) was determined to be the principal species of halogenated byproducts in both cases, while the generation of TOCl by NaClO was much more significant than that by ozone. Only a small fraction of TOCl was removed by the 0.2-μm ceramic membrane. More importantly, the toxic bioassays further revealed that the supernatant of sludge suspension and permeate in the MBR with NaClO cleaning exhibited higher developmental toxicity to the polychaete embryos than those by ozone. The results clearly showed that on-line chemical cleaning with ozone should be a more eco-friendly and safer approach for sustaining long-term membrane permeability in ceramic MBR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

    1987-08-21

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  11. Determination of tetrachloroethylene and other volatile halogenated organic compounds in oil wastes by headspace SPME GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, D.; Bezzi, R.; Torri, C.; Galletti, P.; Tagliavini, E. [Bologna Univ., Ravenna (Italy). Lab. of Chemistry, C.I.R.S.A

    2007-09-15

    Oil wastes and slops are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, which may contain a variety of contaminants including tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) and other volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs). The analytical determination of PCE at trace levels in petroleum-derived matrices is difficult to carry out in the presence of large amounts of hydrocarbon matrix components. In the following study, we demonstrate that headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with GC-MS analysis can be applied for the rapid measurement of PCE concentration in oil samples. The HS-SPME method was developed using liquid paraffin as matrix matching reference material for external and internal calibration and optimisation of experimental parameters. The limit of quantitation was 0.05 mg kg{sup -1}, and linearity was established up to 25 mg kg{sup -1}. The HS-SPME method was extended to several VHOCs, including trichloroethylene (TCE) in different matrices and was applied to the quantitative analysis of PCE and TCE in real samples.

  12. Typical halogenated persistent organic pollutants in indoor dust and the associations with childhood asthma in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Feng, Yan; Wu, Xiaomeng; Yin, Yong; Wang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Halogenated persistent organic pollutants (Hal-POPs) are significant contaminants in the indoor environment that are related to many human diseases. Ingestion of indoor dust is considered the major pathway of Hal-POP exposures, especially for children aged 3-6 years. Alongside a retrospective study on the associations between typical Hal-POP exposure and childhood asthma in Shanghai, indoor dust samples from asthmatic and non-asthmatic children's homes (n = 60, each) were collected. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured by GC-MS. BDE-209, PCB-8 and p,p'-DDE were the predominant components in each chemical category. The concentrations of most Hal-POPs were significantly higher in the asthmatic families. The associations between Hal-POP exposure and asthma occurrence were examined by calculating the odds ratios (ORs) using a logistic regression model. A positive association was found between p,p'-DDE in indoor dust and childhood asthma (OR = 1.825, 95%CI: 1.004, 3.317; p = 0.048). The average daily doses of Hal-POP intake were calculated using the method provided by the USEPA. Non-carcinogenic health risks were preliminarily assessed. Our study indicated that exposure to p,p'-DDE via indoor dust may contribute to childhood asthma occurrence. Non-carcinogenic health risks were not found with the intake of Hal-POPs via the ingestion of indoor dust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) in sediment from a highly eutrophicated lake, China: occurrence, distribution and mass inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Zhong; Liu, Liang-Ying; Zhang, Kai; Liang, Bo; Li, Guo-Lian; Chen, Tian-Hu

    2012-11-01

    Halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) including 16 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 37 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 49 surfacial sediments from Chaohu Lake, a highly eutrophicated lake, China. PBDEs were detected in almost samples with the range of the total concentration (defined as Σ(16)PBDEs) from 0.84 to 86.6 ng g(-1). Compared with the occurrence of PBDEs in Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta in China, lower percentage of BDE-209 over the concentration of Σ(16)PBDEs was inferred by the high-volume application of penta-BDE mixture product for local domestic furniture purpose. The total concentration of 37 PCBs (Σ(37)PCBs) ranged from 0.05 to 3.36 ng g(-1) with the most detection of PCB-1, -4, -52 and -71. Both the concentrations of Σ(16)PBDE and Σ(37)PCB poorly correlated with total organic carbon (TOC), suggesting the significant contribution of phytoplankton organic carbons to sediment TOC. The contamination by PBDEs and PCBs in western region of the lake was significantly more serious than in eastern lake. Our findings about the higher residues of PBDEs and PCBs in sediments at the estuary of Nanfei River compared to the other estuaries also supported the conclusion that urban area (Hefei city) was the main source of PBDEs and PCBs. The comparison with the concentration of HOC in the present study with those in other lacustrine sediments around the world suggested the contamination by PBDEs in Chaohu Lake is at middle of the global concentration range, whereas PCBs is at low end of the global range which could be elucidated by local economic development and historical usage of PBDEs and PCBs. The mass inventories of HOCs in the lake were estimated at 561 and 38 kg, which corresponds to only 0.000006% and 0.0001% of these global historical produce volumes, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of inorganic arsenic in algae using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction followed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihong; Qi, Yuehan; Qin, Deyuan; Liu, Jixin; Mao, Xuefei; Chen, Guoying; Wei, Chao; Qian, Yongzhong

    2017-08-01

    Accurate, stable and fast analysis of toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in complicated and arsenosugar-rich algae matrix is always a challenge. Herein, a novel analytical method for iAs in algae was reported, using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The separation of iAs from algae was first performed by nonpolar SPE sorbent using Br - for arsenic halogenation. Algae samples were extracted with 1% perchloric acid. Then, 1.5mL extract was reduced by 1% thiourea, and simultaneously reacted (for 30min) with 50μL of 10% KBr for converting iAs to AsBr 3 after adding 3.5mL of 70% HCl to 5mL. A polystyrene (PS) resin cartridge was employed to retain arsenicals, which were hydrolyzed, eluted from the PS resin with H 2 O, and categorized as iAs. The total iAs was quantified by HG-AFS. Under optimum conditions, the spiked recoveries of iAs in real algae samples were in the 82-96% range, and the method achieved a desirable limit of detection of 3μgkg -1 . The inter-day relative standard deviations were 4.5% and 4.1% for spiked 100 and 500μgkg -1 respectively, which proved acceptable for this method. For real algae samples analysis, the highest presence of iAs was found in sargassum fusiforme, followed by kelp, seaweed and laver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating the Impact of Ecological Succession on Fluxes of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds (HVOCs) from Retreating Glacier Forefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, M.; Young, D.; O'Doherty, S.; Wadham, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic is one of the fastest warming regions of the Earth, with temperature increases of +7oC projected by 2100 under a mitigation emission scenario. These climate perturbations are forecast to cause the retreat of extensive glacial systems across Canada, Greenland, Svalbard and the Russian Arctic. This will reveal new proglacial land surfaces for microbial colonisation, ultimately succeeding to tundra over decades to centuries. A relatively unexplored dimension to these changes is their impact upon the emission and consumption of halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) from proglacial land surfaces. HVOCs are involved in several important atmospheric processes such as ozone destruction and aerosol formation and despite considerable research, uncertainties remain in the natural cycles of some of these compounds. Here, we investigated the influence of biological process on the fluxes of HVOCs from recently (chambers on surfaces spanning recently-exposed sediments, to approx. 100 yr old tundra in front of Midtre Lovenbreen glacier, Svalbard. In-field analysis of a suite of HVOCs was conducted using a GCMS (gas chromatograph mass spectrometer) with a custom-built pre-concentration system. HVOC concentrations were evaluated with reference to biological (e.g. cell numbers) and physio-chemical (e.g. water content) parameters of the land surface, in order to assess the importance of the microbial community on the net flux. Significant rates of consumption of some HVOC species and production of others was detected. Further laboratory incubations supported the findings in the field. Proglacial surfaces are, therefore, a previously unrecognised sink and source of various HVOCs that have the potential to increase in importance with projected future climate change.

  16. Evaluation of modulators and electron-capture detectors for comprehensive two-dimensional GC of halogenated organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristenson, E.M.; Korytar, P.; Danielsson, C.; Kallio, M.; Brandt, M.; Makela, J.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Beens, J.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    2003-01-01

    Different cryogenic and a heated GC×GC modulator(s) were evaluated and compared for the analysis of high-boiling halogenated compounds. The cryogenic modulators investigated were: (i) the longitudinally modulated cryogenic system; (ii) the liquid-nitrogen-cooled jet modulator (KT2001); (iii) a

  17. Extraction of scandium by organic substance melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, V.P.; Lobanov, F.I.; Zebreva, A.I.; Andreeva, N.N.; Manuilova, O.A.; Il'yukevich, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    Regularities of scandium extraction by the melts of octadecanicoic acid, n-carbonic acids of C 17 -C 20 commerical fraction and mixtures of tributylphosphate (TBP) with paraffin at (70+-1) deg C have been studied. The optimum conditions for scandium extraction in the melt of organic substances are determined. A scheme of the extraction by the melts of higher carbonic acids at ninitial metal concentrations of 10 -5 to 10 -3 mol/l has been suggested. The scandium compound has been isolated in solid form, its composition having been determined. The main advantages of extraction by melts are as follows: a possibility to attain high distribution coefficients, distinct separation of phases after extraction, the absence of emulsions, elimination of employing inflammable and toxic solvents, a possibility of rapid X-ray fluorescence determinatinon of scandium directly in solid extract

  18. Typical halogenated persistent organic pollutants in indoor dust and the associations with childhood asthma in Shanghai, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Feng, Yan; Wu, Xiaomeng; Yin, Yong; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Halogenated persistent organic pollutants (Hal-POPs) are significant contaminants in the indoor environment that are related to many human diseases. Ingestion of indoor dust is considered the major pathway of Hal-POP exposures, especially for children aged 3–6 years. Alongside a retrospective study on the associations between typical Hal-POP exposure and childhood asthma in Shanghai, indoor dust samples from asthmatic and non-asthmatic children's homes (n = 60, each) were collected. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured by GC–MS. BDE-209, PCB-8 and p,p′-DDE were the predominant components in each chemical category. The concentrations of most Hal-POPs were significantly higher in the asthmatic families. The associations between Hal-POP exposure and asthma occurrence were examined by calculating the odds ratios (ORs) using a logistic regression model. A positive association was found between p,p′-DDE in indoor dust and childhood asthma (OR = 1.825, 95%CI: 1.004, 3.317; p = 0.048). The average daily doses of Hal-POP intake were calculated using the method provided by the USEPA. Non-carcinogenic health risks were preliminarily assessed. Our study indicated that exposure to p,p’-DDE via indoor dust may contribute to childhood asthma occurrence. Non-carcinogenic health risks were not found with the intake of Hal-POPs via the ingestion of indoor dust. - Highlights: • Three POP species were measured in indoor dust from the homes of asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. • The concentrations of BDE-47/-99/-209, PCB-8/-49 and p,p’-DDE were significantly higher in the case group. • p,p′-DDE showed positive association with childhood asthma occurrence. • Hal-POP exposure via ingestion of indoor dust was not associated with non-carcinogenic health risks. - The concentrations of select Hal-POPs in dust were determined, and a positive association was found between p

  19. Primary investigation on contamination pattern of legacy and emerging halogenated organic pollutions in freshwater fish from Liaohe River, Northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Guofa, E-mail: rgf2008@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhao, Wang [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhiqiang, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yang, Wang [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Shengtao, Ma [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Minghong, Wu [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Guoying, Sheng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jiamo, Fu [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Legacy halogenated compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and emerging organo-halogen pollutants such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in fish from an old industrial region in Northeast China. PCBs and PBDEs were detected in all of the samples, with concentrations ranging from 38.15 to 170.51 ng/g lipid weight, and 9.40-39.69 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. DP was detected in more than 90% of the samples with concentrations ranging from not detected (ND) to 470 pg g/g lipid weight. Compared with similar data in other areas of the world, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in fish from Liaohe River were at medium or low level. An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China. Other halogenated pollutions, such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, octachlorostyrene, chlorinated anisole, chlorinated thioanisole, triclosan-methyl, and other pesticides, have also been identified in the fish samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP was reported in fish samples from river close to an old industrial base in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first report on the unusually high fraction of PCB-209 in samples from China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC Multiplication-Sign GC-TOFMS was used to identify non-targeted halogenated pollutants. - An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China, which might indicate that there were distinct sources of pure PCB-209 in the region of Liaohe River.

  20. Primary investigation on contamination pattern of legacy and emerging halogenated organic pollutions in freshwater fish from Liaohe River, Northeast China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Guofa; Wang Zhao; Yu Zhiqiang; Wang Yang; Ma Shengtao; Wu Minghong; Sheng Guoying; Fu Jiamo

    2013-01-01

    Legacy halogenated compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and emerging organo-halogen pollutants such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in fish from an old industrial region in Northeast China. PCBs and PBDEs were detected in all of the samples, with concentrations ranging from 38.15 to 170.51 ng/g lipid weight, and 9.40–39.69 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. DP was detected in more than 90% of the samples with concentrations ranging from not detected (ND) to 470 pg g/g lipid weight. Compared with similar data in other areas of the world, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in fish from Liaohe River were at medium or low level. An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China. Other halogenated pollutions, such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, octachlorostyrene, chlorinated anisole, chlorinated thioanisole, triclosan-methyl, and other pesticides, have also been identified in the fish samples. - Highlights: ► DP was reported in fish samples from river close to an old industrial base in China. ► The first report on the unusually high fraction of PCB-209 in samples from China. ► GC × GC–TOFMS was used to identify non-targeted halogenated pollutants. - An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China, which might indicate that there were distinct sources of pure PCB-209 in the region of Liaohe River.

  1. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Halogenated fatty acids are the major contributors to organohalogen compounds in lipids of marine mammals, fish, and bivalves. For the initial characterization of these recently noticed compounds, a determination of the halogen concentration has usually been combined with some lipid isolation......), atomic emission spectrometry, and mass spectrometry. For most environmental samples, chlorinated FAMEs must be enriched prior to GC. ELCD is a useful detection method for indicating halogenated FAMEs in the chromatograms, and tentative identification of the halogenated species can be obtained...

  2. Molecular activation analysis for organo-halogen contaminants in yogurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Chai Zhifang

    2004-01-01

    The concentrations of total halogen (TX), extractable organo-halogen (EOX), extractable persistent organo-halogen (EPOX), organo-chlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in 18 different yogurt specimens of 14 brands from Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shijiazhuang were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA), molecular activation analysis (MAA) and GC-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results indicated that the halogen in yogurt mainly existed as inorganic species and non-extractable organo-halogen compounds. About 1/3 to 1/4 of EOX was EPOX. Further, EOCl and EPOCl were the main organo-halogen species in yogurt. The average concentration of the unknown organo-chlorine was 96% of the EPOCl. HCHs and DDTs were still the main contaminants of OCPs in the yogurt of interest. Also, PCB202, PCB103 and PCB208 were the main contaminants of PCBs. (authors)

  3. Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaic Modules Fabricated via Halogen-Free Solvent System with Roll-to-Roll Compatible Scalable Printing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Youn-Jung; Jung, Yen-Sook; Hwang, Kyeongil; Kim, Jueng-Eun; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sehyun; Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Donmin; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-11-15

    For the first time, the photovoltaic modules composed of small molecule were successfully fabricated by using roll-to-roll compatible printing techniques. In this study, blend films of small molecules, BTR and PC 71 BM were slot-die coated using a halogen-free solvent system. As a result, high efficiencies of 7.46% and 6.56% were achieved from time-consuming solvent vapor annealing (SVA) treatment and roll-to-roll compatible solvent additive approaches, respectively. After successful verification of our roll-to-roll compatible method on small-area devices, we further fabricated large-area photovoltaic modules with a total active area of 10 cm 2 , achieving a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.83%. This demonstration of large-area photovoltaic modules through roll-to-roll compatible printing methods, even based on a halogen-free solvent, suggests the great potential for the industrial-scale production of organic solar cells (OSCs).

  4. Analysis of halogenated and priority pesticides at different concentration levels. Automated SPE extraction followed by isotope dilution-GC/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planas, C.; Saulo, J.; Rivera, J.; Caixach, J. [Institut Investigacions Quimiques i Ambientals (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-09-15

    In this work, automatic SPE extraction of 16 pesticides and metabolites with the automated Power-Prep trademark system is evaluated at different concentration levels using polymeric (ENV+) and C{sub 18} sorbent phases. The method was optimised by comparing recoveries obtained using different eluting solvents. The optimised procedure was then applied to spiked water samples at concentration levels of 0.1{mu}g/L (quality standard for individual pesticides in drinking water) and 0.02{mu}g/L (close to the detection limit of most pesticides).

  5. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) is responsible for non-quantitative H2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer–Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems.

  6. Inkjet-Printed Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes: Halogen-Free Inks, Printing Optimization, and Large-Area Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Yang, Lei; Yu, Mengjie; Jiang, Yi; Liu, Cheng-Fang; Lai, Wen-Yong; Huang, Wei

    2017-11-22

    Manufacturing small-molecule organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) via inkjet printing is rather attractive for realizing high-efficiency and long-life-span devices, yet it is challenging. In this paper, we present our efforts on systematical investigation and optimization of the ink properties and the printing process to enable facile inkjet printing of conjugated light-emitting small molecules. Various factors on influencing the inkjet-printed film quality during the droplet generation, the ink spreading on the substrates, and its solidification processes have been systematically investigated and optimized. Consequently, halogen-free inks have been developed and large-area patterning inkjet printing on flexible substrates with efficient blue emission has been successfully demonstrated. Moreover, OLEDs manufactured by inkjet printing the light-emitting small molecules manifested superior performance as compared with their corresponding spin-cast counterparts.

  7. Determination of volatile organic hydrocarbons in water samples by solid-phase dynamic extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, Maik A; Yuan, Xue; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2007-03-01

    In the present study a headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction method coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPDE-GC/MS) for the trace determination of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons and benzene from groundwater samples was developed and evaluated. As target compounds, benzene as well as 11 chlorinated and brominated hydrocarbons (vinyl chloride, dichloromethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, bromoform) of environmental and toxicological concern were included in this study. The analytes were extracted using a SPDE needle device, coated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) with 10% embedded activated carbon phase (50-microm film thickness and 56-mm film length) and were analyzed by GC/MS in full-scan mode. Parameters that affect the extraction yield such as extraction and desorption temperature, salting-out, extraction and desorption flow rate, extraction volume and desorption volume, the number of extraction cycles, and the pre-desorption time have been evaluated and optimized. The linearity of the HS-SPDE-GC/MS method was established over several orders of magnitude. Method detection limits (MDLs) for the compounds investigated ranged between 12 ng/L for cis-dichloroethylene and trans-dichloroethylene and 870 ng/L for vinyl chloride. The method was thoroughly validated, and the precision at two concentration levels (0.1 mg/L and a concentration 5 times above the MDL) was between 3.1 and 16% for the analytes investigated. SPDE provides high sensitivity, short sample preparation and extraction times and a high sample throughput because of full automation. Finally, the applicability to real environmental samples is shown exemplarily for various groundwater samples from a former waste-oil recycling facility. Groundwater from the site showed a complex contamination with chlorinated volatile organic compounds and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. Determination of volatile organic hydrocarbons in water samples by solid-phase dynamic extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochmann, Maik A.; Schmidt, Torsten C. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Center for Applied Geoscience (ZAG), Tuebingen (Germany); Chair of Instrumental Analysis, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Yuan, Xue [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Center for Applied Geoscience (ZAG), Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    In the present study a headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction method coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPDE-GC/MS) for the trace determination of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons and benzene from groundwater samples was developed and evaluated. As target compounds, benzene as well as 11 chlorinated and brominated hydrocarbons (vinyl chloride, dichloromethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, bromoform) of environmental and toxicological concern were included in this study. The analytes were extracted using a SPDE needle device, coated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) with 10% embedded activated carbon phase (50-{mu}m film thickness and 56-mm film length) and were analyzed by GC/MS in full-scan mode. Parameters that affect the extraction yield such as extraction and desorption temperature, salting-out, extraction and desorption flow rate, extraction volume and desorption volume, the number of extraction cycles, and the pre-desorption time have been evaluated and optimized. The linearity of the HS-SPDE-GC/MS method was established over several orders of magnitude. Method detection limits (MDLs) for the compounds investigated ranged between 12 ng/L for cis-dichloroethylene and trans-dichloroethylene and 870 ng/L for vinyl chloride. The method was thoroughly validated, and the precision at two concentration levels (0.1 mg/L and a concentration 5 times above the MDL) was between 3.1 and 16% for the analytes investigated. SPDE provides high sensitivity, short sample preparation and extraction times and a high sample throughput because of full automation. Finally, the applicability to real environmental samples is shown exemplarily for various groundwater samples from a former waste-oil recycling facility. Groundwater from the site showed a complex contamination with chlorinated volatile organic compounds and aromatic hydrocarbons. (orig.)

  9. Organization of extracting molecules of the diamide type: link with the extracting properties?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meridiano, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of these studies is to establish a link between the different organizations of diamide extractants (used in the DIAMEX process) and their extracting properties. The effects of the key parameters leading the liquid-liquid extraction (concentration of extractant, nature of solute, activity of the aqueous phase, nature of the diluent and temperature) are studied: 1) at the supramolecular scale, with the characterization of the extractant organizations by vapor-pressure osmometry (VPO) and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS/SAXS) experiments; 2) at the molecular scale, with the quantification of the extracted solutes (water, nitric acid, metal nitrate) and the determination of extracted complexes stoichiometries by electro-spray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) experiments. The DMDOHEMA molecule acts as a classical surfactant and forms aggregates of the reverse micelle type. Taking into account the established supramolecular diagrams, a quantitative link between the extractants structures and their extracting properties has been brought to light. To model the europium nitrate extraction, two approaches have been developed: - an approach based on mass action laws. Extractions equilibria have been proposed taking into account the supramolecular speciation; - an innovative approach considering the extracted ions as adsorbed on a specific surface of the extractant molecule which depends on the extractant organization state. The ion extraction can be considered as a sum of isotherms corresponding to the different states of organization. This approach allows to compare the extraction efficiency of an extracting molecule as a function of its organization state. (author)

  10. Uranium extraction from colofanite via organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Valeria Aparecida Leitao

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the use of pure or combined extractants dissolved in organic solvents for quantitative uranium recovery from colofanite, a fluoroapatite ore, from Itataia, Santa Quiteria, Ceara, Brazil. This ore contains the highest brazilian uranium reserve. The metal is associated to phosphate species. The ore is digested with sulfuric acid (wet process), producing phosphoric acid, which is used for manufacturing of fertilizers and animal food. >From the acid leaching, some systems for uranium recovery were tested. Among them, PC88A (2-ethyl-hexyl phosphonic acid, mono-2-ethyl-hexyl ester) 40% vol. and DEHPA (di(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid) 40% vol. in kerosene presented the highest values for the distribution coefficient (D) for uranium. When synergistic systems were employed, the best results were obtained for DEHPA 40%vol. + PC88A 40%vol. and DEHPA 40% vol. + TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) 5% vol. in kerosene. 15% wt/v sodium carbonate was the best medium for uranium stripping and separation from iron, the main interfering element. Uranium was precipitated as sodium diuranate by adding sodium hydroxide (5,0 mol L -1 ). Thorium in the raffinate was extracted by TOPO (0,1% vol.) in cyclohexane. The radioactivity level of the final aqueous waste is similar to natural background, according to CNEN-NE 6.05 Norm. After neutralization, the solid can be co-processed, according to the Directory 264 from the National Brazilian Environmental Council (CONAMA), whereas the treated effluent can be discarded according to the Directory 357 from CONAMA. (author)

  11. Greatly enhanced flux pinning properties of fluorine-free metal-organic decomposition YBCO films by co-addition of halogens (Cl, Br) and metals (Zr, Sn, Hf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoki, Takanori; Ikeda, Shuhei; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Honda, Genki; Nagaishi, Tatsuoki; Doi, Toshiya; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi

    2018-04-01

    Additive-free YBCO films, as well as those with halogen (X) added, metal (M) added and (X, M) co-added, have been prepared by the fluorine-free metal-organic decomposition method on SrTiO3(100) single crystalline substrates, where X = Cl, Br and M = Zr, Sn, Hf. It was revealed that the addition of both Cl and Br to the starting solution resulted in the generation of oxyhalide, Ba2Cu3O4 X 2, in the YBCO films, and that the oxyhalide was found to promote the bi-axial orientation of the YBCO crystals. By adding a decent amount of Cl or Br, highly textured YBCO films with high J c were reproducibly obtained, even when an impurity metal, M, was co-added, while the addition of M without X did not greatly improve J c owing to the poor bi-axial orientation of the YBCO crystals. Our results suggest that the addition of Br more effectively enhances J c than the addition of Cl. The pinning force density at 40 K in 4.8 T reached ˜55 GN m-3 with the co-addition of (Br, M). This value is much larger than that of the pure YBCO film, reaching ˜17 GN m-3.

  12. Retention of Halogenated Solutes on Stationary Phases Containing Heavy Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Miwa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To examine the effects of weak intermolecular interactions on solid-phase extraction (SPE and chromatographic separation, we synthesized some novel stationary phases with a heavy atom effect layer by immobilizing halogenated aromatic rings and hydroxyl groups onto the surface of a hydrophilic base polymer. Using SPE cartridges packed with the functionalized materials, we found that the heavy atom stationary phases could selectively retain halophenols in organic solvents, such as 1-propanol which blocks the hydrogen bonding, or acetonitrile which blocks the p-p interaction. The extraction efficiency of the materials toward the halophenols depended on the dipole moments of phenoxy groups present as functional groups. On the other hand, the extraction efficiency of solutes toward the functional group depended on their molar refractions, i.e., induced dipole moments. The retention of the solutes to the stationary phase ultimately depended on not only strong intermolecular interactions, but also the effects of weak interactions such as the dispersion force.

  13. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry

    2017-04-18

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (20), a first electrode (12), an emissive active stack (14), and a second electrode (18). At least one of the first and second electrodes (12, 18) is a light extracting electrode (26) having a metallic layer (28). The metallic layer (28) includes light scattering features (29) on and/or in the metallic layer (28). The light extracting features (29) increase light extraction from the organic light emitting diode (10).

  14. Apparatus for washing out halogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M; Hahn, J; Kroenig, W

    1941-03-26

    An apparatus is described for washing out of halogens and the like or liquid halogen compounds from the products, which are formed on pressure hydrogenation or splitting of carbon-containing material in the presence of halogens or halogen compounds, consisting of a washing apparatus installed between the reaction vessel and the hot separator, which is inclined in relatively small space for steam regulation and contains, with the steam, arranged baffles, especially spirals.

  15. Formation of bromate and halogenated disinfection byproducts during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of dissolved organic matter and CuO

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that significant bromate (BrO3-) can be formed via the CuO-catalyzed disproportionation of hypobromous acid (HOBr) pathway. In this study, the influence of CuO on the formation of BrO3- and halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes, THMs and haloacetic acids, HAAs) during chlorination of six dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolates was investigated. Only in the presence of slow reacting DOM (from treated Colorado River water, i.e., CRW-BF-HPO), significant BrO3- formation is observed, which competes with bromination of DOM (i.e., THM and HAA formation). Reactions between HOBr and 12 model compounds in the presence of CuO indicates that CuO-catalyzed HOBr disproportionation is completely inhibited by fast reacting phenols, while it predominates in the presence of practically unreactive compounds (acetone, butanol, propionic, and butyric acids). In the presence of slow reacting di- and tri-carboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, and citric acids), BrO3- formation varies, depending on its competition with bromoform and dibromoacetic acid formation (i.e., bromination pathway). The latter pathway can be enhanced by CuO due to the activation of HOBr. Therefore, increasing CuO dose (0-0.2 g L-1) in a reaction system containing chlorine, bromide, and CRW-BF-HPO enhances the formation of BrO3-, total THMs and HAAs. Factors including pH and initial reactant concentrations influence the DBP formation. These novel findings have implications for elevated DBP formation during transportation of chlorinated waters in copper-containing distribution systems.

  16. Modern and historical fluxes of halogenated organic contaminants to a lake in the Canadian arctic, as determined from annually laminated sediment cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, G.A.; Braekevelt, E.; Helm, P.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Outridge, P.M.; Lockhart, W.L.; McNeeley, R.; Rosenberg, B.; Ikonomou, M.G.; Hamilton, P.; Tomy, G.T.; Wilkinson, P.

    2005-01-01

    Two annually laminated cores collected from Lake DV09 on Devon Island in May 1999 were dated using 210 Pb and 137 Cs, and analyzed for a variety of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, short-chain polychlorinated n-alkanes (sPCAs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Dry weight HOC concentrations in Lake DV09 sediments were generally similar to other remote Arctic lakes. Maximum HOC fluxes often agreed well with production maxima, although many compound groups exhibited maxima at or near the sediment surface, much later than peak production. The lower than expected HOC concentrations in older sediment slices may be due to anaerobic degradation and possibly to dilution resulting from a temporary increase in sedimentation rate observed between the mid-1960s and 1970s. Indeed, temporal trends were more readily apparent for those compound classes when anaerobic metabolites were also analyzed, such as for DDT and toxaphene. However, it is postulated here for the first time that the maximum or increasing HOC surface fluxes observed for many of the major compound classes in DV09 sediments may be influenced by climate variation and the resulting increase in algal primary productivity which could drive an increasing rate of HOC scavenging from the water column. Both the fraction (F TC ) and enantiomer fraction (EF) of trans-chlordane (TC) decreased significantly between 1957 and 1997, suggesting that recent inputs to the lake are from weathered chlordane sources. PCDD/Fs showed a change in sources from pentachlorophenol (PeCP) in the 1950s and 1960s to combustion sources into the 1990s. Improvements in combustion technology may be responsible for the reducing the proportion of TCDF relative to OCDD in the most recent slice

  17. Formation of bromate and halogenated disinfection byproducts during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of dissolved organic matter and CuO

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2015-12-02

    Previous studies showed that significant bromate (BrO3-) can be formed via the CuO-catalyzed disproportionation of hypobromous acid (HOBr) pathway. In this study, the influence of CuO on the formation of BrO3- and halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes, THMs and haloacetic acids, HAAs) during chlorination of six dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolates was investigated. Only in the presence of slow reacting DOM (from treated Colorado River water, i.e., CRW-BF-HPO), significant BrO3- formation is observed, which competes with bromination of DOM (i.e., THM and HAA formation). Reactions between HOBr and 12 model compounds in the presence of CuO indicates that CuO-catalyzed HOBr disproportionation is completely inhibited by fast reacting phenols, while it predominates in the presence of practically unreactive compounds (acetone, butanol, propionic, and butyric acids). In the presence of slow reacting di- and tri-carboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, and citric acids), BrO3- formation varies, depending on its competition with bromoform and dibromoacetic acid formation (i.e., bromination pathway). The latter pathway can be enhanced by CuO due to the activation of HOBr. Therefore, increasing CuO dose (0-0.2 g L-1) in a reaction system containing chlorine, bromide, and CRW-BF-HPO enhances the formation of BrO3-, total THMs and HAAs. Factors including pH and initial reactant concentrations influence the DBP formation. These novel findings have implications for elevated DBP formation during transportation of chlorinated waters in copper-containing distribution systems.

  18. The role of different nonspecific interactions and halogen contacts in the crystal structure organization of 5-chloroisatoic anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Dorota; Matera-Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Listowski, Marcin; Janczak, Jan; Videnova-Adrabinska, Veneta

    2018-03-01

    The crystal structure of 6-chloro-2,4-dihydro-1H-3,1-benzoxazine-2,4-dione (5-chloroisatoic anhydride), C 8 H 4 ClNO 3 , has been determined and analysed in terms of connectivity and packing patterns. The compound crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric space group Pna2 1 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The role of different weak interactions is discussed with respect to three-dimensional network organization. Molecules are extended into one-dimensional helical arrangements, making use of N-H...O hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions. The helices are further organized into monolayers via weak C-H...O and lone pair-π interactions, and the monolayers are packed into a noncentrosymmetric three-dimensional architecture by C-Cl...π interactions and C-H...Cl and Cl...Cl contacts. A Hirshfeld surface (HS) analysis was carried out and two-dimensional (2D) fingerprint plots were generated to visualize the intermolecular interactions and to provide quantitative data for their relative contributions. In addition, tests of the antimicrobial activity and in vitro cytotoxity effects against fitoblast L929 were performed and are discussed.

  19. Organic solvents in electromembrane extraction: recent insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2016-01-01

    the introduction. Under the influence of an electrical field, EME is based on electrokinetic migration of the analytes through a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which is an organic solvent immobilized in the pores of the polymeric membrane, and into the acceptor solution. Up to date, close to 150 research...... articles with focus on EME have been published. The current review summarizes the performance of EME with different organic solvents and discusses several criteria for efficient solvents in EME. In addition, the authors highlight their personal perspective about the most promising organic solvents for EME...... and have indicated that more fundamental work is required to investigate and discover new organic solvents for EME....

  20. Marine mammal blubber reference and control materials for use in the determination of halogenated organic compounds and fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucklick, John R.; Pugh, Rebecca S.; Becker, Paul R. [Hollings Marine Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Charleston, SC (United States); Schantz, Michele M.; Porter, Barbara J.; Poster, Dianne L.; Leigh, Stefan; Wise, Stephen A. [NIST, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Rowles, Teri K. [National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a diverse collection of control materials derived from marine mammal blubber, fat, and serum. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1945 Organics in Whale Blubber was recertified for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners. SRM 1945 has also been assigned mass fraction values for compounds not frequently determined in marine samples including toxaphene congeners, coplanar PCBs, and methoxylated PBDE congeners which are natural products. NIST also has assigned mass fraction values, as a result of interlaboratory comparison exercises, for PCB congeners, organochlorine pesticides, PBDE congeners, and fatty acids in six homogenate materials produced from marine mammal blubber or serum. The materials are available from NIST upon request; however, the supply is very limited for some of the materials. The materials include those obtained from pilot whale blubber (Homogenates III and IV), Blainville's beaked whale blubber (Homogenate VII), polar bear fat (Homogenate VI), and California sea lion serum (Marine Mammal Control Material-1 Serum) and blubber (Homogenate V). (orig.)

  1. Effect of organic bases on extraction of gadolinium carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhan, V.V.; Frankovskij, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of pyridine, 2-aminopyridine, benzylamine, antipyrine and o-phenanthroline on the extraction of capronates and bromocapronates of gadolinium with chloroform is studied. Out of the studied organic bases benzylamine produces the highest synergetic effect. In the absence of organic bases gadolinium carboxylates, solvated by three molecules of carbonic acids, are extracted into organic phase. A possihility of extractional separation of gadolinium from comparable amounts of iron with the mixture of 1 M solutions of caproic or bromocaproic acids with 1 M benzylamine from 0.1 M solution of tartaric acids is shown [ru

  2. Halogens in chondritic meteorites and terrestrial accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Patricia L.; Burgess, Ray; Busemann, Henner; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Joachim, Bastian; Day, James M. D.; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2017-11-01

    Volatile element delivery and retention played a fundamental part in Earth’s formation and subsequent chemical differentiation. The heavy halogens—chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br) and iodine (I)—are key tracers of accretionary processes owing to their high volatility and incompatibility, but have low abundances in most geological and planetary materials. However, noble gas proxy isotopes produced during neutron irradiation provide a high-sensitivity tool for the determination of heavy halogen abundances. Using such isotopes, here we show that Cl, Br and I abundances in carbonaceous, enstatite, Rumuruti and primitive ordinary chondrites are about 6 times, 9 times and 15-37 times lower, respectively, than previously reported and usually accepted estimates. This is independent of the oxidation state or petrological type of the chondrites. The ratios Br/Cl and I/Cl in all studied chondrites show a limited range, indistinguishable from bulk silicate Earth estimates. Our results demonstrate that the halogen depletion of bulk silicate Earth relative to primitive meteorites is consistent with the depletion of lithophile elements of similar volatility. These results for carbonaceous chondrites reveal that late accretion, constrained to a maximum of 0.5 ± 0.2 per cent of Earth’s silicate mass, cannot solely account for present-day terrestrial halogen inventories. It is estimated that 80-90 per cent of heavy halogens are concentrated in Earth’s surface reservoirs and have not undergone the extreme early loss observed in atmosphere-forming elements. Therefore, in addition to late-stage terrestrial accretion of halogens and mantle degassing, which has removed less than half of Earth’s dissolved mantle gases, the efficient extraction of halogen-rich fluids from the solid Earth during the earliest stages of terrestrial differentiation is also required to explain the presence of these heavy halogens at the surface. The hydropilic nature of halogens, whereby they track

  3. Effect of Morinda Morindiodes Extracts on Organs of Mice Infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Morinda Morindiodes Extracts on Organs of Mice Infected with ... The histological evaluation of the effect of Morinda(M.) morindiodes plant part(s) extracts in the treatment ... Control animals were given water for the same period of time.

  4. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer-chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-03-30

    Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) is responsible for non-quantitative H 2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer-Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems. The EA-Cr/HTC reactor was substantially modified for the conversion of halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples. The performance of the novel conversion setup for solid and liquid samples was monitored and optimized using a simultaneously operating dual-detection system of IRMS and ion trap MS. The method with several variants in the reactor, including the addition of manganese metal chips, was evaluated in three laboratories using EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (on-line method) and compared with traditional uranium-reduction-based conversion combined with manual dual-inlet IRMS analysis (off-line method) in one laboratory. The modified EA-Cr/HTC reactor setup showed an overall H 2 -recovery of more than 96% for all halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds. All results were successfully normalized via two-point calibration with VSMOW-SLAP reference waters. Precise and accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis was achieved for a variety of organics containing F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, and S-bearing heteroelements. The robust nature of the on-line EA-Cr/HTC technique was demonstrated by a series of 196 consecutive measurements with a single reactor filling. The optimized EA-Cr/HTC reactor design can be implemented in existing analytical equipment using commercially available material and

  5. Tropospheric Halogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, R.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halogens are very reactive chemicals that are known to play an important role in anthropogenic stratospheric ozone depletion chemistry, first recognized by Molina and Rowland (1974). However, they also affect the chemistry of the troposphere. They are of special interest because they are involved in many reaction cycles that can affect the oxidation power of the atmosphere indirectly by influencing the main oxidants O3 and its photolysis product OH and directly, e.g., by reactions of the Cl radical with hydrocarbons (e.g., CH4).Already by the middle of the nineteenth century, Marchand (1852) reported the presence of bromine and iodine in rain and other natural waters. He also mentions the benefits of iodine in drinking water through the prevention of goitres and cretinism. In a prophetic monograph "Air and Rain: The Beginnings of a Chemical Climatology," Smith (1872) describes measurements of chloride in rain water, which he states to originate partly from the oceans by a process that he compares with the bursting of "soap bubbles" which produces "small vehicles" that transfer small spray droplets of seawater to the air. From deviations of the sulfate-to-chloride ratio in coastal rain compared to seawater, Smith concluded that chemical processes occur once the particles are airborne.For almost a century thereafter, however, atmospheric halogens received little attention. One exception was the work by Cauer (1939), who reported that iodine pollution has been significant in Western and Central Europe due to the inefficient burning of seaweed, causing mean gas phase atmospheric concentrations as high as or greater than 0.5 μg m-3. In his classical textbook Air Chemistry and Radioactivity, Junge (1963) devoted less than three pages to halogen gas phase chemistry, discussing chlorine and iodine. As reviewed by Eriksson (1959a, b), the main atmospheric source of halogens is sea salt, derived from the bursting of bubbles of air which are produced by ocean waves and other

  6. Enzymatic Halogenation and Dehalogenation Reactions: Pervasive and Mechanistically Diverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Miles, Zachary D; Winter, Jaclyn M; Eustáquio, Alessandra S; El Gamal, Abrahim A; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-04-26

    Naturally produced halogenated compounds are ubiquitous across all domains of life where they perform a multitude of biological functions and adopt a diversity of chemical structures. Accordingly, a diverse collection of enzyme catalysts to install and remove halogens from organic scaffolds has evolved in nature. Accounting for the different chemical properties of the four halogen atoms (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine) and the diversity and chemical reactivity of their organic substrates, enzymes performing biosynthetic and degradative halogenation chemistry utilize numerous mechanistic strategies involving oxidation, reduction, and substitution. Biosynthetic halogenation reactions range from simple aromatic substitutions to stereoselective C-H functionalizations on remote carbon centers and can initiate the formation of simple to complex ring structures. Dehalogenating enzymes, on the other hand, are best known for removing halogen atoms from man-made organohalogens, yet also function naturally, albeit rarely, in metabolic pathways. This review details the scope and mechanism of nature's halogenation and dehalogenation enzymatic strategies, highlights gaps in our understanding, and posits where new advances in the field might arise in the near future.

  7. Experimental and computational evidence of halogen bonds involving astatine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Maurice, Rémi; Teze, David; Graton, Jérôme; Champion, Julie; Montavon, Gilles; Galland, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    The importance of halogen bonds—highly directional interactions between an electron-deficient σ-hole moiety in a halogenated compound and an acceptor such as a Lewis base—is being increasingly recognized in a wide variety of fields from biomedicinal chemistry to materials science. The heaviest halogens are known to form stronger halogen bonds, implying that if this trend continues down the periodic table, astatine should exhibit the highest halogen-bond donating ability. This may be mitigated, however, by the relativistic effects undergone by heavy elements, as illustrated by the metallic character of astatine. Here, the occurrence of halogen-bonding interactions involving astatine is experimentally evidenced. The complexation constants of astatine monoiodide with a series of organic ligands in cyclohexane solution were derived from distribution coefficient measurements and supported by relativistic quantum mechanical calculations. Taken together, the results show that astatine indeed behaves as a halogen-bond donor—a stronger one than iodine—owing to its much more electrophilic σ-hole.

  8. Environmental levels and toxicological potencies of a novel mixed halogenated carbazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren Pena-Abaurrea

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work involves an extensive analytical and toxicological description of a recently identified mixed halogenated carbazole found in sediment samples, 1,8-dibromo-3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazole (BCCZ. Concentrations and the relative effect potency (REP were calculated for the target BCCZ in a set of stream sediments collected in 2008 in Ontario, Canada. The levels calculated for BCCZ as compared to those previously assessed for legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs in the same samples revealed a significant contribution of BCCZ to the total organic chemical contamination (<1%–95%; average 37%. The corresponding dioxin toxic equivalencies (TEQs of BCCZ in the sediment extracts were estimated from experimental REP data. The experimental data presented supports the classification of this emerging halogenated chemical as a contaminant of emerging environmental concern. Although potential emission sources could not be identified, this study highlights the importance of on-going research for complete characterization of halogenated carbazoles and related compounds.

  9. Impact of solvent extraction organics on bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hualong; Liu, Xiaorong; Shen, Junhui; Chi, Daojie

    2017-03-01

    Solvent extraction organics (SX organics) entrained and dissoluted in the raffinate during copper SX operation, can impact bioleaching in case of raffinate recycling. The influence of SX organics on bioleaching process by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans) has been investigated. The results showed that, cells of At. ferrooxidans grew slower with contaminated low-grade chalcopyrite ores in shaken flasks bioleaching, the copper bioleaching efficiency reached 15%, lower than that of 24% for uncontaminated minerals. Obviously, the SX organics could adsorb on mineral surface and hinder its contact with bacterials, finanlly lead to the low bioleaching efficiency.

  10. Historical trends in occurrence and atmospheric inputs of halogenated volatile organic compounds in untreated ground water used as a source of drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, S.D.; Busenberg, E.; Focazio, M.J.; Plummer, Niel

    2004-01-01

    Analyses of samples of untreated ground water from 413 community-, non-community- (such as restaurants), and domestic-supply wells throughout the US were used to determine the frequency of detection of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking-water sources. The VOC data were compiled from archived chromatograms of samples analyzed originally for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by purge-and-trap gas chromatography with an electron-capture detector (GC-ECD). Concentrations of the VOCs could not be ascertained because standards were not routinely analyzed for VOCs other than trichloromonofluoromethane (CFC-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113). Nevertheless, the peak areas associated with the elution times of other VOCs on the chromatograms can be classified qualitatively to assess concentrations at a detection limit on the order of parts per quadrillion. Three or more VOCs were detected in 100% (percent) of the chromatograms, and 77.2% of the samples contained 10 or more VOCs. The maximum number of VOCs detected in any sample was 24. Modeled ground-water residence times, determined from concentrations of CFC-12, were used to assess historical trends in the cumulative occurrence of all VOCs detected in this analysis, as well as the occurrence of individual VOCs, such as CFC-11, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), chloroform and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The detection frequency for all of the VOCs detected has remained relatively constant from approximately 1940 to 2000; however, the magnitude of the peak areas on the chromatograms for the VOCs in the water samples has increased from 1940 to 2000. For CFC-11, CCl4, chloroform and PCE, small peaks decrease from 1940 to 2000, and large peaks increase from 1940 to 2000. The increase in peak areas on the chromatograms from analyses of more recently recharged water is consistent with reported increases in atmospheric concentrations of the VOCs. Approximately 44% and 6

  11. Halogenated arsenenes as Dirac materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Wencheng; Sun, Minglei; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; Yu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We have revealed the presence of Dirac cone in fully-halogenated arsenene compounds. • All fully-halogenated arsenene except As_2I_2 would spontaneously form and stable in defending the thermal fluctuation in room temperature. - Abstract: Arsenene is the graphene-like arsenic nanosheet, which has been predicted very recently [S. Zhang, Z. Yan, Y. Li, Z. Chen, and H. Zeng, Angewandte Chemie, 127 (2015) 3155–3158]. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigate the structures and electronic properties of fully-halogenated arsenenes. Formation energy analysis reveals that all the fully-halogenated arsenenes except iodinated arsenene are energetically favorable and could be synthesized. We have revealed the presence of Dirac cone in fully-halogenated arsenene compounds. They may have great potential applications in next generation of high-performance devices.

  12. Efficient Annealing-Free P3HT:PC_6_1BM-Based Organic Solar Cells by Using a Novel Solvent Additive without a Halogen or Sulphur Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Man-Jun; Zhu Wei-Guo; Shen Wen-Fei; Wang Jun-Yi; Han Liang-Liang; Chen Wei-Chao; Bao Xi-Chang; Yang Ren-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC_6_1BM) based organic solar cells (OSCs) is significantly improved by using benzyl acetate (BA), an organic compound without any halogen or sulphur atom, as a processing additive to control the blend morphology. The solar cells show PCE of 3.85% with a fill factor (FF) of 65.22%, which are higher than those of the common thermal annealing device (PCE 3.30%, FF 60.83%). The overall increased PCE depends upon the enhanced crystallinity of P3HT and good carriers transport, with a high balanced charge carrier mobility. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  13. Antifeedant Activty Of Different Organic Solvent Crude Extracts Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antifeedant activity of different organic solvents (acetone, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, diethyl ether and ethyl alcohol) crude extracts of latex of Euphorbia hirta (family Euphobiaceae) against Limicolaria aurora was investigated, and compared with a control, using pawpaw, (Carica papaya) as bait, at a concentration ...

  14. Halogen protected cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO functions as anionic extractants for trivalent lanthanide/actinide partitioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Švec, Petr; Selucký, P.; Bubeníková, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2012), s. 103-112 ISSN 0277-5387 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : carboranes * metallaboranes * dicarbollides * CMPR * liquid-liquid extraction * lanthanides * actinides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.813, year: 2012

  15. Selective Extraction of Organic Contaminants from Soil Using Pressurised Liquid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the application of sorbents in pressurised liquid extraction (PLE cell to establish a selective extraction of a variety of organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, phenol, pentachlorophenol, and sterols from soil. The selectivity and efficiency of each sorbent depend on the properties of the material, extracting solvent, capacity factor, organic compounds of interest, and PLE operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and extraction time. Several sorbents (silica, alumina, and Florisil were evaluated and with the proper choice of solvents, polar and nonpolar compounds were successfully separated in two fractions. Nonpolar compounds (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, and pentachlorophenol were recovered in the first fraction using a polar sorbent such as Florisil or alumina, and n-hexane as eluting solvent, while more polar compounds (phenol and sterols were recovered in the second fraction using methanol. Silica (5 g was found to be effective for selective extraction with the satisfactory recoveries for all compounds (PAHs from 87.1–96.2%, chlorpyrifos 102.9%, sterols from 93.7–100.5%, phenol 91.9%, and pentachlorophenol 106.2%. The efficiency and precision of this extraction approach and the existing EPA Method 3545 were compared.

  16. Multi-contaminant analysis of organophosphate and halogenated flame retardants in food matrices using ultrasonication and vacuum assisted extraction, multi-stage cleanup and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuchao; García-Bermejo, Ángel; Malarvannan, Govindan; Gómara, Belén; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-03

    A multi-residue analytical method was developed for the determination of a range of flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), emerging halogenated FRs (EFRs) and organophosphate FRs (PFRs), in food matrices. An ultrasonication and vacuum assisted extraction (UVAE), followed by a multi-stage clean-up procedure, enabled the removal of up to 1g of lipid from 2.5 g of freeze-dried food samples and significantly reduce matrix effects. UVAE achieves a waste factor (WF) of about 10%, while the WFs of classical QuEChERS methods range usually between 50 and 90%. The low WF of UVAE leads to a dramatic improvement in the sensitivity along with saving up to 90% of spiking (internal) standards. Moreover, a two-stage clean-up on Florisil and aminopropyl silica was introduced after UVAE, for an efficient removal of pigments and residual lipids, which led to cleaner extracts than normally achieved by dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE). In this way, the extracts could be concentrated to low volumes, e.g. analysis of PFRs was performed on GC-EI-MS, while PBDEs and EFRs were measured by GC-ECNI-MS. Validation tests were performed with three food matrices (lean beef, whole chicken egg and salmon filet), obtaining acceptable recoveries (66-135%) with good repeatability (RSD 1-24%, mean 7%). Method LOQs ranged between 0.008 and 0.04 ng/g dw for PBDEs, between 0.08 and 0.20 ng/g dw for EFRs, and between 1.4 and 3.6 ng/g dw for PFRs. The method was further applied to eight types of food samples (including meat, eggs, fish, and seafood) with lipid contents ranging from 0.1 to 22%. Various FRs were detected above MLOQ levels, demonstrating the wide-range applicability of our method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method reported for simultaneous analysis of brominated and organophosphate FRs in food matrices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluate the Influence of Eupatorium adenophorum Extract with Mice Organ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, Xiang; Yang, Can; Yang, Yaojun; Liang, Zi; Hu, Qiang; Zhang, Ting

    2018-01-01

    In order to study the influence of extract from Eupatorium adenophorum in mice organs, this experiment will be the basis of further study that make Eupatorium adenophorum become Phyto contraceptive, this experiment take the feeding respectively way after the completion of the 1D, 5D, 10d, 15d of Eupatorium adenophorum mice by intragastrical administration of levonorgestrel group and blank control group. After the same operation in different periods of small rat heart and kidney the uterus, testis, and other organs were observed. The results showed that after extraction of E. adenophorum changes in female mice uterus shape was perfused significantly, showed swelling larger. Data analysis of each viscera coefficient was found E. adenophorum had No obvious effect on the heart, kidneys and testicles of mice. but there are obvious differences date between the treatment group and the blank group. (5d: F=10. 800 P=0. 043 cases) from tissue sections we can see female mice uterus cell morphology changes significantly, there was a similar appearance change in the uterus of the female mice with the estradiol For a male mouse testis of E.adenophorum gavage had No obvious effect. And it is found that the heart, the treated mice kidney, testis, ovary and other organs were observed in each period of time the organization had No obvious change; only female mice uterus tissue sections of individual cells became larger, and the organization of the gap larger. This research shows that E.adenophorum extract has the potential to develop botanical contraceptives, we will conduct in-depth study.

  18. Subcritical-Water Extraction of Organics from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Patrick, Steven; Kirby, James; Bickler, Donald; Willis, Peter; Pelletier, Christine; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for extracting organic compounds from soils, sands, and other solid matrix materials utilizes water at subcritical temperature and pressure as a solvent. The apparatus, called subcritical water extractor (SCWE), is a prototype of subsystems of future instrumentation systems to be used in searching for organic compounds as signs of past or present life on Mars. An aqueous solution generated by an apparatus like this one can be analyzed by any of a variety of established chromatographic or spectroscopic means to detect the dissolved organic compound( s). The apparatus can be used on Earth: indeed, in proof-of-concept experiments, SCWE was used to extract amino acids from soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile), which was chosen because the dryness and other relevant soil conditions there approximate those on Mars. The design of the apparatus is based partly on the fact that the relative permittivity (also known as the dielectric constant) of liquid water varies with temperature and pressure. At a temperature of 30 C and a pressure of 0.1 MPa, the relative permittivity of water is 79.6, due to the strong dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions between individual molecular dipoles. As the temperature increases, increasing thermal energy causes increasing disorientation of molecular dipoles, with a consequent decrease in relative permittivity. For example, water at a temperature of 325 C and pressure of 20 MPa has a relative permittivity of 17.5, which is similar to the relative permittivities of such nonpolar organic solvents as 1-butanol (17.8). In the operation of this apparatus, the temperature and pressure of water are adjusted so that the water can be used in place of commonly used organic solvents to extract compounds that have dissimilar physical and chemical properties.

  19. Evaluation of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of Brazilian red macroalgae organic extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi P. Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease affects nearly 36.5 million people worldwide, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition is currently considered the main therapeutic strategy against it. Seaweed biodiversity in Brazil represents one of the most important sources of biologically active compounds for applications in phytotherapy. Accordingly, this study aimed to carry out a quantitative and qualitative assessment of Hypnea musciformis (Wulfen J.V. Lamouroux, Ochtodes secundiramea (Montagne M.A. Howe, and Pterocladiella capillacea (S.G. Gmelin Santelices & Hommersand (Rhodophyta in order to determine the AChE effects from their extracts. As a matter of fact, the O. secundiramea extract showed 48% acetylcholinesterase inhibition at 400 μg/ml. The chemical composition of the bioactive fraction was determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS; this fraction is solely composed of halogenated monoterpenes, therefore allowing assignment of acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity to them.

  20. Evidence for Interfacial Halogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Wesley B; Simon, Sarah J C; Parlane, Fraser G L; Dean, Rebecca K; Kellett, Cameron W; Hu, Ke; Meyer, Gerald J; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2016-05-10

    A homologous series of donor-π-acceptor dyes was synthesized, differing only in the identity of the halogen substituents about the triphenylamine (TPA; donor) portion of each molecule. Each Dye-X (X=F, Cl, Br, and I) was immobilized on a TiO2 surface to investigate how the halogen substituents affect the reaction between the light-induced charge-separated state, TiO2 (e(-) )/Dye-X(+) , with iodide in solution. Transient absorption spectroscopy showed progressively faster reactivity towards nucleophilic iodide with more polarizable halogen substituents: Dye-F < Dye-Cl < Dye-Br < Dye-I. Given that all other structural and electronic properties for the series are held at parity, with the exception of an increasingly larger electropositive σ-hole on the heavier halogens, the differences in dye regeneration kinetics for Dye-Cl, Dye-Br, and Dye-I are ascribed to the extent of halogen bonding with the nucleophilic solution species. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Conformational analysis of amide extractants by NMR in organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthon, C.

    1993-08-01

    This study deals with nuclear fuel reprocessing. We have essentially used NMR spectroscopy. We want to understand which kind of conformational parameters control selectivity and efficiency of amide extractant. The symmetric monoamides used are DOBA (C 3 H 7 CON (CH 2 CH(C 2 H 5 ) C 4 H 9 ) 2 ), DOiBA ((CH 3 ) 2 CCHON (CH 2 CH(C 2 H 5 )C 4 H 9 ) 2 ) and DOTA ((CH 3 ) 3 CCH 2 CON(CH 2 CH(C 2 H 5 )C 4 H 9 ) 2 ). Each gives two quasi equivalent conformers (cis and trans) in organic phases. The selected malonamide DMDBTDMA ((C 4 H 9 (CH 3 )NCO) 2 CHC 14 H 29 ) has four conformers because of its twice disymmetric amide functions. Weak interactions between monoamides which yield to dimer formation. The malonamide also gives dimers but forms aggregates too. Nitric acid extraction is due to the competitive formation of six species L, L 2 , L 2 (HNO 3 ), L(HNO 3 ), L(HNO 3 ) 2 , L(HNO 3 ) 3 (L: monoamide). Complexation between lanthanides (III) and monoamides yields to the stoichiometries L 3 Ln(NO 3 ) 3 and L 2 Ln(NO 3 ) 3 . Their ratio depend of steric hindrance on the carbonyl and the metal ionic radius. The same thing is observed of Pu 4+ and Th 4+ extraction in non acidic media. L 2 An(NO 3 ) 4 is the main stoichiometric except for the Th 4+ - DOBA system where the species (DOBA) 3 Th(NO 3 ) 4 appear. Exchange rates between the ligand and the complex are pointed out. The monoamide conformations obtained with lanthanide and plutonium nitrate can explain the difference in extracting power of this molecule between An 4+ and Ln 3+ . (author). 162 refs., 87 figs., 44 tabs., 7 annexes

  2. Removal of Intermediate Aromatic Halogenated DBPs by Activated Carbon Adsorption: A New Approach to Controlling Halogenated DBPs in Chlorinated Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingyi; Zhang, Xiangru; Zhu, Xiaohu; Li, Yu

    2017-03-21

    During chlorine disinfection of drinking water, chlorine may react with natural organic matter (NOM) and bromide ion in raw water to generate halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). To mitigate adverse effects from DBP exposure, granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption has been considered as one of the best available technologies for removing NOM (DBP precursor) in drinking water treatment. Recently, we have found that many aromatic halogenated DBPs form in chlorination, and they act as intermediate DBPs to decompose and form commonly known DBPs including trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this work, we proposed a new approach to controlling drinking water halogenated DBPs by GAC adsorption of intermediate aromatic halogenated DBPs during chlorination, rather than by GAC adsorption of NOM prior to chlorination (i.e., traditional approach). Rapid small-scale column tests were used to simulate GAC adsorption in the new and traditional approaches. Significant reductions of aromatic halogenated DBPs were observed in the effluents with the new approach; the removals of total organic halogen, trihalomethanes, and haloacetic acids by the new approach always exceeded those by the traditional approach; and the effluents with the new approach were considerably less developmentally toxic than those with the traditional approach. Our findings indicate that the new approach is substantially more effective in controlling halogenated DBPs than the traditional approach.

  3. Prediction of extraction ability during metal complexing with organic phosphorus extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozen, A.M.; Krupnov, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of thermodynamic parameters of complexing of neutral organic phosphorus compounds (phosphates, phosphine oxides and diphosphine dioxides with different substituents) with seven acceptors of different strength have been made. It is shown that in a wide range of the complexes strength change the entropy contribution of the Gibbs energy of complexing depends but slightly both on the ligand basicity and on the acceptor nature. It is ascertained that this reaction series is isoentropic for any Lewis acid. Practicability of the previously used correlation between extractability and complexing enthalpy has been proved. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Transvaginal organ extraction: potential for broad clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Garth R; Barajas-Gamboa, Juan S; Coker, Alisa M; Cheverie, Joslin; Macias, C Aitor; Sandler, Bryan J; Talamini, Mark A; Horgan, Santiago

    2014-02-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery procedures have evolved over the past few years. A transvaginal approach is a promising alternative for intraperitoneal procedures. Our objective was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transvaginal organ extraction. This institutional review board-approved protocol involved retrospective review of an ongoing prospective study. Female subjects who presented to our hospital for elective cholecystectomy, appendectomy, or sleeve gastrectomy were offered participation in the study. Eligible patients met the following criteria: age between 18 and 75, diagnosis of gallbladder disease, acute appendicitis, or morbid obesity who desired surgical treatment. A hybrid transvaginal natural orifice approach was used in this series. Thirty-four women underwent transvaginal organ extraction between September 2007 and January 2012. The mean age was 40 ± 12.1 years (range 23-63 years). The mean body mass index was 27 ± 6.4 kg/m(2) (range 16-43 kg/m(2)). All patients had an American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of two or below. The mean operative time for cholecystectomy, appendectomy, and sleeve gastrectomy was 90, 71, and 135 min, respectively. There were no conversions to open operation and no intraoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 2 days for all cases. Patients were followed for a mean of 24 months (range 1-61 months). There were two pregnancies and two successful vaginal deliveries. Six patients (18 %) had minor complaints of spotting or heavy menses in the immediate postoperative period that resolved with conservative measures. There were no abdominal wall complications. There were no long-term complications and no mortalities. This initial experience suggests that this surgical approach is safe, does not increase length of stay, and has no long-term vaginal complications. Given this attractive profile, a transvaginal approach may prove to be a superior mode of organ extraction

  5. Selective C-H Halogenation with a Highly Fluorinated Manganese Porphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Dilger, Andrew K; Cheng, Peter T; Ewing, William R; Groves, John T

    2018-01-26

    The selective C-H functionalization of aliphatic molecules remains a challenge in organic synthesis. While radical chain halogenation reactions provide efficient access to many halogenated molecules, the use of typical protocols for the selective halogenation of electron-deficient and strained aliphatic molecules is rare. Herein, we report selective C-H chlorination and fluorination reactions promoted by an electron-deficient manganese pentafluorophenyl porphyrin catalyst, Mn(TPFPP)Cl. This catalyst displays superior properties for the aliphatic halogenation of recalcitrant, electron-deficient, and strained substrates with unique regio- and stereoselectivity. UV/Vis analysis during the course of the reaction indicated that an oxo-Mn V species is responsible for hydrogen-atom abstraction. The observed stereoselectivity results from steric interactions between the bulky porphyrin ligand and the intermediate substrate radical in the halogen rebound step. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area

  7. Halogen bonding in solution: thermodynamics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Thomas M; Chudzinski, Michael G; Sarwar, Mohammed G; Taylor, Mark S

    2013-02-21

    Halogen bonds are noncovalent interactions in which covalently bound halogens act as electrophilic species. The utility of halogen bonding for controlling self-assembly in the solid state is evident from a broad spectrum of applications in crystal engineering and materials science. Until recently, it has been less clear whether, and to what extent, halogen bonding could be employed to influence conformation, binding or reactivity in the solution phase. This tutorial review summarizes and interprets solution-phase thermodynamic data for halogen bonding interactions obtained over the past six decades and highlights emerging applications in molecular recognition, medicinal chemistry and catalysis.

  8. Extraction and Ozonation of organic pollutants in drinking waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenawi, I.M.; Barsoum, B.N.; Abdelhaflz, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The continuous liquid-liquid, CLLE, and solid-phase, SPE. extraction techniques were used to study a problem of international relevance. The work was incident on the evaluation of the efficiency and optimisation of extruding techniques, CLLE. SPE and CLLEt-SPE, towards chlorinated pesticides and phenolic compounds from the Giza treatment plant station (Egypt), where the degree of pollution of such substances in drinking waters must be reduced. The total recoveries, rs, using SPE ranged between I).74 -0.87, whereas, the values were much less using the other two methods (0.158 - 0.1961; indicating the preferability of the SF'E technique. Analytical results were obtained through the various chromatographic techniques, liquid or gas. with adequately chosen detectors. A simple mathematical algorithm has been empirically developed allowing the assessment and comparison of the efficiencies of the three extracting procedures. Further treatment with ozone resulted in the oxidation and elimination of organic pollutants, with consequent improvement of water quality (total pesticide content 0.332-0.19μgL -1 ). A useful ozone treatment unit, capable of dealing with the emanation of contaminants in tap water, was built

  9. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  10. Dissociative Photoionization of 1-Halogenated Silacyclohexanes: Silicon Traps the Halogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Andras; Sigurdardottir, Katrin Lilja; Kvaran, Ágúst; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Arnason, Ingvar

    2016-11-23

    The threshold photoelectron spectra and threshold photoionization mass spectra of 1-halogenated-1-silacyclohexanes, for the halogens X = F, Cl, Br, and I, have been obtained using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet radiation and photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy. As confirmed by a similar ionization onset and density functional theory molecular orbitals, the ionization to the ground state is dominated by electron removal from the silacyclohexane ring for X = F, Cl, and Br, and from the halogen lone pair for X = I. The breakdown diagrams show that the dissociative photoionization mechanism is also different for X = I. Whereas the parent ions decay by ethylene loss for X = F to Br in the low-energy regime, the iodine atom is lost for X = I. The first step is followed by a sequential ethylene loss at higher internal energies in each of the compounds. It is argued that the tendency of silicon to lower bond angles stabilizes the complex cation in which C 2 H 4 is η 2 -coordinated to it, and which precedes ethylene loss. Together with the relatively strong silicon-halogen bonds and the increased inductive effect of the silacyclohexane ring in stabilizing the cation, this explains the main differences observed in the fragmentation of the halogenated silacyclohexane and halogenated cyclohexane ions. The breakdown diagrams have been modeled taking into account slow dissociations at threshold and the resulting kinetic shift. The 0 K appearance energies have been obtained to within 0.08 eV for the ethylene loss for X = F to Br (10.56, 10.51, and 10.51 eV, respectively), the iodine atom loss for X = I (10.11 eV), the sequential ethylene loss for X = F to I (12.29, 12.01, 11.94, and 11.86 eV, respectively), and the minor channels of H loss for X = F (10.56 eV) and propylene loss in X = Cl (also at 10.56 eV). The appearance energies for the major channels likely correspond to the dissociative photoionization reaction energy.

  11. Instrument for Solvent Extraction and Analysis (ISEE) of Organics from Regolith Simulant Using Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Carolina; Hintze, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    ISEE is an instrument with the potential to perform extractions from regolith found on the surface of asteroids and planets, followed by characterization and quantitation of the extracts using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and chromatography (SFC). SFE is a developed technique proven to extract a wide range of organic compounds. SFC is similar to High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) but has the advantage of performing chiral separations without needing to derivatize the chiral compounds. CO2 will be the solvent for both stages as it is readily available in the Mars atmosphere. ISEE will capture CO2 from the environment, and use it for SFE and SFC. If successful, this would allow ISEE to perform analysis of organic compounds without using consumables. This paper will present results on a preliminary, proof-of-principle effort to use SFE and SFC to extract and analyze lunar regolith simulant spiked with organic compounds representing a range of organics that ISEE would expect to characterize. An optimization of variables for the extraction of the organics from the spiked regolith was successfully developed, using 138 bar pressure and 40 C temperature. The extraction flow rate was optimized at 2% SLPM with 30% methanol modifier. The extractions were successful with a value of 77.3+/- 0.9% of organics extracted. However, the recovery of organics after the extraction was very low with only 48.5+/-14.2%. Moreover, three columns were selected to analyze multiple samples at a time; two of them are Viridis HSS C18 SB and Torus DIOL, and the third column, specific for chiral separations, has not yet been selected yet.

  12. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  13. Participation of the Halogens in Photochemical Reactions in Natural and Treated Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Halide ions are ubiquitous in natural waters and wastewaters. Halogens play an important and complex role in environmental photochemical processes and in reactions taking place during photochemical water treatment. While inert to solar wavelengths, halides can be converted into radical and non-radical reactive halogen species (RHS by sensitized photolysis and by reactions with secondary reactive oxygen species (ROS produced through sunlight-initiated reactions in water and atmospheric aerosols, such as hydroxyl radical, ozone, and nitrate radical. In photochemical advanced oxidation processes for water treatment, RHS can be generated by UV photolysis and by reactions of halides with hydroxyl radicals, sulfate radicals, ozone, and other ROS. RHS are reactive toward organic compounds, and some reactions lead to incorporation of halogen into byproducts. Recent studies indicate that halides, or the RHS derived from them, affect the concentrations of photogenerated reactive oxygen species (ROS and other reactive species; influence the photobleaching of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM; alter the rates and products of pollutant transformations; lead to covalent incorporation of halogen into small natural molecules, DOM, and pollutants; and give rise to certain halogen oxides of concern as water contaminants. The complex and colorful chemistry of halogen in waters will be summarized in detail and the implications of this chemistry for global biogeochemical cycling of halogen, contaminant fate in natural waters, and water purification technologies will be discussed.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial potential of organic solvent extracts of novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    methanol and water extracts of selected promising actinomycetes strains were studied towards Gram- positive ... Glucose and all other chemicals were obtained from Himedia. (India). ..... acetate, benzene, n-butanol and ethanol to extract the.

  15. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium from tissue paper matrix using organic extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, A.S.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Direct extraction of dried uranyl nitrate from tissue paper matrix was carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol solutions of extractants such as tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and di-n-hexyl octanamide (DHOA)). The effects of temperature, pressure, extractant and nitric acid concentration on the extraction of uranyl ion were investigated. (author)

  16. Simultaneous determination of radioactive halogen isotopes and 99Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabai, E.; Vajda, N.; Gaca, P.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simplified method for simultaneous determination of radiologically important halogen isotopes and 99 Tc from different types of samples like environmental, biological and waste samples. Due to their long half-lives (longer than 10 5 years) they play important role in the nuclear cycle, especially in environmental monitoring and protection. For a rapid response in the evaluation of 129 I, 36 Cl and 99 Tc contamination levels of these samples it is advantageous to combine the existing individual methods. According to the present procedure, iodine, chlorine and technetium are separated selectively from the same sample aliquot followed by the β spectrometry of the purified fractions. Increased sensitivities can be achieved by neutron activation (NA) especially in the case of 129 I. Our work intends to solve the problem by combining the well-known hot acidic distillation method for iodine separation with the organic extraction process characteristic for technetium separation. The major objective of the work was to separate the disturbing halides from iodine. For this purpose a selective oxidant was applied. For the sample destruction and fractionated distillation an air flow-through installation was used with hot concentrated sulphuric and nitric acids. The trap for iodine contained 3 M NaOH solution. After iodine separation the trap was exchanged for a new one containing the same solution for trapping chlorine or bromine with an addition of 0.01 M KMnO 4 solution as an oxidative agent. As expected, the main part of technetium was contained in the acidic residue after distillation. Tc purification was performed by organic extraction with TBP and TEVA column. (author)

  17. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Songwei

    2016-06-14

    A light extraction substrate includes a glass substrate having a first surface and a second surface. A light extraction layer is formed on at least one of the surfaces. The light extraction layer is a coating, such as a silicon-containing coating, incorporating nanoparticles.

  18. Process for reducing halogen impurities in oil products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basler, F.

    1990-08-14

    Oil products, in particular waste oils, may be efficiently reprocessed according to an economic and technically simple method for removing impurities, notably halogens. In this method, the oil product is treated at temperatures up to about 150{degree}C with an effective amount of an aqueous solution of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of a strong acid, a salt of a weak base and a strong acid and precursors thereof. The oil product obtained in this step is treated at increased temperatures with at least one halogen binding agent. The water and/or solids from the product so treated are separated out. The process of the invention can be carried out in a conventional stripping apparatus. The strong acid used in the first step is preferably selected from sulfurous acid, phosphoric acid, phosphorous acid, and phosphonic acid. The salt of the weak base and strong acid is preferably ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfite, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, ammonium phosphite, and ammonium phosphonic acid. The second step of the method is preferably a coagulation step in which organic halogen compounds break down into hydrogen halides which are neutralized by the added halogen binding agents. The preferred halogen binding agents are ammonia and/or an organic base. The coagulation is preferably carried out in heat exchangers so that the oil is heated in 3 stages and the oil from each stage is passed through a cascade tower. In the third step, additives may be used to enhance separation of the oil. Experiments are described to illustrate the method of the invention. 1 tab.

  19. EXTRACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have the...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/......., organism, tissue and disease terms. The evaluators in the BioCreative V Interactive Annotation Task found the system to be intuitive, useful, well documented and sufficiently accurate to be helpful in spotting relevant text passages and extracting organism and environment terms. Comparison of fully manual...

  20. Some aspects of synergistic extraction of actinides and lanthanides from mixed aqueous-organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, J.P.; Subramanian, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Various aspects of the synergistic extraction and separation of actinides and lanthanides from mixed aqueous-organic solutions (polar media) have been reviewed. Notable recent developments as well as its current status in solvent extraction systems where the aqueous acidic phase contains an organic solvent which is completely miscible with water, are presented briefly. In general, extraction increases in the presence of an organic component. The less polar the additive, the higher is the tendency to form neutral metal complexes which ultimately brings about an increase in the extraction. In a polar media, synergism has mostly been observed, though antagonism is not uncommon. An attempt has been made to classify the factors that play an important role in polar phase extractions. Also, their influence particularly on the extractability of actinides and lanthanides is discussed. The discussion is limited to the factors affecting the extraction equilibria, effect of dielectric constant of the polar medium, solvation of the extracting agent and to the composition and stability of the metal complex in the organic phase. Hydroxyl (OHsup(-)) bearing organic additives, e.g. alcohols, and solvents not containing the hydroxyl group such as acetone, dimethylsulphoxide, tetrahydrofuran, amides and acetonitrile etc. are the two major classes of organic additives considered in these studies. Generally, synergistic effect in extraction of the ion-association (TBP, TOPO, sulphoxides etc.) or anion exchange (amines etc.) type is relatively more pronounced compared to other extractions. A tabular summary concerning extraction of actinides and lanthanides from polar media is appended for ready reference. (author)

  1. Determination of N-containing halogenated natural products using gas chromatography in combination of a nitrogen-phosphorus-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, J.; Vetter, W. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Lebensmittelchemie

    2004-09-15

    In the last few years several nonpolar halogenated natural products (HNPs) such as Q1, MHC-1, BC-2, BC-3, BC-10 were detected at elevated concentrations in marine biota samples. In addition, there are still some abundant peaks of halogenated compounds frequently found in the gas chromatograms of many marine samples which have not yet been identified. Some of the known halogenated natural products (Q1, HDBPs including BC-10, bromoindoles) contain N-heterocyclic backbones. Since nitrogen is scarcely found in anthropogenic halogenated compounds, the detection of N-containing halogenated substances may be used as a first indicator for the presence of HNPs in a sample extract. In the presented method we studied the suitability of a nitrogen phosphorous detector (NPD) for quantification of Q1 and the detection of Ncontaining compounds in marine biota. Analyses were accompanied with GC/ECD analyses.

  2. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  3. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho-García, J. C., E-mail: jc.sancho@ua.es; Pérez-Jiménez, A. J., E-mail: aj.perez@ua.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Alicante, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from –20 to –30 kcal mol{sup −1} at close distances around 3.0–3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings)

  4. Liquid-phase extraction coupled with metal-organic frameworks-based dispersive solid phase extraction of herbicides in peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Wang, Zhibing; Zhang, Liyuan; Nian, Li; Lei, Lei; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-phase extraction coupled with metal-organic frameworks-based dispersive solid phase extraction was developed and applied to the extraction of pesticides in high fatty matrices. The herbicides were ultrasonically extracted from peanut using ethyl acetate as extraction solvent. The separation of the analytes from a large amount of co-extractive fat was achieved by dispersive solid-phase extraction using MIL-101(Cr) as sorbent. In this step, the analytes were adsorbed on MIL-101(Cr) and the fat remained in bulk. The herbicides were separated and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental parameters, including type and volume of extraction solvent, ultrasonication time, volume of hexane and eluting solvent, amount of MIL-101(Cr) and dispersive solid phase extraction time, were optimized. The limits of detection for herbicides range from 0.98 to 1.9 μg/kg. The recoveries of the herbicides are in the range of 89.5-102.7% and relative standard deviations are equal or lower than 7.0%. The proposed method is simple, effective and suitable for treatment of the samples containing high content of fat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of halogen substitution on the enthalpies of solvation and hydrogen bonding of organic solutes in chlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene derived using multi-parameter correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T.; Khachatrian, Artashes A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Acree, William E., E-mail: acree@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Brumfield, Michela [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Abraham, Michael H. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Enthalpies of solution measured for 43 solutes dissolved in chlorobenzene. • Enthalpies of solution measured for 72 solutes dissolved in 1,2-dichlorobenzene. • Mathematical expressions derived for predicting enthalpies of solvation of solutes in chlorobenzene. • Mathematical expressions derived for predicting enthalpies of solvation of solutes in 1,2-chlorobenzene. - Abstract: Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution at 298 K, Δ{sub soln}H{sup A/Solvent}, have been measured by isothermal solution calorimetry for 43 and 72 organic solutes dissolved in chlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene, respectively. The measured Δ{sub soln}H{sup A/Solvent} data, along with published Δ{sub soln}H{sup A/Solvent} values taken from the published literature for solutes dissolved in both chlorobenzene solvents, were converted to enthalpies of solvation, Δ{sub solv}H{sup A/Solvent}, using standard thermodynamic equations. Abraham model correlations were developed from the experimental Δ{sub solv}H{sup A/Solvent} data. The best derived correlations describe the experimental gas-to-chlorobenzene and gas-to-1,2-dichlorobenzene enthalpies of solvation to within standard deviations of 1.5 kJ mol{sup −1} and 1.9 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Enthalpies of X−H…π (X – O, N, and C) hydrogen bond formation of proton donor solutes (alcohols, amines, chlorinated hydrocarbons, etc.) with chlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene were calculated based on the Abraham solvation equation. Obtained values are in good agreement with the results determined using conventional methods.

  6. Natural elimination of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons from the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harress, H.M.; Grathwohl, P.; Torunski, H.

    1987-01-01

    Recently carried out field investigations of groundwater contaminations with volatile halogenated hydrocarbons have shown evidence of natural elimination of these hazardous substances. This elimination effects is rare and observed in connection with special geological conditions. With regard to some contaminated sites, the following mechanisms for this behaviour are discussed: 1. Stripping by naturally ascending gases. 2. Sorption on soil organic matter. 3. Biodegradation. The so far compiled knowledge allowed to develop further research programmes, which are pursued in various projects.

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis due to highly reactive halogenated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, F C; Ive, F A

    1983-11-01

    Ten cases of dermatitis in a fine organic chemicals plant are reported. These cases were all due to exposure to chemical compounds with reactive bromine or chlorine atoms. This type of chemical is always extremely irritant, but evidence is put forward to suggest that these cases were the result of allergic sensitization. Chemicals with reactive halogen atoms should always be handled with extreme care and patch testing should be approached with caution.

  8. Halogenated hydrocarbons - an environmental problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeler, H F; Thofern, E

    1984-01-01

    The paper provides a survey of the incidence of highly volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in ground, surface and drinking water as well as in the snows of Western Germany. Almost the entire production of chlorinated solvents is released into the environment. The absorption media are mostly soil, water and atmosphere. Whereas in the atmosphere elimination reactions take place, solvents that have passed the soil get into the ground water owing to their persistence and can cause considerable pollutions of drinking water. Moreover haloforms may occur in drinking water, which are produced during chlorine disinfection of pre-treated water.

  9. Extending the analytical window for water-soluble organic matter in sediments by aqueous Soxhlet extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine sediments is a complex mixture of thousands of individual constituents that participate in biogeochemical reactions and serve as substrates for benthic microbes. Knowledge of the molecular composition of DOM is a prerequisite for a comprehensive understanding of the biogeochemical processes in sediments. In this study, interstitial water DOM was extracted with Rhizon samplers from a sediment core from the Black Sea and compared to the corresponding water-extractable organic matter fraction (Soxhlet extraction, which mobilizes labile particulate organic matter and DOM. After solid phase extraction (SPE) of DOM, samples were analyzed for the molecular composition by Fourier Transform Ion-Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. The average SPE extraction yield of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in interstitial water was 63%, whereas less than 30% of the DOC in Soxhlet-extracted organic matter was recovered. Nevertheless, Soxhlet extraction yielded up to 4.35% of the total sedimentary organic carbon, which is more than 30-times the organic carbon content of the interstitial water. While interstitial water DOM consisted primarily of carbon-, hydrogen- and oxygen-bearing compounds, Soxhlet extracts yielded more complex FT-ICR mass spectra with more peaks and higher abundances of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds. The molecular composition of both sample types was affected by the geochemical conditions in the sediment; elevated concentrations of HS- promoted the early diagenetic sulfurization of organic matter. The Soxhlet extracts from shallow sediment contained specific three- and four-nitrogen-bearing molecular formulas that were also detected in bacterial cell extracts and presumably represent proteinaceous molecules. These compounds decreased with increasing sediment depth while one- and two-nitrogen-bearing molecules increased, resulting in a higher

  10. Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85-90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams

  11. Influence of Halogen Substituents on the Catalytic Oxidation of 2,4,6-Halogenated Phenols by Fe(III-Tetrakis(p-hydroxyphenyl porphyrins and Potassium Monopersulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Nagao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of halogen substituents on the catalytic oxidation of 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenols (TrXPs by iron(III-porphyrin/KHSO5 catalytic systems was investigated. Iron(III-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-hydroxyphenylporphyrin (FeTHP and its supported variants were employed, where the supported catalysts were synthesized by introducing FeTHP into hydroquinone-derived humic acids via formaldehyde poly-condensation. F (TrFP, Cl (TrCP, Br (TrBP and I (TrIP were examined as halogen substituents for TrXPs. Although the supported catalysts significantly enhanced the degradation and dehalogenation of TrFP and TrCP, the oxidation of TrBP and TrIP was not enhanced, compared to the FeTHP catalytic system. These results indicate that the degree of oxidation of TrXPs is strongly dependent on the types of halogen substituent. The order of dehalogenation levels for halogen substituents in TrXPs was F > Cl > Br > I, consistent with their order of electronegativity. The electronegativity of a halogen substituent affects the nucleophilicity of the carbon to which it is attached. The levels of oxidation products in the reaction mixtures were analyzed by GC/MS after extraction with n-hexane. The most abundant dimer product from TrFP via 2,6-difluoroquinone is consistent with a scenario where TrXP, with a more electronegative halogen substituent, is readily oxidized, while less electronegative halogen substituents are oxidized less readily by iron(III-porphyrin/KHSO5 catalytic systems.

  12. Extraction and characterisation of aqueous organic acids from natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.; Moody, P.M.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from large volumes of groundwater associated with the Broubster and Needle's Eye natural analogue sites, and the BGS research site at Drigg in Cumbria. Extractions were performed by both batchwise extraction and radial flow chromatography using DEAE-cellulose. Retained humic substances were eluted using NaOH and separated into humic and fulvic components by acidification to pH 1. After separation the humic component was purified by repetitive precipitation and dissolution whilst the fulvic component was purified by absorption chromatography. The resulting humic substances were shown to be of high purity with respect to metallic elements, with less than 1% of available sites being occupied. During elution the association of trace elements with humic substances was monitored and a high degree of association between humic substances, U and the Rare Earth Elements was noted. (author)

  13. Chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger - formation of halogenated phenols and subsequent environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melbye, Alf G.; Faksness, Liv-Guri; Knudsen, Boerre Leif

    2006-03-15

    Formation of halogenated phenols as side products from treatment of produced water with aqueous chlorine dioxide has been investigated. The literature describes formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in effluent treatment using chlorine, hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide. A new chlorine dioxide product, originally intended as a H2S scavenger in the oil and gas industry, has been tested both as a phenol scavenger and H2S-scavenger for produced water applications. The concern about the possible formation of halogenated by-products initiated laboratory testing of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger for produced water applications. The tests also included synthetic matrixes containing phenols, and the tests show that halogenated phenols, mainly brominated species, are found in produced water after treatment with chlorine dioxide. Due to potential environmental risk from halogenated organic contaminants, the use of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger is not recommended. (Author)

  14. Efficacy of chitosan supported organic acaricide extract from Melia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conductometric titration, ultraviolet-visible ("UV-Vis") and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were conducted with materials to evaluate the chitosan anchoring ability. In vitro test was used in engorged females for each treatment, which consisted of control, raw extract and three treatments with increasing ...

  15. Determination of persistent organic pollutants in solid environmental samples using accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluid extraction. Exhaustive extraction and sorption/desorption studies of PCBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerklund, E.

    1998-10-01

    Human activity is constantly causing environmental problems due to production and release of numerous chemicals. A group of compounds of special concern is persistent organic pollutants (POP). These toxic, lipophilic chemicals have a high chemical and biological stability, and tend to accumulate in the lipid phase of living organisms. A major sink for POPs are sediments, and consequently these are important for the distribution of POPs in the aquatic environment. Traditionally, determination of POPs relay on exhaustive extraction using liquid extraction techniques (e.g. Soxhlet extraction developed in the late 19th century) followed by gas chromatographic analysis. Since liquid-solid extraction normally requires large volumes of organic solvents in combination with long extraction times and extract clean-up, there has been an increasing demand for improved technology. This should result in reduced organic solvent consumption and sample preparation time, at the same time improving the environment and cutting costs for POP monitoring. In this thesis two modern techniques with capability of fulfilling at least one of these goals have been investigated: (1) Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE), and (2) Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE). Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were chosen as model compounds in all experiments performed on environmental matrices, since they cover a relatively large range of physiochemical parameters. Important parameters influencing the overall extraction efficiency in ASE and SFE, are discussed and illustrated for a large number of sediments. It was demonstrated that, by careful consideration of the experimental parameters, both techniques are capable of replacing old methods such as Soxhlet extraction. ASE is somewhat faster than SFE, but the extracts generated in SFE are much cleaner and can be analyzed without sample clean-up. Consequently the overall sample preparation time may be substantially lower using SFE. However, ASE is important

  16. Self-organizing networks for extracting jet features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennblad, L.; Peterson, C.; Pi, H.; Roegnvaldsson, T.

    1991-01-01

    Self-organizing neural networks are briefly reviewed and compared with supervised learning algorithms like back-propagation. The power of self-organization networks is in their capability of displaying typical features in a transparent manner. This is successfully demonstrated with two applications from hadronic jet physics; hadronization model discrimination and separation of b.c. and light quarks. (orig.)

  17. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  18. Supramolecular organization of organic phases for DIAMEX solvent extraction process; Organisation supramoleculaire des phases organiques de malonamides du procede d'extraction DIAMEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, L

    2005-04-15

    In the frame of nuclear waste cycle, supramolecular organization of organic phases has been studied for DIAMEX solvent extraction process. A general methodology has been developed in order to determine surfactant properties of an extractant at high concentration. An illustration is given by a malonamide (DMDBTDMA) at 0.7 mol/L, in dodecane and contacted with water, at 23 deg C. The concentrations of monomers (0.3 mol/L) and aggregates (0.4 mol/L), c.m.c. (0.25 mol/L), aggregation number (4,4), aggregation constant (7.7) and finally aggregates interactions (U/kT = -1.6) are quantified. The method is based on simultaneous utilization of four experimental techniques (small X-ray and neutron scattering, vapour pressure osmometry and tensiometry) added to the model of Baxter. The structure of malonamide organic phase is depending on extractant concentration. (i) Below 0.2 mol/L, it is a quasi-molecular liquid fluid, extracting few amount of solutes. (ii) From 0.2 to 1 mol/L, it is a complex liquid fluid, containing small spherical aggregates of 5 extractant molecules in coexistence with monomers. This phase behaves like typical microemulsions with reverse micelles, through its stabilizing effect of penetrating oil and steric repulsion between extractants. (iii) Above 1 mol/L, the organic phase is able to extract huge amount of solutes. When HNO{sub 3} or Nd(NO{sub 3} ){sub 3} are extracted, a gel with a pseudo-lamellar structure is observed. With UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3} ){sub 2} a solid crystal with a ratio DMDBTDMA/UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3} ){sub 2} equal to 1/1 is characteristic of the organic phase. The 'third phase' due to attractive interactions between aggregates has exactly the same supramolecular structure than an 'unsplitted organic phase' of the same composition. Aggregates interactions are independent on the chemical affinity of the extractant for solutes. (author)

  19. Supramolecular organization of organic phases for DIAMEX solvent extraction process; Organisation supramoleculaire des phases organiques de malonamides du procede d'extraction DIAMEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, L

    2005-04-15

    In the frame of nuclear waste cycle, supramolecular organization of organic phases has been studied for DIAMEX solvent extraction process. A general methodology has been developed in order to determine surfactant properties of an extractant at high concentration. An illustration is given by a malonamide (DMDBTDMA) at 0.7 mol/L, in dodecane and contacted with water, at 23 deg C. The concentrations of monomers (0.3 mol/L) and aggregates (0.4 mol/L), c.m.c. (0.25 mol/L), aggregation number (4,4), aggregation constant (7.7) and finally aggregates interactions (U/kT = -1.6) are quantified. The method is based on simultaneous utilization of four experimental techniques (small X-ray and neutron scattering, vapour pressure osmometry and tensiometry) added to the model of Baxter. The structure of malonamide organic phase is depending on extractant concentration. (i) Below 0.2 mol/L, it is a quasi-molecular liquid fluid, extracting few amount of solutes. (ii) From 0.2 to 1 mol/L, it is a complex liquid fluid, containing small spherical aggregates of 5 extractant molecules in coexistence with monomers. This phase behaves like typical microemulsions with reverse micelles, through its stabilizing effect of penetrating oil and steric repulsion between extractants. (iii) Above 1 mol/L, the organic phase is able to extract huge amount of solutes. When HNO{sub 3} or Nd(NO{sub 3} ){sub 3} are extracted, a gel with a pseudo-lamellar structure is observed. With UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3} ){sub 2} a solid crystal with a ratio DMDBTDMA/UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3} ){sub 2} equal to 1/1 is characteristic of the organic phase. The 'third phase' due to attractive interactions between aggregates has exactly the same supramolecular structure than an 'unsplitted organic phase' of the same composition. Aggregates interactions are independent on the chemical affinity of the extractant for solutes. (author)

  20. Halogen bond: a long overlooked interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Pilati, Tullio; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high electronegativity, halogen atoms are typically considered, in most of their derivatives, as sites of high electron density and it is commonly accepted that they can form attractive interactions by functioning as the electron donor site (nucleophilic site). This is the case when they work as hydrogen bond acceptor sites. However, the electron density in covalently bound halogens is anisotropically distributed. There is a region of higher electron density, accounting for the ability of halogens to function as electron donor sites in attractive interactions, and a region of lower electron density where the electrostatic potential is frequently positive (mainly in the heavier halogens). This latter region is responsible for the ability of halogen atoms to function as the electron-acceptor site (electrophilic site) in attractive interactions formed with a variety of lone pair-possessing atoms, anions, and π-systems. This ability is quite general and is shown by a wide diversity of halogenated compounds (e.g., organohalogen derivatives and dihalogens). According to the definition proposed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, any attractive interactions wherein the halogen atom is the electrophile is named halogen bond (XB). In this chapter, it is discussed how the practice and the concept of XB developed and a brief history of the interaction is presented. Papers (either from the primary or secondary literature) which have reported major experimental findings in the field or which have given important theoretical contributions for the development of the concept are recollected in order to trace how a unifying and comprehensive categorization emerged encompassing all interactions wherein halogen atoms function as the electrophilic site.

  1. Characterization of organic matrix extracted from fresh water pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yufei; Gao Yonghua; Feng Qingling

    2011-01-01

    Aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl from cultured Hyriopsis cumingii in Zhuji (Zhejiang province, China) were chosen for the study. The matrix proteins were extracted using water and weak acid, and classified as water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM). The proteins from both pearls were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformation infrared spectra (FTIR). The results showed that, AIM of aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl had an ordered structure of α-helix. ASM conformations of these two pearls were different from each other. WSM differed the most between these two pearls. - Research Highlights: → We use a specific method for extracting matrix proteins from aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl respectively. → The matrix proteins are extracted by water and weak acid, and classified as water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM). → AIM of aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl have an ordered structure. ASM conformations of the two pearls are different from each other. WSM differ the most between these two pearls.

  2. Influence of the extracted solute on the aggregation of malonamide extractant in organic phases: Consequences for phase stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthon, L.; Martinet, L.; Testard, F.; Madic, Ch.; Zem, Th.

    2010-01-01

    Due to their amphiphilic properties, malonamide molecules in alkane are organized in reverse micelle type aggregates, composed of a polar core formed by the malonamide polar heads and the extracted solutes, and surrounded by a hydrophobic shell made up of the extractant alkyl chains. The aggregates interact with one another through an attractive potential, leading to the formation of a third phase. This occurs with the splitting of the organic phase into a light phase composed mostly of diluent, and a heavy third phase containing highly concentrated extractant and solutes. In this article, we show that the aggregation (monomer concentration, domain of stability, and attractive potential between micelles) greatly depends on the nature of the extracted solute, whereas the size of aggregate (aggregation number) is only slightly influenced by this. We describe the extraction of water, nitric acid, neodymium nitrate and uranyl nitrate. Strongly polarizable species induce consistently large attraction potentials and a small stability domain for the dispersion of nano-droplets in the solvent. Highly polarizable ions such as lanthanides or uranyl induce more long-range attractive interactions than do protons. (authors)

  3. Effect of Organic Solvents on Microalgae Growth, Metabolism and Industrial Bioproduct Extraction: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miazek, Krystian; Kratky, Lukas; Sulc, Radek; Jirout, Tomas; Aguedo, Mario; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2017-07-04

    In this review, the effect of organic solvents on microalgae cultures from molecular to industrial scale is presented. Traditional organic solvents and solvents of new generation-ionic liquids (ILs), are considered. Alterations in microalgal cell metabolism and synthesis of target products (pigments, proteins, lipids), as a result of exposure to organic solvents, are summarized. Applications of organic solvents as a carbon source for microalgal growth and production of target molecules are discussed. Possible implementation of various industrial effluents containing organic solvents into microalgal cultivation media, is evaluated. The effect of organic solvents on extraction of target compounds from microalgae is also considered. Techniques for lipid and carotenoid extraction from viable microalgal biomass (milking methods) and dead microalgal biomass (classical methods) are depicted. Moreover, the economic survey of lipid and carotenoid extraction from microalgae biomass, by means of different techniques and solvents, is conducted.

  4. Sorption of cesium, strontium, and technetium onto organic-extracted shales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    The sorption of Cs(I), Sr(II), and Tc(VII) onto organic-extracted shales from synthetic brine groundwaters and from 0.03-M NaHCO 3 solution under oxid conditions at room temperature has been studied. The shale samples used in this study were Pumpkin Valley, Upper Dowelltown, Pierre and Green River Formation Shales. The organic content of these shales ranges from less than 2 wt% to 13 wt%. Soxhlet extraction with chloroform and a mixture of chloroform and methanol removed 0.07 to 5.9 wt% of the total organic matter from these shales. In comparison with the results of sorption of these three metal ions onto the corresponding untreated shales, it was observed that there were moderate to significant sorption decreases of Cs(I) and Sr(II) on all four organic-extracted shale samples and moderate sorption decrease of Tc(VII) on the organic-extracted Pumpkin Valley, Pierre, and Green River Shale samples, but only moderate sorption increases of Tc(VII) on the organic-extracted Upper Dowelltown Shale samples from the brine groundwaters. Nevertheless, sorption of Cs(I), Sr(II), and Tc(VII) on all four organic-extracted shale samples from the bicarbonate solution in most cases did not show a consistent pattern. (orig.)

  5. Improved light extraction from white organic light-emitting devices using a binary random phase array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Yasuhisa, E-mail: inada.yasuhisa@jp.panasonic.com; Nishiwaki, Seiji; Hirasawa, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Hashiya, Akira; Wakabayashi, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Masa-aki [R and D Division, Panasonic Corporation, 1006 Kadoma, Kadoma City, Osaka 571-8501 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Jumpei [Device Development Center, Eco Solutions Company, Panasonic Corporation, 1048 Kadoma, Osaka 571-8686 Japan (Japan)

    2014-02-10

    We have developed a binary random phase array (BRPA) to improve the light extraction performance of white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs). We demonstrated that the scattering of incoming light can be controlled by employing diffraction optics to modify the structural parameters of the BRPA. Applying a BRPA to the substrate of the WOLED leads to enhanced extraction efficiency and suppression of angle-dependent color changes. Our systematic study clarifies the effect of scattering on the light extraction of WOLEDs.

  6. Improved light extraction from white organic light-emitting devices using a binary random phase array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Yasuhisa; Nishiwaki, Seiji; Hirasawa, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Hashiya, Akira; Wakabayashi, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Matsuzaki, Jumpei

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a binary random phase array (BRPA) to improve the light extraction performance of white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs). We demonstrated that the scattering of incoming light can be controlled by employing diffraction optics to modify the structural parameters of the BRPA. Applying a BRPA to the substrate of the WOLED leads to enhanced extraction efficiency and suppression of angle-dependent color changes. Our systematic study clarifies the effect of scattering on the light extraction of WOLEDs

  7. Extractability of water-soluble soil organic matter as monitored by spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkhili, Ezzhora; Guyot, Ghislain; Vassal, Nathalie; Richard, Claire

    2012-07-01

    Cold and hot water processes have been intensively used to recover soil organic matter, but the effect of extraction conditions on the composition of the extracts were not well investigated. Our objective was to optimize the extraction conditions (time and temperature) to increase the extracted carbon efficiency while minimizing the possible alteration of water extractable organic matter of soil (WEOM). WEOM were extracted at 20°C, 60°C, or 80°C for 24 h, 10-60 min, and 20 min, respectively. The different processes were compared in terms of pH of suspensions, yield of organic carbon, spectroscopic properties (ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence), and by chromatographic analyses. For extraction at 60°C, the time 30 min was optimal in terms of yield of organic carbon extracted and concentration of absorbing and fluorescent species. The comparison of WEOM 20°C, 24 h; 60°C, 30 min; and 80°C, 20 min highlighted significant differences. The content of total organic carbon, the value of specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)), the absorbance ratio at 254 and 365 nm (E (2)/E (3)), and the humification index varied in the order: WEOM (20°C, 24 h) < WEOM (80°C, 20 min) < WEOM (60°C, 30 min). The three WEOM contained common fluorophores associated with simple aromatic structures and/or fulvic-like and common peaks of distinct polarity as detected by ultra performance liquid chromatography. For the soil chosen, extraction at 60°C for 30 min is the best procedure for enrichment in organic chemicals and minimal alteration of the organic matter.

  8. Disinfection of vegetable seed by treatment with essential oils, organic acids and plant extract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Birnbaum, Y.E.; Zouwen, van der P.S.; Groot, S.P.C.

    2008-01-01

    Various essential oils, organic acids, Biosept, (grapefruit extract), Tillecur and extracts of stinging nettle and golden rod were tested for their antimicrobial properties in order to disinfect vegetable seed. In in vitro assays, thyme oil, oregano oil, cinnamon oil, clove oil and Biosept had the

  9. Dynamics of dissolved and extractable organic nitrogen upon soil amendment with crop residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, G.H.; Hoffland, E.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is increasingly recognized as a pivotal pool in the soil nitrogen (N) cycle. Numerous devices and sampling procedures have been used to estimate its size, varying from in situ collection of soil solution to extraction of dried soil with salt solutions. Extractable

  10. The halogen bond: Nature and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paulo J.

    2017-10-01

    The halogen bond, corresponding to an attractive interaction between an electrophilic region in a halogen (X) and a nucleophile (B) yielding a R-X⋯B contact, found applications in many fields such as supramolecular chemistry, crystal engineering, medicinal chemistry, and chemical biology. Their large range of applications also led to an increased interest in their study using computational methods aiming not only at understanding the phenomena at a fundamental level, but also to help in the interpretation of results and guide the experimental work. Herein, a succinct overview of the recent theoretical and experimental developments is given starting by discussing the nature of the halogen bond and the latest theoretical insights on this topic. Then, the effects of the surrounding environment on halogen bonds are presented followed by a presentation of the available method benchmarks. Finally, recent experimental applications where the contribution of computational chemistry was fundamental are discussed, thus highlighting the synergy between the lab and modeling techniques.

  11. Iron Mineral Catalyzed C-H Activation As a Potential Pathway for Halogenation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbesing, C.; Schoeler, H. F.; Benzing, K.; Krause, T.; Lippe, S.; Rudloff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasing drinking water demand of mankind and an expected climate change the impact of salt lakes and salt deserts will increase within the next decades. Furthermore, a rising sea level influences coastal areas like salt marshes and abets processes which will lead to elevated organohalogen formation. An additional increase of the global warming potential, of particle formation and stratospheric ozone depletion is expected. Understanding these multifaceted processes is essential for mankind to be prepared for these alterations of the atmosphere. For example, Keppler et al. (2000) described the production of volatile halogenated organic compounds via oxidation of organic matter driven by ferric iron. However, the formation of long-chained alkyl halides in salt lakes is yet undisclosed. Despite the relative "inertness" of alkanes a direct halogenation of these compounds might be envisaged. In 2005 Vaillancourt et al. discovered a nonheme iron enzyme which is able to halogenate organic compounds via generating the high valent ferryl cation as reaction center. Based on various publications about C-H activation (Bergman, 2007) we postulate a halogenation process in which an iron containing minerals catalyse the C-H bond cleavage of organic compounds in soils. The generated organic radicals are highly reactive towards halides connected to the iron complex. We suggest that next to diagenetically altered iron containing enzymes, minerals such as oxides, hydroxides and sulfides are involved in abiotic halogenation processes. We applied the amino acid methionine as organic model compound and soluble iron species as reactants. All samples were incubated in aqueous phases containing various NaCl concentrations. As a result various halogenated ethanes and ethenes were identified as reaction products. References Bergman, R. G. (2007) Nature, 446(7134) 391-393 Keppler, F., et al. (2000) Nature, 403(6767) 298-301 Vaillancourt, F. H., et al. (2005) Nature, 436(7054) 1191-1194

  12. Analytical and preparative separation of organic acids from water by extraction with trioctylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, S.H.; Hoyer, O.; Knobel, K.P.; Hodenberg, S. von

    1977-12-01

    The extraction of pure organic acids and of humic and ligninsulfonic acid from water by a solution of trioctylamine in chloroform was investigated (technical grade amine = ALAMINE). Quantitative separation is achieved by double extraction with 5% ALAMINE at pH 3,5 - 4. The acids may be back-extracted with dilute sodium hydroxide solution. Procedures are described for the analytical extraction of water samples of 200 to 2.000 ml and for the flow-through processing of large water volumes. (orig.) [de

  13. Investigation of the remaining major and trace elements in clean coal generated by organic solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Wang; Chunqi Li; Kinya Sakanishi; Tetsuya Nakazato; Hiroaki Tao; Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takayuki Takarada; Ikuo Saito [National Institute Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

    2005-09-01

    A sub-bituminous Wyodak coal (WD coal) and a bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal (IL coal) were thermally extracted with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) to produce clean extract. A mild pretreatment with acetic acid was also carried out. Major and trace inorganic elements in the raw coals and resultant extracts were determined by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS), and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). It was found that the extraction with 1-MN resulted in 73-100% reductions in the concentration of Li, Be, V, Ga, As, Se, Sr, Cd, Ba, Hg, and Pb. The extraction with NMP yielded more extract than that with 1-MN, but it retained more organically associated major and trace metals in the extracts. In the extraction of WD coal with NMP, the acid pretreatment not only significantly enhanced the extraction yield but also significantly reduced the concentrations of alkaline earth elements such as Be, Ca, Mg, Sr, and Ba in the extract. In addition, the modes of occurrence of trace elements in the coals were discussed according to their extraction behaviors. 30 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Efficacy of antimicrobials extracted from organic pecan shell for inhibiting the growth of Listeria spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Dinesh; Crandall, Philip G; Johnson, Casey L; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C

    2013-12-01

    Growers and processors of USDA certified organic foods are in need of suitable organic antimicrobials. The purpose of the research reported here was to develop and test natural antimicrobials derived from an all-natural by-product, organic pecan shells. Unroasted and roasted organic pecan shells were subjected to solvent free extraction to produce antimicrobials that were tested against Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes serotypes to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials. The effectiveness of pecan shell extracts were further tested using a poultry skin model system and the growth inhibition of the Listeria cells adhered onto the skin model were quantified. The solvent free extracts of pecan shells inhibited Listeria strains at MICs as low as 0.38%. The antimicrobial effectiveness tests on a poultry skin model exhibited nearly a 2 log reduction of the inoculated cocktail mix of Listeria strains when extracts of pecan shell powder were used. The extracts also produced greater than a 4 log reduction of the indigenous spoilage bacteria on the chicken skin. Thus, the pecan shell extracts may prove to be very effective alternative antimicrobials against food pathogens and supplement the demand for effective natural antimicrobials for use in organic meat processing. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Selective extraction methods for aluminium, iron and organic carbon from montane volcanic ash soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.; Tonneijck, F.H.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Montane volcanic ash soils contain disproportionate amounts of soil organic carbon and thereby play an often underestimated role in the global carbon cycle. Given the central role of Al and Fe in stabilizing organic matter in volcanic ash soils, we assessed various extraction methods of Al, Fe, and

  16. Batch tests of a microbial fuel cell for electricity generation from spent organic extracts from hydrogenogenic fermentation of organic solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona-Martinez, A.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenogenic fermentative processes of organic solid wastes produce spent solids that contain substantial concentrations of low molecular weight organic acids and solvents. The spent solids can be extracted with wastewater to give a stream containing concentrated, degradable organic compounds. (Author)

  17. Extraction of interesting organic compounds from olive oil waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, Ana

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In the olive fruits there is a large amount of bioactive compounds and substances of high interest. Many of them are known by owing health beneficial properties that contribute to protective effect of the virgin olive oil. During olive oil processing, most of them remain in the olive oil wastes. Although, olive-mill wastewater (OMWW or “alpechin”, olive oil cake (OOC, and the new by-product, known as “alperujo” in Spain and generated by the two-phase extraction process, represent a major disposal and potentially severe pollution problem for the industry, they are also promising source of substances of high value. This review summarises the last knowledge on the utilisation of residual products, with more than 90 references including articles and patents, which are promising with regard to future application. All these investigations have been classified into two options, the recovery of valuable natural constituents and the bioconversion into useful products.Existe una gran cantidad de compuestos bioactivos y de alto interés presentes en la aceituna. Muchos de ellos se conocen por las cualidades beneficiosas que aportan al aceite de oliva virgen. La mayoría permanecen en mayor cantidad en el subproducto de la extracción del aceite. Aunque, el alpechín, el orujo y el nuevo subproducto de extracción del aceite en dos fases, alperujo, representan un problema potencial de vertido y contaminación, también son una prometedora fuente de compuestos de alto valor. Esta revisión resume lo último que se conoce sobre la utilización de estos residuos en el campo anteriormente mencionado, con más de 90 referencias que incluyen artículos y patentes. Todas estas investigaciones han sido clasificadas en cuanto a la recuperación de constituyentes naturalmente presentes o en cuanto a la bioconversión de los residuos en sustancias de interés.

  18. Antiviral Activity of Natural Products Extracted from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Tabassum

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and pre-clinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  19. Enzymatic vegetable organic extracts as soil biochemical biostimulants and atrazine extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Ana María; Tejada, Manuel; Díaz, Ana Isabel; Rodríguez-Morgado, Bruno; Bautista, Juan; Parrado, Juan

    2010-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to gather information on the potential effects of organic biostimulants on soil activity and atrazine biodegradation. Carob germ enzymatic extract (CGEE) and wheat condensed distiller solubles enzymatic extract (WCDS-EE) have been obtained using an enzymatic process; their main organic components are soluble carbohydrates and proteins in the form of peptides and free amino acids. Their application to soil results in high biostimulation, rapidly increased dehydrogenase, phosphatase and glucosidase activities, and an observed atrazine extender capacity due to inhibition of its mineralization. The extender capacity of both extracts is proportional to the protein/carbohydrate ratio content. As a result, these enzymatic extracts are highly microbially available, leading to two independent phenomena, fertility and an atrazine persistence that is linked to increased soil activity.

  20. Extraction of Betulin, Trimyristin, Eugenol and Carnosic Acid Using Water-Organic Solvent Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulgentius N. Lugemwa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A solvent system consisting of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water, in the volume ratio of 4.5:4.5:1, was developed and used to extract, at room temperature, betulin from white birch bark and antioxidants from spices (rosemary, thyme, sage, and oregano and white oak chips. In addition, under reflux conditions, trimyristin was extracted from nutmeg using the same solvent system, and eugenol from olives was extracted using a mixture of salt water and ethyl acetate. The protocol demonstrates the use of water in organic solvents to extract natural products from plants. Measurement of the free-radical scavenging activity using by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH indicated that the extraction of plant material using ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water (4.5:4.5:1, v/v/v was exhaustive when carried out at room temperature for 96 h.

  1. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oil and Organic Extracts of Premna integrifolia Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif M. Al-Reza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was designed to examine the chemical composition and in vitro antioxidant activity of the hydrodistillated essential oil and various extracts obtained from Premna integrifolia Linn. GC-MS analysis of the essential oil was resulted in determination 29 different compounds, representing 95.73% of total oil. Antioxidant activities of the essential oil and organic extracts of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol were determined by three different test systems namely DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide and nitric oxide radical scavenging assays. The essential oil and methanol extract showed potent antioxidant activity among all the tested samples. Furthermore, the amount of total phenolic compounds was determined and its content in methanol extract was the highest as compared to other samples. The results indicate that the essential oil and extracts of Premna integrifolia could serve as an important bio-resource of antioxidants for using in the pharmaceutical industries.

  2. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Energetic halogen atoms or ions, activated by various nuclear transformations are studied in gas, high pressure and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and liquid and solid aqueous solutions of biomolecular and organic solutes in order to understand better the mechanisms and dynamics of high energy monovalent species. The experimental program and its goals remain the same, consisting of four interrelated areas: (1) The stereochemistry of energetic 18 F, /sup 34m/Cl, and 38 Cl substitution reactions with chiral molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. (2) The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving energetic chlorine, bromine, and iodine reactions in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and aqueous solutions of biomolecules and alkyl halides is being investigated in more detail. Current attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. Specifically, energetic halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions or organic and biomolecular solutes are studied. (3) Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular and organic solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are being studied in an attempt to learn more about the activation events in the condensed phase. (4) The applications of hot chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Current attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as site indicators in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are currently being developed. 14 references

  3. Studies on halogen quenching through the Stern-Volmer plot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiue, Makoto; Ishikawa, Hiroaki.

    1978-01-01

    The quenching effect for halogenated benzenes, methanes and ethanes have been investigated. The halogen quenching was accurately measured using the internal conversion electrons emitted from 113 Sn-sup(113m)In. From the quenching constants determined by the Stern-Volmer plots with respect to various halogen quenchers, the following results have been obtained. (1) The quenching constants increase with the number of halogen substituents, so as linearly in halogenated benzenes and exponentially in halogenated methanes and ethanes. Even the isomers of halogenides have different quenching constants. (2) There is a linearity between logarithm of the quenching constant and a polarographic half-wave reduction potential. (3) Electron excitation provides larger quenching constants than UV excitation for halogenated methanes. Based on these results, the mechanism of halogen quenching have been discussed in connection with the exciplex formation. (auth.)

  4. Extraction of surface plasmons in organic light-emitting diodes via high-index coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Bert J; Frischeisen, Jörg; Jaeger, Arndt; Setz, Daniel S; Reusch, Thilo C G; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2012-03-12

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is still limited by poor light outcoupling. In particular, the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at metal-organic interfaces represents a major loss channel. By combining optical simulations and experiments on simplified luminescent thin-film structures we elaborate the conditions for the extraction of SPPs via coupling to high-index media. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the possibility to extract light from wave-guided modes and surface plasmons in a top-emitting white OLED by a high-index prism.

  5. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW HALOGENATED CURCUMINOIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Torres

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work a novel procedure of synthesis of compounds analogues to curcumin with halogens atoms in its structure is described, which can increase its solubility and biological activity. Four halogenated curcuminoids were obtained with great pharmacological interest, none of them reported in literature before. Synthesis was carried out by means of the aldol condensation assisted by microwaves of halogenated aromatic aldehydes and acetylacetona, using morpholine as basic catalyst, in absence of solvent, and the reaction just needed 1 min. The products were purified by treatment of the reaction mixture with methanol under ultrasound irradiation, followed by chromatographic column. All obtained compounds were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, quantitative elementary analysis and high resolution mass spectrometry. The RMN-1H data demonstrate in all structures of synthesized curcuminoids the enol form is the most favored.

  6. Synergistic extraction of transition metal cations from aqueous media by two separated organic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, I.

    1991-12-01

    We have therefore initiated novel approaches to the study of the mechanism of the synergistic extraction of metal ions by means of two separated organic phases, which are brought in contact with the same aqueous phase. The present work is concerned with the extraction of transition metals and actinides ions from nitric acid by chelating agents e.g., HTTA thenoyltrifluoroacetone in a diluent - the first organic phase, and by natural donor, e.g., TBP, tri-butyl phosphate in a diluent the second organic phase. The adduct formation was studied by means of spectrochemical and radiochemical methods. In the first approach the aqueous phase was attacked with both organic phases simultanously (the static or parallel extraction). In this method organic phase are separated one from the other. It was shown that even in the absence of mixing, synergism is observed under this experimental conditions. The results indicate, that adduct formation occurs in both organic phases. Nevertheless the enhanchment of extraction in the TBP phase is by far greater than that in the HTTA containing phase. This approach has one disadvatage, viz., the experiments are very time consuming, a typical experiment requiring over 10 days. In order to overcome this difficulty, the following experiments were carried out: the aqueous phase were first shaken with diluent containing an anionic ligand and the phases were allowed to separate. Then the aqueous solution were shaken with diluent containing a netural donor and the phase again were allowed to separate. The concentration of the metal ions in all the phases were determined. The experiments were repeated with an other diluent replacing the first diluent in one or both organic phases. In this way eight sequences of experiments were carried out for each concentration set chosen. The results thus point out that this experimental approach open new possibilities to investigate the mechanism and the kinetics of synergistic extraction processes. (author) the

  7. Extraction of metal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, R F

    1988-10-19

    Metal values (especially uranium values) are extracted from aqueous solutions of metal oxyions in the absence of halogen ion using an imidazole of defined formula. Especially preferred extractants are 1-alkyl imidazoles and benzimidazoles having from 7 to 25 carbon atoms in the alkyl group.

  8. Recoil halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, L.J.; Blotcky, A.J.; Firouzbakht, M.L.; Rack, E.P.; Nebraska Univ., Omaha

    1982-01-01

    Reactions of recoil 38 Cl, 80 Br and 128 I have been studied in crystalline systems of 5-halouracil, 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-halouridine as well as liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of these halogenated biomolecules. In all systems expect crystalline 5-iuodouracil the major product was the radio-labelled halide ion. There was no evidence for other halogen inorganic species. The major labelled organic product was the parent molecule. A recoil atom tracer technique was developed to acquire site information of the biomolecule solutes in the liquid and frozen aqueous systems. For all liquid and frozen aqueous systems, the halogenated biomolecules tended to aggregate. For liquid systems, the tendency for aggregation diminished as the solute concentration approached zero, where the probable state of the solute approached a monomolecular dispersion. Unlike the liquid state, the frozen ice lattice demonstated a ''caging effect'' for the solute aggregates which resulted in constant product yields over the whole concentration range. (orig.)

  9. Searching for life on Mars: degradation of surfactant solutions used in organic extraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Richard W; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C; Sephton, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Life-detection instruments on future Mars missions may use surfactant solutions to extract organic matter from samples of martian rocks. The thermal and radiation environments of space and Mars are capable of degrading these solutions, thereby reducing their ability to dissolve organic species. Successful extraction and detection of biosignatures on Mars requires an understanding of how degradation in extraterrestrial environments can affect surfactant performance. We exposed solutions of the surfactants polysorbate 80 (PS80), Zonyl FS-300, and poly[dimethylsiloxane-co-[3-(2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)ethoxy)propyl]methylsiloxane] (PDMSHEPMS) to elevated radiation and heat levels, combined with prolonged storage. Degradation was investigated by measuring changes in pH and electrical conductivity and by using the degraded solutions to extract a suite of organic compounds spiked onto grains of the martian soil simulant JSC Mars-1. Results indicate that the proton fluences expected during a mission to Mars do not cause significant degradation of surfactant compounds. Solutions of PS80 or PDMSHEPMS stored at -20 °C are able to extract the spiked standards with acceptable recovery efficiencies. Extraction efficiencies for spiked standards decrease progressively with increasing temperature, and prolonged storage at 60°C renders the surfactant solutions ineffective. Neither the presence of ascorbic acid nor the choice of solvent unequivocally alters the efficiency of extraction of the spiked standards. Since degradation of polysorbates has the potential to produce organic compounds that could be mistaken for indigenous martian organic matter, the polysiloxane PDMSHEPMS may be a superior choice of surfactant for the exploration of Mars.

  10. Overestimation of organic phosphorus in wetland soils by alkaline extraction and molybdate colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Benjamin L; Newman, Susan; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2006-05-15

    Accurate information on the chemical nature of soil phosphorus is essential for understanding its bioavailability and fate in wetland ecosystems. Solution phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy was used to assess the conventional colorimetric procedure for phosphorus speciation in alkaline extracts of organic soils from the Florida Everglades. Molybdate colorimetry markedly overestimated organic phosphorus by between 30 and 54% compared to NMR spectroscopy. This was due in large part to the association of inorganic phosphate with organic matter, although the error was exacerbated in some samples by the presence of pyrophosphate, an inorganic polyphosphate that is not detected by colorimetry. The results have important implications for our understanding of phosphorus biogeochemistry in wetlands and suggest that alkaline extraction and solution 31p NMR spectroscopy is the only accurate method for quantifying organic phosphorus in wetland soils.

  11. Thermal behavior of halogenated imidebismaleimide resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, A.; Al-Halim, N.Z.

    1995-01-01

    Several new poly-halogenated malecimides, bismaleimides and therir copoly resins were synthessised thermally from their corresponding amic acids. The synthesis was accomplished by two way method (amic acid-polimide) instead of the well-known three way method (amic acid-imide-polyimide). Thermal characterization of monomers and their cured resins was achieved using differential thermal analysis (DTA), dynamic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and isothermal gravimetric analysis (IGA). The effect of halogen substituent, especially in the ortho postion, is clear in the imidization proces, while polymerization proceeds almost equally in all systems. Thermal properties of homo and copolymers were correlated with their chemical structures. (author). 15 refs., 4

  12. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenstein, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  13. New Route to Synthesize Surface Organometallic Complexes (SOMC): An Approach by Alkylating Halogenated Surface Organometallic Fragments

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this thesis is to explore new simpler and efficient routes for the preparation of surface organometallic complexes (SOMC) for the transformation of small organic molecules to valuable products. The key element in this new route relies on surface alkylation of various halogenated surface coordination complexes or organometallic fragments (SOMF).

  14. New Route to Synthesize Surface Organometallic Complexes (SOMC): An Approach by Alkylating Halogenated Surface Organometallic Fragments

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to explore new simpler and efficient routes for the preparation of surface organometallic complexes (SOMC) for the transformation of small organic molecules to valuable products. The key element in this new route relies on surface alkylation of various halogenated surface coordination complexes or organometallic fragments (SOMF).

  15. Impact of enhanced ozone deposition and halogen chemistry on model performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, an enhanced ozone deposition scheme due to the interaction of iodide in sea-water and atmospheric ozone and the detailed chemical reactions of organic and inorganic halogen species are incorporated into the hemispheric Community Multiscale Air Quality model. Prelim...

  16. Low molecular weight halogenated hydrocarbons (LMHHs) in Mediterranean sea water: Preliminary observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, D.L.; Villeneuve, J.P.; Harvey, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Halogenated organic compounds containing 1-3 carbon atoms are among the most extensively produced synthetic chemicals. Within this group of compounds are solvents such as chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethane and the chlorofluoro carbons or freons which are used as refrigerants and aerosol sprays. Once produced many of these compounds are eventually released to the environment

  17. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biodegradation of Organic Carbon Extracted from Aquifer Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Catherine Aileen

    2006-01-01

    In conjunction with ongoing studies to develop a method for quantifying potentially biodegradable organic carbon (Rectanus et al 2005), this research was conducted to evaluate the extent to which organic carbon extracted using this method will biodegrade in anaerobic environments. The ultimate goal is to use this method for the evaluation of chloroethene contaminated sites in order to estimate the long-term sustainability of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy. Alt...

  18. The Use of TOC Reconciliation as a Means of Establishing the Degree to Which Chromatographic Screening of Plastic Material Extracts for Organic Extractables Is Complete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis; Couch, Thomas R; Robinson, Sarah J; Volz, Trent J; Colton, Raymond H

    2014-01-01

    Extracts of plastic packaging, manufacturing, and delivery systems (or their materials of construction) are analyzed by chromatographic methods to establish the system's extractables profile. The testing strategy consists of multiple orthogonal chromatographic methods, for example, gas and liquid chromatography with multiple detection strategies. Although this orthogonal testing strategy is comprehensive, it is not necessarily complete and members of the extractables profile can elude detection and/or accurate identification/quantification. Because the chromatographic methods rarely indicate that some extractables have been missed, another means of assessing the completeness of the profiling activity must be established. If the extracts are aqueous and contain no organic additives (e.g., pH buffers), then they can be analyzed for their total organic carbon content (TOC). Additionally, the TOC of an extract can be calculated based on the extractables revealed by the screening analyses. The measured and calculated TOC can be reconciled to establish the completeness and accuracy of the extractables profile. If the reconciliation is poor, then the profile is either incomplete or inaccurate and additional testing is needed to establish the complete and accurate profile. Ten test materials and components of systems were extracted and their extracts characterized for organic extractables using typical screening procedures. Measured and calculated TOC was reconciled to establish the completeness of the revealed extractables profile. When the TOC reconciliation was incomplete, the profiling was augmented with additional analytical testing to reveal the missing members of the organic extractables profile. This process is illustrated via two case studies involving aqueous extracts of sterile filters. Plastic materials and systems used to manufacture, contain, store, and deliver pharmaceutical products are extracted and the extracts analyzed to establish the materials' (or

  19. Comparative study of hypoglycemic and antibacterial activity of organic extracts of four Bangladeshi plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shah Hafez Kabir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine hypoglycemic and antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria of organic extracts of four Bangladeshi plants. Methods: An in vivo hypoglycemic effect on mice model was used to check the hypoglycemic effect of four Bangladeshi herbal organic extracts viz., roots of Curculigo recurvata W. T. Aiton (Satipata (C. recurvata, leaf of Amorphophallus bulbifer Roxb. (Olkachu (A. bulbifer, whole plant of Thunbergia grandiflora Roxb. (Nillata (T. grandiflora and leaf of Steudnera colocasiifolia K. Koch (Yunnan (S. colocasiifolia using glibenclamide as a positive control and water as a negative control. They were also tested for antibacterial activity on three Grampositive and four Gram-negative bacteria by disk diffusion method. C. recurvata, A. bulbifer and T. grandiflora were extracted with methanol and S. colocasiifolia was extracted with ethanol. Results: Among all the plant extract, only ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia leaves at 800 mg/ kg dose significantly (P < 0.01 reduced fasting glucose level in normal mice as compared to standard drug glibenclamide (5 mg/kg. Ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia leaves at 800 mg/ kg dose decreased 20.28% of blood glucose level after 2 h of administration in normal mice, where glibenclamide decreased 39.63%. Methanol extract of T. grandiflra didn’t show any zone of inhibition against the tested bacteria, but other three extracts showed a wide range of zone of inhibition. However, none of the extract showed antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria. Methanol extract of C. recurvata showed maximum zone of inhibition against Bacillus cereus [(10.50 ± 0.50 mm], Salmonella typhi [(16.20 ± 1.26 mm], Escherichia coli [(13.00 ± 1.00 mm] and ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia showed maximum zone of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus [(11.20 ± 1.26 (mm], Bacillus subtilis [(12.00 ± 0.50 (mm], Salmonella paratyphi [(10.80 ± 0.29 (mm

  20. The development of quantitative determination method of organic acids in complex poly herbal extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Dyachok

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The development of sensible, economical and expressive method of quantitative determination of organic acids in complex poly herbal extraction counted on izovaleric acid with the use of digital technologies. Materials and methods. Model complex poly herbal extraction of sedative action was chosen as a research object. Extraction is composed of these medical plants: Valeriana officinalis L., Crataégus, Melissa officinalis L., Hypericum, Mentha piperita L., Húmulus lúpulus, Viburnum. Based on chemical composition of plant components, we consider that main pharmacologically active compounds, which can be found in complex poly herbal extraction are: polyphenolic substances (flavonoids, which are contained in Crataégus, Viburnum, Hypericum, Mentha piperita L., Húmulus lúpulus; also organic acids, including izovaleric acid, which are contained in Valeriana officinalis L., Mentha piperita L., Melissa officinalis L., Viburnum; the aminoacid are contained in Valeriana officinalis L. For the determination of organic acids content in low concentration we applied instrumental method of analysis, namely conductometry titration which consisted in the dependences of water solution conductivity of complex poly herbal extraction on composition of organic acids. Result. The got analytical dependences, which describes tangent lines to the conductometry curve before and after the point of equivalence, allow to determine the volume of solution expended on titration and carry out procedure of quantitative determination of organic acids in the digital mode. Conclusion. The proposed method enables to determine the point of equivalence and carry out quantitative determination of organic acids counted on izovaleric acid with the use of digital technologies, that allows to computerize the method on the whole.

  1. Solvent extraction of thorium(IV) with dibutyldithiophosphoric acid in various organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtui, M.; Haiduc, I.

    1994-01-01

    The extraction of thorium(IV) from perchlorate solutions with di-n-butyldithiophosphoric acid (HBudtp) in various organic solvents occurs through an ion exchange mechanism. The extracted species in the organic phase is an eight-coordinate complex Th(Budtp) 4 . The higher values of the distribution ratio obtained in HBudtp-benzene-water system than in HBudtp-n-butanol-water system are explained by higher solubility of the complex species in nonpolar solvents. The position of the extraction curves in the pH-range lower than 0.7 reduces the complexation of thorium(IV) with Budtp - in the aqueous phase and also the hydrolysis process. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Remediation of soils, sediments and sludges by extraction with organic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Remediation of contaminated soils, sediments and sludges by extraction with organic solvents is still in the initial stages of development. So far hardly any scientific research has been carried out into this approach. Therefore, the main objective of the present investigation was to study

  3. Removal of H2S and volatile organic sulfur compounds by silicone membrane extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study explores an alternative process for the abatement and/or desulfurization of H2S and volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) containing waste streams, which employs a silicone-based membrane to simultaneously remove H2S and VOSC. An extractive membrane reactor allows the

  4. Determination of total and extractable hydrogen peroxide in organic and aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a spectrophotometric method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in uranyl nitrate solutions is reported. The method involves the measurement of the absorbance at 520 mm of a vanadyl peroxide species. This species was formed by the addition of a reagent consisting of vanadium (V) (50 mmol x dm -3 ) in dilute sulphuric acid (2 mol x dm -3 H 2 SO 4 ). This reagent, after dilution, was also used as an extractant for organic phase samples. The method is simple and robust and tolerant of nitric acid and U(VI). Specificity and accuracy were improved by the application of solid phase extraction techniques to remove entrained organic solvents and Pu(VI). Reverse phase solid phase extraction was used to clean-up aqueous samples or extracts which were contaminated with entrained solvent. A solid phase extraction system based upon an extraction chromatography system was used to remove Pu(IV). Detection limits of 26 μmol x dm -3 (0.88 μg x cm -3 ) or 7 μmol x dm -3 (0.24 μg x cm -3 ) for, respectively, a 1 and 4 cm path length cell were obtained. Precisions of RSD = 1.4% and 19.5% were obtained at the extremes of the calibration curve (5 mmol x dm -3 and 50 μmol x dm -3 H 2 O 2 , 1 cm cell). The introduction of the extraction and clean-up stages had a negligible effect upon the precision of the determination. The stability of an organic phase sample was tested and no loss of analyte could be discerned over a period of at least 5 days. (author)

  5. Study of the Performance of the Organic Extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides for Ag Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Carrillo-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many ways to obtain metal nanoparticles: biological, physical, and chemical ways and combinations of these approaches. Synthesis assisted with plant extracts has been widely documented. However, one issue that is under discussion refers to the metabolites responsible for reduction and stabilization that confine nanoparticle growth and prevent coalescence between nanoparticles in order to avoid agglomeration/precipitation. In this study, Ag nanoparticles were synthesized using organic extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides with different polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, and methanol. Each extract was phytochemically characterized to identify the nature of the metabolites responsible for nanoparticle formation. With methanol extract, the compounds responsible for reducing and stabilizing silver nanoparticle were associated with the presence of phenolic compounds (flavonoids and tannins, while, with dichloromethane and hexane extracts, the responsible compounds were mainly terpenoids. Large part of the reducing activity of secondary metabolites in C. ambrosioides is closely related to compounds with antioxidant capacity, such as phenolic compounds (flavone glycoside and isorhamnetin, which are the main constituents of the methanol extracts. Otherwise, terpenoids (trans-diol, α-terpineol, monoterpene hydroperoxides, and apiole are the central metabolites present in dichloromethane and hexane extracts.

  6. Pyridinium ionic liquid-based liquid-solid extraction of inorganic and organic iodine from Laminaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Qing; Yu, Wen-Yan; Xu, Jing-Jing; Cao, Jun

    2018-01-15

    A simple, green and effective extraction method, namely, pyridinium ionic liquid- (IL) based liquid-solid extraction (LSE), was first designed to extract the main inorganic and organic iodine compounds (I - , monoiodo-tyrosine (MIT) and diiodo-tyrosine (DIT)). The optimal extraction conditions were as follows: ultrasonic intensity 100W, IL ([EPy]Br) concentration 200mM, extraction time 30min, liquid/solid ratio 10mL/g, and pH value 6.5. The morphologies of Laminaria were studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The recovery values of I - , MIT and DIT from Laminaria were in the range of 88% to 94%, and limits of detection were in the range of 59.40 to 283.6ng/g. The proposed method was applied to the extraction and determination of iodine compounds in three Laminaria. The results showed that IL-based LSE could be a promising method for rapid extraction of bioactive iodine from complex food matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NEMO: Extraction and normalization of organization names from PubMed affiliations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha Reddy; Topham, Philip

    2010-10-04

    Today, there are more than 18 million articles related to biomedical research indexed in MEDLINE, and information derived from them could be used effectively to save the great amount of time and resources spent by government agencies in understanding the scientific landscape, including key opinion leaders and centers of excellence. Associating biomedical articles with organization names could significantly benefit the pharmaceutical marketing industry, health care funding agencies and public health officials and be useful for other scientists in normalizing author names, automatically creating citations, indexing articles and identifying potential resources or collaborators. Large amount of extracted information helps in disambiguating organization names using machine-learning algorithms. We propose NEMO, a system for extracting organization names in the affiliation and normalizing them to a canonical organization name. Our parsing process involves multi-layered rule matching with multiple dictionaries. The system achieves more than 98% f-score in extracting organization names. Our process of normalization that involves clustering based on local sequence alignment metrics and local learning based on finding connected components. A high precision was also observed in normalization. NEMO is the missing link in associating each biomedical paper and its authors to an organization name in its canonical form and the Geopolitical location of the organization. This research could potentially help in analyzing large social networks of organizations for landscaping a particular topic, improving performance of author disambiguation, adding weak links in the co-author network of authors, augmenting NLM's MARS system for correcting errors in OCR output of affiliation field, and automatically indexing the PubMed citations with the normalized organization name and country. Our system is available as a graphical user interface available for download along with this paper.

  8. Retention of Halogens in Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-05-01

    In spite of their potential roles as melting rate accelerators and foam breakers, halogens are generally viewed as troublesome components for glass processing. Of five halogens, F, Cl, Br, I, and At, all but At may occur in nuclear waste. A nuclear waste feed may contain up to 10 g of F, 4 g of Cl, and ≤100 mg of Br and I per kg of glass. The main concern is halogen volatility, producing hazardous fumes and particulates, and the radioactive iodine 129 isotope of 1.7x10^7-year half life. Because F and Cl are soluble in oxide glasses and tend to precipitate on cooling, they can be retained in the waste glass in the form of dissolved constituents or as dispersed crystalline inclusions. This report compiles known halogen-retention data in both high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. Because of its radioactivity, the main focus is on I. Available data on F and Cl were compiled for comparison. Though Br is present in nuclear wastes, it is usually ignored; no data on Br retention were found.

  9. The effect of organic water-miscible solvents on the extraction of uranium by TOA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiukun; Shen Xinghai; Pen Qixiu; Gao Hongchen

    1989-01-01

    The effect of organic water-miscible solvents, such as methanol, ethanol, acetone, dioxane, glycol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofurance (THF) in aqueous phase on the extraction of uranyl sulphate by tri-n-octylamine (TOA) has been investigated. All data obtained showed that the addition of alcohols, ketones etc. into aqueous phase brings about an increase of distribution ratio of uranium, whereas the addition of DMSO, DMF etc. brings about a decrease of distribution ratio of uranium. In the present study, the regularity and mechanism of extraction with TOA are further studied and discussed from the measurements of some physical properties, such as dielectric constant, interface tension etc

  10. Effect of organic amendments and compost extracts on tomato production and storability in ecological production systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ghorbani reza

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted in Shiravan, Iran, during 2005 in order to investigate the effects of organic amendments, synthetic fertilizers and compost extracts on crop health, productivity and storability of commonly used tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.. Treatments included different fertilizers of cattle, sheep and poultry manures, house-hold compost and chemical fertilizers, and five aqueous extracts from cattle manure, poultry manures, green-waste and house-hold composts and water as control. The effect of fertilizer type on tomato yield and marketable yield was significant (P

  11. Investigation of water-soluble organic matter extracted from shales during leaching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaling; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Horsfield, Brian

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the shales themselves during fluid-rock interaction. Knowledge of the composition, size and structure of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as the main controls on the release of DOC are a prerequisite for a better understanding of these interactions and its effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Black shales from four different geological settings and covering a maturity range Ro = 0.3-2.6% were extracted with deionized water. The DOC yields were found to decrease rapidly with increasing diagenesis and remain low throughout catagenesis. Four DOC fractions have been qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using size-exclusion chromatography. The concentrations of individual low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) decrease with increasing maturity of the samples except for acetate extracted from the overmature Posidonia shale, which was influenced by hydrothermal brines. The oxygen content of the shale organic matter also shows a significant influence on the release of organic acids, which is indicated by the positive trend between oxygen index (OI) and the concentrations of formate and acetate. Based on our experiments, both the properties of the organic matter source and the thermal maturation progress of the shale organic matter significantly influence the amount and quality of extracted organic compounds during the leaching experiments.

  12. Larvicidal efficacy of Scabiosa arenaria Forssk. (Dipsacaceae organs extracts against Culex pipiens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Besbes Hlila

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the larvicidal activity of sixteen extracts of Scabiosa arenaria Forssk. (S. arenaria against the third instar larvae of Culex pipiens L. (C. pipiens. Methods: Larvicidal activity of S. arenaria extracts was determined according to World Health Organization. Twenty third instars of the C. pipiens were exposed to different concentrations (15 µg/mL to 60 µg/mL of extracts. Mortality was recorded after 24 h of exposure. Results: The roots ethyl acetate fraction of S. arenaria had a significant toxic effect on larvae of C. pipiens, with high mortality percentage (100.0% ± 2.2% at 60 µg/mL, and 50% lethal concentration value of LC50 = (15.00 ± 0.09 µg/mL. Conclusions: Results show that roots ethyl acetate could be used for the production of natural bio-pesticides which could decrease our dependence on chemical pesticides.

  13. Extraction of organic materials from red water by metal-impregnated lignite activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Fangfang [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Yihe, E-mail: zyh@cugb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Lv, Fengzhu [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ye, Zhengfang, E-mail: zhengfangye@163.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences of the Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal-impregnated lignite activated carbon was investigated as adsorbent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorbent for the extraction of organic materials from 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) red water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of different metals on the extraction were investigated and discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many loading factors of Cu{sup 2+} were found having great influences on the extraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extraction performances and mechanism of TNT red water on Cu/LAC were investigated. - Abstract: Extraction of organic materials from 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) red water by lignite activated carbon (LAC) impregnated with Cu{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Ag{sup +} was investigated. The affinity to organic materials in red water was found to follow the order: Cu/LAC > Sn/LAC > Ag/LAC > Ba/LAC > Fe/LAC > Ca/LAC, which was explained by the hard and soft acid base (HSAB) theory. Cu{sup 2+} showed the best performance and several parameters were further studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified effective loading of Cu{sup 2+} on the LAC surface. The water quality before and after treated by Cu/LAC was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatograph, Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS), UV-vis spectroscopy and other analyses. The extraction performances and mechanism of organic materials on Cu/LAC were investigated through static methods. The experimental results showed that Cu/LAC possessed stronger extraction ability for the sulfonated nitrotoluenes than the non-sulfonated nitrotoluenes, the kinetic data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. In addition, the leaching out of Cu{sup 2+} from Cu/LAC was found much lower in the 100 times diluted red water (0.074%) than in the raw water (10.201%). Column adsorptions with more concentrated red water were also studied. Finally, Cu/LAC was observed to possess excellent

  14. Determination of Organic Pollutants in Small Samples of Groundwaters by Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary Gas Chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, I.; Leader, R.U.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of 22 organic compounds in polluted groundwaters. The method includes liquid-liquid extraction of the base/neutral organics from small, alkaline groundwater samples, followed by derivatisation and liquid-liquid extraction of phenolic compounds after neu...... neutralisation. The extracts were analysed by capillary gas chromatography. Dual detection by flame Ionisation and electron capture was used to reduce analysis time....

  15. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-07

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  16. Coacervative extraction as a green technique for sample preparation for the analysis of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, A; Wolska, L; Namieśnik, J

    2014-04-25

    One of the present trends in analytical chemistry is miniaturization, which is one of the methods of green analytical chemistry application. A particular emphasis is placed on the elimination of the use of large amounts of organic solvents which are toxic and harmful to the environment, maintaining high efficiency of the extraction process, high recovery values and low values of quantification (LOQ) and detection (LOD) limits. These requirements are fulfilled by coacervative extraction (CAE) technique. In this review, theoretical aspects of the coacervation process are presented along with environmental and bioanalytical applications of this technique, its advantages, limitations and competitiveness with other techniques. Due to its simplicity and rapidity, CAE is an excellent alternative for currently practiced procedures of sample preparation for the analysis of organic compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Solvent extraction of hafnium(IV) by dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid from mixed aqueous-organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Piperkovova, H.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of hafnium(IV) by heptane and toluene solutions of dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (HD) from mixed aqueous-organic solutions has been studied. Alcohols, ketones, carboxylic acids, cyclic ethers, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide were used as the organic component of the mixed phase. Methanol, ethanol, formic acid and dioxane increased the extractability of Hf(IV) whereas other solvents showed only an antagonistic effect. The results were discussed from the point of view of the changes in micellar structure of HD, and compared with the uptake of Hf(IV) by resinous cation exchangers. The solubilization by HD of alcohols, carboxylic acids and dimethylsulfoxide was demonstrated by using the corresponding 14 C and 35 S labelled compounds. (author)

  18. Enhancement in extraction rates by addition of organic acids to aqueous phase in solvent extraction of rare earth metals in presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Azis, A.; Fujita, Mamoru; Teramoto, Masaaki.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the selectivity of rare earth metals by solvent extraction is increased by the addition of a chelating agent such as diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) in the aqueous phase. One of the disadvantages of this method is the decrease in extraction rates due to complexation in the aqueous phase. In this paper, further addition of organic acids to the aqueous phase was examined for the purpose of enhancing the extraction rates in solvent extraction with DTPA. The addition of several kind of organic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid, lactic acid and citric acid was investigated for a Er/Y separation system. A remarkable enhancement in extraction rates was observed with a slight decrease in the selectivity by the addition of citric acid or lactic acid. Extraction rates in the presence of both DTPA and citric acid increased with the increase in citric acid concentration and with the increase in proton concentration. A 150 times enhancement in extraction rates was found in the low proton concentration condition. In order to analyze the extraction rates and selectivities obtained, mass transfer equations were presented by considering both the dissociation reaction of rare earth metal-DTPA complexes and the complex formation between rare earth metal and organic acid in the aqueous phase. The experimental data were analyzed by these equations. (author)

  19. Impact of solvent extraction organics on adsorption and bioleaching of A. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hualong, Yu; Xiaorong, Liu

    2017-04-01

    Copper solvent extraction entrained and dissoluted organics (SX organics) in the raffinate during SX operation can contaminated chalcopyrite ores and influence bioleaching efficiency by raffinate recycling. The adsorption and bioleaching of A. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum with contaminated ores were investigated. The results showed that, A. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum cells could adsorb quickly on minerals, the adsorption rate on contaminated ores were 83% and 60%, respectively, larger than on uncontaminated ores. However, in the bioleaching by the two kinds of acid bacterias, contaminated ores presented a lower bioleaching efficiency.

  20. Extracting the emitter orientation in organic light-emitting diodes from external quantum efficiency measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Tobias D., E-mail: Tobias.Schmidt@physik.uni-augsburg.de; Reichardt, Lukas J.; Wehrmeister, Sebastian; Scholz, Bert J.; Mayr, Christian; Brütting, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Bruetting@physik.uni-augsburg.de [Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Rausch, Andreas F.; Wehlus, Thomas; Reusch, Thilo C. G. [OSRAM OLED GmbH, Wernerwerkstrasse 2, 93049 Regensburg (Germany); Ciarnáin, Rossá Mac; Danz, Norbert [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-28

    Emitter orientation will play a major role in future applications of organic light-emitting diodes due to its strong impact on the efficiency of the devices. Up to now, determining the orientation of transition dipole moments required elaborate angular-dependent measurements of the light emission pattern. In this paper, we present a simplified and straightforward method to extract the emitter orientation from external quantum efficiency measurements. We demonstrate the validity of the method on three different dye-doped emitting systems.

  1. Oxidative Desulfurization of Gasoline by Ionic Liquids Coupled with Extraction by Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Abro, Rashid; Gao, Shurong; Chen, Xiaochun; Yu, Guangren; Abdeltawab, Ahmed A.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, desulfurization of real fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) gasoline was investigated in dual steps; first in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) using imidazolium and pyrrolidonium based Brønsted acidic ionic liquids (ILs) as solvent and catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. In second step, extractive desulfurization took place using organic solvents of furfural, furfural alcohol and ethylene glycol. Variety of factors such as temperature, time, mass ratio of oil/ILs and regene...

  2. Optimization of phenol extraction procedures for preparation of RNA from mammalian lymphoid organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.D.; Sellin, H.G.; Novelli, G.D.

    1978-07-01

    Methods have been developed to optimize the extraction of RNA from mammalian lymphoid organs (spleen) with respect to both quantity and quality of RNA and with minimal DNA contamination. Nuclease inhibitors, including diethyl pyrocarbonate, polyvinyl sulfate, and bentonite were used in the initial disruption of the tissue, which was accomplished by blender, Dounce homogenizer, or preparation of a cell suspension. Seven buffer systems, varying with respect to pH, detergent, and NaCl concentration, were used in the initial extraction with phenol, and the temperature of extraction was also varied. Protocols involving the selective use of naphthalene 1.5-disulfonic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate were developed to provide an initial RNA extract with minimal DNA content. Dounce homogenization, followed by separate treatment of nuclear and cytosol fractions, was found to be the most effective technique, both in terms of RNA yield (averaging 76%) and the quality of RNA recovered (as judged by gel electrophoresis). RNA from blender preparations contained larger amounts of DNA and RNA yield was decreased to 54%. RNA extracted from spleen cell suspensions was of poor quality and gave very poor yield (27%).

  3. Boiling points of halogenated ethanes: an explanatory model implicating weak intermolecular hydrogen-halogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Guy

    2008-10-23

    This study explores via structural clues the influence of weak intermolecular hydrogen-halogen bonds on the boiling point of halogenated ethanes. The plot of boiling points of 86 halogenated ethanes versus the molar refraction (linked to polarizability) reveals a series of straight lines, each corresponding to one of nine possible arrangements of hydrogen and halogen atoms on the two-carbon skeleton. A multiple linear regression model of the boiling points could be designed based on molar refraction and subgroup structure as independent variables (R(2) = 0.995, standard error of boiling point 4.2 degrees C). The model is discussed in view of the fact that molar refraction can account for approximately 83.0% of the observed variation in boiling point, while 16.5% could be ascribed to weak C-X...H-C intermolecular interactions. The difference in the observed boiling point of molecules having similar molar refraction values but differing in hydrogen-halogen intermolecular bonds can reach as much as 90 degrees C.

  4. Biological activities of organic extracts of four Aureobasidium pullulans varieties isolated from extreme marine and terrestrial habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botić, Tanja; Kralj-Kunčič, Marjetka; Sepčić, Kristina; Batista, Urška; Zalar, Polona; Knez, Željko; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2014-01-01

    We report on the screening for biological activities of organic extracts from seven strains that represent four varieties of the fungus Aureobasidium pullulans, that is A. pullulans var. melanogenum, A. pullulans var. pullulans, A. pullulans var. subglaciale and A. pullulans var. namibiae. We monitored haemolysis, cytotoxicity, antioxidant capacity and growth inhibition against three bacterial species. The haemolytic activity of A. pullulans var. pullulans EXF-150 strain was due to five different haemolytically active fractions. Extracts from all of the other varieties contained at least one haemolytically active fraction. Short-term exposure of cell lines to these haemolytically active organic extracts resulted in more than 95% cytotoxicity. Strong antioxidant capacity, corresponding to 163.88 μg ascorbic acid equivalent per gram of total solid, was measured in the organic extract of the strain EXF-3382, obtained from A. pullulans var. melanogenum, isolated from the deep sea. Organic extracts from selected varieties of A. pullulans exhibited weak antibacterial activities.

  5. The variability of standard artificial soils: Behaviour, extractability and bioavailability of organic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Jakub; Hovorková, Ivana; Semple, Kirk T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Artificial soils from different laboratories revealed different fates, behaviour and bioavailability of lindane and phenanthrene. • Lindane behaviour was related to organic carbon. • Phenanthrene behaviour was significantly affected by degrading microorganisms from peat. • Sterilization of artificial soils might reduce unwanted variability. -- Abstract: Artificial soil is an important standard medium and reference material for soil ecotoxicity bioassays. Recent studies have documented the significant variability of their basic properties among different laboratories. Our study investigated (i) the variability of ten artificial soils from different laboratories by means of the fate, extractability and bioavailability of phenanthrene and lindane, and (ii) the relationships of these results to soil properties and ageing. Soils were spiked with 14 C-phenanthrene and 14 C-lindane, and the total residues, fractions extractable by hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and the fractions of phenanthrene mineralizable by bacteria were determined after 1, 14, 28 and 56 days. Significant temporal changes in total residues and extractable and mineralizable fractions were observed for phenanthrene, resulting in large differences between soils after 56 days. Phenanthrene mineralization by indigenous peat microorganisms was suggested as the main driver of that, outweighing the effects of organic matter. Lindane total residues and extractability displayed much smaller changes over time and smaller differences between soils related to organic matter. Roughly estimated, the variability between the artificial soils was comparable to natural soils. The implications of such variability for the results of toxicity tests and risk assessment decisions should be identified. We also suggested that the sterilization of artificial soils might reduce unwanted variability

  6. The variability of standard artificial soils: Behaviour, extractability and bioavailability of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, Jakub, E-mail: hofman@recetox.muni.cz [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, Brno CZ-62500 (Czech Republic); Hovorková, Ivana [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, Brno CZ-62500 (Czech Republic); Semple, Kirk T. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Artificial soils from different laboratories revealed different fates, behaviour and bioavailability of lindane and phenanthrene. • Lindane behaviour was related to organic carbon. • Phenanthrene behaviour was significantly affected by degrading microorganisms from peat. • Sterilization of artificial soils might reduce unwanted variability. -- Abstract: Artificial soil is an important standard medium and reference material for soil ecotoxicity bioassays. Recent studies have documented the significant variability of their basic properties among different laboratories. Our study investigated (i) the variability of ten artificial soils from different laboratories by means of the fate, extractability and bioavailability of phenanthrene and lindane, and (ii) the relationships of these results to soil properties and ageing. Soils were spiked with {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-lindane, and the total residues, fractions extractable by hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and the fractions of phenanthrene mineralizable by bacteria were determined after 1, 14, 28 and 56 days. Significant temporal changes in total residues and extractable and mineralizable fractions were observed for phenanthrene, resulting in large differences between soils after 56 days. Phenanthrene mineralization by indigenous peat microorganisms was suggested as the main driver of that, outweighing the effects of organic matter. Lindane total residues and extractability displayed much smaller changes over time and smaller differences between soils related to organic matter. Roughly estimated, the variability between the artificial soils was comparable to natural soils. The implications of such variability for the results of toxicity tests and risk assessment decisions should be identified. We also suggested that the sterilization of artificial soils might reduce unwanted variability.

  7. Antiperoxidative Activity of Tetracarpidium conophorum Leaf Extract in Reproductive Organs of Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seun Funmilola Akomolafe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetracarpidium conophorum (Mull. Arg. Hutch. & Dalz is one of the many medicinal plants used in folklore as male fertility enhancers. This research was aimed at evaluating the anti-peroxidative activity of the leaves of this plant by determining their capacity to reduce malondialdehyde (MDA level in reproductive organs and accessory glands of rats. Adult male rats were administered orally with the aqueous leaf extract from T. conophorum at 50, 500 and 1000 mg/kg body weight for 21 consecutive days while clomiphene citrate (1.04 mg/kg body weight, a fertility drug was used as standard. The results of the study indicated that there was increase in relative organ weight, body weight, mean total food and water consumed by the treated groups. Testicular MDA level was highly significantly different from that of the control (p<0.0001 although a tentatively decreased MDA level was observed. However, MDA levels in the reproductive accessory glands, epididymis, seminal vesicle and prostate gland were insignificantly (p<0.05 lower than those of controls. The highest percentage decrease of MDA level (66.35, 42.68, 62.50 and 63.36% was observed at the highest concentration of the extract (1000 mg/kg in the testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle and prostate gland respectively. These values were two-fold greater than the values obtained for the standard drug. Interestingly, the treatment of rats with the extract significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and the levels of GSH, vitamin C and total protein. Collectively, the results suggest that the extract from T. conophorum leaves had greater capacity to reduce lipid peroxidation in reproductive organs and accessory glands and thus, this plant may be useful in the treatment/management of reproductive cellular damage involving reactive oxygen species.

  8. Computational Tools To Model Halogen Bonds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Melissa Coates; Ho, P Shing

    2016-03-10

    The use of halogens in therapeutics dates back to the earliest days of medicine when seaweed was used as a source of iodine to treat goiters. The incorporation of halogens to improve the potency of drugs is now fairly standard in medicinal chemistry. In the past decade, halogens have been recognized as direct participants in defining the affinity of inhibitors through a noncovalent interaction called the halogen bond or X-bond. Incorporating X-bonding into structure-based drug design requires computational models for the anisotropic distribution of charge and the nonspherical shape of halogens, which lead to their highly directional geometries and stabilizing energies. We review here current successes and challenges in developing computational methods to introduce X-bonding into lead compound discovery and optimization during drug development. This fast-growing field will push further development of more accurate and efficient computational tools to accelerate the exploitation of halogens in medicinal chemistry.

  9. New Type of Halogen Bond: Multivalent Halogen Interacting with π- and σ-Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir J. Grabowski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed for complexes of BrF3 and BrF5 acting as Lewis acids through the bromine centre, with species playing a role of Lewis base: dihydrogen, acetylene, ethylene, and benzene. The molecular hydrogen donates electrons by its σ-bond, while in remaining moieties—in complexes of hydrocarbons; such an electron transfer follows from π-electrons. The complexes are linked by a kind of the halogen bond that is analyzed for the first time in this study, i.e., it is the link between the multivalent halogen and π or σ-electrons. The nature of such a halogen bond is discussed, as well as various dependencies and correlations are presented. Different approaches are applied here, the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, Natural Bond Orbital method, the decomposition of the energy of interaction, the analysis of electrostatic potentials, etc.

  10. Halogenation of Hydraulic Fracturing Additives in the Shale Well Parameter Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, A. J.; Plata, D.

    2017-12-01

    Horizontal Drilling and Hydraulic fracturing (HDHF) involves the deep-well injection of a `fracking fluid' composed of diverse and numerous chemical additives designed to facilitate the release and collection of natural gas from shale plays. The potential impacts of HDHF operations on water resources and ecosystems are numerous, and analyses of flowback samples revealed organic compounds from both geogenic and anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, halogenated chemicals were also detected, and these compounds are rarely disclosed, suggesting the in situ halogenation of reactive additives. To test this transformation hypothesis, we designed and operated a novel high pressure and temperature reactor system to simulate the shale well parameter space and investigate the chemical reactivity of twelve commonly disclosed and functionally diverse HDHF additives. Early results revealed an unanticipated halogenation pathway of α-β unsaturated aldehyde, Cinnamaldehyde, in the presence of oxidant and concentrated brine. Ongoing experiments over a range of parameters informed a proposed mechanism, demonstrating the role of various shale-well specific parameters in enabling the demonstrated halogenation pathway. Ultimately, these results will inform a host of potentially unintended interactions of HDHF additives during the extreme conditions down-bore of a shale well during HDHF activities.

  11. Determination of silver in soils, sediments, and rocks by organic-chelate extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Ball, J.W.; Nakagawa, H.M.

    1971-01-01

    A useful method for the determination of silver in soil, sediment, and rock samples in geochemical exploration has been developed. The sample is digested with concentrated nitric acid, and the silver extracted with triisooctyl thiophosphate (TOTP) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) after dilution of the acid digest to approximately 6 M. The extraction of silver into the organic extractant is quantitative and not affected by the nitric acid concentration from 4 M to 8 M, or by different volumes of TOTP-MIBK. The extracted silver is stable and remains in the organic phase up to several days. The silver concentration is determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1971.

  12. Effect of temperature on the extraction of europium (III) bymixtures of neutral phosphoro-organic extractants from nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milchlin, E.B.; Khmuran, M.A.; Mikhailichenko, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the distribution of microquantities of europium (III) on extraction with neutral phosphoorganic compounds-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), diisooctylmethyl phosphonate (DIOMP),trialkylphosphine oxide with dissimilar radicals (PODR), or mixtures thereof-from a solution of 2 mole/liter NH 4 NO 3 and 0.01 mole/liter HNO 3 , in the temperature range 20-60 0 C. A temperature rise results in a decrease of the distribution coefficients of the europium on extraction by all of the extractants tested and their mixtures, and also in a reduction of the synergistic effect in extraction by mixtures of the extractants. Based on an investigation of the temperature dependences of the distribution constants of europium nitrate upon extraction by TBP, DIOMP, PODR, or their mixtures, values have been determined for the enthalpy, free energy, and entropy of extraction. It is shown that the enthalpy (-ΔH) increases in the order TBP< DIOMP< PODR. In an extraction with mixed extractants, the enthalpy has a value intermediate between those with the individual extractants. The entropy of extraction (-ΔS) increases in the reverse order PODR< DIOMP< TBP

  13. Removal of endotoxins from bacteriophage preparations by extraction with organic solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Szermer-Olearnik

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin, pyrogen constitutes a very troubling contaminant of crude phage lysates produced in Gram-negative bacteria. Toxicity of LPS depends on the strong innate immunity response including the cytokines. Therefore, its removal is important for bacteriophage applications. In this paper, we present a procedure for extractive removal of endotoxin from bacteriophage preparations with water immiscible solvents (1-octanol or 1-butanol. During extraction most of the phage lytic activity is retained in the aqueous phase, while endotoxin accumulates in the organic solvent. The levels of endotoxin (expressed as endotoxin units, EU in the aqueous bacteriophage-containing fraction determined by limulus amebocyte lysate or EndoLISA assay were exceptionally low. While the initial endotoxin levels in the crude phage lysates ranged between 10(3 and 10(5 EU/ml the average level after organic extraction remaining in the aqueous fraction was 5.3 EU/ml. These values when related to phage titers decreased from 10(3-10(5 EU/10(9 PFU (plaque forming units down to an average of 2.8 EU/10(9 PFU. The purification procedure is scalable, efficient and applicable to all the bacteriophages tested: T4, HAP1 (E. coli and F8 (P. aeruginosa.

  14. Manifold Learning with Self-Organizing Mapping for Feature Extraction of Nonlinear Faults in Rotating Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for extracting the low-dimensional feature automatically with self-organization mapping manifold is proposed for the detection of rotating mechanical nonlinear faults (such as rubbing, pedestal looseness. Under the phase space reconstructed by single vibration signal, the self-organization mapping (SOM with expectation maximization iteration algorithm is used to divide the local neighborhoods adaptively without manual intervention. After that, the local tangent space alignment algorithm is adopted to compress the high-dimensional phase space into low-dimensional feature space. The proposed method takes advantages of the manifold learning in low-dimensional feature extraction and adaptive neighborhood construction of SOM and can extract intrinsic fault features of interest in two dimensional projection space. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the Lorenz system was simulated and rotation machinery with nonlinear faults was obtained for test purposes. Compared with the holospectrum approaches, the results reveal that the proposed method is superior in identifying faults and effective for rotating machinery condition monitoring.

  15. Light extraction enhancement from organic light-emitting diodes with randomly scattered surface fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Gao, Chun-Hong; Cai, Shi-Duan; Jin, Yue; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A combination of scattering layer and roughened substrate is used for light extraction from OLEDs. • The scattering layer is readily achieved by spin-coating the TiO{sub 2} sol. • The enhancement relying scattering depends on the size of TiO{sub 2} nano particles. • With the light extraction techniques the uniform emission is achieved. - Abstract: A combination of a scattering medium layer and a roughened substrate was proposed to enhance the light extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Comparing with a reference OLED without any scattering layer, 65% improvement in the forward emission has been achieved with a scattering layer formed on an intentionally roughened external substrate surface of the OLED by spin-coating a sol–gel fabricated matrix containing well dispersed titania (TiO{sub 2}) particles. Such a combination method not only demonstrated efficient extraction of the light trapped in the glass substrate but also achieved homogenous emission from the OLED panel. The proposed technique, convenient and inexpensive, is believed to be suitable for the large area OLED production in lighting applications.

  16. Downstream extraction process development for recovery of organic acids from a fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekatorou, Argyro; Dima, Agapi; Tsafrakidou, Panagiotia; Boura, Konstantina; Lappa, Katerina; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Pissaridi, Katerina; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2016-11-01

    The present study focused on organic acids (OAs) recovery from an acidogenic fermentation broth, which is the main problem regarding the use of OAs for production of ester-based new generation biofuels or other applications. Specifically, 10 solvents were evaluated for OAs recovery from aqueous media and fermentation broths. The effects of pH, solvent/OAs solution ratios and application of successive extractions were studied. The 1:1 solvent/OAs ratio showed the best recovery rates in most cases. Butyric and isobutyric acids showed the highest recovery rates (80-90%), while lactic, succinic, and acetic acids were poorly recovered (up to 45%). The OAs recovery was significantly improved by successive 10-min extractions. Alcohols presented the best extraction performance. The process using repeated extractions with 3-methyl-1-butanol led to the highest OAs recovery. However, 1-butanol can be considered as the most cost-effective option taking into account its price and availability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Lerch, Harry E.; Bates, Anne L.; Engle, Mark A.; Crosby, Lynn M.; McIntosh, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8 mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500 mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000 s of μg/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20 days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250 days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

  18. Polarographic behaviour and determination of uranium(VI) in alcoholic solutions from organic extraction phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Taibi, K.

    1996-01-01

    The determination of U(VI) in organic extraction phases: hydrocarbon-diethyl-2-hexyl phosphoric acid-trioctylphosphine oxide and hydrocarbon-tri-n-octylamine, diluted by an alcohol has been studied by direct current polarography, as well as by differential pulse polarography (DPP). In order to optimise the analytical procedure, miscibility and conductivity studies of the mixtures hydrocarbon-alcohol (ethanol, n- and isopropanol and n- and isobutanol) were made after addition of sulphuric acid as a supporting electrolyte. In the solutions of sulphuric acid in the alcohol-extractant-hydrocarbon phases, U(VI) gives rise to well defined polarograms. Its electroreduction involves a single electron step in all cases. The DPP peak height is proportional to the U(VI) concentration between 2x10 -6 and 2x10 -3 M, and the 3σ detection limit is ca. 10 -6 M

  19. Organic acid enhanced electrodialytic extraction of lead from contaminated soil fines in suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2007-01-01

    for decontamination of the sludge was investigated. The ability of 11 organic acids to extract Pb from the fine fraction of contaminated soil (grains soil fines in suspension......The implementation of soil washing technology for the treatment of heavy metal contaminated soils is limited by the toxicity and unwieldiness of the remaining heavy metal contaminated sludge. In this work, the feasibility of combining electrodialytic remediation with heterotrophic leaching...... was tested. Five of the acids showed the ability to extract Ph from the soil fines in excess of the effect caused solely by pH changes. Addition of the acids, however, severely impeded EDR, hence promotion of EDR by combination with heterotrophic leaching was rejected. In contrast, enhancement of EDR...

  20. The direct effect of ultrasound on the extraction of date syrup and its micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, M H; Hagh Nazary, S; Haddad Khodaparast, M H

    2004-09-01

    In the date syrup industry, date fruits are mixed with a suitable amount of water at a temperature greater than 50 degrees C for about 1 h. This condition is not sufficient for killing the micro-organisms present in the fruit. In addition, Overheating for a long time can damages nutritious materials and also changes the final product's color. Ultrasound was applied for improving the quantity and quality of the extraction, and also to overcome the health problem. In this research, the following variables were examined: date fruit/water ratio, ultrasonic intensity and temperature. The results showed that sonication under the proper conditions can lead to a higher extraction in a shorter time with a better physical quality of the product. Most importantly, the sonication significantly decreased the microbial count in comparison to the classical method. This study also confirmed the presence of anti-microbial substances in date fruit, and that ultrasonic waves can accelerate their effects.

  1. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  2. Plasmonically sensitized metal-oxide electron extraction layers for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, S; Becker, T; Zilberberg, K; Behrendt, A; Polywka, A; Heiderhoff, R; Görrn, P; Riedl, T

    2015-01-16

    ZnO and TiOx are commonly used as electron extraction layers (EELs) in organic solar cells (OSCs). A general phenomenon of OSCs incorporating these metal-oxides is the requirement to illuminate the devices with UV light in order to improve device characteristics. This may cause severe problems if UV to VIS down-conversion is applied or if the UV spectral range (λ work, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are used to plasmonically sensitize metal-oxide based EELs in the vicinity (1-20 nm) of the metal-oxide/organic interface. We evidence that plasmonically sensitized metal-oxide layers facilitate electron extraction and afford well-behaved highly efficient OSCs, even without the typical requirement of UV exposure. It is shown that in the plasmonically sensitized metal-oxides the illumination with visible light lowers the WF due to desorption of previously ionosorbed oxygen, in analogy to the process found in neat metal oxides upon UV exposure, only. As underlying mechanism the transfer of hot holes from the metal to the oxide upon illumination with hν < Eg is verified. The general applicability of this concept to most common metal-oxides (e.g. TiOx and ZnO) in combination with different photoactive organic materials is demonstrated.

  3. Estimating the impact of seawater on the production of soil water-extractable organic carbon during coastal erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Fugen; Ping, Chien-Lu; Guo, Laodong; Jorgenson, Torre

    2008-01-01

    The production of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) during arctic coastal erosion and permafrost degradation may contribute significantly to C fluxes under warming conditions, but it remains difficult to quantify. A tundra soil collected near Barrow, AK, was selected to evaluate the effects of soil pretreatments (oven drying vs. freeze drying) as well as extraction solutions (pure water vs. seawater) on WEOC yields. Both oven drying and freeze drying significantly increased WEOC release compared with the original moist soil samples; dried samples released, on average, 18% more WEOC than did original moist samples. Similar results were observed for the production of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic C. However, extractable OC released from different soil horizons exhibited differences in specific UV absorption, suggesting differences in WEOC quality. Furthermore, extractable OC yields were significantly less in samples extracted with seawater compared with those extracted with pure water, likely due to the effects of major ions on extractable OC flocculation. Compared with samples from the active horizons, upper permafrost samples released more WEOC, suggesting that continuously frozen samples were more sensitive than samples that had experienced more drying-wetting cycles in nature. Specific UV absorption of seawater-extracted OC was significantly lower than that of OC extracted using pure water, suggesting more aromatic or humic substances were flocculated during seawater extraction. Our results suggest that overestimation of total terrestrial WEOC input to the Arctic Ocean during coastal erosion could occur if estimations were based on WEOC extracted from dried soil samples using pure water.

  4. Evaluation of supercritical fluid extraction/gas chromatography/matrix isolation-infrared spectrometry for analysis of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bopari, A.S.; Bierma, D.R.; Applegate, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil samples for organic compounds typically first requires Soxhlet extraction or sonication. These processes are time consuming and generate large amounts of waste solvent. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), which uses a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide, has recently been shown to extract organic compounds from soil samples in good yields. Moreover, SFE does not generate waste solvent and can be performed rapidly. Gas Chromatography/Matrix Isolation-Infrared Spectrometry (GC/MI-IR) has been used in our laboratories for determining organic compounds present in extracts from various matrices. The authors have interfaced an SFE extraction apparatus to GC/MI-IR instruments. In this paper the utility of SPE/GC/MI-IR instrumentation is discussed

  5. The use of charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage in polar organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züfle, Simon; Altazin, Stéphane; Hofmann, Alexander; Jäger, Lars; Neukom, Martin T.; Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang; Ruhstaller, Beat

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the application of the CELIV (charge carrier extraction by linearly increasing voltage) technique to bilayer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) in order to selectively determine the hole mobility in N,N0-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N0-diphenyl-1,10-biphenyl-4,40-diamine (α-NPD). In the CELIV technique, mobile charges in the active layer are extracted by applying a negative voltage ramp, leading to a peak superimposed to the measured displacement current whose temporal position is related to the charge carrier mobility. In fully operating devices, however, bipolar carrier transport and recombination complicate the analysis of CELIV transients as well as the assignment of the extracted mobility value to one charge carrier species. This has motivated a new approach of fabricating dedicated metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices, where the extraction current contains signatures of only one charge carrier type. In this work, we show that the MIS-CELIV concept can be employed in bilayer polar OLEDs as well, which are easy to fabricate using most common electron transport layers (ETLs), like Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3). Due to the macroscopic polarization of the ETL, holes are already injected into the hole transport layer below the built-in voltage and accumulate at the internal interface with the ETL. This way, by a standard CELIV experiment only holes will be extracted, allowing us to determine their mobility. The approach can be established as a powerful way of selectively measuring charge mobilities in new materials in a standard device configuration.

  6. Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wellington, Kevin W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Veterinary Parasitology, vol. 234: 10-12 Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) Wellington, KW Leboho, T Sakong, BM Adenubi, OT Eloff, JN...

  7. Extraction of pigments from seeds of Bixa orellana L.: an alternative for experimental courses in organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Charllyton Luis S. da; Chaves, Mariana H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes methodologies for the extraction and characterization by TLC, UV-VIS, IR and NMR of bixin from Bixa orellana L. (urucum) seeds. Based on the results, the extraction with NaOH 5% is the fastest, uses low cost materials, requires two to four laboratory hours and is a useful alternative for an experimental Organic Chemistry discipline. (author)

  8. Characteristics of arsenic in humic substances extracted from natural organic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Junko; Norota, Susumu; Kawebe, Yoshishige; Sugita, Hajime; Zhang, Ming

    2018-06-01

    The stability and dispersion of naturally occurring As have been receiving increasing attention, because As is toxic and its contamination is a widespread problem in many countries. This study investigated As fractionation and speciation in organic sediments collected from different depositional settings to elucidate the existence of stable As in humic substances. Eleven organic sediment samples were collected from marine and terrestrial alluvial regions in Hokkaido prefecture, Japan, and the chemical fraction of As and species of humic substances were identified by sequential extraction. In addition, stable As bound in organic matter was evaluated by FT-IR spectroscopy. The As fraction mainly comprised inorganic substances, especially sulfur, iron, and manganese, and terrestrial sediments (lacustrine and inland deposits) were rich in sulfides and Fe and Al (hydr)oxides. When the residual fraction was excluded, the organic fraction of As was higher in seawater sediments than in terrestrial sediments. Among humic substances, cellulose, humic acid, and hydrophilic fulvic acid were clearly associated with As accumulation, and As speciation showed that the As was of organic origin. Cellulose, an organic compound of plant origin, was abundant in As=S and As (III)=O bonds, and As accumulation was higher in sulfur-rich peat sediments, corresponding with the physiological activities of As in plants. Hydrophilic fulvic acid and humic acid in these sediments, originating from small animals and microorganisms in addition to plants, denote higher As contents and abound in As (III, V)=C and C-H, CH 3 bonds even in sulfur-rich sediments. The methylated As bonds reflect the ecological transition of organisms.

  9. Combining protein extraction and anaerobic digestion to produce feed, fuel and fertilizer from green biomass – An organic biorefinery concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Maria Santamaria; Salces, Beatriz Molinuevo; Lübeck, Mette

    Organically grown green biomass (red clover, clover grass) was investigated as a resource for organic feed and organic fertilizer by combination of proteins extraction and anaerobic digestion of the residues. Extraction of proteins from both crops revealed very favourable amino acid composition...... for the use as animal feed. The residual 90% of organic matter, leaving the separation as solid press cake and brown juice was subjected to anaerobic digestion to produce biogas and fertilizer. Methane yields of 220-310 and 430-540 ml CH4/g VS were obtained for press cake and brown juice, respectively...

  10. Mercury and halogens in coal: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Quick, Jeffrey C.; Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.; Senior, Constance L.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from mercury itself, coal rank and halogen content are among the most important factors inherent in coal that determine the proportion of mercury captured by conventional controls during coal combustion. This chapter reviews how mercury in coal occurs, gives available concentration data for mercury in U.S. and international commercial coals, and provides an overview of the natural variation in halogens that influence mercury capture. Three databases, the U.S. Geological Survey coal quality (USGS COALQUAL) database for in-ground coals, and the 1999 and 2010 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) databases for coals delivered to power stations, provide extensive results for mercury and other parameters that are compared in this chapter. In addition to the United States, detailed characterization of mercury is available on a nationwide basis for China, whose mean values in recent compilations are very similar to the United States in-ground mean of 0.17 ppm mercury. Available data for the next five largest producers (India, Australia, South Africa, the Russian Federation, and Indonesia) are more limited and with the possible exceptions of Australia and the Russian Federation, do not allow nationwide means for mercury in coal to be calculated. Chlorine in coal varies as a function of rank and correspondingly, depth of burial. As discussed elsewhere in this volume, on a proportional basis, bromine is more effective than chlorine in promoting mercury oxidation in flue gas and capture by conventional controls. The ratio of bromine to chlorine in coal is indicative of the proportion of halogens present in formation waters within a coal basin. This ratio is relatively constant except in coals that have interacted with deep-basin brines that have reached halite saturation, enriching residual fluids in bromine. Results presented here help optimize mercury capture by conventional controls and provide a starting point for

  11. A simple and automated sample preparation system for subsequent halogens determination: Combustion followed by pyrohydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L S F; Pedrotti, M F; Vecchia, P Dalla; Pereira, J S F; Flores, E M M

    2018-06-20

    A simple and automated system based on combustion followed by a pyrohydrolysis reaction was proposed for further halogens determination. This system was applied for digestion of soils containing high (90%) and also low (10%) organic matter content for further halogens determination. The following parameters were evaluated: sample mass, use of microcrystalline cellulose and heating time. For analytes absorption, a diluted alkaline solution (6 mL of 25 mmol L -1  NH 4 OH) was used in all experiments. Up to 400 mg of soil with high organic matter content and 100 mg of soil with low organic matter content (mixed with 400 mg of cellulose) could be completely digested using the proposed system. Quantitative results for all halogens were obtained using less than 12 min of sample preparation step (about 1.8 min for sample combustion and 10 min for pyrohydrolysis). The accuracy was evaluated using a certified reference material of coal and spiked samples. No statistical difference was observed between the certified values and results obtained by the proposed method. Additionally, the recoveries obtained using spiked samples were in the range of 98-103% with relative standard deviation values lower than 5%. The limits of quantification obtained for F, Cl, Br and I for soil with high (400 mg of soil) and low (100 mg of soil) organic matter were in the range of 0.01-2 μg g -1 and 0.07-59 μg g -1 , respectively. The proposed system was considered as a simple and suitable alternative for soils digestion for further halogens determination by ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Laboratory Investigations of Stratospheric Halogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. Michael; Stickel, Robert E.; Hynes, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    A final report for the NASA-supported project on laboratory investigations of stratospheric halogen chemistry is presented. In recent years, this project has focused on three areas of research: (1) kinetic, mechanistic, and thermochemical studies of reactions which produce weakly bound chemical species of atmospheric interest; (2) development of flash photolysis schemes for studying radical-radical reactions of stratospheric interest; and (3) photochemistry studies of interest for understanding stratospheric chemistry. The first section of this paper contains a discussion of work which has not yet been published. All subsequent chapters contain reprints of published papers that acknowledge support from this grant.

  13. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  14. [Optimization of solid-phase extraction for enrichment of toxic organic compounds in water samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-quan; Li, Feng-min; Wu, Qian-yuan; Hu, Hong-ying

    2013-05-01

    A concentration method for enrichment of toxic organic compounds in water samples has been developed based on combined solid-phase extraction (SPE) to reduce impurities and improve recoveries of target compounds. This SPE method was evaluated in every stage to identify the source of impurities. Based on the analysis of Waters Oasis HLB without water samples, the eluent of SPE sorbent after dichloromethane and acetone contributed 85% of impurities during SPE process. In order to reduce the impurities from SPE sorbent, soxhlet extraction of dichloromethane followed by acetone and lastly methanol was applied to the sorbents for 24 hours and the results had proven that impurities were reduced significantly. In addition to soxhlet extraction, six types of prevalent SPE sorbents were used to absorb 40 target compounds, the lgK(ow) values of which were within the range of 1.46 and 8.1, and recovery rates were compared. It was noticed and confirmed that Waters Oasis HLB had shown the best recovery results for most of the common testing samples among all three styrenedivinylbenzene (SDB) polymer sorbents, which were 77% on average. Furthermore, Waters SepPak AC-2 provided good recovery results for pesticides among three types of activated carbon sorbents and the average recovery rates reached 74%. Therefore, Waters Oasis HLB and Waters SepPak AC-2 were combined to obtain a better recovery and the average recovery rate for the tested 40 compounds of this new SPE method was 87%.

  15. Selected phytotoxins and organic extracts from endophytic fungus Edenia gomezpompae as light reaction of photosynthesis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Rubalcava, Martha Lydia; Ruiz-Velasco Sobrino, María Emma; Meléndez-González, Claudio; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2014-09-05

    In a search for natural herbicides, we investigated the action mechanism of the naphthoquinone spiroketals, isolated from the endophytic fungus Edenia gomezpompae: preussomerins EG1 (1) and EG4 (2), and palmarumycins CP17 (3), and CP2 (4) on the photosynthesis light reactions. The naphthoquinone spiroketals 1-4 inhibited the ATP synthesis in freshly lysed spinach thylakoids from water to MV, and they also inhibited the non-cyclic electron transport in the basal, phosphorylating and uncoupled conditions from water to MV. Therefore, they act as Hill reaction inhibitors. The results suggested that naphthoquinone spiroketals 1-4 have two interactions and inhibition site on the PSII electron transport chain. The first one involves the water splitting enzyme inhibition; and, the second on the acceptor site of PSII in a similar way that herbicide Diuron, studied by polaroghaphy and corroborated by fluorescence of the chlorophyll a of PSII. The culture medium and mycelium organic extracts from four morphological variants of E. gomezpompae were phytotoxic, and the culture medium extracts were more potent than mycelium extracts. They also act as Hill reaction inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Interpreting impedance spectra of organic photovoltaic cells—Extracting charge transit and recombination rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Zou, Yunlong; Holmes, Russell J., E-mail: rholmes@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Holst, James [New Products R and D, Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, 6000 N. Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53209 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    Impedance spectroscopy has been widely used to extract the electron-hole recombination rate constant in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). This technique is typically performed on OPVs held at open-circuit. Under these conditions, the analysis is simplified with recombination as the only pathway for the decay of excess charge carriers; transit provides no net change in the charge density. In this work, we generalize the application and interpretation of impedance spectroscopy for bulk heterojunction OPVs at any operating voltage. This, in conjunction with reverse bias external quantum efficiency measurements, permits the extraction of both recombination and transit rate constants. Using this approach, the transit and recombination rate constants are determined for OPVs with a variety of electron donor-acceptor pairings and compositions. It is found that neither rate constant individually is sufficient to characterize the efficiency of charge collection in an OPV. It is demonstrated that a large recombination rate constant can be accompanied by a large transit rate constant, thus fast recombination is not necessarily detrimental to OPV performance. Extracting the transit and recombination rate constants permits a detailed understanding of how OPV architecture and processing conditions impact the transient behavior of charge carriers, elucidating the origin of optimum device configurations.

  17. Scientific conferences: A big hello to halogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Mate

    2014-09-01

    Halogen bonding connects a wide range of subjects -- from materials science to structural biology, from computation to crystal engineering, and from synthesis to spectroscopy. The 1st International Symposium on Halogen Bonding explored the state of the art in this fast-growing field of research.

  18. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject to...

  19. Advances in organic-inorganic hybrid sorbents for the extraction of organic and inorganic pollutants in different types of food and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Nyuk-Ting; Kamaruddin, Amirah Farhan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Abdul Keyon, Aemi S

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of the extraction and removal of pollutants from food and the environment has been an important issue in analytical science. By incorporating inorganic species into an organic matrix, a new material known as an organic-inorganic hybrid material is formed. As it possesses high selectivity, permeability, and mechanical and chemical stabilities, organic-inorganic hybrid materials constitute an emerging research field and have become popular to serve as sorbents in various separaton science methods. Here, we review recent significant advances in analytical solid-phase extraction employing organic-inorganic composite/nanocomposite sorbents for the extraction of organic and inorganic pollutants from various types of food and environmental matrices. The physicochemical characteristics, extraction properties, and analytical performances of sorbents are discussed; including morphology and surface characteristics, types of functional groups, interaction mechanism, selectivity and sensitivity, accuracy, and regeneration abilities. Organic-inorganic hybrid sorbents combined with extraction techniques are highly promising for sample preparation of various food and environmental matrixes with analytes at trace levels. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Solvent extraction of organic acids from stillage for its re-use in ethanol production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, G A; Caicedo, L A; Alméciga-Díaz, C J; Sanchez, O F

    2010-06-01

    Stillage re-use in the fermentation stage in ethanol production is a technique used for the reduction of water and fermentation nutrients consumption. However, the inhibitory effect on yeast growth of the by-products and feed components that remains in stillage increases with re-use and reduces the number of possible recycles. Several methods such as ultrafiltration, electrodialysis and advanced oxidation processes have been used in stillage treatment prior its re-use in the fermentation stage. Nevertheless, few studies evaluating the effect of solvent extraction as a stillage treatment option have been performed. In this work, the inhibitory effect of serial stillage recycling over ethanol and biomass production was determined, using acetic acid as a monitoring compound during the fermentation and solvent extraction process. Raw palm oil methyl ester showed the highest acetic acid extraction from the aqueous phase, presenting a distribution coefficient of 3.10 for a 1:1 aqueous phase mixture:solvent ratio. Re-using stillage without treatment allowed up to three recycles with an ethanol production of 53.7 +/- 2.0 g L(-1), which was reduced 25% in the fifth recycle. Alternatively, treated stillage allowed up to five recycles with an ethanol final concentration of 54.7 +/- 1.3 g L(- 1). These results show that reduction of acetic acid concentration by an extraction process with raw palm oil methyl ester before re-using stillage improves the number of recycles without a major effect on ethanol production. The proposed process generates a palm oil methyl ester that contains organic acids, among other by-products, that could be used for product recovery and as an alternative fuel.

  1. Studies on avoiding second organic phase in DHDECMP-TBP/kerosene with the extraction of HNO3-Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zilin; Zhao Hugen; Hu Jingxin

    1998-01-01

    The bidentate extractant of DHDECMP (CMP) may by more practical in the treatment of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) if it could be diluted by kerosene. Bu it is difficult to avoid the formation of second organic phase in CMP/kerosene with the extraction of HNO 3 and RE. It is advantageous to avoid the formation of second organic phase after the extraction of HNO 3 and Gd by adding TBP. The formation conditions of second organic phase are studied and the loaded capacity of RE-HNO 3 is measured. The results are as follows. Raising temperature has a slight advantage to avoid formation of second organic phase. The addition of TBP is beneficial to avoid second organic phase. An organic system of 0.60 mol/L CMP-1.20 mol/L TBP/kerosene contacting with an aqueous solution containing 6.0 mol/L HNO 3 does not appear second organic phase. The extraction of RE leads to form second organic phase which does not occur when it only extracts HNO 3 . It is able to avoid second organic phase with a low concentration of CMP. The higher concentration of CMP, the higher loaded capacity of Gd 3+ and HNO 3 . It is advantageous to avoid second organic phase formation and also to get a higher loaded capacity of Gd 3+ and HNO 3 with increasing concentration of TBP. The loaded capacity of Gd decreases with an increasing initial concentration of HNO 3 in aqueous phase because of an increasing concentration of HNO 3 in the organic phase. The loaded capacity of Gd increases with raising temperature. To treat HLLW, the organic system containing 0.60 mol/L CMP and 1.40 mol/L TBP is recommended

  2. chemical studies on the reactivity of some organic extractants for extraction and separation of certain elements from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.M.I.

    2010-01-01

    Lanthanide elements such as lanthanum and neodymium are important elements in photo-electronic and metallurgical industries as well as in nuclear technology. The main constituents of the spent nuclear fuel are actinides like uranium, thorium and various fission products including lanthanides. The co-ordination compounds of the trivalent lanthanum and neodymium continues to be an active research area, which includes the specific spectroscopic and magnetic properties of rare earth ions and their applications as super molecular device, contrast-enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging, optical signal amplifiers and electroluminescent (EL) devices. Hence, the separation and purification of these elements is of great concern. Solvent extraction technique is employed to separate and purify rare earth elements in an industrial scale, but the separation of lanthanum and neodymium is a difficult task, as lanthanide ions exhibit similar chemical and physical properties. They have generally common and stable +3 oxidation state that requires synthesis of certain extractants which are able to extract them from different aqueous solutions. During the last twenty years, different publications have pointed out the remarkable properties of alkyl amide in the field of separation chemistry. These extractants are able to form stable co-ordination compounds with different metallic ions. In this concern, this thesis deals with the synthesis of different amide extractants namely N, N diethylacetoamide (DEAA), N, N Teteraphenyl malonamide (TPMA), N, N diphenylbenzamide (DPBA), N, N' diphenylacetoamide (DPAA), and N, N' Teteraethyl malonamide (TEMA), which were synthesized, characterized and compared with Aliquat-336 in kerosene for extraction and separation of La (III) and Nd (III). The effect of the different parameters affecting the extraction of these metals from aqueous nitric acid medium in the different systems has been studied in terms of shaking time, nitric acid, hydrogen

  3. [Near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Yasuo

    2012-07-01

    The practical electric light bulb was invented by Thomas Alva Edison in 1879. Halogen lamp is the toughest and brightest electric light bulb. With light filter, it is used as a source of near infrared light. Super Lizer and Alphabeam are made as near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp. The light emmited by Super Lizer is linear polarized near infrared light. The wave length is from 600 to 1,600 nm and strongest at about 1,000 nm. Concerning Super Lizer, there is evidence of analgesic effects and normalization of the sympathetic nervous system. Super Lizer has four types of probes. SG type is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. B type is used for narrow area irradiation. C and D types are for broad area irradiation. The output of Alphabeam is not polarized. The wave length is from 700 to 1,600 nm and the strongest length is about 1,000nm. Standard attachment is used for spot irradiation. Small attachment is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. Wide attachment is used for broad area irradiation. The effects of Alphabeam are thought to be similar to that of Super Lizer.

  4. Combining essential oils and olive extract for control of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the combined antimicrobial effects of plant essential oils and olive extract against antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Newport on organic leafy greens. Organic baby spinach, mature spinach, romaine lettuce, and iceberg lettuce were inoculated with S. Newport and dip-t...

  5. The speciation of radionuclides in sediments and soils. Part II. Studies with a sequential organic extraction procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, H.A.; Williams, G.A.; Cooper, M.B.

    1983-07-01

    A series of chemical extractions with a range of organic solvents has been performed to investigate the speciation of radionuclides in soil and sediment samples from the Mt. Brockman area in the Northern Territory. The major result is that of all the organic solvents used in the extractions, only acetic acid removes large proportions of the radionuclides 210 Pb (ca. 30-70%) and 226 Ra (10-55%) from the soil and sediment samples. The failure of the other organic solvents, and in particular dimethylformamide, to extract appreciable amounts of these radionuclides is taken to indicate that 210 Pb and 226 Ra are not present as discrete metal complexes of organic ligands. The overriding conclusion, that the acidic nature of the solvent is the most important property in releasing the bound radionuclides into solution, suggests that even under mildly acidic conditions encountered in the environment significant amounts of 210 Pb and 226 Ra may be released for transportation

  6. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi; Wang, Cheng-Yin; Rose, Bradley Daniel; Jiang, Yundi; Chang, Mincheol; Chu, Ping-Hsun; Yuan, Zhibo; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Bernard, Kippelen; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Collard, David M.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  7. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi

    2015-04-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  8. Rubidium extraction using an organic polymer encapsulated potassium copper hexacyanoferrate sorbent

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-07-11

    Sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) brine contains significant quantity of Rb. As an economically valuable metal, extracting Rb using a suitable and selective extraction method would be beneficial. An inorganic sorbent, copper based potassium hexacyanoferrate (KCuFC), exhibited high selectivity to extract Rb compared to potassium hexacyanoferrate consisting of other transition metal combinations such as Ni, Co and Fe. An organic polymer (polyacrylonitrile, PAN) encapsulated KCuFC (KCuFC-PAN) achieved a Langmuir maximum Rb sorption capacity of 1.23 mmol/g at pH 7.0 ± 0.5. KCuFC-PAN showed Rb selectivity over a wide concentration range of co-existing ions and salinity of SWRO brine. High salinity (0.5-2.5 M NaCl) resulted in 12-30% sorption capacity reduction. At a molar ratio of Li:Rb (21:1), Cs:Rb (0.001:1) and Ca:Rb (14,700:1) commonly found in SWRO brine, sorption reduction of only 18% occurred. Nevertheless, at a very high K:Rb molar ratio (7700:1), KCuFC-PAN sorption capacity of Rb reduced significantly by 65-70%. KCuFC-PAN was well suited for column operation. In a fixed-bed KCuFC-PAN column (influent concentration 0.06 mmol Rb/L, flow velocity 2 m/h), two sorption/desorption cycles were successfully achieved with a maximum Rb sorption capacity of 1.01 (closely similar to the batch study) and 0.85 mmol/g in the first and second cycles, respectively. Around 95% of Rb was desorbed from the column with 0.2 M KCl. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) resin showed promising results of separating Rb from K/Rb mixed solution in effluents from a fixed-bed column, and a subsequent sequential acid desorption, producing 68% purified Rb.

  9. Genotoxicity, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of carotenoids extracted from ionic liquid in multiples organs of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larangeira, Paula Martins; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera; da Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; de Moura, Carolina Foot Gomes; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-11-01

    The ionic liquid or melted salt 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium is an alternative process to extract natural pigments, such as carotenoids. Lycopene represents 80-90% of total of carotenoids presents in tomatoes and it has been widely studied due its potent antioxidant action. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicity, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of carotenoids extracted from ionic liquid using experimental model in vivo. For this purpose, a total of 20 male Wistar rats were distributed into four groups (n=5), as follows: control group; received a corresponding amount of corn oil for 7days by intragastric gavage (i.g.), ionic liquid group, received 10mgkg -1 body weight for 7days by gavage; 10mg carotenoids group, received 10mgkg -1 bw dissolved in corn oil for 7days by gavage and 500mg carotenoids group, received 500mgkg -1 bw dissolved in corn oil for 7days by gavage. Rat liver treated with ionic liquid exhibited moderate histopathological changes randomly distributed in the parenchyma, such as cytoplasmic eosinophilia, apoptotic bodies, inflammatory infiltrate and focal necrosis. DNA damage was found in peripheral blood and liver cells of rats treated with ionic liquid or carotenoids at 500mg. An increase of micronucleated cells and 8-OhDG immunopositive cells were also detected in rats treated with carotenoids at 500mg. In summary, our results demonstrate that recommended dose for human daily intake of carotenoids extracted by ionic liquid did not induce genotoxicity, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity in multiple organs of rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction

  11. Red wine extract, resveratrol, on maintenance of organ function following trauma-hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chao Liu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Resveratrol, is a polyphenol that can be extracted from grapes and red wine, possess potential anti-inflammatory effects, which would result in the reduction of cytokine production, the alteration of the expression of adhesion molecule molecules, and the inhibition of neutrophil function. Resveratrol might also act as an antioxidant, anti-aging, and control of cell cycle and apoptosis. Resveratrol has been shown to have protective effects for patients inshock-like states. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in a variety of intracellular signaling pathways including the regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 pathway, activates estrogen receptor (ER, and the mediation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation and reactive. Moreover, through anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant properties, the resveratrol is believed to maintain organ function following trauma-hemorrhage.

  12. Nano-honeycomb structured transparent electrode for enhanced light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Min; Wang, Zhao-Kui, E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-06-01

    A universal nano-sphere lithography method has been developed to fabricate nano-structured transparent electrode, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), for light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Perforated SiO{sub 2} film made from a monolayer colloidal crystal of polystyrene spheres and tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel is used as a template. Ordered nano-honeycomb pits on the ITO electrode surface are obtained by chemical etching. The proposed method can be utilized to form large-area nano-structured ITO electrode. More than two folds' enhancement in both current efficiency and power efficiency has been achieved in a red phosphorescent OLED which was fabricated on the nano-structured ITO substrate.

  13. Spectrographic determination of traces of halogens; Dosage de traces d'halogenes par la methode spectrographique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melamed, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    Hollow cathode source is employed for determining traces of halogens (fluorine - chlorine) in the uranium oxide U{sub 3}O{sub 8} qualitatively, detection of at least 40 ppm of fluorine, as alkali fluoride and 125 ppm of chlorine, is possible. (author) [French] Un tube a decharge a cathode creuse a ete utilise pour la determination spectrographique des halogenes (fluor - chlore) presentes a l'etat de traces dans un oxyde d'uranium U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. On a pu deceler qualitativement des teneurs de 40 ppm de fluor sous forme de fluorures alcalins. En ce qui concerne le chlore, la plus faible teneur decelee a ete de 125 ppm. (auteur)

  14. DNA Extraction Protocols for Whole-Genome Sequencing in Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panova, Marina; Aronsson, Henrik; Cameron, R Andrew; Dahl, Peter; Godhe, Anna; Lind, Ulrika; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Pereyra, Ricardo; Tesson, Sylvie V M; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Blomberg, Anders; Johannesson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a large proportion of the total biodiversity on this planet, including the majority of the earths' different phyla and classes. Studying the genomes of marine organisms can bring interesting insights into genome evolution. Today, almost all marine organismal groups are understudied with respect to their genomes. One potential reason is that extraction of high-quality DNA in sufficient amounts is challenging for many marine species. This is due to high polysaccharide content, polyphenols and other secondary metabolites that will inhibit downstream DNA library preparations. Consequently, protocols developed for vertebrates and plants do not always perform well for invertebrates and algae. In addition, many marine species have large population sizes and, as a consequence, highly variable genomes. Thus, to facilitate the sequence read assembly process during genome sequencing, it is desirable to obtain enough DNA from a single individual, which is a challenge in many species of invertebrates and algae. Here, we present DNA extraction protocols for seven marine species (four invertebrates, two algae, and a marine yeast), optimized to provide sufficient DNA quality and yield for de novo genome sequencing projects.

  15. Chemical techniques to extract organic fractions from fossil bones for accurate 14C dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Masayo; Muto, Hiroo; Nakamura, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    We examined different concentrations of HCl, such as 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 M, for decalcification of fossil bones and different times of 0.1 M NaOH treatment on collagens to determine the best conditions for purifying collagen through extraction of humic contaminants, and compared the alkali treatment method with the XAD-2 treatment method for several types of fossils. The yield of acid-insoluble bone fractions did not change over the range from 0.4 to 1.0 M HCl and decreased suddenly with 1.2 M HCl on decalcification, and the 14 C ages of the extracted gelatins from the five decalcified fractions were unchanged, suggesting that 14 C ages as those of the XAD-purified hydrolysates. The NaOH-treatment time should be less than several hours to avoid a loss of collagen. The fossil bones used are relatively well-preserved, but the alkali treatment could bring about a lot of loss of organic bone proteins for poorly-preserved bones. The XAD-2 treatment method is effective for accurate radiocarbon dating of fossil bones, if the XAD-2 resin is completely pre-cleaned

  16. Extracting and analyzing ejection fraction values from electronic echocardiography reports in a large health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fagen; Zheng, Chengyi; Yuh-Jer Shen, Albert; Chen, Wansu

    2017-12-01

    The left ventricular ejection fraction value is an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular outcomes including morbidity and mortality and is often used clinically to indicate severity of heart disease. However, it is usually reported in free-text echocardiography reports. We developed and validated a computerized algorithm to extract ejection fraction values from echocardiography reports and applied the algorithm to a large volume of unstructured echocardiography reports between 1995 and 2011 in a large health maintenance organization. A total of 621,856 echocardiography reports with a description of ejection fraction values or systolic functions were identified, of which 70 percent contained numeric ejection fraction values and the rest (30%) were text descriptions explicitly indicating the systolic left ventricular function. The 12.1 percent (16.0% for male and 8.4% for female) of these extracted ejection fraction values are <45 percent. Validation conducted based on a random sample of 200 reports yielded 95.0 percent sensitivity and 96.9 percent positive predictive value.

  17. A Solution Processed Flexible Nanocomposite Electrode with Efficient Light Extraction for Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Liang, Jiajie; Chou, Shu-Yu; Zhu, Xiaodan; Niu, Xiaofan; Zhibinyu; Pei, Qibing

    2014-03-01

    Highly efficient organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on multiple layers of vapor evaporated small molecules, indium tin oxide transparent electrode, and glass substrate have been extensively investigated and are being commercialized. The light extraction from the exciton radiative decay is limited to less than 30% due to plasmonic quenching on the metallic cathode and the waveguide in the multi-layer sandwich structure. Here we report a flexible nanocomposite electrode comprising single-walled carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires stacked and embedded in the surface of a polymer substrate. Nanoparticles of barium strontium titanate are dispersed within the substrate to enhance light extraction efficiency. Green polymer OLED (PLEDs) fabricated on the nanocomposite electrode exhibit a maximum current efficiency of 118 cd/A at 10,000 cd/m2 with the calculated external quantum efficiency being 38.9%. The efficiencies of white PLEDs are 46.7 cd/A and 30.5%, respectively. The devices can be bent to 3 mm radius repeatedly without significant loss of electroluminescent performance. The nanocomposite electrode could pave the way to high-efficiency flexible OLEDs with simplified device structure and low fabrication cost.

  18. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  19. Independent Evolution of Six Families of Halogenating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gangming; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Halogenated natural products are widespread in the environment, and the halogen atoms are typically vital to their bioactivities. Thus far, six families of halogenating enzymes have been identified: cofactor-free haloperoxidases (HPO), vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (V-HPO), heme iron-dependent haloperoxidases (HI-HPO), non-heme iron-dependent halogenases (NI-HG), flavin-dependent halogenases (F-HG), and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent halogenases (S-HG). However, these halogenating enzymes with similar biological functions but distinct structures might have evolved independently. Phylogenetic and structural analyses suggest that the HPO, V-HPO, HI-HPO, NI-HG, F-HG, and S-HG enzyme families may have evolutionary relationships to the α/β hydrolases, acid phosphatases, peroxidases, chemotaxis phosphatases, oxidoreductases, and SAM hydroxide adenosyltransferases, respectively. These halogenating enzymes have established sequence homology, structural conservation, and mechanistic features within each family. Understanding the distinct evolutionary history of these halogenating enzymes will provide further insights into the study of their catalytic mechanisms and halogenation specificity.

  20. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laila Salim Al Hashmi; Mohammad Amzad Hossain; Afaf Mohammed Weli; Qasim Al-Riyami; Jamal Nasser Al-Sabahi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and analyze the chemical composition in different crude extracts of from the leaves of locally grown of Thymus vulgaris L (T. vulgaris) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods: The shade dried leaves powder was extracted with methanol by using Soxhlet extractor. Methanol crude extracts of T. vulgaris and the derived fractions of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol were obtained. Results: Qualitative analyses of various organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris by using GC-MS showed that there were different types of high and low molecular weight compounds. Most of the isolated and identified compounds by GC-MS in the crude extracts are basically biologically important. Further, the T. vulgaris leaf possessed certain characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation. The crude extracts were prepared from the powder leaves of T. vulgaris for respective compounds can be chosen on the basis of above GC-MS analysis. Conclusions: All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris are biologically active molecules. Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T. vulgaris might have some ecological role.

  1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laila; Salim; Al; Hashmi; Mohammad; Amzad; Hossain; Afaf; Mohammed; Weli; Qasim; Al-Riyami; Jamal; Nasser; Al-Sabahi

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To isolate and analyze the chemical composition in different crude extracts of from the leaves of locally grown of Thymus vulgaris L(T.vulgaris)by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS).Methods:The shade dried leaves powder was extracted with methanol by using Soxhlet extractor.Methanol crude extracts of T.vulgaris and the derived fractions of hexane,chloroform,ethyl acetate and butanol were obtained.Results:Qualitative analyses of various organic crude extracts of T.vulgaris by using GC-MS showed that there were different types of high and low molecular weight compounds.Most of the isolated and identified compounds by GC-MS in the crude extracts are basically biologically important.Further,the T.vulgaris leaf possessed certain characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation.The crude extracts were prepared from the powder leaves of T.vulgaris for respective compounds can be chosen on the basis of above GC-MS analysis.Conclusions:All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T.vulgaris are biologically active molecules.Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T.vulgaris might have some ecological role.

  2. Ozone Depletion in Tropospheric Volcanic Plumes: From Halogen-Poor to Halogen-Rich Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjarda J. Roberts

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic halogen emissions to the troposphere undergo a rapid plume chemistry that destroys ozone. Quantifying the impact of volcanic halogens on tropospheric ozone is challenging, only a few observations exist. This study presents measurements of ozone in volcanic plumes from Kīlauea (HI, USA, a low halogen emitter. The results are combined with published data from high halogen emitters (Mt Etna, Italy; Mt Redoubt, AK, USA to identify controls on plume processes. Ozone was measured during periods of relatively sustained Kīlauea plume exposure, using an Aeroqual instrument deployed alongside Multi-Gas SO2 and H2S sensors. Interferences were accounted for in data post-processing. The volcanic H2S/SO2 molar ratio was quantified as 0.03. At Halema‘uma‘u crater-rim, ozone was close to ambient in the emission plume (at 10 ppmv SO2. Measurements in grounding plume (at 5 ppmv SO2 about 10 km downwind of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō showed just slight ozone depletion. These Kīlauea observations contrast with substantial ozone depletion reported at Mt Etna and Mt Redoubt. Analysis of the combined data from these three volcanoes identifies the emitted Br/S as a strong but non-linear control on the rate of ozone depletion. Model simulations of the volcanic plume chemistry highlight that the proportion of HBr converted into reactive bromine is a key control on the efficiency of ozone depletion. This underlines the importance of chemistry in the very near-source plume on the fate and atmospheric impacts of volcanic emissions to the troposphere.

  3. Sequential extraction procedures to ascertain the role of organic matter in the fate of iodine in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavalda, D.; Colle, C.

    2004-01-01

    In the assessment of the radiological impact on man of radioactive substances the fate of the long-lived 129 I in soils is of special interest. In order to predict the behaviour of iodine in the environment the knowledge of soil parameters which are responsible for its sorption is necessary. Sequential extraction techniques were performed to investigate the degree of binding of iodine with soil components and more specifically with the different constituents of soil organic matter (humic acid, fulvic acid, humin) which are liable to change with time. A speciation scheme was especially developed to study the role of organic matter in iodine retention and complexation. In the first steps, several mineral fractions of iodine were extracted: water soluble (H 2 O), exchangeable (1M MgCl 2 ), carbonate bound (0.01N HCl), bound to Fe-Mn oxides (0.5 M NH 4 OH,HCl adjusted to pH=2 with HNO 3 ). After these preliminary steps, the extraction of organic matter was carried out with neutral pyrophosphate (Na 2 H 2 P 2 O 7 / K 4 P 2 O 7 1/1 0.1M pH=7) to determine iodine bound to organo-mineral complexes and sodium hydroxide (0.5 M NaOH) to quantify iodine bound to humic substances. For these extracts, the distribution of iodine between humic and fulvic acids was studied. Iodine bound to residual and insoluble organic matter (humin) was extracted with H 2 O 2 30% adjusted to pH=2 with HNO 3 . In the last step, iodine bound to the residual soil was extracted by wet digestion (H 2 SO 4 ). In this scheme, all the traditional organic reagents (acetate, acetic acid,..) were removed and replaced by mineral reagents to allow the monitoring of organic carbon in the soil extracts. (author)

  4. Structural study of some halogen oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantot, Georges.

    1976-12-01

    Some halogen oxyfluorides are studied from a structural point of view by vibrational spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. Force constant and molecular orbital calculations are added to the experimental data. The pyramidal shape of ClO 2 F under its three physical states is confirmed. In the gas and liquid phases an intermolecular association is observed. A similar interaction takes place in ClOF 3 . ClO 3 F has only a solid state transition above 10K. The structures of ClO 2 F and KBrO 2 F 2 are partly determined. The theoretical calculations are well correlated with the experimental data. They suggest a major influence of the ligands [fr

  5. Neutron activation analysis for the optimal sampling and extraction of extractable organohalogens in human hari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Chai, Z.F.; Sun, H.B.; Xu, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    Many persistent organohalogen compounds such as DDTs and polychlorinated biphenyls have caused seriously environmental pollution problem that now involves all life. It is know that neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a very convenient method for halogen analysis and is also the only method currently available for simultaneously determining organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in one extract. Human hair is a convenient material to evaluate the burden of such compounds in human body and dan be easily collected from people over wide ranges of age, sex, residential areas, eating habits and working environments. To effectively extract organohalogen compounds from human hair, in present work the optimal Soxhelt-extraction time of extractable organohalogen (EOX) and extractable persistent organohalogen (EPOX) from hair of different lengths were studied by NAA. The results indicated that the optimal Soxhelt-extraction time of EOX and EPOX from human hair was 8-11 h, and the highest EOX and EPOX contents were observed in hair powder extract. The concentrations of both EOX and EPOX in different hair sections were in the order of hair powder ≥ 2 mm > 5 mm, which stated that hair samples milled into hair powder or cut into very short sections were not only for homogeneous. hair sample but for the best hair extraction efficiency.

  6. Four groups of new aromatic halogenated disinfection byproducts: effect of bromide concentration on their formation and speciation in chlorinated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Xiangru

    2013-02-05

    Bromide is naturally present in source waters worldwide. Chlorination of drinking water can generate a variety of chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although substantial efforts have been made to examine the effect of bromide concentration on the formation and speciation of halogenated DBPs, almost all previous studies have focused on trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. Given that about 50% of total organic halogen formed in chlorination remains unknown, it is still unclear how bromide concentration affects the formation and speciation of the new/unknown halogenated DBPs. In this study, chlorinated drinking water samples with different bromide concentrations were prepared, and a novel approach-precursor ion scan using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry-was adopted for the detection and identification of polar halogenated DBPs in these water samples. With this approach, 11 new putative aromatic halogenated DBPs were identified, and they were classified into four groups: dihalo-4-hydroxybenzaldehydes, dihalo-4-hydroxybenzoic acids, dihalo-salicylic acids, and trihalo-phenols. A mechanism for the formation of the four groups of new aromatic halogenated DBPs was proposed. It was found that increasing the bromide concentration shifted the entire polar halogenated DBPs as well as the four groups of new DBPs from being less brominated to being more brominated; these new aromatic halogenated DBPs might be important intermediate DBPs formed in drinking water chlorination. Moreover, the speciation of the four groups of new DBPs was modeled: the speciation patterns of the four groups of new DBPs well matched those determined from the model equations, and the reactivity differences between HOBr and HOCl in reactions forming the four groups of new DBPs were larger than those in reactions forming trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids.

  7. Hazard identification of contaminated sites. Ranking potential toxicity of organic sediment extracts in crustacean and fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, J.; Sundberg, H.; Aakerman, G.; Grunder, K.; Eklund, B.; Breitholtz, M. [Dept. of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    Background, aim, and scope: It is well known that contaminated sediments represent a potential long-term source of pollutants to the aquatic environment. To protect human and ecosystem health, it is becoming common to remediate contaminated sites. However, the great cost associated with, e.g., dredging in combination with the large numbers of contaminated sites makes it crucial to pinpoint those sites that are in greatest need of remediation. In most European countries, this prioritization process has almost exclusively been based on chemical analyses of known substances; only seldom toxicity data has been considered. The main objective of the current study was therefore to develop a tool for hazard identification of sediment by ranking potential toxicity of organic sediment extracts in a crustacean and a fish. A secondary objective was to investigate the difference in potential toxicity between compounds with different polarities. Materials and methods Early life stages of the crustacean Nitocra spinipes and the fish Oncorhynchus mykiss, which represent organisms from different trophic levels (primary and secondary consumer) and with different routes of exposure (i.e. ingestion through food, diffusive uptake, and maternal transfer), were exposed to hexane and acetone fractions (semi-polar compounds) of sediment from five locations, ranging from heavily to low contaminated. Preliminary tests showed that the extracts were non-bioavailable to the crustacean when exposed via water, and the extracts were therefore loaded on silica gel. Rainbow trout embryos were exposed using nano-injection technique. Results and discussion Clear concentration-response relationships of both mortality and larval development were observed in all tests with N. spinipes. Also for rainbow trout, the observed effects (e.g., abnormality, hemorrhage, asymmetric yolk sac) followed a dose-related pattern. Interestingly, our results indicate that some of the locations contained toxic semi

  8. Organ-Protective Effects of Red Wine Extract, Resveratrol, in Oxidative Stress-Mediated Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a polyphenol extracted from red wine, possesses potential antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, including the reduction of free radicals and proinflammatory mediators overproduction, the alteration of the expression of adhesion molecules, and the inhibition of neutrophil function. A growing body of evidence indicates that resveratrol plays an important role in reducing organ damage following ischemia- and hemorrhage-induced reperfusion injury. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in decreasing the formation and reaction of reactive oxygen species and pro-nflammatory cytokines, as well as the mediation of a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, including the nitric oxide synthase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, deacetylase sirtuin 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha, hemeoxygenase-1, and estrogen receptor-related pathways. Reperfusion injury is a complex pathophysiological process that involves multiple factors and pathways. The resveratrol is an effective reactive oxygen species scavenger that exhibits an antioxidative property. In this review, the organ-protective effects of resveratrol in oxidative stress-related reperfusion injury will be discussed.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of organic extracts isolated from Aplysina fistularis (Demospongiae: Aplysinidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Teobaldo; Cubero, Juan; Lanz, Zorina; Gomez-Guinan, Yrma; Segnini-Bravo, M. I.

    2000-01-01

    Organic extracts of the sponge Aplysina fistularis (Pallas 1766), were tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and toxic activity of bioactive extract were determined. Susceptibility trials of organic fractions obtained by VLC. Hexane, EtOAc and CHCl 3 showed that EtOAc fraction has antibacterial activity against E. coli, while CHCl 3 fraction inhibited E. coli and S. aureus growth. The later refractioning of EtOAc fraction and the biodirected assays showed that fractions F12 and F13 of EtOAc/Hex and EtOAc F14 were bioactive against E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Only EtOAc/MeOH Sf 2 from subfractioning of EtOAc F14 produced inhibition for E. coli and S. aureus. In Sf2 EtOAc/MeOH, MIC was moderate for S. aureus (MIC > 256 μg/ml). F4 CHCl 3 /MeOH produced a high inhibition in S. aureus (MIC = 0.125 μg/ml) and for E. coli (MIC > 16 μg/ml). F10 CHCl 3 /MeOH showed a moderate activity against S. aureus (MIC > 128 μg/ml) and low activity against E. coli (MIC = 512 μg/ml). F10 CHCI 3 /MeOH did no present toxic activity against Artemia salina. The fractiorts F4 CHCI 3 /MeOH and Sf2 EtOAc/MeOH were toxic for this organism when the concentration was higher than 100 μg/ml. LC50 in both cases was 548.4 and 243.4 μg/ml respectively. The conclusion is that secondary metabolites of medium polarity obtained from A. fistularis have a wide spectrum of anti bacterial activity. Toxicity analysis suggests that only F10 CHCI 3 /MeOH has potential as an antimicrobial agent for clinical use. (author) [es

  10. Organic phosphorus fractionation in wetland soil profiles by chemical extraction and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guangqian; Yang, Haijun; Whelan, Michael J.; White, Sue M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chemical sequential extraction and 31 P NMR spectroscopy were used for organic P analysis. ► Organic P includes orthophosphate, monoester and diester phosphate and pyrophosphate. ► Highly resistant organic P and monoester phosphate were the dominant organic P. ► HCl pretreatment can remove most inorganic P and increase organic P recovery rate. ► A comprehensive organic P chemical sequential fractionation approach was proposed. - Abstract: Organic P (OP) plays an important role in soil P cycling and is a potential P source for wetland plants. In this study, a modified chemical sequential fractionation method and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P NMR) of NaOH–EDTA extracts were used to examine the distribution of organic P fractions and compounds in soil profiles of the Beijing Yeyahu Wetland, China. The influence of acid treatment prior to NaOH–EDTA extraction on 31 P NMR spectra was also investigated. Results show that highly resistant OP was the major class of organic P. The rank order of organic P fractions was highly resistant OP (on average accounting for 68.5% of total OP) > moderately resistant OP (15.8%m of total OP) > moderately labile OP (11.4% of total OP) > labile OP (4.3% of total OP). Most of the organic P fractions decreased with soil depth due to the accumulation of plant residues in surface soils and the deposition and diagenesis of soils. Moderately (r = 0.586, p < 0.01) and highly (r = 0.741, p < 0.01) resistant OP fractions were positively correlated with soil organic matter. Phosphorus compounds including orthophosphate (23–74.6% of total P in spectra), monoester phosphate (18.6–76%), diester phosphate (nil-7.8%) and pyrophosphate (nil-6.7%) were characterized using 31 P NMR. Monoester-P was the dominant soil organic P compound identified. The proportion of monoester-P increased significantly in NaOH–EDTA extracts with HCl pretreatment and it was confirmed by chemical analysis. Therefore, it

  11. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil extracts investigated by FT-ICR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Steffen, D.; Jablonowski, N. D.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Soil drying and rewetting usually increases the release of xenobiotics like pesticides present in agricultural soils. Besides the effect on the release of two aged 14C-labeled pesticide residues we focus on the characterisation of simultaneously remobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to gain new insights into structure and stability aspects of soil organic carbon fractions. The test soil (gleyic cambisol; Corg 1.2%, pH 7.2) was obtained from the upper soil layer of two individual outdoor lysimeter studies containing either environmentally long-term aged 14C residues of the herbicide ethidimuron (0-10 cm depth; time of aging: 9 years) or methabenzthiazuron (0-30 cm depth; time of aging: 17 years). Soil samples (10 g dry soil equivalents) were (A=dry/wet) previously dried (45°C) or (B=wet/wet) directly mixed with pure water (1+2, w:w), shaken (150 rpm, 1 h), and centrifuged (2000 g). This extraction procedure was repeated several individual times, for both setups. The first three individual extractions, respectively were used for further investigations. Salt was removed from samples prior analysis because of a possible quench effect in the electrospray (ESI) source by solid phase extraction (SPE) with Chromabond C18 Hydra-cartridges (Macherey-Nagel) and methanol as backextraction solvent. The so preconcentrated and desalted samples were introduced by flow injection analysis (FIA) in a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for complex natural systems attributed by their outstanding mass resolution (used 400.000 at m/z 400 Da) and mass accuracy (≤ 1ppm) by simultaneously providing molecular level details of thousands of compounds and was successful applied for the investigations of natural organic matter (NOM) different sources like marine and surface water, soil, sediment, bog and crude oil

  12. The Effect of Anisotropy on Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Photonic Crystal Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The light extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED is greatly limited due to the difference in refractive indexes between materials of OLED. We fabricated OLED with photonic crystal microstructures in the interface between the glass substrate and the ITO anode. The light extraction efficiency can be improved by utilizing photonic crystals; however, the anisotropy effect of light extraction was clearly observed in experiment. To optimize the device performance, the effect of photonic crystal on both light extraction and angular distribution was investigated using finite-difference time domain (FDTD method. We simulated the photonic crystals with the structure of square lattice and triangle lattice. We analyzed the improvement of these structures in the light extraction efficiency of the OLED and the influence of arrangement, depth, period, and diameter on anisotropy. The optimized geometric parameters were provided, which will provide the theoretical support for designing the high performance OLED.

  13. A box model study on photochemical interactions between VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toyota

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chemical scheme is developed for the multiphase photochemical box model SEAMAC (size-SEgregated Aerosol model for Marine Air Chemistry to investigate photochemical interactions between volatile organic compounds (VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer (MBL. Based primarily on critically evaluated kinetic and photochemical rate parameters as well as a protocol for chemical mechanism development, the new scheme has achieved a near-explicit description of oxidative degradation of up to C3-hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, C2H4, C3H6, and C2H2 initiated by reactions with OH radicals, Cl- and Br-atoms, and O3. Rate constants and product yields for reactions involving halogen species are taken from the literature where available, but the majority of them need to be estimated. In particular, addition reactions of halogen atoms with alkenes will result in forming halogenated organic intermediates, whose photochemical loss rates are carefully evaluated in the present work. Model calculations with the new chemical scheme reveal that the oceanic emissions of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO and alkenes (especially C3H6 are important factors for regulating reactive halogen chemistry in the MBL by promoting the conversion of Br atoms into HBr or more stable brominated intermediates in the organic form. The latter include brominated hydroperoxides, bromoacetaldehyde, and bromoacetone, which sequester bromine from a reactive inorganic pool. The total mixing ratio of brominated organic species thus produced is likely to reach 10-20% or more of that of inorganic gaseous bromine species over wide regions over the ocean. The reaction between Br atoms and C2H2 is shown to be unimportant for determining the degree of bromine activation in the remote MBL. These results imply that reactive halogen chemistry can mediate a link between the oceanic emissions of VOCs and the behaviors of compounds that are sensitive to halogen chemistry such as dimethyl

  14. Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Henner; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Zega, Tom J.; Cody, George D.; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kilcoyne, A. L. David

    2008-10-01

    Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are supposed to originate from asteroids and comets, sampling the most primitive bodies in the Solar System. They contain abundant carbonaceous material. Some of this, mostly insoluble organic matter (IOM), likely originated in the protosolar molecular cloud, based on spectral properties and H and N isotope characteristics. Together with cometary material returned with the Stardust mission, these samples provide a benchmark for models aiming to understand organic chemistry in the interstellar medium, as well as for mechanisms that secured the survival of these fragile molecules during Solar System formation. The carrier molecules of the isotope anomalies are largely unknown, although amorphous carbonaceous spheres, so-called nanoglobules, have been identified as carriers. We are using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry to identify isotopically anomalous material in meteoritic IOM and IDPs at a ~100-200 nm scale. Organics of most likely interstellar origin are then extracted with the Focused-Ion-Beam technique and prepared for synchrotron X-ray and Transmission Electron Microscopy. These experiments yield information on the character of the H- and N-bearing interstellar molecules: While the association of H and N isotope anomalies with nanoglobules could be confirmed, we have also identified amorphous, micron-sized monolithic grains. D-enrichments in meteoritic IOM appear not to be systematically associated with any specific functional groups, whereas 15N-rich material can be related to imine and nitrile functionality. The large 15N- enrichments observed here (δ15N > 1000 ‰) cannot be reconciled with models using interstellar ammonia ice reactions, and hence, provide new constraints for understanding the chemistry in cold interstellar clouds.

  15. Elucidation of the structure of organic solutions in solvent extraction by combining molecular dynamics and X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferru, G.; Gomes Rodrigues, D.; Berthon, L.; Guilbaud, P.; Diat, O.; Bauduin, P.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the supramolecular structure of the organic phase containing amphiphilic ligand molecules is mandatory for full comprehension of ionic separation during solvent extraction. Existing structural models are based on simple geometric aggregates, but no consensus exists on the interaction potentials. Herein, we show that molecular dynamics crossed with scattering techniques offers key insight into the complex fluid involving weak interactions without any long range ordering. Two systems containing mono- or diamide extractants in heptane and contacted with an aqueous phase were selected as examples to demonstrate the advantages of coupling the two approaches for furthering fundamental studies on solvent extraction. (authors)

  16. Experimental design for extraction and quantification of phenolic compounds and organic acids in white "Vinho Verde" grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopico-García, M S; Valentão, P; Guerra, L; Andrade, P B; Seabra, R M

    2007-01-30

    An experimental design was applied for the optimization of extraction and clean-up processes of phenolic compounds and organic acids from white "Vinho Verde" grapes. The developed analytical method consisted in two steps: first a solid-liquid extraction of both phenolic compounds and organic acids and then a clean-up step using solid-phase extraction (SPE). Afterwards, phenolic compounds and organic acids were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a diode array detector (DAD) and HPLC-UV, respectively. Plackett-Burman design was carried out to select the significant experimental parameters affecting both the extraction and the clean-up steps. The identified and quantified phenolic compounds were: quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin, kaempferol and epicatechin. The determined organic acids were oxalic, citric, tartaric, malic, shikimic and fumaric acids. The obtained results showed that the most important variables were the temperature (40 degrees C) and the solvent (acid water at pH 2 with 5% methanol) for the extraction step and the type of sorbent (C18 non end-capped) for the clean-up step.

  17. Towards a more appropriate water based extraction for the assessment of organic contaminant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, Zachary A.; Reid, Brian J.

    2005-01-01

    This study correlated extractabilities of 37 d aged phenanthrene residues in four dissimilar soils with the fraction that was available for earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus) accumulation and microorganism (Pseudomonas sp.) mineralisation. Extractability was determined using two established techniques, namely (1) a water based extraction using CO 2 equilibrated water and (2) an aqueous based hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) extraction. Results showed no relationship between earthworm accumulation and phenanthrene extractability using either HPCD (r 2 =0.07; slope=-4.76; n=5) or the water based extraction (r 2 =0.31; slope=-5.34; n=5). Earthworm accumulation was overestimated by both techniques. In contrast, the fraction of phenanthrene extractable using both the HPCD technique and the water based extraction correlated strongly with microbial mineralisation. However, the slopes of these linear relationships were 0.48 (r 2 =0.96; n=10), and 0.99 (r 2 =0.88; n=10) for the water based extraction and HPCD, respectively. Thus, the HPCD extraction provided values that were numerically close to the mineralisation values, whilst the water based extraction values were approximately half the mineralisation values. It is submitted that HPCD extraction provided an appropriate method of assessing the fraction of contaminant available for microbial mineralisation in these dissimilar soils. - No significant difference was found between microbially mineralised phenanthrene and extractability using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in four dissimilar soils; the water-only extraction removed half of this fraction

  18. Organohalide respiration in pristine environments: implications for the natural halogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Häggblom, Max M; Smidt, Hauke

    2018-03-01

    Halogenated organic compounds, also termed organohalogens, were initially considered to be of almost exclusively anthropogenic origin. However, over 5000 naturally synthesized organohalogens are known today. This has also fuelled the hypothesis that the natural and ancient origin of organohalogens could have primed development of metabolic machineries for their degradation, especially in microorganisms. Among these, a special group of anaerobic microorganisms was discovered that could conserve energy by reducing organohalogens as terminal electron acceptor in a process termed organohalide respiration. Originally discovered in a quest for biodegradation of anthropogenic organohalogens, these organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) were soon found to reside in pristine environments, such as the deep subseafloor and Arctic tundra soil with limited/no connections to anthropogenic activities. As such, accumulating evidence suggests an important role of OHRB in local natural halogen cycles, presumably taking advantage of natural organohalogens. In this minireview, we integrate current knowledge regarding the natural origin and occurrence of industrially important organohalogens and the evolution and spread of OHRB, and describe potential implications for natural halogen and carbon cycles. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Halogenated Metabolism of Brown Algae (Phaeophyta, Its Biological Importance and Its Environmental Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane La Barre

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Brown algae represent a major component of littoral and sublittoral zones in temperate and subtropical ecosystems. An essential adaptive feature of this independent eukaryotic lineage is the ability to couple oxidative reactions resulting from exposure to sunlight and air with the halogenations of various substrates, thereby addressing various biotic and abiotic stresses i.e., defense against predators, tissue repair, holdfast adhesion, and protection against reactive species generated by oxidative processes. Whereas marine organisms mainly make use of bromine to increase the biological activity of secondary metabolites, some orders of brown algae such as Laminariales have also developed a striking capability to accumulate and to use iodine in physiological adaptations to stress. We review selected aspects of the halogenated metabolism of macrophytic brown algae in the light of the most recent results, which point toward novel functions for iodide accumulation in kelps and the importance of bromination in cell wall modifications and adhesion properties of brown algal propagules. The importance of halogen speciation processes ranges from microbiology to biogeochemistry, through enzymology, cellular biology and ecotoxicology.

  20. Cooperativity of halogen, chalcogen, and pnictogen bonds in infinite molecular chains by electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Halogen bonds (XBs) are intriguing noncovalent interactions that are frequently being exploited for crystal engineering. Recently, similar bonding mechanisms have been proposed for adjacent main-group elements, and noncovalent "chalcogen bonds" and "pnictogen bonds" have been identified in crystal structures. A fundamental question, largely unresolved thus far, is how XBs and related contacts interact with each other in crystals; similar to hydrogen bonding, one might expect "cooperativity" (bonds amplifying each other), but evidence has been sparse. Here, we explore the crucial step from gas-phase oligomers to truly infinite chains by means of quantum chemical computations. A periodic density functional theory (DFT) framework allows us to address polymeric chains of molecules avoiding the dreaded "cluster effects" as well as the arbitrariness of defining a "large enough" cluster. We focus on three types of molecular chains that we cut from crystal structures; furthermore, we explore reasonable substitutional variants in silico. We find evidence of cooperativity in chains of halogen cyanides and also in similar chalcogen- and pnictogen-bonded systems; the bonds, in the most extreme cases, are amplified through cooperative effects by 79% (I···N), 90% (Te···N), and 103% (Sb···N). Two experimentally known organic crystals, albeit with similar atomic connectivity and XB characteristics, show signs of cooperativity in one case but not in another. Finally, no cooperativity is observed in alternating halogen/acetone and halogen/1,4-dioxane chains; in fact, these XBs weaken each other by up to 26% compared to the respective gas-phase dimers.

  1. Investigating substrate use efficiency across different microbial physiologies in soil-extracted, solubilized organic matter (SESOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle, K. T.; Martinez, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental work has elevated the importance of microbial processing for the stabilization of fresh carbon inputs within the soil mineral matrix. Enhancing our understanding of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics therefore requires a better understanding of how efficiently microbial metabolism can process low molecular weight carbon substrates (carbon use efficiency, CUE) under environmentally relevant conditions. One approach to better understanding microbial uptake rates and CUE is the ecophysiological study of soil isolates in liquid media culture consisting of soil-extracted solubilized organic matter (SESOM). We are using SESOM from an Oa horizon under hemlock hardwood vegetation in upstate New York as liquid media for the growth of 12 isolates from the Oa and B horizon of the same site. Here we seek to test the uptake rates as well as CUE of 5 different low molecular weight substrates spanning compound class and nominal oxidation state (glucose, acetate, formate, glycine, valine) by isolates differing in phylogeny and physiology. The use of a spike of each of the 13C-labeled substrates into SESOM, along with a 0.2 μm filtration step, allows accurate partitioning of labeled carbon between biomass, gaseous CO2 as well as the exometabolome. Coupled UHPLC-MS measurements are being used to identify and determine uptake rates of over 80 potential C substrates present in the extract as well as our labeled substrate of interest along the course of the isolate growth curve. This work seeks to utilize a gradient in substrate class as well as microbial physiologies to inform our understanding of C and N cycling under relevant soil solution conditions. Future experiments may also use labeled biomass from stationary phase to investigate the stabilization potential of anabolic products formed from each substrate with a clay fraction isolated from the same site.

  2. Neutron activation determination of gold and palladium using extraction by organic sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil'berg, Eh.N.; Torgov, V.G.; Verevkin, G.V.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Neorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1978-01-01

    Compared are methods of gold determination in standard rock samples of the USA National Geological Service: a) extraction by solutions of dioctylsulfide and oil sulfides from irradiated samples; b) preliminary extraction by the above solfides with the following extract radiation; c) the method of isotope dilution with substoichiometry extraction. A possibility is studied to determine palladium in the sulfide extract with gold using the NaI(Tl) thin crystal scintillators. It is established that joint palladium and gold extraction permits to determine them in many natural products simultaneously

  3. UARS Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) Level 2 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The HALOE home page on the WWW is http://haloe.gats-inc.com/home/index.php The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite...

  4. Allelochemical effects of volatile compounds and organic extracts from Muscodor yucatanensis, a tropical endophytic fungus from Bursera simaruba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Rubalcava, Martha L; Hernández-Bautista, Blanca E; Oropeza, Fabiola; Duarte, Georgina; González, María C; Glenn, Anthony E; Hanlin, Richard T; Anaya, Ana Luisa

    2010-10-01

    Muscodor yucatanensis, an endophytic fungus, was isolated from the leaves of Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) in a dry, semideciduous tropical forest in the Ecological Reserve El Eden, Quintana Roo, Mexico. We tested the mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by M. yucatanensis for allelochemical effects against other endophytic fungi, phytopathogenic fungi and fungoids, and plants. VOCs were lethal to Guignardia mangifera, Colletotrichum sp., Phomopsis sp., Alternaria solani, Rhizoctonia sp., Phytophthora capsici, and P. parasitica, but had no effect on Fusarium oxysporum, Xylaria sp., the endophytic isolate 120, or M. yucatanensis. VOCs inhibited root elongation in amaranth, tomato, and barnyard grass, particularly those produced during the first 15 days of fungal growth. VOCs were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and included compounds not previously reported from other Muscodor species and the previously reported compounds octane, 2-methyl butyl acetate, 2-pentyl furan, caryophyllene, and aromadendrene. We also evaluated organic extracts from the culture medium and mycelium of M. yucatanensis on the same endophytes, phytopathogens, and plants. In general, extracts inhibited plants more than endophytic or phytopathogens fungi. G. mangifera was the only organism that was significantly stimulated by both extracts regardless of concentration. Compounds in both organic extracts were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We discuss the possible allelopathic role that metabolites of M. yucatanensis play in its ecological interactions with its host plant and other organisms.

  5. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2017-07-20

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures.

  6. Rubidium extraction using an organic polymer encapsulated potassium copper hexacyanoferrate sorbent

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri; Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Jeong, Sanghyun; Johir, Md.Abu Hasan; To, Vu Hien Phuong; Kandasamy, Jaya; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2016-01-01

    Sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) brine contains significant quantity of Rb. As an economically valuable metal, extracting Rb using a suitable and selective extraction method would be beneficial. An inorganic sorbent, copper based potassium

  7. Some extractable iron contents as influenced by some organic manures application in the soils of Lake Geriyo, Adamawa state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddiq Abdullahi Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic manures are safer sources of plant nutrients and a good source of micronutrients therefore; pot experiments were carried out to estimate some extractable iron contents as influenced by organic manure application in the soils of Lake Geriyo, Adamawa state, Nigeria. Two types of organic manures; poultry droppings, cow dung and control were used for the experiment. Three levels of organic manures; 5, 10 and 15 tons per hectare (ton ha-1 and three sampling time (30, 60 and 90 DAS were laid down in a completely randomized (CRD design replicated three times. Results obtained revealed that rate, type of organic manures and time of submergence significantly (P ≤ 0.05 changed Fe content in the soil. Mean extractable iron concentrations of 42.01, 56.13 and 24.63 mgkg-1 were recorded for ammonium oxalate extractable iron, Citrate Bicarbonate Dithionite extractable iron and sodium pyrophosphate extractable iron in the first experiment while 45.81, 59.29 and 28.89 mgkg-1 were recorded for the second experiment respectively. However, CBD which extracts both amorphous and crystalline Fe recorded the highest Fe contents throughout the treatments with poultry droppings applied pots recording superior values than that of cowdung manure. similarly, higher values of oxa-Fe and Pyro-Fe were recorded in both manures compared to the control. In conclusion poultry droppings may result in iron accumulation and toxicity hence should be used with caution in the soil of Lake Geriyo and similar soils to avoid serious soil reduction leading to iron toxicity and soil phosphorus antagonism.

  8. Organic metamorphism in the California petroleum basins; Chapter B, Insights from extractable bitumen and saturated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Leigh C.

    2000-01-01

    Seventy-five shales from the Los Angeles, Ventura, and Southern San Joaquin Valley Basins were extracted and analyzed. Samples were chosen on the basis of ROCK-EVAL analyses of a much larger sample base. The samples ranged in burial temperatures from 40 ? to 220 ? C, and contained hydrogen-poor to hydrogen-rich organic matter (OM), based on OM visual typing and a correlation of elemental kerogen hydrogen to carbon ratios with ROCK-EVAL hydrogen indices. By extractable bitumen measurements, rocks with hydrogen- poor OM in the Los Angeles Basin began mainstage hydrocarbon (HC) generation by 90 ? C. The HC concentrations maximized by 165 ? C, and beyond 165 ? C, HC and bitumen concentrations and ROCK-EVAL hydrogen indices all began decreasing to low values reached by 220 ? C, where HC generation was largely complete. Rocks with hydrogen-poor OM in the Southern San Joaquin Valley Basin commenced mainstage HC generation at 135 ? C and HC concentrations maximized by 180 ? C. Above 180 ? C, HC and bitumen concentrations and ROCK-EVAL hydrogen indices all decreased to low values reached by 214 ? C, again the process of HC generation being largely complete. In both cases, bell-shaped HC-generation curves were present versus depth (burial temperature). Mainstage HC generation had not yet begun in Ventura Basin rocks with hydrogen-poor OM by 140 ? C. The apparent lower temperature for initiation of mainstage generation in the Los Angeles Basin is attributed to very recent cooling in that basin from meteoric-water flow. Thus, HC generation there most probably occurred at higher burial temperatures. In contrast, mainstage HC generation, and all aspects of organic metamorphism, were strongly suppressed in rocks with hydrogen-rich OM at temperatures as high as 198 ? C. For example, shales from the Wilmington field (Los Angeles Basin) from 180 ? to 198 ? C retained ROCK-EVAL hydrogen indices of 550- 700 and had saturated-HC coefficients of only 4-15 mg/g organic carbon. The rocks

  9. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglia, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.scaglia@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy); Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira [Laboratório de Química Ambiental, Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, São Carlos (Brazil); Tambone, Fulvia [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy); Adani, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.adani@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100–6000 mg carbon L{sup −1}. {sup 13}C CPMAS-NMR and GC–MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS {sup 13}CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R{sup 2} = − 0.85; p < 0.01, n = 6). - Highlights: • Vermicomposting converts waste into organic fertilizer. • Vermicomposts can have biostimulating effect for the presence of hormone-like molecules. • Auxine-like activity was associated to the vermicompost humic acid fraction (HA). • HA carboxylic acids and amino acids, were reported to act as auxin-like molecules. • A linear regression was found between molecules and auxin-like activity.

  10. A novel evaluation method for extrapolated retention factor in determination of n-octanol/water partition coefficient of halogenated organic pollutants by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-ying; Liang, Chao; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2012-02-03

    The retention factor corresponding to pure water in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), k(w), was commonly obtained by extrapolation of retention factor (k) in a mixture of organic modifier and water as mobile phase in tedious experiments. In this paper, a relationship between logk(w) and logk for directly determining k(w) has been proposed for the first time. With a satisfactory validation, the approach was confirmed to enable easy and accurate evaluation of k(w) for compounds in question with similar structure to model compounds. Eight PCB congeners with different degree of chlorination were selected as a training set for modeling the logk(w)-logk correlation on both silica-based C(8) and C(18) stationary phases to evaluate logk(w) of sample compounds including seven PCB, six PBB and eight PBDE congeners. These eight model PCBs were subsequently combined with seven structure-similar benzene derivatives possessing reliable experimental K(ow) values as a whole training set for logK(ow)-logk(w) regressions on the two stationary phases. Consequently, the evaluated logk(w) values of sample compounds were used to determine their logK(ow) by the derived logK(ow)-logk(w) models. The logK(ow) values obtained by these evaluated logk(w) were well comparable with those obtained by experimental-extrapolated logk(w), demonstrating that the proposed method for logk(w) evaluation in this present study could be an effective means in lipophilicity study of environmental contaminants with numerous congeners. As a result, logK(ow) data of many PCBs, PBBs and PBDEs could be offered. These contaminants are considered to widely exist in the environment, but there have been no reliable experimental K(ow) data available yet. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Organic Extractives from Mentha spp. Honey and the Bee-Stomach: Methyl Syringate, Vomifoliol, Terpenediol I, Hotrienol and Other Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Jerković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The GC and GC/MS analyses of the solvent organic extractive from the stomach of the bees, having collected Mentha spp. nectar, revealed the presence of methyl syringate (6.6%, terpendiol I (5.0% and vomifoliol (3.0% that can be attributed to the plant origin. Other major compounds from the bee-stomach were related to the composition of cuticular waxes and less to pheromones. Organic extractivesfrom Mentha spp. honey were obtained by solvent-free headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The major honey headspace compounds were hotrienol (31.1%–38.5%, 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol (0.5–6.0%, cis- and trans-linalool oxides (0.9–2.8%, linalool (1.0–3.1% and neroloxide (0.9–1.9%. Methyl syringate was the most abundant compound (38.3-56.2% in the honey solvent extractives followed by vomifoliol (7.0–26.6%. Comparison of the honey organic extractives with the corresponding bee-stomach extractive indicated that methyl syringate and vomofoliol were transferred to the honey while terpendiol I was partially transformed to hotrienol in ripened honey.

  12. Molecular marker study of extractable organic matter in aerosols from urban areas of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Sheng, Guoying; Chen, Xiaojing; Fu, Jiamo; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yuping

    The solvent-extractable compounds (lipids) of aerosol samples, which were collected from a western suburb of Beijing, in the city of Guiyang and on the outskirts of Guangzhou, P.R. China, using a standard high volume air sampler, were investigated to determine the distributions of homologous compounds and biomarkers. These preliminary results show that all samples contain aliphatic hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, steranes and triterpanes, derived from both biogenic sources (vascular plant wax input) and fossil fuel contamination (coal, crude oil, etc.). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, which are considered to be combustion products from fossil fuels such as petroleum and, especially in this case, coal burning, are also widely distributed in all samples. Oxygenated compounds (e.g. alkanoic acids, alkanones and alkanols) are present as major fractions and are derived from mainly natural sources. Furthermore, some compositional differences are observed for the organic compounds in samples from different heights above ground. This is interpreted to be due to dilution at higher levels of locally generated aerosol with upper air aerosol transported over longer distances.

  13. Coalescence of organic solutions in acid and metal extraction by tri-alkylamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blain, J.

    1970-01-01

    The formation of two layers with tri-alkylammonium salts solutions in low polarity diluents could be explained on the basis of settling of micelles. Light scattering and viscosity measurements reveal that micelles size increases rather sharply before coalescence. The existence of micelles in the solution has been confirmed by ultracentrifuge experiments. The behaviour of these solutions, in general, is similar to that of colloidal soap solutions. The various parameters which promote third phase formation are: anion size in the order of Cl - ∼ Br - 3 4 - ; extraction of excess acid; metal cation size in the order of UO 2 ++ 4+ ∼ Th 4+ ; decreasing in the length of the n-alkyl chain in the alkyl-ammonium salts; decreasing in diluent polarity. The above phenomenon could be explained on the basis of the affinity between alkylammonium salts and organic solvent. The composition of the three phases is independent of the initial amine concentration for a fixed acid and metal concentration. This has been verified experimentally and is in conformity with phase rule. (author) [fr

  14. Interpretation of fingerprint image quality features extracted by self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Ivan; Olsen, Martin A.; Busch, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of fingerprint quality is of significant importance to any fingerprint-based biometric system. Ensuring high quality samples for both probe and reference can substantially improve the system's performance by lowering false non-matches, thus allowing finer adjustment of the decision threshold of the biometric system. Furthermore, the increasing usage of biometrics in mobile contexts demands development of lightweight methods for operational environment. A novel two-tier computationally efficient approach was recently proposed based on modelling block-wise fingerprint image data using Self-Organizing Map (SOM) to extract specific ridge pattern features, which are then used as an input to a Random Forests (RF) classifier trained to predict the quality score of a propagated sample. This paper conducts an investigative comparative analysis on a publicly available dataset for the improvement of the two-tier approach by proposing additionally three feature interpretation methods, based respectively on SOM, Generative Topographic Mapping and RF. The analysis shows that two of the proposed methods produce promising results on the given dataset.

  15. Solubilization of trace organics in block copolymer micelles for environmental separation using membrane extraction principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The solubilization of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in block copolymer micelles has been studied as a function of polymer composition, architecture, and temperature. Micelle formation is favored at high temperatures, leading to significant enhancements in solubilization capacity. At low temperatures, however, micelles do not form and the solubilization capacity of the block copolymer solution for the organics is low; this provides a convenient method for the regeneration of micellar solutions used as solvents'' in the treatment of contaminated feed streams using membrane extraction principles. It has also been shown (in collaboration with K.P. Johnston of University of Texas, Austin) that supercritical CO[sub 2] can be used effectively for micelle regeneration. Theoretical calculations of the structure of block copolymer micelles in the presence and absence of solutes using self-consistent mean-field lattice theories have successfully captured the trends observed with changing polymer composition and architecture, often quantitatively. The temperature and composition dependence of the micellar properties were determined by allowing the individual polymer segments to assume both polar and non-polar conformations.

  16. Extraction and [superscript 1]H NMR Analysis of Fats from Convenience Foods: A Laboratory Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Moore, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and analysis of fats from convenience foods (crackers, cookies, chips, candies) has been developed as an experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. Students gravimetrically determine the fat content per serving and then perform a [superscript 1]H NMR analysis of the recovered fat to determine the…

  17. Sorption behavior of charged and neutral polar organic compounds on solid phase extraction materials: which functional group governs sorption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bäuerlein, P.S.; Mansell, J.E.; ter Laak, T.L.; de Voogt, P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous polar anthropogenic organic chemicals have been found in the aqueous environment. Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been applied for the isolation of these from aqueous matrices, employing various materials. Nevertheless, little is known about the influence of functional groups on the

  18. Application of numerical modelling to scaling-up of electrically induced extraction from an organic mixture using an ionic liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiński Kamil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-liquid extraction provides an environmentally friendly process as an alternative to azeotropic distillation, pervaporation and reverse osmosis because these techniques require the use of large amounts of energy, may involve volatile organic compounds, and operation at high pressure.

  19. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of soil organic matter extracted from a Brazilian mangrove and Spanish salt marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perobelli Ferreira, F.; Buurman, P.; Macias, F.; Otero, X.L.; Boluda, R.

    2009-01-01

    The soil organic matter (SOM) extracted under different vegetation types from a Brazilian mangrove (Pai Matos Island, São Paulo State) and from three Spanish salt marshes (Betanzos Ría and Corrubedo Natural Parks, Galícia, and the Albufera Natural Park, Valencia) was investigated by pyrolysis-gas

  20. Consequences of bioenergy wood extraction for landscape-level availability of habitat for dead wood-dependent organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiron, Matthew; Jonsell, Mats; Kubart, Ariana; Thor, Göran; Schroeder, Martin; Dahlberg, Anders; Johansson, Victor; Ranius, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Stumps and slash resulting from forest clearcutting is used as a source of low-net-carbon energy, but there are concerns about the consequences of biofuel extraction on biodiversity. Logging residues constitute potentially important habitats, since a large part of forest biodiversity is dependent on dead wood. Here we used snapshot field data from a managed forest landscape (25 000 ha) to predict landscape scale population changes of dead wood dependent organisms after extraction of stumps and slash after clearcutting. We did this by estimating habitat availability for all observed dead wood-dependent beetles, macrofungi, and lichens (380 species) in the whole landscape. We found that 53% of species occurred in slash or stumps. For most species, population declines after moderate extraction (≤30%) were small (dead wood types. However, some species were only recorded in slash and stumps. Red listed species were affected by slash and stump extraction (12 species), but less often than other species. Beetles and fungi were more affected by stump extraction, while lichens were more affected by slash extraction. For beetles and lichens, extraction of a combination of spruce, pine and birch resulted in larger negative effects than if only extracting spruce, while for fungi tree species had little effect. We conclude that extensive extraction decreases the amount of habitat to such extent that it may have negative consequences on species persistence at the landscape level. The negative consequences can be limited by extracting only slash, or only logging residues from spruce stands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Emerging organic pollutants in the vadose zone of a soil aquifer treatment system: Pore water extraction using positive displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopilniak, Alexander; Elkayam, Roy; Rossin, Anna Voloshenko; Lev, Ovadia

    2018-01-01

    Trace organic compounds in effluents, water streams and aquifers are amply reported. However, the mobile pool of Emerging Organic Contaminants (EOCs) in the deep parts of the vadose zone is hard to estimate, due to difficulties in extraction of sufficient quantity of pore water. Here, we present a new methodology for depth profiling of EOCs in pore water by Positive Displacement Extraction (PDE): Pore water extraction from unsaturated soil samples is carried out by withdrawal of soil cores by direct-push drilling and infiltrating the core by organics free water. We show that EOC concentrations in the water eluted in the plateau region of the inverse breakthrough curve is equal to their pore water concentrations. The method was previously validated for DOC extraction, and here the scope of the methodology is extended to pore water extraction for organic pollutants analysis. Method characteristics and validation were carried out with atrazine, simazine, carbamazepine, venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine and caffeine in the concentration range of several ng to several μg/liter. Validation was carried out by laboratory experiments on three different soils (sandy, sandy-clayey and clayey). Field studies in the vadose zone of a SAT system provided 27 m deep EOC profiles with less than 1.5 m spatial resolution. During the percolation treatment, carbamazepine remained persistent, while the other studied EOCs were attenuated to the extent of 50-99%.The highest degradation rate of all studied EOCs was in the aerobic zone. EOC levels based on PDE and extraction by centrifugation were compared, showing a positive bias for centrifugation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The interaction of mercury with halogenated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchofer, Abigail; Sasmaz, Erdem; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of mercury with halogenated graphene was studied using plane-wave density functional theory. Various configurations of H, Hg, O and Br or Cl on the zigzag edge sites of graphene were investigated. Although Hg-Br (or -Cl) complexes were found to be stable on the surface, the most stable configurations found were those with Hg adjacent to O. The surface atoms Hg, O, and Br tend to repel each other during geometric optimization, moving towards an H atom nearest-neighbor where possible. The strength of the Hg-graphene interaction is very sensitive to the local environment. The Hg-graphene binding energy is strongest when the Hg is located next to a surface O but not immediately next to a bound Br. DOS analysis revealed that Hg adsorption involves a gain in Hg 6 p-states and a loss in Hg 5 s electron density, resulting in an oxidized surface-bound Hg complex. DOS analysis suggests that Br strengthens the Hg-graphene interaction by modifying the surface carbon electron density; however, when Br is adjacent to Hg, a direct Hg-Br interaction weakens the Hg-C bond. These investigations provide insight into the mechanism associated with enhanced Hg adsorption on Br-functionalized carbon materials for Hg emissions reductions from coal-fired power plant applications. The authors acknowledge the financial support by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  3. Effects of some organic materials on bicarbonate extractable phosphate content of soils having different pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutullah Özdemir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of rice husk compost (RC, town waste compost (TW and tobacco waste (TB on bicarbonate extractable phosphate content (P in soils having different pH levels under greenhouse conditions. Soil samples used in this study were taken from surfaces (0-20 cm of agricultural fields around Samsun, Northern Anatolia. The experiment was conducted according to split plot design with four doses of organic matterials (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5, %. After a month of mixing organic matterials into soils, lettuce were grown in the medias. According to the results, RC, TW and TB applications into acidic (Tepecik, neutral (Kampüs and alkaline (Çetinkaya soils increased extractable P content. It was observed that effectiveness of organic matterials changed depend on soil reaction, type and dose of organic matterials. All organic wastes were more effective on increment of bicarbonate extractable phosphate content in neutral soil pH when compared the other soil pH levels.

  4. Multi-target determination of organic ultraviolet absorbents in organism tissues by ultrasonic assisted extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xianzhi; Jin, Jiabin; Wang, Chunwei; Ou, Weihui; Tang, Caiming

    2015-03-06

    A sensitive and reliable method was developed for multi-target determination of 13 most widely used organic ultraviolet (UV) absorbents (including UV filters and UV stabilizers) in aquatic organism tissues. The organic UV absorbents were extracted using ultrasonic-assisted extraction, purified via gel permeation chromatography coupled with silica gel column chromatography, and determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Recoveries of the UV absorbents from organism tissues mostly ranged from 70% to 120% from fish filet with satisfactory reproducibility. Method quantification limits were 0.003-1.0ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) except for 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate. This method has been applied to analysis of the UV absorbents in wild and farmed aquatic organisms collected from the Pearl River Estuary, South China. 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone and UV-P were frequently detected in both wild and farmed marine organisms at low ngg(-1)dw. 3-(4-Methylbenzylidene)camphor and most of the benzotriazole UV stabilizers were also frequently detected in maricultured fish. Octocrylene and 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate were not detected in any sample. This work lays basis for in-depth study about bioaccumulation and biomagnification of the UV absorbents in marine environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tannins and Tannin-Related Derivatives Enhance the (Pseudo-)Halogenating Activity of Lactoperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Jana; Prévost, Martine; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Sarosi, Menyhárt-Botond; Rodewald, Steffen; Arnhold, Jürgen; Flemmig, Jörg

    2017-05-26

    Several hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, tannin derivatives, and a tannin-rich plant extract of tormentil rhizome were tested for their potential to regenerate the (pseudo-)halogenating activity, i.e., the oxidation of SCN - to hypothiocyanite - OSCN, of lactoperoxidase (LPO) after hydrogen peroxide-mediated enzyme inactivation. Measurements were performed using 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid in the presence of tannins and related substances in order to determine kinetic parameters and to trace the LPO-mediated - OSCN formation. The results were combined with docking studies and molecular orbital analysis. The - OSCN-regenerating effect of tannin derivatives relates well with their binding properties toward LPO as well as their occupied molecular orbitals. Especially simple compounds like ellagic acid or methyl gallate and the complex plant extract were found as potent enzyme-regenerating compounds. As the (pseudo-)halogenating activity of LPO contributes to the maintenance of oral bacterial homeostasis, the results provide new insights into the antibacterial mode of action of tannins and related compounds. Furthermore, chemical properties of the tested compounds that are important for efficient enzyme-substrate interaction and regeneration of the - OSCN formation by LPO were identified.

  6. Impact of organic fertilizer, humic acid and sea weed extract on wheat production in pothowar region of pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, S.; Anjum, A.S.; Kasana, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L) crop production was evaluated under organic conditions during the year 2008-09 and 2009-2010 at National Agricultural Research Center (NARC), Pakistan Agricultural Research council (PARC) Islamabad. The study includes four treatments with four replications. The treatments includes; (1) Organic fertilizer 625 Kg ha/sup -1/, (2) Organic fertilizer 625 and Humic Acid 10 Kg ha/sup -1/ (3) Humic Acid and Sea weed extract 625 ml ha/sup -1/ and (4) Control. Organic amendments were incorporated during land preparation and seaweed extract as foliar spray. The basal dose of organic fertilizer and humic acid (granule) were added at the time of sowing of wheat during 2008-2009 and 2009-2010.Humic acid solution 1% and sea weed extract were applied as foliar spray at 6 inches of wheat crop. The second foliar spray was done at tillering while third and forth sprays at heading and milking stage respectively. The crop conditions, color, shoot length and spike and yield parameters were recorded at different stages of the organic fertilizer application. The soils and crops managed organically are sustainable. Similarly, biological and chemical properties of soil also improved significantly. The compost enriched with different organic waste increased all physico-chemical and biological properties of the soil as well as yield of the crop. The wheat crop morphological and agronomical parameters also increase significantly. Moreover, nutrients supply and other soil properties like pH, CEC, ECe and plant nutrients including microbial community structure influence positively. (author)

  7. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Tunisian Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. immature fruit and seed organic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, B; Marzouk, Z; Fenina, N; Bouraoui, A; Aouni, M

    2011-06-01

    Inflammations and immune-related diseases including rheumatoid arthritis are widespread in the entire globe. The treatment of these illnesses is mainly based on the use of synthetic and biotechnological drugs, in recent years. Tunisian traditional medicine is a potential source of new remedies namely Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae): endemic in southern Tunisia and used in folk medicine to treat many inflammation disorders. Our goal was to assess the in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Tunisian Citrullus colocynthis immature fruit and seed organic extracts (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone and finely methanol extract). Yields of prepared organic extracts are gravimetrically determined. For the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, we have used respectively, the acetic acid writhing test in mice and the carrageenan-induced paw edema assay in rats. All extracts displayed an important analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities at different doses without inducing any side effects. This study has demonstrated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Citrullus colocynthis immature fruit and seed extracts. Experiment results provide scientific insight into the ancient practice of utilizing Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. as analgesic and as anti-inflammatory agents.

  8. Modeling space-charge-limited currents in organic semiconductors: Extracting trap density and mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2011-11-28

    We have developed and have applied a mobility edge model that takes drift and diffusion currents to characterize the space-charge-limited current in organic semiconductors into account. The numerical solution of the drift-diffusion equation allows the utilization of asymmetric contacts to describe the built-in potential within the device. The model has been applied to extract information of the distribution of traps from experimental current-voltage measurements of a rubrene single crystal from Krellner showing excellent agreement across several orders of magnitude in the current. Although the two contacts are made of the same metal, an energy offset of 580 meV between them, ascribed to differences in the deposition techniques (lamination vs evaporation) was essential to correctly interpret the shape of the current-voltage characteristics at low voltage. A band mobility of 0.13cm 2V-1s-1 for holes is estimated, which is consistent with transport along the long axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. The total density of traps deeper than 0.1 eV was 2.2×1016cm -3. The sensitivity analysis and error estimation in the obtained parameters show that it is not possible to accurately resolve the shape of the trap distribution for energies deeper than 0.3 eV or shallower than 0.1 eV above the valence-band edge. The total number of traps deeper than 0.3 eV, however, can be estimated. Contact asymmetry and the diffusion component of the current play an important role in the description of the device at low bias and are required to obtain reliable information about the distribution of deep traps. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of dissolved organic carbon fractions and copper complexation using solid-phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElmurry, Shawn P.; Long, David T.; Voice, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Trace metal cycling in natural waters is highly influenced by the amount and type of dissolved organic C (DOC). Although determining individual species of DOC is unrealistic, there has been success in classifying DOC by determining operationally defined fractions. However, current fractionation schemes do not allow for the simultaneous quantification of associated trace metals. Using operational classifications, a scheme was developed to fractionate DOC based on a set of seven solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. The cartridges isolated fractions based on a range of specific mechanisms thought to be responsible for DOC aggregation in solution, as well as molecular weight. The method was evaluated to determine if it can identify differences in DOC characteristics, including differences in Cu-DOC complexation. Results are that: (1) cartridge blanks were low for both DOC and Cu, (2) differences are observed in the distribution of DOC amongst the fractions from various sources that are consistent with what is known about the DOC materials and the mechanisms operative for each cartridge, (3) when present as a free cation, Cu was not retained by non-cationic cartridges allowing the method to be used to assess Cu binding, (4) the capability of the method to provide quantitative assessment of Cu-DOC complexation was demonstrated for a variety of DOC standards, (5) Cu was found to preferentially bind with high molecular weight fractions of DOC, and (6) estimated partitioning coefficients and conditional binding constants for Cu were similar to those reported elsewhere. The method developed describes DOC characteristics based on specific bonding mechanisms (hydrogen, donor-acceptor, London dispersion, and ionic bonding) while simultaneously quantifying Cu-DOC complexation. The method provides researchers a means of describing not only the extent of DOC complexation but also how that complex will be behave in natural waters.

  10. PAHs concentration and toxicity in organic solvent extracts of atmospheric particulate matter and sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Noriatsu; Takeuchi, Shin-ya; Kojima, Keisuke; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Komatsu, Toshiko; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the toxicity to marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) were measured for the organic solvent extracts of sea sediments collected from an urban watershed area (Hiroshima Bay) of Japan and compared with the concentrations and toxicity of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). In atmospheric PM, the PAHs concentration was highest in fine particulate matter (FPM) collected during cold seasons. The concentrations of sea sediments were 0.01-0.001 times those of atmospheric PM. 1/EC50 was 1-10 L g(-1) PM for atmospheric PM and 0.1-1 L g(-1) dry solids for sea sediments. These results imply that toxic substances from atmospheric PM are diluted several tens or hundreds of times in sea sediments. The ratio of the 1/EC50 to PAHs concentration ((1/EC50)/16PAHs) was stable for all sea sediments (0.1-1 L μg(-1) 16PAHs) and was the same order of magnitude as that of FPM and coarse particulate matter (CPM). The ratio of sediments collected from the west was more similar to that of CPM while that from the east was more similar to FPM, possibly because of hydraulic differences among water bodies. The PAHs concentration pattern analyses (principal component analysis and isomer ratio analysis) were conducted and the results showed that the PAHs pattern in sea sediments was quite different to that of FPM and CPM. Comparison with previously conducted PAHs analyses suggested that biomass burning residues comprised a major portion of these other sources.

  11. Quantum Chemical Examination of the Sequential Halogen Incorporation Scheme for the Modeling of Speciation of I/Br/Cl-Containing Trihalomethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyang; Li, Maodong; Han, Xuze; Yan, Mingquan

    2018-02-20

    The recently developed three-step ternary halogenation model interprets the incorporation of chlorine, bromine, and iodine ions into natural organic matter (NOM) and formation of iodine-, bromine-, and chlorine-containing trihalomethanes (THMs) based on the competition of iodine, bromine, and chlorine species at each node of the halogenation sequence. This competition is accounted for using the dimensionless ratios (denoted as γ) of kinetic rates of reactions of the initial attack sites or halogenated intermediates with chlorine, bromine, and iodine ions. However, correlations between the model predictions made and mechanistic aspects of the incorporation of halogen species need to be ascertained in more detail. In this study, quantum chemistry calculations were first used to probe the formation mechanism of 10 species of Cl-/Br-/I- THMs. The HOMO energy (E HOMO ) of each mono-, bi-, or trihalomethanes were calculated by B3LYP method in Gaussian 09 software. Linear correlations were found to exist between the logarithms of experimentally determined kinetic preference coefficients γ reported in prior research and, on the other hand, differences of E HOMO values between brominated/iodinated and chlorinated halomethanes. One notable exception from this trend was that observed for the incorporation of iodine into mono- and di-iodinated intermediates. These observations confirm the three-step halogen incorporation sequence and the factor γ in the statistical model. The combined use of quantum chemistry calculations and the ternary sequential halogenation model provides a new insight into the microscopic nature of NOM-halogen interactions and the trends seen in the behavior of γ factors incorporated in the THM speciation models.

  12. Formation of the second organic phase during uranyl nitrate extraction from aqueous solution by 30% tributylphosphate solution in paraffin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yhrkin, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    For extraction systems aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate-30% solution of tributylphosphate in individual paraffins from C 13 to C 17 the influence of the second organic phase of uranyl nitrate concentration in aqueous and organic phases, the length of hydrocarbon chain of paraffin hydrocarbon and temperature from 25 to 50 deg C on formation conditions has been defected. A special method of achieving the conditions of organic phase stratification from three-phase region, involving definition of equilibrium phases composition by density and refractive index, has been elaborated for more precise definition of organic phase homogeneity region. It has been revealed that without addition of nitric acid to uranyl nitrate solution the organic phase homogeneity limits can be achieved solely on paraffins C 15 , C 16 and C 17 and only under conditions similar to equeous phase saturation in terms of uranyl nitrate. 16 refs., 2 figs

  13. Head Space Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (HS - SPME of volatile organic compounds produced by Sporidiobolus salmonicolor (CBS 2636

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Valduga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the assessment of volatile organic compounds produced by Sporidiobolus salmonicolor (CBS 2636 using methyl and ethyl ricinoleate, ricinoleic acid and castor oil as precursors. The analysis of the volatile organic compounds was carried out using Head Space Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (HS - SPME. Factorial experimental design was used for investigating extraction conditions, verifying stirring rate (0-400 rpm, temperature (25-60 ºC, extraction time (10-30 minutes, and sample volume (2-3 mL. The identification of volatile organic compounds was carried out by Gas Chromatography with Mass Spectrum Detector (GC/MSD. The conditions that resulted in maximum extraction were: 60 ºC, 10 minutes extraction, no stirring, sample volume of 2.0 mL, and addition of saturated KCl (1:10 v/v. In the bio-production of volatile organic compounds the effect of stirring rate (120-200 rpm, temperature (23-33 ºC, pH (4.0-8.0, precursor concentration (0.02-0.1%, mannitol (0-6%, and asparagine concentration (0-0.2% was investigated. The bio-production at 28 ºC, 160 rpm, pH 6,0 and with the addition of 0.02% ricinoleic acid to the medium yielded the highest production of VOCs, identified as 1,4-butanediol, 1,2,2-trimethylciclopropilamine, beta-ionone; 2,3-butanodione, pentanal, tetradecane, 2-isononenal, 4-octen-3-one, propanoic acid, and octadecane.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium with arsenazo previous liquid-liquid extraction and colour development in organic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomares Delgado, F.; Vera Palomino, J.; Petrement Eguiluz, J. C.

    1964-01-01

    The determination of uranium with arsenazo is hindered by a great number of cation which form stable complexes with the reactive and may given rise to serious interferences. By studying the optimum conditions of uranium the extraction be means of tributylphosphate solutions dissolved in methylisobuthylketone, under conditions for previous masking of the interfering cations, an organic extract was obtained containing all the uranium together with small amounts of iron. The possible interference derived from the latter element is avoided by reduction with hydroxylammoniumchlorid followed by complex formation of the Fe(II)-ortophenantroline compound in alcoholic medium. (Author) 17 refs

  15. Investigation of extractable organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility that deep-sea hydrothermal vents may contain organic compounds produced by abiotic synthesis or by microbial communities living deep beneath the surface has led to numerous studies of the organic composition of vent fluids. Most of these studies have focused on methane and other light hydrocarbons, while the possible occurrence of more complex organic compounds in the fluids has remained largely unstudied. To address this issue, the presence of higher molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal fluids was assessed at three sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that span a range of temperatures (51 to >360 °C), fluid compositions, and host-rock lithologies (mafic to ultramafic). Samples were obtained at several sites within the Lucky Strike, Rainbow, and Lost City hydrothermal fields. Three methods were employed to extract organic compounds for analysis, including liquid:liquid extraction, cold trapping on the walls of a coil of titanium tubing, and pumping fluids through cartridges filled with solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents. The only samples to consistently yield high amounts of extractable organic compounds were the warm (51-91 °C), highly alkaline fluids from Lost City, which contained elevated concentrations of C8, C10, and C12n-alkanoic acids and, in some cases, trithiolane, hexadecanol, squalene, and cholesterol. Collectively, the C8-C12 acids can account for about 15% of the total dissolved organic carbon in the Lost City fluids. The even-carbon-number predominance of the alkanoic acids indicates a biological origin, but it is unclear whether these compounds are derived from microbial activity occurring within the hydrothermal chimney proximal to the site of fluid discharge or are transported from deeper within the system. Hydrothermal fluids from the Lucky Strike and Rainbow fields were characterized by an overall scarcity of extractable dissolved organic compounds. Trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons including

  16. ASE extraction method for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis in soft tissues of aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodin, Nathalie; Budzinski, Helene; Le Menach, Karyn; Tapie, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Since lipids are depleted in 13 C relative to proteins and carbohydrates, variations in lipid composition among species and within individuals significantly influence δ 13 C and may result in misleading ecological interpretations. Whereas lipid extraction before IRMS analysis constitutes a way of stable isotope result lipid-normalisation, such a procedure was given up because of the un-controlled effects of the methods used (i.e., 'Bligh and Dyer', Soxhlet, etc.) on δ 15 N. The aim of this work was to develop a simple, rapid and efficient lipid extraction method allowing for simultaneous C and N stable isotope analysis in the biological soft tissues of aquatic organisms. The goal was to be free from the lipid influence on δ 13 C values without interfering with δ 15 N values. For that purpose, the modern automated pressurized liquid extraction technique ASE (accelerated solvent extraction) was selected. Eel muscles representative of a broad range of fat contents were extracted via ASE by using different semi-polar solvents (100% dichloromethane and 80% n-hexane/20% acetone) and by operating at different temperature (ambient temperature and 100 deg. C) and pressure (750 and 1900 psi) conditions. The results were discussed in terms of lipid extraction efficiency as well as δ 13 C and δ 15 N variability.

  17. Direct extraction of genomic DNA from maize with aqueous ionic liquid buffer systems for applications in genetically modified organisms analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez García, Eric; Ressmann, Anna K; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Mach, Robert L; Krska, Rudolf; Bica, Katharina; Brunner, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    To date, the extraction of genomic DNA is considered a bottleneck in the process of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. Conventional DNA isolation methods are associated with long extraction times and multiple pipetting and centrifugation steps, which makes the entire procedure not only tedious and complicated but also prone to sample cross-contamination. In recent times, ionic liquids have emerged as innovative solvents for biomass processing, due to their outstanding properties for dissolution of biomass and biopolymers. In this study, a novel, easily applicable, and time-efficient method for the direct extraction of genomic DNA from biomass based on aqueous-ionic liquid solutions was developed. The straightforward protocol relies on extraction of maize in a 10 % solution of ionic liquids in aqueous phosphate buffer for 5 min at room temperature, followed by a denaturation step at 95 °C for 10 min and a simple filtration to remove residual biopolymers. A set of 22 ionic liquids was tested in a buffer system and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate, as well as the environmentally benign choline formate, were identified as ideal candidates. With this strategy, the quality of the genomic DNA extracted was significantly improved and the extraction protocol was notably simplified compared with a well-established method.

  18. Extraction optimization and pixel-based chemometric analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter; Tomasi, Giorgio; Kristensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    . In this study, we tested the combination of solid phase extraction (SPE) with dispersive liquid-liquid micro extraction (DLLME), or with stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), as an extraction method for semi-VOCs in groundwater. Combining SPE with DLLME or SBSE resulted in better separation of peaks...... in an unresolved complex mixture. SPE-DLLME was chosen as the preferred extraction method. SPE-DLLME covered a larger polarity range (logKo/w 2.0-11.2), had higher extraction efficiency at logKo/w 2.0-3.8 and 5.8-11.2, and was faster compared to SPE-SBSE. SPE-DLLME extraction combined with chemical analysis by gas...... chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and pixel-based data analysis of summed extraction ion chromatograms (sEICs) was tested as a new method for chemical fingerprinting of semi-VOCs in 15 groundwater samples. The results demonstrate that SPE-DLLME-GC-MS provides an excellent compromise between compound...

  19. Insect lipid profile: aqueous versus organic solvent-based extraction methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzompa Sosa, D.A.; Yi, L.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Lakemond, C.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    In view of future expected industrial bio-fractionation of insects, we investigated the influence of extraction methods on chemical characteristics of insect lipids. Lipids from Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, Acheta domesticus and Blaptica dubia, reared in the Netherlands, were extracted

  20. Develonment of novel organic extractants for applications in various radioactive waste remedistion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowafy, E. A.; El-Naggar, I.A.; Shalash, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A major goal of our research program is to develop some new amides as extractants for various waste treatments. Heterocyclic amides have been recently employed successfully as extractants for lanthanide and actinide cations and also some fission products from strongly acidic media. Many of these heterocyclic amides extractants have been synthesized in our laboratory and characterized by different techniques. Their synthesis has been improved. By optimization of the formula, it is possible to use aliphatic diluents without third-phase formation in contact with nitric or hydrochloric acids. One of the most interesting applications of amides is their use as extractants in nuclear field. main advantages of these new extractants are ease of synthesis compared with phosphorus compounds, high chemical and radiolytic stability and complete incineration which leads to smaller amounts of radioactive waste. Studies concerning the utilization of these new synthesized reagents for uranium and thorium were explored

  1. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy 18 F, /sup 34m/Cl, and 76 Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,γ) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied

  2. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy /sup 18/F, /sup 34m/Cl, and /sup 76/Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,..gamma..) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied.

  3. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, E.P.

    1980-02-01

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, /sup 80/Br, /sup 82m/Br + /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 128/I, /sup 130/I, and /sup 130m/I + /sup 130/I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation to determine the role of hot atom kinetic energy, halogen atom, enantioner structure, steric effects and phase on the extent of substitution by retention of configuration or by Walden inversion. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace element determinations in biological systems was continued.

  4. Evaluation of antiangiogenic and antiproliferative potential of the organic extract of green algae chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyadari, Mahender; Fatma, Tasneem; Azad, Rajvardhan; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: algae isolates obtained from fresh and marine resources could be one of the richest sources of novel bioactive secondary metabolites expected to have pharmaceutical significance for new drug development. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in experimental models of angiogenesis and by MTT assay. Materials and Methods: lyophilized extract of C. pyrenoidosa was extracted using dichloromethane/methanol (2:1), concentrated and vacuum evaporated to obtain the dried extract. The crude extract was evaluated in the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in in ovo chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) at various concentrations (n = 8) using thalidomide and normal saline as positive and untreated control groups, respectively. The crude extract was also subjected to the antiangiogenic activity in the silver nitrate/potassium nitrate cautery model of corneal neovascularization (CN) in rats where topical bevacizumab was used as a positive control. The vasculature was photographed and blood vessel density was quantified using Aphelion imaging software. The extract was also evaluated for its anti proliferative activity by microculture tetrazolium test (MTT) assay using HeLa cancer cell line (ATCC). Results: VEGF increased the blood vessel density by 220% as compared to normal and thalidomide treatment decreased it to 67.2% in in ovo assay. In the in-vivo CN model, the mean neovascular density in the control group, the C. pyrenoidosa extract and bevacizumab group were found to be 100%, 59.02%, and 32.20%, respectively. The Chlorella pyrenoidosa extract negatively affected the viability of HeLa cells. An IC50 value of the extract was 570 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: a significant antiangiogenic activity was observed against VEGF-induced neovascularization and antiproliferative activity by MTT assay. In this study, it could be attributed that the activity may be

  5. DNA damage induced in mouse tissues by organic wood preserving waste extracts as assayed by {sup 32}P-postlabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randerath, E. [Division of Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Zhou, G.D. [Division of Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Donnelly, K.C. [Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Safe, S.H. [Department of Veterinary Physiology/Pharmacology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Randerath, K. [Division of Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01

    In the present study, a mouse bioassay was used in combination with {sup 32}P-postlabeling to determine DNA adduct formation induced by hexane/acetone extracts of two samples from a WPW site. Female ICR mice were treated dermally with extract corresponding to 3 mg residue or vehicle control once per day for 2 days and killed 24 h later. Skin, lung, liver, kidney, and heart DNA preparations were assayed by nuclease P1-enhanced postlabeling. Adduct profiles were tissue-specific and displayed a multitude of non-polar DNA adducts with levels amounting to one adduct in 1.6 x 10{sup 6} DNA nucleotides in skin (both extracts) and one adduct in 3.2 x 10{sup 7} or 1.2 x 10{sup 7} DNA nucleotides in liver (extract 1 or extract 2). Based on their chromatographic properties, these adducts appeared largely derived from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the extracts. One of the major adducts was identified as the {sup 32}P-labeled derivative of the reaction product of 7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9{alpha}, 10{alpha}-epoxy-7, 8, 9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE I) with N{sup 2} of deoxyguanosine. Total non-polar DNA adduct levels were highest in skin and lung, amounting to 17.4 and 24.0% of the skin values for extracts 1 and 2, respectively, in lung while the corresponding levels in liver were 5.0 and 12.6%. These results were in accord with the carcinogenic potencies of PAHs in these organs. Extract 2 induced higher adduct levels in internal organs, although its PAH concentrations were lower than those of extract 1, i.e. lung, liver, kidney, and heart had 1.4, 2.5, 1.9, and 1.7 times higher total adduct levels and 1.6, 3.3, 1.6, and 1.9 times higher benzo[a]pyrene adduct levels. With the exception of total adducts in lung, the differences between the two extracts were all significant, suggestive of compound interactions. (orig.) (orig.). With 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. DNA damage induced in mouse tissues by organic wood preserving waste extracts as assayed by 32P-postlabeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randerath, E.; Zhou, G.D.; Donnelly, K.C.; Safe, S.H.; Randerath, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, a mouse bioassay was used in combination with 32 P-postlabeling to determine DNA adduct formation induced by hexane/acetone extracts of two samples from a WPW site. Female ICR mice were treated dermally with extract corresponding to 3 mg residue or vehicle control once per day for 2 days and killed 24 h later. Skin, lung, liver, kidney, and heart DNA preparations were assayed by nuclease P1-enhanced postlabeling. Adduct profiles were tissue-specific and displayed a multitude of non-polar DNA adducts with levels amounting to one adduct in 1.6 x 10 6 DNA nucleotides in skin (both extracts) and one adduct in 3.2 x 10 7 or 1.2 x 10 7 DNA nucleotides in liver (extract 1 or extract 2). Based on their chromatographic properties, these adducts appeared largely derived from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the extracts. One of the major adducts was identified as the 32 P-labeled derivative of the reaction product of 7β, 8α-dihydroxy-9α, 10α-epoxy-7, 8, 9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE I) with N 2 of deoxyguanosine. Total non-polar DNA adduct levels were highest in skin and lung, amounting to 17.4 and 24.0% of the skin values for extracts 1 and 2, respectively, in lung while the corresponding levels in liver were 5.0 and 12.6%. These results were in accord with the carcinogenic potencies of PAHs in these organs. Extract 2 induced higher adduct levels in internal organs, although its PAH concentrations were lower than those of extract 1, i.e. lung, liver, kidney, and heart had 1.4, 2.5, 1.9, and 1.7 times higher total adduct levels and 1.6, 3.3, 1.6, and 1.9 times higher benzo[a]pyrene adduct levels. With the exception of total adducts in lung, the differences between the two extracts were all significant, suggestive of compound interactions. (orig.) (orig.). With 5 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Liquid–liquid extraction combined with differential isotope dimethylaminophenacyl labeling for improved metabolomic profiling of organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Jun; Li, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An improved method for profiling the carboxylic acid sub-metabolome is reported. •Liquid–liquid extraction was used for separating the organic acids from the amines. • 12 C/ 13 C-p-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling of the organic acids was carried out on the extract. •Detection interference by amines and labeling efficiency reduction by water were reduced. •About 2500 12 C/ 13 C-peak pairs or putative metabolites could be detected from 20 μL of human urine. -- Abstract: A large fraction of the known human metabolome belong to organic acids. However, comprehensive profiling of the organic acid sub-metabolome is a major analytical challenge. In this work, we report an improved method for detecting organic acid metabolites. This method is based on the use of liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) to selectively extract the organic acids, followed by using differential isotope p-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling of the acid metabolites. The 12 C-/ 13 C-labeled samples are analyzed by liquid chromatography Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC–FTICR–MS). It is shown that this LLE DmPA labeling method offers superior performance over the method of direct DmPA labeling of biofluids such as human urine. LLE of organic acids reduces the interference of amine-containing metabolites that may also react with DmPA. It can also remove water in a biofluid that can reduce the labeling efficiency. Using human urine as an example, it is demonstrated that about 2500 peak pairs or putative metabolites could be detected in a 30-min gradient LC–MS run, which is about 3 times more than that detected in a sample prepared using direct DmPA labeling. About 95% of the 1000 or so matched metabolites to the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) are organic acids. It is further shown that this method can be used to handle as small as 10 μL of urine. We believe that this method opens the possibility of generating a

  8. Liquid–liquid extraction combined with differential isotope dimethylaminophenacyl labeling for improved metabolomic profiling of organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jun; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2013-11-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An improved method for profiling the carboxylic acid sub-metabolome is reported. •Liquid–liquid extraction was used for separating the organic acids from the amines. •{sup 12}C/{sup 13}C-p-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling of the organic acids was carried out on the extract. •Detection interference by amines and labeling efficiency reduction by water were reduced. •About 2500 {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C-peak pairs or putative metabolites could be detected from 20 μL of human urine. -- Abstract: A large fraction of the known human metabolome belong to organic acids. However, comprehensive profiling of the organic acid sub-metabolome is a major analytical challenge. In this work, we report an improved method for detecting organic acid metabolites. This method is based on the use of liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) to selectively extract the organic acids, followed by using differential isotope p-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling of the acid metabolites. The {sup 12}C-/{sup 13}C-labeled samples are analyzed by liquid chromatography Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC–FTICR–MS). It is shown that this LLE DmPA labeling method offers superior performance over the method of direct DmPA labeling of biofluids such as human urine. LLE of organic acids reduces the interference of amine-containing metabolites that may also react with DmPA. It can also remove water in a biofluid that can reduce the labeling efficiency. Using human urine as an example, it is demonstrated that about 2500 peak pairs or putative metabolites could be detected in a 30-min gradient LC–MS run, which is about 3 times more than that detected in a sample prepared using direct DmPA labeling. About 95% of the 1000 or so matched metabolites to the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) are organic acids. It is further shown that this method can be used to handle as small as 10 μL of urine. We believe that this method opens the

  9. Determination of Terpenoid Content in Pine by Organic Solvent Extraction and Fast-GC Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman-Ware, Anne E., E-mail: anne.ware@nrel.gov; Sykes, Robert [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Peter, Gary F. [School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Davis, Mark [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-25

    Terpenoids, naturally occurring compounds derived from isoprene units present in pine oleoresin, are a valuable source of chemicals used in solvents, fragrances, flavors, and have shown potential use as a biofuel. This paper describes a method to extract and analyze the terpenoids present in loblolly pine saplings and pine lighter wood. Various extraction solvents were tested over different times and temperatures. Samples were analyzed by pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry before and after extractions to monitor the extraction efficiency. The pyrolysis studies indicated that the optimal extraction method used a 1:1 hexane/acetone solvent system at 22°C for 1 h. Extracts from the hexane/acetone experiments were analyzed using a low thermal mass modular accelerated column heater for fast-GC/FID analysis. The most abundant terpenoids from the pine samples were quantified, using standard curves, and included the monoterpenes, α- and β-pinene, camphene, and δ-carene. Sesquiterpenes analyzed included caryophyllene, humulene, and α-bisabolene. Diterpenoid resin acids were quantified in derivatized extractions, including pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric, palustric, dehydroabietic, abietic, and neoabietic acids.

  10. Determination of Terpenoid Content in Pine by Organic Solvent Extraction and Fast-GC Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman-Ware, Anne E.; Sykes, Robert; Peter, Gary F.; Davis, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids, naturally occurring compounds derived from isoprene units present in pine oleoresin, are a valuable source of chemicals used in solvents, fragrances, flavors, and have shown potential use as a biofuel. This paper describes a method to extract and analyze the terpenoids present in loblolly pine saplings and pine lighter wood. Various extraction solvents were tested over different times and temperatures. Samples were analyzed by pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry before and after extractions to monitor the extraction efficiency. The pyrolysis studies indicated that the optimal extraction method used a 1:1 hexane/acetone solvent system at 22°C for 1 h. Extracts from the hexane/acetone experiments were analyzed using a low thermal mass modular accelerated column heater for fast-GC/FID analysis. The most abundant terpenoids from the pine samples were quantified, using standard curves, and included the monoterpenes, α- and β-pinene, camphene, and δ-carene. Sesquiterpenes analyzed included caryophyllene, humulene, and α-bisabolene. Diterpenoid resin acids were quantified in derivatized extractions, including pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric, palustric, dehydroabietic, abietic, and neoabietic acids.

  11. Extraction of garlic with supercritical CO2 and conventional organic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. del Valle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. and garlic extracts have therapeutical properties that stem from their sulfur-containing compounds, mainly allicin. The main objective of this work was to compare conventional and "premium" garlic extracts in terms of yield and quality, with the latter being obtained using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 as the solvent. Yield ranged between 0.65 and 1.0% and increased with extraction pressure (150-400 bar at a constant temperature of 50°C. Extraction temperature (35-60°C, on the other hand, had little effect at a constant pressure of 300 bar. Based on yield and quality considerations, the best extraction conditions using SC-CO2 were 35-50°C and 300-400 bar. A yield of 5.5% was obtained by conventional extraction using ethanol as the solvent, but ethanol appeared to be less selective for valuable components than SC-CO2. The use of fresh garlic resulted in extracts that more closely resembled commercial products, possibly because of thermal and oxidative degradation of valuable microconstituents during drying.

  12. Characterization of extractable soil organic matter pools from African Dark Earths (AfDE): A case study in historical biochar and organic waste amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiu, Manna; Plante, Alain; Ohno, Tsutomu; Solomon, Dawit; Lehmann, Johannes; Fraser, James; Leach, Melissa; Fairhead, James

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic Dark Earths are soils generated through long-term human inputs of organic and pyrogenic materials. These soils were originally discovered in the Amazon, and have since been found in Australia and in this case in Africa. African Dark Earths (AfDE) are black, highly fertile and carbon-rich soils that were formed from the original highly-weathered infertile yellowish to red Oxisols and Ultisols through an extant but hitherto overlooked climate-smart sustainable soil management system that has long been an important feature of the indigenous West African agricultural repertoire. Studies have demonstrated that ADE soils in general have significantly different organic matter properties compared to adjacent non-DE soils, largely attributable to the presence of high concentrations of ash-derived carbon. Quantification and characterization of bulk soil organic matter of several (n=11) AfDE and non-AfDE pairs of surface (0-15 cm) soils using thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC-EGA) confirmed substantial differences in SOM composition and the presence of pyrogenic C. Such pyrogenic organic matter is generally considered recalcitrant or relatively stable, but the goal of the current study was to characterize the presumably labile, more rapidly cycling, pools of C in AfDEs through the characterization of hot water- and pyrophosphate-extractable fractions, referred to as HWEOC and PyroC respectively. Extracts were analyzed for carbon content, as well as composition using fluorescence (EEM/PARAFAC) and high resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The amount of extractable C as a proportion of total soil C was relatively low: less than ~0.8% for HWEOC and 2.8% for PyroC. The proportion of HWEOC did not differ (P = 0.18, paired t-test) between the AfDE and the non-AfDE soils, while the proportions of PyroC were significantly larger (P = 0.001) in the AfDE soils compared to the non-AfDE soils. Preliminary analysis of the EEM/PARAFAC data suggests that AfDE samples had

  13. Mutagenicity in salmonella of nitro-organic compounds in extracts of fly ash of a fluidized-bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsen, J.F.; Harris, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenicity of a crude benzene/methanol extract of fly ash from an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor was tested in Salmonella. Six strains were used including three which were mutants in a nitroreductase gene locus. The numbers of revertants from his- to his+ as a function of the amount of fly ash extracted were determined. The results showed that the major mutagens in the crude extract were nitro compounds from the fact that reversion rates in the nitro-reductase-deficient strains were significantly lower than in the parent strains from which they were derived. The responses of three parental strains, TA1538, TA98, and TA100, were quite similar, thus no conclusions could be made about frameshift versus base-substitution mutagens. No identification of specific nitro-organic compounds has been made

  14. Electrothermal atomisation atomic absorption conditions and matrix modifications for determining antimony, arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, gallium, gold, indium, lead, molybdenum, palladium, platinum, selenium, silver, tellurium, thallium and tin following back-extraction of organic aminohalide extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-element organic-extraction and back-extraction procedure, that had been developed previously to eliminate matrix interferences in the determination of a large number of trace elements in complex materials such as geological samples, produced organic and aqueous solutions that were complex. Electrothermal atomisation atomic absorption conditions and matrix modifications have been developed for 13 of the extracted elements (Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Ga, In, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te and Tl) that enhance sensitivity, alleviate problems resulting from the complex solutions and produce acceptable precision. Platinum, Pd and Mo can be determined without matrix modification directly on the original unstripped extracts.

  15. Effects of halogenated aromatics/aliphatics and nitrogen(N)-heterocyclic aromatics on estimating the persistence of future pharmaceutical compounds using a modified QSAR model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung Joo; Fox, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The effects of halogenated aromatics/aliphatics and nitrogen(N)-heterocyclic aromatics on estimating the persistence of future pharmaceutical compounds were investigated using a modified half life equation. The potential future pharmaceutical compounds investigated were approximately 2000 pharmaceutical drugs currently undergoing the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) testing. EPI Suite (BIOWIN) model estimates the fates of compounds based on the biodegradability under aerobic conditions. While BIOWIN considered the biodegradability of a compound only, the half life equation used in this study was modified by biodegradability, sorption and cometabolic oxidation. It was possible that the potential future pharmaceutical compounds were more accurately estimated using the modified half life equation. The modified half life equation considered sorption and cometabolic oxidation of halogenated aromatic/aliphatics and nitrogen(N)-heterocyclic aromatics in the sub-surface, while EPI Suite (BIOWIN) did not. Halogenated aliphatics in chemicals were more persistent than halogenated aromatics in the sub-surface. In addition, in the sub-surface environment, the fates of organic chemicals were much more affected by halogenation in chemicals than by nitrogen(N)-heterocyclic aromatics. © 2013.

  16. INTERACTION’S EFFECT OF ORGANIC MATERIAL AND AGGREGATION ON EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF TPHS FROM PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH MAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ganjidoust and Gh. Naghizadeh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-Assisted Extraction (MAE is a type of low-temperature thermal desorption process that its numerous advantages have caused a wide spread use of it. Microwave heating is a potentially attractive technique as it provides volumetric heating process to improve heating efficiencies as compared with conventional techniques. The ability to rapidly heat the sample solvent mixture is inherent to MAE and the main advantage of this technique. Presently MAE has been shown to be one of the best technologies for removing environmental pollutants specially PAHs, phenols and PCBs from soils and sediments. Five different mixtures and types of aggregation (Sand, Top soil, Kaolinite besides three concentrations of crude oil as a contaminant (1000, 5000 and 10000 mg/L were considered. The results indicated that regardless of aggregation, the presence of humus component in soil reduces the efficiency. Minimum and maximum efficiencies were for sandy soil (containing organic components and kaolinite (without any organic content, respectively. According to the results of this research when some amount of humus and organic materials are available in the matrix, it causes the extraction efficiency to perform as a function of just humus materials but not aggregation. Increasing the concentration of crude oil reduced the efficiency with a sharp steep for higher concentration (5000-10000 mg/L and less steeper for lower concentration (1000-5000 mg/L. The concentration of the contaminant, works just as an independent function with extraction time and aggregation factors. The extraction period of 10 min. can be suggested as an optimum extraction time in FMAE for PAHs contaminated soils.

  17. Determination of halogens by flame emission of metal halogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrion, G.; Marquardt, D.; Stoecker, B.

    1979-01-01

    The A-B systems InF, InCl, InBr, and InI have been excited by laminar H 2 -N 2 flames in order to dermine individual halogens or their mixtures qualitatively or quantitatively. In optimizing the fuel gas composition two different behavior patterns have been found for band intensities, which are correlated with binding energies of InX (X = halogen). The low temperature of the flame leads to complicated matrix effects which first of all result from effects on excitation and from competitive reactions. In general, cations cause a decreased intensity. Therefore, salts have to be converted into hydrohalide acids by ion exchange. Qualitative determinations of individual halogens are possible at a 500 to 50,000fold excess of the others, whereas quantitative determinations can be performed at a 100 to 5,000fold excess in 10 -4 molar solutions with errors of 2 to 10 per cent. (author)

  18. Investigation on trace elements in crude oil and organic matter extracted from rocks with instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zuguo; Chai Zhifang

    1990-01-01

    Solvent extraction, column chromatography and instrumental neutron activation analysis(INAA) have been used to investigate the trace elements in crude oil, organic matter extracted from rocks and their related fractions. With these methods, about 70 crude oil samples from eight different oil fields in China and 6 extracted asphaltene samples of the lower paleozoic from the upper Yangtze region have been analyzed, and about 40 elements of interest have been determined. Those elements include Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hf, I, Ir, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Rb, Re, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Th, Zn, V and parts of REE. The experimental results show that the method possesses several advantages, i.e. non-destructive, multi-elements, sensitive, precise and accurate. Without ashing samples, the loss of volatile elements such as Cl, S, Se and Sb are avoided. The column chromatography makes it possible to study the distributions of trace elements in different fractions of crude oil and organic matter extracted. Meanwhile, the characters of trace elements in them have also been discussed

  19. Supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from Tenax devices. Final report, November 1985-September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.W.; Kopriva, A.J.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-11-01

    This report describes the development and evaluation of on-line supercritical-fluid extraction - gas-chromatography instrumentation and methodology for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from adsorbent sampling devices. Supercritical fluid extraction offers potential advantages for the removal and transport of organic components from adsorbent matrices including rapid and efficient extraction at mild temperatures. Extraction at mild temperatures eliminates potential problems such as analyte decomposition that can be encountered with the high temperatures needed for thermal desorption analysis. Since a major objective of the study was to develop viable instrumentation and methodology, a relatively detailed description of the instrumentation design requirements and present limitations are discussed. The results of several series of methodology validation studies are also presented. These studies included recovery studies of model VOC spiked on three types of Tenax sampling devices including authentic actively pumped (VOST) and passive (EPA) devices. Replicate devices spiked in an exposure chamber were also subjected to parallel analyses using the new methodology and traditional thermal-desorption gas chromatography

  20. Bioactivity of marine organisms. 6. Antiviral evaluation of marine algal extracts from the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Naik, C.G.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Garg, H.S.; Srimal, R.C.

    Ethanolic extracts of Indian marine algae belonging to the Rhodophyceae, Phaeophyceae and Chlorophyceae were tested for anti-semiliki Forest (SFV), Ranikhet Disease (RDV) and Vaccinia (VV) viruses. In the primary screening of 31 seaweeds, 17...

  1. Bioactivity of marine organisms: Part 7- Effect of seaweed extract on central nervous system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Naik, C.G.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Jain, S.; Goel, A.K.; Srimal, R.C.

    Alcohol extracts of marine algae (Rhodophyceae, Phaeophyceae and Chlorophyceae) was screened for their effect on central nervous system. Of 69 species investigated 8 appeared biologically active, 6 being CNS stimulant, sites and dates of collection...

  2. Development of an extraction method for the determination of dissolved organic radiocarbon in seawater by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Togawa, Orihiko; Amano, Hikaru

    2009-01-01

    We developed an extraction method for accurately and reproducibly determining dissolved organic radiocarbon in seawater by ultraviolet oxidation of dissolved organic carbon and subsequent accelerator mass spectrometry. We determined the irradiation time required for oxidation of the dissolved organic carbon. By modifying the experimental apparatus, we decreased contamination by dead carbon, which came mainly from petrochemical products in the apparatus and from the incursion of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The modifications decreased the analytical blank level to less than 1% of sample size, a percentage that had not previously been achieved. The recovery efficiency was high, 95±1%. To confirm both the accuracy and reproducibility of the method, we tested it by analyzing an oxalic acid radiocarbon reference material and by determining the dissolved organic carbon in surface seawater samples. (author)

  3. A Residential Area Extraction Method for High Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery by Using Visual Saliency and Perceptual Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yixiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by human visual cognitive mechanism,a method of residential area extraction from high-resolution remote sensing images was proposed based on visual saliency and perceptual organization. Firstly,the data field theory of cognitive physics was introduced to model the visual saliency and the candidate residential areas were produced by adaptive thresholding. Then,the exact residential areas were obtained and refined by perceptual organization based on the high-frequency features of multi-scale wavelet transform. Finally,the validity of the proposed method was verified by experiments conducted on ZY-3 and Quickbird image data sets.

  4. Copper-catalyzed recycling of halogen activating groups via 1,3-halogen migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, R David; Van Hoveln, Ryan; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2012-10-03

    A Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-halogen migration reaction effectively recycles an activating group by transferring bromine or iodine from a sp(2) to a benzylic carbon with concomitant borylation of the Ar-X bond. The resulting benzyl halide can be reacted in the same vessel under a variety of conditions to form an additional carbon-heteroatom bond. Cross-over experiments using an isotopically enriched bromide source support intramolecular transfer of Br. The reaction is postulated to proceed via a Markovnikov hydrocupration of the o-halostyrene, oxidative addition of the resulting Cu(I) complex into the Ar-X bond, reductive elimination of the new sp(3) C-X bond, and final borylation of an Ar-Cu(I) species to turn over the catalytic cycle.

  5. Investigations on organics in the Libyan beach sand and water: extraction, spectroscopy and gas chromatography, Zwarah to East Tripoli coastline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, L.H.; El-Jawashi, S.A.; Ejbali, A.A.; Garbaj, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-three samples from fifteen locations extending along 200 kilometers from near the Tunisian borders to 20 kilometers east of Tripoli harbour were examined for their organic contents. Sampling was conducted under the following specifications. 1. Dry beach sand, 3-4 meters away from water (denoted ds). 2. Wet beach sand, obtained from 1 meter depth (denoted ws). 3. Beach water (denoted w). Known amounts of sand (ds or ws) and beach water (w) were extracted with a suitable volume of chloroform. Organics in the extracts were determined gravimetrically by complete evaporation of chloroform, the residue was further examined by gas chromatography, and distribution of carbon numbers in each sample were assessed. Alternatively, a direct determination of organics concentration in CHCl 3 solution was obtained spectrophotometrically from calibration curves of absorptions at 410nm and 260nm. Infrared study on organics isolated from different locations enabled the assessment of the degree of oxidation suffered by each sample. This was obtained by comparing the relative absorption values at 1736 and 1712cm -1 , normalized with respect to 2925 cm -1 ; C-H stretching vibration; to rule out effects due to concentration. Organics concentration in shore water ranged from 0.05 to 9.50 ppm, depending on location and industrial activities, while much higher concentrations, ranging from 50-1500 ppm were detected in dry and wet beach sand samples. (author)

  6. GC-MS Study of Mono- and Bishaloethylphosphonates Related to Schedule 2.B.04 of the Chemical Weapons Convention: The Discovery of a New Intramolecular Halogen Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazas-Márquez, Nerea; Sierra, María; Nova, Clara; Moreno, Juan Manuel; Aboitiz, Nuria; de Rivas, Gema; Sierra, Miguel A.; Martínez-Álvarez, Roberto; Gómez-Caballero, Esther

    2016-09-01

    A new class of compounds, mono- and bis-haloethylphosphonates (HAPs and bisHAPs, respectively), listed in Schedule 2.B.04 of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), has been synthesized and studied by GC-MS with two aims. First, to improve the identification of this type of chemicals by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, (OPCW). Second, to study the synergistic effect of halogen and silicon atoms in molecules undergoing mass spectrometry. Fragmentation patterns of trimethylsilyl derivatives of HAPs were found to depend on the nature of the halogen atom; this was in agreement with DFT-calculations. The data suggest that a novel intramolecular halogen transfer takes place during the fragmentation process.

  7. Characterization of lecithin isolated from anchovy (Engraulis japonica) residues deoiled by supercritical carbon dioxide and organic solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Mi; Asaduzzaman, A K M; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2012-07-01

    Lecithin was isolated and characterized from anchovy (Engraulis japonica) deoiled residues using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) at a semibatch flow extraction process and an organic solvent (hexane) extraction. SC-CO(2) extraction was carried out to extract oil from anchovy at different temperatures (35 to 45 °C) and pressures (15 to 25 MPa). Extraction yield of oil was influenced by physical properties of SC-CO(2) with temperature and pressure changes. The major phospholipids of anchovy lecithin were quantitatively analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) (68%± 1.00%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) (29%± 0.50%) were the main phospholipids. Thin layer chromatography was performed to purify the individual phospholipids. The fatty acid compositions of lecithin, PC, and PE were analyzed by gas chromatography. A significant amount of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were present in both phospholipids of PC and PE. Emulsions of lecithin in water were prepared through the use of a homogenizer. Oxidative stability of anchovy lecithin was high in spite of its high concentration of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Lecithin can be totally metabolized by humans, so is well tolerated by humans and nontoxic when ingested. Lecithin from anchovy contain higher amounts of ω-3 fatty acids especially EPA and DHA, it may have positive outcome to use in food and pharmaceutical industries. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

    2013-05-21

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  9. Halogens determination in vegetable NBS standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stella, R.; Genova, N.; Di Casa, M.

    1977-01-01

    Levels of all four halogens in Orchard Leaves, Pine Needles and Tomato Leaves NBS reference standards were determined. For fluorine a spiking isotope dilution method was used followed by HF absorption on glass beads. Instrumental nuclear activation analysis was adopted for chlorine and bromine determination. Radiochemical separation by a distillation procedure was necessary for iodine nuclear activation analysis after irradiation. Activation parameters of Cl, Br and I are reported. Results of five determinations for each halogen in Orchard Leaves, Pine Needles and Tomato Leaves NBS Standard Materials and Standard deviations of the mean are reported. (T.I.)

  10. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting under...

  11. Modulation of human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by brominated and halogen-free flame retardants as a measure for in vitro neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.S.; van Kleef, R.G.D.M.; Westerink, R.H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are abundant persistent organic pollutants with well-studied toxicity. The toxicological and ecological concern associated with BFRs argues for replacement by safer alternatives. However, the (neuro)toxic potential of alternative halogen-free flame retardants

  12. Ionic liquids intercalated in montmorillonite as the sorptive phase for the extraction of low-polarity organic compounds from water by rotating-disk sorptive extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiscal-Ladino, Jhon A.; Obando-Ceballos, Mónica; Rosero-Moreano, Milton [Grupo de Investigación en Cromatografía y Técnicas Afines GICTA, Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Caldas, Calle 65 No. 26-10, Manizales (Colombia); Montaño, Diego F.; Cardona, Wilson; Giraldo, Luis F. [Química de Plantas Colombianas, Instituto de Química, Escuela de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, A.A, 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Richter, Pablo, E-mail: prichter@ciq.uchile.cl [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 233, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-02-08

    Montmorillonite (MMT) clays were modified by the intercalation into their galleries of ionic liquids (IL) based on imidazolium quaternary ammonium salts. This new eco-materials exhibited good features for use as a sorptive phase in the extraction of low-polarity analytes from aqueous samples. Spectroscopic analyses of the modified clays were conducted and revealed an increase in the basal spacing and a shifting of the reflection plane towards lower values as a consequence of the effective intercalation of organic cations into the MMT structure. The novel sorbent developed herein was assayed as the sorptive phase in rotating-disk sorptive extraction (RDSE), using polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), representative of low-polarity pollutants, as model analytes. The final determination was made by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Among the synthetized sorptive phases, the selected system for analytical purposes consisted of MMT modified with the 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (HDMIM-Br) IL. Satisfactory analytical features were achieved using a sample volume of 5 mL: the relative recoveries from a wastewater sample were higher than 80%, the detection limits were between 3 ng L{sup −1} and 43 ng L{sup −1}, the precision (within-run precision) expressed as the relative standard deviation ranged from 2% to 24%, and the enrichment factors ranged between 18 and 28. Using RDSE, the extraction efficiency achieved for the selected MMT-HDMIM-Br phase was compared with other commercial solid phases/supports, such as polypropylene, polypropylene with 1-octanol (as a supported liquid membrane), octadecyl (C18) and octyl (C8), and showed the highest response for all the studied analytes. Under the optimized extraction conditions, this new device was applied in the analysis of the influent of a wastewater treatment plant in Santiago (Chile), demonstrating its applicability through the good recoveries and precision achieved with real samples

  13. Organization of fluorescent cholesterol analogs in lipid bilayers - lessons from cyclodextrin extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milles, Sigrid; Meyer, Thomas; Scheidt, Holger A; Schwarzer, Roland; Thomas, Lars; Marek, Magdalena; Szente, Lajos; Bittman, Robert; Herrmann, Andreas; Günther Pomorski, Thomas; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2013-08-01

    To characterize the structure and dynamics of cholesterol in membranes, fluorescent analogs of the native molecule have widely been employed. The cholesterol content in membranes is in general manipulated by using water-soluble cyclodextrins. Since the interactions between cyclodextrins and fluorescent-labeled cholesterol have not been investigated in detail so far, we have compared the cyclodextrin-mediated membrane extraction of three different fluorescent cholesterol analogs (one bearing a NBD and two bearing BODIPY moieties). Extraction of these analogs was followed by measuring the Förster resonance energy transfer between a rhodamine moiety linked to phosphatidylethanolamine and the labeled cholesterol. The extraction kinetics revealed that the analogs are differently extracted from membranes. We examined the orientation of the analogs within the membrane and their influence on lipid condensation using NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Our data indicate that the extraction of fluorescent sterols from membranes is determined by several parameters, including their impact on lipid order, their hydrophobicity, their intermolecular interactions with surrounding lipids, their orientation within the bilayer, and their affinity with the exogenous acceptor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. EXTRACTION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: IMPLICATIONS ON FATE AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT. (R825513C007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five methods were used for the extraction of hexachlorobutadiene and chlorobenzenes from a contaminated estuarine sediment. The following extraction methods were used: Soxhlet extraction, sonication and solvent extraction, sequential solvent extraction, saponification and solv...

  15. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of β-diketones, halogenated β-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs

  16. Transition from metal-ligand bonding to halogen bonding involving a metal as halogen acceptor a study of Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, and Hg complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vytor; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Utilizing all-electron Dirac-exact relativistic calculations with the Normalized Elimination of the Small Component (NESC) method and the local vibrational mode approach, the transition from metal-halide to metal halogen bonding is determined for Au-complexes interacting with halogen-donors. The local stretching force constants of the metal-halogen interactions reveal a smooth transition from weak non-covalent halogen bonding to non-classical 3-center-4-electron bonding and finally covalent metal-halide bonding. The strongest halogen bonds are found for dialkylaurates interacting with Cl2 or FCl. Differing trends in the intrinsic halogen-metal bond strength, the binding energy, and the electrostatic potential are explained.

  17. Ozone variability and halogen oxidation within the Arctic and sub-Arctic springtime boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Gilman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of halogen oxidation on the variabilities of ozone (O3 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs within the Arctic and sub-Arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated using field measurements from multiple campaigns conducted in March and April 2008 as part of the POLARCAT project. For the ship-based measurements, a high degree of correlation (r = 0.98 for 544 data points collected north of 68° N was observed between the acetylene to benzene ratio, used as a marker for chlorine and bromine oxidation, and O3 signifying the vast influence of halogen oxidation throughout the ice-free regions of the North Atlantic. Concurrent airborne and ground-based measurements in the Alaskan Arctic substantiated this correlation and were used to demonstrate that halogen oxidation influenced O3 variability throughout the Arctic boundary layer during these springtime studies. Measurements aboard the R/V Knorr in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans provided a unique view of the transport of O3-poor air masses from the Arctic Basin to latitudes as far south as 52° N. FLEXPART, a Lagrangian transport model, was used to quantitatively determine the exposure of air masses encountered by the ship to first-year ice (FYI, multi-year ice (MYI, and total ICE (FYI+MYI. O3 anti-correlated with the modeled total ICE tracer (r = −0.86 indicating that up to 73% of the O3 variability measured in the Arctic marine boundary layer could be related to sea ice exposure.

  18. The subtle balance of weak supramolecular interactions: The hierarchy of halogen and hydrogen bonds in haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Raatikainen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts: 4-IPhNH3Cl (1, 4-IPhNH3Br (5, 4-IPhNH3H2PO4 (6, 4-ClPhNH3H2PO4 (8, 3-IPyBnCl (9, 3-IPyHCl (10 and 3-IPyH-5NIPA (3-iodopyridinium 5-nitroisophthalate, 13, where hydrogen or/and halogen bonding represents the most relevant non-covalent interactions, has been prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. This series was further complemented by extracting some relevant crystal structures: 4-BrPhNH3Cl (2, CCDC ref. code TAWRAL, 4-ClPhNH3Cl (3, CURGOL, 4-FPhNH3Cl (4, ANLCLA, 4-BrPhNH3H2PO4, (7, UGISEI, 3-BrPyHCl, (11, CIHBAX and 3-ClPyHCl, (12, VOQMUJ from Cambridge Structural Database for sake of comparison. Based on the X-ray data it was possible to highlight the balance between non-covalent forces acting in these systems, where the relative strength of the halogen bonding C–X···A− (X = I, Br or Cl and the ratio between the halogen and hydrogen bonds [C–X···A− : D–H···A−] varied across the series.

  19. Water extraction of coals - potential for estimating low molecular weight organic acids as carbon feedstock for the deep terrestrial biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieth, A.; Mangelsdorf, K.; Sykes, R.; Horsfield, B. [Geoforschungszentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    With the recent increasing interest in the deep biosphere, the question arises as to where the carbon sources that support deep microbial communities are derived from. Our research was focussed on the water-soluble, low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids that are potentially available from different sedimentary lithologies to serve as a carbon source to feed the deep biosphere. A series of Eocene-Pleistocene coals, mudstones and sandstones of varying rank (maturity) and total organic carbon (TOC) content from the Waikato Basin, New Zealand, has been Soxhlet-extracted using water. The combined concentration of recovered formate, acetate and oxalate range from 366 to 2499 {mu} g/g sediment and appear to be dependent on rank, organofacies and TOC. The yields indicate the potential of carbonaceous sediments to feed the local deep terrestrial biosphere over geological periods of time. The existence of living microbial organisms in the mudstones and sandstones was proved by the identification of intact phospholipids (PLs).

  20. Inorganic-Organic hybrid materials for uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mourabit, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate rocks are industrially processed in large quantities to produce phosphoric acid and fertilisers. These rocks contain significant concentration of uranium (50 to 300 ppm) which could be interesting for nuclear industry. This work deals with the valorisation of uranium as a by-product from fertiliser industry. The aim of this study is to develop a hybrid material, constituted of an inorganic solid support grafted with an extractant (complexing molecule), which can extract selectively uranium from phosphoric acid medium. The first step of our approach was to identify an inorganic support which is stable under these particular conditions (strong acidity and complexing medium). The chemical and mechanical stability of different meso-porous materials, such as silica, glass and carbon was studied. In a second phase, we focused on the identification and the optimisation of complexing molecules, specific of uranium in phosphoric acid. These ligands were then grafted on the most stable solids. Finally, the efficiency of these hybrid systems was evaluated through different tests of extraction, selectivity and de-extraction. (author) [fr

  1. Kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminant extraction from sediment by granular activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakowska, M.I.; Kupryianchyk, D.; Smit, M.; Koelmans, A.A.; Meent, van de D.

    2014-01-01

    Ex situ solid phase extraction with granular activated carbon (GAC) is a promising technique to remediate contaminated sediments. The methods' efficiency depends on the rate by which contaminants are transferred from the sediment to the surface of GAC. Here, we derive kinetic parameters for

  2. Development of halogen-free cables for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Mitsuo; Ito, Kazumi; Yaji, Takeo; Yoshida, Shin; Sakurai, Takako; Matsushita, Shigetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    On the occasion where serious fire accidents were experienced in the past, the need for making flame-retardant wire and cable incombustible took place and has since been generalizing. Various sorts of flame-retardant cables have already been developed and been actually used. From the viewpoint of avoiding the interference with the evacuation and fire-fighting activity in case of fire or the secondary accidents such as corrosion of the distributing panel, etc., the demand for non-halogen flame-retardant cable has rapidly been increasing in recent years in some fields of general industries, because this specific cable would generate the least amount of toxic smoke or corrosive gas even when it should burn. Similar demand has been increasing also for the cable used for nuclear power plants. In this field, earnest desire has been made for the development of non-halogen flame-retardant cable having specific environmental resistance specially required at nuclear power plants in addition to the properties and capacities required in general industries. The authors have continued examinations on the anti-environmental properties of the materials for cable such as long heat resistance, radiation resistance, steam resistance and succeeded in completing various sorts of non-halogen flame-retardant cable for nuclear power plants. In this report, we will introduce various features of the cable we have developed this time as well as the long-term reliability of non-halogen flame-retardant materials. (author)

  3. Development of non-halogen cables for nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagyu, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Onishi, Takao (Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1983-12-01

    The non-halogen fire-resistant cables for nuclear power stations which never generate halogen gas, have been developed. The cables comprise the insulator of EP rubber and the sheath of polyolefine containing non-halogen inorganic fire-retardant. The results of the environmental test and fire-resistance test are described. In the environmental test, the cables were subjected to the heating, gamma-irradiation and steam exposure successively, according to IEEE specification 323,383, and subsequently the change in the appearance, tensile strength and electrical performance of the cables was measured. In the fire-resistance test, the vertical tray fire test according to the IEEE specification 383 was adopted, and other tests including the vertical fire test on insulator cores, oxygen index, the generation of corrosive gas, copper mirror corrosion test, gas toxicity test and optical smoke density test were carried out. It became clear that the cables did not generate halogen gas on burning, and brought about reduced toxicity, corrosion and smoke, and that the safety against fire is greatly improved by using the cables.

  4. Polar Flattening and the Strength of Halogen Bonding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Robert; Kolář, Michal H.; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2015), s. 4727-4732 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * interaction energies * halogen bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2015

  5. Is there theoretical evidence for mutual influence between halogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on many-body analysis, two and three-body terms of interaction energies have a positive contribution to the total interaction energy. It was found that the amount of charge transfer in the triads is higher than that in the corresponding dyads. AIM analyses showed that the halogen and pnicogen-hydride bonds in the ...

  6. Halogen-Mediated Conversion of Hydrocarbons to Commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ronghe; Amrute, Amol P; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2017-03-08

    Halogen chemistry plays a central role in the industrial manufacture of various important chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. It involves the reaction of halogens or halides with hydrocarbons, leading to intermediate compounds which are readily converted to valuable commodities. These transformations, predominantly mediated by heterogeneous catalysts, have long been successfully applied in the production of polymers. Recent discoveries of abundant conventional and unconventional natural gas reserves have revitalized strong interest in these processes as the most cost-effective gas-to-liquid technologies. This review provides an in-depth analysis of the fundamental understanding and applied relevance of halogen chemistry in polymer industries (polyvinyl chloride, polyurethanes, and polycarbonates) and in the activation of light hydrocarbons. The reactions of particular interest include halogenation and oxyhalogenation of alkanes and alkenes, dehydrogenation of alkanes, conversion of alkyl halides, and oxidation of hydrogen halides, with emphasis on the catalyst, reactor, and process design. Perspectives on the challenges and directions for future development in this exciting field are provided.

  7. Benchmark Calculations of Noncovalent Interactions of Halogenated Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2012), s. 4285-4292 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : halogenated molecules * noncovalent interactions * benchmark calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.389, year: 2012

  8. Development of non-halogen cables for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagyu, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Onishi, Takao

    1983-01-01

    The non-halogen fire-resistant cables for nuclear power stations which never generate halogen gas, have been developed. The cables comprise the insulator of EP rubber and the sheath of polyolefine containing non-halogen inorganic fire-retardant. The results of the environmental test and fire-resistance test are described. In the environmental test, the cables were subjected to the heating, gamma-irradiation and steam exposure successively, according to IEEE specification 323,383, and subsequently the change in the appearance, tensile strength and electrical performance of the cables was measured. In the fire-resistance test, the vertical tray fire test according to the IEEE specification 383 was adopted, and other tests including the vertical fire test on insulator cores, oxygen index, the generation of corrosive gas, copper mirror corrosion test, gas toxicity test and optical smoke density test were carried out. It became clear that the cables did not generate halogen gas on burning, and brought about reduced toxicity, corrosion and smoke, and that the safety against fire is greatly improved by using the cables. (Yoshitake, I.)

  9. Use of cyanopropyl-bonded hplc column for bioassay-directed fractionation of organic extracts from incinerator emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Williams, R.W.; Brooks, L.R.; Taylor, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The present study has shown that cyanopropyl-(CN) bonded silica HPLC columns are applicable for the fractionation of mass and mutagenic activity of organic extracts from some incinerator emissions. Dichloromethane-extractable organics from particles emitted by two different municipal waste incinerators and by a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator that was combusting polyethylene were fractionated by HPLC, and the mutagenicity of the fractions was determined by means of a microsuspension mutagenicity assay with Salmonella TA98. The CN-bonded silica columns provided high (80-100 percent) mass and mutagenicity recoveries for most emission extracts, and it fractionated the mutagenic activity. The results suggest that the emissions from municipal waste incinerators contain a high amount of direct-acting (-S9) mutagenic activity that is resolvable by HPLC using CN-bonded silica. Sub-fractionation of selected mutagenic HPLC fractions and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy can be used to identify mutagenic species within complex incinerator emissions. The coupling of microsuspension bioassays to HPLC fractionation should be a useful tool for this type of analysis

  10. Nuclear lamina and nuclear matrix organization in sperm pronuclei assembled in Xenopus egg extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Jenkins, H; Goldberg, M W; Allen, T D; Hutchison, C J

    1996-09-01

    Nuclear lamina and matrices were prepared from sperm pronuclei assembled in Xenopus egg extracts using a fractionation and extraction procedure. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that while chromatin was efficiently removed from nuclei during the extraction procedure, the distribution of lamins was unaffected. Consistent with this data, the amount of lamin B3, determined by immunoblotting, was not affected through the extraction procedure. Nuclear matrices were visualised in DGD sections by TEM. Within these sections filaments were observed both at the boundary of the nucleus (the lamina) and within the body of the nucleus (internal nuclear matrix filaments). To improve resolution, nuclear matrices were also prepared as whole mounts and viewed using field emission in lens scanning electron microscopy (FEISEM). This technique revealed two distinct networks of filaments. Filaments lying at the surface of nuclear matrices interconnected nuclear pores. These filaments were readily labelled with monoclonal anti-lamin B3 antibodies. Filaments lying within the body of the nuclear matrix were highly branched but were not readily labelled with antilamin B3 antibodies. Nuclear matrices were also prepared from sperm pronuclei assembled in lamin B3 depleted extracts. Using FEISEM, filaments were also detected in these preparations. However, these filaments were poorly organised and often appeared to aggregate. To confirm these results nuclear matrices were also observed as whole mounts using TEM. Nuclear matrices prepared from control nuclei contained a dense array of interconnected filaments. Many (but not all) of these filaments were labelled with anti-lamin B3 antibodies. In contrast, nuclear matrices prepared from "lamin depleted nuclei' contained poorly organised or aggregated filaments which were not specifically labelled with anti-lamin B3 antibodies.

  11. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  12. Preliminary studies of using preheated carrier gas for on-line membrane extraction of semivolatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we present results for the on-line determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air using membrane extraction with a sorbent interface-ion mobility spectrometry (MESI-IMS) system with a preheated carrier (stripping) gas. The mechanism of the mass transfer of SVOCs across a membrane was initially studied. In comparison with the extraction of volatile analytes, the mass transfer resistance that originated from the slow desorption from the internal membrane surface during the SVOC extraction processes should be taken into account. A preheated carrier gas system was therefore built to facilitate desorption of analytes from the internal membrane surface. With the benefit of a temperature gradient existing between the internal and external membrane surfaces, an increase in the desorption rate of a specific analyte at the internal surface and the diffusion coefficient within the membrane could be achieved while avoiding a decrease of the distribution constant on the external membrane interface. This technique improved both the extraction rate and response times of the MESI-IMS system for the analysis of SVOCs. Finally, the MESI-IMS system was shown to be capable of on-site measurement by monitoring selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from cigarette smoke.

  13. Manganese Catalyzed C–H Halogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T.

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C–H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon–halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C–H bonds to C–Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L–MnV$=$O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn–F fluorine source, effecting carbon–fluorine bond

  14. Control of aliphatic halogenated DBP precursors with multiple drinking water treatment processes: Formation potential and integrated toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimeng; Chu, Wenhai; Yao, Dechang; Yin, Daqiang

    2017-08-01

    The comprehensive control efficiency for the formation potentials (FPs) of a range of regulated and unregulated halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs) (including carbonaceous DBPs (C-DBPs), nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs), and iodinated DBPs (I-DBPs)) with the multiple drinking water treatment processes, including pre-ozonation, conventional treatment (coagulation-sedimentation, pre-sand filtration), ozone-biological activated carbon (O 3 -BAC) advanced treatment, and post-sand filtration, was investigated. The potential toxic risks of DBPs by combing their FPs and toxicity values were also evaluated. The results showed that the multiple drinking water treatment processes had superior performance in removing organic/inorganic precursors and reducing the formation of a range of halogenated DBPs. Therein, ozonation significantly removed bromide and iodide, and thus reduced the formation of brominated and iodinated DBPs. The removal of organic carbon and nitrogen precursors by the conventional treatment processes was substantially improved by O 3 -BAC advanced treatment, and thus prevented the formation of chlorinated C-DBPs and N-DBPs. However, BAC filtration leads to the increased formation of brominated C-DBPs and N-DBPs due to the increase of bromide/DOC and bromide/DON. After the whole multiple treatment processes, the rank order for integrated toxic risk values caused by these halogenated DBPs was haloacetonitriles (HANs)≫haloacetamides (HAMs)>haloacetic acids (HAAs)>trihalomethanes (THMs)>halonitromethanes (HNMs)≫I-DBPs (I-HAMs and I-THMs). I-DBPs failed to cause high integrated toxic risk because of their very low FPs. The significant higher integrated toxic risk value caused by HANs than other halogenated DBPs cannot be ignored. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Linking precious metal enrichment and halogen cycling in mafic magmatic systems: insights from the Rum layered intrusion, NW Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. P.; O'Driscoll, B.; Clay, P. L.; Burgess, R.

    2017-12-01

    Layered intrusions host the world's largest known concentrations of the platinum-group elements (PGE). Emphasis has been attached to the role of halogen-bearing fluids in concentrating the precious metals, but whether this occurs at the magmatic stage, or via subsequent metasomatism, is actively debated. One obstacle to progress has been the analytical difficulty of measuring low abundances of the halogens in the cumulate products of layered intrusions. To elucidate the importance of the halogens in facilitating PGE-mineralisation, as well as fingerprint halogen provenance and assess the importance of halogen cycling in mafic magma systems more generally, a suite of samples encompassing different stages of activity of the Palaeogene Rum layered intrusion was investigated. Halogen abundances were measured by neutron irradiation noble gas mass spectrometric analysis, permitting the detection of relatively low (ppm-ppb) abundances of Cl, Br and I in mg-sized samples. The samples include PGE-enriched chromite seams, various cumulates (e.g., peridotites), picrites (approximating the Rum parental magma), and pegmatites representing volatile-rich melts that circulated the intrusion at a late-stage in its solidification history. The new data reveal that PGE-bearing chromite seams contain relatively low Cl concentrations (2-3 ppm), with high molar ratios of Br/Cl and I/Cl (0.005 and 0.009, respectively). The picrites and cumulates have Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios close to sub-continental lithospheric mantle values of approximately 0.0013 and 0.00002, respectively, and thus likely reflect the Rum magma source region. A positive correlation between Cl and Br signifies comparable partitioning behaviour in all samples. However, I is more variable, displaying a positive correlation with Cl for more primitive samples (e.g. picrite and peridotite), and seemingly decoupling from Br and Cl in chromite seams and pegmatites. The relative enrichment of I over Cl in the chromite seams points

  16. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products.

  17. E. S. R. studies of halogenated pyrimidines in. gamma. -irradiated alkaline glasses. [Halogenated uracil bases; bromouridine; bromodeoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, L D; Zimbrick, J D [Kansas Univ., Lawrence (USA)

    1975-11-01

    The reactions of mobile electrons (e/sup -//sub m/) and oxygen radical anions (O./sup -/) with halogenated bases and nucleosides have been studied in ..gamma..-irradiated alkaline glasses by e.s.r. and specific halogen-ion electrode techniques. It was shown that electrons react with halogenated uracil bases (XUr where X = Cl, Br, I but not F) by dissociative electron attachment to form uracil-5-yl radicals (U.) and halogen anions. The relative rates of reaction of e/sup -//sub m/ with XUr decreased in the sequence BrUr > ClUr > FUr > IUr. Thermal annealing studies carried out on U. in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O matrices supported the hypothesis that U. in H/sub 2/O hydrates across the 5-6 double bond in the temperature region 135/sup 0/ to 155/sup 0/ K, and deuterates to a much smaller extent in D/sub 2/O at temperatures above 155/sup 0/ K. Studies on bromouridine and bromodeoxyuridine suggested that e/sup -/sub(m) reacts with the base moieties to form U. type radicals which abstract H. from the sugar moieties of adjacent nucleosides.

  18. Extraction of Phytosterols from Tall Oil Soap Using Selected Organic Solvents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rousková, Milena; Heyberger, Aleš; Tříska, Jan; Krtička, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2011), s. 805-812 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS400720504; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : liquid - liquid extraction * tall oil soap * phytosterols Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2011

  19. Electrochemical monitoring of the co-extraction of water with hydrated ions into an organic solvent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareček, Vladimír

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 88, MAR 2018 (2018), s. 57-60 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-09980S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Liquid/liquid interface * Water co-extraction dynamics * Emulsification Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.396, year: 2016

  20. Antifungal Activity of Culture Filtrates and Organic Extracts of Aspergillus spp. against Pythium ultimum

    OpenAIRE

    Rania Aydi-Ben Abdallah; Marwa Hassine; Hayfa Jabnoun-Khiareddine; Rabiaa Haouala; Mejda Daami-Remadi

    2014-01-01

    Culture filtrates, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of nine isolates of Aspergillus spp. (A. niger, A. terreus, A. flavus and Aspergillus sp.), isolated from soil and compost, were tested for antifungal activity against Pythium ultimum the causal agent of the potato Pythium leak. Culture filtrates showed a significant antifungal activity at the different tested concentrations. Total inhibition of the pathogen was induced by the filtrate of CH8 of Aspergillus sp., used at 10% ...

  1. Evaluation of grapefruit seed extract as natural fungicide to control apple scab in organic apple growing

    OpenAIRE

    Trapman, Marc

    2004-01-01

    C-pro, an experimental fungicide based on grapefruit seed extract was compared to copper oxychloride for the control of apple scab in a field trial. Efficacy and possible phytotoxic effects where accessed. The C-pro formulation was analysed for possible chemical additives by HPTLC. C-pro proved tot be more effective in controlling apple scab then the standard rate of 300 gram copper oxychloride per ha, and gave a better leaf quality and less fruit skin russeting then the sta...

  2. Comparison of marine sampling methods for organic contaminants: Passive samplers, water extractions, and live oyster deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, Kristin B; Vlahos, Penny; Whitney, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory and field trials evaluated the efficacy of three methods of detecting aquatic pesticide concentrations. Currently used pesticides: atrazine, metolachlor, and diazinon and legacy pesticide dieldrin were targeted. Pesticides were extracted using solid-phase extraction (SPE) of water samples, titanium plate passive samplers coated in ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea viginica) as biosamplers. A laboratory study assessed the extraction efficiencies and precision of each method. Passive samplers yielded the highest precision of the three methods (RSD: 3-14% EVA plates; 19-60% oysters; and 25-56% water samples). Equilibrium partition coefficients were derived. A significant relationship was found between the concentration in oyster tissue and the ambient aquatic concentration. In the field (Housatonic River, CT (U.S.)) water sampling (n = 5) detected atrazine at 1.61-7.31 μg L(-1), oyster sampling (n = 2×15) detected dieldrin at n.d.-0.096 μg L(-1) SW and the passive samplers (n = 5×3) detected atrazine at 0.97-3.78 μg L(-1) SW and dieldrin at n.d.-0.68 μg L(-1) SW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminant extraction from sediment by granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowska, M I; Kupryianchyk, D; Smit, M P J; Koelmans, A A; Grotenhuis, J T C; Rijnaarts, H H M

    2014-03-15

    Ex situ solid phase extraction with granular activated carbon (GAC) is a promising technique to remediate contaminated sediments. The methods' efficiency depends on the rate by which contaminants are transferred from the sediment to the surface of GAC. Here, we derive kinetic parameters for extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from sediment by GAC, using a first-order multi-compartment kinetic model. The parameters were obtained by modeling sediment-GAC exchange kinetic data following a tiered model calibration approach. First, parameters for PAH desorption from sediment were calibrated using data from systems with 50% (by weight) GAC acting as an infinite sink. Second, the estimated parameters were used as fixed input to obtain GAC uptake kinetic parameters in sediment slurries with 4% GAC, representing the ex situ remediation scenario. PAH uptake rate constants (kGAC) by GAC ranged from 0.44 to 0.0005 d(-1), whereas GAC sorption coefficients (KGAC) ranged from 10(5.57) to 10(8.57) L kg(-1). These values are the first provided for GAC in the presence of sediment and show that ex situ extraction with GAC is sufficiently fast and effective to reduce the risks of the most available PAHs among those studied, such as fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization and Storage Stability Study of Bixin Extracted from Bixa orellana Using Organic Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husa, N. N.; Hamzah, F.; Said, H. M.

    2018-05-01

    Colorant is one of the additives to give a better appearance or improve the colour of the product. Synthetic colorant has been widely used in industrial due to its readiness in the market and its colour stability. However the arising issues related to the safety, nutrition and also the therapeutic effect has encouraged users to become more concern about the colouring component. Thus, the present research was conducted in order to produce natural colorant called bixin from Bixa orellana or also known as annatto seeds. The study was focusing on the effect of the solvent on the characteristic and concentration of the extracted bixin. While stability of the bixin during different storage condition was determined to further validate the effectiveness of the solvent. The result indicated that methanol and acetone gave darker of the bixin colour as compared to the water. However, the deterioration rate of the bixin in acetone and methanol were faster as compared to the water. The extracted bixin was analysed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectrophotometer analysis. The strong band for the bixin was observed at absorbance range of 1704 – 1740cm-1. The study indicates that the concentration of the extracted bixin was the highest in methanol which gave 817.7 ppm of bixin. Meanwhile, bixin concentration in acetone and water was 602.9 ppm and 477.19 ppm respectively.

  5. Moringa oleifera Leaf Extracts as Multifunctional Ingredients for "Natural and Organic" Sunscreens and Photoprotective Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Buso, Piergiacomo; Radice, Matteo; Dissette, Valeria; Lampronti, Ilaria; Gambari, Roberto; Manfredini, Stefano; Vertuani, Silvia

    2018-03-15

    Moringa oleifera has gained increasing popularity as a food supplement but not in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic area. The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of extracts from the leaves of Moringa oleifera as a herbal sun care phytocomplex. Three different extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves, from Senegal, have been prepared and chemically characterized in the phenolic fraction by HPLC-DAD and Folin-Ciocalteu test. To explore photoprotective properties, an extensive evaluation of UV filtering, antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, ORAC, PCL), and anti-hyperproliferative (human melanoma Colo38 cells) capacities have been conducted. Furthermore, a formulation study regarding cosmetic prototypes has been carried out in order to determine the Sun Protection Factor (SPF), which was assessed in vitro. The extracts were demonstrated to confer significant values of protection, with an SPF 2, that corresponds to a 50% protection against UV-B rays, at concentrations as low as 2% to 4%. Finally, the evaluation on potential irritation of the finished formulations was conducted by Patch Test and no significant irritant potential was observed. These evidence enlarged the already significant number of activities and potential uses of this plant, which is well-known for its importance in the medicinal and nutritional fields.

  6. Third phase formation in organic solutions in the extraction of mono-acids by tertiary trialcoyl-amines diluted in very slightly polar organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robaglia, Michele

    1973-01-01

    The phenomena of third phase formation which can occur during the extraction of an acid with a tertiary amine diluted in a low polarity diluent are studied. In the first part a system including water (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - H 2 O) is compared with an anhydrous system (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - N 2 ). There are two kinds of gaps. One during amine salification, another one during the extraction of excess acid. The important part of the water content of the organic phase is demonstrated. The presence of water enhances the gaps. The polar water molecules are dissolved inside the tri-octylamine salt micelles. The heavy phase is formed by aggregates, the light phase represents the solubility of the non soluble species in the medium. In the second part are studied the influence of some parameters (like nature of diluent, acid, amine and temperature) on the gaps formation and on the extraction of excess acid and water. In every cases the part played by water remains the same. Finally some comparisons are made between tertiary systems and binary systems which formed them. The binary systems were studied by the mean of crystallization curves. (author) [fr

  7. Modeling space-charge-limited currents in organic semiconductors: Extracting trap density and mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuñ a, Javier; Salleo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    We have developed and have applied a mobility edge model that takes drift and diffusion currents to characterize the space-charge-limited current in organic semiconductors into account. The numerical solution of the drift-diffusion equation allows

  8. Organic Contaminants Associated with the Extraction of Unconventional Gas. Risk Analysis in the Initial Phases of the Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L.; Hurtado, A.; Recreo, F.; Eguilior, S.

    2015-01-01

    The latest technological advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling are promoting a commercial scale extraction of unconventional fossil fuels in several regions of the world. Although there is still no commercial scale extraction in the Member States of the EU, potential stocks in some of them, as in the case of Spain, stimulate the need to carry out precautionary previous studies. These, based on the experience in the USA, will allow to define the characteristics that a priori should include a project of unconventional gas extraction, so that their safety is maximized by minimizing the likelihood of adverse effects on the environment. In unconventional gas production a fracturing fluid, typically water, with different types of additives is injected into the reservoir at very high pressure in order to create fractures to increase the porosity and permeability of the rock. In this scenario the flowback and produced water (water brought to the surface during the extraction of gas or oil) is usually a mixture of fluids injected and brines present in the repository. The quality of the flowback and produced water is variable. Its salinity varies from similar to drinking water to several times more saline than seawater. Furthermore, different compounds other than salt can be present in various amounts in the flowback and produced water: oil and other organic compounds, solids in suspension, bacteria, naturally occurring radioactive elements (NORM), and any of the elements injected with the hydraulic fracturing fluid. Due to the high variability of contaminants in the flowback and produced water as well as potentially large volumes involved, composition of flowback and produced water and the analysis of the risks associated with them is an important aspect to consider from the initial phases of project development of unconventional gas extraction. This report covers the risk analysis of an unconventional gas extraction project, the initial assessment of the

  9. Use of grape seed and its natural polyphenol extracts as a natural organic coagulant for removal of cationic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Young-Mo; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2009-11-01

    Natural organic coagulants (NOCs) such as chitosan and Moringa oleifera seeds have been extensively characterized for potential application in water treatment as an alternative to metal-based coagulants. However, the action of both chitosan and M. oleifera seeds is mainly restricted to anionic organic pollutants because of their cationic functional groups affording poor cationic pollutant coagulation by electrostatic repulsion. In this study, we employed ethanolic grape seed extract (GSE) and grape seed-derived polyphenols such as tannic acid and catechin in an effort to find novel NOCs showing stable anionic forms for removal of cationic organic pollutants. The target substances tested were malachite green (MG) and crystal violet (CV), both mutagenic cationic dyes. Polyphenol treatment induced fast decolorization followed by gradual floc formation concomitant with red or blue shifts in maximum absorbance wavelengths of the cationic dyes. Liquid chromatography analysis of flocs formed by polyphenols directly showed that initial supramolecular complexes attributed mainly to electrostatic attraction between polyphenol hydroxyphenyl groups and cationic dyes further progressed into stronger aggregates, leading to precipitation of dye-polyphenol complexes. Consistent with the results obtained using catechin and tannic acid, use of GSE also resulted in effective decolorization and coagulation of soluble MG and CV in aqueous solutions. Screening of several organic GSE components for NOC activity strongly suggested that natural polyphenols are the main organic ingredients causing MG and CV removal via gradual floc formation. The treatment by natural polyphenols and GSE decreased toxicity of MG- or CV-contaminated water.

  10. Methane oxidation and degradation of organic compounds in landfill soil covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero-order kin......High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero...

  11. Boiling points of halogenated aliphatic compounds: a quantitative structure-property relationship for prediction and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Halogenated aliphatic compounds have many technical uses, but substances within this group are also ubiquitous environmental pollutants that can affect the ozone layer and contribute to global warming. The establishment of quantitative structure-property relationships is of interest not only to fill in gaps in the available database but also to validate experimental data already acquired. The three-dimensional structures of 240 compounds were modeled with molecular mechanics prior to the generation of empirical descriptors. Two bilinear projection methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and partial-least-squares regression (PLSR), were used to identify outliers. PLSR was subsequently used to build a multivariate calibration model by extracting the latent variables that describe most of the covariation between the molecular structure and the boiling point. Boiling points were also estimated with an extension of the group contribution method of Stein and Brown.

  12. Isomorphous Crystals from Diynes and Bromodiynes Involved in Hydrogen and Halogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baillargeon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Isomorphous crystals of two diacetylene derivatives with carbamate functionality (BocNH-CH2-diyne-X, where X = H or Br have been obtained. The main feature of these structures is the original 2D arrangement (as supramolecular sheets or walls in which the H bond and halogen bond have a prominent effect on the whole architecture. The two diacetylene compounds harbor neighboring carbamate (Boc protected amine and conjugated alkyne functionalities. They differ only by the nature of the atom located at the penultimate position of the diyne moiety, either a hydrogen atom or a bromine atom. Both of them adopt very similar 2D wall organizations with antiparallel carbamates (as in antiparallel beta pleated sheets. Additional weak interactions inside the same walls between molecular bricks are H bond interactions (diyne-H···O=C or halogen bond interactions (diyne-Br···O=C, respectively. Based on crystallographic atom coordinates, DFT (B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p and DFT (M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p calculations were performed on these isostructural crystals to gain insight into the intermolecular interactions.

  13. New sorbent in the dispersive solid phase extraction step of quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe for the extraction of organic contaminants in drinking water treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Maristela B R; Caldas, Sergiane S; Primel, Ednei G

    2014-04-04

    Recent studies have shown a decrease in the concentration of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PCPs) in water after treatment. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that these compounds may adhere to the sludge; however, investigation of these compounds in drinking water treatment sludge has been scarce. The sludge generated by drinking water treatment plants during flocculation and decantation steps should get some special attention not only because it has been classified as non-inert waste but also because it is a very complex matrix, consisting essentially of inorganic (sand, argil and silt) and organic (humic substances) compounds. In the first step of this study, three QuEChERS methods were used, and then compared, for the extraction of pesticides (atrazine, simazine, clomazone and tebuconazole), pharmaceuticals (amitriptyline, caffeine, diclofenac and ibuprofen) and PCPs (methylparaben, propylparaben, triclocarban and bisphenol A) from drinking water treatment sludge. Afterwards, the study of different sorbents in the dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) step was evaluated. Finally, a new QuEChERS method employing chitin, obtained from shrimp shell waste, was performed in the d-SPE step. After having been optimized, the method showed limits of quantification (LOQ) between 1 and 50 μg kg(-1) and the analytical curves showed r values higher than 0.98, when liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was employed. Recoveries ranged between 50 and 120% with RSD≤15%. The matrix effect was evaluated and compensated with matrix-matched calibration. The method was applied to drinking water treatment sludge samples and methylparaben and tebuconazole were found in concentration

  14. Solvent extraction of indium and gallium complexes with bromopyrogallol red by mixed extractants containing chloroform, a polar organic solvent and monocarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatnitskij, I.V.; Lysenko, O.V.; Kolomiets, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction of indium and gallium complexes with bromopyragallol red (BPR) has been studied using mixed extractants containing chloroform, capronic acid (HL) and 1-pentanol (S) (extractant 1), and chloroform, HL, S and propionic acid (extractant 2). The latter is more selectie and extracts only the indium complex. Optimal conditions have been found for the extraction of In-BRP complex (pH 6.3-6.5; C BPR 1.5x10 -4 M) its composition has been estimated and discussed

  15. Use of Lignins from Sugarcane Bagasse for Assembling Microparticles Loaded with Azadirachta indica Extracts for Use as Neem-Based Organic Insecticides

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Eveline S.; Perlatti, Bruno; Silva, Everton M. da; Matos, Andreia P.; Silva, Maria Fátima G. F. da; Fernandes, João B.; Zuin, Vânia G.; Silva, Caio M. P. da; Forim, Moacir R.

    2017-01-01

    Microcapsules of sugarcane bagasse lignin loaded with organic extracts of neem (Azadirachta indica) were prepared and evaluated as potential bioinsecticides. Lignins were extracted and modified by oxidation and acetylation reactions providing different biopolymers. Afterwards, they were characterized through several analytical techniques. The formulations were initially prepared as colloidal suspension of lignin nanoparticles, which were then spray-dried. The products were submitted to qualit...

  16. Nonthmicin, a Polyether Polyketide Bearing a Halogen-Modified Tetronate with Neuroprotective and Antiinvasive Activity from Actinomadura sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Noriaki; In, Yasuko; Kataura, Tetsushi; Tashiro, Etsu; Saiki, Ikuo; Sudoh, Yuri; Duangmal, Kannika; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip

    2017-03-17

    Nonthmicin (1), a new polyether polyketide bearing a chlorinated tetronic acid, was isolated from the culture extract of a soil-derived Actinomadura strain. The structure of 1 was elucidated by interpretation of NMR and MS spectroscopic data, and the absolute configuration of 1 was proposed on the basis of the crystal structure of its dechloro congener ecteinamycin (2) also isolated from the same strain. Tetronic acids modified by halogenation have never been reported from natural products. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to have neuroprotective activity and antimetastatic properties at submicromolar concentrations in addition to antibacterial activity.

  17. The choice of organic diluent for extraction regeneration of NPP spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, G.F.; Ilozhev, A.P.; Nikiforov, A.S.; Smelov, V.S.; Shevchenko, V.B.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of the published data the technical requirements for hydrocarbon diluents of tributyl phosphate used in NPP spent fuel process are formulated. The alkane chain length can be in the C 11 - C 15 range. Although the relation of separate alkanes is not strictly defined, it is preferable to use hydrocarbons C 12 - C 13 , which are characterized by the high flash point temperature better compatibility with extracted solvates of nitrates of actinide elements and they have good hydrodynamic parameters. The content of fatty acids and alcohols must not exceed 0.01 mol/l, the content of aromatic hydrocarbons approximately 1 vol. %

  18. Using Best Practices to Extract, Organize, and Reuse Embedded Decision Support Content Knowledge Rules from Mature Clinical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Spencer J; Fox, Zachary E; Giuse, Dario A; Williams, Annette M; Kou, Qing-Hua; Weitkamp, Asli; Neal R, Patel; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge, embedded over time in mature medical systems, presents an interesting and complex opportunity for information organization, maintenance, and reuse. To have a holistic view of all decision support requires an in-depth understanding of each clinical system as well as expert knowledge of the latest evidence. This approach to clinical decision support presents an opportunity to unify and externalize the knowledge within rules-based decision support. Driven by an institutional need to prioritize decision support content for migration to new clinical systems, the Center for Knowledge Management and Health Information Technology teams applied their unique expertise to extract content from individual systems, organize it through a single extensible schema, and present it for discovery and reuse through a newly created Clinical Support Knowledge Acquisition and Archival Tool (CS-KAAT). CS-KAAT can build and maintain the underlying knowledge infrastructure needed by clinical systems.

  19. Determination of basicity of neutral organic phosphorus extractants in nonpolar solvents by the 31P NMR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakshin, V.V.; Meshcheryakov, N.M.; Il'in, E.G.; Ignatov, M.E.; Laskorin, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    The variant of the NMR method application is developed for quantitative description of acidic-basic properties of neutral organic phosphorus extractants, R 3 P--O (NPE), in non-polar organic solvents. For the NPE basicity determination the dependence of the chemical shift value in NMR 31 P spectra of 0.1 M NPE solutions in the dodecane on sulfuric acid acitivity in aqueous phase at 0-12 M acidity is studied. The linear equation relating NPE basicity and electronic structure of these compounds expressed through the sum: of Kabachnik reaction constants is derived. Linear dependences between the NPE basicity value in dodecane and NPE basicity in nitromethane as well as enthalpies of complexes formation with charge transport with standard acid-iodine in heptane, enthalpies of hydrogen complexes formation with phenol and water have been found

  20. Using Best Practices to Extract, Organize, and Reuse Embedded Decision Support Content Knowledge Rules from Mature Clinical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Spencer J.; Fox, Zachary E.; Giuse, Dario A.; Williams, Annette M.; Kou, Qing-hua; Weitkamp, Asli; Neal R, Patel; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge, embedded over time in mature medical systems, presents an interesting and complex opportunity for information organization, maintenance, and reuse. To have a holistic view of all decision support requires an in-depth understanding of each clinical system as well as expert knowledge of the latest evidence. This approach to clinical decision support presents an opportunity to unify and externalize the knowledge within rules-based decision support. Driven by an institutional need to prioritize decision support content for migration to new clinical systems, the Center for Knowledge Management and Health Information Technology teams applied their unique expertise to extract content from individual systems, organize it through a single extensible schema, and present it for discovery and reuse through a newly created Clinical Support Knowledge Acquisition and Archival Tool (CS-KAAT). CS-KAAT can build and maintain the underlying knowledge infrastructure needed by clinical systems. PMID:28269846

  1. [Removal of volatile organic compounds in soils by soil vapor extraction (SVE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fu-xiang; Zhang, Sheng-tian; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Ke; Lin, Yu-suo

    2011-05-01

    An experiment study has been carried out to investigate effects of the diameter of soil columns, the size of soil particulate and different contaminants on efficiency of simulated soil vapor extraction (SVE). Experiments with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and n-propylbenzene contaminated soils showed that larger bottom area/soil height (S/H) of the columns led to higher efficiency on removal of contaminants. Experiments with contaminated soils of different particulate size showed that the efficiency of SVE decreased with increases in soil particulate size, from 10 mesh to between 20 mesh and 40 mesh and removal of contaminants in soils became more difficult. Experiments with contaminated soils under different ventilation rates suggested that soil vapor extraction at a ventilation rate of 0.10 L x min(-1) can roughly remove most contaminants from the soils. Decreasing of contaminants in soils entered tailing stages after 12 h, 18 h and 48 h for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, respectively. Removal rate of TVOCs (Total VOCs) reached a level as high as 99.52%. The results of the experiment have indicated that molecule structure and properties of the VOCs are also important factors which have effects on removal rates of the contaminants. Increases in carbon number on the benzene ring, decreases in vapor pressure and volatile capability resulted in higher difficulties in soil decontamination. n-propylbenzene has a lower vapor pressure than toluene and ethylbenzene which led to a significant retard effect on desorption and volatilization of benzene and ethylbenzene.

  2. NETWORKS OF NANOPARTICLES IN ORGANIC – INORGANIC COMPOSITES: ALGORITHMIC EXTRACTION AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Thiedmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The rising global demand in energy and the limited resources in fossil fuels require new technologies in renewable energies like solar cells. Silicon solar cells offer a good efficiency but suffer from high production costs. A promising alternative are polymer solar cells, due to potentially low production costs and high flexibility of the panels. In this paper, the nanostructure of organic–inorganic composites is investigated, which can be used as photoactive layers in hybrid–polymer solar cells. These materials consist of a polymeric (OC1C10-PPV phase with CdSe nanoparticles embedded therein. On the basis of 3D image data with high spatial resolution, gained by electron tomography, an algorithm is developed to automatically extract the CdSe nanoparticles from grayscale images, where we assume them as spheres. The algorithm is based on a modified version of the Hough transform, where a watershed algorithm is used to separate the image data into basins such that each basin contains exactly one nanoparticle. After their extraction, neighboring nanoparticles are connected to form a 3D network that is related to the transport of electrons in polymer solar cells. A detailed statistical analysis of the CdSe network morphology is accomplished, which allows deeper insight into the hopping percolation pathways of electrons.

  3. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1980-02-01

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, 80 Br, /sup 82m/Br + 82 Br, 82 Br, 82 Br, 128 I, 130 I, and /sup 130m/I + 130 I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace elements and trace molecule determinations in biological systems was continued

  4. Magnetic metal-organic frameworks for fast and efficient solid-phase extraction of six Sudan dyes in tomato sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin-Ran; Chen, Xue-Lei; Hao, Yu-Lan; Li, Li; Xu, Hou-Jun; Wang, Man-Man

    2018-06-01

    Magnetic solid-phase extraction is an effective and useful technique to preconcentrate trace analytes from food samples. In this study, a magnetic trimeric chromium octahedral metal-organic framework (Fe 3 O 4 -NH 2 @MIL-101) was fabricated and characterized. Fe 3 O 4 -NH 2 @MIL-101 was applied as an adsorbent of magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography to effectively isolate and simultaneously determine six Sudan dyes (Para Red, Sudan I-IV, and Sudan Red 7B) from tomato sauce. Potential factors affecting the MSPE were investigated in detail, and adsorption efficiency of Fe 3 O 4 -NH 2 @MIL-101 was compared with those of conventional adsorbents, such as neutral alumina, HLB, and C 18 . The developed method facilitated the extraction with using only 3 mg of adsorbent in 2 min. In addition, enhancement factors of 50, linear range of 0.01-25 μg/mL, and detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.5-2.5 μg/kg were obtained. The intra-day and inter-day recoveries for spiked Sudan dyes were in the range of 72.6%-92.9% and 69.6%-91.6%, respectively, with relative standard deviations of ≤9.2%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Liquid-liquid extraction of ruthenium(III) thiocyanate with hexamethylphosphoramide: direct spectrophotometric determination in the organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, B.K.; Pal, B.K.; Chowdhury, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ru(III) thiocyanate has been extracted with hexamethylphosphoramide(HMPA) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Thus the extractability, sensitivity and selectivity are improved over the simple binary Ru(III) thiocyanate system in spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium in the organic phase. The maximum colour develops on the steam bath, at the acidity range of 1.5 - 2.5 M with HCl and ammonium thiocyanate concentration range of 0.25 - O.5 M. The colour is completely extractable in MIBK when 1.5 - 3.0 ml HMPA is used and show maximum absorbance at 570 nm. The colour system obeys Beer's law for 0.7 - 13 μg Ru/ml and the optimum concentration range is 2 - 13 μg/ml. The molar absorptivity and sensitivity are 6940 l . mole -1 cm -1 and 0.0145 μg/cm 2 respectively. The percent relative error is 2.72%. The method is very simple and does not require oxidation and subsequent distillation. The method can be applied in the presence of osmium. (Author)

  6. Pyrolytic in situ magnetization of metal-organic framework MIL-100 for magnetic solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shu-Hui; An, Hai-Yan; Yu, Jing; Mao, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Zhe; Bai, Lei; Huang, Yan-Feng; Zhou, Peng-Xin

    2017-09-29

    In this study, we report a facile, environmental friendly fabrication of a type of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-100 that can be used for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE). The magnetic MOF composites were fabricated using in situ calcination method. The as-synthesized materials exhibited both high porosity and magnetic characteristics. They used for the MSPE of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water samples. Such MOF-based magnetic solid-phase extraction in combination with gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID), exhibited wide linearity (0.02-250μgL -1 ), low detection limits (4.6-8.9ngL -1 ), and high enrichment factors (452-907) for PAHs. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra- and inter-day extractions of PAHs were ranging from 1.7% to 9.8% and 3.8% to 9.2%, respectively. The recoveries for spiked PAHs (1μgL -1 ) in water samples were in the range of 88.5% to 106.6%. The results showed that the special anion-π orbital (electron donor-acceptor) interaction and π-π stacking between magnetic MIL-100 and PAHs play an important role in the adsorption of PAHs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The influence of the Tribulus terrestris extract on the parameters of the functional preparedness and athletes' organism homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milasius, K; Dadeliene, R; Skernevicius, Ju

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the Tribulus terrestris extract on the parameters of the functional preparadness and athletes' organism homeostase was investigated. It was established the positive impact of dietary supplement "Tribulus" (Optimum Nutrition, U.S.A.) using per 1 capsule 3 times a day during 20 days on athletes' physical power in various energy producing zones: anaerobic alactic muscular power and anaerobic alactic glycolytic power statistically reliable increased. Tribulus terrestris extract, after 20 days of consuming it, did not have essential effect on erythrocytes, haemoglobin and thrombocytes indices. During the experimental period statistically importantly increased percentage of granulocytes and decreased percentage of leucocytes show negative impact of this food supplement on changes of leucocytes formula in athletes' blood. Creatinkinase concentration in athletes' blood statistically importantly has increased and creatinine amount has had a tendency to decline during 20 days period of consuming Tribulus terrestris extract. The declining tendency of urea, cholesterol and bilirubin concentrations has appeared. The concentration of blood testosterone increased statistically reliable during the first half (10 days) of the experiment; it did not grow during the next 10 days while consuming Tribulus still.

  8. Charge Carrier Generation, Recombination, and Extraction in Polymer–Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Laquai, Fré dé ric; Andrienko, Denis; Deibel, Carsten; Neher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the basic principles of photocurrent generation in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, discuss the loss channels limiting their efficiency, and present case studies of several polymer–fullerene blends. Using steady-state and transient, optical, and electrooptical techniques, we create a precise picture of the fundamental processes that ultimately govern solar cell efficiency.

  9. Using solid phase micro extraction to determine salting-out (Setschenow) constants for hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.T.O.; Muijs, B.

    2010-01-01

    With increasing ionic strength, the aqueous solubility and activity of organic chemicals are altered. This so-called salting-out effect causes the hydrophobicity of the chemicals to be increased and sorption in the marine environment to be more pronounced than in freshwater systems. The process can

  10. Charge Carrier Generation, Recombination, and Extraction in Polymer–Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Laquai, Frederic

    2016-12-20

    In this chapter we review the basic principles of photocurrent generation in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, discuss the loss channels limiting their efficiency, and present case studies of several polymer–fullerene blends. Using steady-state and transient, optical, and electrooptical techniques, we create a precise picture of the fundamental processes that ultimately govern solar cell efficiency.

  11. Octadecyl functionalized core-shell magnetic silica nanoparticle as a powerful nanocomposite sorbent to extract urinary volatile organic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zheng; Perestrelo, Rosa; Reyes-Gallardo, Emilia M; Lucena, R; Cárdenas, S; Rodrigues, João; Câmara, José S

    2015-05-08

    In this present study, magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with octadecyl groups (Fe3O4@SiO2-C18 NPs) were synthesized, characterized and employed, for the first time, as powerful nanosorbent to extract endogenous volatile organic metabolites (EVOMs) namely, hexanal, heptanal, decanal, benzaldehyde, 4-heptanone, 5-methyl-2-furfural and phenol, described as potential biomarkers of cancer, from human urine. By using co-precipitation, surface modification methods, the carbon-ferromagnetic nanocomposite was synthesized and characterized by infrared spectrum (IR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By coupling with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-qMS), a reliable, sensitive and cost-effective method was validated. To test the extraction efficiency of the carbon-ferromagnetic nanocomposite toward urinary EVOMs experimental variables affecting the extraction performance, including nanosorbent amount, adsorption time, elution time, and nature of elution solvent, were investigated in detail. The extraction process was performed by dispersing Fe3O4@SiO2-C18 NPs into working solution containing targeted VOMs, and into urine samples, and then eluted with an adequate organic solvent. The eluate was collected, concentrated and analyzed by GC-qMS. Under the optimized conditions, the LODs and LOQs achieved were in the range of 9.7-57.3 and 32.4-190.9ng/mL, respectively. Calibration curves were linear (r(2)≥0. 988) over the concentration ranges from 0.25 to 250ng/mL. In addition, a satisfying reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3 and 11%, respectively. The method also afforded satisfactory results in terms of the matrix effect (72.8-96.1%) and recoveries (accuracy) higher than 75.1% for most of the studied EVOMs. The Fe3O4@SiO2-C18 NPs-based sorbent extraction combined with GC-qMS revealed that the new nanosorbent had a strong ability to retain the

  12. Rapid and simple purification of elastin-like polypeptides directly from whole cells and cell lysates by organic solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VerHeul, Ross; Sweet, Craig; Thompson, David H

    2018-03-26

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) are a well-known class of proteins that are being increasingly utilized in a variety of biomedical applications, due to their beneficial physicochemical properties. A unifying feature of ELP is their demonstration of a sequence tunable inverse transition temperature (Tt) that enables purification using a simple, straightforward process called inverse transition cycling (ITC). Despite the utility of ITC, the process is inherently limited to ELP with an experimentally accessible Tt. Since the underlying basis for the ELP Tt is related to its high overall hydrophobicity, we anticipated that ELP would be excellent candidates for purification by organic extraction. We report the first method for rapidly purifying ELP directly from whole E. coli cells or clarified lysates using pure organic solvents and solvent mixtures, followed by aqueous back extraction. Our results show that small ELP and a large ELP-fusion protein can be isolated in high yield from whole cells or cell lysates with greater than 95% purity in less than 30 min and with very low levels of LPS and DNA contamination.

  13. The Effects of Aqueous Extract of Anacyclus Pyrethrum on Sperm Count and Reproductive Organs in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahraki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 80 million individuals suffer from infertility globally. Various factors such as some drugs and toxins have harmful effects on fertility. Anacyclus pyrethrum plant in Indian traditional medicine is used for treatment of many diseases including infertility. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 48 male adult rats were divided randomly into four groups (N=12 including one control group (A and three test groups (B, C and D. Test groups (B, C and D received root aqueous extract of A. pyrethrum intraperitoneally with doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days, respectively. At the end of the treatment period, the reproduction variables such as weight of body and sex organs, the sperm count in epididymis and right and left vas deferens and percent of abnormal spermatozoids were determined. The test groups were compared to the controls using analysis of variance following Tukey. Results: Data analysis of body and sex organs’ weight, sperm count of epididymis and right and left vas deferens and percent of abnormal spermatozoids showed a significant difference between the tests and control groups (p=0.02, p=0.0001; however, no significant difference was found between two groups regarding vas deferens weight. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that root aqueous extract of A. pyrethrum increased the weights of body and sex organs, increase of sperm count of epididymis and right and left vas deferens, and reduction of percent of abnormal spermatozoids in treated rats.

  14. A comparison of sample preparation methods for extracting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from equine faeces using HS-SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Rachael; Archer, Debra; Probert, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Disturbance to the hindgut microbiota can be detrimental to equine health. Metabolomics provides a robust approach to studying the functional aspect of hindgut microorganisms. Sample preparation is an important step towards achieving optimal results in the later stages of analysis. The preparation of samples is unique depending on the technique employed and the sample matrix to be analysed. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) is one of the most widely used platforms for the study of metabolomics and until now an optimised method has not been developed for equine faeces. To compare a sample preparation method for extracting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from equine faeces. Volatile organic compounds were determined by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GCMS). Factors investigated were the mass of equine faeces, type of SPME fibre coating, vial volume and storage conditions. The resultant method was unique to those developed for other species. Aliquots of 1000 or 2000 mg in 10 ml or 20 ml SPME headspace were optimal. From those tested, the extraction of VOCs should ideally be performed using a divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethysiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS) SPME fibre. Storage of faeces for up to 12 months at - 80 °C shared a greater percentage of VOCs with a fresh sample than the equivalent stored at - 20 °C. An optimised method for extracting VOCs from equine faeces using HS-SPME-GCMS has been developed and will act as a standard to enable comparisons between studies. This work has also highlighted storage conditions as an important factor to consider in experimental design for faecal metabolomics studies.

  15. Interactions between crude drug extracts used in Japanese traditional Kampo medicines and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 2B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Rie; Watanabe, Tomoki; Ishiuchi, Kan'ichiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Junko; Makino, Toshiaki

    2018-03-25

    The use of herbal medicines has become popular worldwide, and the information on drug interactions between herbal medicines and chemical drugs is needed. We screened the inhibitory effects of crude drugs used in Kampo medicines used in Japan on organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 2B1 to predict potential interactions between Kampo medicines and chemical drugs used together. We chose 98 kinds of crude drugs frequently used as ingredients of Kampo formulations in Japan and prepared their boiling water extracts. We then screened their inhibitory effects on OATP2B1 by measuring the uptake of estrone 3-sulphate (E3S) by HEK293 cells stably expressing OATP2B1. At the concentration of 100µg/ml, the extracts prepared from 12 kinds of crude drugs, Scuteralliae Radix, Arecae Semen, Aurantii Fructus Immaturus, Perillae Herba, Panacis Japonici Rhizoma, Moutan Cortex, Polygalae Radix, Rhei Rhizoma, Cannabis Fructus, Chrysanthemi Flos, Eriobotryae Folium, and Querci Cortex, suppressed the function of OATP2B1 by less than 20%. The extract of bofutsushosan, a representative Kampo formulation, inhibited OATP2B1 function with sufficient levels to suppress absorption of OATP2B1 substrates in clinics. We further evaluated the inhibitory effects of several ingredients containing Rhei Rhizoma, Perillae Herba, and Moutan Cortex on OATP2B1. Because of crude drugs used in Kampo medicines might suppress absorption of OATP2B1 substrates, these results may contribute to the safe and effective use of Kampo medicine in clinics. A list of abbreviations: EC, (-)-epicatechin; ECG, epicatechin gallate; EGC, epigallocatechin; EGCG, Epigallocatechin gallate; FBS, fetal bovine serum; grapefruit juice; HEK293, Human embryonic kidney; IC 50, The half inhibitory concentration; OATP, organic anion-transporting polypeptide; β-PGG, penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose; t.i.d, 3 times a day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in soil water extracts using Vibrio harveyi BB721 and its implication for microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A Mark; Wang, Haizhen; Xu, Jianming; Leddy, Menu; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E

    2012-01-01

    Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is commonly used to measure the growth potential of microorganisms in water, but has not yet been investigated for measuring microbial growth potential in soils. In this study, a simple, rapid, and non-growth based assay to determine AOC in soil was developed using a naturally occurring luminous strain Vibrio harveyi BB721 to determine the fraction of low molecular weight organic carbon in soil water extract. Calibration of the assay was achieved by measuring the luminescence intensity of starved V. harveyi BB721 cells in the late exponential phase with a concentration range from 0 to 800 µg l(-1) glucose (equivalent to 0-16.0 mg glucose C kg(-1) soil) with the detection limit of 10 µg l(-1) equivalent to 0.20 mg glucose C kg(-1) soil. Results showed that bioluminescence was proportional to the concentration of glucose added to soil. The luminescence intensity of the cells was highly pH dependent and the optimal pH was about 7.0. The average AOC concentration in 32 soils tested was 2.9±2.2 mg glucose C kg(-1). Our data showed that AOC levels in soil water extracts were significantly correlated (Pgrowth bioluminescence based assay. Understanding the levels of AOC in soil water extract provides new insights into our ability to estimate the most available carbon pool to bacteria in soil that may be easily assimilated into cells for many metabolic processes and suggest possible the links between AOC, microbial regrowth potential, and microbial biomass in soils.

  17. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC in soil water extracts using Vibrio harveyi BB721 and its implication for microbial biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincai Ma

    Full Text Available Assimilable organic carbon (AOC is commonly used to measure the growth potential of microorganisms in water, but has not yet been investigated for measuring microbial growth potential in soils. In this study, a simple, rapid, and non-growth based assay to determine AOC in soil was developed using a naturally occurring luminous strain Vibrio harveyi BB721 to determine the fraction of low molecular weight organic carbon in soil water extract. Calibration of the assay was achieved by measuring the luminescence intensity of starved V. harveyi BB721 cells in the late exponential phase with a concentration range from 0 to 800 µg l(-1 glucose (equivalent to 0-16.0 mg glucose C kg(-1 soil with the detection limit of 10 µg l(-1 equivalent to 0.20 mg glucose C kg(-1 soil. Results showed that bioluminescence was proportional to the concentration of glucose added to soil. The luminescence intensity of the cells was highly pH dependent and the optimal pH was about 7.0. The average AOC concentration in 32 soils tested was 2.9±2.2 mg glucose C kg(-1. Our data showed that AOC levels in soil water extracts were significantly correlated (P<0.05 with microbial biomass determined as microbial biomass carbon, indicating that the AOC concentrations determined by the method developed might be a good indicator of soil microbial biomass. Our findings provide a new approach that may be used to determine AOC in environmental samples using a non-growth bioluminescence based assay. Understanding the levels of AOC in soil water extract provides new insights into our ability to estimate the most available carbon pool to bacteria in soil that may be easily assimilated into cells for many metabolic processes and suggest possible the links between AOC, microbial regrowth potential, and microbial biomass in soils.

  18. In vitro total phenolics, flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of essential oil, various organic extracts from the leaves of tropical medicinal plant Tetrastigma from Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M Amzad; Shah, Muhammad Dawood; Gnanaraj, Charles; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2011-09-01

    To detect the in vitro total phenolics, flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of essential oil, various organic extracts from the leaves of tropical medicinal plant Tetrastigma from Sabah. The dry powder leaves of Tetrastigma were extracted with different organic solvent such as hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and aqueous methanol. The total phenolic and total flavonoids contents of the essential oil and various organic extracts such as hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and aqueous ethanol were determined by Folin - Ciocalteu method and the assayed antioxidant activity was determined in vitro models such as antioxidant capacity by radical scavenging activity using α, α-diphenyl- β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The total phenolic contents of the essential oil and different extracts as gallic acid equivalents were found to be highest in methanol extract (386.22 mg/g) followed by ethyl acetate (190.89 mg/g), chloroform (175.89 mg/g), hexane (173.44 mg/g), and butanol extract (131.72 mg/g) and the phenolic contents not detected in essential oil. The antioxidant capacity of the essential oil and different extracts as ascorbic acid standard was in the order of methanol extract > ethyl acetate extract >chloroform> butanol > hexane extract also the antioxidant activity was not detected in essential oil. The findings show that the extent of antioxidant activity of the essential oil and all extracts are in accordance with the amount of phenolics present in that extract. Leaves of Tetrastigma being rich in phenolics may provide a good source of antioxidant. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of organic motif tailored hybrid nanoframes: Exploiting in vitro bioactivity and heavy metal ion extraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayade, Kundan C. [School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon, MS (India); Kuwar, Anil S. [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon, MS (India); Ingle, Sopan T. [School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon, MS (India); Attarde, Sanjay B., E-mail: sb.attarde@yahoo.co.in [School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon, MS (India)

    2017-02-15

    Hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) were designed by adsorbing a (13E,19E)-N{sub 1}′,N{sub 3}′-bis[4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene]malonohydrazide (L) motif, on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} distorted hexagonal and cubic NPs. Electronic images of the synthesized hybrid NPs revealed distorted topographies with size of ∼50–70 nm. We exploited key in vitro features, topographies, thermal behaviours, spectroscopic data, magnetic properties and heavy metal ion extraction efficiencies of the prepared hybrids. Additionally, the discrete discussion on the surface areas of the synthesized NPs tackled with BET, are introduced. Characterization with FT-IR, SEM, TEM, XRD, BET, VSM, TGA, particle size analysis and Raman spectroscopic techniques revealed that the organic scaffold L is attached to the prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} NPs surface via adsorption or covalent interactions or some sort of charge/proton transfer. Antibacterial tests depicted that, L and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} NPs exhibited moderate to good antifungal activity against C. albicans, while synthesized key hybrids has shown good to high antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacterium, S. aureus, two Gram-negative bacteria's, E. coli and P. aeruginosa, and antifungal activity against C. albicans. Also, the Zn{sup 2+} ion extraction efficiency of the key hybrids was tackled and validated with commercial pharmaceutical tablet analysis. - Highlights: • New hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) shown good to high antibacterial activity. • NPs showed barely compromised magnetism and thermal stability. • Macroporous NPs depicted harmonious Zn(II) ion extraction efficiency. • Extraction of Zn(II) ions by NPs exhibited no matrix interference.

  20. Selective Permeation and Organic Extraction of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein (gfpuv from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Marina

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformed cells of Escherichia coli DH5-α with pGFPuv, induced by IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside, express the green fluorescent protein (gfpuv during growth phases. E. coli subjected to the combination of selective permeation by freezing/thawing/sonication cycles followed by the three-phase partitioning extraction (TPP method were compared to the direct application of TPP to the same culture of E. coli on releasing gfpuv from the over-expressing cells. Material and Methods Cultures (37°C/100 rpm/ 24 h; μ = 0.99 h-1 - 1.10 h-1 of transformed (pGFP Escherichia coli DH5-α, expressing the green fluorescent protein (gfpuv, absorbance at 394 nm and emission at 509 nm were sonicated in successive intervals of sonication (25 vibrations/pulse to determine the maximum amount of gfpuv released from the cells. For selective permeation, the transformed previously frozen (-75°C cells were subjected to three freeze/thaw (-20°C/ 0.83°C/min cycles interlaid by sonication (3 pulses/ 6 seconds/ 25 vibrations. The intracellular permeate with gfpuv in extraction buffer (TE solution (25 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, 1 mM β-mercaptoethanol β-ME, 0.1 mM PMSF was subjected to the three-phase partitioning (TPP method with t-butanol and 1.6 M ammonium sulfate. Sonication efficiency was verified on the application to the cells previously treated by the TPP method. The intra-cell releases were mixed and eluted through methyl HIC column with a buffer solution (10 mM Tris-HCl, 10 mM EDTA, pH 8.0. Results The sonication maximum released amount obtained from the cells was 327.67 μg gfpuv/mL (20.73 μg gfpuv/mg total proteins – BSA, after 9 min of treatment. Through the selective permeation by three repeated freezing/thawing/sonication cycles applied to the cells, a close content of 241.19 μg gfpuv/mL (29.74 μg gfpuv/mg BSA was obtained. The specific mass range of gfpuv released from the same cultures, by the three-phase partitioning (TPP

  1. Development of an on-line analyzer for organic phase uranium concentration in extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanwu; Song Yufen; Zhu Yaokun; Cong Peiyuan; Cui Songru

    1998-10-01

    The working principle, constitution, performance of an on-line analyzer and the development characteristic of immersion sonde, data processing system and examination standard are reported. The performance of this instrument is reliable. For identical sample, the signal fluctuation in continuous monitoring for four months is less than +-1%. According to required measurement range by choosing appropriate length of sample cell the precision of measurement is better than 1% at uranium concentration 100 g/L. The detection limit is (50 +- 10) mg/L. The uranium concentration in process stream can be automatically displayed and printed out in real time and 4∼20 mA current signal being proportional to the uranium concentration can be presented. So the continuous control and computer management for the extraction process can be achieved

  2. Trivalent actinide-lanthanide extraction by DEHPA. Structure of organic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattee, D.; Musikas, C.; Faure, A.; Chachaty, C.

    1985-09-01

    The di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid HDEHDTP is a bidentate ligand with sulphur donor atoms which has a good affinity for soft acids. H 2 O H NMR and light diffraction let us demonstrate that HDEHDTP is a monomer and NaDEHDTP a reverse micelle. When La 3+ replaces Na + , the reverse micelle is preserved. In the same way when TBP expells H 2 O the polymerised state is preserved. Evidence of that is provided by low angle X-ray diffraction; the micelles are shell-shaped and the ions are strongly tied to the ligand. The mechanism of extraction has been determined with traces of metal for HDEHDTP and the synergistic system HDEHDTP, TBP. The substitution of H 2 O by TBP in the complex induces a shortening of the S-metal bound so that the 5f ions better ability to form covalent bounds is settled [fr

  3. Stratified systems without organic solvent - new extraction type of macro- and microquantities of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyogtev, M.I.; Alikina, E.N.; Popova, O.N.; Amindjanov, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of studies on solubility in four component systems: di anti pyril methane-benzoic (salicylic) acid-HCl-H 2 O, hexyl di anti pyril methane-benzoic (salicylic) acid-HCl-H 2 O at 298 and 323 K. It is defined that stable stratification appears by addition of hydrochloric acid in the concentration range of 3.0-4.9 wt.% HCl. At substitution of di anti pyril methane on hexyl di anti pyril methane the wide range of stratification in the cut of hexyl di anti pyril methane-benzoic (salicylic) acid - 5 wt.% HCl is observes. The possibility of using of stratified systems for quantitative extraction of copper, cadmium, iron, thallium and tin is proposed.

  4. Disinfection by-products and extractable organic compounds in South African tap water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carien Nothnagel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available An important step in urban purification of drinking water is disinfection by e.g. chlorination where potential pathogenic micro-organisms in the water supply are killed. The presence of organic material in natural water leads to the formation of organic by- products during disinfection. Over 500 of these disinfection by-products (DBPs have been identified and many more are estimated to form during the disinfection step. Several DBPs such as trihalomethanes (THMs, which is carcinogenic, poses serious health risks to the community. There is very few quantitative data available which realizes the actual levels of these compounds present in drinking water. The levels of four THMs present in drinking water were measured. It included chloroform, bromodichloromethane, chlorodibromomethane and bromoform. Although microbiological parameters are considered to get more attention than disinfection by-products, the measurement of the levels of these compounds in South-African drinking water is essential together with establishing minimum acceptable concentration levels. The target range for total trihalomethanes (TTHMs established by the US EPA at the end of 2003 is 0-0.08ug/mL. The aim of this paper is to create an awareness of the problem as well as presenting preliminary results obtained with the method of analysis. Preliminary results indicate that urgent attention must be given to the regulation and monitoring of DBPs in South African drinking water.

  5. Extracting dimer structures from simulations of organic-based materials using QM/MM methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Jiménez, A.J., E-mail: aj.perez@ua.es; Sancho-García, J.C., E-mail: jc.sancho@ua.es

    2015-09-28

    Highlights: • DFT geometries of isolated dimers in organic crystals differ from experimental ones. • This can be corrected using QM/MM geometry optimizations. • The QM = B3LYP–D3(ZD)/cc-pVDZ and MM = GAFF combination works reasonably well. - Abstract: The functionality of weakly bound organic materials, either in Nanoelectronics or in Materials Science, is known to be strongly affected by their morphology. Theoretical predictions of the underlying structure–property relationships are frequently based on calculations performed on isolated dimers, but the optimized structure of the latter may significantly differ from experimental data even when dispersion-corrected methods are used for it. Here, we address this problem on two organic crystals, namely coronene and 5,6,11,12-tetrachlorotetracene, concluding that it is caused by the absence of the surrounding monomers present in the crystal, and that it can be efficiently cured when the dimer is embedded into a general Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) geometry optimization scheme. We also investigate how the size of the MM region affects the results. These findings may be helpful for the simulation of the morphology of active materials in crystalline or glassy samples.

  6. Interactions between excitation and extraction modes in an organic-based plasmon-emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Nan-Fu, E-mail: nfchiu@ntnu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Le Ster, Maxime [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Material Sciences and Engineering, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Rennes, Rennes 35708 (France); Yang, Cheng-Du [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Ming-Hung; Tsai, Feng-Yu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Directional emission properties give rise to a spectral band-gap response enhancement. • The subsequent emission intensity can increase by up to 3.5 times. • FWHM of approximately 60 nm in a defined direction is achieved. • SP coupling rate is approximately 80% on the metal grating structure. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the feasibility of enhancing an organic-based plasmon-emitting diode on the directional light beaming efficiency by near-field surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in both metal grating and polymer grating nanostructures. The interaction between organic/metal and PR/metal interfaces to cause SPPs can facilitate specific directional emission. Directional emission properties give rise to a spectral band-gap response enhancement. Our results also verify that efficient surface plasmon grating coupled emissions (SPGCEs) can improve directionality under index-mediated tuning. Experimental results indicate SP decoupling emission in the visible light. The subsequent emission intensity can increase by up to 3.5 times. Moreover, a narrow FWHM of approximately 60 nm in a defined direction is achieved, and an SP coupling rate is approximately 80% on the metal grating structure. The proposed method is highly promising for use as an active plasmonic emitter and discoloration biosensors with enhanced SPPs resonance energy, owing to interactions with the organic/metal nanostructure.

  7. Flue gas corrosion through halogen compounds in fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, R

    1987-04-01

    The halogens of chlorine and fluorine greatly influence the corrosion speed of metal materials. If small quantities of chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are present in fuel gas like in landfill gas, they must not result in enhanced corrosion of gas appliances. Data from literature and the initial results of tests run by the author indicate that quantities at about 10 mg/cbm (in terms of chlorine) can be assumed not to cause any noticeable acceleration of corrosion speed.

  8. Competition between Halogen, Hydrogen and Dihydrogen Bonding in Brominated Carboranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Holub, Josef; Růžičková, Z.; Řezáč, Jan; Lane, P. D.; Wann, D. A.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Růžička, A.; Hobza, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 21 (2016), s. 3373-3376 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05677S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : bromine * carboranes * halogen bonds * sigma holes * X-ray crystal structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2016

  9. Extraction of lanthanides and actinides (III) by DI-2 ethyl dithiophosphoric acid and DI-2 ethyl hexyl monothiophosphoric acid. Structure of the complexes in the organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattee, D.; Musikas, C.; Faure, A.; Chachaty, C.

    1986-09-01

    To operate a trivalent actinide-lanthanide (III) group chemical separation from low pH nitric solutions we studied the extractive properties of the di-2 ethyl hexyl dithiophosphoric acid (HDEHDTP); this bidentate ligand which possesses a sulfur donor atom is a good extractant of soft acids. We so expect a better selectivity for the actinides (III) extraction. We also have investigated extractive properties of di-2 ethyl hexyl monothiophosphoric acid (HDEHTP) for trivalent actinides and lanthanides; HDEHDTP is a bidentate ligand with one oxygen donor atom and so is a better extractant for hard acids like actinides and lanthanides (III); but its selectivity is weak. The addition of TBP (tri-n butyl phosphate) to HDEHDTP deals to strong synergistic organic complexes with a great selectivity for Am(III). We explicited this phenomenon. When the metal is macroconcentrated the organic complexes aggregate and form inverted micelles

  10. Simultaneous Microwave Extraction and Separation of Volatile and Non-Volatile Organic Compounds of Boldo Leaves. From Lab to Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Petigny

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microwave extraction and separation has been used to increase the concentration of the extract compared to the conventional method with the same solid/liquid ratio, reducing extraction time and separate at the same time Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC from non-Volatile Organic Compounds (NVOC of boldo leaves. As preliminary study, a response surface method has been used to optimize the extraction of soluble material and the separation of VOC from the plant in laboratory scale. The results from the statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions were: microwave power 200 W, extraction time 56 min and solid liquid ratio of 7.5% of plants in water. Lab scale optimized microwave method is compared to conventional distillation, and requires a power/mass ratio of 0.4 W/g of water engaged. This power/mass ratio is kept in order to upscale from lab to pilot plant.

  11. Analysis of vapor extraction data from applications in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, D.; Gudemann, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses vapor extraction, an in-situ process to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) from soils of the vadose zone, applied in Europe since the early 1980s. In a vapor extraction well a negative differential pressure is created by a blower or similar device. The differential pressure generates a steady flow of soil gas towards the extraction well and thus provides a flushing of the soil with air undersaturated in respect to the contaminant concentration. Contaminants will evaporate into the gaseous phase both form the liquid phase and form the soil. Differential pressures applied range from 15 inches - 350 inches of water. The contaminated discharge air can be treated by activated carbon or other suitable methods. The effective radius of vapor extraction systems (VES) ranges typically form 20 feet to 150 feet underneath non-sealed - and up to 300 feet underneath sealed surfaces. Contamination from volatile organic compounds (VOC) have turned out to be widespread due to their almost ubiquitous presence in industrial processes. Specifically, VOC include halogenated hydrocarbons like TCE, PCE or TCA, aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, xylene and volatile fuels like gasoline

  12. In-vitro study on calcium carbonate crystal growth mediated by organic matrix extracted from fresh water pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yufei; Qiao Li; Feng Qingling

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of studying the mediation of organic matrix on the crystallization of calcium carbonate, water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM) were extracted from aragonite pearls and vaterite pearls respectively. Then, in-vitro calcium carbonate crystallization experiments under the control of these six organic matrices were carried out in the present study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the morphology of CaCO 3 and Raman spectroscopy as a powerful technique was used to distinguish the crystal polymorph. Influences of the six kinds of organic matrices on the calcium carbonate crystal growth are proposed. ASM of vaterite pearls can induce vaterite to crystallize and WSM of aragonite pearls mediates to produce aragonite crystals. The single AIM membranes of the two pearls have no pronounced effect on the CaCO 3 crystallization. Additionally, the crystal size obtained with the additive of WSM of the two kinds of pearls is smaller than that with the additive of ASM. Moreover, self-assembly phenomenon in the biomineralization process and the distorted morphology calcite are observed. Current results demonstrate important aspects of matrix protein-controlled crystallization, which is beneficial to the understanding of nacre biomineralization mechanism. Further study of the precise control of these matrix proteins on CaCO 3 crystal growth is being processed. - Highlights: ► WSM, ASM and AIM are extracted from aragonite pearls and vaterite pearls. ► ASM of vaterite pearl induces vaterite. ► WSM of aragonite pearl mediates to produce aragonite. ► WSM can fine control crystal size smaller than that with the additive of ASM. ► Self-assembly and the distorted calcite existed in the mineralization process.

  13. Structure-Energy Relationships of Halogen Bonds in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholfield, Matthew R; Ford, Melissa Coates; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Butta, Hawera; Mehl, Ryan A; Ho, P Shing

    2017-06-06

    The structures and stabilities of proteins are defined by a series of weak noncovalent electrostatic, van der Waals, and hydrogen bond (HB) interactions. In this study, we have designed and engineered halogen bonds (XBs) site-specifically to study their structure-energy relationship in a model protein, T4 lysozyme. The evidence for XBs is the displacement of the aromatic side chain toward an oxygen acceptor, at distances that are equal to or less than the sums of their respective van der Waals radii, when the hydroxyl substituent of the wild-type tyrosine is replaced by a halogen. In addition, thermal melting studies show that the iodine XB rescues the stabilization energy from an otherwise destabilizing substitution (at an equivalent noninteracting site), indicating that the interaction is also present in solution. Quantum chemical calculations show that the XB complements an HB at this site and that solvent structure must also be considered in trying to design molecular interactions such as XBs into biological systems. A bromine substitution also shows displacement of the side chain, but the distances and geometries do not indicate formation of an XB. Thus, we have dissected the contributions from various noncovalent interactions of halogens introduced into proteins, to drive the application of XBs, particularly in biomolecular design.

  14. First principles study of halogens adsorption on intermetallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Quanxi; Wang, Shao-qing

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The linear relation between adsorbates induced work function change and dipole moment change also exists for intermetallic surfaces. • It is just a common linear relationship rather than a directly proportion. • A new weight parameter β is proposed to describe different factors effect on work function shift. - Abstract: Halides are often present at electrochemical environment, they can directly influence the electrode potential or zero charge potential through the induced work-function change. In this work, we focused in particular on the halogen-induced work function change as a function of the coverage of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine on Al_2Au and Al_2Pt (110) surfaces. Results show that the real relation between work function change and dipole moment change for halogens adsorption on intermetallic surfaces is just a common linear relationship rather than a directly proportion. Besides, the different slopes between fitted lines and the theoretical slope employed in pure metal surfaces demonstrating that the halogens adsorption on intermetallic surfaces are more complicated. We also present a weight parameter β to describe different factors effect on work function shift and finally qualify which factor dominates the shift direction.

  15. Development of no halogen incombustible cables for atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Nobumasa; Kimura, Hitoshi; Fujimura, Shun-ichi

    1990-01-01

    In upgrading light water reactor technology, it is important to improve the reliability of machinery and equipment, to make regular inspection efficient, to extend the period of continuous operation, to optimize operation cycle and to improve the maintainability of plant facilities. For the cables for nuclear power stations, high incombustibility is required, and at present halogen system incombustible materials are used. Recently the development of no halogen incombustible cables has been advanced, with which the generation of corrosive gas and smoke at the time of fires is slight. In this study, the application of such no halogen incombustible cables to nuclear power stations and the improvement of reliability of the cables were investigated. The cables to be developed are those for electric power, control and instrumentation in BWR plants and insulated electric wires. The required characteristics are incombustibility, no generation of smoke and corrosive gas at the time of fires, radiation resistance and steam resistance in LOCA. The selection of base polymers, metal hydrates and radiation protectors, the evaluation of radiation resistance and steam resistance, the examination of the corrosive and poisonous properties of generated gas and smoke generation and so on are reported. The development was successful. (K.I.)

  16. Use of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to study immunological markers resulting from exposure to PM2.5 organic extract from Puerto Rico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Rivera, Evasomary; Gioda, Adriana; Sanchez-Rivera, Diana; Roman-Velazquez, Felix R.; Jimenez-Velez, Braulio D.

    2010-01-01

    Fine particulate air pollutants, mainly their organic fraction, have been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. Puerto Rico has been reported to have the highest prevalence of pulmonary diseases (e.g., asthma) in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the immunological response of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to organic extracts isolated from airborne particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) in Puerto Rico. Organic extracts from PM 2.5 collected throughout an 8-month period (2000-2001) were pooled (composite) in order to perform chemical analysis and biological activity testing. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM 2.5 organic extract to assess cytotoxicity, levels of cytokines and relative gene expression of MHC-II, hPXR and CYP3A5. Our findings show that organic PM 2.5 consist of toxic as well as bioactive components that can regulate the secretion of cytokines in BEAS-2B, which could modulate inflammatory response in the lung. Trace element analyses confirmed the presence of metals in organic extracts highlighting the relative high abundance of Cu and Zn in polar organic extracts. Polar organic extracts exhibited dose-dependant toxicity and were found to significantly induce the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1β and IL-7 while significantly inhibiting the secretion of IL-8, G-CSF and MCP-1. Moreover, MHC-II transcriptional activity was up-regulated after 24 h of exposure, whereas PXR and CYP3A5 were down-regulated. This research provides a new insight into the effects of PM 2.5 organic fractions on specific effectors and their possible role in the development of respiratory inflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico.

  17. Halogens are key cofactors in building of collagen IV scaffolds outside the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyle L; Hudson, Billy G; Voziyan, Paul A

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in understanding the molecular assembly of basement membranes, as exemplified by the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) of the kidney filtration apparatus. In particular, an essential role of halogens in the basement membrane formation has been discovered. Extracellular chloride triggers a molecular switch within non collagenous domains of collagen IV that induces protomer oligomerization and scaffold assembly outside the cell. Moreover, bromide is an essential cofactor in enzymatic cross-linking that reinforces the stability of scaffolds. Halogenation and halogen-induced oxidation of the collagen IV scaffold in disease states damage scaffold function. Halogens play an essential role in the formation of collagen IV scaffolds of basement membranes. Pathogenic damage of these scaffolds by halogenation and halogen-induced oxidation is a potential target for therapeutic interventions.

  18. Activity of insulin growth factors and shrimp neurosecretory organ extracts on a lepidopteran cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, P J; Liebon, C; Morinière, M; Oberlander, H; Porcheron, P

    1997-01-01

    Ecdysteroids, or molting hormones, have been proven to be key differentiation regulators for epidermal cells in the postembryonic development of arthropods. Regulators of cell proliferation, however, remain largely unknown. To date, no diffusible insect peptidic growth factors have been characterized. Molecules structurally related to insulin have been discovered in insects, as in other eucaryotes. We developed in vitro tests for the preliminary characterization of potential growth factors in arthropods by adapting the procedures designed to detect such factors in vertebrates to an insect cell line (IAL-PID2) established from imaginal discs of the Indian meal moth. We verified the ability of these tests to measure the proliferation of IAL-PID2 cells. We tested mammalian insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I, IGF-II). Following an arrest of cell proliferation by serum deprivation, IGF-I and IGF-II caused partial resumption of the cell cycle, evidenced by DNA synthesis. In contrast, the addition of 20-hydroxyecdysone arrested the proliferation of the IAL-PID2 cells. The cell line was then used in a test for functional characterization of potential growth factors originating from the penaeid shrimp, Penaeus vannamei. Crude extracts of neurosecretory and nervous tissues, eyestalks, and ventral neural chain compensated for serum deprivation and stimulated completion of mitosis. Arch.

  19. A Survey of Electron Impact Cross-Sections for Halogens and Halogen Compounds of Interest to Plasma Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Published electron impact cross section data on halogens Cl2, F2, and halogen containing compounds such as Cx Fy, HCl, Cx Cly Fz are reviewed and critically evaluated based on the information provided by various researchers. The present work reports data on electron impact excitation, ionization, dissociation, electron attachment, electron detachment, and photo detachment. Elastic scattering cross sections and data on bulk properties such as diffusion coefficients in various background gases are also evaluated. Since some of the cross sectional data is derived from indirect measurements such as drift velocity, care has been taken to reconcile the differences among the reported data with due attention to the measurement technique. In conclusion, the processes with no or very limited amount of data and questionable set of data are identified and recommendation for further research direction is made.

  20. Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe: the tropical North Atlantic experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Lee

    2010-02-01

    these air mass classifications is observed in the time series of soluble gas and aerosol composition measurements, with additional identification of periods of slightly elevated dust concentrations consistent with the trajectories passing over the African continent. The CVAO is shown to be broadly representative of the wider North Atlantic marine boundary layer; measurements of NO, O3 and black carbon from the ship are consistent with a clean Northern Hemisphere marine background. Aerosol composition measurements do not indicate elevated organic material associated with clean marine air. Closer to the African coast, black carbon and NO levels start to increase, indicating greater anthropogenic influence. Lower ozone in this region is possibly associated with the increased levels of measured halocarbons, associated with the nutrient rich waters of the Mauritanian upwelling. Bromide and chloride deficits in coarse mode aerosol at both the CVAO and on D319 and the continuous abundance of inorganic gaseous halogen species at CVAO indicate significant reactive cycling of halogens.

    Aircraft measurements of O3 and CO show that surface measurements are representative of the entire boundary layer in the vicinity both in diurnal variability and absolute levels. Above the inversion layer similar diurnal behaviour in O3 and CO is observed at lower mixing ratios in the air that had originated from south of Cape Verde, possibly from within the ITCZ. ECMWF calculations on two days indicate very different boundary layer depths and aircraft flights over the ship replicate this, giving confidence in the calculated boundary layer depth.

  1. Halogen bond tunability II: the varying roles of electrostatic and dispersion contributions to attraction in halogen bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Murray, J. S.; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Řezáč, Jan; Solá, R. J.; Concha, M. C.; Ramos, F. M.; Politzer, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 11 (2013), s. 4651-4659 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : dispersion * electrostatics * halogen bonding * noncovalent interactions Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2013

  2. Extractable organic matter in PM10 from LiWan district of Guangzhou City, PR China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xinhui; Sheng, Guoying; Peng, Peng an; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fu, Jiamo

    2002-12-02

    PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The sigma(n)-alkane and sigmaPAHs ranged from 26.4 to 719.2 ng/m3 and 7.4 to 159.4 ng/m3, respectively. A seasonal fluctuation was clearly evident with higher concentrations occurring during the colder months (April). In addition, some compositional differences are observed for the organic compounds in samples collected from different heights above ground level. Higher sites had a significant contribution from vascular plant wax. The presence of petroleum products with no carbon number preference, pristane, phytane and a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) with unresolved to resolved components ratio (U/R) of 6.2-13.2 confirm the petroleum component. The relative distribution of n-alkanes and the values of molecular diagnostic ratio, such as carbon preference index (CPI) values ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 (for the whole range of n-alkanes), indicated the importance of petroleum and diesel residues and gasoline emissions, as well as the minor contribution of n-alkanes emitted directly from epicuticular waxes. Indeed, the percent contribution of leaf 'wax' n-alkanes (5.2-19.4%) indicated a low contribution of biogenic sources. The fossil fuel biomarkers, hopanes and steranes were observed in the PM10 samples, which indicate a petroleum origin. The distribution pattern of PAHs was characteristic of anthropogenic emissions. Coupling carbon number maximum (Cmax), CPI, U/R values, molecular marker and molecular diagnostic ratios for alkanes and PAHs revealed a classification of natural biogenic and anthropogenic components of atmospheric aerosols. These analyses support the conclusion that vehicular emission was the major source of organic compounds during the study period, while the contribution of epicuticular waxes emitted by terrestrial plants was minor.

  3. Extraction of medium chain fatty acids from organic municipal waste and subsequent production of bio-based fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannengiesser, Jan; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Mrukwia, Timo; Jager, Johannes; Schebek, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on investigations for a new technology to generate bio-based fuel additives from bio-waste. The investigations are taking place at the composting plant in Darmstadt-Kranichstein (Germany). The aim is to explore the potential of bio-waste as feedstock in producing different bio-based products (or bio-based fuels). For this investigation, a facultative anaerobic process is to be integrated into the normal aerobic waste treatment process for composting. The bio-waste is to be treated in four steps to produce biofuels. The first step is the facultative anaerobic treatment of the waste in a rotting box namely percolate to generate a fatty-acid rich liquid fraction. The Hydrolysis takes place in the rotting box during the waste treatment. The organic compounds are then dissolved and transferred into the waste liquid phase. Browne et al. (2013) describes the hydrolysis as an enzymatically degradation of high solid substrates to soluble products which are further degraded to volatile fatty acids (VFA). This is confirmed by analytical tests done on the liquid fraction. After the percolation, volatile and medium chain fatty acids are found in the liquid phase. Concentrations of fatty acids between 8.0 and 31.5 were detected depending on the nature of the input material. In the second step, a fermentation process will be initiated to produce additional fatty acids. Existing microorganism mass is activated to degrade the organic components that are still remaining in the percolate. After fermentation the quantity of fatty acids in four investigated reactors increased 3-5 times. While fermentation mainly non-polar fatty acids (pentanoic to octanoic acid) are build. Next to the fermentation process, a chain-elongation step is arranged by adding ethanol to the fatty acid rich percolate. While these investigations a chain-elongation of mainly fatty acids with pair numbers of carbon atoms (acetate, butanoic and hexanoic acid) are demonstrated. After

  4. Halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1975--February 14, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1976-02-01

    High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, are being studied in gaseous, high pressure, and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and other organic systems. Experimental and theoretical data are presented in the following areas: systematics of iodine hot atom reactions in halomethanes, reactions and systematics of iodine reactions with pentene and butene isomers, radiative neutron capture activated reactions of iodine with acetylene, gas to liquid to solid transition in hot atom chemistry, kinetic theory applications of hot atom reactions and the mathematical development of caging reactions, solvent dependence of the stereochemistry of the 38 Cl for Cl substitution following 37 Cl(n,γ) 38 Cl in liquid meso and dl-(CHFCl) 2 . A technique was also developed for the radioassay of Al in urine specimens

  5. Halonium Ions as Halogen Bond Donors in the Solid State [XL2]Y Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Kari; Haukka, Matti

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of halogen bonding interactions is one of the most rapidly developing areas of supramolecular chemistry. While the other weak non-covalent interactions and their influence on the structure and chemistry of various molecules, complexes, and materials have been investigated extensively, the understanding, utilizations, and true nature of halogen bonding are still relatively unexplored. Thus its final impact in chemistry in general and in materials science has not yet been fully established. Because of the polarized nature of a Z-X bond (Z=electron-withdrawing atom or moiety and X=halogen atom), such a moiety can act as halogen bond donor when the halogen is polarized enough by the atom/moiety Z. The most studied and utilized halogen bond donor molecules are the perfluorohalocarbons, where Z is a perfluorinated aryl or alkyl moiety and X is either iodine or bromine. Complementing the contemporary halogen bonding research, this chapter reviews the solid state structural chemistry of the most extremely polarized halogen atoms, viz. halonium ions, X+, and discussed them as halogen bond donors in the solid state [XL2]Y complexes (X=halonium ion, Y=any anion).

  6. Extraction of cesium from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katykhin, G.S.; Simonov, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction of cesium from acidic solutions is studied. Halogen-substituted carboxylic acids were chosen for the aqueous phase and nitrobenzene the diluent. The distribution coefficients are determined by the use of radioactive tracers 134 Cs and 137 Cs. It is believed that large singly charged anions of strong acids are necessary for the extraction of cesium. Metal halide acids are selected for supplying the anions

  7. Quantitative analysis of semivolatile organic compounds in selected fractions of air sample extracts by GC/MI-IR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childers, J.W.; Wilson, N.K.; Barbour, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are currently investigating the capabilities of gas chromatography/matrix isolation infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in environmental air sample extracts. Their efforts are focused on the determination of SVOCs such as alkylbenzene positional isomers, which are difficult to separate chromatographically and to distinguish by conventional electron-impact ionization GC/mass spectrometry. They have performed a series of systematic experiments to identify sources of error in quantitative GC/MI-IR analyses. These experiments were designed to distinguish between errors due to instrument design or performance and errors that arise from some characteristic inherent to the GC/MI-IR technique, such as matrix effects. They have investigated repeatability as a function of several aspects of GC/MI IR spectrometry, including sample injection, spectral acquisition, cryogenic disk movement, and matrix deposition. The precision, linearity, dynamic range, and detection limits of a commercial GC/MI-IR system for target SVOCs were determined and compared to those obtained with the system's flame ionization detector. The use of deuterated internal standards in the quantitative GC/MI-IR analysis of selected fractions of ambient air sample extracts will be demonstrated. They will also discuss the current limitations of the technique in quantitative analyses and suggest improvements for future consideration

  8. Analysis of Mars Analogue Soil Samples Using Solid-Phase Microextraction, Organic Solvent Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowska, G. E.; Kidd, R. D.; Foing, B. H.; Kanik, I.; Stoker, C.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are robust and abundant molecules in extraterrestrial environments. They are found ubiquitously in the interstellar medium and have been identified in extracts of meteorites collected on Earth. PAHs are important target molecules for planetary exploration missions that investigate the organic inventory of planets, moons and small bodies. This study is part of an interdisciplinary preparation phase to search for organic molecules and life on Mars. We have investigated PAH compounds in desert soils to determine their composition, distribution and stability. Soil samples (Mars analogue soils) were collected at desert areas of Utah in the vicinity of the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), in the Arequipa region in Peru and from the Jutland region of Denmark. The aim of this study was to optimize the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method for fast screening and determination of PAHs in soil samples. This method minimizes sample handling and preserves the chemical integrity of the sample. Complementary liquid extraction was used to obtain information on five- and six-ring PAH compounds. The measured concentrations of PAHs are, in general, very low, ranging from 1 to 60 ng g(sup -1). The texture of soils is mostly sandy loam with few samples being 100% silt. Collected soils are moderately basic with pH values of 8-9 except for the Salten Skov soil, which is slightly acidic. Although the diverse and variable microbial populations of the samples at the sample sites might have affected the levels and variety of PAHs detected, SPME appears to be a rapid, viable field sampling technique with implications for use on planetary missions.

  9. Enrofloxacin behavior in presence of soil extracted organic matter: An electrochemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antilén, Monica; Valencia, Camila; Peralta, Emilia; Canales, Camila; Espinosa-Bustos, Christian; Escudey, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a novel and simple method aimed at determining and quantifying Enrofloxacin in presence of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) is proposed. The method was based on the electrochemical oxidation of Enrofloxacin by using cyclic voltammetry as technique. It was found that this analyte presents a good electroactivity, in absence and in presence of NOM. However, this electrochemical behavior is highly pH-dependent, since the reaction is more favorable when less acid the media is. At this point, different pH values were studied in order to corroborate this phenomenon. Additionally, kinetic studies were done to determine the control of the reaction, the number of transferred electrons in the entire process and the rate determining step of the reaction by analyzing the Tafel slope. With these antecedents, a mechanism was proposed and the final product of the reaction was corroborated by using LC-MS. Finally, analytical parameters were studied with the aim of proposing this new method as an electrochemical sensor of Enrofloxacin. It was found that the method is highly linear, precise and accurate. Moreover, this method is not only sensitive but also selective to Enrofloxacin in presence of NOM, in comparison to spectrophotometric methods previously reported.

  10. Influence of barley grain treated with alkaline compounds or organic extracts on site and extent of digestion of starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Naseroleslami

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Two ex vivo experiments were conducted to verify the effect of barley grain (Nusrat cultivar treated with alkaline compounds (AC including alum, ammonium, and sodium hydroxide or cation-exchanged organic extracts (OE prepared from alfalfa hay, sugar beet pulp and Ulva Fasciata, on extent and digestion of starch. Methods In the first study, the in vitro first order disappearance kinetic parameters of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP and starch were estimated using a non-linear model (D(t = D(i · e(−kd · time + I, where: D(t = potentially digestible residues at any time, D(i = potentially digestible fraction at any time, kd = fractional rate constant of digestion (/h, I = indigestible fraction at any time. In the second experiment, the ruminal and post-ruminal disappearance of DM, CP, and starch were determined using in situ mobile nylon bag. Results Barley grains treated with alum and alfalfa extract had a higher constant rate of starch digestion (0.11 and 0.09/h than others. Barley grain treated with OE had a higher constant rate of CP digestion and that of treated with AC had a higher constant rate of starch digestion (0.08 and 0.11/h compared with those of the other treatments. The indigestible fraction of starch treated with alum and sugar beet pulp extract was higher than that of the control group (0.24 and 0.25 vs 0.21. Barley grain treated with AC and OE had significant CP disappearance in the rumen, post-rumen and total tract, and also starch disappearance for post-rumen and total tract compared with the untreated (p<0.001. Conclusion This study demonstrated that AC and OE might have positive effects on the starch degradation of the barley grain. In addition, treating barley grain with alum and sugar beet pulp extract could change the site and extend digestion of protein and starch.

  11. Pattern Recognition Scavenger Receptor A/CD204 Regulates Airway Inflammatory Homeostasis Following Organic Dust Extract Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Jill A.; Anderson, Leigh; Gleason, Angela M.; West, William W.; Romberger, Debra J.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to agriculture organic dusts, comprised of a diversity of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, results in chronic airway diseases. The multi-functional class A macrophage scavenger receptor (SRA)/CD204 has emerged as an important class of pattern recognition receptors with broad ligand binding ability. Our objective was to determine the role of SRA in mediating repetitive and post-inflammatory organic dust extract (ODE)-induced airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and SRA knockout (KO) mice were intra-nasally treated with ODE or saline daily for 3 wk and immediately euthanized or allowed to recover for 1 wk. Results show that lung histopathologic changes were increased in SRA KO mice as compared to WT following repetitive ODE exposures marked predominately by increased size and distribution of lymphoid aggregates. After a 1-wk recovery from daily ODE treatments, there was significant resolution of lung injury in WT mice, but not SRA KO animals. The increased lung histopathology induced by ODE treatment was associated with decreased accumulation of neutrophils, but greater accumulation of CD4+ T-cells. The lung cytokine milieu induced by ODE was consistent with a TH1/TH17 polarization in both WT and SRA KO mice. Overall, our data demonstrate that SRA/CD204 plays an important role in the normative inflammatory lung response to ODE as evidenced by the enhanced dust-mediated injury viewed in the absence of this receptor. PMID:24491035

  12. Changes in the chemical characteristics of water-extracted organic matter from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cow dung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Meiyan; Li, Xiaowei; Yang, Jian; Huang, Zhidong; Lu, Yongsen

    2012-02-29

    The chemical changes of water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) from five different substrates of sewage sludge enriched with different proportions of cow dung after vermicomposting with Eisenia fetida were investigated using various analytical approaches. Results showed that dissolved organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, and C/N ratio of the substrates decreased significantly after vermicomposting process. The aromaticity of WEOM from the substrates enhanced considerably, and the amount of volatile fatty acids declined markedly, especially for the cow dung substrate. Gel filtration chromatography analysis showed that the molecular weight fraction between 10(3) and 10(6) Da became the main part of WEOM in the final product. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed that the proportion of H moieties in the area of 0.00-3.00 ppm decreased, while increasing at 3.00-4.25 ppm after vermicomposting. Fluorescence spectra indicated that vermicomposting caused the degradation of protein-like groups, and the formation of fulvic and humic acid-like compounds in the WEOM of the substrates. Overall results indicate clearly that vermicomposting promoted the degradation and transformation of liable WEOM into biological stable substances in sewage sludge and cow dung alone, as well as in mixtures of both materials, and testing the WEOM might be an effective way to evaluate the biological maturity and chemical stability of vermicompost. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracting Information about the Electronic Quality of Organic Solar-Cell Absorbers from Fill Factor and Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaienburg, Pascal; Rau, Uwe; Kirchartz, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fill factor in organic solar cells remains challenging due to its complex dependence on a multitude of parameters. By means of drift-diffusion simulations, we thoroughly analyze the fill factor of such low-mobility systems and demonstrate its dependence on a collection coefficient defined in this work. We systematically discuss the effect of different recombination mechanisms, space-charge regions, and contact properties. Based on these findings, we are able to interpret the thickness dependence of the fill factor for different experimental studies from the literature. The presented model provides a facile method to extract the photoactive layer's electronic quality which is of particular importance for the fill factor. We illustrate that over the past 15 years, the electronic quality has not been continuously improved, although organic solar-cell efficiencies increased steadily over the same period of time. Only recent reports show the synthesis of polymers for semiconducting films of high electronic quality that are able to produce new efficiency records.

  14. Effects of thermal desorption on the composition of two coking plant soils: Impact on solvent extractable organic compounds and metal bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biache, Coralie [G2R UMR 7566, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LIMOS UMR 7137, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)], E-mail: coralie.biache@g2r.uhp-nancy.fr; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Faure, Pierre [G2R UMR 7566, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Munier-Lamy, Colette; Leyval, Corinne [LIMOS UMR 7137, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate the efficiency and the influence of thermal desorption on the soil organic compartment, contaminated soils from coking plant sites (NM and H) were compared to their counterparts treated with thermodesorption. The extractable organic matter, and the metal content and distribution with soil compartments were studied. In both thermodesorbed soils, PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) degradation exceeded 90%. However, the thermal desorption led not only to a volatilization of the organic compounds but also to the condensation of extractable organic matter. The treatments only affected the Fe and Zn distribution within the more stable fractions, whereas the organic compound degradation did not affect their mobility and availability. - Thermal desorption does not induce a metal mobilization but condensation seems to occur during the treatment.

  15. In-tube electro-membrane extraction with a sub-microliter organic solvent consumption as an efficient technique for synthetic food dyes determination in foodstuff samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazregar, Mohammad; Rajabi, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Asghari, Alireza; Abdossalami asl, Yousef

    2015-09-04

    A simple and efficient extraction technique with a sub-microliter organic solvent consumption termed as in-tube electro-membrane extraction (IEME) is introduced. This method is based upon the electro-kinetic migration of ionized compounds by the application of an electrical potential difference. For this purpose, a thin polypropylene (PP) sheet placed inside a tube acts as a support for the membrane solvent, and 30μL of an aqueous acceptor solution is separated by this solvent from 1.2mL of an aqueous donor solution. This method yielded high extraction recoveries (63-81%), and the consumption of the organic solvent used was only 0.5μL. By performing this method, the purification is high, and the utilization of the organic solvent, used as a mediator, is very simple and repeatable. The proposed method was evaluated by extraction of four synthetic food dyes (Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red, and Carmoisine) as the model analytes. Optimization of variables affecting the method was carried out in order to achieve the best extraction efficiency. These variables were the type of membrane solvent, applied extraction voltage, extraction time, pH range, and concentration of salt added. Under the optimized conditions, IEME-HPLC-UV provided a good linearity in the range of 1.00-800ngmL(-1), low limits of detection (0.3-1ngmL(-1)), and good extraction repeatabilities (RSDs below 5.2%, n=5). It seems that this design is a proper one for the automation of the method. Also the consumption of the organic solvent in a sub-microliter scale, and its simplicity, high efficiency, and high purification can help one getting closer to the objectives of the green chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MICHIGAN SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION REMEDIATION (MISER) MODEL: A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO MODEL SOIL VAPORT EXTRACTION AND BIOVENTING OF ORGANIC MATERIALS IN UNSATURATED GEOLOGICAL MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the formulation, numerical development, and use of a multiphase, multicomponent, biodegradation model designed to simulate physical, chemical, and biological interactions occurring primarily in field scale soil vapor extraction (SVE) and bioventing (B...

  17. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP

  18. Emission of Volatile OrganoHalogens by Southern African Solar Salt Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotte, Karsten; Weissflog, Ludwig; Lange, Christian Albert; Huber, Stefan; Pienaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds containing halogens - especially chlorine - have been considered for a long time of industrial origin only, and it was assumed that the production and emission of these compounds can easily be controlled by humans in case they will cause a threat for life on Earth. Since the middle of the 80ies of the last century it became clear that the biologically active organohalogens isolated by chemists are purposefully produced by nature as antibiotics or as antifeedant etc. To date more than 3800 organohalogens are known to be naturally produced by bio-geochemical processes. The global budgets of many such species are poorly understood and only now with the emergence of better analytical techniques being discovered. For example the compound chloromethane nature's production (5 GT) outdates the anthropogenic production (50 KT) by a factor of 100. Thus organohalogens are an interesting recent case in point since they can influence the ozone budget of the boundary layer, play a role in the production of aerosols and the climate change discussion. An intriguing observation is that most of the atmospheric CH3Cl and CH3Br are of terrestrial rather than of marine origin and that a number of halogenated small organic molecules are produced in soils. The high concentrations of halides in salt soils point to a possibly higher importance of natural halogenation processes as a source of volatile organohalogens. Terrestrial biota, such as fungi, plants, animals and insects, as well as marine algea, bacteria and archaea are known or suspected to be de-novo producers of volatile organohalogens. In recent years we revealed the possibility for VOX to form actively in water and bottom sediments of hyper-saline environments in the course of studying aridization processes during climatic warming. Due to the nature of their production process solar salt works, as to be found along-side the Southern African coast line but also upcountry, combine a variety of semi- and

  19. Cellular effects of halogen blue light from dental curing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosic, I.; Pavicic, I.; Jukic, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Halogen curing lights are the most frequently used polymerization source in dental offices. Light-cured bonding systems have become increasingly popular among clinicians because they offer a number of advantages over self-cured adhesives. The effort to increase polymerization quality releases the commercially available high power light density dental curing units. Emitted visible blue light belongs to the range of nonionizing radiation. Common concern in both, patients and dentist grows with regard to the unfavorable effects on the pulp tissue. The aim of study was to evaluate the time and dose dependence effect of halogen light curing unit (Elipar TriLight, ESPE Dental AG, Germany) at the disposed condition modes in vitro. A quartz-tungsten-halogen light source emits radiation of the wavelengths between 400 and 515 nm. This halogen blue light source operates in the three illumination modes, medium (M), exponential (E) and standard (S), and five illumination times. The total irradiance or the light intensity was measured by the light intensity control area on the control panel of device and mean light intensity given by manufacturer was 800 m W/cm 2 . Continuous culture of V79 cells was illuminated in triplicate. The influence of medium mode (M), exponential (E) and standard (S) illumination during 20, 40 and 80 sec on the cell viability, colony forming ability and proliferation of V79 cell culture was investigated. Trypan blue exclusion test was used to determine cell viability, both, in the treated and control cell samples. Colony forming ability was assessed for each exposure time and mode by colony count on post-exposure day 7. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counts for each time and mode of exposure during five post-exposure days. Statistical difference were determined at p<0.05 (Statistica 7.0, StatSoft Inc., USA). Viability of cells was not affected by blue light in view of exposure time and modes. Regardless to exposure or illumination

  20. Chemical analysis and toxicity of seaweed extracts with inhibitory activity against tropical fruit anthracnose fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Levi Pompermayer; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie; Jamal, Claudia Masrouah; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Centeno, Danilo da Cruz; Colepicolo Neto, Pio; de Carvalho, Luciana Retz; Yokoya, Nair S

    2014-07-01

    Banana and papaya are among the most important crops in the tropics, with a value amounting to millions of dollars per year. However, these fruits suffer significant losses due to anthracnose, a fungal disease. It is well known that certain seaweed extracts possess antifungal activity, but no published data appear to exist on the practical application of this property. In the present study, five organic Brazilian seaweed extracts were screened for their activity against banana and papaya anthracnose fungi. Furthermore, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of the extracts were evaluated by the brine shrimp lethality assay and the Allium cepa root-tip mutagenicity test respectively, while their major components were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Strong fungus-inhibitory effects of Ochtodes secundiramea and Laurencia dendroidea extracts were observed on both papaya (100 and 98% respectively) and banana (89 and 78% respectively). This impressive activity could be associated with halogenated terpenes, the major components of both extracts. Only Hypnea musciformis extract showed cytotoxic and mutagenic effects. The results of this study suggest the potential use of seaweed extracts as a source of antifungal agents with low toxicity to control anthracnose in papaya and banana during storage. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Impact of enhanced ozone deposition and halogen chemistry on tropospheric ozone over the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fate of ozone in marine environments has been receiving increased attention due to the tightening of ambient air quality standards. The role of deposition and halogen chemistry is examined through incorporation of an enhanced ozone deposition algorithm and inclusion of halogen ch...

  2. Large volume TENAX {sup registered} extraction of the bioaccessible fraction of sediment-associated organic compounds for a subsequent effect-directed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, K.; Brack, W. [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre or Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Effect-Directed Analysis

    2007-06-15

    Background, Aim and Scope: Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is a powerful tool for the identification of key toxicants in complex environmental samples. In most cases, EDA is based on total extraction of organic contaminants leading to an erroneous prioritization with regard to hazard and risk. Bioaccessibility-directed extraction aims to discriminate between contaminants that take part in partitioning between sediment and biota in a relevant time frame and those that are enclosed in structures, that do not allow rapid desorption. Standard protocols of targeted extraction of rapidly desorbing, and thus bioaccessible fraction using TENAX {sup registered} are based only on small amounts of sediment. In order to get sufficient amounts of extracts for subsequent biotesting, fractionation, and structure elucidation a large volume extraction technique needs to be developed applying one selected extraction time and excluding toxic procedural blanks. Materials and Methods: Desorption behaviour of sediment contaminants was determined by a consecutive solid-solid extraction of sediment using TENAX {sup registered} fitting a tri-compartment model on experimental data. Time needed to remove the rapidly desorbing fraction trap was calculated to select a fixed extraction time for single extraction procedures. Up-scaling by about a factor of 100 provided a large volume extraction technique for EDA. Reproducibility and comparability to small volume approach were proved. Blanks of respective TENAX {sup registered} mass were investigated using Scenedesmus vacuolatus and Artemia salina as test organisms. Results: Desorption kinetics showed that 12 to 30 % of sediment associated pollutants are available for rapid desorption. t{sub r}ap is compound dependent and covers a range of 2 to 18 h. On that basis a fixed extraction time of 24 h was selected. Validation of large volume approach was done by the means of comparison to small method and reproducibility. The large volume showed a good

  3. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

    2002-02-26

    The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

  4. Global gene expression changes in human embryonic lung fibroblasts induced by organic extracts from respirable air particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Líbalová Helena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we used cell-free assays to demonstrate the toxic effects of complex mixtures of organic extracts from urban air particles (PM2.5 collected in four localities of the Czech Republic (Ostrava-Bartovice, Ostrava-Poruba, Karvina and Trebon which differed in the extent and sources of air pollution. To obtain further insight into the biological mechanisms of action of the extractable organic matter (EOM from ambient air particles, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 were treated with the same four EOMs to assess changes in the genome-wide expression profiles compared to DMSO treated controls. Method For this purpose, HEL cells were incubated with subtoxic EOM concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 μg EOM/ml for 24 hours and global gene expression changes were analyzed using human whole genome microarrays (Illumina. The expression of selected genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Dose-dependent increases in the number of significantly deregulated transcripts as well as dose-response relationships in the levels of individual transcripts were observed. The transcriptomic data did not differ substantially between the localities, suggesting that the air pollution originating mainly from various sources may have similar biological effects. This was further confirmed by the analysis of deregulated pathways and by identification of the most contributing gene modulations. The number of significantly deregulated KEGG pathways, as identified by Goeman's global test, varied, depending on the locality, between 12 to 29. The Metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 exhibited the strongest upregulation in all 4 localities and CYP1B1 had a major contribution to the upregulation of this pathway. Other important deregulated pathways in all 4 localities were ABC transporters (involved in the translocation of exogenous and endogenous metabolites across membranes and DNA repair, the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways

  5. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  6. Experiments on the VERONA test facility on formation and decomposition of polyhalogenated dioxins and furans and other organic halogen compounds in the combustion process; Untersuchungen an der Technikumsanlage VERONA zur Bildung und zum Abbau von polyhalogenierten Dioxinen und Furanen und anderen Organohalogenverbindungen in Verbrennungsprozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, D.

    2002-09-01

    The study examines measures to reduce dioxin formation in thermal waste treatment. The VERONA pilot plant (VErbrennungsanlage mit feststehendem ROst und getrennter NAchbrennkammer - incineration plant with stationary grate and separate post-combustion chamber) was developed to carry out practical experiments. The experiments were conducted using wood and propane as basic combustible materials and with controlled dosage of various bromine-, chlorine- and copper-containing compounds. The behaviour of the following compounds was studied in the combustion chamber, after the post-combustion chamber and after the heat exchanger: PCPh, PBrPh, PCBz, PBrBz, PCDD/F and PBDD/F. Experiments involving the variation of various primary measures (moisture content of combustible material, air supply, temperature in the combustion chamber, quality of post-combustion, quantities and structures of halogen compounds) have shown that the quality of post-combustion plays a much greater role than the other measures. For this reason, a search was launched for indicators which can be measured readily and by means of which the quality of post-combustion in terms of organohalide decomposition can be evaluated, and which correlate closely with the dioxin concentrations after the heat exchanger. It became apparent that the congeners of the chlorophenols and of the chlorobenzenes, measured in various incineration stages, are not suited, nor is the CO content. (orig.)

  7. Special features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Ravich, Yu.I.; Dereza, A.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Specific features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride are investigasted. Lead telluride samples with chlorine additions (with tellurium excess) and, besides, with bromine- and iodine additions were studied in order to reveal general regularities in alloyind with all halogen donor impurities. Experimental dependences of the difference between the electron and hole concentrations (n-p) in PbTe as a function of an amount of introduced halogen impurities (Ni) are presented for samples with a maximum compensation at 295 K. General features of the n-p=f(Ni) dependence are presented for all halogens. The hypothesis on the kinetic mechanism of increasing the efficiency of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride is suggested

  8. Retention efficiencies of halogenated and non-halogenated hydrocarbons in selected wetland ecosystem in Lake Victoria Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadrack Mule

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of retention efficiencies of halogenated and non-halogenated hydrocarbon in selected wetland ecosystems in Lake Victoria basin was carried out. Qualitative and quantitative determination of the presence of residual hydrocarbons in Kigwal/Kimondi, Nyando and Nzoia wetland ecosystems using Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS instrument indicated the presence of residual organochlorines, organophosphorus, carbamates and synthetic pyrethroid hydrocarbons in water, sediment and plant materials. In order to compare the retention efficiencies of the wetlands, the wetland ecosystems were divided into three different sections, namely: inlet, mid and outlet. Calculations of mass balances of residual halogenated and non-halogenated hydrocarbons at the respective sections was done taking into account the partition of the studied compounds in samples of water, sediments and papyrus reed plant materials and analyzed using validated Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS method. From the analysis, several residual hydrocarbons namely: bendiocarb, benzene hexachloride (BHC, carbaryl, cypermethrin, decis, deltamethrin, diazinon, dieldrin, DDT, DDD, DDE, malathion, propoxur, sumithion, 5-phenylrhodanine, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene, 1-(2-phenoxybenzylhydrazine were detected and quantified. The levels of the selected residual hydrocarbons in water samples were used to calculate the retention efficiencies of a specific hydrocarbon and the values recorded. Generally, River Nyando wetland recorded mean percentage retention efficiencies of 76 and 94% for dry and rainy seasons respectively; Kigwal/Kimondi wetland had seasonal mean percentage retention efficiencies of 63 to 78%. River Nzoia also had calculated seasonal mean percentage retention efficiencies of between 56 to 88%. Dry season had lower mean percentages retention efficiencies as compared to rainy season in the three wetlands of interest during the period of study. The study

  9. Long-term Studies of Marine Halogen Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschritter, J.; Holla, R.; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2009-04-01

    Institute of Enviromental Physics, Heidelberg, Germany. Long term measurements of atmospheric trace gases using multi-axis DOAS instruments are pursued at the new SOLAS observatory on the island of Sao Vicente, (Cape Verde). This research is part of the SOPRAN (Surface Ocean Processes in the ANthropocene) project (Fördernummer:03F0462F). Reactive halogen species (RHS) such as bromine- and iodine- containing species play major roles in the chemistry of ozone in both the troposphere and lower stratosphere and thus possibly influence the ozone budget on a global scale. In addition iodine-species emitted from the ocean surface have been shown to be responsible for the production of new atmospheric particles in the marine boundary layer. This may have an effect on cloud formation and radiation transfer on local and global scales. Long term measurements of RHS abundances will help to identify their key regions and processes for formation. A new long term Multi-MAX-DOAS instrument has been installed at the SOLAS observatory on the island of Sao Vicente, (Cape Verde). The main focus of these unique measurements is the investigation of reactive halogen chemistry in the subtropical marine boundary layer based on measurements of BrO, IO, and possibly OIO. Because of its wide spectral range also the use for O4-retrievals to gain aerosol profiles is possible. IO has been detected with mixing ratios up to 1.3 ppt. For BrO an upper limit of 2 ppt could be determined.

  10. The effect of tree species on seasonal fluctuations in water-soluble and hot water-extractable organic matter at post-mining sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cepáková, Šárka; Tošner, Z.; Frouz, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 275, August (2016), s. 19-27 ISSN 0016-7061 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1288; GAJU(CZ) GAJU/04-146/2013/P Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : HWC * liquid-state 1H NMR * seasonality * soil organic carbon * water-extractable organic matter Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  11. Changes in the chemical characteristics of water-extracted organic matter from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cow dung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Meiyan, E-mail: xingmeiyan@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Li, Xiaowei; Yang, Jian; Huang, Zhidong; Lu, Yongsen [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-02-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vermicomposting causes an increase in the aromaticity of WEOM from the substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vermicomposting homogenizes the molecular weight of WEOM from the substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The WEOM from the vermicompost is characterized by high O-containing groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The WEOM from the vermicompost includes small aliphatic and protein-like groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The WEOM test is a good way to evaluate the biological maturity of vermicompost. - Abstract: The chemical changes of water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) from five different substrates of sewage sludge enriched with different proportions of cow dung after vermicomposting with Eisenia fetida were investigated using various analytical approaches. Results showed that dissolved organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, and C/N ratio of the substrates decreased significantly after vermicomposting process. The aromaticity of WEOM from the substrates enhanced considerably, and the amount of volatile fatty acids declined markedly, especially for the cow dung substrate. Gel filtration chromatography analysis showed that the molecular weight fraction between 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 6} Da became the main part of WEOM in the final product. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed that the proportion of H moieties in the area of 0.00-3.00 ppm decreased, while increasing at 3.00-4.25 ppm after vermicomposting. Fluorescence spectra indicated that vermicomposting caused the degradation of protein-like groups, and the formation of fulvic and humic acid-like compounds in the WEOM of the substrates. Overall results indicate clearly that vermicomposting promoted the degradation and transformation of liable WEOM into biological stable substances in sewage sludge and cow dung alone, as well as in mixtures of both materials, and testing the WEOM might be an effective way to evaluate the biological maturity and

  12. Changes in the chemical characteristics of water-extracted organic matter from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cow dung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Meiyan; Li, Xiaowei; Yang, Jian; Huang, Zhidong; Lu, Yongsen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vermicomposting causes an increase in the aromaticity of WEOM from the substrates. ► Vermicomposting homogenizes the molecular weight of WEOM from the substrates. ► The WEOM from the vermicompost is characterized by high O-containing groups. ► The WEOM from the vermicompost includes small aliphatic and protein-like groups. ► The WEOM test is a good way to evaluate the biological maturity of vermicompost. - Abstract: The chemical changes of water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) from five different substrates of sewage sludge enriched with different proportions of cow dung after vermicomposting with Eisenia fetida were investigated using various analytical approaches. Results showed that dissolved organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, and C/N ratio of the substrates decreased significantly after vermicomposting process. The aromaticity of WEOM from the substrates enhanced considerably, and the amount of volatile fatty acids declined markedly, especially for the cow dung substrate. Gel filtration chromatography analysis showed that the molecular weight fraction between 10 3 and 10 6 Da became the main part of WEOM in the final product. 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed that the proportion of H moieties in the area of 0.00–3.00 ppm decreased, while increasing at 3.00–4.25 ppm after vermicomposting. Fluorescence spectra indicated that vermicomposting caused the degradation of protein-like groups, and the formation of fulvic and humic acid-like compounds in the WEOM of the substrates. Overall results indicate clearly that vermicomposting promoted the degradation and transformation of liable WEOM into biological stable substances in sewage sludge and cow dung alone, as well as in mixtures of both materials, and testing the WEOM might be an effective way to evaluate the biological maturity and chemical stability of vermicompost.

  13. Direct analysis of volatile organic compounds in foods by headspace extraction atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hurtado, P; Palmer, E; Owen, T; Aldcroft, C; Allen, M H; Jones, J; Creaser, C S; Lindley, M R; Turner, M A; Reynolds, J C

    2017-11-30

    The rapid screening of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by direct analysis has potential applications in the areas of food and flavour science. Currently, the technique of choice for VOC analysis is gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, the long chromatographic run times and elaborate sample preparation associated with this technique have led a movement towards direct analysis techniques, such as selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and electronic noses. The work presented here describes the design and construction of a Venturi jet-pump-based modification for a compact mass spectrometer which enables the direct introduction of volatiles for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Volatile organic compounds were extracted from the headspace of heated vials into the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer using a Venturi pump. Samples were analysed directly with no prior sample preparation. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to differentiate between different classes of samples. The interface is shown to be able to routinely detect problem analytes such as fatty acids and biogenic amines without the requirement of a derivatisation step, and is shown to be able to discriminate between four different varieties of cheese with good intra and inter-day reproducibility using an unsupervised PCA model. Quantitative analysis is demonstrated using indole standards with limits of detection and quantification of 0.395 μg/mL and 1.316 μg/mL, respectively. The described methodology can routinely detect highly reactive analytes such as volatile fatty acids and diamines without the need for a derivatisation step or lengthy chromatographic separations. The capability of the system was demonstrated by discriminating between different varieties of cheese and monitoring the spoilage of meats. © 2017 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass

  14. Effects of fluoride and other halogen ions on the external stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whorlow, K.M.; Hutto, F.B. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    The drip procedure from the Standard Test Method for Evaluating the Influence of Thermal Insulation on External Stress Corrosion Cracking Tendency of Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASTM C 692-95a) was used to research the effect of halogens and inhibitors on the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) of Type 304 stainless steel as it applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.36, Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel. The solutions used in this research were prepared using pure chemical reagents to simulate the halogens and inhibitors found in insulation extraction solutions. The results indicated that sodium silicate compounds that were higher in sodium were more effective for preventing chloride-induced ESCC in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel. Potassium silicate (all-silicate inhibitor) was not as effective as sodium silicate. Limited testing with sodium hydroxide (all-sodium inhibitor) indicated that it may be effective as an inhibitor. Fluoride, bromide, and iodide caused minimal ESCC which could be effectively inhibited by sodium silicate. The addition of fluoride to the chloride/sodium silicate systems at the threshold of ESCC appeared to have no synergistic effect on ESCC. The mass ratio of sodium + silicate (mg/kg) to chloride (mg/kg) at the lower end of the NRC RG 1.36 Acceptability Curve was not sufficient to prevent ESCC using the methods of this research

  15. Improving Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Devices by Attaching Nanostructures with Self-Assembled Photonic Crystal Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Yu Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-monolayered hexagonal self-assembled photonic crystal (PC pattern fabricated onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET films by using simple nanosphere lithography (NSL method has been demonstrated in this research work. The patterned nanostructures acted as a scattering medium to extract the trapped photons from substrate mode of optical-electronic device for improving the overall external quantum efficiency of the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. With an optimum latex concentration, the distribution of self-assembled polystyrene (PS nanosphere patterns on PET films can be easily controlled by adjusting the rotation speed of spin-coater. After attaching the PS nanosphere array brightness enhancement film (BEF sheet as a photonic crystal pattern onto the device, the luminous intensity of OLEDs in the normal viewing direction is 161% higher than the one without any BEF attachment. The electroluminescent (EL spectrum of OLEDs with PS patterned BEF attachment also showed minor color offset and superior color stabilization characteristics, and thus it possessed the potential applications in all kinds of display technology and solid-state optical-electronic devices.

  16. Relationships between stability, maturity, water-extractable organic matter of municipal sewage sludge composts and soil functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Luigi; Cavani, Luciano; Grigatti, Marco; Ciavatta, Claudio; Marzadori, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Compost capability of restoring or enhancing soil quality depends on several parameters, such as soil characteristics, compost carbon, nitrogen and other nutrient content, heavy metal occurrence, stability and maturity. This study investigated the possibility of relating compost stability and maturity to water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) properties and amendment effect on soil quality. Three composts from municipal sewage sludge and rice husk (AN, from anaerobic wastewater treatment plants; AE, from aerobic ones; MIX, from both anaerobic and aerobic ones) have been analysed and compared to a traditional green waste compost (GM, from green manure, solid waste and urban sewage sludge). To this aim, WEOMs were characterized through chemical analysis; furthermore, compost stability was evaluated through oxygen uptake rate calculation and maturity was estimated through germination index determination, whereas compost impact on soil fertility was studied, in a lab-scale experiment, through indicators as inorganic nitrogen release, soil microbial biomass carbon, basal respiration rate and fluorescein di-acetate hydrolysis. The obtained results indicated that WEOM characterization could be useful to investigate compost stability (which is related to protein and phenol concentrations) and maturity (related to nitrate/ammonium ratio and degree of aromaticity) and then compost impact on soil functionality. Indeed, compost stability resulted inversely related to soil microbial biomass, basal respiration rate and fluorescein di-acetate hydrolysis when the products were applied to the soil.

  17. MICHIGAN SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION REMEDIATION (MISER) MODEL: A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO MODEL SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND BIOVENTING OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN UNSATURATED GEOLOGICAL MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and bioventing (BV) are proven strategies for remediation of unsaturated zone soils. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can be used to integrate and quantify the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in field sc...

  18. Utilizing thin-film solid-phase extraction to assess the effect of organic carbon amendments on the bioavailability of DDT and dieldrin to earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improved approaches are needed to rapidly and accurately assess the bioavailability of persistent, hydrophobic organic compounds in soils at contaminated sites. The performance of a thin-film solid-phase extraction (TF-SPE) assay using vials coated with ethylene vinyl acetate polymer was compared to...

  19. The use of solid sorbents for direct accumulation of organic compounds from water matrices : a review of solid-phase extraction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liska, I.; Krupcik, J.; Leclercq, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main principles of solid-phase extraction techniques are reviewed in this paper. Various solid sorbents can be used as a suitable trap for direct accumulation of organic compounds from aqueous solutions. The trapped analytes can be desorbed by elution with suitably chosen liquid phases. These

  20. Control of damping-off of organic and conventional cucumber with extracts from a plant-associated bacterium rivals a seed treatment pesticide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmentally friendly control measures are needed for soilborne diseases of crops grown in organic and conventional production systems. We tested ethanol extracts from cultures of Serratia marcescens N4-5 and N2-4, Burkholderia cepacia BC-1 and BC-2, and B. ambifaria BC-F for control of damping-o...

  1. Marine organisms as source of extracts to disrupt bacterial communication: bioguided isolation and identification of quorum sensing inhibitors from Ircinia felix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Quintana

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, 39 extracts from marine organisms were evaluated as quorum sensing inhibitors, collected in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and the Brazilian Coast including 26 sponges, seven soft corals, five algae and one zooanthid. The results showed that crude extracts from the soft coral Eunicea laciniata, and the sponges Svenzea tubulosa, Ircinia felix and Neopetrosia carbonaria were the most promising source of quorum sensing inhibitors compounds without affecting bacterial growth, unlike the raw extracts of Agelas citrina, Agelas tubulata, Iotrochota arenosa, Topsentia ophiraphidites, Niphates caycedoi, Cliona tenuis, Ptilocaulis walpersi, Petrosia pellasarca, and the algae Laurencia catarinensis and Laurencia obtusa, which displayed potent antibacterial activity against the biosensors employed. The crude extract from the sponge I. felix was fractionated, obtaining furanosesterterpenes which were identified and evaluated as quorum sensing inhibitors, showing a moderate activity without affecting the biosensor's growth.

  2. Polydimethylsiloxane rod extraction, a novel technique for the determination of organic micropollutants in water samples by thermal desorption-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, L; Popp, P; Paschke, A; Pawliszyn, J

    2004-01-30

    A novel, simple and inexpensive approach to absorptive extraction of organic compounds from environmental samples is presented. It consists of a polydimethylsiloxane rod used as an extraction media, enriched with analytes during shaking, then thermally desorbed and analyzed by GC-MS. Its performance was illustrated and evaluated for the enrichment of sub- to ng/l of selected chlorinated compounds (chlorobenzenes and polychlorinated biphenyls) in water samples. The new approach was compared to the stir bar sorptive extraction performance. A natural ground water sample from Bitterfeld, Germany, was also extracted using both methods, showing good agreement. The proposed approach presented good linearity, high sensitivity, good