WorldWideScience

Sample records for extract geophysical profile

  1. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091452 Cai Xuelin(School of Earth Science,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Cao Jiaming Lithospheric and Asthenospheric Structures of the Koktokay of Xinjiang to Jianyang of Sichuan Geoscience Transect(Geology in China,ISSN1000-3657,CN11-1167/P,35(3),2008,p.375-391,8 illus.,2 tables,64 refs.)Key words:lithosphere,asthenosphere,Xinjiang,SichuanBy using the theory and method of modern structural analysis,this paper analyzes the explosion seismic sounding profiling and natural seismic surface wave tomographic imaging in the Koktokay of Xinjiang to Jianyang of Sichuan geoscience transect and integrates the results of research on geology,geochemistry,structural petrology of deep-seated xenoliths and geophysical signs.The studies indicate that the geometric structure pattern of high-speed blocks or mantle block tectonics is one of the basic conditions for controlling the lithospheric tectonic pattern and tectonic deformation of the lithospheric surface.

  2. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20152233 An Zhenchang(Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics,Institute of Geology and Geophysics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029,China);Peng Fenglin Inspection and Study on the Geomagnetic Survey,Charts and Models during 1683~1949in China(Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074/P,57(11),2014,p.3795-3803,60refs.)

  3. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20080091 Cheng Luying(Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Wuhan 430077,China);Xu Houze Rotation of the Gravity Potential on the Earth’s Gravity Field Recovery(Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074/P,49(1),2006,p.93-98,3 illus.,24 refs.,with English abstract)

  4. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111476 Chen Bin(Institute of Geophysics,China Earthquake Administration,Beijing 100081,China);Gu Zuowen Study of Geomagnetic Secular Variation in China(Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074/P,53(9),2010,p.2144-2154,6 illus.,4 tables,38 refs.)Key words:secular variations of geomagnetic field,China

  5. Geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bolt, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 13: Geophysics is a 10-chapter text that focuses with the theoretical solid-earth geophysics. This volume specifically covers the general topics of terrestrial magnetism and electricity, the Earth's gravity field, tidal deformations, dynamics of global spin, spin processing, and convective models for the deep interior. This volume surveys first the construction of mathematical models, such as the representation of the geomagnetic field by assuming arrangements of multipole sources in the core and the fast computer evaluation of two- and three-dimensiona

  6. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150056 Gao Yanguang(School of Earth and Space Sciences,Peking University,Beijing 100087,China);Li Yonghua Crustal Thickness and Vp/Vsin the Northeast China-North China Region and Its Geological Implication(Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074/P,57(3),2014,p.847-857,7illus.,58 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:crust,Poisson’s ration,Northeast China,North China20150057 He Lijuan(State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution,Institute of Geology and Geophysics,Chinese Academy of Sci-

  7. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122208 Chen Shi ( Institute of Geophysics,China Earthquake Administration,Beijing 100081,China );Wang Qianshen Thermal Isostasy of North China and Its Gravity Isostasy and Deep Structure ( Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074 / P,54 ( 11 ), 2011,p.2864-2875,8illus.,1 table,37refs. ) Key words:gravity field,Bouguer anomaly,isostasy theory,North China In this paper,based on the up to date global free-air gravity anomaly dataset ( TopexV18.1 ),

  8. Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. H.; Cassen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Four areas of investigation, each dealing with the measurement of a particular geophysical property, are discussed. These properties are the gravity field, seismicity, magnetism, and heat flow. All are strongly affected by conditions, past or present, in the planetary interior; their measurement is the primary source of information about planetary interiors.

  9. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140634 Cao Lingmin(Key Laboratory of Marine Geology and Environment,Institute of Oceanology,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Qingdao 266071,China);Xu Yi Finite Difference Tomography of the Crustal Velocity Structure in Tengchong,Yunnan Province(Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074/P,56(4),2013,p.1159-1167,6illus.,35refs.,with English abstract)

  10. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102191 Du Letian(Beijing Uranium Geology Research Institute,Beijing 100029,China)Mantle Ichor(HACONS Fluids):The Interior Crucial Factor of Geodynamics(Acta Geoscientica Sinica,ISSN1006-3021,CN11-3474/P,30(6),2009,p.739-748,7 illus.,2 tables,36 refs.)Key words:mantle convection,ore-forming fluidsThis paper attempts to summarize the achievements in geodynamic studies as a whole.Five dynamic principles of the Earth are put forward in this paper:1)the introduction of Na and K to any kind of rocks is the key to magma genesis;2)Na-and K-metasomatism is the most fundamental mechanism in whole hydrothermalism;3)geotectonic movement results from mantle-crust asthenospherization,which is stimulated by Na-and K-metasomatism;4)the evolution of the Earth is represented;and 5)Na-and K-fluids(namely,mantle ichors-HACONS)are derived from deep hydrogen(H+,H,H2)flow extraction from the mantle.20102192 Gao Rui(Lithosphere Research Center,Institute of Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Beijing 100037,China)

  11. Time profile of the slowly extracted beam

    CERN Document Server

    Pullia, M

    1997-01-01

    An important spin-off from accelerators is the use of synchrotrons for cancer therapy. For this application a precise control of the slow extraction is needed to satisfy the medical specifications for the online measurement and control of the delivered dose. This has led to a renewed interest in the basic theory of third-order resonance extraction. In the present paper, an analytic study of the time profile of the extracted beam is made by first considering the time profile of an elementary strip of monoenergetic particles from the side of the shrinking stable triangle. This basic result is then used to predict the characteristics of the spills for the most common extraction configurations. The influence of ripples whose period is comparable to the transit time of a particle in the resonance is also analyzed. Simulations of the extraction process that confirm the analytic study are included.

  12. Geophysical imaging of subsurface structures in volcanic area by seismic attenuation profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru, Tetsuro; No, Tetsuo; Fujie, Gou

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical imaging by using attenuation property of multichannel seismic reflection data was tested to map spatial variation of physical properties of rocks in a volcanic area. The study area is located around Miyakejima volcanic island, where an intensive earthquake swarm was observed associated with 2000 Miyakejima eruption. Seismic reflection survey was conducted five months after the swarm initiation in order to clarify crustal structure around the hypocenters of the swarm activity. However, the resulting seismic reflection profiles were unable to provide significant information of deep structures around the hypocenters. The authors newly applied a seismic attribute method that focused seismic attenuation instead of reflectivity to the volcanic area, and designed this paper to assess the applicability of this method to subsurface structural studies in poorly reflective volcanic areas. Resulting seismic attenuation profiles successfully figured out attenuation structures around the Miyakejima volcanic island. Interestingly, a remarkable high-attenuation zone was detected between Miyakejima and Kozushima islands, being well correlated with the hypocenter distribution of the earthquake swarm in 2000. The high-attenuation zone is interpreted as a fractured area that was developed by magma activity responsible for the earthquake swarms that have been repeatedly occurring there. The present study can be one example showing the applicability of seismic attenuation profiling in a volcanic area. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: .

  13. Influence of extraction method on protein profile of soybeans

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlićević Milica Ž.; Stanojević Slađana P.; Vucelić-Radović Biljana V.

    2013-01-01

    Comparison between protein profiles of soybean obtained by commonly used methods of extraction (Tris buffer and Tris-urea buffer) with methods used for extraction of plant proteins for 2D PAGE analysis (direct solubilization in IEF buffer, acetone extraction, phenol extraction, extraction with urea solubilization buffer and thiourea-urea extraction) was investigated. 2D profiles of samples extracted directly in IEF buffer, in urea solubilization buffer and in acetone were characterized ...

  14. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  15. High-resolution geophysical profiling using a stepped-frequency ground penetrating radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noon, D.; Longstaff, D. [The University of Queensland, (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system which uses stepped-frequency waveforms to obtain high-resolution geophysical profiles. The main application for this system is the high-resolution mapping of thin coal seam structures, in order to assist surface mining operations in open-cut coal mines. The required depth of penetration is one meter which represents the maximum thickness of coal seams that are designated `thin`. A resolution of five centimeters is required to resolve the minimum thickness of coal (or shale partings) which can be economically recovered in an open-cut coal mine. For this application, a stepped-frequency GPR system has been developed, because of its ultrawide bandwidth (1 to 2 GHz) and high external loop sensitivity (155 dB). The field test results of the stepped-frequency GPR system on a concrete pavement and at two Australian open-cut coal mines are also presented. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards in an alpine catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Seijmonsbergen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Liechtenstein has faced an increasing number of natural hazards over recent decades: debris flows, slides, snow avalanches and floods repeatedly endanger the local infrastructure. Geomorphological field mapping and geo-electrical profiling was used to assess hazards near Malbun, a village potentially endangered by landslides, and especially debris flows. The area is located on the tectonic contacts of four different nappe slices. The bedrock consists of anhydrite and gypsum, dolomite, shale, marl, and limestone. The spatial distribution and occurrence of debris flows and slides is evaluated through a combination of geomorphological expert knowledge, and detailed visualization in a geographical information system. In a geo-database a symbol-based 1:3000 scale geomorphological map has been digitized and rectified into polygons. The polygons include information on the main geomorphological environment, the Quaternary material distribution and of geomorphological processes, which are stored in attribute tables. The spatial distribution of these attributes is then combined with geophysical information and displacement rates interpolated from benchmark measurements. On one of the landslides two geo-electrical profiles show that the distance to a potential failure plane varies between 10-20 m and that the topography of the failure plane is influenced by subterranean gypsum karst features. The displacement measurements show that this landslide actively disintegrates into minor slides and is not, therefore, a risk to the village of Malbun. The hazard zonation indicates that debris flows can pose a risk if no countermeasures are taken. Gypsum karst may locally accelerate the landslide activity. In contrast, the impact of debris flows is diminished because collapse dolines may act as sediment traps for the debris flow materials. This research illustrates how geomorphological expert knowledge can be integrated in a GIS for the evaluation of natural hazards

  17. Subsurface profiling using integrated geophysical methods for 2D site response analysis in Bangalore city, India: a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Deepu; Anbazhagan, P.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, site response analysis has become a mandatory step for the design of important structures. Subsurface investigation is an essential step, from where the input parameters for the site response study like density, shear wave velocity (Vs), thickness and damping characteristics, etc, are obtained. Most site response studies at shallow bedrock sites are one-dimensional (1D) and are usually carried out by using Vs from multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) or a standard penetration test (SPT) for N values with assumptions that soil layers are horizontal, uniform and homogeneous. These assumptions are not completely true in shallow bedrock regions as soil deposits are heterogeneous. The objective of this study is to generate the actual subsurface profiles in two-dimensions at shallow bedrock regions using integrated subsurface investigation testing. The study area selected for this work is Bangalore, India. Three survey lines were selected in Bangalore at two different locations; one at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Campus and the other at Whitefield. Geophysical surveys like ground penetrating radar (GPR) and 2D MASW were carried out at these survey lines. Geophysical test results are compared and validated with a conventional geotechnical SPT. At the IISc site, the soil profile is obtained from a trench excavated for a proposed pipeline used to compare the geophysical test results. Test results show that GPR is very useful to delineate subsurface layers, especially for shallow depths at both sites (IISc Campus and Whitefield). MASW survey results show variation of Vs values and layer thickness comparatively at deeper depths for both sites. They also show higher density soil strata with high Vs value obtained at the IISc Campus site, whereas at the Whitefield site weaker soil with low shear velocity is observed. Combining these two geophysical methods helped to generate representative 2D subsurface profiles. These subsurface profiles can be

  18. Developing a complex independent component analysis technique to extract non-stationary patterns from geophysical time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Geodetic/geophysical observations, such as the time series of global terrestrial water storage change or sea level and temperature change, represent samples of physical processes and therefore contain information about complex physical interactionswith many inherent time scales. Extracting relevant information from these samples, for example quantifying the seasonality of a physical process or its variability due to large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions, is not possible by rendering simple time series approaches. In the last decades, decomposition techniques have found increasing interest for extracting patterns from geophysical observations. Traditionally, principal component analysis (PCA) and more recently independent component analysis (ICA) are common techniques to extract statistical orthogonal (uncorrelated) and independent modes that represent the maximum variance of observations, respectively. PCA and ICA can be classified as stationary signal decomposition techniques since they are based on decomposing the auto-covariance matrix or diagonalizing higher (than two)-order statistical tensors from centered time series. However, the stationary assumption is obviously not justifiable for many geophysical and climate variables even after removing cyclic components e.g., the seasonal cycles. In this paper, we present a new decomposition method, the complex independent component analysis (CICA, Forootan, PhD-2014), which can be applied to extract to non-stationary (changing in space and time) patterns from geophysical time series. Here, CICA is derived as an extension of real-valued ICA (Forootan and Kusche, JoG-2012), where we (i) define a new complex data set using a Hilbert transformation. The complex time series contain the observed values in their real part, and the temporal rate of variability in their imaginary part. (ii) An ICA algorithm based on diagonalization of fourth-order cumulants is then applied to decompose the new complex data set in (i

  19. New Beam Profile Monitoring System At Extraction From U-70

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, A G; Gorlov, V N; Gres, V N; Sokolov, S V; Terekhov, V I

    2004-01-01

    In the course of upgrading Instrumentation of extracted beams at IHEP the new beam profile monitoring system has been developed and comissioned. It incorporates many improvements towards lower amount of monitor substance to be placed in the beam path, lower cable expenses, higher radiation and noisy resistance, wider dynamic range. New circuitry allows one to measure profiles separately for each extraction in one machine cycle. The system has a capability for multiple measures of beam profile during the slow extraction for exploring dynamic effects. The paper describes hardware and software of system.

  20. geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards in an alpine catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; de Graaff, L.W.S.

    2006-01-01

    Liechtenstein has faced an increasing number of natural hazards over recent decades: debris flows, slides, snow avalanches and floods repeatedly endanger the local infrastructure. Geomorphological field mapping and geo-electrical profiling was used to assess hazards near Malbun, a village potentiall

  1. geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards in an alpine catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; de Graaff, L.W.S.

    2006-01-01

    Liechtenstein has faced an increasing number of natural hazards over recent decades: debris flows, slides, snow avalanches and floods repeatedly endanger the local infrastructure. Geomorphological field mapping and geo-electrical profiling was used to assess hazards near Malbun, a village

  2. Morphological surface profile extraction with multiple range sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barshan, B; Baskent, D

    2001-01-01

    A novel method is described for surface profile extraction based on morphological processing of multiple range sensor data. The approach taken is extremely flexible and robust, in addition to being simple and straightforward. It can deal with arbitrary numbers and configurations of sensors as well a

  3. Preprocessing and exploratory analysis of chromatographic profiles of plant extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Cruz-Juarez, L.; Bont, de D.; Hall, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of herbal extracts to compare samples from different origin is important for robust production and quality control strategies. This characterization is now mainly performed by analysis of selected marker compounds. Metabolic fingerprinting of full metabolite profiles of plant ex

  4. Integrated geophysical-petrological modelling of the Trans-European Suture Zone along the TOR-profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Folker; Ebbing, Jörg; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    We apply the integrated geophysical-petrological software package LitMod3D to study the effect of changes in thickness and composition associated with the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist-Zone as part of the Transeuropean Suture Zone (TESZ). Results of the TOR-project (Teleseismic Tomography TORnquist) show a P wave velocity anomaly that indicates an abrupt step in the base lithosphere between southern Sweden and Northern Germany. From a depth of ~300 km beneath the proto-Proterozoic Baltic shield the base lithosphere increases to less than 100 km beneath the Phanerozoic terranes in the southwest. However, this significant change in lithospheric thickness is not expressed by significant changes in the gravity field or topography. Hence, some form of isostatic compensation must be achieved by changes in the composition or thermal structure of the crust or upper mantle. First sensitivity tests were performed to show that the most important parameters to explain seismic upper mantle velocities, gravity and topography. These are, in addition to lithospheric thickness, the densities and thermal conductivity in the crust and the amount of depletion of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). When applying a simple geometry with steps at the Moho and base lithosphere, the TOR results could be reproduced to a large degree when applying different compositions for the SCLM beneath the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic domains. To address the gravity field and topography as well, we present two alternative models for the TOR-profile. In the first model, the gravity field and topography is explained by dividing the Phanerozoic SCLM in a refertilized upper and more depleted lower part. This model leads to a deeper base lithosphere (130 km), but does not provide a very good fit to the P wave velocities. In the second alternative, the thermal conductivity of the Phanerozoic crust and for the sediments has been increased within reasonable parameters. This leads to a shallower LAB ~100 km and

  5. Extraction of Profile Information from Cloud Contaminated Radiances. Appendixes 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Zhou, D. K.; Huang, H.-L.; Li, Jun; Liu, X.; Larar, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Clouds act to reduce the signal level and may produce noise dependence on the complexity of the cloud properties and the manner in which they are treated in the profile retrieval process. There are essentially three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances: (1) cloud-clearing using spatially adjacent cloud contaminated radiance measurements, (2) retrieval based upon the assumption of opaque cloud conditions, and (3) retrieval or radiance assimilation using a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model which accounts for the absorption and scattering of the radiance observed. Cloud clearing extracts the radiance arising from the clear air portion of partly clouded fields of view permitting soundings to the surface or the assimilation of radiances as in the clear field of view case. However, the accuracy of the clear air radiance signal depends upon the cloud height and optical property uniformity across the two fields of view used in the cloud clearing process. The assumption of opaque clouds within the field of view permits relatively accurate profiles to be retrieved down to near cloud top levels, the accuracy near the cloud top level being dependent upon the actual microphysical properties of the cloud. The use of a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model enables accurate retrievals down to cloud top levels and below semi-transparent cloud layers (e.g., cirrus). It should also be possible to assimilate cloudy radiances directly into the model given a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model using geometric and microphysical cloud parameters retrieved from the radiance spectra as initial cloud variables in the radiance assimilation process. This presentation reviews the above three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances. NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer radiance spectra and Aqua satellite AIRS radiance spectra are used to illustrate how cloudy radiances can be used

  6. Chemical profile and antinociceptive efficacy of Rheedia longifolia leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José A A; Calheiros, Andrea; Nascimento, Diogo D; Bérenger, Ana Luiza R; Amendoeira, Fábio C; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Figueiredo, Maria Raquel; Alves, Luiz A; Frutuoso, Valber da Silva

    2011-09-01

    Different species of the family Clusiaceae, including Rheedia longifolia, are used in folk medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. This family is largely distributed in tropical and subtropical areas of Brazil, but their chemical and pharmacological properties have been the subject of a few studies. In previous studies, we found that the aqueous extract from R. longifolia leaves presented important anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. We investigated the chemical profile of R. longifolia and characterized the pharmacological effect of different chemically identified fractions in pharmacological models of neurogenic and inflammatory nociception. The pharmacological tests showed that oral treatment with aqueous crude extract and fractions of methanol extract of R. longifolia leaf induced a significant antinociceptive effect using von Frey filaments. In addition, the most polar fractions presented antinociceptive activity in a neurogenic model of nociception (capsaicin model). The chromatographic analysis indicated the presence of bisflavonoids in the fractions obtained from the methanol extract. These results suggest that bisflavonoids found in methanol-extracted fractions are involved in the inhibition of inflammatory and neurogenic nociception. It is important that the R. longifolia aqueous extract treatment inhibited ulcer formation induced by indomethacin, suggesting an anti-ulcerogenic activity closely associated with its analgesic effect.

  7. Lignin profiling in extracted xylans by size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Christian; Schild, Gabriele; Kliba, Gerhard; Potthast, Antje

    2016-10-20

    Utilization of the polymeric parts of lignocellulose is expected to gain increasing importance in future biorefinery scenarios. In that respect, a particular focus is placed on hemicelluloses from different wood species gained from an industrially feasible upgrading step in the production of dissolving pulps from paper pulps. During alkaline post-extractions for hemicellulose removal, residual lignins are extracted as well. They are either covalently linked to the extracted hardwood xylans or simply co-dissolved in the alkaline lye. In order to better describe the lignin in xylan containing lyes, a method for lignin profiling was set up by hyphenating size-exclusion chromatography of xylans with UV detection which facilitates visualization of the residual lignin distribution. Simultaneous lignin quantification was achieved with lignin standards prepared from Kraft cooking liquors. The setup presented may serve as advanced characterization for novel xylan products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of soft tissue profile changes in serial extraction and late premolar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J R; Little, R M; Joondeph, D R; Doppel, D M

    1999-04-01

    To assess soft tissue profile changes through time, a comparison was made of patients treated by serial extraction without subsequent orthodontic treatment (n=28), patients treated with serial extraction and orthodontic treatment (n=30), and patients treated orthodontically with late extraction (n=30). Cephalometric radiographs were traced and digitized; linear and angular measurements were made with a custom computer program that allowed digitization of specific soft tissue points. Maxillary, mandibular, and overall cephalometric superimpositions and linear measurements of change from the superimpositions were done by hand. Statistical analyses were made to determine if significant differences existed within each group at each time period and between groups at each time period, as well as between males and females at each time period. Data were also analyzed to determine if significant correlations existed between any hard tissue variable and any soft tissue variable, or between any soft tissue variable and any other soft tissue variable. It was found that in those patients treated with late premolar extraction, the most labial point of the mandibular incisor was more posterior from pretreatment to posttreatment than in the serial extraction group. While a great number of associations existed between variables, no significant differences were found between the soft tissue profiles of these three groups of patients. The gender differences that were found to exist were most likely due to normal maturational changes, not the treatment itself.

  9. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  10. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131193 Bing Pingping (Key Lab.of Geophysical Exploration of CNPC , China University of Petroleum , Beijing 102249 , China); Cao Siyuan Non-Linear AVO Inversion Based on Support Vector Machine (Chinese Journal of Geophysics , ISSN0001-5733 , CN11-2074/P , 55 (3), 2012 , p.1025-1032 , 4illus. , 26 tables , 2refs.)

  11. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    20160511An Yulin(School of Geophysics and Information Technology,China University of Geosciences,Beijing100083,China);Guo Lianghui High Precision Computation and Numerical Value Characteristics of Gravity Emendation Values Arising from Mass of the Earth

  12. Exploration Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  13. Agricultural Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  14. EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072109 An Yong(Key Lab of Geophysics Exploration under CNPC,China University of Petroleum,Beijing 102249,China);Wei Lichun Most Homogeneous Dip-Scanning Method Using Edge Preserving Smoothing for Seismic Noise Attenuation(Applied Geophysics,ISSN1672-7975,CN11-5212/O,3(4),2006,p.210-217,17 illus.,3 refs.)Key words:seismic exploration,denoising

  15. Does Psychological Profile Influence Third Molar Extraction and Postoperative Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Jovani-Sancho, María Del Mar; Cortell-Ballester, Isidoro

    2017-03-01

    Our purposes were to determine the influence of psychological profile on hemodynamic changes in patients who undergo surgical removal of the third molars under intravenous sedation and to evaluate the effect on patients' anxiety and postoperative recovery. We performed a prospective study of 100 patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II; aged ≥18 years) seen in the CIMIVClinic (Department of Oral Surgery, Casa de Salud University Hospital, Valencia, Spain) who underwent extractions of all third molars under intravenous sedation. All patients were administered the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-R). The following parameters were monitored at different times during the surgical interventions: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and heart rate. Position and depth of impaction of the tooth (Pell and Gregory classification and Winter classification), surgery duration, and surgical technique also were recorded. Finally, the degree of pain experienced the week after the surgical intervention was measured using a visual analog scale. Patients' anxiety levels preoperatively were significantly higher in patients with psychological distress (P = .023). Postoperative pain significantly decreased from the first day to the seventh day in healthy patients but not in patients with altered psychological conditions (P < .05). Nevertheless, the hemodynamic changes were not correlated with the psychological impairment. Intravenous sedation enables the control of hemodynamic changes in all patients independently of their psychological profile. Patients with psychological distress present with higher levels of dental anxiety and postoperative pain. Future studies are needed to further clarify this interaction. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Polyphenol profile and antioxidant activity of extracts from olive leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetla Yancheva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The compounds, derivatives of olive leaves have a high antioxidant activity. The content of the total phenolic compounds (TPC, antioxidant activity (AOA and HPLC polyphenol profile of methanol extracts from the leaves of the olive cultivars Chondrolia Halkidiki, Kalamon, Koroneiki grown in the nursery (in vivo and in vitro plants of Chondrolia Halkidiki were compared. The results obtained for TPC varied between 9.2±0.5 mgGAE*gDW-1 and 16.4±0.5 mgGAE*gDW-1 . Antioxidant capacity was determined by four methods DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and CUPRAC. The highest results for TPC and AOA were achieved for the leaves of Chondrolia Halkidiki grown in vitro. A high correlation between the results gained from the TPC and AOA was established. Conducted HPLC analysis revealed the presence of 3,4- dihydroxybenzoic, caffeic, sinapic and ferulic acids and quercetin, hesperidin and luteolin and the quercetin glycosides rutin and hyperoside.

  17. Terverticillate Penicillia studied by direct electrospray mass spectrometric profiling of crude extracts: I. Chemosystematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsgaard, Jørn; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1997-01-01

    A chemosystematic study of 339 isolates from all known terverticillate Penicillium taxa was performed using electrospray mass spectrometric analysis of extractable metabolites. The mass profiles were made by injecting crude plug extracts made from cultures grown on Czapek Yeast Autolysate agar (C...... to known secondary metabolites were, however, found in all mass profiles. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  18. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    20161263Ao Ruide(State Key Laboratory of Marine Geology,Tongji University,Shanghai200092,China);Dong Liangguo Source-Independent Envelope-Based FWI to Build an Initial Model(Chinese Journal of Geophysics,ISSN0001-5733,CN11-2074/P,58(6),2015,p.1998-2010,15illus.,18refs.,

  19. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20151907 Bai Yang(Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research,Institute of Geology a nd Geophysics,Chinese Academy of Sci-ences,Beijing100029,China);Song Haibin Structural Characteristics and Genesis of Pockmarks in the Northwest of the South China Sea Derived from Reflective Seismic and Multibeam

  20. From Geophysical Data to Geophysical Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Peng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Geophysics is based on massive data work including data observation, data gathering/collecting, data management, and data analysis. Over the years, in China and other countries, geophysicists and geophysical institutions have accumulated a huge amount of geophysical data, built up many geophysical data banks and data centers, constructed/established many monitoring and transferring systems and infrastructures of geophysical data, and developed many advanced data analysis methods about data on land, ocean, and space. Based on this work, a new discipline of geophysics, geophysical informatics, has been gradually developing over the past 20 years. The recent advances of geophysical informatics in China are introduced and reviewed in this paper.

  1. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solvent extraction of papaya seed oil: yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2013-10-10

    The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE) and solvent extraction (SE)). In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively). Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%-74.7%), palmitic (16:0, 14.9%-17.9%), stearic (18:0, 4.50%-5.25%), and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%-4.6%). Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO), palmitoyl diolein (POO) and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL). In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE) and conditions.

  2. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction (UAE and Solvent Extraction of Papaya Seed Oil: Yield, Fatty Acid Composition and Triacylglycerol Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanah Mohd Ghazali

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE and solvent extraction (SE. In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively. Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%–74.7%, palmitic (16:0, 14.9%–17.9%, stearic (18:0, 4.50%–5.25%, and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%–4.6%. Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO, palmitoyl diolein (POO and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL. In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE significantly (p < 0.05 influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE and conditions.

  3. Extracting mineral system event histories from geophysical and geochemical data in geologically complex terrain - an example from the southeastern Fennoscandian Shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorjonen-Ward, Peter; Kontinen, Asko; Lerssi, Jouni; Mertanen, Satu; Molnar, Ferenc; O'Brien, Hugh; Pohjolainen, Esa; Halla, Jaana; Korhonen, Fawna; Mattila, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The mineral systems concept is intended to extend and inform exploration capability, through understanding processes of metal extraction, transport and precipitation within a well-defined architectural framework, as opposed to simple - or even sophisticated - targeting of geophysical or geochemical anomalies. Given that geophysical and geochemical data represent a summation of all events and processes that have affected a body of rock, the use of advanced inversion techniques could be impeded unless we can extract an accurate event history and derive a comprehensive understanding of the history of hydrothermal events and their structural framework, even in a qualitative sense. In ideal cases, we may be able to place age constraints using isotopes or paleomagnetism, if hydrothermal mineral reactions enhance (or disperse) geochemical and geophysical signals. Given a the tendency for deformation in the brittle regime to occur preferentially by reactivation of existing zones of weakness, we might also expect a progressive linear enhancement or dilution of anomalies, where fluid-flow is focused within permeable fault zones. We illustrate these issues through an analysis of event histories and their relationship to diverse mineralization styles and episodes in the southeastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield, where the oldest mineral systems are represented by orogenic gold deposits in Neoarchean greenstone belts and the youngest events are recorded locally by Paleozoic crystallization of uraninite in repeatedly reactivated fault zones. The Neoarchean Karelian craton was subjected to thermal reworking as the foreland terrain to the 1.9-1.8 Ga Svecofennian Orogeny, as demonstrated by resetting of K-Ar, Ar-Ar, Rb-Sr and locally Pb-Pb isotopic systems in feldspars and pyrite, both within gold deposits, and regionally. However, retention of Archean strain patterns and observations of the strain state of Proterozoifc dyke swarms indicate an essentially brittle response, with

  4. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132654Bi Xiaojia(Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Miao Fang Lithology Identification and Mapping by Hyperion Hyperspectral Remote Sensing(Computing Techniques for Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1001-1749,CN51-1242/P,34(5),2012,p.599-603,2illus.,14refs.)Key words:geologic mapping,hyperspectral remote sensing,Qinghai Province

  5. EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072798 Chen Fengyun(China University of Mining and Technology,Xuzhou 221008,China);Hang Yuan Algorithm and Application of the Coherency/Variance Cube Technique(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,CN11-1906/P,30(3),2006,p.250-253,257,7 illus.,7 refs.)Key words:seismic exploration The coherency/variance cube technique has been developed in recent years as a new technique of seismic data interpretation.

  6. Processing of laser radar data for the extraction of an along-the-levee-crown elevation profile for levee remediation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael J.; McGill, Thomas E.; Taylor, Stacy R.

    2004-09-01

    Using LiDAR data collected on the levees along the Rio Grande River in New Mexico and Texas, an algorithm has been developed to automatically extract longitudinal elevation profiles. This algorithm consists of a series of filters, interpretation of geophysical properties, and digitized levee centerlines. The series of filters, in order of operation, include an alignment buffer filter, bare-earth filter, sampling filter and a maximum value filter. The result of the filter configuration is a 3-D polyline that models the levee crest. This algorithm allows for efficient identification of portions of levee that are lower than original design specifications. A comparison between the LiDAR levee crown extraction filter and a least-cost-path technique are offered.

  7. Extraction of alkaloids for NMR-based profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Nyberg, Nils; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W.

    2012-01-01

    A museum collection of Cinchona cortex samples (n = 117), from the period 1850–1950, were extracted with a mixture of chloroform-d1, methanol-d4, water-d2, and perchloric acid in the ratios 5:5:1:1. The extracts were directly analyzed using 1H NMR spectroscopy (600 MHz) and the spectra evaluated ...

  8. Application of Amplitude Ratio Profiles Extracted withPrestack Kirchhoff Integral Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhiqin; Wang Shangxu; Zhang Shaohong; Wang Yun; Wang Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    The Z component and X component profiles of seismic waves extracted with the prestack Kirchhoff integral migration could approximate to the primary wave (P wave) and converted shear wave (PS wave) profiles under certain conditions. The relative change of their reflection amplitude reflects the formation stress anomaly and subsurface media anisotropy. The principle and method for extracting amplitude ratios were studied and the application of amplitude ratio profiles was also examined when processing and interpreting actual seismic data. The amplitude ratio profile is an effective supplementary means of identifying the stratigraphic boundary and lithology.

  9. From Geophysical Data to Geophysical Informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Fenglin; Peng, Le; Zhang, Jian; Xue, Guoqiang; Ma, Maining; Zhang, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Geophysics is based on massive data work including data observation, data gathering/collecting, data management, and data analysis. Over the years, in China and other countries, geophysicists and geophysical institutions have accumulated a huge amount of geophysical data, built up many geophysical data banks and data centers, constructed/established many monitoring and transferring systems and infrastructures of geophysical data, and developed many advanced data analysis methods about data on...

  10. Analgesic profile of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from Marrubium vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M M; de Jesus, R A; Cechinel-Filho, V; Schlemper, V

    1998-04-01

    Marrubium vulgare L. is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to cure a variety of diseases. Recently we have demonstrated that a hydroalcoholic extract of this plant showed significant, nonspecific antispasmodic effects on isolated smooth muscle. In this report, we have investigated the possible analgesic effects of the same hydroalcoholic extract in different models of pain in mice. The results suggest that this extract exhibits significant analgesic activity, antagonizing chemically-induced acute pain. Such effects may be related to the presence of steroids and terpenes, which were detected by TLC analysis.

  11. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110471 Cai Shaokun(Mechatronics and Automation College,National University of Defense Technology,Changsha 410073,China);Wu Meiping A Comparison of Digital Lowpass FIR-Filters in Airborne Gravimetry(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,CN11-1906/P,34(1),2010,p.74-78,8 illus.,3 tables,14 refs.)Key words:aerogravity surveys,filtersThere is a lot of noise in the data observed by airborne gravimeter.Digital lowpass FIR-filter i

  12. Terverticillate penicillia studied by direct electrospray mass spectrometric profiling of crude extracts II. Database and identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsgaard, Jørn

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectral database was built using standard instrument software from 678 electrospray mass spectra (mass profiles) from crude fungal extracts of terverticillate taxa within the genus Penicillium. The match factors calculated from searching all the mass profiles stored in the database were u...... of the isolates stored according to classical taxonomic criteria. Mass profiles collected in previous studies could be identified by a search in the database. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  13. Petroleum geophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    The book is compiled from a series of e-learning modules. GeoCLASS is an e-learning system with contents from petroleum geophysics. It is the result of collaboration between professors at the University of Bergen and the University of Oslo, and its material has been used as curriculum in master program courses at these universities for several years. Using a unique feature to GeoCLASS, these advanced scientific topics are presented on multiple levels. The introductions open the door to this vast pool of knowledge, accessible even for high school students. Enter the door, and you enter the modules. Various levels of content are presented, and the more advanced levels can be shielded from the regular user, and only accessed by those with particular interest. The chapters in the book are: Elastic waves; Survey planning; Seismic acquisition; Basic seismic signal theory and processing; Seismic imaging; Seismic attributes; Rock physics; Reservoir monitoring. (AG)

  14. Pharmacological profile of extracts of Pelargonium sidoides and their constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Herbert; Kayser, Oliver; Radtke, Oliver A; Kiderlen, Albrecht F; Koch, Egon

    2003-01-01

    In areas of southern Africa, aqueous extracts from the roots of Pelargonium sidoides are employed to cure various disorders. Nowadays, a modern formulation (EPs 7630), elaborated from the traditional herbal medicine, is successfully used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. We previously observed that root extracts of P. sidoides and their representative constituents exhibit moderate antibacterial and significant immunomodulatory capabilities. The present study was performed to further assess the efficacy and mode of action for these pharmacological activities. The results indicate that P. sidoides extracts may well possess antimycobacterial activity as claimed in traditional uses. Furthermore, significant antibacterial properties against multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains as well as TNF-inducing potencies and prominent interferon-like activities in supernatants of sample-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages were observed using several functional assays. In addition, EPs 7630 stimulated the synthesis of IFN-beta in MG 63 cells as demonstrated by a specific enzyme immunoassay. For gallic acid, a characteristic constituent, evidence for the expression of iNOS and TNF-alpha transcripts in stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and, hence, activation at the transcriptional level was revealed by RT-PCR. The present results, when taken together with the recently reported pharmacological activities, provide for a rationale basis of the utilization of EPs 7630 in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  15. Agricultural Geophysics: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods are becoming an increasingly valuable tool for agricultural applications. Agricultural geophysics investigations are commonly (although certainly not always) focused on delineating small- and/or large-scale objects/features within the soil profile (~ 0 to 2 m depth) over very lar...

  16. Extraction, fatty acid profile and antioxidant activity of sesame extract (Sesamum Indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Carvalho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article carried out the extraction of sesame oil by using three extraction techniques: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE, Soxhlet and sequential extraction. The SFE was performed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 as solvent and ethanol as cosolvent. Tests were performed at 20 MPa, 35ºC and a flow rate of 2.5 g CO2/min with a total extraction time of 210 minutes. The Soxhlet extraction was performed for 8 hours, using petroleum ether and ethanol as solvents, until the exhaustion of the oil contained in the seeds. The sequential extraction used ethyl ether, ethanol and water as solvents. The Soxhlet extraction was the most effective (58.93%, while the SFE technique obtained 26.47% as the best result. The antioxidant activity (AA was determined by the β-carotene/linoleic acid system, with good oxidation inhibition percentages (29.32-83.49% for all the extracts. The main fatty acids (FA in sesame oil were oleic and linoleic acids.

  17. Determination of storage conditions for shrimp extracts: analysis of specific IgE-allergen profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piboonpocanun, Surapon; Boonchoo, Siribangon; Pariyaprasert, Wipada; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2010-03-01

    The consumption of shrimp is a common cause of food hypersensitivity reactions. Shrimp allergy is diagnosed using a skin prick test (SPT) as well as by food challenges. Due to the lack of a wide variety of commercial shrimp extracts for SPTs, we selected various shrimp species for the preparation of local shrimp extracts. However, optimal storage conditions for the shrimp extracts which also maintains allergenic potency has not yet been identified. The objective of the present study was to determine the potency of the shrimp extracts under different storage conditions and durations. Specific IgE-allergen profiles of eight shrimp-allergic patients were investigated by using sera incubated with extracts prepared from lyophilized raw or boiled shrimp, which were stored at 4 degress C or -20 degress C for up to 4 weeks. When stored at -20 degress C, most allergens were preserved after 4 weeks. However, storage at 4 degress C results in few allergens remaining after 2 weeks. Boiled-shrimp extracts stored at 4 degree C and -20 degress C contained higher amounts of IgE-allergen complexes than raw-shrimp extracts. Moreover, in both raw and boiled shrimp extracts, the IgE bound 36-40 kDa allergens constituted the major proteins since they were observed in all IgE-allergen profiles. In conclusion, we recommend that shrimp extracts are stored at -20 degress C for 4 weeks to prevent the loss of allergens.

  18. Preliminary phytochemical investigation and thin layer chromatography profiling of sequential extracts of Moringa oleifera pods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Moringa oleifera Lam (Moringaceae is a highly valued plant, distributed in many countries of the tropics and subtropics. It has an impressive range of medicinal uses with high nutritional value. Aim: The present study, primarily aims to carry out a preliminary phytochemical screening so as to detect the major class of compounds present in M. oleifera and to perform thin layer chromatography (TLC profiling of all sequential extracts. Materials and Methods: Phytochemical analysis was performed by various qualitative methods and TLC profiling was carried out using various solvent system of varying polarity. Results and Conclusions: Qualitative phytochemical analysis reflects the presence of phenolics, triterpenoids, cardiac glycosides, steroid, alkaloids and saponin in the plant extract. TLC profiling of the M. oleifera pods was carried out using sequential extracts of petroleum ether, benzene, petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, ethanol and water respectively. The results obtained in the present investigation indicated M. oleifera pods as a rich source of natural antioxidants.

  19. Tabletop Models for Electrical and Electromagnetic Geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charles T.

    2002-01-01

    Details the use of tabletop models that demonstrate concepts in direct current electrical resistivity, self-potential, and electromagnetic geophysical models. Explains how data profiles of the models are obtained. (DDR)

  20. EVALUATION OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL STANDARDS OF CYPERUS ROTUNDUS RHIZOME WITH PHYTOCHEMICAL AND HPTLC PROFILING OF ITS EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Hema

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyperus rotundus (Musta, is a medicinal plant growing in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate regions having many pharmacological and medicinal characteristics. The current study attempts to standardize the extracts of raw drug Musta as per pharmacopoeial requirement. Roots and rhizomes of Musta sold in the markets of Mangalore were collected. Test sample was analysed for ash and extractive values. Tests for phytochemicals like alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, phenols, carbohydrates, saponins, tannins and coumarins were performed in both ethanolic and aqueous extracts. Total phenolic content of the extracts were done as per standard protocol. Fingerprint profile of ethanolic and aqueous extract has been derived by photodocumentation and HPTLC densitometric scan. Ash values, extractive values, phytochemical tests, total phenol content and the HPTLC fingerprint of the Musta has been derived from the current study. The set of values obtained from the studies can be used as standards for testing, standardization and quality control of medicinal materials sold as Musta.

  1. Anti-Oxiflammatory Profile of Date Extracts (Phoenix sylvestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rintu Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fruit of date palm (Phoenix sylvestrisL. is edible and used as an anti-geriatric, anti-oxidant ethnomedicine. In this study, three different types ofdateextracts, methanolic, acidic ethanolic and basic ethanolicwere evaluated for their putative in vitro scavenging effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS, where scavenging of hydroxyl radicals (basic ethanolic>acidic ethanolic>methanolic, superoxide radicals (acidic ethanolic>basic ethanolic>methanolic, DPPH radicals (acidic ethanolic>methanolic>basic ethanolic, nitric oxide (NO (methanolic>acidic ethanolic>basic ethanolic and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (basic ethanolic>acidic ethanolic> methanolic were found to occur in a dose dependent manner. Their flavonoid and phenolic contents proved to be the source of this potent free radical scavenging activity and indicated a direct correlation with their total anti-oxidant capacity. On human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK and murine RAW macrophages, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced inflammation, the date extracts applied therapeutically, inhibit intracellular oxidative stress significantly. This reinstatement of cellular homeostasis presumably occurs via mitochondrial pathways. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(6.000: 297-317

  2. Polar Lipid Profile of Nannochloropsis oculata Determined Using a Variety of Lipid Extraction Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servaes, K; Maesen, M; Prandi, B; Sforza, S; Elst, K

    2015-04-22

    Lipid compositions obtained from microalgae species are affected by both the cultivation conditions and the extraction method used. In this study, the extraction of lipids from Nannochloropsis oculata using traditional and modern extraction technologies with several solvents has been compared. Because important polyunsaturated fatty acids are bound to polar lipids, these polar lipids were the main focus of this study. The dominant compounds in the glycolipid fractions were monogalactosyldiglycerides and digalactosyldiglycerides bearing fatty acid chains containing at least one site of unsaturation. Phosphatidylcholine and trimethylhomoserines were detected in the phospholipid fractions. The fatty acid profile comprised large fractions of C16:0, C16:1, C20:5, and C18:3. Extraction of specific compounds was determined by extraction efficiency as well as differences in the selectivity of the method used. The composition derived from a glycolipid fraction was observed to be affected by the method used to a greater extent than the phospholipid fraction.

  3. Aircraft micro-doppler feature extraction from high range resolution profiles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Berndt, RJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available and aircraft propellers from high range resolution profiles. The two features extracted are rotation rate harmonic (related to the rotation rate and number of blades of the scattering propeller/rotor) and the relative down range location of modulating propeller...

  4. Evaluating DNA Extraction Methods for Community Profiling of Pig Hindgut Microbial Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Hugenholtz, Philip; Batstone, Damien John

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of high quality PCR-amplifiable DNA has been the general minimal requirement for DNA extraction methods for bulk molecular analysis. However, modern high through-put community profiling technologies are more sensitive to representativeness and reproducibility of DNA extraction method. Here, we assess the impact of three DNA extraction methods (with different levels of extraction harshness) for assessing hindgut microbiomes from pigs fed with different diets (with different physical properties). DNA extraction from each sample was performed in three technical replicates for each extraction method and sequenced by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Host was the primary driver of molecular sequencing outcomes, particularly on samples analysed by wheat based diets, but higher variability, with one failed extraction occurred on samples from a barley fed pig. Based on these results, an effective method will enable reproducible and quality outcomes on a range of samples, whereas an ineffective method will fail to generate extract, but host (rather than extraction method) remains the primary factor.

  5. HPLC-TOF/MS profile and nitric oxide scavenging activity of Orthosiphon stamineus leaf extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel Akyirem Akowuah; Zhari Ismail; Maraiam Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to develop liquid chromatography (LC)/Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF/MS) profile for methanol and water extracts of Orthosiphon stamineus leaf using SEN and RA as flavonoid and non-flavonoid polyphenolic markers in the extracts. The study also evaluates in vitro nitric oxide radical scavenging effect of the extracts. Method:Orthogonal Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer equipped with HPLC separation module was used in the analyses of the extract. The in vitro nitric oxide scavenging activity of the extracts was measured according to the method described by Rao. Results: The qualitative analysis of the extracts performed with HPLC-TOF/MS confirmed the presence sinensitin (SEN) and rosmarinic acid (RA) in the extracts. The extracts showed in vitro nitric oxide scavenging activities. Conclusions: The HPLC-TOF/MS method could be employed for quality determination of herbal medicinal products and formulations containing O. stamineus. The extracts may play a significant role in prevention of degenerate disease due to its ability to scavenge nitric oxide radical.

  6. Senna singueana: Antioxidant, Hepatoprotective, Antiapoptotic Properties and Phytochemical Profiling of a Methanol Bark Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Sobeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are considered as an important source for the discovery of new drugs to treat aging-related degenerative diseases and liver injury. The present study profiled the chemical constituents of a methanol extract from Senna singueana bark using HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS and 36 secondary metabolites were identified. Proanthocyanidins dominated the extract. Monomers, dimers, trimers of (epicatechin, (epigallocatechin, (epiguibourtinidol, (entcassiaflavan, and (epiafzelechin represented the major constituents. The extract demonstrated notable antioxidant activities in vitro: In DPPH (EC50 of 20.8 µg/mL, FRAP (18.16 mM FeSO4/mg extract assays, and total phenolic content amounted 474 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g extract determined with the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Also, in an in vivo model, the extract increased the survival rate of Caenorhabditis elegans worms pretreated with the pro-oxidant juglone from 43 to 64%, decreased intracellular ROS inside the wild-type nematodes by 47.90%, and induced nuclear translocation of the transcription factor DAF-16 in the transgenic strain TJ356. Additionally, the extract showed a remarkable hepatoprotective activity against d-galactosamine (d-GalN induced hepatic injury in rats. It significantly reduced elevated AST (aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin. Moreover, the extract induced a strong cytoplasmic Bcl-2 expression indicating suppression of apoptosis. In conclusion, the bark extract of S. sengueana represents an interesting candidate for further research in antioxidants and liver protection.

  7. Component content distribution profile control in rare earth countercurrent extraction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yang; Fangping Xu; Rongxiu Lu; Yongquan Ding

    2015-01-01

    Considering that the on-line measurement and automatic control of element component content (ECC) are dif-ficult to perform in rare earth cascade extraction process, the ECC distribution profile is dynamical y regulated at al stages to assess the effect of product purity control. Focusing on the theory of countercurrent extraction, the technology parameters and pre-setting flow-rates during the extract process are designed. Under varying process parameters, a novel step by step model is also proposed for each stage to analyze the impact on the distribution profile change. Combining the mass balance model and ECC changing trend at the monitoring stage, the ECC dis-tribution profile can be automatical y regulated by dynamical y compensating the related extract or scrubbing liquid flow-rate. To this end, the required product purity at the two outlets is achieved. Based on Wincc and Matlab dynamic simulators, a specific Pr/Nd cascade extraction process is used to illustrate and demonstrate the application of the present approach.

  8. Chemical profiling of Centella asiatica under different extraction solvents and its antibacterial activity, antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supawan Rattanakom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Centella asiatica (L urban, synonym Hydrocotyle asiatica, is found almost all over the world. This plant is famous in Ayurvedic medicine and used in the management of central nervous system, skin and gastrointestinal disorder. Thus this research had been done to evaluate the effect of solvent extraction (Ethanol, Chloroform and Hexane of C. asiatica on chemical profile, antioxidant activity and antibacterial activity against some foodborne pathogens. The result showed that all solvents (ethanol, chloroform and hexane used in extraction showed antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica Typhimurium U302, S. enterica Enteritidis, S. enterica 4,5,12:I human (US clone, Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis at 50mg/ml concentration. In antioxidant part, ethanolic extract gave highest phenolic content and FRAP value. The results also showed that different extraction solvent gave different chemical profile. Hexane extract C. asiatica showed lowest in both antibacterial and antioxidant activity. Ethanolic and chloroform extract of C. asiatica showed promising potential in both antibacterial and antioxidant activity.

  9. Optimized DNA extraction from neonatal dried blood spots: application in methylome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghantous, Akram; Saffery, Richard; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Hirschfeld, Steven; Kasten, Carol; Dwyer, Terence; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector

    2014-07-01

    Neonatal dried blood spots (DBS) represent an inexpensive method for long-term biobanking worldwide and are considered gold mines for research for several human diseases, including those of metabolic, infectious, genetic and epigenetic origin. However, the utility of DBS is restricted by the limited amount and quality of extractable biomolecules (including DNA), especially for genome wide profiling. Degradation of DNA in DBS often occurs during storage and extraction. Moreover, amplifying small quantities of DNA often leads to a bias in subsequent data, particularly in methylome profiles. Thus it is important to develop methodologies that maximize both the yield and quality of DNA from DBS for downstream analyses. Using combinations of in-house-derived and modified commercial extraction kits, we developed a robust and efficient protocol, compatible with methylome studies, many of which require stringent bisulfite conversion steps. Several parameters were tested in a step-wise manner, including blood extraction, cell lysis, protein digestion, and DNA precipitation, purification and elution. DNA quality was assessed based on spectrophotometric measurements, DNA detectability by PCR, and DNA integrity by gel electrophoresis and bioanalyzer analyses. Genome scale Infinium HumanMethylation450 and locus-specific pyrosequencing data generated using the refined DBS extraction protocol were of high quality, reproducible and consistent. This study may prove useful to meet the increased demand for research on prenatal, particularly epigenetic, origins of human diseases and for newborn screening programs, all of which are often based on DNA extracted from DBS.

  10. Comparison of the Profile and Composition of Volatiles in Coniferous Needles According to Extraction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonjin; Lee, Sang Mi; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Lee, Hong Jin; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Jo, Gyeong Suk; Kim, Young-Suk

    2016-03-17

    The enantiomeric distribution and profile of volatiles in plants, which affect the biological and organoleptic properties, can be varied depending on extraction methods as well as their cultivars. The secondary volatile components of the needles of three conifer cultivars (Chamaecyparispisifera, Chamaecyparisobtusa, and Thujaorientalis) were compared. Furthermore, the effects of three different extraction methods--solid-phase microextraction (SPME), steam distillation (SD), and solvent extraction (SE)--on the composition and enantiomeric distribution of those volatiles were elucidated. Monoterpene hydrocarbons predominated in all samples, and the compositions of sesquiterpenes and diterpenes differed according to the cultivar. In particular, the yields of oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were greatest for SD, whereas those of sesquiterpenes and diterpenes were highest for SE. On the other hand, more monoterpenes with higher volatility could be obtained with SPME and SD than when using SE. In addition, the enantiomeric composition of nine chiral compounds found in three cultivars differed according to their chemotype. There were also some differences in the yielded oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, but not monoterpene hydrocarbons, according to the extraction method. These results demonstrate that the extraction methods used as well as the cultivars influence the measured volatile profiles and enantiomeric distribution of coniferous needle extracts.

  11. Proteomic profiling of birch (Betula verrucosa) pollen extracts from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Anja; Hawranek, Thomas; Krückemeier, Leif; Asam, Claudia; Egger, Matthias; Ferreira, Fátima; Briza, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Pollen of the European white birch is a major source of spring pollinosis in Europe. Pollen-allergy diagnosis and treatment by specific immunotherapy commonly rely on extracts of natural origin. To gain insight into the protein content and its variability, we evaluated the profile of allergenic and non-allergenic proteins in extracts of pollen from different origins by MS-based proteomics. Aqueous extracts prepared from commercially available Swedish birch pollen, pollen collected from Austrian trees and a commercial skin prick extract were analyzed by 1-DE, 2-DE, immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, resulting in a complete inventory of extractable, disease-relevant pollen proteins. A main focus of this study was on the isoform distribution of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen. Using a combination of intact mass determination and peptide sequencing, five isoforms (a, b, d, f and j) were unequivocally identified in Swedish and Austrian birch pollen extracts, while the skin prick extract contained only isoforms a, b and d. Using the same methods as for Bet v 1, divergencies in the sequence of birch profilin (Bet v 2), a plant panallergen, were solved. The molecular characterization of pollen extracts is relevant for standardization and development of new reagents for specific immunotherapy.

  12. Characterization of paprika (Capsicum annuum) extract in orange juices by liquid chromatography of carotenoid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouly, P P; Gaydou, E M; Corsetti, J

    1999-03-01

    The carotenoid pigment profiles of authentic pure orange juices from Spain and Florida and an industrial paprika (Capsicum annuum) extract used for food coloring were obtained using reversed-phase liquid chromatography with a C18 packed column and an acetone/methanol/water eluent system. The procedure involving the carotenoid extraction is described. Both retention times and spectral properties using photodiode array detection for characterization of the major carotenoids at 430 and 519 nm are given. The influence of external addition of tangerine juice and/or paprika extract on orange juice color is described using the U.S. Department of Agriculture scale and adulterated orange juice. The procedure for quantitation of externally added paprika extract to orange juice is investigated, and the limit of quantitation, coefficient of variation, and recoveries are determined.

  13. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  14. Comparative phytochemical profiling and effects of Nerium oleander extracts on the activities of murine peritoneal macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Priyankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerium oleander is a medicinal plant. Apart from its ethnopharmacological uses, pharmacognostic studies have revealed several of its bioactivities. Previously we demonstrated that the phenolic and flavonoid rich extracts of oleander leaf, stem and root possess potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities. Moreover, the leaf extract actively modulates the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance and exerts anti-inflammatory activities on murine splenic lymphocytes. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effect of oleander leaf, stem and root extracts on phagocytosis and the free radical-related activities of murine peritoneal macrophages. In addition, phytochemical profiling was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The results demonstrated that the increase in phagocytosis and decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO were in the order of leaf>root>stem. The inhibition of cell adhesion, nitric oxide (NO and elevation of respiratory burst activity was in the order of leaf>stem>root. However, the bioactivities of the leaf extract were much high than those of the stem and root extracts. Phytochemical analysis also revealed the presence of several bioactive constituents in oleander extracts. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that oleander possesses the capacity to modulate macrophage activities and the bioactivities are attributed to the numerous phytochemicals identified in oleander extracts.

  15. Influence of Accelerated Solvent Extraction and Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction on the Anthocyanin Profile of Different Vaccinium Species in the Context of Statistical Models for Authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffels, Peter; Weber, Fabian; Schieber, Andreas

    2015-09-02

    Anthocyanins are frequently discussed as marker compounds for fruit product authenticity. Proper analysis including sample preparation for the determination of anthocyanin concentrations is crucial for the comparability of authenticity data. The present study determined the influence of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), using two different solvent compositions on the anthocyanin profile of bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.), and American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.). Besides differences in total anthocyanin concentrations in the extracts, significant deviations (p ≤ 0.05) in the individual anthocyanin concentration were observed, resulting in differing anthocyanin proportions. Linear discriminant analysis comparing the differences caused by the extraction method to the natural differences within a set of 26 bilberry and lowbush blueberry samples of different origins was conducted. It revealed that profile variations induced by the extraction methods are in a similar scale to profile variations as a result of geographic and climatic differences.

  16. Uncaria tomentosa aqueous-ethanol extract triggers an immunomodulation toward a Th2 cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Alexandre; Sartori, Alexandrina; Valente, Ligia Maria Marino; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2011-08-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC (Rubiaceae) is a large woody vine that is native to the Amazon and Central American rainforests and is used widely in traditional medicine for its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory activities. The present work used in vivo immunotoxic and in vitro immunomodulatory experiments to investigate the effects of a pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid extract from U. tomentosa bark on lymphocyte phenotype, Th1/Th2 cytokine production, cellular proliferation and cytotoxicity. For the in vivo immunotoxicity testing, BALB/c male mice were treated once a day with 125, 500 or 1250 mg/kg of U. tomentosa extract for 28 days. For the in vitro protocol, lymphocytes were cultured with 10-500 μg/mg of the extract for 48 h. The extract increased the cellularity of splenic white pulp and the thymic medulla and increased the number of T helper lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. Also, a large stimulatory effect on lymphocyte viability was observed. However, mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations of U. tomentosa extract. Furthermore, an immunological polarization toward a Th2 cytokine profile was observed. These results suggest that the U. tomentosa aqueous-ethanol extract was not immunotoxic to mice and was able to modulate distinct patterns of the immune system in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Chemical constituents and pharmacological profile of Gunnera manicata L. extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiane de Cássia Mariotti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gunnera perpensa L. (Gunneraceae is a native South African plant widely used in traditional medicine as an antibacterial and antifungal. In southern Brazil there is the native species called Gunnera manicata L. that also belongs to the Gunneraceae. Nevertheless, there is no information about chemical and pharmacological properties of South American Gunnera species. Therefore this study aimed at assessing the phytochemical and pharmacological profiles of aqueous and methanol Brazilian G. manicata extracts. The results showed that antimicrobial activity in an agar diffusion assay was effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans . Phenolic compounds were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS and all extracts presented gallic acid and only the methanol extract obtained from the leaves exhibited hyperoside. Rutin, quercetin and chlorogenic acid were not found in the samples analysed. Total phenolic content was higher in methanol extract and total flavonoid content was low in all extracts. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical test, and all samples presented good to moderate antioxidant activity. These results encourage complementary studies on the chemical composition of the plant extracts focusing on isolation and structure elucidation of their active compounds.

  18. DNA extraction procedure affects organic-aggregate-attached bacterial community profiles from a shallow eutrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangming; Gao, Guang; Zhu, Liping; Chao, Jianying; Qin, Boqiang

    2009-06-01

    Organic aggregates (OA) in aquatic ecosystems harbour diverse microbial communities. The colonization and growth of OA-attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. The development of efficient and comparative DNA extraction methods is one of the most critical steps in the study of the composition and diversity of OA-attached bacterial communities. To evaluate whether different DNA extraction procedures affect the measurement of bacterial community composition, we compared four in situ lysis procedures using OA from three locations in a shallow eutrophic lake (Lake Taihu, China). The extracted DNA was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles. We found that the choice of DNA extraction protocol had a significant influence on the fingerprints of the OA-attached bacterial community. This was shown not only in the number of bands but also in their relative representation of certain DNA bands. Using the bead-beating DNA extraction method in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, we found that crude microbial DNA could be extracted efficiently from different OA types. This protocol is reproducible and gives very pure DNA of relatively high molecular mass. More importantly, the protocol provided more representative and informative data on the diversity of OA-attached bacterial communities.

  19. Evaluation of extracts of Piper sarmentosum for accelerated stability by metabolomic fingerprint profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hussain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike pharmaceuticals, precise stability assessment of herbal products is challenging because of their complex nature. A new trend in natural products is that the extract is considered active as a whole whether active constituents are known or not. Hence, the stability of all the constituents must be taken into account, which is possible by analyzing metabolomic fingerprint profiles. Therefore, present study aimed to evaluate ethanol extracts of fruit of Piper sarmentosum, an important medicinal plant, for accelerated stability using metabolomic fingerprint profiling. The extract was exposed to three storage conditions of different temperature and humidity and analyzed at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 months by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC to get metabolomic fingerprints. FTIR fingerprints in combination with chemometrics indicated the changes in metabolomics, stirring with the passage of time at all storage conditions. Visual inspection of HPTLC densitograms revealed metabolomic changes in the extracts stored for 6 months at 60 °C and 85% relative humidity. The results of the study indicate that the products made from this plant ought to be stored at room temperature, below 30 °C and 45% relative humidity, and excessive heating must be avoided during manufacturing process. Moreover, the method may be used by natural product industry as a tool of identification, classification and discrimination (ICD.

  20. Extraction of Internal Tidal Currents from A Portion of Sea Current Profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩春明; 潘增弟; 范典

    2002-01-01

    Internal tide is one of the major oceanic phenomena. Determination of internal tide is important for theoretical studyand for ocean engineering research. As an inverse problem, extraction of internal tidal currents from sea currents is diffi-cult. In this paper, a method is developed to extract internal tidal currents from a portion of the sea current profile basedon the fact that the directions of internal tidal currents above and below the thermocline are inverse. Sea current data col-lected from the South China Sea is processed with this method. The internal tidal currents and the depth of the thermo-cline are successfully extracted. The depth of the thermocline determined is in good agreement with that measured in 1959.

  1. Safety Profile of Meswak Root Extract on Liver, Kidney, Sexual Hormones and Hematological Parameters of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Y. IBRAHIM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the safety profile of Salvadora persica (Salvadoraceae aqueous alcoholic root extract by carrying out acute and sub-chronic toxicity assessment in order to find out any side effect of the traditionally using of these root sticks. Regarding to acute toxicity test, mice were administered the extract up to 5 g kg-1, intraperitoneally. Animals were then observed for behavioural changes; signs of toxicity, and mortality within 24 h. Surviving mice were monitored for 7 days for signs of delayed toxicity. In the sub-chronic toxicity test, rats were daily treated with the extract at a dose of 400 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally, for 30 days. At the end of the test period, hematological and biochemical parameters were determined in blood and serum samples with determination of vital organs weights. In the acute toxicity test, the extract was practically non-toxic showing no mortality and visible signs of delayed toxicity. The LD50, given intraperitoneally, was estimated to be 4 g kg-1. Administration of extract (at a dose of 400 mg Kg-1 b.wt. to male and female rats for 30 days did not produce any significant (P < 0.05 effect on hematological and most biochemical parameters also vital organs weights. The root extract showed adverse effects on sexual hormones, by increasing estrogen secretion and reducing testosterone level in male rats. At the same time, the extract reduces progesterone level in female satellite group. Overall, Meswak aqueous extract is safe concerning liver and kidney functions and hematological assessments; however, it induces reversal effect on sexual hormones levels determined in sera.

  2. Heat exposure of Cannabis sativa extracts affects the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Martin; Spinedi, Luca; Unfer-Grauwiler, Sandra; Bodmer, Michael; Surber, Christian; Luedi, Markus; Drewe, Juergen

    2012-05-01

    The most important psychoactive constituent of CANNABIS SATIVA L. is Δ (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol (CBD), another important constituent, is able to modulate the distinct unwanted psychotropic effect of THC. In natural plant extracts of C. SATIVA, large amounts of THC and CBD appear in the form of THCA-A (THC-acid-A) and CBDA (cannabidiolic acid), which can be transformed to THC and CBD by heating. Previous reports of medicinal use of cannabis or cannabis preparations with higher CBD/THC ratios and use in its natural, unheated form have demonstrated that pharmacological effects were often accompanied with a lower rate of adverse effects. Therefore, in the present study, the pharmacokinetics and metabolic profiles of two different C. SATIVA extracts (heated and unheated) with a CBD/THC ratio > 1 were compared to synthetic THC (dronabinol) in a double-blind, randomized, single center, three-period cross-over study involving 9 healthy male volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of the cannabinoids was highly variable. The metabolic pattern was significantly different after administration of the different forms: the heated extract showed a lower median THC plasma AUC (24 h) than the unheated extract of 2.84 vs. 6.59 pmol h/mL, respectively. The later was slightly higher than that of dronabinol (4.58 pmol h/mL). On the other hand, the median sum of the metabolites (THC, 11-OH-THC, THC-COOH, CBN) plasma AUC (24 h) was higher for the heated than for the unheated extract. The median CBD plasma AUC (24 h) was almost 2-fold higher for the unheated than for the heated extract. These results indicate that use of unheated extracts may lead to a beneficial change in metabolic pattern and possibly better tolerability.

  3. Extraction Analysis and Creation of Three-Dimensional Road Profiles Using Matlab OpenCRG Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Hari Borse

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In vehicle systems dynamics there are wide applications of simulation of vehicles on road surfaces. These simulation applications are related to vehicle handling ride comfort and durability. For accurate prediction of results there is a need for a reliable and efficient road representations. The efficient representation of road surface profiles is to represent them in three-dimensional space. This is made possible by the CRG Curved Regular Grid approach. OpenCRG is a completely open source project including a tool suite for the creation modification and evaluation of road surfaces. Its objective is to standardized detailed road surface description and it may be used for applications like tire models vibrations or driving simulation. The Matlab tool suite of OpenCRG provides powerful modification or creation tools and allows to visualize the 3D road data representation. The current research focuses on basic concepts of OpenCRG and its Matlab environment. The extraction of longitudinal two-dimensional road profiles from three-dimensional CRG format is researched. The creation of simple virtual three-dimensional roads has been programmed. A Matlab software tool to extract create and analyze the three-dimensional road profiles is to be developed.

  4. Computer-Aided (13)C NMR Chemical Profiling of Crude Natural Extracts without Fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakiri, Ali; Hubert, Jane; Reynaud, Romain; Lanthony, Sylvie; Harakat, Dominique; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc

    2017-05-26

    A computer-aided, (13)C NMR-based dereplication method is presented for the chemical profiling of natural extracts without any fractionation. An algorithm was developed in order to compare the (13)C NMR chemical shifts obtained from a single routine spectrum with a set of predicted NMR data stored in a natural metabolite database. The algorithm evaluates the quality of the matching between experimental and predicted data by calculating a score function and returns the list of metabolites that are most likely to be present in the studied extract. The proof of principle of the method is demonstrated on a crude alkaloid extract obtained from the leaves of Peumus boldus, resulting in the identification of eight alkaloids, including isocorydine, rogersine, boldine, reticuline, coclaurine, laurotetanine, N-methylcoclaurine, and norisocorydine, as well as three monoterpenes, namely, p-cymene, eucalyptol, and α-terpinene. The results were compared to those obtained with other methods, either involving a fractionation step before the chemical profiling process or using mass spectrometry detection in the infusion mode or coupled to gas chromatography.

  5. Advances in geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    The critically acclaimed serialized review journal for over 50 years, Advances in Geophysics is a highly respected publication in the field of geophysics. Since 1952, each volume has been eagerly awaited, frequently consulted, and praised by researchers and reviewers alike. Now in its 54th volume, it contains much material still relevant today--truly an essential publication for researchers in all fields of geophysics.Key features: * Contributions from leading authorities * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field

  6. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  7. Advances in geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    The critically acclaimed serialized review journal for over 50 years, Advances in Geophysics is a highly respected publication in the field of geophysics. Since 1952, each volume has been eagerly awaited, frequently consulted, and praised by researchers and reviewers alike. Now in its 52nd volume, it contains much material still relevant today--truly an essential publication for researchers in all fields of geophysics.Key features: * Contributions from leading authorities * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field

  8. Waterberg coalfield airborne geophysics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, S

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Geophysics Project Number: 1.5.5 Sub Committee: Geology and Geophysics Presenter: Dr. Stoffel Fourie Co-Workers: Dr. George Henry & Me. Leonie Marè Collaborators: Coaltech & CSIR Project Objectives Major Objectives: circle5 Initiate Semi...-Regional Exploration of the Waterberg Coalfield to the benefit of the Industry. circle5 Generate a good quality Airborne Geophysical Dataset. circle5 Generate a basic lineament and surface geology interpretation of the Ellisras Basin. circle5 Generate a basic...

  9. Esthetic perception of changes in facial profile resulting from orthodontic treatment with extraction of premolars: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iared, Walter; Silva, Edina Mariko Koga da; Rufino Macedo, Cristiane; Iared, Wagner

    2017-01-01

    The changes in patients' facial profiles after orthodontic treatment with and without extraction of four premolars and the cephalometric parameters that can aid in clinical decision making are examined...

  10. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long qaodmasdkwaspemas5ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdfls 22 ft wide qaodmasdkwaspemas4ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdfls 7 ft deep concrete...

  11. Chemical profile and antimicrobial activity of Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina) extracts obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mazutti,M.; Mossi,A. J.; CANSIAN,R.L.; Corazza,M. L.; Dariva,C.; Vladimir Oliveira,J.

    2008-01-01

    This work reports the effects of temperature (20 to 50ºC) and pressure (100 to 250 bar) on the extraction yield, chemical characteristics and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Peumus boldus Molina obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction. Results showed that the extraction variables affect the extraction yield and the chemical distribution of the major compounds present in the extracts. The extracts were chemically analyzed with regard to 1,8-cineole, trans-sabinene, pinocarveol, ...

  12. Chemical profile and antimicrobial activity of Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina) extracts obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mazutti,M.; A J Mossi; CANSIAN,R.L.; M. L. Corazza; Dariva,C.; J. Vladimir Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This work reports the effects of temperature (20 to 50ºC) and pressure (100 to 250 bar) on the extraction yield, chemical characteristics and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Peumus boldus Molina obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction. Results showed that the extraction variables affect the extraction yield and the chemical distribution of the major compounds present in the extracts. The extracts were chemically analyzed with regard to 1,8-cineole, trans-sabinene, pinocarveol, ...

  13. Release Profile of Andrographis paniculata Leaf Extract Nanocapsule as α-Glucosidase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrani, K.; Imansari, F.; Utami, T. S.; Arbianti, R.

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata is one of 13 leading commodities Indonesian medicinal plants through the Ditjen POM. Andrographolide as main active compound has been shown to have many pharmacological activities, one of which is as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors which has clinical potential as an antitumor, antiviral, antidiabetic, and immunoregulator agents. This study aims to do nanoencapsulation of Andrographis paniculatar leaf extract to increase its active compound bioavailability and get a release profile through synthetic fluids media simulation. Nanoencapsulation with ionic gelation method result the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity values of 73.47% and 46.29% at 2%: 1% of chitosan: STPP ratio. The maximum α-glucosidase inhibition of 37.17% was obtained at 16% concentration. Burst release at gastric pH conditions indicate that most of the drug (in this study is an Andrographis paniculata leaf extract) adsorbed on the surface of the nanoparticles an indicates that the kind of nanoparticle formed is nanosphere.

  14. Biological activities and phytochemical profiles of extracts from different parts of bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akinobu; Zhu, Qinchang; Tan, Hui; Horiba, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Mori, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Iwamoto, Akira; Kawahara, Hiroharu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-06-18

    Besides being a useful building material, bamboo also is a potential source of bioactive substances. Although some studies have been performed to examine its use in terms of the biological activity, only certain parts of bamboo, especially the leaves or shoots, have been studied. Comprehensive and comparative studies among different parts of bamboo would contribute to a better understanding and application of this knowledge. In this study, the biological activities of ethanol and water extracts from the leaves, branches, outer culm, inner culm, knots, rhizomes and roots of Phyllostachys pubescens, the major species of bamboo in Japan, were comparatively evaluated. The phytochemical profiles of these extracts were tentatively determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The results showed that extracts from different parts of bamboo had different chemical compositions and different antioxidative, antibacterial and antiallergic activities, as well as on on melanin biosynthesis. Outer culm and inner culm were found to be the most important sources of active compounds. 8-C-Glucosylapigenin, luteolin derivatives and chlorogenic acid were the most probable compounds responsible for the anti-allergy activity of these bamboo extracts. Our study suggests the potential use of bamboo as a functional ingredient in cosmetics or other health-related products.

  15. A New Skeleton Feature Extraction Method for Terrain Model Using Profile Recognition and Morphological Simplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is always difficul to reserve rings and main truck lines in the real engineering of feature extraction for terrain model. In this paper, a new skeleton feature extraction method is proposed to solve these problems, which put forward a simplification algorithm based on morphological theory to eliminate the noise points of the target points produced by classical profile recognition. As well all know, noise point is the key factor to influence the accuracy and efficiency of feature extraction. Our method connected the optimized feature points subset after morphological simplification; therefore, the efficiency of ring process and pruning has been improved markedly, and the accuracy has been enhanced without the negative effect of noisy points. An outbranching concept is defined, and the related algorithms are proposed to extract sufficient long trucks, which is capable of being consistent with real terrain skeleton. All of algorithms are conducted on many real experimental data, including GTOPO30 and benchmark data provided by PPA to verify the performance and accuracy of our method. The results showed that our method precedes PPA as a whole.

  16. Biological Activities and Phytochemical Profiles of Extracts from Different Parts of Bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinobu Tanaka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides being a useful building material, bamboo also is a potential source of bioactive substances. Although some studies have been performed to examine its use in terms of the biological activity, only certain parts of bamboo, especially the leaves or shoots, have been studied. Comprehensive and comparative studies among different parts of bamboo would contribute to a better understanding and application of this knowledge. In this study, the biological activities of ethanol and water extracts from the leaves, branches, outer culm, inner culm, knots, rhizomes and roots of Phyllostachys pubescens, the major species of bamboo in Japan, were comparatively evaluated. The phytochemical profiles of these extracts were tentatively determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis. The results showed that extracts from different parts of bamboo had different chemical compositions and different antioxidative, antibacterial and antiallergic activities, as well as on on melanin biosynthesis. Outer culm and inner culm were found to be the most important sources of active compounds. 8-C-Glucosylapigenin, luteolin derivatives and chlorogenic acid were the most probable compounds responsible for the anti-allergy activity of these bamboo extracts. Our study suggests the potential use of bamboo as a functional ingredient in cosmetics or other health-related products.

  17. Metabolic profiling of bioactive Pancratium canariense extracts by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torras-Claveria, Laura; Berkov, Strahil; Jáuregui, Olga; Caujapé, Juli; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Bastida, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Pancratium canariense Ker Gawler is a plant species belonging to family Amaryllidaceae. Plants from this family are known to synthesise a particular type of bioactive compounds, named Amaryllidaceae alkaloids, which have shown AChE inhibitory activity. To perform the metabolite profiling of methanolic extracts from P. canariense in order to identify bioactive compounds. Methanolic extracts from bulbs, leaves and fruits were separated into alkaloid-free apolar and polar fractions, as well as alkaloid fractions, and subjected to AChE assay. Metabolite profiling of extracts and fractions of P. canariense was carried out by GC-EI-MS and LC-ESI-TOF-MS. AChE inhibitory activities of the alkaloid fractions at a concentration of 10 microg/mL were 29.80 +/- 0.91, 40.93 +/- 4.60 and 58.06 +/- 1.18% for the bulbs, leaves and fruits, respectively. Seventy-six metabolites-mono-, di- and trisaccharides, fatty acids, amino acids, sterols as well as several Amaryllidaceae alkaloids-were detected. Further purification of the alkaloids from the methanolic extracts resulted in the detection of 31 compounds including several potent AChE inhibitors such as habranthine and galanthamine, and the structural elucidation of 3-O-acetylhabranthine, a new natural compound with potential AChE inhibitory activity. The described method resulted in effective integration of both GC-EI-MS and LC-ESI-TOF-MS strategies, which permitted the identification of many metabolites, as well as the structural elucidation of new compounds with potential AChE inhibitory activity. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Toxicity and Safety Profiles of Methanolic Extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI for Wistar Rats

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    Gotmi Sharwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The goals of this research were to evaluate acute (single-dose and sub-acute (repeated-dose toxicity profiles of methanolic extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI for Wistar rats and to assess the safety profile of PI by observing physiological changes, mortality, changes in body weight

  19. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica

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    J. Saúl García-Pérez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P, temperature (T, and co-solvent (CoS, four treatments (T were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min, followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min. Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0, followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c, α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3 and stearic acid (C18:0 differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica.

  20. Polyphenolic Profile, Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Eastern Teaberry (Gaultheria procumbens L. Leaf Extracts

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    Piotr Michel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dry leaf extracts of eastern teaberry (Gaultheria procumbens L. were evaluated as a source of bioactive phytocompounds through systematic activity testing and phytochemical profiling. The antioxidant efficiency was tested using five complementary in vitro models (DPPH; FRAP; linoleic acid (LA peroxidation assay; O2•− and H2O2 scavenging tests in parallel with standard antioxidants. The 75% methanol extract and its diethyl ether, ethyl acetate (EAF, n-butanol and water fractions exhibited the dose-dependent responses in all assays, with the highest capacities found for EAF (DPPH EC50 = 2.9 μg/mL; FRAP = 12.8 mmol Fe2+/g; IC50 for LA-peroxidation = 123.9 μg/mL; O2•− SC50 = 3.9 μg/mL; H2O2 SC50 = 7.2 μg/mL. The EAF had also the highest anti-inflammatory activity in the inhibition tests of lipoxygenase and hyaluronidase (60.14% and 21.83% effects, respectively, at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. Activity parameters of the extracts correlated strongly with the levels of total phenolics (72.4–270.7 mg GAE/g, procyanidins, and phenolic acids, whereas for flavonoids only moderate effects were observed. Comprehensive UHPLC-PDA-ESI-MS3 and HPLC-PDA studies led to the identification of 35 polyphenols with a procyanidin A-type trimer, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, isomers of caffeoylquinic acids, and (‒-epicatechin being the dominant components. Significant activity levels, high phenolic contents and high extraction yields (39.4%–42.5% DW for defatted and crude methanol extracts, respectively indicate the value of eastern teaberry leaves as bioactive products.

  1. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, J Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica.

  2. ScholarLens: extracting competences from research publications for the automatic generation of semantic user profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Sateli

    2017-07-01

    given user. Competences are derived by text mining the articles, including syntactic, semantic, and LOD entity linking steps. We then populate a knowledge base in RDF format with user profiles containing the extracted competences.We implemented our approach as an open source library and evaluated our system through two user studies, resulting in mean average precision (MAP of up to 95%. As part of the evaluation, we also analyze the impact of semantic zoning of research articles on the accuracy of the resulting profiles. Finally, we demonstrate how these semantic user profiles can be applied in a number of use cases, including article ranking for personalized search and finding scientists competent in a topic —e.g., to find reviewers for a paper. Availability All software and datasets presented in this paper are available under open source licenses in the supplements and documented at http://www.semanticsoftware.info/semantic-user-profiling-peerj-2016-supplements. Additionally, development releases of ScholarLens are available on our GitHub page: https://github.com/SemanticSoftwareLab/ScholarLens.

  3. Nearshore continental shelf: Morphology, paleomorphology, and sediment transport based on high-resolution geophysical profiling of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anima, Roberto Juan

    The intertwining of the shoreline with its coastal streams, headlands, pocket beaches, coves, and sea cliffs is tied to a nearshore with sea floor outcrops, shore-normal sand-filled low areas, subbottom channels, and variations in sediment texture. The stitching together of the two aspects of this high-energy environment was accomplished by geophysical surveying techniques that uncovered direct connections to each facet of the coastal area between Ano Nuevo and New Brighton Beach. What this work has accomplished is the expansion of our view of a high energy, active margin coastline in a way that reveals aspects of the nearshore that connect onshore coastal features, to previously unknown offshore features in a three dimensional view that incorporates morphology, processes, and time. This work gives a look at a nearshore that hints of a low sea level stand coastal scene not unlike our present. It uncovers relic stream channels that are direct ancestors of the present coastal streams. And finally, it proposes a conceptual model of how modern processes are constantly at work to shape and reshape this dynamic environment in order to fulfill its goal of moving sediment alongshore.

  4. Geophysical Surveys of the San Andreas and Crystal Springs Reservoir System Including Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Swath Bathymetry, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, David P.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes geophysical data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Andreas Reservoir and Upper and Lower Crystal Springs Reservoirs, San Mateo County, California, as part of an effort to refine knowledge of the location of traces of the San Andreas Fault within the reservoir system and to provide improved reservoir bathymetry for estimates of reservoir water volume. The surveys were conducted by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the USGS for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The data were acquired in three separate surveys: (1) in June 2007, personnel from WCMG completed a three-day survey of San Andreas Reservoir, collecting approximately 50 km of high-resolution Chirp subbottom seismic-reflection data; (2) in November 2007, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of San Andreas reservoir; and finally (3) in April 2008, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of both the upper and lower Crystal Springs Reservoir system. Top of PageFor more information, contact David Finlayson.

  5. Application of geophysical methods to agriculture: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods are becoming an increasingly valuable tool for agricultural applications. Agricultural geophysics investigations are commonly (although certainly not always) focused on delineating small- and/or large-scale objects/features within the soil profile (~ 0 to 2 m depth) over very lar...

  6. Chemical profile and antimicrobial activity of Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina extracts obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction

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    M. Mazutti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the effects of temperature (20 to 50ºC and pressure (100 to 250 bar on the extraction yield, chemical characteristics and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Peumus boldus Molina obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction. Results showed that the extraction variables affect the extraction yield and the chemical distribution of the major compounds present in the extracts. The extracts were chemically analyzed with regard to 1,8-cineole, trans-sabinene, pinocarveol, pinocarvone, 4-terpineol, ascaridole, piperitone oxide, limonene dioxide and n-eicosane in a GC/MSD. Antimicrobial tests demonstrated that the high-pressure CO2 extracts had activity against 13 bacteria and that better action was verified with extracts obtained at a lower CO2 extraction density and a higher temperature.

  7. Chemometric profile of root extracts of Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. with hyphenated gas chromatography mass spectrometric technique.

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    Amol B Tayade

    Full Text Available Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. (Rose root or Arctic root or Golden root or Shrolo, belonging to the family Crassulaceae, is an important food crop and medicinal plant in the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert. Chemometric profile of the n-hexane, chloroform, dichloroethane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and 60% ethanol root extracts of R. imbricata were performed by hyphenated gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS technique. GC/MS analysis was carried out using Thermo Finnigan PolarisQ Ion Trap GC/MS MS system comprising of an AS2000 liquid autosampler. Interpretation on mass spectrum of GC/MS was done using the NIST/EPA/NIH Mass Spectral Database, with NIST MS search program v.2.0g. Chemometric profile of root extracts revealed the presence of 63 phyto-chemotypes, among them, 1-pentacosanol; stigmast-5-en-3-ol, (3β,24S; 1-teracosanol; 1-henteracontanol; 17-pentatriacontene; 13-tetradecen-1-ol acetate; methyl tri-butyl ammonium chloride; bis(2-ethylhexyl phthalate; 7,8-dimethylbenzocyclooctene; ethyl linoleate; 3-methoxy-5-methylphenol; hexadecanoic acid; camphor; 1,3-dimethoxybenzene; thujone; 1,3-benzenediol, 5-pentadecyl; benzenemethanol, 3-hydroxy, 5-methoxy; cholest-4-ene-3,6-dione; dodecanoic acid, 3-hydroxy; octadecane, 1-chloro; ethanone, 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl; α-tocopherol; ascaridole; campesterol; 1-dotriacontane; heptadecane, 9-hexyl were found to be present in major amount. Eventually, in the present study we have found phytosterols, terpenoids, fatty acids, fatty acid esters, alkyl halides, phenols, alcohols, ethers, alkanes, and alkenes as the major group of phyto-chemotypes in the different root extracts of R. imbricata. All these compounds identified by GC/MS analysis were further investigated for their biological activities and it was found that they possess a diverse range of positive pharmacological actions. In future, isolation of individual phyto-chemotypes and subjecting them to biological activity will definitely prove fruitful

  8. Urease inhibitory profile of extracts and chemical constituents of Pistacia atlantica ssp. cabulica Stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Ghias; Ismail; Rauf, Abdur; Raza, Muslim; Khan, Haroon; Nasruddin; Khan, Majid; Farooq, Umar; Khan, Ajmal; Arifullah

    2016-06-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the urease inhibitory profile of extract and fractions of Pistacia atlantica ssp. cabulica Stocks followed by bioactivity-guided isolated compounds. The crude extract was found significantly active with urease inhibitor (95.40% at 0.2 mg/mL) with IC50 values of 32.0 ± 0.28 μg/mL. Upon fractionation, ethyl acetate fraction displayed 100% urease inhibition with IC50 values of 19.9 ± 0.51 μg/mL at 0.2 mg/mL. However, n-hexane and chloroform fractions exhibited insignificant urease inhibition. Similarly, the isolated compound, transilitin (1) and dihydro luteolin (2) demonstrated marked urease attenuation with 95 and 98% respectively, at 0.15 mg/mL. Both the isolated compounds showed marked potency with IC50 values of 8.54 ± 0.54 and 9.58 ± 2.22 μg/mL, respectively. In short, both the extract and fractions and isolated compounds showed marked urease inhibition and thus a useful natural source of urease inhibition.

  9. Effect of Ethanol/Water Solvents on Phenolic Profiles and Antioxidant Properties of Beijing Propolis Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunli; Wu, Zhengshuang; Wang, Ziyan; Zhang, Hongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Propolis is a natural substance known to be beneficial for human health and used as a folk medicine in many parts of the world. In this study, phenolic profiles and antioxidant properties of Beijing propolis extracted by different ethanol/water solvents were analyzed. Our results reveal that phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties of propolis extracts were significantly dependent on the concentration of ethanol/water solvents. Totally, 29 phenolic compounds were identified: 12 phenolic acids, 13 flavonoids, and 4 phenolic acid esters. In particular, 75 wt.% ethanol/water solvent may be the best for the highest extraction yield and the strongest antioxidant properties. Caffeic acid, benzyl caffeate, phenethyl caffeate, 5-methoxy pinobanksin, pinobanksin, pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, chrysin, and galangin were the characteristic compounds of Beijing propolis, and these compounds seem to verify that Beijing propolis may be poplar-type propolis. In addition, the presence of high level of pinobanksin-3-O-acetate in Chinese propolis may be a novel finding, representing one-third of all phenolics. PMID:26351514

  10. Hawthorn Fruit Extract Elevates Expression of Nrf2/HO-1 and Improves Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Liu, Yanan; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2016-05-13

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge) extract on the lipid profiles and antioxidant properties in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. After ovariectomy, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: the non-OVX control (Sham), the OVX-control (OVX), the OVX + 100 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OL), and the OVX + 200 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OH). The final body weights of the OVX group were significantly increased, but the increment was significantly decreased in hawthorn groups (p hawthorn groups showed a significant decrease in these levels (p hawthorn groups compared with the OVX group (p hawthorn groups exhibited a significant increase in expression (p hawthorn extract reversed the suppression of protein levels. These results suggest that hawthorn extract could have protective effects in OVX rats by improving lipid profiles, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving the antioxidant defense system.

  11. Effects of different methods of DNA extraction for activated sludge on the subsequent analysis of bacterial community profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianpeng; Ouyang, Xiong; Tang, Yueheng; Yang, Ying; Luo, Ying

    2012-02-01

    The effect of different DNA extraction protocols on activated sludge DNA yield and bacterial community composition was evaluated by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Nine different procedures to extract DNA were compared-sonication (30s), sonication (40s), sonication (50s), freezing-thawing, bead milling, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-lysozyme, SDS-proteinase K, SDS-lysozyme-proteinase, and a commercial extraction kit. It was found that the TGGE profiles and the DNA band numbers made significant differences via various extraction methods. The yield and purity of DNA extracted by sonication and other physical methods were not satisfactory, while the DNA purity extracted by SDS and other chemical-biological methods were better. Crude DNA extracts isolated by sonication and other physical methods passed the polymerase chain reaction, despite the absence of purification and acquired affluent DNA bands in TGGE. The affluence of bands in TGGE was not consistent with the yield and purification of DNA, but was correlative with extraction protocols. To analyze the activated sludge bacterial community by TGGE fingerprint, it is necessary to make a synthesis of the TGGE fingerprint profiles of chemical and physical DNA extraction methods to overcome the representative bias.

  12. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long × 22 ft wide × 7 ft deep concrete basin at CRREL for fresh or saltwater investigations and can be temperature...

  13. HPTLC profile of aqueous extract of different chromatographic fractions of Aloe barbadensis Miller

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    Nishant Kumar Ojha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the fingerprint profile of Aloe barbadensis Miller by using High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC technique. Methods: after optimization of solvent system by Thin Layer Chromatography, different fractions of aqueous extract of Aloe was collected by column chromatography and the fingerprinting was done by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC Results: solvent system of methanol:chloroform :: 1:1 was found appropriate for fractionation by column chromatography. Total seven fractions were collected and they were analysed by HPTLC. Distinct spectra of different constituents were obtained for each fraction. Conclusions: HPTLC fingerprinting of Aloe barbadensis Miller may be useful in characterization of different phytochemicals found in this species. It may also be useful in differentiating the species from the adulterant and act as a biochemical marker for this medicinally important plant in the pharmaceutical industry.

  14. Altering the phenolics profile of a green tea leaves extract using exogenous oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Annewieke J W; Gruppen, Harry; Bisschop, Robbin; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Transformation from green tea leaves into black tea involves oxidation of catechins into theaflavins and other complex phenolics by endogenous enzymes in tea leaves. By employing tyrosinase and laccase, both from Agaricus bisporus, on green tea catechins, the oxidation process was directed towards a higher theaflavins content, which is considered an important quality parameter in tea. The main tea catechins were incubated with tyrosinase and laccase, and product formation was monitored by RP-UHPLC-PDA-ESI-MS. The kind of catechin, their substitution with a galloyl group, and the type of oxidase used were important factors determining theaflavin concentrations. In particular, incubation of epicatechin with epigallocatechin with tyrosinase gave a high, stable theaflavin content. In a green tea extract, tyrosinase increased the proportion of theaflavins by twofold compared to black tea. Laccase mainly formed insoluble complexes. Our results indicate that the phenolic profile of tea can be modulated by using commercially available exogenous oxidases.

  15. The antimicrobial profile of extracts of a Phormidium-like cyanobacterium changes with phosphate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Semary, Nermin Adel

    2012-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity of lipophilic extracts of mat-forming Phormidium-like cyanobacterium isolated from Egypt was investigated under different phosphate concentrations. The antimicrobial profile changed with different phosphate levels indicating metabolic changes under stressful conditions. The fractions that resulted in highest antimicrobial activity from the three different phosphate concentrations were chosen for further analyses. The bioactive compounds were identified using chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques including UV, FTIR, GC-MS and proton-NMR. The chemical analyses indicated that the compound at standard phosphate concentration was eugenol whereas the bioactive compound at half phosphate concentration was 4-tert-butylcyclohexanol. The third bioactive compound at quarter phosphate concentration was octadecanoic acid. The eugenol is known for its antimicrobial as well as pain relief properties and can be used in many pharmaceutical preparations whereas the octadecanoic acid and cyclohexanol derivative are used in some antimicrobial pharmaceuticals. The study highlights the change in antimicrobial profile of bioactive compounds derived from cyanobacteria through manipulating the concentration of a key nutrient in growth medium. This strategy can be employed for mass production of these compounds and others for future biotechnological applications.

  16. Effects of purified herbal extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza on lipid profile in hyperlipidemic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuchang Li; Ling Zhu; Bin Huang

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective Hyperlipidemia is one of the most potent and best substantiated risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). Purified Salvia miltiorrhiza extract (PSME) had been shown to have hypolipidemic effect in animal experiments. This study aimed to evaluate its iipids modulating effects in hyperlipidemic patients. Methods In this single-blind, placebo controlled study, lipid profiles of 80 hyperlipidemic patients were checked at same conditions. They were divided into two equal groups randomly (each composing of 40 patients). They were given PSME tablet (800 mg) three times per day, or placebo tablet. All patients were put on NCEP type Ⅱ diet and six weeks later, lipid profiles were checked. Results In PSME group, total cholesterol decreased by 27.32 mg/dl (12.3% reduction), LDL-cholesterol decreased by 23.13 mg/dl (16.8% reduction) and HDL-cholesterol increased by 9.06 mg/dl (11.1%), all were statistically significant. Although triglyceride dropped by 12.12 mg/dl (5.1%) but this was not significant statistically (P=-0.34). There were no significant changes oflipids levels in the placebo group. Conclusions PSME has significant favorable effect on total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol and may be a potential agent for the treatment ofatherogenic dyslipidemia.

  17. Effects of propolis (Trigona sp.) extract supplementation on the growth and blood profile of Pangasius djambal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Firman M.; Nugroho, Rudy Agung; Fachmy, Syafrizal

    2017-02-01

    The study was conducted to examine the effects of propolis extract (PE) on the growth (G), growth rate (GR), specific growth rate (SGR) and blood profile (erythrocyte, leukocyte, and hemoglobin) of catfish (Pangasius djambal). five groups of fish with three replicates, containing 10 fish each group were fed various concentration of PE, viz 2 (P1), 4 (P2), 6 (P3), 8 (P4) and 10 (P5) g kg-1 of PE in a basal diet and compared to control (C) fish without PE at a rate 3% of body weight for 4 weeks. At the end of the trial, G, GR, SGR, and blood profile (erythrocyte, leukocyte, and hemoglobin) of all groups of fish were examined. The results showed that PE in the fish diet significantly increased G, GR, SGR, erythrocyte, hemoglobin while leukocyte was not affected by dietary any concentration of PE. The dietary 10 g kg-1 PE in the diet of fish showed the highest growth while the highest number of erythrocyte and hemoglobin activity was found in the fish fed 6 g kg-1 PE in the diet. These findings suggested that the inclusion of PE higher than 8 g kg-1 in the diet is beneficial to improve growth, growth rate, specific growth rate, erythrocyte and hemoglobin of Pangasius djambal.

  18. TLC profiles and antibacterial activity of Glinus oppositifolius L. Aug. DC. (Molluginaceae leaf and stem extracts against bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Janet R. Martin-Puzon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antibacterial activities and the thin-layer chromatography (TLC fingerprint profiles of leaf and stem extracts of Glinus oppositifolius L. Aug. DC (G. oppositifolius. Methods: The leaves and stems were extracted using chloroform, ethanol and methanol as solvents. The antibacterial activity of the extracts were evaluated through disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration and bactericidal concentration assays against methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamaseproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii (A. baumanii. The TLC separation was carried out on leaf and stem ethanol extracts in ethyl acetate: n-hexane solvent system. Distinct spots were examined under visible light, UV 254 nm, UV 366 nm and after spraying with vanillin-sulfuric acid. Results: The leaf extracts revealed antibacterial activities, inhibiting the growth of the nonresistant and multidrug-resistant strains of the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa and A. baumanii. The TLC fingerprint profiles demonstrated the presence of various phytochemicals in leaf and stem extracts. Leaf extracts exhibited more diverse constituents compared to stem extracts, but some constituents were similar in both plant parts. Conclusions: G. oppositifolius leaf extracts can be used as new, alternative sources of antimicrobials against non-resistant and multidrug-resistant strains of the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa and A. baumanii. The TLC profiles represent the chemical integrity of G. oppositifolius leaf and stem extracts which form an important and powerful tool for standardization, authentication, quality control and determination of bioactive components of G. oppositifolius in any formulation and in powder form.

  19. HPLC Evaluation of Phenolic Profile, Nutritive Content, and Antioxidant Capacity of Extracts Obtained from Punica granatum Fruit Peel

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    Sushil Kumar Middha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study revealed polyphenolic content, nutritive content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic profile of methanol and aqueous extracts of Punica granatum peel extract. For this, extracts were screened for possible antioxidant activities by free radical scavenging activity (DPPH, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. The total phenolics and flavonoid recovered by methanolic (MPE and the water extract (AQPE were ranged from 185 ± 12.45 to 298.00 ± 24.86 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalents/gm and 23.05 ± 1.54 to 49.8 ± 2.14 quercetin (QE mg/g, respectively. The EC50 of herbal extracts ranged from 100 µg/ml (0.38 quercetin equivalents, for AQPE, 168 µg/ml (0.80 quercetin equivalents, for MPE. The phenolic profile in the methanolic extracts was investigated by chromatographic (HPLC method. About 5 different flavonoids, phenolic acids, and their derivatives including quercetin (1, rutin (2, gallic acid (3, ellagic acid (4, and punicalagin as a major ellagitannin (5 have been identified. Among both extracts, methanolic extract was the most effective. This report may be the first to show nutritive content and correlation analysis to suggest that phenols and flavonoids might contribute the high antioxidant activity of this fruit peel and establish it as a valuable natural antioxidant source applicable in the health food industry.

  20. Phytochemical Profiling of Flavonoids, Phenolic Acids, Terpenoids, and Volatile Fraction of a Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Mena

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the phytochemical profile of a proprietary rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract rich in carnosic acid. A characterization of the (polyphenolic and volatile fractions of the extract was carried out using mass spectrometric techniques. The (polyphenolic composition was assessed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MSn and a total of 57 compounds were tentatively identified and quantified, 14 of these being detected in rosemary extract for the first time. The rosemary extract contained 24 flavonoids (mainly flavones, although flavonols and flavanones were also detected, 5 phenolic acids, 24 diterpenoids (carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol derivatives, 1 triterpenoid (betulinic acid, and 3 lignans (medioresinol derivatives. Carnosic acid was the predominant phenolic compound. The volatile profile of the rosemary extract was evaluated by head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME linked to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Sixty-three volatile molecules (mainly terpenes, alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and ketones were identified. This characterization extends the current knowledge on the phytochemistry of Rosmarinus officinalis and is, to our knowledge, the broadest profiling of its secondary metabolites to date. It can assist in the authentication of rosemary extracts or rosemary-containing products or in testing its bioactivity. Moreover, this methodological approach could be applied to the study of other plant-based food ingredients.

  1. Influence of DNA extraction on oral microbial profiles obtained via 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Abusleme

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The advent of next-generation sequencing has significantly facilitated characterization of the oral microbiome. Despite great efforts in streamlining the processes of sequencing and data curation, upstream steps required for amplicon library generation could still influence 16S rRNA gene-based microbial profiles. Among upstream processes, DNA extraction is a critical step that could represent a great source of bias. Accounting for bias introduced by extraction procedures is important when comparing studies that use different methods. Identifying the method that best portrays communities is also desirable. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate bias introduced by different DNA extraction procedures on oral microbiome profiles. Design: Four DNA extraction methods were tested on mock communities consisting of seven representative oral bacteria. Additionally, supragingival plaque samples were collected from seven individuals and divided equally to test two commonly used DNA extraction procedures. Amplicon libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced via 454-pyrosequencing. Results: Evaluation of mock communities revealed that DNA yield and bacterial species representation varied with DNA extraction methods. Despite producing the lowest yield of DNA, a method that included bead beating was the only protocol capable of detecting all seven species in the mock community. Comparison of the performance of two commonly used methods (crude lysis and a chemical/enzymatic lysis+column-based DNA isolation on plaque samples showed no effect of extraction protocols on taxa prevalence but global community structure and relative abundance of individual taxa were affected. At the phylum level, the latter method improved the recovery of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes over crude lysis. Conclusion: DNA extraction distorts microbial profiles in simulated and clinical oral samples, reinforcing the

  2. Influence of DNA extraction on oral microbial profiles obtained via 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusleme, Loreto; Hong, Bo-Young; Dupuy, Amanda K; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Diaz, Patricia I

    2014-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has significantly facilitated characterization of the oral microbiome. Despite great efforts in streamlining the processes of sequencing and data curation, upstream steps required for amplicon library generation could still influence 16S rRNA gene-based microbial profiles. Among upstream processes, DNA extraction is a critical step that could represent a great source of bias. Accounting for bias introduced by extraction procedures is important when comparing studies that use different methods. Identifying the method that best portrays communities is also desirable. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate bias introduced by different DNA extraction procedures on oral microbiome profiles. Four DNA extraction methods were tested on mock communities consisting of seven representative oral bacteria. Additionally, supragingival plaque samples were collected from seven individuals and divided equally to test two commonly used DNA extraction procedures. Amplicon libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced via 454-pyrosequencing. Evaluation of mock communities revealed that DNA yield and bacterial species representation varied with DNA extraction methods. Despite producing the lowest yield of DNA, a method that included bead beating was the only protocol capable of detecting all seven species in the mock community. Comparison of the performance of two commonly used methods (crude lysis and a chemical/enzymatic lysis+column-based DNA isolation) on plaque samples showed no effect of extraction protocols on taxa prevalence but global community structure and relative abundance of individual taxa were affected. At the phylum level, the latter method improved the recovery of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes over crude lysis. DNA extraction distorts microbial profiles in simulated and clinical oral samples, reinforcing the importance of careful selection of a DNA extraction protocol to improve

  3. Evaluation of different methods for DNA extraction from human burnt bones and the generation of genetic profiles for identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzair, Anum; Rasool, Nouman; Wasim, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Bone exposure to heat in the presence of moisture breaks the phosphodiester bonds of the backbone, leaving sheared DNA in bone cells. This also limits the possibility of generating a complete profile of the victim. With the increasing incidence of fire outbreaks over the past few years, a paradigm shift to establish identity has been observed, from morphological identification of victims to STR profiling. For this study, 10 bone samples were taken from burnt human bodies that were recovered from different fire outbreak scenes. The DNA from these burnt human tissues was isolated using four different extraction methods: the organic extraction method, the total demineralisation method, the Qiagen kit method, and the Chelex extraction method. STR profiles of victims were generated on a genetic analyser using an AmpFlSTR Identifiler® Plus Kit and analysed on Gene Mapper ID-X. DNA isolated from bones using the total demineralisation extraction method and organic extraction method was of the highest quality due to the efficient removal of inhibitors. DNA obtained using these two methods successfully generated the STR profiles of the victims. The quality of isolated DNA obtained through the Qiagen kit was comparatively low, but STR profiles of the victims were successfully generated. The Chelex kit failed to extract good quality DNA of high quantity from the burnt bones, encountering inhibition in all samples at varying degrees. This study concludes that total demineralisation and the Qiagen kit are sophisticated and reliable methods to obtain a good yield of DNA from burnt human bones, which can be used for the identification of victims.

  4. Extracting body image symptom dimensions among eating disorder patients: the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Kim, Se-Kang; Wall, David

    2015-09-01

    The present study employs Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS), a procedure for extracting dimensions, in order to identify core eating disorder symptoms in a clinical sample. A large sample of patients with eating disorders (N=5193) presenting for treatment completed the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2; Garner, 1991), and PAMS was then employed to estimate individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed symptom profile approximates the pattern of the dimensions. The findings revealed three symptom dimensions: Body Thinness, Body Perfectionism, and Body Awareness. Subsequent analysis using individual level data illustrate that the PAMS profiles properly operate as prototypical profiles that encapsulate all individuals' response patterns. The implications of these dimensional findings for the assessment and diagnosis of eating disorders are discussed.

  5. Multi-Component Profiling of Trace Volatiles in Blood by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry with Dynamic Headspace Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Shoji; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic headspace extraction method (DHS) with high-pressure injection is described. This dynamic extraction method has superior sensitivity to solid phase micro extraction, SPME and is capable of extracting the entire gas phase by purging the headspace of a vial. Optimization of the DHS parameters resulted in a highly sensitive volatile profiling system with the ability to detect various volatile components including alcohols at nanogram levels. The average LOD for a standard volatile mixture was 0.50 ng mL(-1), and the average LOD for alcohols was 0.66 ng mL(-1). This method was used for the analysis of volatile components from biological samples and compared with acute and chronic inflammation models. The method permitted the identification of volatiles with the same profile pattern as in vitro oxidized lipid-derived volatiles. In addition, the concentration of alcohols and aldehydes from the acute inflammation model samples were significantly higher than that for the chronic inflammation model samples. The different profiles between these samples could also be identified by this method. Finally, it was possible to analyze alcohols and low-molecular-weight volatiles that are difficult to analyze by SPME in high sensitivity and to show volatile profiling based on multi-volatile simultaneous analysis.

  6. Geophysical Methods: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A.; Goldstein, N. E.; Lee, K. H.; Majer, E. L.; Morrison, H. F.; Myer, L.

    1992-01-01

    Geophysics is expected to have a major role in lunar resource assessment when manned systems return to the Moon. Geophysical measurements made from a lunar rover will contribute to a number of key studies: estimating regolith thickness, detection of possible large-diameter lava tubes within maria basalts, detection of possible subsurface ice in polar regions, detection of conductive minerals that formed directly from a melt (orthomagmatic sulfides of Cu, Ni, Co), and mapping lunar geology beneath the regolith. The techniques that can be used are dictated both by objectives and by our abilities to adapt current technology to lunar conditions. Instrument size, weight, power requirements, and freedom from orientation errors are factors we have considered. Among the geophysical methods we believe to be appropriate for a lunar resource assessment are magnetics, including gradiometry, time-domain magnetic induction, ground-penetrating radar, seismic reflection, and gravimetry.

  7. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  8. SICHUAN GEOPHYSICAL COMPANY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Sichuan Geophysical Company (abbreviated as SCGC below), originally named Sichuan Geophysical Company of CNPC Sichuan Petroleum, was founded in 1956 and is a subsidiary of CNPC Chuanqing Drilling Engineering Company Limited. With more than 50 years' development, SCGC now owns almost 3800 employees and has become a big oil & gas seismic exploration engineering service enterprise with the characteristic mountain seismic exploration techniques, and its annual business turnover reaches nearly 2 billion RMB. It can provide the integrated seismic exploration engineering service including seismic data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and geological comprehensive evaluation in various complex regions for clients at home and abroad.

  9. Profiling of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plant extracts using in-source CID fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Ádám; Abrankó, László

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids (HCQAs) are a major class of phenolic plant secondary metabolites, belonging to the chlorogenic acid family. Various health-beneficial properties of HCQAs have been shown, which has drawn interest for HCQA profiling in plants of human consumption. However, this task remains challenging, because several isomeric HCQAs can be present in the sample with identical molecular formulae and the limited availability of reference standards poses additional challenges to their identification. In the present work, a high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q/TOF-MS) method accompanied with an effective data filtering protocol is presented, which is shown to be suitable for the identification of HCQAs in plant materials in a non-targeted manner. Both collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation performed in a collision cell and in-source (CID) fragmentation were used to produce accurate mass fragments. It was shown that fragmentation characteristics required for identification of regio-isomers of HCQAs can be achieved with in-source CID fragmentation, enabling the use of a single-stage MS system with in-source fragmentation for convincing identification of HCQAs. Based on a thorough validation of identified HCQA compounds using coffee bean extracts as reference samples, comprehensive profiling of HCQAs in two apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) genotypes ('Preventa' and 'Gönci magyarkajszi') was carried out for the first time and the following 10 HCQAs were shown to be present in apricot fruit: 3-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), cis-3-CQA, 4-CQA, 5-CQA, cis-5-CQA, 3,5-diCQA, 3-p-coumaroylquinic acid (pCoQA), 4-pCoQA, 3-feruloylquinic acid (FQA) and cis-3-FQA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. An HPLC-ESI-Q/TOF-MS method suitable for the identification of hydroxycinnamoyilquinic acids (HCQAs) in plant material in a non-targeted manner was developed. Single-stage, high

  10. The consumption of Hibiscus sabdariffa dried calyx ethanolic extract reduced lipid profile in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce Ma; Orta-Flores, Zaida; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M; Nolasco-Hipólito, Cirilo; Angulo-Guerrero, Ofelia; Sánchez-Ricaño, Ramón; Infanzón, Rosa M; Trujillo, Patricia R L

    2005-12-01

    The scientific basis for the statement that plants and their active constituents play an important role in the prevention of chronic and degenerative diseases is continously advancing. The object of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. dried calyx ethanolic extract on the serum lipid profile of Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were fed during 4 weeks with either a basal diet, containing high cholesterol (1%), cholic acid (0.25%), lard oil (10%), or a supplemental diet with H. sabdariffa extract at 5%, 10%, and 15% levels (SD(5), SD(10), SD(15)). Weight gain and faeces dry weight were both very significantly less (p extract addition showed the best results in the reduction of serum lipids under study conditions.

  11. Real Time Extraction Kinetics of Electro Membrane Extraction Verified by Comparing Drug Metabolism Profiles Obtained from a Flow-Flow Electro Membrane Extraction-Mass Spectrometry System with LC-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, David; Jensen, Henrik; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2015-01-01

    A simple to construct and operate, "dip-in" electromembrane extraction (EME) probe directly coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for rapid extraction and real time analysis of various analytes was developed. The setup demonstrated that EME-MS can be used as a viable...... alternative to conventional protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for studying drug metabolism. Comparison of EME-MS with LC-MS for drug metabolism analysis demonstrated for the first time that real time extraction of analytes by EME is possible. Metabolism kinetics...... were investigated for three different drugs: amitriptyline, promethazine, and methadone. By comparing the EME-MS extraction profiles of the drug substances and formed drug metabolites with the metabolism profiles obtained by conventional protein precipitation followed by LC-MS good correlation...

  12. Extraction of depth profiles of third-order elastic constants in cracked media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjelka, Marek; Koehler, Bernd; Mayer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Elastic constants of components are usually determined by tensile tests in combination with ultrasonic experiments. However, these properties may change due to e.g. mechanical treatments or service conditions during their lifetime. Knowledge of the actual material parameters is key to the determination of quantities like residual stresses present in the medium. In this work the acoustic nonlinearity parameter (ANP) for surface acoustic waves is examined through the derivation of an evolution equation for the amplitude of the second harmonic. Given a certain depth profile of the third-order elastic constants, the dependence of the ANP with respect to the input frequency is determined and on the basis of these results, an appropriate inversion method is developed. This method is intended for the extraction of the depth dependence of the third-order elastic constants of the material from second-harmonic generation and guided wave mixing experiments, assuming that the change in the linear Rayleigh wave velocity is small. The latter assumption is supported by a 3D-FEM model study of a medium with randomly distributed micro-cracks as well as theoretical works on this topic in the literature.

  13. Identification of Protein Pupylation Sites Using Bi-Profile Bayes Feature Extraction and Ensemble Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupylation, one of the most important posttranslational modifications of proteins, typically takes place when prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup is attached to specific lysine residues on a target protein. Identification of pupylation substrates and their corresponding sites will facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanism of pupylation. Comparing with the labor-intensive and time-consuming experiment approaches, computational prediction of pupylation sites is much desirable for their convenience and fast speed. In this study, a new bioinformatics tool named EnsemblePup was developed that used an ensemble of support vector machine classifiers to predict pupylation sites. The highlight of EnsemblePup was to utilize the Bi-profile Bayes feature extraction as the encoding scheme. The performance of EnsemblePup was measured with a sensitivity of 79.49%, a specificity of 82.35%, an accuracy of 85.43%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.617 using the 5-fold cross validation on the training dataset. When compared with other existing methods on a benchmark dataset, the EnsemblePup provided better predictive performance, with a sensitivity of 80.00%, a specificity of 83.33%, an accuracy of 82.00%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.629. The experimental results suggested that EnsemblePup presented here might be useful to identify and annotate potential pupylation sites in proteins of interest. A web server for predicting pupylation sites was developed.

  14. Comparative analysis of polyphenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tunisian pome fruit pulp and peel aqueous acetone extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattouch, S; Caboni, P; Coroneo, V; Tuberoso, C; Angioni, A; Dessi, S; Marzouki, N; Cabras, P

    2008-02-13

    Pome trees, apple, pear, and quince, are classified into the subfamily Pomoideae, belonging to the Rosaceae family. Their autumnal fruits are consumed worldwide in different forms, that is, fresh or transformed into jams, jelly, juices, etc. Their well-established beneficial properties to human health were found mainly related to their phenolic content. Pulp and peel aqueous acetone extracts obtained from Tunisian fruits at commercial maturity were comparatively evaluated for their phenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials. The phenolic compounds present in the extracts were identified and quantified using RP-HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS techniques. Significant differences in the chromatographic profiles among these fruits, as well as between pulp and peel extracts of each fruit, were observed. Quince, followed by 'Red Delicious', peel extracts showed the highest phenolic content (160.33 and 110.90 mg/100 g of fresh weight). The stronger inhibitory effect on DPPH radicals corresponded to those obtained from peel materials. A comparative analysis of the antimicrobial potential against a range of microorganism strains was also carried out. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus were the most sensitive to the active extracts. Among the examined phenolic extracts, 'Red Delicious' and quince peels showed the highest effects for inhibiting bacteria growth. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations ranged from 10(2) to 10(4) microg of polyphenol/mL. Red skin apple and quince peels could be of great interest as important antioxidant and antimicrobial polyphenol sources.

  15. Arizona Geophysical Data Base

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Ronald G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of digital data sets were compiled for input into a geophysical data base for a one degree quadrangle in Arizona. Using a Landsat digital mosaic as a base, information on topography, geology, gravity as well as Seasat radar imagery were registered. Example overlays and tabulations are performed.

  16. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for microbial community profiling with an application to pediatric bronchoalveolar lavage samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Willner

    Full Text Available Barcoded amplicon sequencing is rapidly becoming a standard method for profiling microbial communities, including the human respiratory microbiome. While this approach has less bias than standard cultivation, several steps can introduce variation including the type of DNA extraction method used. Here we assessed five different extraction methods on pediatric bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL samples and a mock community comprised of nine bacterial genera to determine method reproducibility and detection limits for these typically low complexity communities. Additionally, using the mock community, we were able to evaluate contamination and select a relative abundance cut-off threshold based on the geometric distribution that optimizes the trade off between detecting bona fide operational taxonomic units and filtering out spurious ones. Using this threshold, the majority of genera in the mock community were predictably detected by all extraction methods including the hard-to-lyse Gram-positive genus Staphylococcus. Differences between extraction methods were significantly greater than between technical replicates for both the mock community and BAL samples emphasizing the importance of using a standardized methodology for microbiome studies. However, regardless of method used, individual patients retained unique diagnostic profiles. Furthermore, despite being stored as raw frozen samples for over five years, community profiles from BAL samples were consistent with historical culturing results. The culture-independent profiling of these samples also identified a number of anaerobic genera that are gaining acceptance as being part of the respiratory microbiome. This study should help guide researchers to formulate sampling, extraction and analysis strategies for respiratory and other human microbiome samples.

  17. Qualitative and spatial metabolite profiling of lichens by a LC-MS approach combined with optimised extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Delphine; Peresse, Tiphaine; Hitti, Eric; Carrie, Daniel; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Lichens are self-sustaining partnerships comprising fungi as shape-forming partners for their enclosed symbiotic algae. They produce a tremendous diversity of metabolites (1050 metabolites described so far). A comparison of metabolic profiles in nine lichen species belonging to three genera (Lichina, Collema and Roccella) by using an optimised extraction protocol, determination of the fragmentation pathway and the in situ localisation for major compounds in Roccella species. Chemical analysis was performed using a complementary study combining a Taguchi experimental design with qualitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Optimal conditions to obtain the best total extraction yield were determined as follows: mortar grinding to a fine powder, two successive extractions, solid:liquid ratio (2:60) and 700 rpm stirring. Qualitative analysis of the metabolite profiling of these nine species extracted with the optimised method was corroborated using MS and MS/MS approaches. Nine main compounds were identified: 1 β-orcinol, 2 orsellinic acid, 3 putative choline sulphate, 4 roccellic acid, 5 montagnetol, 6 lecanoric acid, 7 erythrin, 8 lepraric acid and 9 acetylportentol, and several other compounds were reported. Identification was performed using the m/z ratio, fragmentation pathway and/or after isolation by NMR analysis. The variation of the metabolite profile in differently organised parts of two Roccella species suggests a specific role of major compounds in developmental stages of this symbiotic association. Metabolic profiles represent specific chemical species and depend on the extraction conditions, the kind of the photobiont partner and the in situ localisation of major compounds. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Pharmacopeial HPLC identification methods are not sufficient to detect adulterations in commercial bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) extracts. Anthocyanin profile provides additional clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Suresh

    2014-12-01

    Current pharmacopeias provide HPLC anthocyanin profiles to identify commercial bilberry extracts. However, the pharmacopeial identification protocols may not be sufficient enough to distinguish genuine bilberry extracts from adulterated material. This is primarily due to the non-inclusion of literature-reported anthocyanin profile and compositional variations in bilberry when sourced from different geographical regions. Using anthocyanin profiles of both authentic bilberry extracts and literature reports, we attempted to provide appropriate identification protocol for genuine bilberry extracts. We compared HPLC anthocyanin profiles of selected 'suspected' adulterant species and adulterant-spiked bilberry extracts to decipher clues to infer adulteration. The clues include appearance of new anthocyanin peaks and changes in compositional ratios of anthocyanins. In addition, we attempted to provide likely adulterants based on 'economic motivation' and market place information and appropriate clues to identify them in adulterated commercial bilberry extracts.

  19. PCR-fingerprint profiles of mitochondrial and genomic DNA extracted from Fetus cervi using different extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jinxia; Wang, Xuesong; Gao, Lijun; Xia, Wei; Li, Mingcheng; Yuan, Guangxin; Niu, Jiamu; Zhang, Lihua

    2016-06-01

    The use of Fetus cervi, which is derived from the embryo and placenta of Cervus Nippon Temminck or Cervs elaphus Linnaeus, has been documented for a long time in China. There are abundant species of deer worldwide. Those recorded by China Pharmacopeia (2010 edition) from all the species were either authentic or adulterants/counterfeits. Identification of their origins or authenticity became a key in the preparation of the authentic products. The traditional SDS alkaline lysis and salt-outing methods were modified to extract mt DNA and genomic DNA from fresh and dry Fetus cervi in addition to Fetus from false animals, respectively. A set of primers were designed by bioinformatics to target the intra-and inter-variation. The mt DNA and genomic DNA extracted from Fetus cervi using the two methods meet the requirement for authenticity. Extraction of mt DNA by SDS alkaline lysis is more practical and accurate than extraction of genomic DNA by salt-outing method. There were differences in length and number of segments amplified by PCR between mt DNA from authentic Fetus cervi and false animals Fetus. The distinctive PCR-fingerprint patterns can distinguish the Fetus cervi from adulterants and counterfeit animal Fetus.

  20. Serum protein profiling by solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry: A future diagnostics tool?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Anne K; Madsen, Jonna S; Vach, Werner;

    2009-01-01

    Serum protein profiling by MS is a promising method for early detection of disease. Important characteristics for serum protein profiling are preanalytical factors, analytical reproducibility and high throughput. Problems related to preanalytical factors can be overcome by using standardized...

  1. Phytochemical profile of Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis extracts and correlation to their antioxidant and anti-proliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Tomic, Goran; Nikolic, Ivana; Nerantzaki, Alexandra A; Sayyad, Nisar; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Stojanovic, Ivana; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Tzakos, Andreas G

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to monitor the anti-proliferative activity of Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis extracts against cancer cells and to correlate this activity with their phytochemical profiles using liquid chromatography/diode array detection/electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n)). For the quantitative estimation of triterpenic acids in the crude extracts an NMR based methodology was used and compared with the HPLC measurements, both applied for the first time, for the case of betulinic acid. Both extracts exerted cytotoxic activity through dose-dependent impairment of viability and mitochondrial activity of rat insulinoma m5F (RINm5F) cells. Decrease of RINm5F viability was mediated by nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis. Importantly, these extracts potentiated NO and TNF-α release from macrophages therefore enhancing their cytocidal action. The rosemary extract developed more pronounced antioxidant, cytotoxic and immunomodifying activities, probably due to the presence of betulinic acid and a higher concentration of carnosic acid in its phytochemical profile.

  2. Application of bacterial cytological profiling to crude natural product extracts reveals the antibacterial arsenal of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Trial, Rachelle M; Newton, Gerald L; Lamsa, Anne; Ranmali Perera, Varahenage; Aguilar, Julieta; Liu, Wei-Ting; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-05-01

    Although most clinically used antibiotics are derived from natural products, identifying new antibacterial molecules from natural product extracts is difficult due to the complexity of these extracts and the limited tools to correlate biological activity with specific molecules. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) provides a rapid method for mechanism of action determination on plates and in complex natural product extracts and for activity-guided purification. We prepared an extract from Bacillus subtilis 3610 that killed the Escherichia coli lptD mutant and used BCP to observe two types of bioactivities in the unfractionated extract: inhibition of translation and permeablization of the cytoplasmic membrane. We used BCP to guide purification of the molecules responsible for each activity, identifying the translation inhibitors bacillaene and bacillaene B (glycosylated bacillaene) and demonstrating that two molecules contribute to cell permeabilitization, the bacteriocin subtilosin and the cyclic peptide sporulation killing factor. Our results suggest that bacillaene mediates translational arrest, and show that bacillaene B has a minimum inhibitory concentration 10 × higher than unmodified bacillaene. Finally, we show that BCP can be used to screen strains on an agar plate without the need for extract preparation, greatly saving time and improving throughput. Thus, BCP simplifies the isolation of novel natural products, by identifying strains, crude extracts and fractions with interesting bioactivities even when multiple activities are present, allowing investigators to focus labor-intensive steps on those with desired activities.

  3. Computational identification of protein methylation sites through bi-profile Bayes feature extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlin Shao

    Full Text Available Protein methylation is one type of reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs, which plays vital roles in many cellular processes such as transcription activity, DNA repair. Experimental identification of methylation sites on proteins without prior knowledge is costly and time-consuming. In silico prediction of methylation sites might not only provide researches with information on the candidate sites for further determination, but also facilitate to perform downstream characterizations and site-specific investigations. In the present study, a novel approach based on Bi-profile Bayes feature extraction combined with support vector machines (SVMs was employed to develop the model for Prediction of Protein Methylation Sites (BPB-PPMS from primary sequence. Methylation can occur at many residues including arginine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and proline. For the present, BPB-PPMS is only designed to predict the methylation status for lysine and arginine residues on polypeptides due to the absence of enough experimentally verified data to build and train prediction models for other residues. The performance of BPB-PPMS is measured with a sensitivity of 74.71%, a specificity of 94.32% and an accuracy of 87.98% for arginine as well as a sensitivity of 70.05%, a specificity of 77.08% and an accuracy of 75.51% for lysine in 5-fold cross validation experiments. Results obtained from cross-validation experiments and test on independent data sets suggest that BPB-PPMS presented here might facilitate the identification and annotation of protein methylation. Besides, BPB-PPMS can be extended to build predictors for other types of PTM sites with ease. For public access, BPB-PPMS is available at http://www.bioinfo.bio.cuhk.edu.hk/bpbppms.

  4. Chemical profiling of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb. rhizome using different techniques of solvent extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanimah Simoh

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: It was evident from the results that C. aeruginosa rhizome extracted using two different techniques of solvent extractions (MTBE and M/C contained various chemical classes of compounds including terpenoids, sterols, organic acids, fatty acids and sugars. Different methods of extraction have led to different compounds extraction for C. aeruginosa rhizome. The results also indicated that the plant was a source of phytochemical importance.

  5. Bioactive metabolite profiles and antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from Muntingia calabura L. leaves and stems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Patrick Cruiz Buhian; Raquel Orejudos Rubio; Demetrio Lim Valle Jr.; Juliana Janet Martin-Puzon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the bioactive phytochemicals and antimicrobial activity of leaf and stem ethanolic extracts from Muntingia calabura L.(M. calabura).Methods: Dried leaves and stems of M. calabura were extracted with 95% ethanol. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the extracts were examined using the disc diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC) of each extract showing antimicrobial activity was determined. The dried extracts were subjected to phytochemical screening to determine the presence of bioactive components. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined by the Folin–Ciocalteu method and the aluminum chloride method, respectively.Results: Varying degrees of antimicrobial activity were exhibited by the leaf and stem extracts against Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P. aeruginosa), Salmonella typhimurium,Staphylococcus aureus(S. aureus), Bacillus subtilis, and Candida albicans(C. albicans),with minimal activity against Escherichia coli. Based on the MIC, the extracts showed the highest activity against C. albicans, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of sterols, flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins, glycosides and tannins in the leaf extract; however, no triterpenes were detected. In the stem extract,triterpenes were detected along with relative amounts of flavonoids, saponins, glycosides and tannins. Alkaloids and sterols were absent in the stem extract.Conclusions: M. calabura leaf and stem ethanol extracts are potential sources of antibacterial agents against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. This study reports for the first time the high degree of antifungal activity of M. calabura ethanolic extract, especially against C. albicans.

  6. Extracts of Monascusus Purpureus beyond Statins --Profile of Efficacy and Safety of the Use of Extracts of Monascus Purpureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIANCHI Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Extracts of Monascus purpureus have always been considered a natural source of lovastatin,the precursor of the world's largest selling class of drugs. In actual fact, the fungus contains many other substances (flavonoids, polyunsaturated fats, pyrrolinic compounds etc. ) with a wide variety of other actions.The most recent studies have shown that it has an action on the glycemic metabolism, and on the mechanisms of adipogenesis, also an effects on the endothelium and on postprandial vasodilation. These effects are more extensive and complex than those of statins alone. And new strains of Monascus purpureus have recently been patented where the presence of statins is only one of the therapeutic components of the fungus. In particular,the increase in secondary components, such as flavonoids, which coincides with a more complex therapeutic action, probably making the new extracts of Monascus purpureus, the ideal candidate for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Polyphenolic Profile and Targeted Bioactivity of Methanolic Extracts from Mediterranean Ethnomedicinal Plants on Human Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Pollio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methanol extracts of the aerial part of four ethnomedicinal plants of Mediterranean region, two non-seed vascular plants, Equisetum hyemale L. and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L. Newman, and two Spermatophyta, Juniperus communis L. (J. communis and Cotinus coggygria Scop. (C. coggygria, were screened against four human cells lines (A549, MCF7, TK6 and U937. Only the extracts of J. communis and C. coggygria showed marked cytotoxic effects, affecting both cell morphology and growth. A dose-dependent effect of these two extracts was also observed on the cell cycle distribution. Incubation of all the cell lines in a medium containing J. communis extract determined a remarkable accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase, whereas the C. coggygria extract induced a significant increase in the percentage of G1 cells. The novelty of our findings stands on the observation that the two extracts, consistently, elicited coherent effects on the cell cycle in four cell lines, independently from their phenotype, as two of them have epithelial origin and grow adherent and two are lymphoblastoid and grow in suspension. Even the expression profiles of several proteins regulating cell cycle progression and cell death were affected by both extracts. LC-MS investigation of methanol extract of C. coggygria led to the identification of twelve flavonoids (compounds 1–11, 19 and eight polyphenols derivatives (12–18, 20, while in J. communis extract, eight flavonoids (21–28, a α-ionone glycoside (29 and a lignin (30 were found. Although many of these compounds have interesting individual biological activities, their natural blends seem to exert specific effects on the proliferation of cell lines either growing adherent or in suspension, suggesting potential use in fighting cancer.

  8. Polyphenolic Profile and Targeted Bioactivity of Methanolic Extracts from Mediterranean Ethnomedicinal Plants on Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Antonino; Zarrelli, Armando; Romanucci, Valeria; Di Mauro, Alfredo; Barra, Federica; Pinto, Gabriele; Crescenzi, Elvira; Roscetto, Emanuela; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2016-03-23

    The methanol extracts of the aerial part of four ethnomedicinal plants of Mediterranean region, two non-seed vascular plants, Equisetum hyemale L. and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L.) Newman, and two Spermatophyta, Juniperus communis L. (J. communis) and Cotinus coggygria Scop. (C. coggygria), were screened against four human cells lines (A549, MCF7, TK6 and U937). Only the extracts of J. communis and C. coggygria showed marked cytotoxic effects, affecting both cell morphology and growth. A dose-dependent effect of these two extracts was also observed on the cell cycle distribution. Incubation of all the cell lines in a medium containing J. communis extract determined a remarkable accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase, whereas the C. coggygria extract induced a significant increase in the percentage of G1 cells. The novelty of our findings stands on the observation that the two extracts, consistently, elicited coherent effects on the cell cycle in four cell lines, independently from their phenotype, as two of them have epithelial origin and grow adherent and two are lymphoblastoid and grow in suspension. Even the expression profiles of several proteins regulating cell cycle progression and cell death were affected by both extracts. LC-MS investigation of methanol extract of C. coggygria led to the identification of twelve flavonoids (compounds 1-11, 19) and eight polyphenols derivatives (12-18, 20), while in J. communis extract, eight flavonoids (21-28), a α-ionone glycoside (29) and a lignin (30) were found. Although many of these compounds have interesting individual biological activities, their natural blends seem to exert specific effects on the proliferation of cell lines either growing adherent or in suspension, suggesting potential use in fighting cancer.

  9. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  10. LC-MS-based metabolite profiling of methanolic extracts from the medicinal and aromatic species Mentha pulegium and Origanum majorana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taamalli, Amani; Arráez-Román, David; Abaza, Leila; Iswaldi, Ihsan; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing interest dedicated to the phenolic compounds with a view to their antioxidant and healthy properties. Recent studies have focused on plants from the Lamiaceae family with special interest in phenolic compounds antioxidant potential. The metabolite profile of methanolic extracts from two Lamiacea medicinal plants was investigated. Mentha pulegium and Origanum majorana methanolic extracts were analysed using reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-UHPLC) coupled to electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOF-MS) detection in the negative ion mode. A total of 85 metabolites were characterised from different families, such as organic acids and derivatives, amino acids and derivatives, nucleosides, phenolic compounds as well as other polar metabolites, by using the MS and MS/MS information provided by the QTOF-MS. However, the total phenols and flavonoids were also quantified spectrophotometrically and they registered higher amounts in Mentha pulegium than in Origanum majorana extract. Gallocatechin was the major compound in M. pulegium extract whereas quercetin dimethyl ether, jaceidin and dihydrokaempferide were the major ones in O. majorana extract. The distribution of phenolic compounds in the methanolic extract showed a variation among studied plants. Mentha pulegium can be considered as a source of gallocatechin. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Ameliorating Effect of Ginger Extract (Zingiber officinale Roscoe on Liver Marker Enzymes, Lipid Profile in Aluminium chloride Induced Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kalaiselvi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, aluminium (Al exposure has been increasing and it has the potential to be toxic in animal and humans. In recent years, ginger has become a subject of interest because of its beneficial effects on human health. The purpose of the present study to investigate the effect of ginger extract on serum biochemical parameters of aluminium chloride (AlCl3 induced male rats. 24 Wistar rats (6 in each group distributed into 4 groups. Control group received distilled water as vehicle; In E1 group, animal received AlCl3 orally (100 mg/kg bw, E2 group received AlCl3 (100 mg/kg bw and simultaneously with ginger extract (50 mg/kg bw and E3 group received ginger extract alone (50 mg/kg bw for 60 days. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples were collected for separating the serum for biochemical analyses. The results showed that oral administration of aluminium revealed a significant increase in the levels of serum glucose, total protein, globulin, albumin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, lipid profile and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP and no change was noted in bilirubin. The extract of ginger decreased the activities serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, lipid profile and all the parameter studied. It was concluded that the consumption of ginger protects the liver and kidney against the Aluminium toxicity. In addition, ginger is capable of improving hyperlipidemia and the impaired kidney functions.

  12. ¹H NMR and HPLC/DAD for Cannabis sativa L. chemotype distinction, extract profiling and specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Wieland; Politi, Matteo

    2015-08-01

    The medicinal use of different chemovars and extracts of Cannabis sativa L. requires standardization beyond ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with complementing methods. We investigated the suitability of (1)H NMR key signals for distinction of four chemotypes measured in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide together with two new validated HPLC/DAD methods used for identification and extract profiling based on the main pattern of cannabinoids and other phenolics alongside the assayed content of THC, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG) their acidic counterparts (THCA, CBDA, CBGA), cannabinol (CBN) and cannflavin A and B. Effects on cell viability (MTT assay, HeLa) were tested. The dominant cannabinoid pairs allowed chemotype recognition via assignment of selective proton signals and via HPLC even in cannabinoid-low extracts from the THC, CBD and CBG type. Substantial concentrations of cannabinoid acids in non-heated extracts suggest their consideration for total values in chemotype distinction and specifications of herbal drugs and extracts. Cannflavin A/B are extracted and detected together with cannabinoids but always subordinated, while other phenolics can be accumulated via fractionation and detected in a wide fingerprint but may equally serve as qualitative marker only. Cell viability reduction in HeLa was more determined by the total cannabinoid content than by the specific cannabinoid profile. Therefore the analysis and labeling of total cannabinoids together with the content of THC and 2-4 lead cannabinoids are considered essential. The suitability of analytical methods and the range of compound groups summarized in group and ratio markers are discussed regarding plant classification and pharmaceutical specification.

  13. Bioactive metabolite profiles and antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from Muntingia calabura L. leaves and stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Patrick Cruiz Buhian

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: M. calabura leaf and stem ethanol extracts are potential sources of antibacterial agents against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. This study reports for the first time the high degree of antifungal activity of M. calabura ethanolic extract, especially against C. albicans.

  14. Insect lipid profile: aqueous versus organic solvent-based extraction methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzompa Sosa, D.A.; Yi, L.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Lakemond, C.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    In view of future expected industrial bio-fractionation of insects, we investigated the influence of extraction methods on chemical characteristics of insect lipids. Lipids from Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, Acheta domesticus and Blaptica dubia, reared in the Netherlands, were extracted

  15. Phytochemical profile and anticholinesterase and antimicrobial activities of supercritical versus conventional extracts of Satureja montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Filipa V M; Martins, Alice; Salta, Joana; Neng, Nuno R; Nogueira, José M F; Mira, Delfina; Gaspar, Natália; Justino, Jorge; Grosso, Clara; Urieta, José S; Palavra, António M S; Rauter, Amélia P

    2009-12-23

    Winter savory Satureja montana is a medicinal herb used in traditional gastronomy for seasoning meats and salads. This study reports a comparison between conventional (hydrodistillation, HD, and Soxhlet extraction, SE) and alternative (supercritical fluid extraction, SFE) extraction methods to assess the best option to obtain bioactive compounds. Two different types of extracts were tested, the volatile (SFE-90 bar, second separator vs HD) and the nonvolatile fractions (SFE-250 bar, first and second separator vs SE). The inhibitory activity over acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase by S. montana extracts was assessed as a potential indicator for the control of Alzheimer's disease. The supercritical nonvolatile fractions, which showed the highest content of (+)-catechin, chlorogenic, vanillic, and protocatechuic acids, also inhibited selectively and significantly butyrylcholinesterase, whereas the nonvolatile conventional extract did not affect this enzyme. Microbial susceptibility tests revealed the great potential of S. montana volatile supercritical fluid extract for the growth control and inactivation of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus, showing some activity against Botrytis spp. and Pyricularia oryzae. Although some studies were carried out on S. montana, the phytochemical analysis together with the biological properties, namely, the anticholinesterase and antimicrobial activities of the plant nonvolatile and volatile supercritical fluid extracts, are described herein for the first time.

  16. Geophysical monitoring in a hydrocarbon reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of hydrocarbons from reservoirs demands ever-increasing technological effort, and there is need for geophysical monitoring to better understand phenomena occurring within the reservoir. Significant deformation processes happen when man-made stimulation is performed, in combination with effects deriving from the existing natural conditions such as stress regime in situ or pre-existing fracturing. Keeping track of such changes in the reservoir is important, on one hand for improving recovery of hydrocarbons, and on the other hand to assure a safe and proper mode of operation. Monitoring becomes particularly important when hydraulic-fracturing (HF) is used, especially in the form of the much-discussed "fracking". HF is a sophisticated technique that is widely applied in low-porosity geological formations to enhance the production of natural hydrocarbons. In principle, similar HF techniques have been applied in Europe for a long time in conventional reservoirs, and they will probably be intensified in the near future; this suggests an increasing demand in technological development, also for updating and adapting the existing monitoring techniques in applied geophysics. We review currently available geophysical techniques for reservoir monitoring, which appear in the different fields of analysis in reservoirs. First, the properties of the hydrocarbon reservoir are identified; here we consider geophysical monitoring exclusively. The second step is to define the quantities that can be monitored, associated to the properties. We then describe the geophysical monitoring techniques including the oldest ones, namely those in practical usage from 40-50 years ago, and the most recent developments in technology, within distinct groups, according to the application field of analysis in reservoir. This work is performed as part of the FracRisk consortium (www.fracrisk.eu); this project, funded by the Horizon2020 research programme, aims at helping minimize the

  17. Regularization methods for the extraction of depth profiles from simulated ARXPS data derived from overlayer/substrate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paynter, R.W., E-mail: Royston_Paynter@emt.inrs.ca [INRS Energie Materiaux Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regularization improved the accuracy and reproducibility of ARXPS depth profiles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 'S-curve' and 'L-curve' regularization parameters were shown to be equivalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'S-curve' parameterization was optimal in 50% of cases for the MaxEnt regulator. - Abstract: Starting from posited input depth profiles of silicon oxide on silicon, 100 sets of noisy simulated ARXPS data were created for each oxide layer thickness of 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24 and 27 Angstrom-Sign . Oxygen depth profiles were then recovered from the noisy simulated data using regularized inversion methods, including maximum entropy and Tikhonov regularization. Three regularization parameters were used: one determined by the S-curve method, one determined by the L-curve method and a third corresponding to the closest correspondence between the input and extracted profiles. The various regularization schemes evaluated were ranked with respect to their ability to reproduce the input profile.

  18. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  19. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  20. Geophysical wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chaoguang

    2000-11-01

    This study is concerned with geophysical wave tomography techniques that include advanced diffraction tomography, traveltime calculation techniques and simultaneous attenuation and velocity tomography approaches. We propose the source independent approximation, the Modified Quasi-Linear approximation and develop a fast and accurate diffraction tomography algorithm that uses this approximation. Since the Modified Quasi-Linear approximation accounts for the scattering fields within scatterers, this tomography algorithm produces better image quality than conventional Born approximation tomography algorithm does with or without the presence of multiple scatterers and can be used to reconstruct images of high contrast objects. Since iteration is not required, this algorithm is efficient. We improve the finite difference traveltime calculation algorithm proposed by Vidale (1990). The bucket theory is utilized in order to enhance the sorting efficiency, which accounts for about ten percent computing time improvement for large velocity models. Snell's law is employed to solve the causality problem analytically, which enables the modified algorithm to compute traveltimes accurately and rapidly for high velocity contrast media. We also develop two simultaneous attenuation and velocity tomography approaches, which use traveltimes and amplitude spectra of the observed data, and discuss some of their applications. One approach is processing geophysical data that come from one single survey and the other deals with the repeated survey cases. These approaches are nonlinear and therefore more accurate than linear tomography. A linear system for wave propagation and constant-Q media are assumed in order to develop the tomography algorithms. These approaches not only produce attenuation and velocity images at the same time but also can be used to infer the physical rock properties, such as the dielectric permittivity, the electric conductivity, and the porosity. A crosshole radar

  1. Geophysics publications honored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysics and geology publications by the U.S. Geological Survey were awarded one first- and two third-place prizes at the ‘Blue Pencil’ ceremony last month, sponsored by the National Association of Government Communicators.First place in the news release category went to Frank Forrester, an AGU member and recently retired USGS information officer. Editors and artists of the bimonthly USGS Earthquake Information Bulletin were awarded third place in the category for technical magazines using at least two colors.

  2. Hawthorn Fruit Extract Elevates Expression of Nrf2/HO-1 and Improves Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hyun Yoo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge extract on the lipid profiles and antioxidant properties in ovariectomized (OVX rats. After ovariectomy, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: the non-OVX control (Sham, the OVX-control (OVX, the OVX + 100 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OL, and the OVX + 200 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OH. The final body weights of the OVX group were significantly increased, but the increment was significantly decreased in hawthorn groups (p < 0.05. The serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups showed a significant decrease in these levels (p < 0.05. The hepatic triglyceride (TG and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were significantly reduced in the hawthorn groups compared with the OVX group (p < 0.05. The mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor (Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were significantly decreased in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups exhibited a significant increase in expression (p < 0.05. The protein expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GPx were lower in the OVX group than the Sham group (p < 0.05. The oral administration of hawthorn extract reversed the suppression of protein levels. These results suggest that hawthorn extract could have protective effects in OVX rats by improving lipid profiles, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving the antioxidant defense system.

  3. Morus nigra leaf extract improves glycemic response and redox profile in the liver of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Carolina Morais; Lúcio, Karine de Pádua; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Isoldi, Mauro César; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Schulz, Richard; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia and alterations in the carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. DM is associated with increased oxidative stress and pancreatic beta cell damage, which impair the production of insulin and the maintenance of normoglycemia. Inhibiting oxidative damage and controlling hyperglycemia are two important strategies for the prevention of diabetes. The pulp and leaf extracts of mulberry (Morus nigra L.) have abundant total phenolics and flavonoids, and its antioxidant potential may be an important factor for modulating oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In this study, DM was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan monohydrate (135 mg kg(-1)). Female Fischer rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic pulp, and diabetic leaf extract. Animals in the diabetic pulp and diabetic leaf extract groups were treated for 30 days with M. nigra L. pulp or leaf extracts, respectively. At the end of treatment, animals were euthanized and, liver and blood samples were collected for analysis of biochemical and metabolic parameters. Our study demonstrated that treatment of diabetic rats with leaf extracts decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase (CAT) ratio and carbonylated protein levels by reducing oxidative stress. Moreover, the leaf extract of M. nigra L. decreased the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, increased insulinemia, and alleviated hyperglycemia-induced diabetes. In conclusion, our study found that the leaf extract of M. nigra L. improved oxidative stress and complications in diabetic rats, suggesting the utility of this herbal remedy in the prevention and treatment of DM.

  4. Profiling of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Dry Extracts from the Selected Sorbus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Michel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant efficiency of dry extracts from inflorescences and/or leaves of seven Sorbus species was studied using four in vitro tests of SET (single electron transfer and HAT-type (hydrogen atom transfer mechanisms. The 70% methanol extracts and its diethyl ether, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water fractions were tested in parallel with the phenolic standards, e.g., caffeic acid, quercetin, BHA, BHT, and TroloxÒ. The SET-type activity of the extracts depended primarily on the extraction solvent. The most valuable extracts were n-butanol and ethyl acetate ones, which activity was high in the DPPH (EC50 = 3.2–5.2 μg/mL, TEAC (2.8–4.0 mmol Trolox®/g, and FRAP (9.8–13.7 mmol Fe2+/g tests, and strongly correlated with the total phenolic levels (39.6–58.2% of gallic acid equivalents. The HPLC-PDA analysis of the extracts led to the identification of chlorogenic acid, isoquercitrin, hyperoside, rutin, quercetin 3-O-sophoroside, and sexangularetin 3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside as the main components. Apart from flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acids, proanthocyanidins have also a significant impact on the SET-type activity. The HAT-reactivity of the extracts in the linoleic acid peroxidation test (IC50 = 36.9–228.3 μg/mL depended more strongly on the plant tissue than on the extraction solvent, and its correlation with the phenolic content was weak. Both SET and HAT-type activity of the most potent Sorbus extracts was comparable with the activity of the standards, indicating their great potential as effective sources for health products.

  5. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  6. Preliminary results concerning the simulation of beam profiles from extracted ion current distributions for mini-STRIKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostinetti, P., E-mail: piero.agostinetti@igi.cnr.it; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Giacomin, M. [Physics Department, Università di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bonomo, F.; Schiesko, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The Radio Frequency (RF) negative hydrogen ion source prototype has been chosen for the ITER neutral beam injectors due to its optimal performances and easier maintenance demonstrated at Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching in hydrogen and deuterium. One of the key information to better understand the operating behavior of the RF ion sources is the extracted negative ion current density distribution. This distribution—influenced by several factors like source geometry, particle drifts inside the source, cesium distribution, and layout of cesium ovens—is not straightforward to be evaluated. The main outcome of the present contribution is the development of a minimization method to estimate the extracted current distribution using the footprint of the beam recorded with mini-STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter). To accomplish this, a series of four computational models have been set up, where the output of a model is the input of the following one. These models compute the optics of the ion beam, evaluate the distribution of the heat deposited on the mini-STRIKE diagnostic calorimeter, and finally give an estimate of the temperature distribution on the back of mini-STRIKE. Several iterations with different extracted current profiles are necessary to give an estimate of the profile most compatible with the experimental data. A first test of the application of the method to the BAvarian Test Machine for Negative ions beam is given.

  7. WATER EXTRACT OF SWEET POTATO LEAF IMPROVED LIPID PROFILE AND BLOOD SOD CONTENT OF RATS WITH HIGH CHOLESTEROL DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Sumardika

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Food stuffs with high flavonoids content  are believed to prevent various diseases caused by oxidative stress because of its antioxidants effect.  Purple sweet potato leaves have been proved containing high flavonoids, and can be developed very easily. To prove antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties of the water extract of purple sweet potato leaves, one research was conducted in the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University. The study design was randomized control group pre- and post-test.  Twenty adult male wistar rats were divided into two groups of 10 rats. Both groups of rats were given high-cholesterol diet for three months to induce dyslipidemia. Control group of 10 rats were given only high-cholesterol diet alone, whereas the treatment group also treated with purple sweet potato leaf water extract with a dose of 6 cc per day divided into two doses. Before treatment and after treatment, lipid profile and blood SOD levels were measured. The results showed a decrease in total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol significantly in the treated group (P = 0.0001. In the treatment group there was also an increase in HDL cholesterol and blood SOD which was significantly differ than the control group (P = 0.0001. From the results of this study, it can be concluded that administration of water extract of purple sweet potato leaves can improve the lipid profile and increase blood SOD of rat given high-cholesterol diet.

  8. MORPHOLOGICAL PROFILE AND GRANULOMETRIC MAPS IN EXTRACTION OF BUILDINGS IN VHR SATELLITE IMAGES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kupidura Przemysław; Skulimowska Monika

    2015-01-01

    ...: the morphological profile, and granulometric maps in detecting buildings on satellite images. It briefly explains the theoretical basis for granulometric analysis of image and compares two methods used in research...

  9. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which I and my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same ti...

  10. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which land my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same tim...

  11. Geophysical limits to global wind power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Kate; Kravitz, Ben; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-02-01

    There is enough power in Earth's winds to be a primary source of near-zero-emission electric power as the global economy continues to grow through the twenty-first century. Historically, wind turbines are placed on Earth's surface, but high-altitude winds are usually steadier and faster than near-surface winds, resulting in higher average power densities. Here, we use a climate model to estimate the amount of power that can be extracted from both surface and high-altitude winds, considering only geophysical limits. We find wind turbines placed on Earth's surface could extract kinetic energy at a rate of at least 400TW, whereas high-altitude wind power could extract more than 1,800TW. At these high rates of extraction, there are pronounced climatic consequences. However, we find that at the level of present global primary power demand (~ 18TW ref. ), uniformly distributed wind turbines are unlikely to substantially affect the Earth's climate. It is likely that wind power growth will be limited by economic or environmental factors, not global geophysical limits.

  12. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of the carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua L.) germ flour extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Luísa; Escapa, Ana Luísa; Fernandes, Eliana; Fajardo, Alba; Aligué, Rosa; Alberício, Fernando; Neng, Nuno; Nogueira, José Manuel Florêncio; Romano, Anabela

    2011-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the phytochemical content and to determine the antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of methanol extracts of the carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua L.) germ flour. The extracts were rich in phenolic compounds, had considerable antioxidant activity, and reduced the viability of cervical (HeLa) cancer cells. The chemical content and the biological activities of the extracts were significantly affected by gender and cultivar. Female cultivar Galhosa had the highest levels of phenolic compounds, and the highest antioxidant activity. Extracts from the hermaphrodite trees and from the female cultivars Galhosa and Costela/Canela exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity. The most abundant compound was theophylline. The phenolic content was correlated to both antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. Our findings provide new knowledge about the health implications of consuming food supplemented with carob germ flour.

  13. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening and GC- MS Profiling of Ethanolic Flower Extract of Calotropis gigantea Linn. (Apocyanaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dhivya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calotropis gigantea Linn is popularly known as the swallow-wort or milkweed and is used as one of the most important drug in Traditional System of Medicine to treat various ailments. The aim of this study is to screen the phytochemicals present in the ethanolic flower extract of Calotropis gigantea and further analysis of the components present in it by GC-MS analysis. Ten grams of flower power was sequentially extracted by ethanol. The results showed the presence of phytochemical compounds of alkaloids, tannins, phenol, flavanoids, sterols, antraquinones, proteins and quinones in the flower extract. The GC-MS analysis of the ethanolic extract revealed the presence of 14 major compounds. This study forms a basis for the biological characterization and importance of the compounds identified and creates a platform to screen many bioactive components to treat many diseases.

  14. Gene expression profiles of Drosophila melanogaster exposed to an insecticidal extract of Piper nigrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Helen R; Scott, Ian M; Sims, Steve; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John Thor

    2006-02-22

    Black pepper, Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae), has insecticidal properties and could potentially be utilized as an alternative to synthetic insecticides. Piperine extracted from P. nigrum has a biphasic effect upon cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity with an initial suppression followed by induction. In this study, an ethyl acetate extract of P. nigrum seeds was tested for insecticidal activity toward adult Musca domestica and Drosophila melanogaster. The effect of this same P. nigrum extract upon differential gene expression in D. melanogaster was investigated using cDNA microarray analysis of 7380 genes. Treatment of D. melanogaster with P. nigrum extract led to a greater than 2-fold upregulation of transcription of the cytochrome P450 phase I metabolism genes Cyp 6a8, Cyp 9b2, and Cyp 12d1 as well as the glutathione-S-transferase phase II metabolism gene Gst-S1. These data suggests a complex effect of P. nigrum upon toxin metabolism.

  15. Soil DNA Extraction Procedure Influences Protist 18S rRNA Gene Community Profiling Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Susana S; Nunes, Inês; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies allow deeper studies of the soil protist diversity and function. However, little attention has been given to the impact of the chosen soil DNA extraction procedure to the overall results. We examined the effect of three acknowledged DNA recovery methods, two ma...... high replication reproducibility. A comprehensive understanding of the DNA extraction techniques impact on soil protist diversity can enable more accurate diversity assays....

  16. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening and GC- MS Profiling of Ethanolic Flower Extract of Calotropis gigantea Linn. (Apocyanaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    R.Dhivya; K. Manimegalai

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis gigantea Linn is popularly known as the swallow-wort or milkweed and is used as one of the most important drug in Traditional System of Medicine to treat various ailments. The aim of this study is to screen the phytochemicals present in the ethanolic flower extract of Calotropis gigantea and further analysis of the components present in it by GC-MS analysis. Ten grams of flower power was sequentially extracted by ethanol. The results showed the presence of phytochemical compounds ...

  17. The effect of aqueous extract of Kalanchoe Folium on methylprednisolone pharmacokinetic profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriyanti, Niken; Garmana, Afrillia Nuryanti; Setiawan, Finna; Sukandar, Elin Yulinah; Adnyana, I. Ketut

    2016-03-01

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves had immunosupressant effect on lupus nephritis model. When it combined with methylprednisolone, there is a risk of interaction. In this study rats divided into two groups, a group that received methylprednisolone (MP) (0.72 mg/kgBW) and a group that received MP in combination with extract (0.36 mg/kg BW MP and 140 mg/kg BW extract). These treatment were given everyday for 4 weeks. Methylprednisolone concentration in rats serum was measured using HPLC with extraction method according to Lawson method (1985). The column used was Inertsil C-18 using mobile phase KH2PO4 : metanol (15:85) buffer, flow rate 0.6 mL/minutes, UV detector (λ = 230 nm) and pressure 1319 psi. The result showed that there was an interaction occurred. The combination of MP and aqueous extract of K. pinnata leaves showed interaction which causing methylprednisolone level comparable with methylprednisolone level in MP group. Mean of decreasing MP level in serum was 0.285 ppm. It means that aqueous extract of Kalanchoe Folium could elevate methylprednisolone concentration in plasma. Adjustment of the dose must be considered in this combination.

  18. Development of standardized extractive solution from Lippia sidoides by factorial design and their redox active profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of variables of preparation on total flavonoids content from extractive solution of Lippia sidoides Cham., Verbenaceae. Thus a 23 factorial design was used to study the importance of plant proportion, the extraction method and solvent on the extraction of flavonoid. The methodology of determination of chemicals in factorial design was validated according to the parameters required by Brazilian Health Agency. The extraction solution was selected through a full factorial design where the best conditions to achieve the highest content of flavonoids were: 7.5% (w/v of plant with ethanol 50% (v/v as solvent. The polyphenols content was determined by LC method and its relationship with the antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities was evaluated. The free radical scavenging activities and antioxidant potentials were determined for different concentrations using various in vitro models. Our results indicate that extracts exhibited a significant dose-dependent antioxidant effect as evaluated by TRAP/TAR assays. Besides, we observed an antioxidant activity against hydroxyl radicals and nitric oxide, and protection against lipid peroxidation in vitro. Our results suggest that the extract presents significant in vitro antioxidant potential indicating promising perspectives for its use as pharmaceutical/or food additive.

  19. Chemical profiling of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb. rhizome using different techniques of solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanimah; Simoh; Alizah; Zainal

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the possible phytochemical constituents of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb.(C. aeruginosa) rhizome using two different techniques of direct solvent extraction. Methods: Two different techniques of direct solvent extractions, i.e. methyl tert-butyl ether(MTBE) extraction and two-phase methanol/chloroform(M/C) system, were used in this study. The analysis of the phytochemical constituents in MTBE and M/C extracts was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The mass spectra of the compounds was matched with the NIST 08 mass spectral library. Results: The present study revealed that the extraction using two-phase M/C have resulted in higher metabolite coverage compared to the extraction with MTBE. Direct solvent extraction using MTBE revealed the presence of 27 compounds; whereas, M/C allowed the extraction of 18 and 36 compounds in polar(methanol) and nonpolar(chloroform) fractions respectively. The major compounds detected in the MTBE extract that based on the peak area percentage were methenolone(16.64%), cycloisolongifolene, 8,9-dehydro-9-formyl-(15.93%), labd-13-en-15-oic acid,8,12-epoxy-12-hydroxy-γ-lactone(10.77%), propiolic acid, 3-(1-hydroxy)-2 isopropyl-1,5-methylcyclohexyl)(7.84%), 4-oxo-β-isodamascol(5.17%), velleral(3.11%) and Z-α-farnesene(2.00%). The most prevailing major compounds identified in the polar fraction of the M/C extraction were α-D glucopyranoside, 1,3,4,6 tetrakis-O-(TMS)(trimethylsilyl)-β-D-fructofuranosyl 2,3,4,6-tetrakis-O-(TMS)-(38.08%), d-glucose, 2,3,4,5,6-pentakis-O-(TMS)-, O-methyloxime(14.61%), D-fructose, 1,3,4,5,6-pentakis-O-(TMS)-, O-methyloxime(5.28%), isocitric acid(TMS)(3.06%), oxalic acid, bis(TMS) ester(2.96%), hexadecanoic acid, TMS ester(2.16%), citric acid, ethyl ester, tri-TMS(1.91%) and butanedioic acid, [(TMS) oxy]-, bis(TMS) ester(1.14%); whereas in the nonpolar extract, among the major compounds detected were cycloisolongifolene, 8, 9-dehydro-9-formyl(15

  20. Assessment of facial profile changes in Class I biprotrusion adolescent subjects submitted to orthodontic treatment with extractions of four premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trindade Mattos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cephalometric changes in tooth and profile position in young adolescent individuals with Class I biprotrusion submitted to orthodontic treatment with extractions of four first premolars. METHODS: Pre and posttreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs from 20 patients with Class I biprotrusion malocclusion were used to evaluate the following measurements: nasolabial angle, distance from lips to E line, distance from lips, incisors, tip of the nose and soft tissue pogonion to Sy line. RESULTS: All measurements showed significant changes after treatment (p<0.05, except the distance from lips and soft tissue pogonion to Sy line. There was a positive correlation between the retraction of incisors and the change of upper and lower lips (0.803/0.925; p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The profile retrusion observed occurred more due to nose growth than to lips retraction. The response from soft tissues to incisors retraction showed a great variability.

  1. Serum protein profiling by miniaturized solid-phase extraction and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Anne K; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2005-01-01

    for translation of MALDI-MS based diagnostic methods to clinical applications. We have investigated a number of MALDI matrices and several miniaturized solid-phase extraction (SPE) methods for serum protein concentration and desalting with the aim of generating reproducible, high-quality protein profiles by MALDI...... mass spectra (m/z 1000-12,000) to be obtained from serum. In a proof-of-principle application, SPE with chelating material and MALDI-MS identified protein peaks in serum that had been previously reported for distinguishing a person diagnosed with breast cancer from a control. These preliminary results...

  2. The Effect of Chelidonium majus Extract on the Lipid Profile and Activity of Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Changizi-Ashtiyani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past centuries, global population has increased at different rates and so has been the case with cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, given the importance of population and cholesterol control, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Chelidonium majus (C. majus aerial parts extract on the lipid profile and prolactin levels and the activity of pituitary-gonadal axis in hypercholesterolemic rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 35 Wistar rats were selected and categorized into 5 groups. The control group had ordinary diet, the model group had high-fat diet, and experimental groups consisted of hypercholesterolemic rats that respectively received minimal dosages of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg of C. majus extract. After 21 days, blood samples were taken and the factors of interest were measured. Then, the gathered data were analyzed using SPSS-11.5. Results: The amount of triglyceride and cholesterol were increased in the model group compared to the control group whereas the same items were decreased in the experimental group. C. majus extract also decreased testosterone and increased prolactin and gonadotropins. Conclusion: In this study, C. majus extract resulted in decreased fat and testosterone levels as well as increased prolactin level; however, since many sources have informed of the toxicity of this plant, cautious use of the plant is advised.

  3. Effects of Ethanol Leaf Extract of Ficus Glumosa on Fasting blood Glucose and Serum Lipid Profile in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Z U; Moh'd, A; Tanko, Y

    2013-06-30

    Ficus glumosa, commonly known as the fig tree or "African rock fig" is a plant with immense medicinal value used for the management of diabetes for over 2000 years. The aim of the present study is to determine the hypoglycemic and anti-lipidemic properties of the ethanolic leaves extract of Ficus glumosa in alloxan-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Thirty (30) adult male Wister rats weighing (120 - 220) grams of about 18 to 22 weeks of age were used in the study. The animals were assigned into six groups (1-6) of five rats (n=5) each. Group VI served as the positive control group receiving 0.9% normal saline (5ml/kg) alone via intra-peritoneal route (i.p.), Groups I (negative control), II, III, IV and V were treated with alloxan and after the induction of hyperglycaemia, received in addition via i.p. for 7 days: 0.9% normal saline (5ml/kg) alone, 100mg/kg, 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg of ethanolic leaves extract of Ficus glumosa respectively while Group V received 6lU/kg of short-acting insulin. The determinations of blood glucose levels were carried out at intervals of one day for 7 days. Serum lipid profile, were done on the 7th day.Premininary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids,saponin,tannins,cardiac glycosides,triterpenes,ceramides and reducing sugars.The LD50 of the extract of Ficus glumosa was found to be 2,154mg/kg.The results of the study showed that,100mg/kg and 400mg/kg of ethanolic leaves extract of Ficus glumosa significantly lowered blood glucose levels and 200mg/kg significantly lowered serum lipid profile compared with negative control group.In conclusion, the results of the study showed that Ficus glumosa possesses anti-hyperglycaemic and anti-lipidemic effect.

  4. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Profile of Euphorbia pulcherrima Methanol Extract on Wistar Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Sharif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was designed to evaluate the acute and subchronic toxicity of E. pulcherrima methanol extract. Mean lethal dose (LD50 and subchronic toxicity were determined using Lorke’s method to assess the effect of the extract on kidney and liver functions along histopathology assessment of the liver and kidney, respectively. The LD50 determined was 3807.89 mg/kg both orally and intraperitoneally. The kidney function parameters indicated elevation of the serum urea above the normal value in both control and the group treated with 10 mg/kg of the extract with mean values of 7.92 ± 1.19 and 7.86 ± 1.14 mMol/L, respectively. The creatinine and electrolytes were within the normal values. The results of ALAT, ASAT, ALP, T protein albumin, and bilirubin in all cases were within the normal values. Kidney, liver function parameters, and relative organ weight were statistically insignificant across all groups. This shows that various concentrations of E. pulcherrima extract did not influence negatively the liver and kidney function parameters. Further studies are required to rule out the observed mild hepatic histological changes among a few members of the groups treated with 100 and 1000 mg/kg/day and any possible hepatoprotective and nephron-protective potential the extract may possess.

  5. Analysis of phytochemical profile of Terminalia arjuna bark extract with antioxidative and antimicrobial properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shreya Mandal; Arpita Patra; Animesh Samanta; Suchismita Roy; Arpita Mandal; Tapasi Das Mahapatra; Shrabani Pradhan; Koushik Das; Dilip Kumar Nandi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate phytochemical screening, antimicrobial activity and qualitative thin layer chromatographic separation of flavonoid components, antioxidant activity and total flavonoid compound of Terminalia arjuna. Methods:For phytochemical screening, some common and available standard tests were done. Antimicrobial bioassay was done through agar well diffusion method. Detection of antioxidant activity and flavonoid compounds were done through thin layer chromatography. Total antioxidant activity was measured by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in colorimetric method. Aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for total flavonoid determination. Results:Phytochemical screening showed the active compounds presence in high concentration, such as phytosterol, lactones, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and tannins and glycosides. The antimicrobial activity of extract showed that greater inhibition zone against Gram negative bacteria than Gram positive bacteria. This methanolic extract showed a promising antioxidant activity, as absorption of DPPH redicles decreased in DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Flavonoids components having antioxidant property present in the methanol extract at a level of 199.00 mg quercetin equivalent/g of dried methanol extract in colorimetric method. Conclusions: The Terminalia arjuna bark extract revealed the presence of bio-active constituents which are known to exhibit medicinal as well as physiological activities.

  6. Effect of Ethanol Extract of Sesamum indicum Seeds on Lipid Profile in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ali Ghani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of active compound (sesamin found in defatted ethanol extract of Sesamum indicum seeds on the serum levels of lipid in mice. The qualitative and quantitative determination of sesamin bioactive compound in defatted ethanol extract using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC analysis was carried out and compared with standard sesamin. It was found that the concentration of sesamin was 79.9% of ethanolic extract according to total peak area. The ffect of active compound (sesamin in defatted ethanol sesame extract was evaluated in mice blood serum (in vivo after feeding them high and low fat diet for one month. Defatted Sesame extract at concentration 500 mg/kg of body weight (B.W showed significant reduction (p#0.05 in the level of total cholesterol (62.26 , 56.14 mg/dl, triglycerides (61.54 , 61.12 mg/dl , and low density lipoprotein LDL (29.97 , 23.21 mg/dl and significant increase in the level of high density lipoprotein HDL (19.39 , 20.70 mg/dl in comparison with both high and low fat diet groups which recorded (80.43 , 68.24 mg/dl, (77.50 , 74.16 mg/dl, (16.80 , 19.32 mg/dl, and (48.09 , 34.08 mg/dL, respectively.

  7. Sampling functions for geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  8. Geophysics of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model of Mars is presented on the basis of light-scattering observations of the Martian atmosphere and surface and interior data obtained from observations of the geopotential field. A general description of the atmosphere is presented, with attention given to the circulation and the various cloud types, and data and questions on the blue haze-clearing effect and the seasonal darkening wave are summarized and the Mie scattering model developed to explain these observations is presented. The appearance of the planet from earth and spacecraft through Mariner 9 is considered, and attention is given to the preparation of topographical contour maps, the canal problem and large-scale lineaments observed from Mariner 9, the gravity field and shape of the planet and the application of Runcorn's geoid/convection theory to Mars. Finally, a summary of Viking results is presented and their application to the understanding of Martian geophysics is discussed.

  9. Multiplex Assay for Protein Profiling and Potency Measurement of German Cockroach Allergen Extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taruna Khurana

    Full Text Available German cockroach (GCr allergens induce IgE responses and may cause asthma. Commercial GCr allergen extracts are variable and existing assays may not be appropriate for determining extract composition and potency.Our aim was to develop a multiplex antibody/bead-based assay for assessment of GCr allergen extracts.Single chain fragment variable (scFv antibodies against GCr were obtained by screening libraries derived from naïve human lymphocytes and hyperimmunized chicken splenocytes and bone marrow. Selected clones were sequenced and characterized by immunoblotting. Eighteen scFv antibodies (17 chicken, 1 human coupled to polystyrene beads were used in this suspension assay; binding of targeted GCr allergens to antibody-coated beads was detected using rabbit antisera against GCr, and against specific allergens rBla g 1, rBla g 2, and rBla g 4. The assay was tested for specificity, accuracy, and precision. Extracts were also compared by IgE competition ELISA.Chicken scFv's generated eight different binding patterns to GCr proteins from 14 to 150 kDa molecular weight. Human scFv's recognized a 100 kDa GCr protein. The multiplex assay was found to be specific and reproducible with intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of 2.64% and inter-assay CV of 10.0%. Overall potencies of various GCr extracts were calculated using mean logEC50s for eight selected scFvs. Overall potency measures were also analyzed by assessing the contributions to potency of each target.An scFv antibody-based multiplex assay has been developed capable of simultaneously measuring different proteins in a complex mixture, and to determine the potencies and compositions of allergen extracts.

  10. Phytochemical profile and free radical nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suluvoy, Jagadish Kumar; Berlin Grace, V M

    2017-05-01

    Averrhoa bilimbi L. belongs to family Oxalidaceae. Traditionally, people use this plant (root, bark, leaves and fruits) for treating several illnesses include itches, boils, syphilis, whooping cough, hypertension, fever and inflammation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity and GC-MS analysis of A. bilimbi L. fruit extract. Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruits were collected for the preliminary phytochemical analysis, antioxidant scavenging activity and biologically important compounds were identified by GC-MS analysis. The preliminary phytochemicals, GC-MS, total phenolic content and NO scavenging activity of the plant were analysed. In the present investigation, the A. bilimbi L. fruit extract has major phytochemicals. Among the 151 compounds identified in GC-MS, 15 compounds are found to have diverse biological activity. We also observed that the A. bilimbi L. fruit extract has high level of total phenolic compounds at a concentration of 209.25 GAE mg/g. Presence of phenolic compound apparently explains the antioxidant activity of the plant. Antioxidant activity of A. bilimbi L. fruit extract is proven from its high level of NO scavenging activity of potent IC50 value of 108.10. From the above study, it is apparent that the A. bilimbi L. fruit extract is a rich source of phytochemicals (natural products) with biological activity. The GC-MS report on this fruit proves that natural products have pharmacologically and biologically active compounds. A high phenolic content is observed in our study. A. bilimbi L. fruit extract is also found to have NO scavenging activity in our study.

  11. Serious games for Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Valerio; Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Childhood stage is indispensable in the education of human beings and especially critical to arise scientific interest in children. We discuss the participatory design of a didactic videogame, i.e. a "serious" game to teach geophysics and Earth sciences to high and low-school students. Geophysics is the application of the laws and techniques of physics to uncover knowledge about the earth's dynamic processes and subsurface structure. It explores phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis to improve our understanding of the earth's physical processes and our ability to predict reoccurrences. Effective mitigation of risks from catastrophic geologic hazards requires knowledge and understanding of local geology and geologic processes. Scientific outreach can be defined as discourse activity, whose main objective is to communicate some knowledge previously produced in scientific contexts to a non-expert massive audience. One of the difficulties science educators need to overcome is to explain specific concepts from a given discipline in a language simple and understandable for their audience. Digital games today play a large role in young people's lives. Games are directly connected to the life of today's adolescents. Therefore, digital games should be included and broached as a subject in the classroom. The ardor and enthusiasm that digital games evoke in teenagers has indeed brought many researchers, school leaders and teachers to the question "how video games" can be used to engage young people and support their learning inside the classroom. Additionally, studies have shown that digital games can enhance various skills such as the ability to concentrate, stamina, tactical aptness, anticipatory thinking, orientation in virtual spaces, and deductive reasoning. Thus, videogames become an effective didactic mechanism and should have a place in the classroom. The project aims to explore the potentials of entertainment technologies in educational processes

  12. Sustainable Geophysical Observatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemann, R. J.; Lerner-Lam, A.; Aster, R.; Beck, S.; Ekstrom, G.; Nyblade, A.; Sandvol, E.

    2007-05-01

    Geophysical networks are defined not only by their technical specifications, but also by the characteristics and needs of the communities that use them. Growing populations supported by more elaborate urban infrastructure with its fine-grained socio-economic interdependencies and relying on global and regional connections for sustainability make new demands for natural hazard risk management. Taking advantage of advances in the underlying science to provide society with accurate risk assessments often requires higher fidelity measurements, entirely new types of observations, and an evolutionary sense of data products and information management. Engineering a high-tech system to address stakeholder needs is difficult, and designing for unpredictable developments requires an emphasis on adaptation. Thus, it is essential to promote formation of organizations or communities that can support evolution of a technological system, imagine new uses, and develop the societal relationships that sustain operations and provide capital for improvement. The owners must have a deep understanding of why the system works in particular ways and how to manage data products for the benefits of stakeholders. To be effective, community promotion must be sustained over a longer period of time than required to build a network and should be aimed at integrating the community into worldwide partnerships. Practices that can promote community formation if they are sustained include repeated training and scientific exchange workshops, extended visits by experts and staff at all levels to and from countries where networks are installed, mechanisms that make timely upgrades realistically possible, and routine exchange and wide dissemination of data in all directions. The combination of international research and educational collaborations, supported by open data exchange, with regionalized and specific assessments of local stakeholder needs and concerns, provides a sustainable model for

  13. Lipid profile and biological activity of different extracts of Stapelia hirsuta L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Shabana

    2016-12-01

    Results and conclusion: β-amyrin (1, lupeol (2, α-amyrin (3 and β-sitosterol (4 were isolated from the n-hexane extract. GLC analysis of (USM and (FAME revealed that, squalene, α-amyrin and β-sitosterol are the major hydrocarbon, triterpene and sterol respectively. The percentages of the unsaturated and saturated fatty acids are 40.8% and 48% respectively. Caproic acid (26.6% was the major fatty acid and stearic (1.2% being the minor one. Biological screening of the different extracts and fractions were carried out and significant results were obtained.

  14. EXTRACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have the...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/....

  15. Developments in geophysical exploration methods

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    One of the themes in current geophysical development is the bringing together of the results of observations made on the surface and those made in the subsurface. Several benefits result from this association. The detailed geological knowledge obtained in the subsurface can be extrapolated for short distances with more confidence when the geologi­ cal detail has been related to well-integrated subsurface and surface geophysical data. This is of value when assessing the characteristics of a partially developed petroleum reservoir. Interpretation of geophysical data is generally improved by the experience of seeing the surface and subsurface geophysical expression of a known geological configuration. On the theoretical side, the understanding of the geophysical processes themselves is furthered by the study of the phenomena in depth. As an example, the study of the progress of seismic wave trains downwards and upwards within the earth has proved most instructive. This set of original papers deals with some of ...

  16. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena-the Gulf Stream, for example-something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future.

  17. Protective role of Phyllantus niruri extract on serum lipid profiles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... Blood was collected in two different tubes i.e. one with fluoride oxalate ... by tail vein puncture of both the normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats. ... administration of the extract the rats were observed for toxic effects after 48 h ...

  18. Assessment of oral safety profile of aqueous extract blend of three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    populations in Africa and Asia still rely on plant extracts, including spices with ... the spice in 1000 mL of distilled water at 100 °C for 60 min. ..... 23 in the sera and central nervous system of EAE mice. Iran J Immunol ... and acid-base balance.

  19. Safety profile of Hoodia gordonii extract: Mouse prenatal developmental toxicity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dent, M.P.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Russell, P.J.; Bradford, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hoodia gordonii extract (0, 5, 15 or 50. mg/kg body weight/day, n= 24 mice/group) was orally administered by gavage to female CD-1 mice from gestation days 5-17. On gestation day 18 the females were euthanized and examined. Treatment at 50. mg/kg/day caused a marked reduction in feed intake and body

  20. Safety profile of Hoodia gordonii extract: Rabbit prenatal developmental toxicity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dent, M.P.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Russell, P.J.; Bradford, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hoodia gordonii extract was orally administered by gavage to groups of 22 female New Zealand white rabbits from day 3-28 after mating at doses of 0 (control), 3, 6 or 12. mg/kg bodyweight/day. These doses were reached by a dose escalation phase between days 3 and 7 after mating. As well as a vehicle

  1. Metabolic profiling of Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract in rat serum, urine and faeces after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dao-Jin; Hu, Hua-Gang; Xing, Shao-Fang; Gao, Ya-Jun; Xu, Si-Fan; Piao, Xiang-Lan

    2014-10-15

    Folk drug Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino contains many biologically active phytochemicals which have been demonstrated to be effective against chronic diseases. As in vivo anti-tumor experiments of G. pentaphyllum extract (GP) show much stronger antitumor activities than in vitro, it is important and necessary to understand the metabolic study of GP. A sensitive and specific U-HPLC-MS method was utilized for the first time to rapidly identify gypenosides and its possible metabolites in rat serum, urine, and faeces after oral administration. Solid phase extraction was utilized in the sample preparation. Negative Electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry was used to discern gypenosides and its possible metabolites in rat samples. As a result, after oral administration, a total of seven metabolites of G. pentaphyllum extract were assigned, two from the rat serum and seven both from the rat urine and faeces. As metabolites of G. pentaphyllum extract, all of them have never been reported before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies on neuropharmacological profile of ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaves in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakre, Adewale G; Aderibigbe, Adegbuyi O; Ademowo, Olusegun G

    2013-10-07

    Moringa oleifera (family Moringaceae), commonly called Horseradish or tree of life, is traditionally used for the treatment of epilepsy and neurologic conditions. The objective of this study is to investigate the neurobehavioural and anticonvulsant properties of the ethanol extract from the leaves of Moringa oleifera. Neurobehavioural properties were evaluated using the open field, hole board, Y-maze, elevated plus maze (EPM) and pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis. Pentylenetetrazole (leptazol), picrotoxin and strychnine induced convulsion tests were used to investigate the anti-convulsive actions of Moringa oleifera. The result showed that the extract (250-2000mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in rearing, grooming, head dips and locomotion (P6.4g/kg. The findings from this study suggest that the ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaves possesses CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities possibly mediated through the enhancement of central inhibitory mechanism involving release γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). The results partially justified the traditional use of the extract for the treatment of epilepsy. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatial analysis of oil reservoirs using DFA of geophysical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We employ Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA technique to investigate spatial properties of an oil reservoir. This reservoir is situated at Bacia de Namorados, RJ, Brazil. The data corresponds to well logs of the following geophysical quantities: sonic, gamma ray, density, porosity and electrical resistivity, measured in 56 wells. We tested the hypothesis of constructing spatial models using data from fluctuation analysis over well logs. To verify this hypothesis we compare the matrix of distances among well logs with the differences among DFA-exponents of geophysical quantities using spatial correlation function and Mantel test. Our data analysis suggests that sonic profile is a good candidate to represent spatial structures. Then, we apply the clustering analysis technique to the sonic profile to identify these spatial patterns. In addition we use the Mantel test to search for correlation among DFA-exponents of geophysical quantities.

  4. Determination of fatty acids percentages and profile extracted from cuttlefish of Iranian coasts of Persian Gulf and Oman Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yosief Ali Asadpour

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the fatty acid profile extracted from cuttlefish of Persian Gulf and Oman Sea, including Ancistrocheirus, Enoploteuthidae, Cranchiidae, Ommastrephidae and Loliginidae. Methods:Oil was extracted by the Bligh and Dyer method. The fatty acid profile of the oil was determined by gas chromatography. Results:The results showed that (13±5)% of wet weight of cuttlefish is oil. The results also showed that cuttlefish oil has 29.40% saturated fatty acids and 23.70% single-band unsaturated fatty acids, and the total value of the unsaturated multiple-band is 40.20%, the contents of arachidonic acid 2.78%, linolenic acid 3.10%, linoleic acid 5.20%, docosahexaenoic acid 15.40%, and eicosapentaenoic acid 9.60% out of the total fatty acids of the same may be mentioned. Conclusions:The results of the current study described that cuttlefish is considered for the first time as the new and rich source of omega-3 and omega-6.

  5. EVALUATION OF THE EXTRACTS OF LEUCAS ASPERA ON BIOCHEMICAL PROFILES IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF DIABETES MELLITUS (TYPE- I IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Tukaram

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Leucas aspera leaves on experimental diabetes mellitus (type I in rats in terms of alterations in biochemical profiles. Thirty rats were randomly divided into six groups of 5 rats in each. Group-I were fed on basal diet without any treatment, group-II induced diabetic models (type-I (Alloxan monohydrate dissolved in sterile normal saline (150 mg/kgBW, ip, group-III, IV, V and VI were induced diabetics and treated with extract of Leucas aspera (30,100,150 and 300mg/kg BW respectively, PO twice daily in the morning and evening post prandially for thirty days respectively. The blood samples were collected on day 0, 10, 20 and 30 and were used for the analysis of biochemical profiles.The blood glucose (mg% were consistently increased significantly (P<0.01 in groups II,III, IV V and VI till day 20 while in groups V and VI there was a significant (P<0.01 decline in the values on day 30. There was found to have profound effect in lowering the blood glucose levels in dose dependent manner. The study revealed that experimental diabetes mellitus (type-I induced patho-biochemical changes were ameliorated more effectively by ethanolic extract of Leucas aspera in dose dependent manner.

  6. n-alkane profiles of engine lubricating oil and particulate matter by molecular sieve extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Gianni A; Charland, Jean-Pierre; Macdonald, Penny; Graham, Lisa

    2007-05-15

    As part of the Canadian Atmospheric Fine Particle Research Program to obtain reliable primary source emission profiles, a molecular sieve method was developed to reliably determine n-alkanes in lubricating oils, vehicle emissions, and mobile source dominated ambient particulate matter (PM). This work was also initiated to better calculate carbon preference index values (CPI: the ratio of the sums of odd over even n-alkanes), a parameter for estimating anthropogenic versus biogenic contributions in PM. n-Alkanes in lubricating oil and mobile source dominated PM are difficult to identify and quantify by gas chromatography due to the presence of similar components that cannot be fully resolved. This results in a hump, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) that leads to incorrect n-alkane concentrations and CPI values. The sieve method yielded better chromatography, unambiguous identification of n-alkanes and allowed examination of differences between n-alkane profiles in light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) lubricating oils that would have been otherwise difficult. These profile differences made it possible to relate the LDV profile to that of the PM samples collected during a tunnel study in August 2001 near Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada). The n-alkane PM data revealed that longer sampling times result in a negative artifact, i.e., the desorption of the more volatile n-alkanes from the filters. Furthermore, the sieve procedure yielded n-alkane data that allowed calculation of accurate CPI values for lubricating oils and PM samples. Finally, this method may prove helpful in estimating the respective diesel and gasoline contributions to ambient PM.

  7. Solving the jigsaw puzzle of wound-healing potato cultivars: metabolite profiling and antioxidant activity of polar extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastmalchi, Keyvan; Cai, Qing; Zhou, Kevin; Huang, Wenlin; Serra, Olga; Stark, Ruth E

    2014-08-06

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a worldwide food staple, but substantial waste accompanies the cultivation of this crop due to wounding of the outer skin and subsequent unfavorable healing conditions. Motivated by both economic and nutritional considerations, this metabolite profiling study aims to improve understanding of closing layer and wound periderm formation and guide the development of new methods to ensure faster and more complete healing after skin breakage. The polar metabolites of wound-healing tissues from four potato cultivars with differing patterns of tuber skin russeting (Norkotah Russet, Atlantic, Chipeta, and Yukon Gold) were analyzed at three and seven days after wounding, during suberized closing layer formation and nascent wound periderm development, respectively. The polar extracts were assessed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods, including multivariate analysis and tentative identification of 22 of the 24 biomarkers that discriminate among the cultivars at a given wound-healing time point or between developmental stages. Differences among the metabolites that could be identified from NMR- and MS-derived biomarkers highlight the strengths and limitations of each method, also demonstrating the complementarity of these approaches in terms of assembling a complete molecular picture of the tissue extracts. Both methods revealed that differences among the cultivar metabolite profiles diminish as healing proceeds during the period following wounding. The biomarkers included polyphenolic amines, flavonoid glycosides, phenolic acids and glycoalkaloids. Because wound healing is associated with oxidative stress, the free radical scavenging activities of the extracts from different cultivars were measured at each wounding time point, revealing significantly higher scavenging activity of the Yukon Gold periderm especially after 7 days of wounding.

  8. A sensitive method to extract DNA from biological traces present on ammunition for the purpose of genetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieltjes, Patrick; Mieremet, René; Zuniga, Sofia; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Pijpe, Jeroen; de Knijff, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Exploring technological limits is a common practice in forensic DNA research. Reliable genetic profiling based on only a few cells isolated from trace material retrieved from a crime scene is nowadays more and more the rule rather than the exception. On many crime scenes, cartridges, bullets, and casings (jointly abbreviated as CBCs) are regularly found, and even after firing, these potentially carry trace amounts of biological material. Since 2003, the Forensic Laboratory for DNA Research is routinely involved in the forensic investigation of CBCs in the Netherlands. Reliable DNA profiles were frequently obtained from CBCs and used to match suspects, victims, or other crime scene-related DNA traces. In this paper, we describe the sensitive method developed by us to extract DNA from CBCs. Using PCR-based genotyping of autosomal short tandem repeats, we were able to obtain reliable and reproducible DNA profiles in 163 out of 616 criminal cases (26.5%) and in 283 out of 4,085 individual CBC items (6.9%) during the period January 2003-December 2009. We discuss practical aspects of the method and the sometimes unexpected effects of using cell lysis buffer on the subsequent investigation of striation patterns on CBCs.

  9. Solid phase extraction and metabolic profiling of exudates from living copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Heuschele, Jan; Nylund, Göran M.

    2016-01-01

    Copepods are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. They exude bioactive compounds that mediate mate finding or induce defensive traits in prey organisms. However, little is known about the chemical nature of the copepod exometabolome that contributes to the chemical landscape in pelagic habitats. Here we...... describe the development of a closed loop solid phase extraction setup that allows for extraction of exuded metabolites from live copepods. We captured exudates from male and female Temora longicornis and analyzed the content with high resolution LC-MS. Chemometric methods revealed 87 compounds...... that constitute a specific chemical pattern either qualitatively or quantitatively indicating copepod presence. The majority of the compounds were present in both female and male exudates, but nine compounds were mainly or exclusively present in female exudates and hence potential pheromone candidates...

  10. Neuropharmacological profile of an ethanol extract of Ruta chalepensis L. in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Trujano, M E; Carrera, D; Ventura-Martinez, R; Cedillo-Portugal, E; Navarrete, A

    2006-06-15

    The effects of an ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis on the central nervous system (CNS) and LD(50) determination were studied in mice. A crude extract was given systemically and its effects were tested on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, sodium pentobarbital-induced hypnosis, exploratory activity, anxiety and nociception. Results from the experimental models tested showed: (1) a delay in the onset of seizures and a dose-dependent suppression in the tonic phase and mortality induced by PTZ; (2) a prolongation of the time of sodium pentobarbital-induced hypnosis; (3) a significant attenuation in the anxiety-response and (4) a reduction in the licking time and shaking behavior in the formalin-induced nociception test. The sedative-hypnotic potentiation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects suggest that Ruta chalepensis induces a depressant activity on the CNS.

  11. EFFECTS OF LEAF EXTRACTS OF MORINGA OLEIFERA ON REGULATION OF HYPOTHYROIDISM AND LIPID PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. SINHA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous leaf extract of Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its ameliorative effect in the regulation of thyroidismin rat model. Male albino rats of 120-150 g were treated orally with doses of 500mg/kg body weight (b.w. and250 mg/ kg b.w. of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera leaf. Results show that T3 and T4 were increased and TSHwas decreased significantly (p>0.05 at high doses compared to those in the control group. Also, the extractsignificantly reduced (p<0.05 total cholesterol concentration and low density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDLconcentration in the serum while it had no significant effect on serum High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterolconcentration at all doses administered when compared with controls. The results of this study suggest that theextract may have beneficial effect on serum cholesterol concentration and a stimulant to thyroid functions.

  12. ANNALS OF GEOPHYSICS: AD MAJORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Florindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Annals of Geophysics is a bimonthly international journal, which publishes scientific papers in the field of geophysics sensu lato. It derives from Annali di Geofisica, which commenced publication in January 1948 as a quarterly periodical devoted to general geophysics, seismology, earth magnetism, and atmospheric studies. The journal was published regularly for a quarter of a century until 1982 when it merged with the French journal Annales de Géophysique to become Annales Geophysicae under the aegis of the European Geophysical Society. In 1981, this journal ceased publication of the section on solid earth geophysics, ending the legacy of Annali di Geofisica. In 1993, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING, founder of the journal, decided to resume publication of its own journal under the same name, Annali di Geofisica. To ensure continuity, the first volume of the new series was assigned the volume number XXXVI (following the last issue published in 1982. In 2002, with volume XLV, the name of the journal was translated into English to become Annals of Geophysics and in consequence the journal impact factor counter was restarted. Starting in 2010, in order to improve its status and better serve the science community, Annals of Geophysics has instituted a number of editorial changes including full electronic open access, freely accessible online, the possibility to comment on and discuss papers online, and a board of editors representing Asia and the Americas as well as Europe. [...

  13. Toxicity profile of ethanolic extract of Azadirachta indica stem bark in male Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anofi Omotayo Tom Ashafa; Latifat Olubukola Orekoya; Musa Toyin Yakubu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the toxic implications of ethanolic stem bark extract of Azadirachtaindica (A. indica) at 50, 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight in Wistar rats. Methods: Fifty male rats of Wistar strains were randomly grouped into five (A-E) of ten animals each. Animals in Group A (control) were orally administered 1 mL of distilled water on daily basis for 21 days while those in Groups B-E received same volume of the extract corresponding to 50, 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight. Results: The extract did not significantly (P>0.05) alter the levels of albumin, total protein, red blood cells and factors relating to it whereas the white blood cell, platelets, serum triacylglycerol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly (P<0.05). In contrast, the final body weights, absolute weights of the liver, kidney, lungs and heart as well as their organ-body weight ratios, serum globulins, total and conjugated bilirubin, serum cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and computed atherogenic index increased significantly. The spleen-body weight ratio, alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases, sodium, potassium, calcium, feed and water intake were altered at specific doses. Conclusions: Overall, the alterations in the biochemical parameters of toxicity have consequential effects on the normal functioning of the organs of the animals. Therefore, the ethanolic extract of A. indica stem bark at the doses of 50, 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight may not be completely safe as an oral remedy and should be taken with caution if absolutely necessary.

  14. Toxicity profile of ethanolic extract of Azadirachta indica stem bark in male Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anofi; Omotayo; Tom; Ashafal; Latifat; Olubukola; Orekoya; Musa; Toyin; Yakubu

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the loxic implications of ethanolic stem bark extract of Azadirachta indica(A-indica)at 50,100,200 and 300 mg/kg body weight in Wistar rats.Methods:Fifty male rats of Wistar strains were randomly grouped into five(A-F.)of ten animals each.Animals in Group A(control)were orally administered 1 mL of distilled water on daily basis for 21 days while those in Groups B-E received same volume of the extract corresponding to 50,100,200 and 300mg/kg body weight.Results:The extract did not significantly(P>0.05)alter the levels of albumin,total protein,red blood cells and factors relating to it whereas the white blood cell,platelets,serum triacylglycerol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly(P<0.05).In contrast,the final body weights,absolute weights of the liver,kidney,lungs and heart as well as their organ-body weight ratios,serum globulins,total and conjugated bilirubin,serum cholesterol,low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and computed atherogenic index increased significantly.The spleen-body weight ratio,alkaline phosphatase,alanine and aspartate transaminases,sodium,potassium,calcium,feed and water intake were altered at specific doses.Conclusions:Overall,the alterations in the biochemical parameters of toxicity have consequential effects on the normal functioning of the organs of the animals.Therefore,the ethanolic extract of A.indica stem bark at the doses of 50,100,200 and 300 mg/kg body weight may not be completely safe as an oral remedy and should be taken with caution if absolutely necessary.

  15. Extraction of alkaloids for NMR-based profiling: exploratory analysis of an archaic Cinchona bark collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Nyberg, Nils T; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2012-11-01

    A museum collection of Cinchonae cortex samples (n = 117), from the period 1850-1950, was extracted with a mixture of chloroform-d1, methanol-d4, water-d2, and perchloric acid in the ratios 5 : 5 : 1 : 1. The extracts were directly analyzed using 1H NMR spectroscopy (600 MHz) and the spectra evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) and total statistical correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY). A new method called STOCSY-CA, where CA stands for component analysis, is described, and an analysis using this method is presented. It was found that the samples had a rather homogenous content of the well-known cinchona alkaloids quinine, cinchonine, and cinchonidine without any apparent clustering. Signals from analogues were detected but not in substantial amounts. The main variation was related to the absolute amounts of extracted alkaloids, which was attributed to the evolution of the Cinchona tree cultivation during the period in which the samples were collected.

  16. Endemic Balkan parsnip Pastinaca hirsuta: the chemical profile of essential oils, headspace volatiles and extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Snežana Č; Jovanović, Olga P; Petrović, Goran M; Stojanović, Gordana S

    2015-04-01

    The present study for the first time reports the chemical composition of the endemic Balkan parsnip Pastinaca hirsuta Pančić essential oil and headspace (HS) volatiles, obtained from fresh roots, stems, flowers and fruits, as well as fresh fruits n-hexane and diethyl ether extracts. According to GC-MS and GC-FID analyses, β-Pinene was one of the major components of the root and stem HS volatiles (50.6-24.1%). (E)-β-Ocimene was found in a significant percentage in the stem and flowers HS volatiles (31.6-57.3%). The most abundant constituent of the fruit HS, flower and fruit essential oils and both extracts was hexyl butanoate (70.5%, 31.1%, 80.4%, 47.4% and 52.7%, respectively). Apiole, accompanied by myristicin and (Z)-falcarinol, make up over 70% of the root essential oils. γ-Palmitolactone was the major component of the stem essential oils (51.9% at the flowering stage and 45.7% at the fruiting stage). Beside esters as dominant compounds, furanocoumarins were also identified in extracts. (Dis)similarity relations of examined plant samples were also investigated by the agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis. The obtained results show there is difference in the composition of volatile components from different plant organs, while the stage of growth mainly affects the quantitative volatiles composition.

  17. The effect of Gongronema latifolium extracts on serum lipid profile and oxidative stress in hepatocytes of diabetic rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N H Ugochukwu; N E Babady; M Cobourne; S R Gasset

    2003-02-01

    Diabetes is known to involve oxidative stress and changes in lipid metabolism. Many secondary plant metabolites have been shown to possess antioxidant activities, improving the effects of oxidative stress on diabetes. This study evaluated the effects of extracts from Gongronema latifolium leaves on antioxidant enzymes and lipid profile in a rat model of non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The results confirmed that the untreated diabetic rats were subjected to oxidative stress as indicated by significantly abnormal activities of their scavenging enzymes (low superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxide activities), compared to treated diabetic rats, and in the extent of lipid peroxidation (high malondialdehyde levels) present in the hepatocytes. The ethanolic extract of G. latifolium leaves possessed antioxidant activity as shown by increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and decreases in malondialdehyde levels. High levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, which are typical of the diabetic condition, were also found in our rat models of diabetes. The ethanolic extract also significantly decreased triglyceride levels and normalized total cholesterol concentration.

  18. Comprehensive geophysics and lithosphenc structure in the western Xizang (Tibet) Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔祥儒; 王谦身; 熊绍柏

    1996-01-01

    Comprehensive investigations along the Gyirong-Lugu-Sangehu geophysical profile in the western Xizang Plateau are presented. Analysis and interpretation of the lithospheric structure resulted in setting up of the geophysical methods and marks for the division of tectonic units in the lithospheric structure. Comprehensive geophysical survey in the remote west of Xizang is reported and some reliable geophysical evidence for deep structure division in the study region is provided. These lay a solid basis for probing into the mechanism of the Xizang Plateau uplift and geodynamics.

  19. The tuber extract and flour of Dioscorea alatanormalize the blood lipid profile of rabbits treated with high cholesterol diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelis Imanningsih

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Umbi Dioscorea alata (DA memiliki potensi untuk mencegah kondisi hiperlipidemia karena mengandung senyawa bioaktif antosianin, serat pangan, dan diosgenin yang bermanfaat dalam menormalkan kadar lipida darah. Pada penelitian ini dipelajari pengaruh pemberian ekstrak air dan tepung umbi DA dalam menormalkan profil lipida darah kelinci yang diberi ransum tinggi kolesterol.Metode: Ekstrak dan tepung umbi DA diberikan kepada kelinci percobaan selama 60 hari dengan disain penelitian rancangan acak lengkap. Perlakuan ransum sebagai berikut: 1 Ransum basal sebagai kontrol negatif (K0, 2 Ransum basal + kolesterol 0.5% sebagai kontrol positif (K1, 3 Ransum basal+kolesterol 0.5% + ekstrak DA 1.8 g/100 g (KE1, 4 Ransum basal+kolesterol 0.5%+ekstrak DA 3.6 g/100 g (KE2, 5 Ransum basal mengandung 15% tepung DA + kolesterol 0.5% (KT1 dan 6 Ransum basal mengandung 30% tepung DA + kolesterol 0.5% (KT2. Kadar total kolesterol, LDL, HDL kolesterol dan trigliserida pada serum dianalisa pada awal, hari ke 28, hari ke 56 dan pada akhir penelitian. Hasil: Pemberian ransum tinggi kolesterol sebanyak 1% meningkatkan kadar kolesterol darah sebesar 16 kali dibandingkan kontrol. Pemberian 15% dan 30% tepung DA ransum tinggi kolesterol dapat mempertahakankan profil lipida darah kelinci ke arah normal, khususnya pada substitusi 30% tepung DA. Akan tetapi, ekstrak air tepung DA tidak dapat mempertahankan kadar lipida normal kelinci yang diberi ransum tinggi kolesterol. Kesimpulan:Tepung DA memiliki efek anti-hiperlipidemia. (Health Science Indones 2014;1:23-9Kata kunci:ekstrak, tepung, Dioscorea alata, hiperlipidemiaAbstractBackground: Dioscorea alata(DA tuber has potential to prevent the condition of hyperlipidemia due to the bioactive compound, such as anthocyanins, diosgenin, and dietary fiber that beneficial in normalizing blood lipid profiles. In this research, the effect of water extract and flour of DA tuber administration was examined on

  20. The tuber extract and flour of Dioscorea alatanormalize the blood lipid profile of rabbits treated with high cholesterol diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelis Imanningsih

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Umbi Dioscorea alata (DA memiliki potensi untuk mencegah kondisi hiperlipidemia karena mengandung senyawa bioaktif antosianin, serat pangan, dan diosgenin yang bermanfaat dalam menormalkan kadar lipida darah. Pada penelitian ini dipelajari pengaruh pemberian ekstrak air dan tepung umbi DA dalam menormalkan profil lipida darah kelinci yang diberi ransum tinggi kolesterol.Metode: Ekstrak dan tepung umbi DA diberikan kepada kelinci percobaan selama 60 hari dengan disain penelitian rancangan acak lengkap. Perlakuan ransum sebagai berikut: 1 Ransum basal sebagai kontrol negatif (K0, 2 Ransum basal + kolesterol 0.5% sebagai kontrol positif (K1, 3 Ransum basal+kolesterol 0.5% + ekstrak DA 1.8 g/100 g (KE1, 4 Ransum basal+kolesterol 0.5%+ekstrak DA 3.6 g/100 g (KE2, 5 Ransum basal mengandung 15% tepung DA + kolesterol 0.5% (KT1 dan 6 Ransum basal mengandung 30% tepung DA + kolesterol 0.5% (KT2. Kadar total kolesterol, LDL, HDL kolesterol dan trigliserida pada serum dianalisa pada awal, hari ke 28, hari ke 56 dan pada akhir penelitian. Hasil: Pemberian ransum tinggi kolesterol sebanyak 1% meningkatkan kadar kolesterol darah sebesar 16 kali dibandingkan kontrol. Pemberian 15% dan 30% tepung DA ransum tinggi kolesterol dapat mempertahakankan profil lipida darah kelinci ke arah normal, khususnya pada substitusi 30% tepung DA. Akan tetapi, ekstrak air tepung DA tidak dapat mempertahankan kadar lipida normal kelinci yang diberi ransum tinggi kolesterol. Kesimpulan:Tepung DA memiliki efek anti-hiperlipidemia. (Health Science Indones 2014;1:23-9Kata kunci:ekstrak, tepung, Dioscorea alata, hiperlipidemiaAbstractBackground: Dioscorea alata(DA tuber has potential to prevent the condition of hyperlipidemia due to the bioactive compound, such as anthocyanins, diosgenin, and dietary fiber that beneficial in normalizing blood lipid profiles. In this research, the effect of water extract and flour of DA tuber administration was examined on

  1. Jesuit Geophysical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udias, Agustin; Stauder, William

    Jesuits have had ah interest in observing and explaining geophysical phenomena since this religious order, the Society of Jesus, was founded by Ignatius of Loyola in 1540. Three principal factors contributed to this interest: their educational work in colleges and universities, their missionary endeavors to remote lands where they observed interesting and often as yet undocumented natural phenomena, and a network of communication that brought research of other Jesuits readily to their awareness.One of the first and most important Jesuit colleges was the Roman College (today the Gregorian University) founded in 1551 in Rome, which served as a model for many other universities throughout the world. By 1572, Christopher Clavius (1537-1612), professor of mathematics at the Roman College, had already initiated an important tradition of Jesuit research by emphasizing applied mathematics and insisting on the need of serious study of mathematics in the program of studies in the humanities. In 1547 he directed a publication of Euclid's work with commentaries, and published several treatises on mathematics, including Arithmetica Practica [1585], Gnomonicae [1581], and Geometrica Practica [1606]. Clavius was also a Copernican and supported his friend Galileo when he announced the discovery of the satellites of Jupiter.

  2. Geophysical lineaments of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepley, L.K.

    1979-08-01

    Photolineaments seen on satellite images are usually expressions of deep crustal ruptures. However, photolineaments are omnipresent and an independent expression of regional discontinuities is needed to help rank the photolineaments. Published gravity and magnetic contour maps of Arizona were analyzed to produce a single geophysical lineament map to indicate trends of regional basement structures. This map shows that the southwestern quarter of Arizona is dominated by a NNW-ENE orthogonal system whereas the remainder of the state is gridded by a NW-NE system. North-south systems are present throughout the state, as are EW lineaments. Arizona is transected by the WNW Texas Strand, but other shorter systems trending in the Texas direction are found throughout the state south of the Strand. The major lineament systems as seen on Landsat, gravity, and magnetic maps correlate reasonably well with known geothermal manifestations. Many other systems are Precambrian, Paleozoic, and/or Mesozoic in age but appear to control the location of Quaternary volcanic systems.

  3. MPLEx: a method for simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of samples for multi-omics profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Gonzalez, Juan F.; Habyarimana, Fabien; Negretti, Nicholas M.; Sims, Amy C.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Thackray, Larissa B.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ahmer, Brian; Konkel, Michael E.; Motin, Vladimir; Baric, Ralph S.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-01-01

    The continued emergence and spread of infectious agents is of increasing concern due to increased population growth and the associated increased livestock production to meet food demands, increased urbanization and land-use changes, and greater travel. A systems biology approach to infectious disease research can significantly advance our understanding of host-pathogen relationships and facilitate the development of new therapies and vaccines. Molecular characterization of infectious samples outside of appropriate biosafety containment can only take place subsequent to pathogen inactivation. Herein, we describe a modified Folch extraction using chloroform/methanol that facilitates the molecular characterization of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of proteins, metabolites, and lipids for subsequent mass spectrometry-based multi-omics measurements. This metabolite, protein and lipid extraction (MPLEx) method resulted in complete inactivation of bacterial and viral pathogens with exposed lipid membranes, including Yersinia pestis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni in pure culture, and Yersinia pestis, Campylobacter jejuni, West Nile, MERS-CoV, Ebola, and influenza H7N9 viruses in infection studies. Partial inactivation was observed for pathogens without exposed lipid membranes including 99.99% inactivation of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 99.6% and >99% inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores and vegetative cells, respectively, and 50% inactivation of adenovirus type 5. To demonstrate that MPLEx yields biomaterial of sufficient quality for subsequent multi-omics analyses, we highlight select proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics data from human epithelial lung cells infected with wild-type and mutant forms of influenza H7N9. We believe that MPLEx will facilitate systems biology studies of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and multi

  4. GEOTECHNICAL EXAMINATION OF THE GEOPHYSICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... olokoro lateritic soil, particle size distribution, compaction test, geophysical properties, california bearing ratio. 1. ... e.g. alluvial soil, aeolin soil, glacial soil etc. [2]. .... Garg, S.K. Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineer- ing.

  5. Changes in urinary metabolic profile after oral administration of curcuma extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Stocchero, Matteo; Clauser, Maria; Boschiero, Irene; Ndoum, Emmanuel; Schiavon, Mariano; Mammi, Stefano; Schievano, Elisabetta

    2014-11-01

    The diffusion of phytochemicals in health promoting products is growing, but studies related to their effects on healthy subjects are still lacking despite the large consumption of natural products as nutraceuticals or food supplements. In many cases, research supports the in vitro antioxidant activity of phytochemicals, but the health claims attributed to the final marketed nutraceutical products have dubious scientific foundation. Also, studies focussed on the definition of their biological targets and mechanisms of action can be useful to assess their efficacy and safety. In this study, the effect of oral administration of 80mg/kg of Curcuma longa Linn. extract to 12 healthy rats over 25 days was evaluated by monitoring the changes of urinary composition. 24-h urine was collected during the animal experiment and the composition was analyzed by (1)H NMR and HPLC-MS. The two datasets were studied individually through a metabolomic approach and the multivariate analysis revealed significant differences between the control and the treated group. Curcumin levels were also measured in 24-h urine samples by HPLC-MS. Both the (1)H NMR and the HPLC-MS dataset showed that the administration of 80mg/kg of Curcuma longa extract to healthy animals induces changes in urinary composition. Decreased allantoin urinary levels can be considered a partial demonstration of the in vivo effect of curcumin on oxidative stress in a healthy animal model.

  6. Candida albicans PROTEIN PROFILE CHANGES IN RESPONSE TO THE BUTANOLIC EXTRACT OF Sapindus saponariaL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana FIORINI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that is capable of causing superficial and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Extracts of Sapindus saponaria have been used as antimicrobial agents against various organisms. In the present study, we used a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS to identify the changes in protein abundance of C. albicans after exposure to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC of the butanolic extract (BUTE of S. saponaria and also to fluconazole. A total of six different proteins with greater than 1.5 fold induction or repression relative to the untreated control cells were identified among the three treatments. In general, proteins/enzymes involved with the glycolysis (GPM1, ENO1, FBA1, amino acid metabolism (ILV5, PDC11 and protein synthesis (ASC1 pathways were detected. In conclusion, our findings reveal antifungal-induced changes in protein abundance of C. albicans. By using the previously identified components of the BUTE of S. saponaria(e.g., saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides, it will be possible to compare the behavior of compounds with unknown mechanisms of action, and this knowledge will help to focus the subsequent biochemical work aimed at defining the effects of these compounds.

  7. Antidiarrheal and antimicrobial profiles extracts of the leaves from Trichilia emetica Vahl.(Meliaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiessoun; Konaté; Kassi; Yomalan; Oksana; Sytar; Marian; Brestic

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate and-diarrhoeal and antimicrobial activities of the bioactive fraction of Trichilia emetica in order to provide a scientific basis for the management of gastroenteritis in Burkina Faso.Methods:To do this,polyphenols content of extract and fractions were investigated.FolinCiocalteu,AlCl3 methods and tannic acid respectively were used for polyphenols content.The in vivo antidiarrhocal activity was done using Swiss albino mice of both sexes.In vitro antimicrobial activity(disc-diffusion assay,minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum microbicidal concentration or minimal bactericidal concentration) was assessed using seven bacteria strains(Gram-negative and Gram-positive).Results:About our study,it was found that ethyl acetate fraction effective attenuation factior(EAF) elicits the higher total phenolics and total flavonoids contents compared to the extracts of leaves of Trichilici emetica.EAF of Trichilia emetica Vahl..has positive effects in a dose dependent manner against diarrhoea induced by castor oil in experimental mice.The bioactive fraction also showed good antimicrobial activity against all tested Gram-negative and Grampositive bacteria strains.It was shown that experimental bacteria strains were more sensitive to the EAF effect compared to the ciprofloxacin.Conclusions:The obtained results allow justifying the traditional uses of Trichilia emetica and possess good antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial activities of EAF from Trichilia emetica.Results of the present study have clearly supported the utilization of Trichilia emetica in Burkina Faso traditional medicine.

  8. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nikolas I.

    Nearly 80 years ago, Yugoslavian seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic recognized, while studying a Balkan earthquake, that velocities of seismic waves increase abruptly at a few tens of kilometers depth , giving rise to the seismological definition of the crust. Since that discovery, many studies concerned with the nature of both the continental and oceanic crusts have appeared in the geophysical literature.Recently, interest in the continental crust has cascaded. This is largely because of an infusion of new data obtained from major reflection programs such as the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) and British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) and increased resolution of refraction studies. In addition, deep continental drilling programs are n ow in fashion. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach is a summary of present knowledge of the continental crust. Meissner has succeeded in writing a book suited to many different readers, from the interested undergraduate to the professional. The book is well documented , with pertinent figures and a complete and up-to-date reference list.

  9. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  10. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Italian National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics; Experimental Geophysical Observatory at OceanSITES site E2M3A from 2002-09-16 to 2009-10-13 (NCEI Accession 0130031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, DEPTH -...

  11. MORPHOLOGICAL PROFILE AND GRANULOMETRIC MAPS IN EXTRACTION OF BUILDINGS IN VHR SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupidura Przemysław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the analysis of possibilities of using granulometric analysis methods: the morphological profile, and granulometric maps in detecting buildings on satellite images. It briefly explains the theoretical basis for granulometric analysis of image and compares two methods used in research. Tests were carried out on a fragment of QuickBird satellite scene – pansharpened multispectral image. 8 variants of classification differing in terms of the data and the model of classification were compared. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the different options for classification based on the analysis factor kappa values and omission and commission errors. The results indicate the significant potential of the proposed methods, and analysis of the observed imperfections allows to specify the possible fields of their development

  12. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Eight Phenolic Compounds and Their Conjugated Metabolites after Oral Administration of Rhus verniciflua Extracts in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming Ji; Kim, In Sook; Park, Jong Suk; Dong, Mi-Sook; Na, Chun-Soo; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2015-06-10

    Rhus verniciflua (Toxicodendron vernicifluum) is a medicinal tree popularly used in Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea as a food additive or herbal medicine because of its beneficial effects. R. verniciflua extract (RVE) contains diverse phenolic compounds, such as flavonoids, as its major biological active constituents. In this study, the pharmacokinetic profiles of eight phenolic compounds were investigated following oral administration of RVE to rats. The eight phenolic compounds were 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, fisetin, fustin, butin, sulfuretin, taxifolin, and garbanzol. The plasma concentrations of the eight compounds were determined by using a liquid chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer before and after treatment with β-glucuronidase. When 1.5 g/kg RVE was administered, the eight compounds were all detected in plasma, mainly as conjugated forms. These pharmacokinetic data would be useful for understanding the pharmacological effects of RVE.

  13. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The broad objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structures and thermal and stress histories of the solid planets by combining results from analytical and computational modeling, and geophysical data analysis of gravity, topography and tectonic surface structures. During the past year we performed two quite independent studies in the attempt to explain the Mariner 10 magnetic observations of Mercury. In the first we revisited the possibility of crustal remanence by studying the conditions under which one could break symmetry inherent in Runcorn's model of a uniformly magnetized shell to produce a remanent signal with a dipolar form. In the second we applied a thin shell dynamo model to evaluate the range of intensity/structure for which such a planetary configuration can produce a dipole field consistent with Mariner 10 results. In the next full proposal cycle we will: (1) develop numerical and analytical and models of thin shell dynamos to address the possible nature of Mercury s present-day magnetic field and the demise of Mars magnetic field; (2) study the effect of degree-1 mantle convection on a core dynamo as relevant to the early magnetic field of Mars; (3) develop models of how the deep mantles of terrestrial planets are perturbed by large impacts and address the consequences for mantle evolution; (4) study the structure, compensation, state of stress, and viscous relaxation of lunar basins, and address implications for the Moon s state of stress and thermal history by modeling and gravity/topography analysis; and (5) use a three-dimensional viscous relaxation model for a planet with generalized vertical viscosity distribution to study the degree-two components of the Moon's topography and gravity fields to constrain the primordial stress state and spatial heterogeneity of the crust and mantle.

  14. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    The new millennium has seen a fresh wave of world economic development especially in the Asian-Pacific region. This has contributed to further rapid urban expansion, creating shortages of energy and resources, degradation of the environment, and changes to climatic patterns. Large-scale, new urbanization is mostly seen in developing countries but urban sprawl is also a major social problem for developed nations. Urbanization has been accelerating at a tremendous rate. According to data collected by the United Nations [1], 50 years ago less than 30% of the world population lived in cities. Now, more than 50% are living in urban settings which occupy only about 1% of the Earth's surface. During the period from 1950 to 1995, the number of cities with a population higher than one million increased from 83 to 325. By 2025 it is estimated that more than 60% of 8.3 billion people (the projected world population [1]) will be city dwellers. Urbanization and urban sprawl can affect our living quality both positively and negatively. In recent years geophysics has found significant and new applications in highly urbanized settings. Such applications are conducive to the understanding of the changes and impacts on the physical environment and play a role in developing sustainable urban infrastructure systems. We would like to refer to this field of study as 'urban geophysics'. Urban geophysics is not simply the application of geophysical exploration in the cities. Urbanization has brought about major changes to the geophysical fields of cities, including those associated with electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism and heat. An example is the increased use of electromagnetic waves in wireless communication, transportation, office automation, and computer equipment. How such an increased intensity of electromagnetic radiation affects the behaviour of charged particles in the atmosphere, the equilibrium of ecological systems, or human health, are new research frontiers to be

  15. Dereplication of macrocyclic trichothecenes from extracts of filamentous fungi through UV and NMR profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy-Cordero, Arlene A; Graf, Tyler N; Wani, Mansukh C; Kroll, David J; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2010-09-01

    Macrocyclic trichothecenes (MTs), which have potent cytotoxicity, have been isolated from many different fungal species. These compounds were evaluated clinically by the US National Cancer Institute in the 1970s and 1980s. However, they have yet to be advanced into viable drugs because of severe side effects. Our team is investigating a diverse library of filamentous fungi for new anticancer leads. To avoid reisolating MTs through bioactivity-directed fractionation studies, a protocol for their facile dereplication was developed. The method uses readily available photodiode array detectors to identify one of two types of characteristic UV spectra for these compounds. In addition, diagnostic signals can be observed in the (1)H-NMR spectra, particularly for the epoxide and conjugated diene moieties, even at the level of a crude extract. Using these techniques in a complementary manner, MTs can be dereplicated rapidly.

  16. Profiling extractable and leachable inorganic impurities in ophthalmic drug containers by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Paige; Nelson, Jenny

    2017-08-24

    In this study, we investigated the elemental impurities present in the plastic material of ophthalmic eye drop bottles using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Metallic contaminations, especially localized within the small cavity of the eye, can significantly perturb the ocular metallome. The concern is two-fold: first certain elements, for example heavy metals, can be toxic to humans at even trace levels, and second, these contaminations can have adverse reactions with other medicines or enzymatic processes in the eye. The implication of redox-active metals in cataract formation is one such biological consequence. The analysis demonstrated the effect of aggressive storage and transportation conditions on elemental extractable and leachable contamination, and posits that release of these elemental impurities can disrupt metallome equilibrium in the ocular compartment, leading to toxicity and disease.

  17. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PROFILE OF CURCUMIN FROM ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF CURCUMA LONGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Himesh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910. Since the time of Ayurveda (1900 B.C numerous therapeutic activities have been assigned to turmeric for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, including those of the skin, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems, aches, pains, wounds, sprains, and liver disorders. Extensive research within the last half century has proven that most of these activities, once associated with turmeric, are due to curcumin. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities and thus has a potential against various malignant diseases, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and other chronic illnesses. Curcumin can be considered an ideal “Spice for Life”. Curcumin is the most important fraction of turmeric which is responsible for its biological activity. In the present work we have investigated the qualitative and quantitative determination of curcumin in the ethanolic extract of C.longa. Qualitative estimation was carried out by thin layer chromatographic (TLC method. The total phenolic content of the ethanolic extract of C.longa was found to be 11.24 as mg GAE/g. The simultaneous determination of the pharmacologically important active curcuminoids viz. curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bis-demethoxycurcumin in Curcuma longa was carried out by spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. HPLC separation was performed on a Cyber Lab C-18 column (250 x 4.0 mm, 5μ using acetonitrile and 0.1 % orthophosphoric acid solution in water in the ratio 60 : 40 (v/v at flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection of curcuminoids

  18. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  19. Characterising the enzymatic profile of crude tentacle extracts from the South Atlantic jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Paloma S; Long, Paul F; Brammall, Lucas; Marques, Antonio C; Almeida, Michelle T; Padilla, Gabriel; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M

    2016-09-01

    Jellyfish venoms are of medical and biotechnological importance, with toxins displaying antimicrobial, analgesic and anti-tumor activities. Although proteolytic enzymes have also been described, detailed characterisation of these proteins is scant in Olindias spp. High throughput mass spectrometry profiling of cnidarian venoms has become increasingly popular since the first description of the proteomic profile of putative toxins isolated from nematocysts of the hydrozoan jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis describing the presence of orthologous enzymes as presented in venoms of advanced species as snakes. Rigorous bioinformatics analyses can aid functional annotation, but biochemical assays are prerequisite to unambiguously assign toxic function to a peptide or protein. Here we present results that experimentally confirm previously predicted proteomic analysis that crude venom extracts from tentacles of O. sambaquiensis are composed of polypeptides with metalloproteinase, serine proteinase and phospholipases A2 activities. Surprisingly, levels of serine proteinase and phospholipase A2 activities were comparable to those observed in venoms of Bothrops snakes which were used as positive controls in this study. Hence, these data offer new opportunities to explore serine proteinase and phospholipase A2 activities in the clinical sequelae following O. sambaquiensis envenomation, with future possible biopharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Profiling of volatile compounds in APC(Min/+) mice blood by dynamic headspace extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Shoji; Nishiumi, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-10-15

    Various volatile compounds as well as hydrophilic compounds exist in the blood. For example, 2-alkenals, 4-hydroxy-2-alkenals, and ketoaldehydes have been reported as oxidized lipid-derived volatiles in blood. These specific volatiles have been associated with diseases; however, multi-volatile analyses have not been performed. In this study, volatile profiling of APC(Min/+) mouse plasma by dynamic headspace extraction was performed for multi-volatile analysis. In total, 19 volatiles were detected in the plasma of mice, based on information regarding oxidized lipid-derived volatile compounds, and eight of these compounds differed significantly between normal and diseased mice. 2-Methyl-2-butanol and benzyl alcohol were previously unreported in blood samples. Furthermore, 3,5,5-trimethyl-2(5H)-furanone was only detected in normal mice. 5-Methyl-3-hexanone and benzaldehyde have been detected in subjects with gastrointestinal diseases and lung cancer, respectively. Therefore, volatile profiling can be used to detect differences between samples and to identify compounds associated with diseases.

  1. Effect of alginate composition on profile release and characteristics of chitosan-alginate microparticles loaded with mangosteen extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Kamarza; Halimah, Nur; Krisanti, Elsa

    2017-03-01

    Preparation of mangostin-loaded chitosan-alginate microparticles, chemical and physical characterization of the particles, and mangostin release profiles, are described herein. Mangostin rich fraction was obtained from Garcinia mangostana L. pericarp by extraction followed by fractionation. Mangostin-loaded chitosan-alginate microparticles were prepared by ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate as the linking agent and various concentration of alginate. Mangostin was effectively loaded in all microparticle formulations, resulting in ˜97% encapsulation efficiencies. The loading of mangostin and the in-vitro release profiles in simulated gastrointestinal fluids were affected by the chitosan to alginate ratios used in the preparation of the microparticles. Increased alginate concentration resulted in lowered release of mangostin from microparticles immersed in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) up to two hours. Low release of mangostin in acidic fluid but high release in simulated colon fluid, indicated that the chitosan-alginate microparticles are prospective carrier for extended release of active compound in gastrointestinal system.

  2. Effects of supercritical fluid extraction pressure on chemical composition, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Macías, D; Laubscher, A; Castro, N; Argüello, A; Jiménez-Flores, R

    2013-03-01

    The consumer trend for healthier food choices and preferences for low-fat products has increased the interest in low-fat cheese and nutraceutical dairy products. However, consumer preference is still for delicious food. Low- and reduced-fat cheeses are not completely accepted because of their unappealing properties compared with full-fat cheeses. The method reported here provides another option to the conventional cheese-making process to obtain lower fat cheese. Using CO(2) as a supercritical fluid offers an alternative to reduce fat in cheese after ripening, while maintaining the initial characteristics and flavor. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of pressure (10, 20, 30, and 40 × 10(6) Pa) of supercritical CO(2) on the amount of fat extracted, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of 2 varieties of goat cheese: Majorero, a protected denomination of origin cheese from Spain, and goat Gouda-type cheese. The amount of fat was reduced 50 to 57% and 48 to 55% for Majorero and goat Gouda-type cheeses, respectively. Higher contents (on a fat basis) of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine were found in Majorero cheese compared with control and goat Gouda-type cheeses. The microbial population was reduced after supercritical fluid extraction in both cheeses, and the lethality was higher as pressure increased in Majorero cheese, most noticeably on lactococcus and lactobacillus bacteria. The Gouda-type cheese did not contain any lactobacilli. Micrographs obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy showed a more open matrix and whey pockets in the Majorero control cheese. This could explain the ease of extracting fat and reducing the microbial counts in this cheese after treatment with supercritical CO(2). Supercritical fluid extraction with CO(2) has great potential in the dairy industry and in commercial applications. The Majorero cheese obtained after the supercritical fluid extraction treatment was an excellent

  3. Phytochemical profiling of Curcuma kwangsiensis rhizome extract, and identification of labdane diterpenoids as positive GABAA receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Anja; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Raith, Melanie; Zaugg, Janine; Rueda, Diana C; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    An ethyl acetate extract of Curcuma kwangsiensis S.G. Lee & C.F. Liang (Zingiberaceae) rhizomes (100 μg/ml) enhanced the GABA-induced chloride current (IGABA) through GABAA receptors of the α1β2γ2S subtype by 79.0±7.0%. Potentiation of IGABA was measured using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique and Xenopus laevis oocytes. HPLC-based activity profiling of the crude extract led to the identification of 11 structurally related labdane diterpenoids, including four new compounds. Structure elucidation was achieved by comprehensive analysis of on-line (LC-PDA-ESI-TOF-MS) and off-line (microprobe 1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data. The absolute configuration of the compounds was established by comparison of experimental and calculated ECD spectra. Labdane diterpenes represent a new class of plant secondary metabolites eliciting positive GABAA receptor modulation. The highest efficiency was observed for zerumin A (maximum potentiation of IGABA by 309.4±35.6%, and EC50 of 24.9±8.8 μM).

  4. In vivo antileishmanial activity and chemical profile of polar extract from Selaginella sellowii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Priscilla de Souza Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The polar hydroethanolic extract from Selaginella sellowii(SSPHE has been previously proven active on intracellular amastigotes (in vitro test and now was tested on hamsters infected with Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis (in vivo test. SSPHE suppressed a 100% of the parasite load in the infection site and draining lymph nodes at an intralesional dose of 50 mg/kg/day × 5, which was similar to the results observed in hamsters treated with N-methylglucamine antimonate (Sb (28 mg/Kg/day × 5. When orally administered, SSPHE (50 mg/kg/day × 20 suppressed 99.2% of the parasite load in infected footpads, while Sb suppressed 98.5%. SSPHE also enhanced the release of nitric oxide through the intralesional route in comparison to Sb. The chemical fingerprint of SSPHE by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and tandem mass spectrometry showed the presence of biflavonoids and high molecular weight phenylpropanoid glycosides. These compounds may have a synergistic action in vivo. Histopathological study revealed that the intralesional treatment with SSPHE induced an intense inflammatory infiltrate, composed mainly of mononuclear cells. The present findings reinforce the potential of this natural product as a source of future drug candidates for American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  5. Analysis of volatiles in Pinotage wines by stir bar sorptive extraction and chemometric profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldegergis, Berhane T; Crouch, Andrew M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple, cost-effective, and reliable method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) in the headspace mode was used for the analysis of 39 volatile components in Pinotage wines. The method was sensitive, with LODs ranging from 50.0 pg/L to 281 ng/L and LOQs between 180 pg/L and 938 ng/L. Precision was between 6 and 20%. The intermediate precision was within the acceptable range. Moreover, good calibration curves with R(2) > 0.99 for all compounds were achieved. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 87 young Pinotage wines of vintages 2005 and 2006 collected from various South African regions. To characterize the results based on vintage and origin, the obtained concentrations of the compounds were subjected to chemometric analysis. Exploratory factor analysis (FA), principal component analysis (PCA), and analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) were consecutively done. The chemometrics approach revealed a reasonable correlation among the volatile components of these wines, as well as with respect to their year of production.

  6. Electrocardiographic profile of guinea pig heart submitted to Ginkgo biloba extract and its terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.O. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiographic effects produced by Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb and by ginkgolides A (GA and B (GB, and bilobalide (BB were investigated in guinea pig heart mounted in Langendorff apparatus (Tyrode, 34 ± 0.1 ºC, 95% O2, 5% CO2. Electrocardiographic parameters were evaluated in the conditions: 1 control with Tyrode and DMSO, 2 EGb (n=4, GA (n=5, GB (n=5 or BB (n=6, and 3 washout. The results showed that 0.1 and 1.0 mg/ml of EGb do not change the electrocardiographic parameters. However, 10 mg/ml of EGb increased the PR interval (PRi at 21% (p<0.001. This increase was also observed for 50 mM GA (20%, p<0.001 and 70 mM BB (13%, p<0.001, which indicates Ca2+ channel block. However, the 50 mM GB reduced the PRi at 11 % (p<0.001. The GA (23%, p<0.001, GB (16%, p<0.001, and BB (40%, p<0.001 reduced the QT interval (QTi, which suggests the activation of the potassium channel. However, EGb increased QTi (6%, p<0.001. The EGb (28%, p<0.05 and GB (13%, p<0.05 reduced the heart rate. Atrioventricular (AV block was observed with EGb, GA, and BB. We can conclude that EGb and its terpenoids alter the ECG parameters inducing AV block, which indicates possible arrhythmogenic potential.

  7. PARAMETERS OF THE IMMUNOLOGICAL PROFILE IN CHICKENS TREATED WITH A CALENDULA OFFICINALIS EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C DUMITRU

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Tests were carried out on thirty, 42 days old Rock x Cornish chickens, divided into three experimental groups: I - control injected with saline, II - injected with a Calendula officinalis extraction supplemented with Bayol and III - treated with Bayol. The effects of the in vivo treatments and simultaneous antigen priming (0.5 ml of a 5 % suspension of SRBC on their humoral (lysozyme, anti-SRBC antibodies and cell-mediated (leucocyte blast transformation responses were investigated. Lysozyme (51.50 ± 32.30, 56.80 ± 41.27, 29.50 ± 22.73 μg/ml(p<0.05, and anti-SRBC antibody titers (2.35 ± 0.86, 2.05 ± 0.65 and 1.90 ± 0.55 were the lowest in Bayol treated group. Spontaneous stimulation index was positively influenced by the in vivo Bayol therapy (57.20 ± 8.88 per cent, when compared to that recorded for the other groups (31.06 ± 18.93 group I, 33.37 ± 19.26 group II.

  8. Effect of oil extraction assisted by ultrasound on the physicochemical properties and fatty acid profile of pumpkin seed oil (Cucurbita pepo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Santos, Betsabé; Rodríguez-Miranda, Jesús; Herman-Lara, Erasmo; Torruco-Uco, Juan G; Carmona-García, Roselis; Juárez-Barrientos, José M; Chávez-Zamudio, Rubí; Martínez-Sánchez, Cecilia E

    2016-07-01

    The effects of amplitude and time of ultrasound-assisted extraction on the physicochemical properties and the fatty acid profile of pumpkin seed oil (Cucurbita pepo) were evaluated. Ultrasound time (5-30 min) and the response variables amplitude (25-100%), extraction yield, efficiency, oxidative stability in terms of the free fatty acids (FFA) of the plant design comprising two independent experiments variables, peroxide (PV), p-anisidine (AV), totox value (TV) and the fatty acid profile were evaluated. The results were analyzed by multiple linear regression. The time and amplitude showed significant differences (P<0.05) for all variables. The highest yield of extraction was achieved at 5 min and amplitude of 62.5% (62%). However, the optimal ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions were as follows: ultrasound time of 26.34 min and amplitude of 89.02%. All extracts showed low FFA (2.75-4.93% oleic acid), PV (1.67-4.68 meq/kg), AV (1.94-3.69) and TV (6.25-12.55) values. The main fatty acids in all the extracts were oleic and linoleic acid. Therefore, ultrasound-assisted oil extraction had increased performance and reduced extraction time without affecting the oil quality.

  9. Geophysical applications for levee assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlaib, Hussein Khalefa

    Levees are important engineering structures that build along the rivers to protect the human lives and shield the communities as well as agriculture lands from the high water level events. Animal burrows, subsurface cavities, and low density (high permeability) zones are weakness features within the levee body that increase its risk of failure. To prevent such failure, continuous monitoring of the structure integrity and early detection of the weakness features must be conducted. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Capacitively Coupled Resistivity (CCR) methods were found to be very effective in assessing the levees and detect zones of weakness within the levee body. GPR was implemented using multi-frequency antennas (200, 400, and 900 MHz) with survey cart/wheel and survey vehicle. The (CCR) method was applied by using a single transmitter and three receivers. Studying the capability and the effectiveness of these methods in levee monitoring, subsurface weakness feature detection, and studying the structure integrity of levees were the main tasks of this dissertation. A set of laboratory experiments was conducted at the Geophysics Laboratory of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) to analyze the polarity change in GPR signals in the presence of subsurface voids and water-filled cavities. Also three full scale field expeditions at the Big Dam Bridge (BDB) Levee, Lollie Levee, and Helena Levee in Arkansas were conducted using the GPR technique. This technique was effective in detecting empty, water, and clay filled cavities as well as small scale animal burrows (small rodents). The geophysical work at BDB and Lollie Levees expressed intensive subsurface anomalies which might decrease their integrity while the Helena Levee shows less subsurface anomalies. The compaction of levee material is a key factor affecting piping phenomenon. The structural integrity of the levee partially depends on the density/compaction of the soil layers. A

  10. Salacia campestris root bark extract: peroxidase inhibition, antioxidant and antiradical profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Rebuglio Vellosa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and free radical species have been implicated in initiating or accompanying many diseases in living organisms; there is thus, a continual need for antioxidants molecules to inactivate ROS/free radicals. Many studies of plants crude extracts have demonstrated free-radical scavenging and antioxidant action. Salacia species have long been used, in several countries, as traditional medicines against certain diseases and for their anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, Salacia campestris Walp (Hippocrateaceae root bark ethanol extract (ScEtOH was assessed for its ability to scavenge free radicals and reactive oxygen species; the results were expressed as percentage inhibition of the active species. ScEtOH was efficient against studied species: DPPH radical (obtained inhibition = 30%, ABTS•+ (IC50 = 1.8±0.8 μg/mL, HOCl (IC50 = 1.7 ± 0.1 μg/mL, O2•- (obtained inhibition = 32%, and NO• (obtained inhibition = 18 %. Peroxidase activity inhibition was evaluated through the guaiacol oxidation reaction catalyzed by hemin, HRP and myeloperoxidase (MPO; data showed that ScEtOH at 10 μg/mL led to 54 and 51% of inhibition, respectively, for the hemin and HRP systems. In the MPO system, ScEtOH promoted a 50% inhibition at 8.9 μg/mL, whereas quercetin, a powerful MPO inhibitor, inhibited this system at 1.35 μg/mL.Espécies reativas do oxigênio (ERO e radicais livres estão relacionados ao início ou à exacerbação de muitas doenças em organismos vivos; existindo portanto uma necessidade contínua por moléculas antioxidantes que inativem as ERO e radicais livres. Muitos estudos com extratos brutos de plantas têm demonstrado propriedades antioxidantes e seqüestradoras de radicais livres. Espécies de Salacia são utilizadas, em muitos países, como remédio tradicional contra certas doenças e por suas propriedades antiinflamatórias. Neste estudo, o extrato bruto etanólico da casca da raiz da Salacia

  11. Unleashing Geophysics Data with Modern Formats and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alex; Brodie, Ross C.; Druken, Kelsey; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Kemp, Carina; Richardson, Murray; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    . The first geophysical data collection selected for transformation by GA was Airborne ElectroMagnetics (AEM) data which was held in proprietary-format files, with associated ISO 19115 metadata held in a separate relational database. Existing NetCDF-CF metadata profiles were enhanced to cover AEM and other geophysical data types, and work is underway to formalise the new geophysics vocabulary as a proposed extension to the Climate & Forecasting conventions. The richness and flexibility of HDF5's internal indexing mechanisms has allowed lossless restructuring of the AEM data for efficient storage, subsetting and access via either the NetCDF4/HDF5 APIs or Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP) data services. This approach not only supports large-scale HPC processing, but also interactive access to a wide range of geophysical data in user-friendly environments such as iPython notebooks and more sophisticated cloud-enabled portals such as the Virtual Geophysics Laboratory (VGL). As multidimensional AEM datasets are relatively complex compared to other geophysical data types, the general approach employed in this project for modernizing AEM data is likely to be applicable to other geophysics data types. When combined with the use of standards-based data services and APIs, a coordinated, systematic modernisation will result in vastly improved accessibility to, and usability of, geophysical data in a wide range of computational environments both within and beyond the geophysics community.

  12. Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course Offered by The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Allison, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Saustrup, S.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers an intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. Now in year six, the course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and visualization. Techniques covered include high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.). Students participate in an initial period of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area (which changes each year) along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas and Galveston, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, have provided ideal locations for students to investigate coastal and sedimentary processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques. In the field, students rotate between two research vessels: one vessel, the 22' aluminum-hulled R/V Lake Itasca, owned and operated by UTIG, is used principally for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling; the other, NOAA's R/V Manta or the R/V Acadiana, operated by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, and is used primarily for high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibrocoring. While at sea, students assist with survey design, learn instrumentation set up, acquisition parameters, data quality control, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of three, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for

  13. Geophysical delineation of acidity and salinity in the Central Manitoba gold mine tailings pile, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycholiz, C.; Ferguson, I. J.; Sherriff, B. L.; Cordeiro, M.; Sri Ranjan, R.; Pérez-Flores, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Surface electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods can map enhanced electrical conductivity caused by acid mine drainage in mine tailings piles. In this case study, we investigate quantitative relationships between geophysical responses and the electrical conductivity, acidity and salinity of tailing samples at the Central Manitoba Mine tailings in Manitoba, Canada. Previous electromagnetic surveys at the site identified zones of enhanced conductivity that were hypothesized to be caused by acid mine drainage. In the present study, high-resolution EM31 and DC-resistivity measurements were made on a profile through a zone of enhanced conductivity and laboratory measurements of salinity and pH were made on saturation paste extracts from an array of tailing samples collected from the upper 2 m of tailings along the profile. Observed spatial correlation of pH and pore-fluid salinity in the tailings samples confirms that the enhanced conductivity in the Central Manitoba Mine tailings is due to acid mine drainage. Contoured cross-sections of the data indicate that the acid mine drainage is concentrated near the base of the oxidized zone in the thicker parts of the tailings pile. The zone of increased acidity extends to the surface on sloping margins causing an increase in apparent conductivity in shallow penetrating geophysical responses. The quantitative relationship between measured pH and salinity shows that the conductivity increase associated with the acid mine drainage is due only in part to conduction by ions produced from dissociation of sulfuric acid. Comparison of the observations with fluid conductivity estimates based on statistical relationships of pH and ion concentrations in water samples from across the tailings pile shows that Ca2 + and Mg2 + ions also make significant contributions to the conductivity at all values of pH and Cu2 +, Al3 + and Fe3 + ions make additional contributions at low pH. Variability in the measured conductivity at constant

  14. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  15. Changes in the aromatic profile of espresso coffee as a function of the grinding grade and extraction time: a study by the electronic nose system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severini, C; Ricci, I; Marone, M; Derossi, A; De Pilli, T

    2015-03-01

    The changes in chemical attributes and aromatic profile of espresso coffee (EC) were studied taking into account the extraction time and grinding level as independent variables. Particularly, using an electronic nose system, the changes of the global aromatic profile of EC were highlighted. The results shown as the major amounts of organic acids, solids, and caffeine were extracted in the first 8 s of percolation. The grinding grade significantly affected the quality of EC probably as an effect of the particle size distribution and the percolation pathways of water through the coffee cake. The use of an electronic nose system allowed us to discriminate the fractions of the brew as a function of the percolation time and also the regular coffee obtained from different grinding grades. Particularly, the aromatic profile of a regular coffee (25 mL) was significantly affected by the grinding level of the coffee grounds and percolation time, which are two variables under the control of the bar operator.

  16. Georadar - high resolution geophysical electromagnetic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Stern

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Georadar is a high resolution geophysical electromagnetic device that was developed in the first part of the 1980's. In Slovenia it was first tested in 1991 on several objects of economicgeological, geotechnical and hydrogeologic nature.Here its usefulness in karst studied is presented. The first part of the paper deals with description of measurement procedure and methodological bases, and the second part with experience and results of case histories. Shown are radargrams from ornamental stone quarry Hotavlje, calcite mine Stahovica, Golobja jama karstcave near Divača and from highway construction site Razdrto-Čebulovica. All measurements were performed with the georadar instrument Pulse EKKO IV with a lOOMHz antenna according to the method of reflection profiling.

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of Caco-2 Cancer Cell Line following Treatment with Extracts from Iodine-Biofortified Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta A Koronowicz

    Full Text Available Although iodization of salt is the most common method used to obtain iodine-enriched food, iodine deficiency disorders are still a global health problem and profoundly affect the quality of human life. Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which are crucial regulators of human metabolism, cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and have been reported to be involved in carcinogenesis. In this study, for the first time, we evaluated the effect of iodine-biofortified lettuce on transcriptomic profile of Caco-2 cancer cell line by applying the Whole Human Genome Microarray assay. We showed 1326 differentially expressed Caco-2 transcripts after treatment with iodine-biofortified (BFL and non-fortified (NFL lettuce extracts. We analysed pathways, molecular functions, biological processes and protein classes based on comparison between BFL and NFL specific genes. Iodine, which was expected to act as a free ion (KI-NFL or at least in part to be incorporated into lettuce macromolecules (BFL, differently regulated pathways of numerous transcription factors leading to different cellular effects. In this study we showed the inhibition of Caco-2 cells proliferation after treatment with BFL, but not potassium iodide (KI, and BFL-mediated induction of mitochondrial apoptosis and/or cell differentiation. Our results showed that iodine-biofortified plants can be effectively used by cells as an alternative source of this trace element. Moreover, the observed differences in action of both iodine sources may suggest a potential of BFL in cancer treatment.

  18. Transcriptome Profiling of Caco-2 Cancer Cell Line following Treatment with Extracts from Iodine-Biofortified Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronowicz, Aneta A; Kopeć, Aneta; Master, Adam; Smoleń, Sylwester; Piątkowska, Ewa; Bieżanowska-Kopeć, Renata; Ledwożyw-Smoleń, Iwona; Skoczylas, Łukasz; Rakoczy, Roksana; Leszczyńska, Teresa; Kapusta-Duch, Joanna; Pysz, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Although iodization of salt is the most common method used to obtain iodine-enriched food, iodine deficiency disorders are still a global health problem and profoundly affect the quality of human life. Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which are crucial regulators of human metabolism, cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and have been reported to be involved in carcinogenesis. In this study, for the first time, we evaluated the effect of iodine-biofortified lettuce on transcriptomic profile of Caco-2 cancer cell line by applying the Whole Human Genome Microarray assay. We showed 1326 differentially expressed Caco-2 transcripts after treatment with iodine-biofortified (BFL) and non-fortified (NFL) lettuce extracts. We analysed pathways, molecular functions, biological processes and protein classes based on comparison between BFL and NFL specific genes. Iodine, which was expected to act as a free ion (KI-NFL) or at least in part to be incorporated into lettuce macromolecules (BFL), differently regulated pathways of numerous transcription factors leading to different cellular effects. In this study we showed the inhibition of Caco-2 cells proliferation after treatment with BFL, but not potassium iodide (KI), and BFL-mediated induction of mitochondrial apoptosis and/or cell differentiation. Our results showed that iodine-biofortified plants can be effectively used by cells as an alternative source of this trace element. Moreover, the observed differences in action of both iodine sources may suggest a potential of BFL in cancer treatment.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of extraction solvent and organ selection on the chemical profile of Astragalus spinosus using HPTLC- multivariate image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawky, Eman; Selim, Dina A

    2017-09-01

    The evaluation of extraction protocols for untargeted and targeted metabolomics was implemented for root and aerial organs of Astragalus spinosus in this work. The efficiency and complementarity of commonly used extraction solvents, namely petroleum ether, methylene chloride, ethyl acetate and n-butanol were considered for method evaluation using chemometric techniques in conjunction with new, simple, and fast high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method for fingerprint analysis by extracting information from a digitalized HPTLC plate using ImageJ software. A targeted approach was furtherly implemented by developing and validating an HPTLC method allowing the quantification of three saponin glycosides. The results of untargeted and targeted principle component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) revealed that the apparent saponins profile seems to depend on a combined effect of matrix composition and the properties of the selected solvent for extraction, where both the biological matrix of the investigated plant organs, as well as the extraction solvent can influence the precision of metabolite abundances. Although, the aerial part is frequently discarded as waste, it is shown hereby that it has similar chemical profile compared to the medicinal part, roots, yet a different extraction solvents pattern is recognized between the two organs which can be attributed to the differences in the composition, permeability or accessibility of the sample matrix/organ tissues, rather than the chemical structures of the detected metabolites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A GEOPHYSICAL COMPANY FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ BGP is one of the world leading onshore geophysical service contractors with a registered capital of 5,100 million Yuan. In 2002, BGP became a liability-limited company after merging other six Chinese geophysical companies.

  1. Fatty acid profile and elemental content of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) oil--effect of extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Mageshni; Moodley, Roshila; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2012-01-01

    Interest in vegetable oil extracted from idioblast cells of avocado fruit is growing. In this study, five extraction methods to produce avocado oil have been compared: traditional solvent extraction using a Soxhlet or ultrasound, Soxhlet extraction combined with microwave or ultra-turrax treatment and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Traditional Soxhlet extraction produced the most reproducible results, 64.76 ± 0.24 g oil/100 g dry weight (DW) and 63.67 ± 0.20 g oil/100 g DW for Hass and Fuerte varieties, respectively. Microwave extraction gave the highest yield of oil (69.94%) from the Hass variety. Oils from microwave extraction had the highest fatty acid content; oils from SFE had wider range of fatty acids. Oils from Fuerte variety had a higher monounsaturated: saturated FA ratio (3.45-3.70). SFE and microwave extraction produced the best quality oil, better than traditional Soxhlet extraction, with the least amount of oxidizing metals present.

  2. Reproducibility of serum protein profiling by systematic assessment using solid-phase extraction and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Anne K; Christensen, René Depont; Madsen, Jonna S

    2008-01-01

    for serum protein profiling we investigated a range of sample preparation techniques and developed a statistical method based on repeated analyses for evaluation of protein-profiling performance of MALDI MS. Two different solid-phase extraction (SPE) methods were investigated, namely custom......Protein profiling of human serum by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is potentially a new diagnostic tool for early detection of human diseases, including cancer. Sample preparation is a key issue in MALDI MS and the analysis of complex samples such as serum......-made microcolumns and commercially available magnetic beads. Using these two methods, nineteen different sample preparation methods for serum profiling by MALDI MS were systematically tested with regard to matrix selection, stationary phase, selectivity, and reproducibility. Microcolumns were tested with regard...

  3. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  4. Cross Section and Profile Extracting from Digital Topographic Map%在数字化地形图中图摘纵横断图形

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周荣; 刘玉善

    2012-01-01

    对传统纸质图摘纵横断数据采集的一般流程进行分析,从相关步骤环节入手,分析缺点。编写的图摘纵横断软件对步骤环节进行改进,作业人员完成对数字化电子地形图中图摘纵横断的数据采集过程,从而完成了传统纸质图摘纵横断数据采集的成果要求,同时进一步提供了为检验人员对数据的完整性、正确性加以核对的便利性。通过作业人员的实践,取得了良好的效果。%The paper analyzes cross section and drofile extracting from traditional paper map and the general flow.From the steps of related links,it analyzes the weaknesses.The extracting software improves the steps,the indoor personnel with digital electronic topographic map finishes extracting cross section and profiles acquisition process,This method meets the profile extracting from the traditional map,and further provides for inspection personnel to the integrity of the data,to check the correctness of convenience on cross section and profile.Through the practice,and it can achieve good effect.

  5. Geochemical Characterization Using Geophysical Data and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.; Murray, C.; Roden, E.; Majer, E.

    2002-12-01

    Although the spatial distribution of geochemical parameters is extremely important for many subsurface remediation approaches, traditional characterization of those parameters is invasive and laborious, and thus is rarely performed sufficiently to describe natural hydrogeological variability at the field-scale. This study is an effort to jointly use multiple sources of information, including noninvasive geophysical data, for geochemical characterization of the saturated and anaerobic portion of the DOE South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia. Our data set includes hydrogeological and geochemical measurements from five boreholes and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic tomographic data along two profiles that traverse the boreholes. The primary geochemical parameters are the concentrations of extractable ferrous iron Fe(II) and ferric iron Fe(III). Since iron-reducing bacteria can reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) under certain conditions, information about the spatial distributions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) may indicate both where microbial iron reduction has occurred and in which zone it is likely to occur in the future. In addition, as geochemical heterogeneity influences bacterial transport and activity, estimates of the geochemical parameters provide important input to numerical flow and contaminant transport models geared toward bioremediation. Motivated by our previous research, which demonstrated that crosshole geophysical data could be very useful for estimating hydrogeological parameters, we hypothesize in this study that geochemical and geophysical parameters may be linked through their mutual dependence on hydrogeological parameters such as lithofacies. We attempt to estimate geochemical parameters using both hydrogeological and geophysical measurements in a Bayesian framework. Within the two-dimensional study domain (12m x 6m vertical cross section divided into 0.25m x 0.25m pixels), geochemical and hydrogeological parameters were considered as data

  6. Marine Magnetic Data Holdings of World Data Center-a for Marine Geology and Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, George F.; Metzger, Dan

    1992-01-01

    The World Data Center-A for Marine Geology and Geophysics is co-located with the Marine Geology & Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO. Fifteen million digital marine magnetic trackline measurements are managed within the GEOphysical DAta System (GEODAS). The bulk of these data were collected with proton precision magnetometers under Transit Satellite navigational control. Along-track sampling averages about 1 sample per kilometer, while spatial density, a function of ship's track and survey pattern, range from 4 to 0.02 data points/sq. km. In the near future, the entire geophysical data set will be available on CD-ROM. The Marine Geology and Geophysics Division (World Data Center-A for MGG), of the National Geophysical Data Center, handles a broad spectrum of marine geophysical data, including measurements of bathymetry, magnetics, gravity, seismic reflection subbottom profiles, and side-scan images acquired by ships throughout the world's oceans. Digital data encompass the first three, while the latter two are in analog form, recorded on 35mm microfilm. The marine geophysical digital trackline data are contained in the GEODAS data base which includes 11.6 million nautical miles of cruise trackline coverage contributed by more than 70 organizations worldwide. The inventory includes data from 3206 cruises with 33 million digital records and indexing to 5.3 million track miles of analog data on microfilm.

  7. Effects of Labisia pumila var alata extracts on the lipid profile, serum antioxidant status and abdominal aorta of high-cholesterol diet rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianita, Roza; Jantan, Ibrahim; Jalil, Juriyati; Amran, Athirah Zawani

    2016-07-15

    Previous studies on Labisia pumila var. alata (LPva) have showed that it could inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and provide protection on myocardial infarction in rats. We hypothesized that LPva extracts can modulate the lipid profiles and serum antioxidant status of hypercholesterolemic rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of aqueous and 80% ethanol extracts of LPva on atherogenic and serum antioxidant parameters as well as changes in abdominal aorta of high-cholesterol diet rats. The major components of the extracts, gallic acid, flavonoids and alkyl resorcinols were analyzed by using a validated reversed phase HPLC method. The rats were induced to hypercholesterolemic status with daily intake of 2% cholesterol for a duration of 8 weeks. Three different doses (100, 200 and 400mg/kg) of the extracts were administered daily on the 4th week onwards. The rats were then sacrificed and the blood was collected via abdominal aorta and serum was separated by centrifugation for biochemical analysis. Part of the aorta tissues were excised immediately for histopathological examination. The serum of LPva treated rats showed significant reduction in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and the abdominal aorta showed a significant decrease of atheroma lesions in treated rats. Serum lipid profiles of treated rats showed a decrease in total cholesterol, total triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels as compared to control group. The atherogenic indices in treated rats were significantly improved along with an increasing level of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The extracts also exhibited significant increase of antioxidant enzymes and decrease of MDA as a product of lipid peroxidation. LPva extracts can reduce the risk of dyslipidemia by improving the serum lipid profiles and modulating serum antioxidants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  8. Consequences of AphanizomenonFlos-aquae(AFA) extract (Stemtech (TM) ) on metabolic profile of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Banazadeh, Zahra; Shafiee, Gita; Khatami, Fatemeh; Ahadi, Zeinab; Heshmat, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Blue- green algae is one of the most nutrient dense foods which is rich in substances that have useful effects on human health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a water- soluble extract of the cyanophyta Aphanizomenon Flos-aquae (Stemtech (TM) ) as a functional supplement on CD markers, lipid profile, glucose levels as well as its side effects in Iranian patients with type 2 diabetes. During this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 49 type 2 diabetic patients, aged between 20 and 60 years with a HbA1C ≥ 7.5 %, were allocated. Patients were divided into two groups of placebo and treated with an equal ratio 1:1. The subjects in StemtechTM group received one capsule of StemFlo (508 mg) before breakfast and two capsules of StemEnhance (500 mg) after each meal for a period of 12 weeks, and placebo group was instructed to take placebo with the same pattern. During the intervention period, subjects were asked to keep usual diet and prohibited to take any functional foods or dietary supplements. Metabolic panel has been measured as the primary outcome of study at the beginning and end of the intervention period via blood sampling. Stemtech (TM) supplementation for 12 weeks decreased fasting blood glucose (FBG) and Glycatedhemoglobin (HbA1c). Mean serum chemistry parameters (Triglyceride, Total Cholesterol, LDL, HDL, CRP, AST, ALT, BUN and Creatinine) as well as CD 34(+), IL-6, TNF-α in treated and control groups before and after the study showed no considerable dissimilarities. StemtechTM intervention brought in positive consequence on blood glucose levels in Iranian patients with type 2 diabetes, consequently suggests the Stemtech (TM) as a functional food for the management of diabetes.

  9. Digital gene-expression profiling analysis of the cholesterol-lowering effects of alfalfa saponin extract on laying hens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To prevent cardiovascular disease, people are advised to limit their intake of dietary cholesterol to less than 300 mg/day. Egg consumption has been seriously reduced because of the high levels of cholesterol. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cholesterol-lowering effects of alfalfa saponin extract (ASE in yolk and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using digital gene-expression profiling analysis. Liver and ovary tissues were isolated from laying hens fed with ASE for RNA sequencing. RESULTS: The cholesterol content of the yolks of eggs from hens fed 120 mg/kg ASE declined considerably on day 60. Other groups (60, 240, 480 mg/kg ASE group also showed decreases, but they were not significant. Digital gene expression generated over nine million reads per sample, producing expression data for least 12,384 genes. Among these genes, 110 genes showed greater than normal expression in the liver and 107 genes showed greater than normal expression in the ovary. Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1 and apolipoprotein H (Apoh, which act in the synthesis of bile acid and cholesterol efflux, showed more expression in the livers of hens given dietary ASE supplementation. In the ovary, levels of very low density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr, apolipoprotein B (Apob, apovitellenin 1 (ApovldlII and vitellogenin (VtgI, VtgII and VtgIII in ovary decreased with dietary ASE supplementation. CONCLUSION: Transcriptome analysis revealed that the molecular mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of ASE were partially mediated by enhancement of cholesterol efflux in the liver and this reduced of cholesterol deposition in the ovary.

  10. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(2) analytical profile of extracts obtained from purple sweet potato after green ultrasound-assisted extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenzhou; Guan, Qingyan; Koubaa, Mohamed; Barba, Francisco J; Roohinejad, Shahin; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Yang, Xinsun; Li, Shuyi; He, Jingren

    2017-01-15

    Ultrasound pre-treatment (UAE) was applied to assist the extraction of valuable compounds (polyphenols (especially anthocyanins), and proteins) from purple sweet potato (PSP). Under optimum conditions (ultrasound time (40min); supplementary hot extraction (80°C) up to 120min; pH: 2.5; ethanol concentration: 58%), the highest concentrations of polyphenols (3.877mg/g), anthocyanins (0.293mg/g), and proteins (0.753mg/g) were found, with minimal specific energy consumption (8406J/mg). Moreover, anthocyanin and non-anthocyanin polyphenols in PSP extract from optimized extraction temperature were identified using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(2). The major identified anthocyanins were peonidin-3-caffeoyl-p-hydroxybenzoyl sophoroside-5-glucoside, peonidin-3-(6″-caffeoyl-6‴-feruloyl sophoroside)-5-glucoside, cyanidin-3-caffeoyl-p-hydroxybenzoyl sophoroside-5-glucoside, whereas the major identified non-anthocyanin molecules were quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid-3-glucose. The amount of the predominant anthocyanin and non-anthocyanin compounds from PSP extract obtained after UAE was higher than that extracted after conventional solvent extraction. The results obtained in this work demonstrated the efficiency of UAE for the recovery of anthocyanins from PSP.

  11. Near-surface applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Everett, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Just a few meters below the Earth's surface lie features of great importance, from geological faults which can produce devastating earthquakes, to lost archaeological treasures! This refreshing, up-to-date book explores the foundations of interpretation theory and the latest developments in near-surface techniques, used to complement traditional geophysical methods for deep-exploration targets. Clear but rigorous, the book explains theory and practice in simple physical terms, supported by intermediate-level mathematics. Techniques covered include magnetics, resistivity, seismic reflection and refraction, surface waves, induced polarization, self-potential, electromagnetic induction, ground-penetrating radar, magnetic resonance, interferometry, seismoelectric and more. Sections on data analysis and inverse theory are provided and chapters are illustrated by case studies, giving students and professionals the tools to plan, conduct and analyze a near-surface geophysical survey. This is an important textbook fo...

  12. New Geophysical Observatory in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Bettucci, L.; Nuñez, P.; Caraballo, R. R.; Ogando, R.

    2013-05-01

    In 2011 began the installation of the first geophysical observatory in Uruguay, with the aim of developing the Geosciences. The Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory Aiguá (OAGA) is located within the Cerro Catedral Tourist Farm (-34 ° 20 '0 .89 "S/-54 ° 42 '44.72" W, h: 270m). This has the distinction of being located in the center of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly. Geologically is emplaced in a Neoproterozoic basement, in a region with scarce anthropogenic interference. The OAGA has, since 2012, with a GSM-90FD dIdD v7.0 and GSM-90F Overhauser, both of GEM Systems. In addition has a super-SID receiver provided by the Stanford University SOLAR Center, as a complement for educational purposes. Likewise the installation of a seismograph REF TEK-151-120A and VLF antenna is being done since the beginning of 2013.

  13. Geophysical fields of a megalopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, A. A.; Loktev, D. N.; Rybnov, Yu. S.; Soloviev, S. P.; Kharlamov, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    A description of the Center of Geophysical Monitoring for Systematic Investigation of Negative Consequences for the Human Environment and Infrastructure of the City of Moscow Resulting from Natural and Technogenic Factors, which is part of the Institute of Geosphere Dynamics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IGD RAS), is presented. The results of synchronous observations of the seismic vibrations, electric and acoustic fields, and atmospheric meteoparameters performed at the Center and in the Mikhnevo Geophysical observatory of IGD RAS situated outside of the zone of the Moscow influence are examined. It is shown that the megalopolis influence consists of an increase in the amplitudes of the physical fields, a change in their spectral composition, and the violation of natural periodicities. A technogenic component that has a considerable impact on the natural physical processes in the surface atmosphere is an important factor that characterizes a megalopolis.

  14. Geophysical interpretation using integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Eskola, L

    1992-01-01

    Along with the general development of numerical methods in pure and applied to apply integral equations to geophysical modelling has sciences, the ability improved considerably within the last thirty years or so. This is due to the successful derivation of integral equations that are applicable to the modelling of complex structures, and efficient numerical algorithms for their solution. A significant stimulus for this development has been the advent of fast digital computers. The purpose of this book is to give an idea of the principles by which boundary-value problems describing geophysical models can be converted into integral equations. The end results are the integral formulas and integral equations that form the theoretical framework for practical applications. The details of mathematical analysis have been kept to a minimum. Numerical algorithms are discussed only in connection with some illustrative examples involving well-documented numerical modelling results. The reader is assu­ med to have a back...

  15. Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Yoram

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to increase water savings and show better ecological control of natural vegetation by developing hydrogeological-geophysical methods for characterizing the permeability and content of water in soil. The ground penetrating radar (GPR) tool was developed and used as the surface geophysical method for monitoring water content. Initial results using the tool suggest that surface GPR is a viable technique for obtaining precision volumetric water content profile estimates, and that laboratory-derived petrophysical relationships could be applied to field-scale GPR data. A field-scale bacterial transport study was conducted within an uncontaminated sandy Pleistocene aquifer to evaluate the importance of heterogeneity in controlling the transport of bacteria. Geochemical, hydrological, geological, and geophysical data were collected to characterize the site prior to and after chemical and bacterial injection experiments. Study results shows that, even within the fairly uniform shallow marine deposits of the narrow channel focus area, heterogeneity existed that influenced the chemical tracer transport over lateral distances of a few meters and vertical distances of less than a half meter. The interpretation of data suggest that the incorporation of geophysical data with limited hydrological data may provide valuable information about the stratigraphy, log conductivity values, and the spatial correlation structure of log conductivity, which have traditionally been obtainable only by performing extensive and intrusive hydrological sampling.

  16. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  17. Geophysical examination of coal deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. J.

    1981-04-01

    Geophysical techniques for the solution of mining problems and as an aid to mine planning are reviewed. Techniques of geophysical borehole logging are discussed. The responses of the coal seams to logging tools are easily recognized on the logging records. Cores for laboratory analysis are cut from selected sections of the borehole. In addition, information about the density and chemical composition of the coal may be obtained. Surface seismic reflection surveys using two dimensional arrays of seismic sources and detectors detect faults with throws as small as 3 m depths of 800 m. In geologically disturbed areas, good results have been obtained from three dimensional surveys. Smaller faults as far as 500 m in advance of the working face may be detected using in seam seismic surveying conducted from a roadway or working face. Small disturbances are detected by pulse radar and continuous wave electromagnetic methods either from within boreholes or from underground. Other geophysical techniques which explicit the electrical, magnetic, gravitational, and geothermal properties of rocks are described.

  18. Rapid Geophysical Surveyor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of US Department of Energy waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sites where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed because of refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL in September 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2{1/2} in. along survey lines spaced 1-ft apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 worker-days using conventional ground survey techniques.

  19. SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience): Learning Geophysics by Doing Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Gilpin, B. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2005-12-01

    SAGE, a field-based educational program in applied geophysical methods has been an REU site for 16 years and completed its 23rd year of operation in July 2005. SAGE teaches the major geophysical exploration methods (including seismics, gravity, magnetics, and electromagnetics) and applies them to the solution of specific local and regional geologic problems. These include delineating buried hazardous material; mapping archaeological sites; and studying the structure, tectonics, and water resources of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico. Nearly 600 graduates, undergraduates, and professionals have attended SAGE since 1983. Since 1990 REU students have numbered 219 coming from dozens of different campuses. There have been 124 underrepresented REU students including 100 women, 14 Hispanics, 7 Native Americans, and 3 African Americans. Tracking of former REU students has revealed that 81% have gone on to graduate school. Keys to the success of SAGE are hands-on immersion in geophysics for one month and a partnership between academia, industry, and a federal laboratory. Successful approaches at SAGE include: 1) application of the latest equipment by all students; 2) continued updating of equipment, computers, and software by organizing universities and industry affiliates; 3) close ties with industry who provide supplemental instruction, furnish new equipment and software, and alert students to the current industry trends and job opportunities; 4) two-team, student data analysis structure that simultaneously addresses specific geophysical techniques and their integration; and 5) oral and written reports patterned after professional meetings and journals. An eight member, 'blue ribbon' advisory panel from academia, industry, and the federal government has been set up to maintain the vitality of SAGE by addressing such issues as funding, new faculty, organization, and vision. SAGE is open to students from any university (or organization) with backgrounds including

  20. Effect of Morus nigra aqueous extract treatment on the maternal-fetal outcome, oxidative stress status and lipid profile of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Sinzato, S. [UNESP; de Campos, Kleber Eduardo; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha [UNESP; Damasceno,Débora Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance: Morus nigra, commonly known as black mulberry, is widely used in Brazilian folk medicine for the diabetes treatment.Aim of this study: To evaluate the effect of Morus nigra aqueous extract treatment on maternal lipid and oxidative stress profile, reproductive outcomes, and also fetal anomaly incidence from diabetic and non-diabetic rats.Materials and methods: Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) in virgin female Wistar rats. Morus nigra leaf aqueou...

  1. Different in Vivo Reactivity Profile in Health Care Workers and Patients with Spina Bifida to Internal and External Latex Glove Surface-Derived Allergen Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy to natural rubber latex is a well-recognized health problem, especially among health care workers and patients with spina bifida. Despite latex sensitization being acquired in health institutions in both health care workers and patients with spina bifida, differences in allergen sensitization profiles have been described between these two risk groups. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the in vivo reactivity of health care workers and patients with spina bifida to extracts of in...

  2. Inorganic profile of some Brazilian medicinal plants obtained from ethanolic extract and ''in natura'' samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.O.M.; de Sousa, P.T.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.

    2004-10-03

    The Anadenathera macrocarpa, Schinus molle, Hymenaea courbaril, Cariniana legalis, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnodendron barbatiman, were collected ''in natura'' samples (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) from different commercial suppliers. The pharmaco-active compounds in ethanolic extracts had been made by the Mato Grosso Federal University (UFMT). The energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry was used for the elemental analysis in different parts of the plants and respective ethanolic extracts. The Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Rb, S, Sr and Zn concentrations were determined by the fundamental parameters method. Some specimens showed a similar inorganic profile for ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples and some ones showed a distinct inorganic profile. For example, the Anadenathera macrocarpa showed a similar concentration in Mg, P, Cu, Zn and Rb elements in ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples; however very different concentration in Na, S, Cl, K , Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr was observed in distinctive samples. The Solidago microglossa showed the K, Ca, Cl, S, Mg, P and Fe elements as major constituents in both samples, suggesting that the extraction process did not affect in a considerable way the ''in natura'' inorganic composition. The elemental composition of the different parts of the plants (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) has been also determined. For example, the Schinus molle specimen showed P, K, Cl and Ca elements as major constituents in the seeds, Mg, K and Sr in the barks and Mg, S, Cl and Mn in the leaves, demonstrating a differentiated elementary distribution. These inorganic profiles will contribute to evaluate the quality control of the Brazilian herbaceous trade and also will assist to identify which parts of the medicinal plants has greater therapeutic effect.

  3. Effects of Arctium lappa aqueous extract on lipid profile and hepatic enzyme levels of sucrose-induced metabolic syndrome in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ahangarpour

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Arctium lappa is known to have antioxidant and antidiabetic effects in traditional medicine. Objectives: The aim of this paper was to study the effects of A. lappa root extract (AE on lipid profile and hepatic enzyme levels in sucrose-induced metabolic syndrome (MS in female rats. The study used 40 adult female Wistar rats weighing 150 g-250 g randomly divided into five groups: control, metabolic syndrome (MS, metabolic syndrome+AE at 50,100, 200 mg/kg. MS was induced by administering 50% sucrose in drinking water for 6 weeks. AE was intra-peritoneally administered daily at doses of 50,100, and 200 mg/kg for two sequential weeks at the end of the fourth week in metabolic syndrome rats. Twenty-four hours after the last administration of AE, blood was collected and centrifuged, and then the serum was used for the measurement of lipid profile and hepatic enzyme. Serum glucose, insulin, fasting insulin resistance index, body weight, water intake, lipid profile, and hepatic enzymes were significantly increased although food intake was decreased in MS rats compared to the control rats. The lipids and liver enzymes were reduced by AE extracts in the MS group. This study showed that the A. lappa root aqueous extract exhibits a hypolipidemic activity of hyperlipidemic rats. This activity is practically that of a triple-impact antioxidant, hypolipidemic, and hepatoprotective.

  4. Serum hepatic biochemistry and electrophoretic protein profile of healthy and Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice treated with extracts of Agaricus blazei Murill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durval Verçosa Junior

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Compounds isolated from Agaricus blazei Murill represent a group of promising natural immunomodulators for use in the treatment of neoplasms. We have evaluated the serum biochemical profile of healthy and Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice treated with different extracts of A. blazei. Total, supernatant, and polysaccharide extracts of A. blazei were obtained from suspensions (at acidic or neutral pH kept in a water bath at 60 °C or in an ultrasonic bath at 37 °C. After oral administering the extracts to mice for 21 days, blood samples were collected for determination of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, creatine kinase (CK, urea, total protein, albumin, globulins, and alpha-, beta- and gamma-globulin fractions. The presence of the tumor led to a significant increase in serum CK and AST activities and in the concentrations of total globulin and the gamma-globulin fraction, and to a decrease in the albumin and alpha2-globulin levels. The polysaccharide extracts of A. blazei reduced the serum AST and ALT activities, probably due to a hepatoprotective effect. In addition, polysaccharide and supernatant extracts inhibited the tumor-induced increase in gamma-globulin levels. Thus, the supernatant and polysaccharide fractions of the extract of A. blazei have potential for use in complementary antineoplastic treatments.

  5. Carbonate extraction process for the metabolic, isozymic and proteomic profiling of rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.), a hyper-acidic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Sharma, Pankaj Kumar; Chaurasiya, Narayan Das; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Tyagi, Bali Ram; Srivastava, Avdhesh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.) is a valuable monoterpene-yielding plant. It has been well characterised phytochemically through the isolation of >270 secondary metabolites, however, there is hardly any biochemical or metabolic information concerning this plant. Initial attempts to investigate its metabolism failed to produce any enzyme activity in the tissue extracts prepared in routine extraction buffers owing to the intrinsic properties of the tissue matrix. It was recognised that cellular hyper-acidity (cell sap pH approximately 3.0) gave rise to very low protein levels in the extracts, thus prohibiting detection of activities of even primary metabolic enzymes that are usually abundantly present in plants. Tissue extraction in Tris solution without pH adjustment (as used for studies involving citrus and banana) led to little or no improvement. Therefore, a novel approach using sodium carbonate solution as an efficient extraction system for enzymes and proteins from the plant was studied. Functionality of the carbonate extraction has been demonstrated through its effectiveness, a several-fold superior performance, in yielding protein, monitoring primary metabolism and secondary metabolic enzymes, and isozymic and polypeptide profiling. The process may also be helpful in the reliable analysis of other acidic plant tissues.

  6. Release Profile and Inhibition Test of The Nanoparticles A. Paniculata Extract as Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase in The Process of Carbohydrates Breakdown Into Glucose Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imansari, Farisa; Sahlan, Muhammad; Arbianti, Rita

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A.paniculata) contain the main active substances Andrographolide which helps lower glucose levels in diabetics by inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. The ability of the extract A.paniculata in lowering glucose levels will increase with the technique encapsulation with a coating of composition Chitosan-STPP as a drug delivery to the target organ. This study aimed to get an overview of A.paniculata release profile of nanoparticles in a synthetic fluid media with various concentrations of coating and inhibition testing nasty shard extract in inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. This research resulted in nanoparticles by coating efficiency and loading capacity of chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. The ability of A.paniculata extracts as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors has been demonstrated in this study, the percent inhibition of 33.17%.

  7. Profil jaringan lunak wajah kasus borderline maloklusi klas I pada perawatan ortodonti dengan dan tanpa pencabutan gigi (Facial soft tissue profile on borderline class I malocclusion in orthodontic treatment with or without teeth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of orthodontic treatment plan with or without teeth extraction remains controversial, especially in borderline cases, so it requires more data and information to establish appropriate treatment plans in order to obtain optimal treatment results. Purpose: The study was aimed to determine the facial soft tissue changes in the borderline class I cases treated with and without tooth extraction on post-orthodontic treatment. Methods: The study was conducted on 28 lateral cephalograms, divided into two groups; 13 cases with tooth extraction, and 15 cases without tooth extraction. The subject criterias were as follows; class I malocclusion treated with straightwire technique, skeletal class I, in range of age between 18 to 30 years old, normal overjet 2-4 mm, arch length discrepancy between 2.5 to 5 mm, Index of Fossa Canine (IFC between 37% to 44%, did not using extraoral devices, and treated with teeth extraction of 4 second premolars or without tooth extraction. The measurement of nasolabial angle, labiomental angle, and linear position of the upper and lower lip to E-Ricketts line were done on each cephalogram before and after orthodontic treatment. Results: In teeth extraction cases, there was a change on upper and lower lips positions (p<0.05, but there were no changes on nasolabial angle and labiomental angle (p>0.05. In non teeth extraction cases, there were no changes in nasolabial angle, labiomental angle, and lips positions (p>0.05. Both of groups also have indicated that there were no changes on linear position of the upper and lower lip (p>0.05. Post-orthodontic treatment indicated a significant differences between extraction and nonextraction cases on nasolabial and labiomental angle, and lips position (p<0.05. Conclusion: The facial soft tissue profile changes on teeth extraction case was more retruded than non- teeth extraction case.Latar belakang: Penentuan rencana perawatan ortodonti dengan pencabutan atau

  8. Anti-oxidant properties and polyphenolic profile screening of Vitis vinifera stems and leaves crude extracts grown in Perlis, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Nursyahda; Zulkifli, Razauden Mohamed; Akhir, Fazrena Nadia Md; Basar, Norazah

    2014-03-01

    Grape has become a fast growing agricultural sector in Malaysia producing between 0.62 kg to 2.03 kg waste per vinestock. This study aims to generate useful information on anti-oxidative properties as well as polyphenolic composition of grapevine waste. Stems and leaves of Vitis vinifera cultivated in Perlis, Malaysia were extracted using methanol, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether. Ethyl acetate stems extract exhibited highest total phenolic content. While in DPPH assay, methanolic stems extract show the highest antioxidant activities. This result indicates that total phenolic content in the extracts may not contribute directly to the antioxidant activities. Thin Layer Chromatograms of all crude extracts exhibited good separation under solvent system petroleum ether-ethyl acetate (2:3) resulted in detection of resveratrol in ethyl acetate stems crude extract.

  9. Employing photoacoustic spectroscopy in the evaluation of the skin permeation profile of emulsion containing antioxidant phenolic-rich extract of Melochia arenosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunin, Luana Magri; Borghi, Fernanda Belincanta; Nogueira, Ana Claudia; Higachi, Luciana; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Diniz, Andréa; Truiti, Maria da Conceição Torrado

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an important factor modulating skin alterations. Melochia arenosa Benth. (Malvaceae) is a Brazilian plant with antimicrobial activity and antioxidant potential. The objective of this study is to develop a topical formulation containing antioxidant phenolic-rich extract of M. arenosa and to evaluate its skin permeation profile. Response surface methodology was used to maximize the total phenolic (TP) content of the extract and its antioxidant activity was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), and respiratory burst methods. An emulsion containing 1% optimized extract (OE) was developed and employed photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) for the determination of its skin permeation profile. The morphology of the skin was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The optimum conditions predicted for the major extractive efficiency of the phenolics with 100% ethanol led extraction time 101 h and plant:solvent proportion 1:13.5 (w/v). OE presented TP = 724.6 ± 8.2 mg GAE/g extract and scavenging capacity of DPPH (IC50 value = 11.43 ± 0.14 µg/mL) and ABTS radicals (IC50 value = 35.42 ± 0.48 µg/mL). The production of ROS by neutrophils after stimulation with phorbol miristate acetate was lower when the OE was present in the reaction medium, endorsing its high antioxidant capacity. The data obtained by PAS indicated that the OE present in the emulsion has permeated and was distributed in the whole skin. No histopathological alterations were observed in the histological analysis. The formulation developed is a promising tool for skin care and could prevent the damage caused by oxidative stress.

  10. GEOPHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132231 Chen Li(State Key Laboratory of Marine Geology,Tongji University,Shanghai200092,China);Xue Mei Group Velocity Tomography of Rayleigh Waves in South China Sea and Its Geodynamic Implications(Acta Seismologica Sinica,ISSN0253-3782,CN11-2021/P,34(6),2012,p.754-772,9illus.,46refs.,with English abstract)Key words:Rayleigh waves,velocity structure,South China Sea

  11. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Goff, J. A.; Gulick, S. P. S.; McIntosh, K. D.; Saustrup, S., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples. Students participate in an initial three days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas, and Galveston, TX, and Grand Isle, LA, provide ideal locations for students to investigate coastal processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques in an exploratory mode. At sea, students assist with survey design and instrumentation set up while learning about acquisition parameters, data quality control, trouble-shooting, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of four, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for particle size analysis and data processing. During the course's final week, teams return to the classroom where they integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software such as Echos, Landmark, Caris, and Fledermaus. The course concludes with a series of final presentations and discussions in which students examine geologic history and/or sedimentary processes represented by the Gulf Coast continental shelf with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and low instructor to student ratio (sixteen

  12. Geophysical survey at Tell Barri (Syria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Giovanni; Cella, Federico; Pierobon, Raffaella; Castaldo, Raffaele; Castiello, Gabriella; Fedi, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    A geophysical survey at the archaeological site of Tell Barri (Northeasterm Syria) was carried out. The Tell (Arab word for "hill") is 32 m high with a whole covered area of 37 hectares. The Tell, with its huge dimensions and with a great amount of pottery on the surface, is a precious area to study the regional history from IV mill. BC to Islamic and Medieval period. The geophysical study consisted in magnetic and electromagnetic measurements in the lower town area. The aim of this survey was to provide evidence of the presence of buried archaeological structures around an already excavated area. The wall structures in the Tell Barri are made by backed or crude clay bricks. The instrument used for the magnetic survey was an Overhauser-effect proton magnetometer (Gem GSM-19GF), in gradiometric configuration. The electromagnetic instrument used, Geonics Ltd. EM31, implements a Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Method (FDEM). It was used in vertical coils configuration, and this choice should grant a maximum theoretical investigation depth of about 6 m. Before starting the measurements on a larger scale, we conducted a magnetic and EM test profile on some already excavated, outcropping, baked bricks walls. Results were encouraging, because clear and strong magnetic and EM anomalies were recorded over the outcropping walls. However, in the survey area these structures are covered by 3 to 4 meters of clay material and the increased sensors-structures distance will reduce the anomalies amplitude. Moreover, the cover material is disseminated with bricks, basalt blocks and ceramics, all of which have relevant magnetic properties. After magnetic surveying some 50 m side square areas, we verified that unfortunately their effect resulted to be dominant with respect to the deeper wall structures, degrading too much the signal-to-noise ratio. The processing and analysis of magnetic data is however currently underway and will determine decisions about further use of this method

  13. Phytochemical profiles and antimicrobial activity of aromatic Malaysian herb extracts against food-borne pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziman, Nurain; Abdullah, Noriham; Noor, Zainon Mohd; Kamarudin, Wan Saidatul Syida Wan; Zulkifli, Khairusy Syakirah

    2014-04-01

    Preliminary phytochemical and flavonoid compounds of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of 6 aromatic Malaysian herbs were screened and quantified using Reverse-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC). The herbal extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 10 food-borne pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms using disk diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)/minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of herbal extracts were determined. In the phytochemical screening process, both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. hydropiper exhibited presence of all 7 tested phytochemical compounds. Among all herbal extracts, the aqueous P. hydropiper and E. elatior extracts demonstrated the highest antibacterial activity against 7 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with diameter ranging from 7.0 to 18.5 mm and 6.5 to 19 mm, respectively. The MIC values for aqueous and ethanolic extracts ranged from 18.75 to 175 mg/mL and 0.391 to 200 mg/mL, respectively while the MBC/MFC values for aqueous and ethanolic extracts ranged from 25 to 200 mg/mL and 3.125 to 50 mg/mL, respectively. Major types of bioactive compounds in aqueous P. hydropiper and E. elatior extracts were identified using RP-HPLC instrument. Flavonoids found in these plants were epi-catechin, quercetin, and kaempferol. The ability of aqueous Persicaria hydropiper (L.) H. Gross and Etlingera elatior (Jack) R.M. Sm. extracts to inhibit the growth of bacteria is an indication of its broad spectrum antimicrobial potential. Hence these herbal extracts may be used as natural preservative to improve the safety and shelf-life of food and pharmaceutical products.

  14. Hypoglycaemic activity of Mathurameha, a Thai traditional herbal formula aqueous extract, and its effect on biochemical profiles of streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayarop, Kullacha; Peungvicha, Penchom; Temsiririrkkul, Rungravi; Wongkrajang, Yuvadee; Chuakul, Wongsatit; Rojsanga, Piyanuch

    2017-06-29

    The Thai traditional herbal formula-Mathurameha, consisting of 26 medicinal plants, has been used as an alternative and complementary medicine for diabetes treatment in Wangnamyen Hospital, Thailand. To provide scientific evidences on the efficacy and safety of this herbal formula, in vivo hypoglycaemic activity, effect on serum biochemical profiles and acute toxicity were investigated. Experimental type 2 diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide 15 min prior to intravenous injection of streptozotocin. The most effective extract from the oral glucose tolerant test (OGTT) was administered daily via the oral route to diabetic rats for 2 weeks. Two-hour postprandial plasma glucose (2h-PPG) levels were measured on days 0, 7, and 14. Biochemical data were measured at the end of daily oral administration experiment. Aqueous extract of the herbal formula was the most potent extract for improving glucose tolerance of streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats after single oral administration. After 2 weeks of daily oral administration, the aqueous extract showed a dose-dependent glucose lowering effect. At doses of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg, the 2h-PPG level of diabetic rats decreased by 3.32%, 15.78%, and 17.94%, respectively. Most of the biochemical profiles of diabetic rats were improved, including the total cholesterol (TC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein, albumin, globulin, creatinine, and uric acid levels. The significantly increased triglyceride (TG) level observed in treated diabetic rats indicated a lack of a beneficial effect of the extract on lipid homeostasis. Nevertheless, there were no signs or symptoms of acute toxicity observed after oral administration of aqueous extract (5 g/kg) to both male and female rats. The results revealed that the herbal formula aqueous extract has hypoglycaemic activity, beneficial effects on biochemical profiles and a lack of acute toxicity. This study

  15. Studies in geophysics: Active tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Active tectonics is defined within the study as tectonic movements that are expected to occur within a future time span of concern to society. Such movements and their associated hazards include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and land subsidence and emergence. The entire range of geology, geophysics, and geodesy is, to some extent, pertinent to this topic. The needs for useful forecasts of tectonic activity, so that actions may be taken to mitigate hazards, call for special attention to ongoing tectonic activity. Further progress in understanding active tectonics depends on continued research. Particularly important is improvement in the accuracy of dating techniques for recent geologic materials.

  16. Geophysical study in waste landfill localized above fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariveltom Cosme da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical survey is an important method for investigation of contaminated areas used in the characterization of contrasting physical properties in the presence of pollutants. This work applied the geophysical methods of Electrical Resistivity and Self Potential in waste landfill, located in Caçapava do Sul city, RS. The landfill is located over fractured metamorphic rocks. Eight lines of electrical profiling with 288 measures of self potential were done. In addition, 83 measurements of direction and dip of fractures were taken. The application of spontaneous potential method permitted to detect the direction of groundwater flow. The electrical resistivity measurements allowed the identification of low-intensity anomalies associated with the presence of leachate. There is a relationship between anomalous zones and the directions of fractures.

  17. About well-posed definition of geophysical fields'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermokhine, Konstantin; Zhdanova, Ludmila; Litvinova, Tamara

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new approach to the downward continuation of geophysical fields based on approximation of observed data by continued fractions. Key Words: downward continuation, continued fraction, Viskovatov's algorithm. Many papers in geophysics are devoted to the downward continuation of geophysical fields from the earth surface to the lower halfspace. Known obstacle for the method practical use is a field's breaking-down phenomenon near the pole closest to the earth surface. It is explained by the discrepancy of the studied fields' mathematical description: linear presentation of the field in the polynomial form, Taylor or Fourier series, leads to essential and unremovable instability of the inverse problem since the field with specific features in the form of poles in the lower halfspace principally can't be adequately described by the linear construction. Field description by the rational fractions is closer to reality. In this case the presence of function's poles in the lower halfspace corresponds adequately to the denominator zeros. Method proposed below is based on the continued fractions. Let's consider the function measured along the profile and represented it in the form of the Tchebishev series (preliminary reducing the argument to the interval [-1, 1]): There are many variants of power series' presentation by continued fractions. The areas of series and corresponding continued fraction's convergence may differ essentially. As investigations have shown, the most suitable mathematical construction for geophysical fields' continuation is so called general C-fraction: where ( , z designates the depth) For construction of C-fraction corresponding to power series exists a rather effective and stable Viskovatov's algorithm (Viskovatov B. "De la methode generale pour reduire toutes sortes des quantitees en fraction continues". Memoires de l' Academie Imperiale des Sciences de St. Petersburg, 1, 1805). A fundamentally new algorithm for Downward Continuation

  18. AROMA PROFILE AND ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF ALCOHOLIC AND AQUEOUS EXTRACTS FROM ROOT, LEAF AND STALK OF NETTLE (Urtica dioica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razzagh Mahmoudi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plant can be considered as a great source of new antimicrobial agents due to their enormous therapeutic potential and limited side effects. Nettle (Urtica dioica L. is a widespread and common medicinal plant widely used in traditional medicine. The present study investigates the antimicrobial potency of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Urtica dioica on some gram positive and negative bacteria and also a particular type of fungi and analyzes the extracts to find the active ingredients by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS method. Results from disc diffusion assay indicated that water extract of root, leaf and stalk had the highest antimicrobial activity respectively and caused significant inhibition zones in P. vulgaris, L. monocytogenes and K. pneumoniae cultures. Antimicrobial efficacy of ethanol extracts was higher in root extract which caused high growth inhibition zones in P. vulgaris, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus cultures. MBC and MIC experiments of the ethanol extract illustrated that the most powerful antimicrobial effect was related to the stem organ extract on K. pnuomonae and S. aureus bacteria. Highest level of antibacterial effects in root can be due to its higher concentration of contents compared to other organs. Based on these results it can be suggested that Urtica dioica and its water and ethanol extracts have noticeable antimicrobial effects against gram negative, positive and Candida albicans fungi that may be applicable as a prophylactic or therpeutic antimicrobial agent in both human and animals.

  19. Stabilization of lysosomal membrane and cell membrane glycoprotein profile by Semecarpus anacardium linn. nut milk extract in experimental hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, B; Sachdanandam, P

    2000-08-01

    Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day for 14 days exerted an in vivo stabilizing effect on lysosomal membrane and glycoprotein content in rat hepatocellular carcinoma. This was demonstrated in normal rats and in animals whose biomembranes were rendered fragile by induction of hepatocellular carcinoma with aflatoxin B(1) and subsequent treatment with Semecarpus anacardium nut extract. In this condition, the discharge of lysosomal enzymes increased significantly with a subsequent increase in glycoprotein components. The nut extract administration reversed these adverse changes to near normal in treated animals. The possible reason for this reversal is discussed. Such stabilization of biomembranes by Semecarpus anacardium nut extract may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers involving abnormal fragility of lysosomes and glycoprotein content providing the extract demonstrates safety in a full toxicity study. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. MANIFESTATION OF FAULT ZONES IN GEOPHYSICAL FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Spivak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical fields influenced by tectonics faults were observed, and instrumental observation results are analysed in the article. It is shown that fault zones are characterized by geophysical fields that are more variable than those in midmost segments of crustal blocks, more intense responses to weak external impacts such as lunar and solar tides and atmospheric pressure variations, and intensive relaxation. Transformation of energy between geophysical fields varying in origin takes place mainly in the fault zones.

  1. Effect of Morus nigra aqueous extract treatment on the maternal-fetal outcome, oxidative stress status and lipid profile of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, G T; Calderon, I M P; Sinzato, S; Campos, K E; Rudge, M V C; Damasceno, D C

    2011-12-08

    Morus nigra, commonly known as black mulberry, is widely used in Brazilian folk medicine for the diabetes treatment. To evaluate the effect of Morus nigra aqueous extract treatment on maternal lipid and oxidative stress profile, reproductive outcomes, and also fetal anomaly incidence from diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) in virgin female Wistar rats. Morus nigra leaf aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) was administered from day 0 to 20 of pregnancy. At day 21 of pregnancy, all rats were anesthetized and killed to obtain blood samples and maternal-fetal data. After treatment with Morus nigra extract, non-diabetic and diabetic rats presented no glycemic changes. Fetuses from diabetic dams, regardless of Morus nigra treatment, were small for pregnancy age. In diabetic dams, plant treatment caused reduced MDA, cholesterol, triglycerides and VLDL levels, and decreased placental index and weight as compared to diabetic group. The fetuses from diabetic rats treated with Morus nigra extract had lower frequency of skeletal and visceral anomalies as compared to diabetic group. Thus, Morus nigra leaf aqueous extract failed to control hyperglycemia in diabetic rats. However, Morus nigra treatment had antioxidant effect, contributing to reduce incidence of internal anomalies in offspring from diabetic dams. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge...

  3. SwathProfiler and NProfiler: Two new ArcGIS Add-ins for the automatic extraction of swath and normalized river profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Peña, J. V.; Al-Awabdeh, M.; Azañón, J. M.; Galve, J. P.; Booth-Rea, G.; Notti, D.

    2017-07-01

    The present-day great availability of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models has improved tectonic geomorphology analyses in their methodological aspects and geological meaning. Analyses based on topographic profiles are valuable to explore the short and long-term landscape response to tectonic activity and climate changes. Swath and river longitudinal profiles are two of the most used analysis to explore the long and short-term landscape responses. Most of these morphometric analyses are conducted in GIS software, which have become standard tools for analyzing drainage network metrics. In this work we present two ArcGIS Add-Ins to automatically delineate swath and normalized river profiles. Both tools are programmed in Visual Basic . NET and use ArcObjects library-architecture to access directly to vector and raster data. The SwathProfiler Add-In allows analyzing the topography within a swath or band by representing maximum-minimum-mean elevations, first and third quartile, local relief and hypsometry. We have defined a new transverse hypsometric integral index (THi) that analyzes hypsometry along the swath and offer valuable information in these kind of graphics. The NProfiler Add-In allows representing longitudinal normalized river profiles and their related morphometric indexes as normalized concavity (CT), maximum concavity (Cmax) and length of maximum concavity (Lmax). Both tools facilitate the spatial analysis of topography and drainage networks directly in a GIS environment as ArcMap and provide graphical outputs. To illustrate how these tools work, we analyzed two study areas, the Sierra Alhamilla mountain range (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain) and the Eastern margin of the Dead Sea (Jordan). The first study area has been recently studied from a morphotectonic perspective and these new tools can show an added value to the previous studies. The second study area has not been analyzed by quantitative tectonic geomorphology and the results suggest a landscape

  4. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wu

    Full Text Available Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs, mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin, exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  5. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. B.; Gulick, S. P.; Allison, M. A.; Goff, J. A.; Duncan, D. D.; Saustrup, S.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers an intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. Now in year five, the course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and visualization. Techniques covered include high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.). Students seek to understand coastal and sedimentary processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of these techniques in an exploratory mode. Students participate in an initial three days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area (which changes each year) along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. In the field, students rotate between two small research vessels: one vessel, the 22' aluminum-hulled R/V Lake Itasca, owned and operated by UTIG, is used principally for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling; the other, NOAA's R/V Manta or the R/V Acadiana, operated by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, is used primarily for high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. While at sea, students assist with survey design, learn instrumentation set up, acquisition parameters, data quality control, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of three, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for particle size analysis and initial data processing. During the course's final week, teams

  6. A Research of the Application Geophysical Methods to the Polluted Site and the river bottom mud in Geophysical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S.; Liu, H. C.

    2013-12-01

    -hole investigation. Last, the case studies on using geophysical technologies including geophysical well logging are introduced to snapshot the complex profile of DNAPL distribution for improving future application.

  7. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  8. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  9. Open Access to Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyeva, Nataliya A.; Zabarinskaya, Ludmila P.

    2017-04-01

    Russian World Data Centers for Solar-Terrestrial Physics & Solid Earth Physics hosted by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences are the Regular Members of the ICSU-World Data System. Guided by the principles of the WDS Constitution and WDS Data Sharing Principles, the WDCs provide full and open access to data, long-term data stewardship, compliance with agreed-upon data standards and conventions, and mechanisms to facilitate and improve access to data. Historical and current geophysical data on different media, in the form of digital data sets, analog records, collections of maps, descriptions are stored and collected in the Centers. The WDCs regularly fill up repositories and database with new data, support them up to date. Now the WDCs focus on four new projects, aimed at increase of data available in network by retrospective data collection and digital preservation of data; creation of a modern system of registration and publication of data with digital object identifier (DOI) assignment, and promotion of data citation culture; creation of databases instead of file system for more convenient access to data; participation in the WDS Metadata Catalogue and Data Portal by creating of metadata for information resources of WDCs.

  10. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  11. GIPP: Geophysical Instrument Pool Potsdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Haberland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Geophysical Instrument Pool Potsdam (GIPP consists of field instruments, sensors and equipment for temporary seismological studies (both controlled source and earthquake seismology as well as for magnetotelluric (electromagnetic experiments. These instruments are mainly mobile digital recorders, broadband seis­mometers and short period sensors, and they are used to reveal the subsurface structure and to investigate earth­quakes. Sensors for magnetotellurics include induction coil and fluxgate magnetometers and non-polarizing silver / silver-chloride electrodes. It is operated by the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. The instru­ment facility is open to all academic applicants, both national and international. Instrument applications are evalu­ated and ranked by an external steering board. Currently, for seismological applications >850 geophysical recorders, >170 broadband seis­mo­meters and >1300 short period geophones are available (among others. Available for magnetotelluric experiments are > 50 real-time data-loggers, >150 induction coils, and >500 electrodes. User guidelines and data policy are in force and data archives are provided (standard exchange formats.

  12. Attenuated geophysical signatures associated with ongoing remediation efforts at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che-Alota, V.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sauck, W. A.; Nolan, J. T.; Slater, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    Previous geophysical investigations (1996, 1997, 2003, and 2004) conducted at the decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) showed a clearly defined high conductivity anomaly associated with hydrocarbon contaminants in the vadose zone and ground water near the source area. The source of the geophysical anomalies was attributed to biogeochemical modifications of the contaminated zone resulting from intrinsic bioremediation. During these previous surveys, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data showed a zone of attenuated GPR reflections extending from the vadose zone to below the water table. Self potential data (SP) data defined a positive anomaly coincident with the hydrochemically defined plume, while electrical resistivity data showed anomalously high conductivity within the zone of impact. In 2007, another integrated geophysical study of the site was conducted. GPR, SP, electrical resistivity, and induced polarization surveys were conducted with expectations of achieving similar results as the past surveys. However, preliminary assessment of the data shows a marked decrease in electrical conductivity and SP response over the plume. GPR data still showed the attenuated signals, but the zone of attenuation was only observed below the water table. We attribute the attenuation of the observed geophysical anomalies to ongoing soil vapor extraction initiated in 2003. Significant removal of the contaminant mass by the vapor extraction system has altered the subsurface biogeochemical conditions and these changes were documented by the 2007 geophysical and geochemical data. The results of this study show that the attenuation of the contaminant plume is detectable with geophysical methods.

  13. Antibacterial and dermal toxicological profiles of ethyl acetate extract from Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch. Milne-Redh (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njateng Guy SS

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence in recent years of numerous resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria to a range of formerly efficient antibiotics constitutes a serious threat to public health. Crassocephalum bauchiense, a medicinal herb found in the West Region of Cameroon is used to treat gastrointestinal infections as well as liver disorders. The ethyl acetate extract from the leaves of C. bauchiense was evaluated for its antibacterial activity as well as acute and sub-acute toxicities. Methods The plant extract was prepared by maceration in ethyl acetate. Its phytochemical screening was done by standard methods. The broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity. The in vivo antibacterial activity of a gel formulation (0.05, 1 and 2% w/v of this extract was evaluated using a Staphylococcus aureus-induced dermatitis in a murine model. Selected haematological and biochemical parameters were used to evaluate the dermal sub-acute toxicity of the extract in rats. Results Phytochemical screening of the C. bauchiense extract revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenols, tannins and sterols. In vitro antibacterial activities were observed against all the tested microorganisms (MIC = 0.04-6.25 mg/ml. Formulated extract-gel (2% w/v and gentamycin (reference drug eradicated the microbial infection after five days of treatment. A single dermal dose of this extract up to 32 g/kg body weight (bw did not produce any visible sign of toxicity. Also, daily dermal application of the C. bauchiense extract gel formulation for 28 days did not show any negative effect, instead some biochemical parameters such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT and AST, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high density lipoprotein (HDL and triglycerides were significantly (p Conclusion These results indicate that the C. bauchiense ethyl acetate extract can be used safely for the treatment of some bacterial infections.

  14. A novel protodioscin-enriched fenugreek seed extract (Trigonella foenum-graecum, family Fabaceae improves free testosterone level and sperm profile in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Bagchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A novel, patent-pending 20% protodioscin-enriched extract has been developed in our laboratories from fenugreek seeds(Furosap®. We assessed the efficacy of Furosap®in 50 male volunteers (age: 35-65 yearson free and total increased testosterone levels, sperm profile, mental alertness, cardiovascular health, mood, libido,and quality of life. Methods: Furosap®(500 mg/day/subjectwas administered to the 50 male volunteers over a period of 12 weeks in aone-arm, open-labelled study, to determine the efficacy on free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile andsperm morphology, libido and erectile dysfunction, mood and mental alertness and broad spectrum safety parameters. Institution Review Board approval was obtained for this study and the study was registered at the clinicaltrials.gov(NCT02702882.Results: A statistically significant increase in freetestosterone levels were observed in these volunteers following supplementation of Furosap®. Sperm morphology, sperm counts, mental alertness, mood, cardiovascular health,and libidoperformancewere significantly improved. Extensive blood chemistry analyses revealed broad spectrum safety. No significant changes were observed in serum lipid function, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDLlevels,andhemogram.Conclusions: Results confirmedthat this protodioscin-enriched extract from fenugreek seeds (Furosapis safe and efficacious in boosting serum free testosterone levels, healthy sperm profile, mental alertness, cardiovascular health,and overall performance in male volunteers

  15. Effects of Ganoderma lucidum (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts on the miRNA Profile and Telomerase Activity of the MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonul, Oyku; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Kalmis, Erbil; Kayalar, Husniye; Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Atay, Sevcan; Ak, Handan

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal higher Basidiomycetes mushroom that exerts anticancer effects through several different mechanisms. This study investigated the effects of G. lucidum on the telomerase activity and microRNA (miRNA) profiles of MCF-7 cells. According to the cytotoxicity results, the G. lucidum ether extract exhibits the highest cytotoxic potency; therefore it was chosen for the subsequent telomerase activity assay and miRNA profiling. The telomerase activity observed in the cells treated with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of G. lucidum ether extract (100 µg/mL in dimethyl sulfoxide) was 32.2% lower than that of the control cells treated with 1% dimethyl sulfoxide. Among 1066 miRNAs, the most downregulated miRNA was hsa-miR-27a* (4.469-fold), and the most upregulated miRNA was hsa-miR-1285 (10.462-fold). A database search revealed the predicted miRNAs that target the catalytic subunit of the telomerase enzyme telomerase reverse transcriptase, and only miR-3687 (upregulated 2.153-fold) and miR-1207-5p (upregulated 2.895-fold) were changed by at least 2-fold. The miRNA profile changes demonstrated in this study provide a data set regarding their effects on the pathways that regulate telomerase activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with G. lucidum. These data should aid the development of novel cancer treatment strategies.

  16. Phospholipid Profile of the Stomach and Duodenum of Normal Rabbits Fed with Supplements of Unripe Pawpaw (Carica papaya) and Unripe Plantain (Musa sapientum) Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriyamremu, G. E.; Asagba, S. O.; Osagie, V. E.; Ojeaburu, S. I.; Lolodi, O.

    This study reports the effect of unripe pawpaw and/or unripe plantain extracts on the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum of normal rabbits. Supplementation of chow with unripe pawpaw or plantain extract significantly reduced (p< 0.05) the weight gained by rabbits compared with the control. The total phospholipids content in the stomach and duodenum were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. In the stomach and duodenum, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SGM) were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. Pawpaw occasioned a decrease in the PE/PC ratio in both tissues as against an increase observed in the SGM/PC ratio. The results presented suggests that unripe pawpaw meal and unripe plantain extract alter the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum in ways which may affect membrane fluidity of these tissues and would have profound effect on the gastro-duodenal mucosa and thus have implication(s) for gastric and duodenal ulcers in rabbits.

  17. Ameliorating effect of black tea extract on cadmium chloride-induced alteration of serum lipid profile and liver histopathology in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantur, Venkappa S; Somannavarib, Manjunath S; Yendigeri, Saeed; Das, Kusal K; Goudar, Shivaprasad S

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is one among the most environmental pollutants that affects many organs like kidney, liver and testis. The present study was aimed to assess the simultaneous effects of black tea extracts (BTE) on cadmium chloride induced alterations in lipid profile and liver histology. Adult rats were divided into four groups (n=6/group), group I (normal saline), group II (CdCl2, 1.0 mg/kg, b.wt; i.p), group III (black tea extract, 2.5 gm tea leaf/dl of water that is 2.5% of aqueous BTE) and group IV (cadmium chloride + BTE). Cadmium chloride intoxicated rats showed significant increase in serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol and there is a significant decrease in the serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol. In the liver, cadmium chloride showed changes in normal architecture, swollen hepatocytes, kupffer cells hyperplasia, dilation and congestion of central vein. Oral administration of black tea extracts with cadmium chloride significantly improves lipid profile and liver architecture as compared to the cadmium chloride group. The results indicate that BTE is beneficial in preventing cadmium-induced lipid alterations and hepatocellular damage.

  18. Response to Grisedale and Van Daal: comparison of STR profiling from low template DNA extracts with and without the consensus profiling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokshoorn Bas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a recent contribution to this journal Grisedale and Van Daal concluded that a single STR analysis of all available template DNA is to be preferred over replicate analyses and a consensus approach when analyzing low template DNA samples. A single STR analysis approach does not allow for an assessment of the validity of the resulting DNA profile. We argue that the use of replicate amplifications is the best way to objectively quantify the extent of the stochastic variation in the data. By applying consensus methodology and/or a probabilistic model, the interpretation of the data will therefore be more objective and reliable.

  19. Intra-specific biodiversity of Italian myrtle (Myrtus communis) through chemical markers profile and biological activities of leaf methanolic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, G; Muzzoli, M; Statti, G A; Conforti, F; Bianchi, A; Agrimonti, C; Ballero, M; Poli, F

    2007-02-01

    Methanolic extracts of Myrtus communis leaves from two Italian regions (Calabria and Sardinia) were processed to determine the content of myrtenol, linalool and eucalyptol. Among the Calabrian and Sardinian myrtle samples, linalool and eucalyptol chemotypes were prevalent. The extracts were also tested for antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal activities. Myrtle leaves samples were dried and extracted through maceration. Partition chromatography was adopted to separate myrtenol, linalool and eucalyptol fractions. Analyses were performed through GC and GC-MS. Some of the samples showed a good scavenger activity evidenced by DPPH radical scavenging assay and beta-carotene bleaching test. Antibacterial and antifungal activities were generally weak. The phytochemical and biological characterization of all the extracts were determined with an aim to characterize the intra-specific biodiversity of myrtle populations.

  20. Growth profile and SEM analyses of Candida albicans and Escherichia coli with Hymenocallis littoralis (Jacq.) Salisb leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, N; Sumathy, V; Vikneswaran, M; Sreeramanan, S

    2014-12-01

    Hymenocallis littoralis (Jacq.) Salisb (Melong kecil) commonly known as 'Spider Lily' is an herbaceous plant from the family Amaryllidaceae. Study was carried out to determine the effect of H. littoralis leaf extract on the growth and morphogenesis of two pathogenic microbes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. The leaf extract displayed favourable anticandidal and antibacterial activity with a minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of 6.25 mg/mL. Time kill study showed both microbes were completely killed after treated with leaf extract at 20 h. Both microbes' cell walls were heavily ruptured based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The significant anticandidal and antibacterial activities showed by H. littoralis leaf extract suggested the potential antimicrobial agent against C. albicans and E. coli.

  1. Toxicity of Moringa oleifera seed extract on some hematological and biochemical profiles in a freshwater fish, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Chokkalingam; Ramesh, Mathan; Kumaran, Satyanarayanan Senthil; Lakshmi, Srinivasan Audhi

    2012-11-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the acute and sublethal toxicity of Moringa oleifera seed extract on hematological and biochemical variables of a freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio under laboratory conditions. The 96 h LC50 value of M. oleifera seed extract to the fish C. carpio was estimated by probit analysis method and was found to be 124.0 mg/L (with 95% confidence limits). For sublethal studies a non lethal dose of 1/10th of 96 h LC50 value (12.40 mg/L) was taken. During acute treatment (96 h), hematological variables like red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were significantly (Pseed extract. However a significant (Pseed extract while a significant (Pseed extract exposed fish, whereas plasma protein level declined. However, a biphasic trend was noticed in Hb, Hct, RBC and MCHC levels. This study may provide baseline information about the toxicity of M. oleifera seed extract to C. carpio and to establish safer limit in water purification.

  2. [Effects on the lipid profile in humans of a polyphenol-rich carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) extract in a dairy matrix like a functional food; a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Navarro-Alarcón, Miguel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos; Fonollá-Joya, Juristo

    2013-11-01

    The design of functional foods enriched in nutrients that favorably alter the lipid profile to prevent cardiovascular diseases and stimulate bowel function is of great interest. We have assayed a non-extractable-tannates-rich carob-fiber (PF-1®) in a milk matrix developed by Biosearch S.A. to discover its effects on the lipid profile and bowel function of human volunteers. A 4-week interventional study (400 mL daily consumption of this functional food, containing 20 g of PF-1®/L), was conducted: blood samples were analyzed for lipid profile, glucose, transaminases, creatinine and fat-soluble vitamins. The body-mass index and bowel function of the participants in the study were also measured. A tendency for triglyceride levels to diminish was observed in all participants (P = 0.066), and in the normal-cholesterol group in particular (P = 0.078). Another tendency to total cholesterol levels fell in the hypercholesterolemic group (P = 0.061) was also found. In the normal-cholesterol group, total cholesterol (CT), HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels significantly increased with the consumption of the functional food (P function was also recorded by volunteers. This preliminary study highlights the possible positive influence of this functional food on the regulation of the lipid profile and bowel function in humans.

  3. Rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nuts and seeds by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Song, Shuang-Hong; Wu, Mei; He, Tian; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2013-12-15

    Based on microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation (MUED), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was proposed for rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nut and seed materials. Several critical experimental parameters for MUED, including reaction temperature, microwave power, amounts of catalyst and derivatisation reagent, have been optimised using response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids obtained with MUED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The MUED method simplified the handling steps compared to the conventional procedure, shortened the sample preparation time whilst improving the extraction and derivatisation efficiency of lipids, and reduced oxidisation and decomposition of the unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, robustness and practicality of this method highlighted its significant potential for application in the rapid analysis of fatty acids in natural food resource samples.

  4. The Use of NMR Metabolite Profiling and in vivo Hypoglycemic Assay for Comparison of Unfractionated Aqueous Leaf Extracts of Two Ocimum Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Livia Marques; Espíndola-Netto, Jair Machado; Tinoco, Luzineide Wanderley; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Costa, Sônia Soares

    2016-06-01

    Ocimum basilicum and Ocimum gratissimum (Lamiaceae) are used to treat diabetes mellitus in Africa. In a previous work, we identified chicoric acid as a hypoglycemic substance in O. gratissimum. This study aims to compare the chemical metabolite profile and the hypoglycemic activity of unfractionated aqueous extracts from leaves of both Lamiaceae species. The metabolite composition of OB and OG decoctions (10% w/v) was analyzed using HPLC-DAD and NMR tools. Chicoric acid showed to be the major phenolic in both extracts, besides caftaric, caffeic, and rosmarinic acids; nevertheless, there is approximately three times more of this substance in OG. From 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses, 19 substances were identified in OB, while 12 in OG. The in vivo acute hypoglycemic activity of the extracts was assessed intraperitoneally in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg of both extracts significantly reduced their glycemia, compared to controls (P Ocimum species by NMR. Our findings confirmed the potential of both species in DM treatment in spite of marked differences in their chemical composition. However, long-term studies are necessary in order to identify the most promising of the two species for the development of an herbal medicine.

  5. Chemical Profile and Antioxidant Properties of Extracts and Essential Oils from Citrus × limon (L.) Burm. cv. Femminello Comune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Bonesi, Marco; Sanzo, Giuseppe Di; Verardi, Alessandra; Lopresto, Catia Giovanna; Pugliese, Alessandro; Menichini, Francesco; Balducchi, Roberto; Calabrò, Vincenza

    2016-05-01

    Citrus × limon cv. Femminello Comune (Rutaceae) from Rocca Imperiale (Italy), one of the six Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) Italian lemon crops, has been recently received renewed interest. In this work, fresh and dried peels and leaves were extracted by hydrodistillation, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), and Soxhlet apparatus. Chemical profile was assessed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Except for leaves extracts obtained by Soxhlet apparatus, the monoterpene hydrocarbons fraction dominated. Limonene, γ-terpinene, and β-pinene were the main identified compounds. The antioxidant activity was investigated using different in vitro assays namely 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ABTS, ferric reducing ability power (FRAP), and β-carotene bleaching test. In DPPH test, the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of fresh peel exhibited the highest activity (IC50 of 1.17 mg/ml). Leaves extracted by SFE showed a good activity in both DPPH and β-carotene bleaching test with IC50 values of 2.20 and 6.66 mg/ml, respectively. Monoterpene hydrocarbons fraction exhibited a positive Pearson's correlation coefficient with all antioxidant assays. Leaves, often considered waste material, should be considered from a different point because they represent a matrix of indisputable interest. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  6. Numerical simulation in applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Juan Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the theory of waves propagation in a fluid-saturated porous medium (a Biot medium) and its application in Applied Geophysics. In particular, a derivation of absorbing boundary conditions in viscoelastic and poroelastic media is presented, which later is employed in the applications. The partial differential equations describing the propagation of waves in Biot media are solved using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Waves propagating in a Biot medium suffer attenuation and dispersion effects. In particular the fast compressional and shear waves are converted to slow diffusion-type waves at mesoscopic-scale heterogeneities (on the order of centimeters), effect usually occurring in the seismic range of frequencies. In some cases, a Biot medium presents a dense set of fractures oriented in preference directions. When the average distance between fractures is much smaller than the wavelengths of the travelling fast compressional and shear waves, the medium behaves as an effective viscoelastic an...

  7. Fractals in geology and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects N with a characteristic size greater than r scales with the relation N of about r exp -D. The frequency-size distributions for islands, earthquakes, fragments, ore deposits, and oil fields often satisfy this relation. This application illustrates a fundamental aspect of fractal distributions, scale invariance. The requirement of an object to define a scale in photograhs of many geological features is one indication of the wide applicability of scale invariance to geological problems; scale invariance can lead to fractal clustering. Geophysical spectra can also be related to fractals; these are self-affine fractals rather than self-similar fractals. Examples include the earth's topography and geoid.

  8. Strainmeters and tiltmeters in geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulty, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Several types of sensitive strainmeters and tiltmeters have been developed, and it is now becoming clear which geophysical applications are most suitable for these instruments. In general, strainmeters and tiltmeters are used for observing ground deformation at periods of minutes to days. Small-scale lateral inhomogeneities at the instrument sites distort signals by a few percent, although the effects of large structures can be calculated. In earth tide work these lateral inhomogeneities and unknown ocean loading signals prevent accurate values of the regional tide from being obtained. This limits tidal investigations to looking for temporal variations, possibly associated with pre-earthquake dilatancy, and spatial variations caused by gross elasticity contrasts in the local geological structure. Strainmeters and tiltmeters are well suited for observing long-period seismic waves, seismic slip events on faults and volcano tumescence, where small site-induced distortions in the measured signals are seldom important.

  9. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical parameters and the technical staff of the VLBI system at the fundamental station GGAO. It also gives an overview about the VLBI activities during the report year. The Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) consists of a 5-meter radio telescope for VLBI, a new 12-meter radio telescope for VLBI2010 development, a 1-meter reference antenna for microwave holography development, an SLR site that includes MOBLAS-7, the NGSLR development system, and a 48" telescope for developmental two-color Satellite Laser Ranging, a GPS timing and development lab, a DORIS system, meteorological sensors, and a hydrogen maser. In addition, we are a fiducial IGS site with several IGS/IGSX receivers. GGAO is located on the east coast of the United States in Maryland. It is approximately 15 miles NNE of Washington, D.C. in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  10. Online Polar Oceans Geophysical Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; O'Hara, S.; Arko, R. A.; Carbotte, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    With funding from the Office of Polar Programs of the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry Synthesis (AMBS, http://www.marine-geo.org/antarctic/) is an integrated web-accessible bathymetry and geophysical database for the Southern Ocean and Antarctica, serving data from the US research vessels Nathaniel B. Palmer and Laurence M. Gould, amongst others. Interdisciplinary polar data can be downloaded for free through Data Link (http://www.marine-geo.org/link/index.php) which enables keyword searches by data and instrument type, geographical bounds, scientist, expedition name and dates. The data visualisation tool GeoMapApp (http://www.marine-geo.org/geomapapp/) supports dynamic exploration of a multi-resolutional digital elevation model (DEM) of the global oceans, including the polar regions, allowing users to generate custom grids and maps and import their own data sets and grids. A specialised polar stereographic map projection incorporating multibeam swath bathymetry and the BEDMAP under-ice seaflooor topography is available for the Southern Ocean. To promote inter-operability, we are working with research partners including the Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project and the National Geophysical Data Center to develop standardised metadata and best practices that comply with existing FGDC and ISO standards. For example, the global DEM is served freely as an OGC-compliant Web Map Service map layer and is available for viewing with Google Earth. We are working towards full indexing of the AMBS database holdings at the Antarctic Master Directory. geo.org/antarctic/

  11. Agricultural geophysics: Past/present accomplishments and future advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods have become an increasingly valuable tool for application within a variety of agroecosystems. Agricultural geophysics measurements are obtained at a wide range of scales and often exhibit significant variability both temporally and spatially. The three geophysical methods predomi...

  12. Phenolic Profiling and Evaluation of Contraceptive Effect of the Ethanolic Extract of Salsola imbricata Forssk. in Male Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa Gamil Shehab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reported researches dealing with either composition or bioactivity of Salsola imbricata are limited. This study was conducted aiming to investigate the phenolic composition of the plant and evaluate its efficacy as male contraceptive. Polyphenols, namely, phenolic acids and flavonoids, were qualitatively and quantitatively analysed by RP-HPLC in the hydrolysed methanol extract using two different wavelengths, 280 and 330 nm. The efficiency of different solvents in extracting the plant phenolics was assessed via spectrophotometric determination of the total phenolic and flavonoid contents. Acute toxicity study was carried out on the ethanolic extract to ascertain its safety prior to biological evaluation. The contraceptive effect was assessed, in male rats, by oral administration of the extract at two doses (250 and 500 mg/kg b. wt., over a period of 65 days. HPLC analyses allowed the identification and quantification of a total of 13 and 8 components in the hydrolysed-methanol extract; the overall phenolic composition was dominated by quercitrin (12.692% followed by coumaric acid (4.251%. Prolonged oral administration of the ethanolic extract caused slight reduction in the testis weight only. A significant decrease in the sperm count was observed (P<0.01 in the two treated groups while significant decrease in the epididymal sperm motility was only observed in the high dose group. Morphological abnormalities were observed in sperms of treated animals. No distinct change in serum FSH, LH, and testosterone concentration was recorded. The histopathological findings supported to a high extent these results. The male contraceptive activity of Salsola imbricata could be ascribed to its phenolic components, especially quercitrin.

  13. Determination of the n-alkane profile of epicuticular wax extracted from mature leaves of Cestrum nocturnum (Solanaceae: Solanales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nandita; Ghosh, Anupam; Bhattacharjee, Indranil; Laskar, Subrata; Chandra, Goutam

    2010-09-01

    An n-hexane extract of fresh, mature leaves of Cestrum nocturnum (Solanales: Solanaceae) containing thin layer epicuticular waxes was analysed by thin-layer chromatography, infrared and gas liquid chromatography using standard hydrocarbons. Seventeen long chain alkanes (n-C(18) to n-C(34)) were identified and quantified. Hentriacontane (n-C(31)) was established as the major n-alkane, while nonadecane (n-C(19)) was the least abundant component of the extracted wax fraction. The carbon preference index calculated for the sample was 1.30, showing an odd to even carbon number predominance.

  14. Extraction efficiency, phytochemical profiles and antioxidative properties of different parts of Saptarangi (Salacia chinensis L.) - An important underutilized plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadage, Dhanaji M; Kshirsagar, Parthraj R; Pai, Sandeep R; Chavan, Jaykumar J

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to evaluate extraction efficiency, detection and quantification of phytochemicals, minerals and antioxidative capacity of different parts of Salacia chinensis L. Continuous shaking extraction, steam bath assisted extraction, ultrasonic extraction and microwave assisted extraction with varied time intervals were employed for extraction of phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidants. Preliminary screening revealed the presence of wide array of metabolites along with carbohydrates and starch. Steam bath assisted extraction for 10 min exposure was found most suitable for extraction phenolics (46.02 ± 2.30 mg of gallic acid equivalent per gram of dry weight and 48.57 ± 2.42 mg of tannic acid equivalent per gram of dry weight) and flavonoids (35.26 ± 1.61 mg of quercetin equivalent per gram of dry weight and 51.60 ± 2.58 mg of ellagic acid equivalent per gram of dry weight). In support, reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography- diode array detector confirmed the presence of seven pharmaceutically important phenolic acids. Antioxidant capacity was measured by 1, 1- diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) scavenging (ABTS) and N, N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPD) assays and represented as trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and ascorbic acid equivalent antioxidant capacity (AEAC). Antioxidant capacity ranged from 121.02 ± 6.05 to 1567.28 ± 78.36 µM trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and 56.62 ± 2.83 to 972.48 ± 48.62 µM ascorbic acid equivalent antioxidant capacity. Roots showed higher yields of illustrated biochemical parameters, however fresh fruit pulp was found a chief source of minerals. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of a vast array of phytoconstituents associated with different plant parts. The present study revealed the amounts of minerals and diverse phytoconstituents in

  15. Ultra-highly diluted plant extracts of Hydrastis canadensis and Marsdenia condurango induce epigenetic modifications and alter gene expression profiles in HeLa cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santu Kumar Saha; Sourav Roy; Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methylation-specific epigenetic process and gene expression profiles of HeLa cel s treated with ultra-high dilutions (HDs) of two plant extracts, Hydrastis canadensis (HC-30) and Marsdenia condurango (Condu-30), diluted 1060 times, were analyzed against placebo 30C (Pl-30) for alterations in gene profiles linked to epigenetic modifications. METHODS: Separate groups of cel s were subjected to treatment of Condu-30, HC-30, and Pl-30 prepared by serial dilutions and succussions. Global microarray data recorded on Affymetrix platform, using 25-mer probes were provided by iLifeDiscoveries, India. Slides were scanned with 3000 7G microarray scanner and raw data sets were extracted from Cel (raw intensity) files. Analyses of global microarray data profile, differential gene expression, fold change and clusters were made using GeneSpring GX12.5 software and standard normalization procedure. Before microarray study, concentration of RNA (ng/μL), RIN value and rRNA ratio for al the samples were analysed by Agilant Bioanalyzer 2100. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR were done for analyzing SMAD-4 expression. Fluorescence-activated cel sorting study was further made to elucidate fate of cel s at divisional stages. Methylation-specific restriction enzyme assay was conducted for ascertaining methylation status of DNA at specific sites. RESULTS: HDs of HC-30 and Condu-30 differential y altered methylation in specific regions of DNA and expression profiles of certain genes linked to carcinogenesis, as compared to Pl-30. Two separate cut sites were found in genomic DNA of untreated and placebo-treated HeLa cel s when digested with McrBC, compared to a single cut observed in Condu-30-treated genomic DNA. SMAD-4 gene expression validated the expression pattern observed in microarray profile. Methylation-specific restriction enzyme assay elucidated differential epigenetic modifications in drug-treated and control cel s

  16. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.). In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen

  17. Optimal protein extraction methods from diverse sample types for protein profiling by using Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2DE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A A; Azman, S N; Abdul Rani, N R; Kua, B C; Sasidharan, S; Kiew, L V; Othman, N; Noordin, R; Chen, Y

    2011-12-01

    There is a great diversity of protein samples types and origins, therefore the optimal procedure for each sample type must be determined empirically. In order to obtain a reproducible and complete sample presentation which view as many proteins as possible on the desired 2DE gel, it is critical to perform additional sample preparation steps to improve the quality of the final results, yet without selectively losing the proteins. To address this, we developed a general method that is suitable for diverse sample types based on phenolchloroform extraction method (represented by TRI reagent). This method was found to yield good results when used to analyze human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), Vibrio cholerae, Cryptocaryon irritans cyst and liver abscess fat tissue. These types represent cell line, bacteria, parasite cyst and pus respectively. For each type of samples, several attempts were made to methodically compare protein isolation methods using TRI-reagent Kit, EasyBlue Kit, PRO-PREP™ Protein Extraction Solution and lysis buffer. The most useful protocol allows the extraction and separation of a wide diversity of protein samples that is reproducible among repeated experiments. Our results demonstrated that the modified TRI-reagent Kit had the highest protein yield as well as the greatest number of total proteins spots count for all type of samples. Distinctive differences in spot patterns were also observed in the 2DE gel of different extraction methods used for each type of sample.

  18. EDITORIAL: The interface between geophysics and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Journal of Geophysics and Engineering (JGE) aims to publicize and promote research and developments in geophysics and in related areas of engineering. As stated in the journal scope, JGE is positioned to bridge the gap between earth physics and geo-engineering, where it reflects a growing trend in both industry and academia. JGE covers those aspects of engineering that bear closely on geophysics or on the targets and problems that geophysics addresses. Typically this will be engineering focused on the subsurface, particularly petroleum engineering, rock mechanics, geophysical software engineering, drilling technology, remote sensing, instrumentation and sensor design. There is a trend, visible throughout academia, for rapid expansion in cross-disciplinary, multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary working. Many of the most important and exciting problems and advances are being made at the boundaries between traditional subject areas and, increasingly, techniques from one discipline are finding applications in others. There is a corresponding increasing requirement for researchers to be aware of developments in adjacent areas and for papers published in one area to be readily accessible, both in terms of location and language, to those in others. One such area that is expanding rapidly is that at the interface between geophysics and engineering. There are three principal developments. Geophysics, and especially applied geophysics, is increasingly constrained by the limits of technology, particularly computing technology. Consequently, major advances in geophysics are often predicated upon major developments in engineering and many research geophysicists are working in multi-disciplinary teams with engineers. Engineering problems relevant to the sub-surface are increasingly looking to advances in geophysics to provide part of the solution. Engineering systems, for example, for tunnel boring or petroleum reservoir management, are using high-resolution geophysical

  19. Effect of Green Tea Extract on Systemic Metabolic Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Determined via RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Young Choi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Green tea (GT has various health effects, including anti-obesity properties. However, the multiple molecular mechanisms of the effects have not been fully determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the anti-obesity effects of GT via the analysis of its metabolic and transcriptional responses based on RNA-seq profiles. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal, high-fat (60% energy as fat, or high-fat + 0.25% (w/w GT diet for 12 weeks. The GT extract ameliorated obesity, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity (DIO mice. GT supplementation resulted in body weight gain reduction than mice fed high-fat through enhanced energy expenditure, and reduced adiposity. The transcriptome profiles of epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT suggested that GT augments transcriptional responses to the degradation of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs, as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling, which suggests enhanced energy homeostasis. Our findings provide some significant insights into the effects of GT for the prevention of obesity and its comorbidities. We demonstrated that the GT extract contributed to the regulation of systemic metabolic homeostasis via transcriptional responses to not only lipid and glucose metabolism, but also amino acid metabolism via BCAA degradation in the adipose tissue of DIO mice.

  20. Effect of Green Tea Extract on Systemic Metabolic Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Determined via RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Young; Kim, Ye Jin; Ryu, Ri; Cho, Su-Jung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Green tea (GT) has various health effects, including anti-obesity properties. However, the multiple molecular mechanisms of the effects have not been fully determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the anti-obesity effects of GT via the analysis of its metabolic and transcriptional responses based on RNA-seq profiles. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal, high-fat (60% energy as fat), or high-fat + 0.25% (w/w) GT diet for 12 weeks. The GT extract ameliorated obesity, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. GT supplementation resulted in body weight gain reduction than mice fed high-fat through enhanced energy expenditure, and reduced adiposity. The transcriptome profiles of epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) suggested that GT augments transcriptional responses to the degradation of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, which suggests enhanced energy homeostasis. Our findings provide some significant insights into the effects of GT for the prevention of obesity and its comorbidities. We demonstrated that the GT extract contributed to the regulation of systemic metabolic homeostasis via transcriptional responses to not only lipid and glucose metabolism, but also amino acid metabolism via BCAA degradation in the adipose tissue of DIO mice. PMID:27754422

  1. GC/Mass analysis of the volatile compounds of P. hyrcanicum diethyl ether extract and GC profiling of some Iranian Polygonum species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saeidnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship among four species of Polygonum (including P. hyrcanicum (three samples, P. persicaria, P. avicular, and P. hydropiper was investigated by GC profiling. Furthermore, the major compounds of the ethylic ether extract of P. hyrcanicum were identified by GC/MS as: α-bisabolol (17.5%, cedrol (15.9%, sesquisabinene hydrate (13.0%, α-elemol (10.5% and trans-longipinocarveol (10.1%. All the identified compounds were sesquiterpenes and no monoterpene, fatty acid and/or hydrocarbone were detected in the extract. Chemical distances among the mentioned species were calculated in order to construct the dendrogram of closely related samples. Results indicated that the distance between two samples of P. hyrcanicum was considered to be short and their GC profiles were quite similar to each other and also there was a close relationship between the two samples of Polygonum with P. avicular. P. hydropiper was observed far from the two samples of P. hyrcanicum in comparison to other samples. Interestingly, P. hyrcanicum, gathered from Veresk, had no close relationship with other pairs of P. hyrcanicum.The results of this study support the phylogenetic relationships among these Polygonum species which was previously reported.

  2. Geophysical characterization of buried active faults: the Concud Fault (Iberian Chain, NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Óscar; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Liesa, Carlos L.; Simón, José L.

    2016-11-01

    The Concud Fault is a 14-km-long active fault that extends close to Teruel, a city with about 35,000 inhabitants in the Iberian Range (NE Spain). It shows evidence of recurrent activity during Late Pleistocene time, posing a significant seismic hazard in an area of moderate-to-low tectonic rates. A geophysical survey was carried out along the mapped trace of the southern branch of the Concud Fault to evaluate the geophysical signature from the fault and the location of paleoseismic trenches. The survey identified a lineation of inverse magnetic dipoles at residual and vertical magnetic gradient, a local increase in apparent conductivity, and interruptions of the underground sediment structure along GPR profiles. The origin of these anomalies is due to lateral contrast between both fault blocks and the geophysical signature of Quaternary materials located above and directly south of the fault. The spatial distribution of anomalies was successfully used to locate suitable trench sites and to map non-exposed segments of the fault. The geophysical anomalies are related to the sedimentological characteristics and permeability differences of the deposits and to deformation related to fault activity. The results illustrate the usefulness of geophysics to detect and map non-exposed faults in areas of moderate-to-low tectonic activity where faults are often covered by recent pediments that obscure geological evidence of the most recent earthquakes. The results also highlight the importance of applying multiple geophysical techniques in defining the location of buried faults.

  3. Dietary plant extracts modulate gene expression profiles in ileal mucosa of weaned pigs after an Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Lee, J J; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the effects of infection with a pathogenic F-18 Escherichia coli and 3 different plant extracts on gene expression of ileal mucosa in weaned pigs. Weaned pigs (total = 64, 6.3 ± 0.2 kg BW, and 21-d old) were housed in individual pens for 15 d, 4 d before and 11 d after the first inoculation (d 0). Treatments were in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement: with or without an F-18 E. coli challenge and 4 diets (a nursery basal, control diet [CON], 10 ppm of capsicum oleoresin [CAP], garlic botanical [GAR], or turmeric oleoresin [TUR]). Results reported elsewhere showed that the plant extracts reduced diarrhea in challenged pigs. Total RNA (4 pigs/treatment) was extracted from ileal mucosa of pigs at d 5 post inoculation. Double-stranded cDNA was amplified, labeled, and further hybridized to the microarray, and data were analyzed in R. Differential gene expression was tested by fitting a mixed linear model in a 2 × 4 factorial ANOVA. Bioinformatics analysis was conducted by DAVID Bioinformatics Resources 6.7 (DAVID; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID, NIH], http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). The E. coli infection altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 240 genes in pigs fed the CON (148 up- and 92 down-regulated). Compared with the infected CON, feeding CAP, GAR, or TUR altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 52 genes (18 up, 34 down), 117 genes (34 up- and 83 down-regulated), or 84 genes (16 up- and 68 down-regulated), respectively, often counteracting the effects of E. coli. The E. coli infection up-regulated (P < 0.05) the expression of genes related to the activation of immune response and complement and coagulation cascades, but down-regulated (P < 0.05) the expression of genes involved in protein synthesis and accumulation. Compared with the CON, feeding CAP and GAR increased (P < 0.05) the expression of genes related to integrity of membranes in infected pigs, indicating enhanced gut mucosa health. Moreover

  4. Erosion of a model geophysical fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Li-Hua; Philippe, Pierre; Chambon, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    A specificity of natural flows such as debris flows, landslides or snow avalanches is that, mostly, the material forming the static bed has mechanical properties similar to those of the flowing material (mud/mud, snow/snow). To explore the bed erosion phenomenon induced by such geophysical flows, we consider the geomaterial as a continuum by performing experiments in laboratory on a model fluid that can behaves as a solid or as a liquid, depending on the conditions. Indeed, we propose an experimental study where a yield-stress fluid is implemented to model both the eroding flow and the eroded bed. Our approach is to capture the process of erosion in terms of solid-liquid transition. The studied hydrodynamics consists of a pipe-flow disturbed by the presence of an obstacle. We use a polymer micro-gel Carbopol that exhibits a Hershel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. By taking advantage of the fluid transparency, the flow is monitoring by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) internal visualization technique. Upstream of the obstacle, a solid-liquid-like interface between a flow zone and a dead zone appears in the fluid. In this study, we aim to investigate the dominant physical mechanism underlying the formation of the static domain, by combining the rheological characterization of the yield-stress fluid (using a rheometer), with the observation of the morphological evolution of the system substratum / flow and the local measurement of related hydrodynamic parameters. Our first result shows that the flow above the dead zone behaves as a classical plug flow, whose velocity profile can successfully be described by a Hagen-Poiseuille equation including a HB rheology, but except in a thin zone (compared to the whole flow zone) at the close vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. Thanks to a high PIV measurement resolution, we then properly examine the typical feature lying at the tail of the velocity profile. The numerical derivation of the profile shows that the shear rate in this

  5. Crop rotation and seasonal effects on fatty acid profiles of neutral and phospholipids extracted from no-till agricultural soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Alejandro E.; Ravnskov, Sabine; Larsen, John

    2015-01-01

    to winter differentially according to soil treatment being the smallest decrease inHR management 35%. Both PLFA and NLFA profiles showed strong potential to discriminatebetween different land uses. In winter samples, some rare or unknown fatty acids were relevant forthe discrimination of agricultural...... practices while NLFA 20:0 appears to be a good marker of HRsoils despite season or location. The PLFA-based taxonomic biomarkers for total bacteria, Gramnegativebacteria and arbuscular mycorrhiza showed a significant trend NE>HR>LR in the wintersampling. HR management was also characterized by high levels...... of NLFA in winter samples as ifhigh crop rotation improves lipids reserves in soil during winter more than in monocropping soilmanagement. In conclusion, PLFA and particularly NLFA profiles appear to provide useful andcomplementary information to obtain a footprint of different soil use and managements...

  6. Pitfalls and Limitations in the Interpretation of Geophysical Images for Hydrologic Properties and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical imaging (e.g., electrical, radar, seismic) can provide valuable information for the characterization of hydrologic properties and monitoring of hydrologic processes, as evidenced in the rapid growth of literature on the subject. Geophysical imaging has been used for monitoring tracer migration and infiltration, mapping zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange, and verifying emplacement of amendments for bioremediation. Despite the enormous potential for extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical images, there also is potential for misinterpretation and over-interpretation. These concerns are particularly relevant when geophysical results are used within quantitative frameworks, e.g., conversion to hydrologic properties through petrophysical relations, geostatistical estimation and simulation conditioned to geophysical inversions, and joint inversion. We review pitfalls to interpretation associated with limited image resolution, spatially variable image resolution, incorrect data weighting, errors in the timing of measurements, temporal smearing resulting from changes during data acquisition, support-volume/scale effects, and incorrect assumptions or approximations involved in modeling geophysical or other jointly inverted data. A series of numerical and field-based examples illustrate these potential problems. Our goal in this talk is to raise awareness of common pitfalls and present strategies for recognizing and avoiding them.

  7. Reduction of body fat and improved lipid profile associated with daily consumption of a Puer tea extract in a hyperlipidemic population: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gitte S; Beaman, Joni L; He, Yi; Guo, Zhixin; Sun, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The goal for this study was to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of Puer tea extract (PTE) on body weight, body-fat composition, and lipid profile in a non-Asian population in the absence of dietary restrictions. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design was used. A total of 59 overweight or mildly obese subjects were enrolled upon screening to confirm fasting cholesterol level at or above 220 mg/dL (5.7 mmol/dL). After giving informed consent, subjects were randomized to consume PTE (3 g/day) or placebo for 20 weeks. At baseline and at 4-week intervals, blood lipids, C-reactive protein, and fasting blood glucose were evaluated. A dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan was performed at baseline and at study exit to evaluate changes to body composition. Appetite and physical and mental energy were scored at each visit using visual analog scales (0-100). Consumption of PTE was associated with statistically significant weight loss when compared to placebo (Plipid profile, including a mild reduction in cholesterol and the cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein ratio after only 4 weeks, as well as a reduction in triglycerides and very small-density lipoproteins, where average blood levels reached normal range at 8 weeks and remained within normal range for the duration of the study (Plipid profile.

  8. Influence of Tribulus terrestris extract on lipid profile and endothelial structure in developing atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta of rabbits on a high-cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, M Altug; Yaymaci, Bengi; Sati, Leyla; Cayli, Sevil; Acar, Goksemin; Altug, Tuncay; Demir, Ramazan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pleotropic effects of an extract of a traditional herb, Tribulus terrestris (TT), on the lipid profile and vascular endothelium of the abdominal aorta in New Zealand rabbits fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Eighteen rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (n=6 for each). One experimental group (EG-I) was given a cholesterol-rich diet, a second experimental group (EG-II) was treated with TT following a cholesterol-rich diet, and a control group (CG) was fed a standard diet. Blood samples were collected on day 0 and then at weeks 4 and 12 to determine total serum cholesterol (TC), high density lipid-cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipid-cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels. Tissues were collected from the abdominal aorta for immunohistochemistry and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. In EG-II, the serum lipid profile was significantly lower than that of EG-I at week 12 with a reduction of TC: 65%; LDL-C: 66%; HDL-C: 64%; TG: 55%. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that endothelial damage was more prominent in EG-I compared to EG-II. The ruptured endothelial linings and damaged cellular surfaces increased in EG-I compared to EG-II. Our data indicate that dietary intake of TT can significantly lower serum lipid profiles, decrease endothelial cellular surface damage and rupture and may partially repair the endothelial dysfunction resulting from hyperlipidemia.

  9. Extraction of nuclear DNA from rhinoceros horn and characterization of DNA profiling systems for white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Cindy K; Vermeulen, Gerhard J; Clarke, Amy B; de Wet, Jacobus I; Guthrie, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    Rhinoceros horn is now worth more, per unit weight, than gold, diamonds, or cocaine. Rhinoceros horn has been used in traditional Asian medicine as a presumed cure for a wide range of ailments. Rhinoceros poaching in South Africa has, on average, more than doubled each year over the past 5 years with the rapid economic growth in east and southeast Asia being assumed to be the primary factor driving the increased demand for horn. Here we report on the characterization of methods for genomic DNA extraction from rhinoceros horn and on DNA profiling systems for white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros. The DNA profiling system described includes 22 short tandem repeat (STR), or microsatellite, markers and a gender marker (ZF1), which have been used previously in various studies on rhinoceros. Using a θ value of 0.1, a conservative estimate of random match probability in 5 white rhinoceros ranged from 1:7.3x10(6) to 1:3.0x10(8). Given that the total population of white rhinoceros is approximately 20,000 such random match probabilities indicate that the genotyping system described provides data which can be used for evidentiary purposes. Furthermore, the methods are appropriate for use in investigations involving trace amounts of rhinoceros horn and the matching of profiles obtained from seized rhinoceros horn with material collected from live animals or poached carcasses.

  10. Metabolite profiling of Clinacanthus nutans leaves extracts obtained from different drying methods by 1H NMR-based metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Noor Haslinda Noor; Latip, Jalifah; Khatib, Alfi

    2016-11-01

    The metabolites of Clinacanthus nutans leaves extracts and their dependence on drying process were systematically characterized using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) multivariate data analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were able to distinguish the leaves extracts obtained from different drying methods. The identified metabolites were carbohydrates, amino acid, flavonoids and sulfur glucoside compounds. The major metabolites responsible for the separation in PLS-DA loading plots were lupeol, cycloclinacosides, betulin, cerebrosides and choline. The results showed that the combination of 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses could act as an efficient technique to understand the C. nutans composition and its variation.

  11. Effect of chicory seed extract on glucose tolerance test (GTT) and metabolic profile in early and late stage diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ghamarian Abdolreza; Abdollahi Mohammad; Su Xiaogang; Amiri Azita; Ahadi Ali; Nowrouzi Azin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose of the study The goal was to evaluate and compare the effects of aqueous extract of the seeds of chicory, Cichorium intybus L., on glucose tolerance test (GTT) and blood biochemical indices of experimentally-induced hyperglycemic rats. Methods Late stage and early stage of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ) and a combination of STZ and niacinamide (NIA/STZ), respectively. Within each group, one subgroup received daily i...

  12. Geotechnical applications of geophysics in coal mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatherly, P. [CMTE/CSIRO Exploration and Mining, North Ryde, NSW (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    In coal mining, geophysical techniques have an established application in determining the location of seam boundaries ahead of the face so that underground mines can be planned to avoid any geological structures that might disrupt production. Geophysics can also be used in geotechnical studies to determine the in situ properties of the rock mass and the response of the rock mass to the mining. The use of geophysical logs and microseismic monitoring in these geotechnical applications are discussed in this paper. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Nonlinear regularization with applications in geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Eva Ann-Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    integral equation, as well as for solving the two geophysical inverse problems considered in this thesis. We compare the IRGN method, the Levenberg-Marquardt method, the trust-region method and the inexact Gauss-Newton method for solving the nonlinear Hammerstein integral equation, and for solving two...... geophysical inverse problems: a seismic tomography problem, and a geoelectrical sounding problem. We found that all four methods gave reasonable solutions for the two geophysical problem. However, the inexact Gauss-Newton method converged faster than the others for the seismic tomography problem...

  14. Nonlinear regularization with applications in geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Eva Ann-Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    integral equation, as well as for solving the two geophysical inverse problems considered in this thesis. We compare the IRGN method, the Levenberg-Marquardt method, the trust-region method and the inexact Gauss-Newton method for solving the nonlinear Hammerstein integral equation, and for solving two...... geophysical inverse problems: a seismic tomography problem, and a geoelectrical sounding problem. We found that all four methods gave reasonable solutions for the two geophysical problem. However, the inexact Gauss-Newton method converged faster than the others for the seismic tomography problem...

  15. Alcoholic Extract of Lotus Leaves Improves Lipid Profile in Rats with HIV Protease Inhibitor-induced Dyslipidaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, QJ; Lu, ZZ; Deng, QY; Wei, BM

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To examine the effect of the alcoholic extract of lotus leaves (AELL) on antiretroviral treatment-induced dyslipidaemia in a rat model. Methods: Lotus leaves were extracted by 95% ethanol. Seventy male Sprague-Dawley rats were given lopinavir/ritonavir for six weeks. At weeks 0 and 6, sera were collected for measurement of total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG). Rats meeting the criteria for dyslipidaemia were assigned to four groups and received once daily for another four weeks lopinavir/ritonavir (group A), lopinavir/ritonavir plus 0.52 g/kg AELL (group B), lopinavir/ritonavir plus 0.26 g/kg AELL (group C), or lopinavir/ritonavir plus 0.13 g/kg AELL (group D), respectively. At weeks 8 and 10, blood samples were collected again for measurement of TC and TG. Results: Both TC and TG increased over time in group A during the observation period (weeks 6 to 10), however, TC and TG decreased in group B, and TG declined in group C. Neither TC nor TG could be reduced to a level near baseline. Conclusion: Alcoholic extract of lotus leaves may have the potential to treat dyslipidaemia related to highly active antiretroviral treatment, but may not be potent enough to reduce TC or TG concentrations to goal levels when used alone. PMID:26426169

  16. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett eWagner Mackenzie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation, with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates.

  17. Strawberry (cv. Romina Methanolic Extract and Anthocyanin-Enriched Fraction Improve Lipid Profile and Antioxidant Status in HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Y. Forbes-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL are recognized as critical factors in the development of atherosclerosis. Healthy dietary patterns, with abundant fruit and vegetable consumption, may prevent the onset of these risk factors due to the presence of phytochemical compounds. Strawberries are known for their high content of polyphenols; among them, flavonoids are the major constituents, and it is presumed that they are responsible for the biological activity of the fruit. Nevertheless, there are only a few studies that actually evaluate the effects of different fractions isolated from strawberries. In order to assess the effects of two different strawberry extracts (whole methanolic extract/anthocyanin-enriched fraction on the lipid profile and antioxidant status in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells, the triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol content, lipid peroxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS content and antioxidant enzymes’ activity on cell lysates were determined. Results demonstrated that both strawberry extracts not only improved the lipid metabolism by decreasing triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol contents, but also improved the redox state of HepG2 cells by modulating thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances production, antioxidant enzyme activity and ROS generation. The observed effects were more pronounced for the anthocyanin-enriched fraction.

  18. Transcriptional profile of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 in response to tissue extracts from a susceptible Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Antonio Agustino

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is a Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes "halo blight" disease of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. This disease affects both foliage and pods, and is a major problem in temperate areas of the world. Although several bacterial genes have been determined as participants in pathogenesis, the overall process still remains poorly understood, mainly because the identity and function of many of the genes are largely unknown. In this work, a genomic library of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 was constructed and PCR amplification of individual fragments was carried out in order to print a DNA microarray. This microarray was used to identify genes that are differentially expressed when bean leaf extracts, pod extracts or apoplastic fluid were added to the growth medium. Results Transcription profiles show that 224 genes were differentially expressed, the majority under the effect of bean leaf extract and apoplastic fluid. Some of the induced genes were previously known to be involved in the first stages of the bacterial-plant interaction and virulence. These include genes encoding type III secretion system proteins and genes involved in cell-wall degradation, phaseolotoxin synthesis and aerobic metabolism. On the other hand, most repressed genes were found to be involved in the uptake and metabolism of iron. Conclusion This study furthers the understanding of the mechanisms involved, responses and the metabolic adaptation that occurs during the interaction of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola with a susceptible host plant.

  19. Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a multi-element contaminated soil profile assessed by in-situ soil pore water sampling, column leaching and sequential extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beesley, Luke, E-mail: l.beesley@2007.ljmu.ac.u [Faculty of Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo [Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Clemente, Rafael [Dep. of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, PO Box 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Lepp, Nicholas; Dickinson, Nicholas [Faculty of Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Three methods for predicting element mobility in soils have been applied to an iron-rich soil, contaminated with arsenic, cadmium and zinc. Soils were collected from 0 to 30 cm, 30 to 70 cm and 70 to 100 cm depths in the field and soil pore water was collected at different depths from an adjacent 100 cm deep trench. Sequential extraction and a column leaching test in the laboratory were compared to element concentrations in pore water sampled directly from the field. Arsenic showed low extractability, low leachability and occurred at low concentrations in pore water samples. Cadmium and zinc were more labile and present in higher concentrations in pore water, increasing with soil depth. Pore water sampling gave the best indication of short term element mobility when field conditions were taken into account, but further extraction and leaching procedures produced a fuller picture of element dynamics, revealing highly labile Cd deep in the soil profile. - Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a polluted soil can be realistically interpreted by in-situ soil pore water sampling.

  20. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  1. Evaluation of the impact of six different DNA extraction methods for the representation of the microbial community associated with human chronic wound infections using a gel-based DNA profiling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilhari, Ayomi; Sampath, Asanga; Gunasekara, Chinthika; Fernando, Neluka; Weerasekara, Deepaka; Sissons, Chris; McBain, Andrew; Weerasekera, Manjula

    2017-09-19

    Infected chronic wounds are polymicrobial in nature which include a diverse group of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Majority of these communal microorganisms are difficult to grow in vitro. DNA fingerprinting methods such as polymerase chain reaction-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) facilitate the microbial profiling of complex ecosystems including infected chronic wounds. Six different DNA extraction methods were compared for profiling of the microbial community associated with chronic wound infections using PCR-DGGE. Tissue debris obtained from chronic wound ulcers of ten patients were used for DNA extraction. Total nucleic acid was extracted from each specimen using six DNA extraction methods. The yield, purity and quality of DNA was measured and used for PCR amplification targeting V2-V3 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA gene. QIAGEN DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit (K method) produced good quality genomic DNA compared to the other five DNA extraction methods and gave a broad diversity of bacterial communities in chronic wounds. Among the five conventional methods, bead beater/phenol-chloroform based DNA extraction method with STES buffer (BP1 method) gave a yield of DNA with a high purity and resulted in a higher DGGE band diversity. Although DNA extraction using heat and NaOH had the lowest purity, DGGE revealed a higher bacterial diversity. The findings suggest that the quality and the yield of genomic DNA are influenced by the DNA extraction protocol, thus a method should be carefully selected in profiling a complex microbial community.

  2. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics' Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course: A Hand-On Education Approach to Applied Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. B.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez, R.; Duncan, D.; Saustrup, S.

    2016-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, offers a 3-week marine geology and geophysics field course. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling and analysis. Students first participate in 3 days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work at locations that provide an opportunity to investigate coastal and continental shelf processes. Teams of students rotate between UTIG's 26' R/V Scott Petty and NOAA's 82' R/V Manta. They assist with survey design, instrumentation set up, and learn about acquisition, quality control, and safe instrument deployment. Teams also process data and analyze samples in onshore field labs. During the final week teams integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software. The course concludes with team presentations on their interpretations with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and high instructor/student ratio (sixteen students, three faculty, and three teaching assistants). Post-class, students may incorporate course data in senior honors or graduate thesis and are encouraged to publish and present results at national meetings. This course (to our knowledge) remains the only one of its kind, satisfies field experience requirements for some degree programs, and provides an alternative to land-based field courses. Alumni note the course's applicability to energy, environmental, and geotechnical industries as well as coastal restoration/management fields.

  3. COLLADA Computing for Geophysical Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The COLLADATM open industry XML standard for 3D Graphics Exchange is applied for representation, combination and analysis of geophysical information from disparate...

  4. A geological and geophysical data collection system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudhakar, T.; Afzulpurkar, S.

    A geological and geophysical data collection system using a Personal Computer is described below. The system stores data obtained from various survey systems typically installed in a charter vessel and can be used for similar applications on any...

  5. Exploring the oceans- The geophysical way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murthy, K.S.R.

    The evolution of the eastern continental margin of India (ECMI), the Bengal Fan and the Central Indian Basin (CIB) is a consequence of the breakup of India from the eastern Gondwanaland in Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Recent marine geophysical...

  6. The Geophysical Database Management System in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzay-Chyn Shin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Geophysical Database Management System (GDMS is an integrated and web-based open data service which has been developed by the Central Weather Bureau (CWB, Taiwan, ROC since 2005. This service went online on August 1, 2008. The GDMS provides six types of geophysical data acquired from the Short-period Seismographic System, Broadband Seismographic System, Free-field Strong-motion Station, Strong-motion Building Array, Global Positioning System, and Groundwater Observation System. When utilizing the GDMS website, users can download seismic event data and continuous geophysical data. At present, many researchers have accessed this public platform to obtain geophysical data. Clearly, the establishment of GDMS is a significant improvement in data sorting for interested researchers.

  7. Physicist + Geologist points to Geophysics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Glenn M.; Stueber, Alan M.

    1974-01-01

    A two-quarter introductory course in geophysics at the advanced undergraduate/beginning graduate level is described. An outline of course content is provided, and mechanics of instruction are discussed. (DT)

  8. Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Magnetometer Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This file is comprised of the variation one minute values of the geomagnetic components X, Y and Z. These data were calculated by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory...

  9. A field guide to geophysics in archaeology

    CERN Document Server

    Oswin, John

    2009-01-01

    Geophysics operations in archaeology have become well known through exposure on television. However, the technique is presented as the action of specialists and something of a mystery, where people walk about with strange contraptions, and results appear from a computer. This is not the case, however. Some scientific knowledge is needed in order to understand how the machines work and what they detect but otherwise it is only necessary to know how to handle the instruments, how to survey a field and how to interpret the computer results. This book provides all the relevant information. It explains geophysics operations in archaeology, describes the science that gives the soil properties to measure and the means by which the instruments make their measurements. Dr John Oswin is in charge of the geophysics operation of the Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society and his work has recently been the subject of a television programme. He has taught many students how to use geophysical equipment.

  10. Marine geophysical data management and presentation system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    The Geophysical Data Management and Presentation System (GPDMPS) constitutes an integral part of the large Geological Oceanographic Database (GODBASE) which is under development at the Indian National Oceanographic Data Centre (INODC...

  11. Effect of chicory seed extract on glucose tolerance test (GTT and metabolic profile in early and late stage diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghamarian Abdolreza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose of the study The goal was to evaluate and compare the effects of aqueous extract of the seeds of chicory, Cichorium intybus L., on glucose tolerance test (GTT and blood biochemical indices of experimentally-induced hyperglycemic rats. Methods Late stage and early stage of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ and a combination of STZ and niacinamide (NIA/STZ, respectively. Within each group, one subgroup received daily i. p. injections of chicory extract (125 mg/kg body weight, for 28 days. Body weight and fasting blood sugar (FBS were measured weekly. Blood was analyzed for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and sera for alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, nitric oxide (NO, triacylglycerol (TG, total cholesterol (TC, total protein, and insulin on days 10 and 28 after treatment. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT along with insulin determination was performed on a different set of rats in which the chicory-treated groups received the extract for 10 days. Results During 4 weeks of treatment, chicory prevented body-weight loss and decreased FBS. ALT activities and levels of TG, TC and HbA1c decreased, and concentration of NO increased in the chicory treated groups (p Conclusions Chicory appeared to have short-term (about 2 hours, as far as GTT is concerned and long-term (28 days, in this study effects on diabetes. Chicory may be useful as a natural dietary supplement for slowing down the pace of diabetes progress, and delaying the development of its complications.

  12. Effect of chicory seed extract on glucose tolerance test (GTT and metabolic profile in early and late stage diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahadi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study The goal was to evaluate and compare the effects of aqueous extract of the seeds of chicory, Cichorium intybus L., on glucose tolerance test (GTT and blood biochemical indices of experimentally-induced hyperglycemic rats.MethodsLate stage and early stage of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ and a combination of STZ and niacinamide (NIA/STZ, respectively. Within each group, one subgroup received daily i. p. injections of chicory extract (125 mg/kg body weight, for 28 days. Body weight and fasting blood sugar (FBS were measured weekly. Blood was analyzed for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and sera for alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, nitric oxide (NO, triacylglycerol (TG, total cholesterol (TC, total protein, and insulin on days 10 and 28 after treatment. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT along with insulin determination was performed on a different set of rats in which the chicory-treated groups received the extract for 10 days.ResultsDuring 4 weeks of treatment, chicory prevented body-weight loss and decreased FBS. ALT activities and levels of TG, TC and HbA1c decreased, and concentration of NO increased in the chicory treated groups (p < 0.05. Unlike late-stage diabetes, fasting serum insulin concentrations were higher and GTT pattern approximated to normal in chicory-treated earlystage diabetic rats.ConclusionsChicory appeared to have short-term (about 2 hours, as far as GTT is concerned and longterm (28 days, in this study effects on diabetes. Chicory may be useful as a natural dietary supplement for slowing down the pace of diabetes progress, and delaying the development of its complications.

  13. Analysis of lipid profile and atherogenic index in hyperlipidemic rat (Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout, 1769) that given the methanolic extract of Parijoto (Medinilla speciosa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'adah, Noor Nailis; Purwani, Kristanti Indah; Nurhayati, Awik Puji Dyah; Ashuri, Nova Maulidina

    2017-06-01

    Diet of high lipids cause hyperlipidemia, which marked by an increase of total cholesterols, triglycerides, LDL-C, and decreasing of HDL-C. Hyperlipidemia lead the occurrence of atherosclerosis, one of factors that trigger cardiovascular disease, as hypertention; coronary heart and stroke. Parijoto (M. speciosa) is endemic plants in Asia with a distribution center in Malaysia, Indonesia and Philippines. Parijoto contain phytochemical components such as flavonoids, saponins and kardenolin. Flavonoid potensial as an antioxidants and can improve the hyperlipidemia condition. This study was aimed to determine lipid profiles and atherogenic index of hyperlipidemic Wistar rats (R. norvegicus Berkenhout, 1769) which given the methanolic extract of Parijoto (M. speciosa). The research was done with pre and post test randomized control group design. Rats were given a mixture of duck yolk and reused cooking oil (1:1) orally as much as 1% of body weight (BW) for 30 days. After hyperlipidemia achieved, rats were divided into 5 group: normal rats, hyperlipidemic rats, hyperlipidemic rats were given the methanolic extract of Parijoto (M. speciosa) 500 mg/kg, 1000 mg/kg, and 1500 mg/kg BW. Blood samples were collected when rats in hyperlipidemia conditions and after treatment with the methanolic extract of Parijoto (M. speciosa) for 30 days. The data of total cholesterol, HDL-Cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol level, and atherogenic index were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey test at 5% significance level. The result showed that giving of methanolic extract of Parijoto (M. speciosa) in hyperlipidemic rats reduced the total cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol levels, and increased of HDL-cholesterol levels significantly (p<0.01), so atherogenic index reduced significantly too (p<0.01). Total cholesterol and LDL-Cholesterol levels were positively correlated with the atherogenic index, whereas HDL-cholesterol levels were negatively correlated with the atherogenic index.

  14. Shallow geophysical investigations at the Akhmim archaeological site, Suhag, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mahfooz A.; Atya, Magdy A.; Hassan, Azza M.; Sato, Motoyuki; Wonik, Thomas; El-Kenawy, Abeer A.

    2008-06-01

    Ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic terrain conductivity, and electric tomography have proven to be effective tools if they are combined together to investigate archeological sites. We have conducted a geophysical survey at the Akhmim archaeological site, the main objective of our survey is to locate additional buried structures for further excavation. Geophysical data were acquired in the area using the GEM-300 multi-frequency terrain conductivity profiler, the SIR 2000 ground penetrating radar, and the Syscal R2 resistivity meter systems. The results of the integrated interpretation show a number of buried features and a strong linear zone about 1 m wide that coincides with the suspected trend of a buried wall. There appears to be two parallel ridges of strong reflections on either side, indicating two parallel walls extended East-West and a room is identified at the bottom left corner of the site. Moreover, the interpretation results of some selected GPR and dipoledipole resistivity profiles adjacent to the open-air museum suggest the existence of a second statue of Ramses II to the right of the previously discovered statue which could still be buried in the sand.

  15. 道路路面测量数据的特征参数提取与统计分析%Extraction and statistic analysis of characteristic parameters of road profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段虎明; 马颖; 石锋; 张开斌; 谢飞

    2013-01-01

    介绍道路路面数据测量系统的构成和数据预处理方法.针对测量的道路路面数据,阐述由路面数据提取可表征其特性的特征参数,包括基本统计量、国际平整度指数和功率谱密度参数等.在路面特征参数提取基础上,以北京地区真实海量路面测量数据为例,进行道路路面特征参数的统计分析,得到可反映、表征该地区路面特点的统计分析结果.总结道路路面特征参数提取与统计分析方法,展望其应用前景.%The forms of data measurement system of road surface and data pre-processing methods of road surface profile in automotive tests were introduced. Based on the measured data of road surface profile, some extracted characteristic parameters of road surface profile were presented, including basic statistics ( mean and standard deviation) , international roughness index (IRI) and parameters of power spectral density (PSD). After the introduction of extraction methods of characteristic parameters of road profiles, many actual measured road surface data in Beijing were taken as examples, their characteristic parameters of road profiles were extracted and these characteristic parameters of road profiles were analyzed statistically. The results showed that these extracting characteristic parameters of road profile methods are simple and effective; these extracted characteristic parameters can be widely used for vehicle tests and highway maintenance and repair. Finally, the extraction and statistical analysis methods of road characteristic parameters were summarized and their application prospects were presented.

  16. Geophysical Investigations for Groundwater in Outita, Morroco, using ERT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Ouadif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Morocco is a country in semi-arid to arid climate. Rainfall is irregular in time and space. Surface water undergoes very large fluctuations due to the hydraulicity of the year. Hence, the use of groundwater resources that play a very important role in supplying water to rural populations and irrigation. In this context a geophysical survey was carried out in Outita. The interpretation of ERT profiles oriented West-East showed a horst and graben structure and revealed the existence of water-bearing formations at depths of around 300m. To determine the lateral extent of these formations, two ERT profiles oriented in the North-South direction were carried out.

  17. The remote sensing needs of Arctic geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The application of remote sensors for obtaining geophysical information of the Arctic regions is discussed. Two significant requirements are to acquire sequential, synoptic imagery of the Arctic Ocean during all weather and seasons and to measure the strains in the sea ice canopy and the heterogeneous character of the air and water stresses acting on the canopy. The acquisition of geophysical data by side looking radar and microwave sensors in military aircraft is described.

  18. Multiscale geophysical imaging of the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, A. D.; Singha, K.; Minsley, B. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; Slater, L.

    2015-03-01

    Details of Earth's shallow subsurface—a key component of the critical zone (CZ)—are largely obscured because making direct observations with sufficient density to capture natural characteristic spatial variability in physical properties is difficult. Yet this inaccessible region of the CZ is fundamental to processes that support ecosystems, society, and the environment. Geophysical methods provide a means for remotely examining CZ form and function over length scales that span centimeters to kilometers. Here we present a review highlighting the application of geophysical methods to CZ science research questions. In particular, we consider the application of geophysical methods to map the geometry of structural features such as regolith thickness, lithological boundaries, permafrost extent, snow thickness, or shallow root zones. Combined with knowledge of structure, we discuss how geophysical observations are used to understand CZ processes. Fluxes between snow, surface water, and groundwater affect weathering, groundwater resources, and chemical and nutrient exports to rivers. The exchange of gas between soil and the atmosphere have been studied using geophysical methods in wetland areas. Indirect geophysical methods are a natural and necessary complement to direct observations obtained by drilling or field mapping. Direct measurements should be used to calibrate geophysical estimates, which can then be used to extrapolate interpretations over larger areas or to monitor changing processes over time. Advances in geophysical instrumentation and computational approaches for integrating different types of data have great potential to fill gaps in our understanding of the shallow subsurface portion of the CZ and should be integrated where possible in future CZ research.

  19. Brief Introduction of Sichuan Geophysical Company

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Founded in 1956,Sichuan Geophysicai Company (SCGC) is the largest engineering technological service enterprise for petroleum and natural gas seismic exploration in the westem part of China,which is integrated in acquisition,processing and interpretation of seismic data as well as technological deyelopment. Iris also a member of International Asociation of Geophysical Contractors, a member of Association of CNPC Geophysical Contractors and a survey unit with qualification of A level authenticated by China National Survey & Mapping Bureau.

  20. Dictionary of geophysics, astrophysics, and astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, Richard A

    2001-01-01

    The Dictionary of Geophysics, Astrophysics, and Astronomy provides a lexicon of terminology covering fields such as astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, relativity, geophysics, meteorology, Newtonian physics, and oceanography. Authors and editors often assume - incorrectly - that readers are familiar with all the terms in professional literature. With over 4,000 definitions and 50 contributing authors, this unique comprehensive dictionary helps scientists to use terminology correctly and to understand papers, articles, and books in which physics-related terms appear.

  1. Gene expression profiling of RNA extracted from FFPE tissues: NuGEN technologies' whole-transcriptome amplification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leah; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of RNA isolated from formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples has been historically challenging. Yet FFPE samples are sought-after because of the in-depth retrospective records typically associated with them rendering these samples a valuable resource for translational medicine studies. Extensive degradation, chemical modifications, and cross-linking have made it difficult to isolate RNA of sufficient quality required for large-scale gene expression profiling studies. NuGEN Technologies' WT-Ovation™ FFPE System linearly amplifies RNA from FFPE samples through a robust and simple whole-transcriptome approach using as little as 50 ng total RNA isolated from FFPE samples. The amplified material may be labeled with validated kits and/or protocols from NuGEN for analysis on any of the major gene expression microarray platforms, including: Affymetrix, Agilent, and Illumina gene expression arrays. Results compare well with those obtained using RNA from fresh-frozen samples. RNA quality from FFPE samples varies significantly and neither sample age nor sample size analysis via gel electrophoresis or the Agilent Bioanalyzer system accurately predict materials suitable for amplification. Therefore, NuGEN has validated a correlative qPCR-based analytical method for the RNA derived from FFPE samples which effectively predicts array results. The NuGEN approach enables fast and successful analysis of samples previously thought to be too degraded for gene expression analysis.

  2. Pharmacokinetic profiles of falcarindiol and oplopandiol in rats after oral administration of polyynes extract of Oplopanax elatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; He, Yi-Sheng; Xu, Ling-Hui; Zhang, Bi-Ying; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yang, Jie; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Polyynes, such as facarindiol (FAD) and oplopandiol (OPD), are responsible for anticancer activities of Oplopanax elatus (O. elatus). A novel approach to pharmacokinetics determination of the two natural polyynes in rats was developed and validated using a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method. Biosamples were prepared by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate/n-hexane (V : V = 9 : 1) and the analytes were eluted on an Agilent ZORBAX Eclipse Plus C18 threaded column (4.6 mm × 50 mm, 1.8 μm) with the mobile phase of acetonitrile-0.1% aqueous formic acid at a flow-rate of 0.5 mL·min(-1) within a total run time of 11 min. All analytes were simultaneously monitored in a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode using electrospray source in positive mode. The method was demonstrated to be rapid, sensitive, and reliable, and it was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic studies of the two polyynes in rat plasma after oral administration of polyynes extract of O. elatus.

  3. MDA and Histologic Profile of Pancreatic Diabetic-Rats Model Administered With Extract of Glycine max (L. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luh Putu Gina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus is characterized by leveling up glucose in human blood and affects increasing of free radicals in body as well as leading to cellular oxidative stress. Experimentally, this condition is able to be characterized by increasing malondialdehyde (MDA level in cell and histological changing in pancreas appearance. Consumption of antioxidant substances was reported able to reduce the MDA quantity as free radicals. Black soybean or Glycine max (L Merr. was reported contains important antioxidant agents such as anthocyanin and isoflavone. This paper discloses recent investigation on application of black soybean water extract to reduce the MDA level on diabetes mellitus-rat model induced by STZ (DM and also reports the pancreas histological changing of the DM rats. Investigation revealed that black soybean water extract significantly affect decreasing of MDA level by 4.9%, 27.1% and 45.7% in three different doses theraphy (500, 750, and 1000 mg/kg BW. Histologically, it also clearly indicates repairing of pancreas tissue of the DM rats.

  4. Scan Profiles Based Method for Segmentation and Extraction of Planar Objects in Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Long; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s). The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc.) that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling) that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  5. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals the N-Acyl-Taurine Geodiataurine in Extracts from the Marine Sponge Geodia macandrewii (Bowerbank).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Elisabeth K; Søderholm, Kine L; Isaksson, Johan; Andersen, Jeanette H; Hansen, Espen

    2016-05-27

    A metabolomic approach was used to identify known and new natural products from the marine sponges Geodia baretti and G. macandrewii. G. baretti is known to produce bioactive natural products such as barettin (1), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (2), and bromobenzisoxazolone barettin (3), while secondary metabolites from G. macandrewii are not reported in the literature. Specimens of the two sponges were collected from different sites along the coast of Norway, and their extracts were analyzed using UHPLC-HR-MS. Metabolomic analyses revealed that extracts from both species contained barettin (1) and 8,9-dihydrobarettin (2), and all samples of G. baretti contained higher amounts of both compounds compared to G. macandrewii. The analysis of the MS data also revealed that samples of G. macandrewii contained a compound that was not present in any of the G. baretti samples. This new compound was isolated and identified as the N-acyl-taurine geodiataurine (4), and it was tested for antioxidant, anticancer, and antibacterial properties.

  6. SCAN PROFILES BASED METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION AND EXTRACTION OF PLANAR OBJECTS IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s. The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc. that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  7. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  8. Geophysics of Small Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, Erik I.

    1998-01-01

    As a SETI Institute PI from 1996-1998, Erik Asphaug studied impact and tidal physics and other geophysical processes associated with small (low-gravity) planetary bodies. This work included: a numerical impact simulation linking basaltic achondrite meteorites to asteroid 4 Vesta (Asphaug 1997), which laid the groundwork for an ongoing study of Martian meteorite ejection; cratering and catastrophic evolution of small bodies (with implications for their internal structure; Asphaug et al. 1996); genesis of grooved and degraded terrains in response to impact; maturation of regolith (Asphaug et al. 1997a); and the variation of crater outcome with impact angle, speed, and target structure. Research of impacts into porous, layered and prefractured targets (Asphaug et al. 1997b, 1998a) showed how shape, rheology and structure dramatically affects sizes and velocities of ejecta, and the survivability and impact-modification of comets and asteroids (Asphaug et al. 1998a). As an affiliate of the Galileo SSI Team, the PI studied problems related to cratering, tectonics, and regolith evolution, including an estimate of the impactor flux around Jupiter and the effect of impact on local and regional tectonics (Asphaug et al. 1998b). Other research included tidal breakup modeling (Asphaug and Benz 1996; Schenk et al. 1996), which is leading to a general understanding of the role of tides in planetesimal evolution. As a Guest Computational Investigator for NASA's BPCC/ESS supercomputer testbed, helped graft SPH3D onto an existing tree code tuned for the massively parallel Cray T3E (Olson and Asphaug, in preparation), obtaining a factor xIO00 speedup in code execution time (on 512 cpus). Runs which once took months are now completed in hours.

  9. Characterization of fruit products by capillary zone electrophoresis and liquid chromatography using the compositional profiles of polyphenols: application to authentication of natural extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Meritxell; Núñez, Oscar; Saurina, Javier; Hernández-Cassou, Santiago; Puignou, Lluis

    2014-02-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were applied to the authentication of fruit products based on the compositional profiles of polyphenols. Various sample treatments were used to maximize the overall recovery of polyphenols or specific fractions, such as phenolic acids or anthocyanins. The resulting CZE and HPLC data were treated with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showing that samples were mainly clustered according to the fruit of origin, with cranberry- and grape-based products clearly separated in groups. A possible adulterated cranberry extract was analyzed more deeply by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) in order to identify the presence of A-type proanthocyanidins, which are characteristic and more abundant in cranberry-based products. In accordance with PCA interpretation, HRMS results indicated that the suspicious sample was not a cranberry-based product, allowing us to validate and demonstrate the suitability of both CZE- and HPLC-proposed methods for the characterization of fruit-based products.

  10. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Agung Nugroho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the phytochemicals content of Terminalia catappa leaves extract (TCL and its effects on the survival and blood profiles of ornamental fish (Betta sp Ninety fish were randomly assigned into six triplicates groups and reared in various concentration of TCL: 0 (control, 125, 250, 375, 500, 625 ppm for 30 days. Temperature, Dissolve oxygen (DO, and pH were monitored during the trial. After 30 days, survival, Red Blood Cells (RBC, White Blood Cells (WBC, haemoglobin (Hb, lymphocyte, and total protein serum (TPS were analyzed. Based on the phytochemicals test, saponin, triterpenoid, quinon, phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid were detected on the TCL. Temperature and DO were not affected by any concentration of TCL. The lowest pH (5.05 was found in fish medium immersed with 625 ppm of TCL. Adding TCL above 375 ppm resulted in significantly higher survival, RBC, and Hb. The highest WBC was found in fish immersed with 625 ppm whereas the lowest lymphocyte was found in fish immersed with 375 of TCL. However, immersing any various concentration of TCL did not affect on the TPS. In summary, immersing TCL above 375 ppm is beneficial to enhance survival, RBC, WBC, and Hb of Betta sp.How to CiteNugroho, R. A., Manurung, H., Saraswati, D., Ladyescha, D. & Nur, F. M. (2016. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 240-247.

  11. Decaffeinated green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves insulin resistance and metabolic profiles in normolipidic diet--but not high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Aline; Santamarina, Aline; Souza, Gabriel; Mennitti, Laís; Okuda, Marcos; Venancio, Daniel; Seelaender, Marilia; do Nascimento, Claudia Oller; Ribeiro, Eliane; Lira, Fabio; Oyama, Lila

    2015-09-01

    Supplementation with epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which restores metabolic profiles, has been proposed as an option for preventing and treating obesity. We investigated whether decaffeinated green tea extract rich in EGCG, attenuates high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic alterations in Swiss mice. The mice were maintained on either a control diet (CD) or HFD for 8 weeks and supplemented with either a placebo or EGCG (50mg/kg/day). Body weight, serum lipid profiles, cytokine protein expression, and content in epididymal (EPI) and retroperitoneal (RET) adipose tissues, and adipocyte area were measured. The body weights of HFD + placebo-fed mice were increased compared with those of HFD + EGCG-fed mice (28 and 21%, respectively), whereas the body weights of CD + EGCG-fed mice were decreased 16% compared with those of the CD + placebo group. Serum triglyceride levels were decreased 32% in the CD + EGCG group compared with the CD + placebo group. Compared with the CD + placebo group, increased phosphorylation of AMPK and hormone-sensitive lipase in EPI and RET, respectively, was found in the CD + EGCG group. Increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation was observed in both adipose tissues. In addition, TNF-α and IL-10 levels in EPI and adiponectin levels were higher in the CD + EGCG group than in the CD + placebo group. TNF-α levels were lower in the HFD + EGCG group than in the HFD + placebo group. Furthermore, the CD + EGCG group exhibited a lower adipocyte area than the CD + placebo group. These indicate that the effects of decaffeinated green tea extract on body mass may be related to the crosstalk between lipolytic and inflammatory pathways in normolipidic diet-fed mice but not in HFD-fed mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensitivity analysis and application in exploration geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, R.

    2013-12-01

    In exploration geophysics, the usual way of dealing with geophysical data is to form an Earth model describing underground structure in the area of investigation. The resolved model, however, is based on the inversion of survey data which is unavoidable contaminated by various noises and is sampled in a limited number of observation sites. Furthermore, due to the inherent non-unique weakness of inverse geophysical problem, the result is ambiguous. And it is not clear that which part of model features is well-resolved by the data. Therefore the interpretation of the result is intractable. We applied a sensitivity analysis to address this problem in magnetotelluric(MT). The sensitivity, also named Jacobian matrix or the sensitivity matrix, is comprised of the partial derivatives of the data with respect to the model parameters. In practical inversion, the matrix can be calculated by direct modeling of the theoretical response for the given model perturbation, or by the application of perturbation approach and reciprocity theory. We now acquired visualized sensitivity plot by calculating the sensitivity matrix and the solution is therefore under investigation that the less-resolved part is indicated and should not be considered in interpretation, while the well-resolved parameters can relatively be convincing. The sensitivity analysis is hereby a necessary and helpful tool for increasing the reliability of inverse models. Another main problem of exploration geophysics is about the design strategies of joint geophysical survey, i.e. gravity, magnetic & electromagnetic method. Since geophysical methods are based on the linear or nonlinear relationship between observed data and subsurface parameters, an appropriate design scheme which provides maximum information content within a restricted budget is quite difficult. Here we firstly studied sensitivity of different geophysical methods by mapping the spatial distribution of different survey sensitivity with respect to the

  13. Dual High-Resolution α-Glucosidase and Radical Scavenging Profiling Combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for Identification of Minor and Major Constituents Directly from the Crude Extract of Pueraria lobata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Qinglei, Sun

    2015-01-01

    The crude methanol extract of Pueraria lobata was investigated by dual high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition and radical scavenging profiling combined with hyphenated HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Direct analysis of the crude extract without preceding purification was facilitated by combining chromatograms...... from two analytical-scale HPLC separations of 120 and 600 μg on-column, respectively. High-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiles were obtained after microfractionation of the eluate in 96-well microplates. This allowed full bioactivity profiling of individual peaks in the HPLC...... chromatogram of the crude methanol extract. Subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis allowed identification of 21 known compounds in addition to two new compounds, i.e., 3′-methoxydaidzein 8-C-[α-d-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-d-glucopyranoside and 6″-O-malonyl-3′-methoxydaidzin, as well as an unstable compound...

  14. AfricaArray International Geophysics Field School: Applications of Near Surface Geophysics to challenges encountered in mine planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. J.; Jones, M. Q.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nyblade, A.; Snyman, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Hard rock exploration and mining presents many opportunities for the effective use of near surface geophysics. For over 10 years the AfricaArray international geophysics field school has been hosted at a variety of mines in South Africa. While the main objective of the field school is practical training for the next generation of geophysicists, being hosted at a mine has allowed us to investigate applications of near surface geophysics in the early stages of mine planning and development as geophysics is often cheaper and faster than drilling. Several applications include: detailed delineation of dykes and stringer dykes, physical property measurements on drill core for modeling and marker horizons, determination of overburden thickness, locations of water and faults. Dolerite dykes are usually magnetic and are associated with loss of ground (i.e. where the dyke replaces the ore and thus reduces the amount of ore available) and safety/stability concerns. Thus the accurate mapping of dykes and narrow stringers that are associated with them are crucial to the safe planning of a mine. We have acquired several case studies where ground magnetic surveys have greatly improved on the resolution and detail of airborne magnetic surveys in regions of complicated dyke swarms. In many cases, thin stringer dykes of less than 5 cm have been detected. Physical property measurements of these dykes can be used to distinguish between different ages of dykes. It is important to accurately determine overburden thickness when planning an open pit mine as this directly affects the cost of development. Depending on the nature of the overburden, both refraction seismic and or DC resistivity can provide continuous profiling in the area of interest that fills in gaps between boreholes. DC resistivity is also effective for determining water associated with dykes and structures that may affect mine planning. The field school mainly addresses the training of a variety of students. The core

  15. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall extract and poplar propolis ethanol extract supplementation on growth performance, digestibility, blood profile, fecal microbiota and fecal noxious gas emissions in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Kim, In H

    2014-06-01

    A total of 105 growing pigs (24.91 ± 1.06 kg) were used in a 6-week trial to investigate the effects of including Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall extract and poplar propolis ethanol extract (SPE) in the diet on growth performance, digestibility, blood profiles, fecal microbiota and fecal noxious gas emissions. Pigs were randomly allocated to one of three dietary treatments (seven pens/treatment, five pigs/pen) according to initial body weight and sex (two gilts and three barrows). Treatments consisted of a corn soybean meal basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.05 or 0.10% SPE. There was a significant linear improvement (P red blood cells and white blood cells concentration were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by SPE supplementation in the diets. In conclusion, results indicate that dietary SPE supplementation can improve growth performance, digestibility and fecal microbiota, and decrease fecal gas emissions in growing pigs. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Comparing the sugar profiles and primary structures of alkali-extracted water-soluble polysaccharides in cell wall between the yeast and mycelial phases from Tremella fuciformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanyu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Juan; Zheng, Liesheng; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2016-05-01

    To gain insights into dimorphism, cell wall polysaccharides from Tremella fuciformis strains were obtained from alkali-extracted water-soluble fractions PTF-M38 (from the mycelial form), PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 (from the yeast form) of T. fuciformis strains were used to gain some insights into dimorphism study. Their chemical properties and structural features were investigated using gel permeation chromatography, gas chromatography, UV and IR spectrophotometry and Congo red binding reactions. The results indicated that the backbones of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were configured with α-linkages with average molecular weights of 1.24, 1.08, and 1.19 kDa, respectively. PTF-M38 was mainly composed of xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose in a ratio of 1:1.47:0.48:0.34, while PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were mainly composed of xylose, mannose and glucose in a ratio of 1:1.65:4.06 and 1:1.21:0.44, respectively. The sugar profiles of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were also established for further comparison. These profiles showed that all three polysaccharides contained the same sugars but in different ratios, and the carbon sources (xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose) affected the sugar ratios within the polysaccharides.

  17. Exercise Training and Grape Seed Extract Co-Administration Improves Lipid Profile, Weight Loss, Bradycardia, and Hypotension of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badavi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:: Exercise Training (ET and Grape Seed Extract (GSE as an antioxidant have many positive effects on controlling diabetes mellitus and its complications. Objectives:: This study aimed to determine the effects of GSE alone or combined with ET on body weight, plasma lipid profile, blood pressure, and heart rate in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods:: In this study, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to five groups: sedentary control, sedentary diabetic, trained diabetic, GSE treated sedentary diabetic, and GSE treated trained diabetic. ET was conducted on the treadmill daily for 8 weeks. One way ANOVA followed by LSD test was used for statistical analysis. Results:: Reduction of body weight, high density lipoproteins, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure and increment of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein, and very low density lipoproteins were observed after STZ injection. Co-administration of GSE and ET had more positive effects on lipid profile compared to each method alone. In addition, GSE and ET modified heart rate partially, while their combination was more effective in improvement of heart rat in conscious rats. On the other hand, administration of ET or GSE alone did not affect systolic blood pressure and body weight, while their combination restored systolic blood pressure completely and improved body weight partially. Conclusions:: The study findings indicated that ET combined with GSE had more beneficial effects compared to each one alone on the complications of STZ induced diabetes. This may constitute a convenient and inexpensive therapeutic approach to diabetic complications.

  18. Effect of inulin extracts or inulin-containing plant supplement on blood lipid indices and fatty acid profile in fattener tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grela, E R; Sobolewska, S; Roziński, T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of inulin or dandelion, chicory and Jerusalem artichoke powder on lipid indices and fatty acid profile in fattener tissues. The experiment involved 120 crossbred pigs (PL x PLW) x Duroc with an initial body weight of 25.0 +/- 0.5 kg. Animals were assigned into 6 groups. A diet for group I (control) did not comprise an inulin additive, group II and III received 2% inulin (water or water-alcohol extraction of inulin from chicory root, respectively), while the mixtures for group IV, V and VI contained 4% root powder from Jerusalem artichoke (topinambur), chicory or dandelion, respectively. The animals were slaughtered at 115 kg body weight. The samples of blood, liver and the muscle longissimus dorsi tissues as well as whole hearts were collected for analysis. Fatty acid profile, some lipid indices and crude fat and cholesterol content were evaluated. Dietary supplement of 40 g dandelion powder resulted in preferable significant changes in the blood lipid indices and fatty acids composition (increased PUFA share and decreased n-6/n-3 ratio).

  19. Comparative identification of protein profiles and major allergens of saliva, salivary gland and whole body extracts of mosquito species in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkamchai, Sirichit; Khongtak, Pacharee; Leemingsawat, Somjai; Komalamisra, Narumon; Junsong, Nujorn; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Wisuthsarewong, Wanee; Boitano, John J

    2010-01-01

    Allergic reactions to mosquito bites, such as generalized urticaria or severe local reactions are common problems worldwide. The diverse sources of allergen prepared from different mosquito body parts usage are a major obstacle to obtaining safe and effective tests and immunotherapy for mosquito bite allergy. Thus, the reactions are often not recognized and allergen immunotherapy is seldom used for severe reaction to mosquito bites. In a search for appropriate allergen sources, the protein profiles of saliva, salivary glands and whole body extracts were comparatively analyzed from 4 common mosquito species of Thailand and/or South East Asia; viz. Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and a zoophilic strain, Anopheles minimus. The major allergens in the extracts which elicited specific IgE responses in the pooled sera of subjects allergic to mosquito bites were identified. It was concluded that mosquito saliva was the best source of allergens. Additionally, both species-specific and species-shared allergens of the 4 mosquito species were identified. The major saliva allergens having MWs of 36, 32 and 22 kDa were identified. The identificstion of major allergens should facilitate the production of specific recombinant allergens and contribute to improvement in the diagnosis and specific immunotherapy of Thai mosquito bite allergy patients.

  20. Natural killer cell activation and modulation of chemokine receptor profile in vitro by an extract from the cyanophyta Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Aaron N; Zaske, Lue Ann; Patterson, Kelly M; Drapeau, Christian; Jensen, Gitte S

    2007-09-01

    The present research was designed to study the effects of an extract from the edible cyanophyta Aphanizomenon flos-aquae on human natural killer (NK) cells. We have previously shown, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design, that ingestion of 1.5 g of dried whole A. flos-aquae resulted in a transient reduction in peripheral blood NK cells in 21 healthy human volunteers, suggesting increased NK cell homing into tissue. We have now identified an extract from A. flos-aquae (AFAe) that directly activates NK cells in vitro and modulates the chemokine receptor profile. NK cell activation was evaluated by expression of CD25 and CD69 on CD3-CD56+ cells after 18 hours. Changes in CXCR3 and CXCR4 chemokine receptor expression after 5-60 minutes were evaluated by immunostaining and flow cytometry. AFAe induced the expression of CD69 on CD3-CD56+ NK cells, induced CD25 expression on 25% of these cells, and acted in synergy with interleukin 2. NK cells enriched by RosetteSep (StemCell Technologies Inc., Vancouver, BC, Canada) were not activated by AFAe, indicating that the NK activation was dependent on other cells such as monocytes. The low-molecular-weight fraction <5,000 of AFAe was responsible for the most robust NK cell activation, suggesting novel compounds different from previously reported macrophage-activating large polysaccharides.

  1. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity and fast UHPLC-DAD-IT-TOF profiling of polyphenolic compounds extracted from green lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.; var. Maravilla de Verano).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Giacomo; Sommella, Eduardo; Manfra, Michele; De Nisco, Mauro; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Scopa, Antonio; Sofo, Adriano; Marzocco, Stefania; Adesso, Simona; Novellino, Tiziana; Campiglia, Pietro

    2015-01-15

    Fresh cut vegetables represent a widely consumed food worldwide. Among these, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is one of the most popular on the market. The growing interest for this "healthy" food is related to the content of bioactive compounds, especially polyphenols, that show many beneficial effects. In this study, we report the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential of polyphenols extracted from lettuce (var. Maravilla de Verano), in J774A.1 macrophages stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lettuce extract significantly decreased reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide release, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cycloxygenase-2 expression. A detailed quali/quantitative profiling of the polyphenolic content was carried out, obtaining fast separation (10 min), good retention time and peak area repeatability, (RSD% 0.80 and 8.68, respectively) as well as linearity (R(2)⩾ 0.999) and mass accuracy (⩽ 5 ppm). Our results show the importance in the diet of this cheap and popular food for his healthy properties.

  2. Comparison of three modifications of fused-silica capillaries and untreated capillaries for protein profiling of maize extracts by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobozy, Ewa; Sentkowska, Aleksandra; Piskor, Anna

    2014-09-01

    In this work, capillary electrophoresis was applied to protein profiling of fractionated extracts of maize. A comparative study on the application of uncoated fused-silica capillaries and capillaries modified with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, ω-iodoalkylammonium salt and a commercially available neutral capillary covalently coated with polyacrylamide is presented. The coating stability, background electrolyte composition, and separation efficiency were investigated. It was found that for zeins separation, the most stable and efficient was the capillary coated with polyacrylamide. Finally, the usefulness of these methods was studied for the differentiation of zein fraction in transgenic and nontransgenic maize. Zeins extracted from maize standards containing 0 and 5% m/m genetic modification were successfully separated, but slight differences were observed in terms of the zein content. Albumin and globulin fractions were analyzed with the use of unmodified fused-silica capillary with borate buffer pH 9 and the capillary coated with polyacrylamide with phosphate buffer pH 3. In the albumin fraction, additional peaks were found in genetically modified samples.

  3. Efficacy of Furosap(TM), a novel Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract, in Enhancing Testosterone Level and Improving Sperm Profile in Male Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Anuj; Verma, Narsingh; Swaroop, Anand; Bagchi, Manashi; Preuss, Harry G; Tiwari, Kiran; Bagchi, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dietary fiber rich fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds have exhibited cardioprotective, hypolipidemic and other health benefits. Furosap (FS), an innovative, patented, 20% protodioscin-enriched extract was developed in our laboratory from fenugreek seeds. This study examined the free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile and morphology, sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters of FS in 50 male volunteers following supplementation over a period of 12 weeks. Methods: Institutional Review Board (IRB) and other regulatory approvals were obtained for our study. This one-arm, open-labelled, multi-center study was conducted in 50 male volunteers (age: 35 to 65 years) over a period of 12 weeks to determine the efficacy of FS (500 mg/day/subject) on free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile, sperm morphology, libido and sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters. Results: Free testosterone levels were improved up to 46% in 90% of the study population. 85.4% of the study population showed improvements in sperm counts. Sperm morphology improved in 14.6% of volunteers. Majority of the subjects enrolled in the study demonstrated improvements in mental alertness and mood. Furthermore, cardiovascular health and libido were significantly improved. Extensive safety parameters were evaluated which included blood chemistry data. No significant changes were observed in serum lipid function, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL levels, hemogram (CBC), hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Conclusion: Overall, the results demonstrate that FS, enriched in 20% protodioscin, is safe and effective in attenuating testosterone levels, healthy sperm profile, mental alertness, cardiovascular health and overall performance in human subjects.

  4. Efficacy of FurosapTM, a novel Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract, in Enhancing Testosterone Level and Improving Sperm Profile in Male Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Anuj; Verma, Narsingh; Swaroop, Anand; Bagchi, Manashi; Preuss, Harry G.; Tiwari, Kiran; Bagchi, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dietary fiber rich fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds have exhibited cardioprotective, hypolipidemic and other health benefits. Furosap (FS), an innovative, patented, 20% protodioscin-enriched extract was developed in our laboratory from fenugreek seeds. This study examined the free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile and morphology, sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters of FS in 50 male volunteers following supplementation over a period of 12 weeks. Methods: Institutional Review Board (IRB) and other regulatory approvals were obtained for our study. This one-arm, open-labelled, multi-center study was conducted in 50 male volunteers (age: 35 to 65 years) over a period of 12 weeks to determine the efficacy of FS (500 mg/day/subject) on free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile, sperm morphology, libido and sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters. Results: Free testosterone levels were improved up to 46% in 90% of the study population. 85.4% of the study population showed improvements in sperm counts. Sperm morphology improved in 14.6% of volunteers. Majority of the subjects enrolled in the study demonstrated improvements in mental alertness and mood. Furthermore, cardiovascular health and libido were significantly improved. Extensive safety parameters were evaluated which included blood chemistry data. No significant changes were observed in serum lipid function, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL levels, hemogram (CBC), hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Conclusion: Overall, the results demonstrate that FS, enriched in 20% protodioscin, is safe and effective in attenuating testosterone levels, healthy sperm profile, mental alertness, cardiovascular health and overall performance in human subjects. PMID:28138310

  5. Assessment of capillary anion exchange ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the quantitative profiling of the phosphometabolome and organic acids in biological extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitvang, Hans F N; Kristiansen, Kåre A; Bruheim, Per

    2014-11-28

    Metabolic profiling has become an important tool in biological research, and the chromatographic separation of metabolites coupled with mass spectrometric detection is the most frequently used approach for such studies. The establishment of robust chromatographic methods for comprehensive coverage of the anionic metabolite pool is especially challenging. In this study, the development of a capillary ion exchange chromatography (capIC) - negative ESI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) workflow for the quantitative profiling of the phosphometabolome (e.g., sugar phosphates and nucleotides) is presented. The chromatographic separation and MS/MS conditions were optimized, and the precision of repetitive injections and accuracy in terms of error percentage to true concentration were assessed. The precision is excellent for a capillary flow system with an average CV% of 8.5% for a 50-fmol standard injection and in the lower 2.4-4.4% range for higher concentrations (500-7,500 fmol). The limit of detection (LOD) ranges from 1 to 100 nM (5-500 fmol injected on column), and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) ranges from 1 to 500 nM (5-2,500 fmol injected on column). A fast gradient method with the injection of 50% methanol in water between analytical samples is needed to eliminate carry-over and ensure optimal re-equilibration of the column. Finally, the quantitative applicability of the system was tested on real biological matrices using the constant-volume standard addition method (SAM). Extracts of the human kidney Hek293 cell line were spiked with increasing concentrations of standards to determine the concentration of each metabolite in the sample. Forty-four metabolites were detected with an average uncertainty of 4.1%. Thus, the capIC-MS/MS method exhibits excellent selectivity, sensitivity and precision for the quantitative profiling of the phosphometabolome.

  6. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to ...

  7. Protective effects of Annona muricata Linn. (Annonaceae) leaf aqueous extract on serum lipid profiles and oxidative stress in hepatocytes of streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, Stephen O; Ojewole, John A O

    2008-10-25

    Extracts from various morphological parts of Annona muricata Linn. (Annonaceae) are widely used medicinally in many parts of the world for the management, control and/or treatment of a plethora of human ailments, including diabetes mellitus (DM). The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effects of A. muricata leaf aqueous extract (AME) in rat experimental paradigms of DM. The animals used were broadly divided into four (A, B, C and D) experimental groups. Group A rats served as 'control' animals and received distilled water in quantities equivalent to the administered volumes of AME and reference drugs' solutions intraperitoneally. Diabetes mellitus was induced in Groups B and C rats by intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (STZ, 70 mg kg(-1)). Group C rats were additionally treated with AME (100 mg kg(-1) day(-1), p.o.) as from day 3 post STZ injection, for four consecutive weeks. Group D rats received AME (100 mg kg(-1) day(-1) p.o.) only for four weeks. Post-euthanization, hepatic tissues were excised and processed biochemically for antioxidant enzymes and lipid profiles, such as catalase (CAT), reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL), respectively. Treatment of Groups B and C rats with STZ (70 mg kg(-1) i. p.) resulted in hyperglycaemia, hypoinsulinaemia, and increased TBARS, ROS, TC, TG and LDL levels. STZ treatment also significantly decreased (pmuricata extract has a protective, beneficial effect on hepatic tissues subjected to STZ-induced oxidative stress, possibly by decreasing lipid peroxidation and indirectly enhancing production of insulin and endogenous antioxidants.

  8. The Environmental Geophysics Web Site and Geophysical Decision Support System (GDSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This product provides assistance to project managers, remedial project managers, stakeholders, and anyone interested in on-site investigations or environmental geophysics. The APM is the beta version of the new U.S. EPA Environmental Geophysics Web Site which includes the Geophys...

  9. Gene expression profiles in human HepG2 cells treated with extracts of the Tamarindus indica fruit pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Nurhanani; Aziz, Azlina A; Junit, Sarni M

    2010-12-01

    Tamarindus indicaL. (T. indica) or locally known as asam jawa belongs to the family of Leguminosae. The fruit pulp had been reported to have antioxidant activities and possess hypolipidaemic effects. In this study, we attempted to investigate the gene expression patterns in human hepatoma HepG2 cell line in response to treatment with low concentration of the fruit pulp extracts. Microarray analysis using Affymetrix Human Genome 1.0 S.T arrays was used in the study. Microarray data were validated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. Amongst the significantly up-regulated genes were those that code for the metallothioneins (MT1M, MT1F, MT1X) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTA1, GSTA2, GST02) that are involved in stress response. APOA4, APOA5, ABCG5 and MTTP genes were also significantly regulated that could be linked to hypolipidaemic activities of the T. indica fruit pulp.

  10. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples.

  11. Dietary Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall Extract Supplementation Alleviates Oxidative Stress and Modulates Serum Amino Acids Profiles in Weaned Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Martínez, Yordan

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall extract (SCCWE) on growth performance, oxidative stress, intestinal morphology, and serum amino acid concentration in weaned piglets. Utilizing a completely randomized design, 40 healthy piglets weaned at 21 d were grouped into 4 experimental treatments with 10 pigs per treatment group. Treatments consisted of a basal diet (T0), a basal diet with a 0.05% SCCWE (T1), a basal diet with a 0.10% SCCWE (T2), and a basal diet with a 0.15% SCCWE (T3). SCCWE supplementation increased the average daily gain and final body weight compared with T0 (P < 0.05). SCCWE in T2 and T3 improved the average daily feed intake and decreased the feed/gain ratio compared with T1 and T2 (P < 0.05). SCCWE decreased serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly compared to T0 (P < 0.05). SCCWE increased the concentration of Ile compared to T0 (P < 0.05). Moreover, the concentrations of Leu, Phe, and Arg were higher in T2 and T3 (P < 0.05). These findings indicate beneficial effects of SCCWE supplementation on growth performance, the concentration of some essential amino acids, and alleviation of oxidative stress in weaned piglets.

  12. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  13. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B.; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  14. New insight into quinoa seed quality under salinity: changes in proteomic and amino acid profiles, phenolic content, and antioxidant activity of protein extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris eAloisi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa seeds. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49 and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR, exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC and flavonoid (TFC contents, and antioxidant activity (AA of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace

  15. Geophysical study of the Monroe-Red Hill geothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, C.W.; Chapman, D.S.; Ward, S.H.

    1978-10-01

    A detailed geophysical study consisting of heat flow, dipole-dipole resistivity, ground magnetics and gravity was conducted in the vicinity of Monroe, Utah to assess the resource potential of an identified hydrothermal system. The detailed study covered a 40 km/sup 2/ area along the Sevier fault near the Monroe-Red Hill hot springs. Fourteen 100m dipole-dipole resistivity profiles across the system were used to construct a first separation apparent resistivity contour map. The map effectively outlines the trace of the Sevier fault and reveals an elongate zone of low resistivity (< 10 ..cap omega..-m) associated with the hydrothermal system. Similar features are evident on the total magnetic intensity anomaly map. Gravity modeling across the system indicates that the Sevier fault is comprised of three or more nearly vertical en echelon faults. On the basis of geological mapping and surface geophysical surveys a series of eleven shallow boreholes (40 to 90m was drilled on two profiles across the system. Surface geothermal gradients vary from 240/sup 0/C km/sup -1/ to over 1000/sup 0/C km/sup -1/ along the profiles. Heat flow values vary smoothly from 550 mW m/sup -2/ to over 3000 mW m/sup -2/, a significant enhancement over background Basin and Range heat flow of 80 mW m/sup -2/. Heat budget calculations based on conductive heat loss and enthalpy of the discharge waters indicae a net power loss of 7.8 MW.

  16. HVDC Ground Electrodes - a Source of Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, P. F.; Pereira, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The HVDC electrode is a component of a High Voltage Direct Current energy transmission system, and is designed to inject into the ground continuous currents up to 3500 A. The typical HVDC ground electrode is a ring of vertical conductors, 1 km wide, buried a few tens of meters.The design of a HVDC electrode is based on extensive geological, geotechnical and geophysical surveys. Geophysical data are usually electrical (VES) and electromagnetic (TEM/MT) acquisitions, for the modeling of the shallow, near-surface and deep layers of the crust. This survey aims, first, the electrode site selection, and then, at the selected site, this data is combined into a single apparent resistivity curve, which is inverted, allowing for the determination of the layered geoelectric crust model. The injection of electrical continuous current in the electrode is then simulated, with the geoelectric crust model, for the determination of the soil surface potential profile (which is usually asymmetric for different directions, due to non-1D geoelectric models).For the commissioning of a HVDC electrode, field measurements are done, such as electrode grounding resistance, soil surface potentials and metal-to-soil potentials at specific structures (buried pipelines, for instance).The geophysical data acquired during the design phase is a set of data completely independent from the electrical data acquired during the electrode commissioning phase, and both are correlated by the geoelectric model. It happens, therefore, that the geoelectric model can be calibrated based on the electrical data, with the correction of static shifts and other adjustments.This paper suggests that the commissioning of HVDC systems should be associated to a research & development program, with a university or foundation. The idea is to enjoy the opportunity of a more complete field survey, with the acquisition of a wide set of data for a better geological characterization of the area where the electrode was built.

  17. Site Characterization of Deep Bedrock with Integrated Geophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, J.; Kim, C.; Eun, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    In order to utilize the deep underground storage facility stable for a long time, precise site characterization is required before its construction. Various kinds of geophysical survey as well as drilling and geological survey should be used to know the status of deep bedrock. A research had been conducted to make the site characterization of deep bedrock for several years, and to achieve its purpose, integrated geophysical survey were applied to the test area which had gneiss bedrock. DC resistivity survey for six surficial profiles was conducted to find the appropriate location of drilling survey. Cross-hole/surface-to-hole resistivity tomography survey and borehole reflection radar survey were applied to the drill holes after its installation completed. Three bore holes of which length was 500 meter were drilled to investigate the status of deep bedrock, and cross-hole tomography survey was applied between two boreholes among these. Also borehole reflection radar survey was conducted to another two boreholes. Deep seated fracture zones which were not identified with the surficial geological and resistivity survey were found through the analysis of tomography section. Fracture zones were consisted of steep slope fault and these were also identified with the result of borehole radar section. After the basic survey was completed, one of three holes was extended to the depth of 1 km. Radar reflection survey which was only available to the deep drill-hole was applied. Because steel casing was installed to the depth of 750 m to stabilize the extended drill-hole, resistivity method was not available and borehole radar reflection method was only available among the geophysical method used in this research. Through results of radar reflection survey, several fracture zones were identified for the newly extended section of drill hole and some of those facture has relatively large size and passed through the bore hole.

  18. Geophysical and geological investigations of the Boda area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waenstedt, S. [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-04-15

    The studies conducted in the Boda area exhibit the presence of a severely fractured rock mass with occasional caves. The Boda area appears to be intersected by a few significant zones, obvious from a study of the topography but do appear in some of the geophysical investigations as well. The structures in the area have quite efficiently isolated the rock plint where the caves are located. It is not possible from these investigations, however, to draw far-reaching conclusions about the age and genesis of the zones or about their continuation towards depth. The geological investigation shows, apart from the caves, no unusual features. The rock types in the investigated area correspond with rock types found elsewhere in the region. The area is highly unsuitable for geophysical surface investigations. Part of the area consists of scattered and quite large blocks that constitute obstacles when making measurements in the area. Since there is little or no soil between the blocks some measurements (e.g. resistivity) are not possible to carry out. Furthermore, the scattered blocks cause unwanted reflections and other difficulties that deteriorate the quality of the geophysical data. The radar measurements with two different frequencies show an interesting result of importance not only to this investigation. The lower frequency appears to penetrate through the rocky overburden and is able to detect the soil-rock interface. The higher frequency is severely disturbed by the overburden but caves show much more clearly in this data. The fractured rock around Boda appears to be a shallow feature, since the radar measurements show a quite significant feature throughout most of the profiles, which appears to be the upper boundary of the bedrock. There are, however, some occasional strong reflectors below the interface between fractured and competent rock.

  19. Chemopreventive effect of Korean Angelica root extract on TRAMP carcinogenesis and integrative "omic" profiling of affected neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Li; Tang, Suni; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-12-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanol extract exerts anti-cancer activity in several allograft and xenograft models. Here we examined its chemopreventive efficacy through gavage administration against primary carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice and wild type littermates were given a daily gavage (5 mg/mouse, Monday-Friday) of AGN or vehicle, beginning at 8 wk of age (WOA). All mice were terminated at 24 WOA, unless earlier euthanasia was necessitated by large tumors. Whereas AGN-treated TRAMP mice decreased dorsolateral prostate lesion growth by 30% (P = 0.009), they developed fewer and smaller neuroendocrine-carcinomas (NE-Ca) (0.12 g/mouse) than vehicle-treated counterparts (0.81 g/mouse, P = 0.037). We analyzed the proteome and transcriptome of banked NE-Ca to gain molecular insights. Angiogenesis-antibody array detected a substantial reduction in AGN-treated NE-Ca of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an angiogenesis stimulator. iTRAQ proteomics plus data mining suggested changes of genes upstream and downstream of FGF2 functionally consistent with AGN inhibiting FGF2/FGFR1 signaling at different levels of the transduction cascade. Moreover, AGN upregulated mRNA of genes related to immune responses, restored expression of many tumor suppressor genes, and prostate function and muscle differentiation genes. On the other hand, AGN down-regulated mRNA of genes related to neuron signaling, oncofetal antigens, inflammation, and mast cells, Wnt signaling, embryonic morphogenesis, biosynthesis, cell adhesion, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. These changes suggest not only multiple cancer cell targeting actions of AGN but also impact on the tumor microenvironments such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune surveillance.

  20. Geophysics: creativity and the archaeological imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Ferraby

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper article explores archaeology as a creative practice by engaging specifically with the processes and visuals of geophysics. An area of archaeology considered highly scientific, a different way of looking reveals geophysics to be a poetic form of landscape study. The processes used to collect, alter, interpret and visualize visualise the data are creative acts that have parallels with more easily recognizable recognisable arts practices such as painting, drawing or photography. The paper article explores the ideas behind ways of seeing, the archaeological imagination, technologies and process. The section that follows explores the different elements of work and the ways of seeing and thinking they inspire. The paper article ends by showcasing how other arts practices can give alternative perspectives on geophysics and how these can in turn influence fine art.

  1. Introduction to Rheology and Application to Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancey, C.

    This chapter gives an overview of the major current issues in rheology through a series of different problems of particular relevance to geophysics. For each topic considered here, we will outline the key elements and point the reader to ward the most helpful references and authoritative works. The reader is also referred to available books introducing rheology [1, 2] for a more complete presentation and to the tutorial written by Middleton and Wilcock on mechanical and rheological app lications in geophysics [3]. This chapter will focus on materials encountered by geophysicists (mud, snow, magma, etc.), although in most cases we will consider only suspensions of particles within an interstitial fluid without loss of generality. Other complex fluids such as polymeric liquids are rarely encountered in geophysics.

  2. Integrated Approaches On Archaeo-Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukdemirci, M.; Piro, S.; Zamuner, D.; Ozer, E.

    2015-12-01

    Key words: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Magnetometry, Geophysical Data Integration, Principal Component Analyse (PCA), Aizanoi Archaeological Site An application of geophysical integration methods which often appealed are divided into two classes as qualitative and quantitative approaches. This work focused on the application of quantitative integration approaches, which involve the mathematical and statistical integration techniques, on the archaeo-geophysical data obtained in Aizanoi Archaeological Site,Turkey. Two geophysical methods were applied as Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Magnetometry for archaeological prospection on the selected archaeological site. After basic data processing of each geophysical method, the mathematical approaches of Sums and Products and the statistical approach of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) have been applied for the integration. These integration approches were first tested on synthetic digital images before application to field data. Then the same approaches were applied to 2D magnetic maps and 2D GPR time slices which were obtained on the same unit grids in the archaeological site. Initially, the geophysical data were examined individually by referencing with archeological maps and informations obtained from archaeologists and some important structures as possible walls, roads and relics were determined. The results of all integration approaches provided very important and different details about the anomalies related to archaeological features. By using all those applications, integrated images can provide complementary informations as well about the archaeological relics under the ground. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thanks to Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Fellowship for Visiting Scientists Programme for their support, Istanbul University Scientific Research Project Fund, (Project.No:12302) and archaeologist team of Aizanoi Archaeological site for their support

  3. Geophysical survey of the Burnum archaeological site (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Federica; Campedelli, Alessandro; Giorgi, Enrico; Lepore, Giuseppe; de Maria, Sandro

    2010-05-01

    A multidisciplinary geophysical investigation has been carried out at the site of Burnum (Krka Valley, Croatia) by the University of Bologna, in the context of an international agreement between the University of Zadar, the Civic Museum of Drniš, and the Centre for the Study of the Adriatic Sea Archaeology (Ravenna). The Burnum Project aims at improving our knowledge and preserve the important roman castrum, transformed in a municipium at the beginning of the 2nd century AD. Since 2005, different geophysical techniques have been applied to the site, such as magnetometry, electrical resistivity studies and ground penetrating radar, making the investigated area an interesting case history of a multidisciplinary approach applied to archaeology. After different field works, the geophysical mapping of the southern part of the castrum is almost complete, whereas the northern one will be completed during next planned campaigns. Magnetic data have been collected with the gradient technique, using an Overhauser system and an optically-pumped Potassium magnetometer-gradiometer, configured with a vertical sensor distance of 1.50 m. The resistivity method has been applied using the ARP© (Automatic Resistivity Profiling) and the OhM Mapper systems. GPR surveys have been carried out testing different systems and antennas. During 2009, a special emphasis was given to the acquisition, processing and interpretation of the optically-pumped Potassium magnetometer-gradiometer data. As a result, a clear image of the settlement configuration was obtained, improving our knowledge of the forum-basilica complex and possibly discovering a second auxiliary castrum. Direct exploration by archaeological excavations of selected areas has correctly confirmed the geophysical results and the archaeological interpretation proposed. The features of the building materials, brought to the light and analysed after the excavations, were coherent with the instrumental responses of all the applied

  4. Cytotoxic Effect and Constituent Profile of Alkaloid Fractions from Ethanolic Extract of Ficus septica Burm. f. Leaves on T47D Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Akbar, Fiki Fatihah; Wiyani, Anggie; Sudarsono

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the profile of alkaloids in two ethyl acetate soluble fractions, namely fractions A and B from an ethanolic extract of Ficus septica leaves and cytotoxic effect on T47D breast cancer cells. Preparation of both fractions involved maceration of leaves with 70% (v/v) ethanol, filtration with Al2O3, precipitation with 0.1 N HCl, Mayer reagent, and 0.1 N NaOH, and also partition with ethyl acetate. Qualitative thin layer chromatography (TLC) was conducted to determine the profile of alkaloids in the two fractions, using alkaloid specific reagents such as Dragendorff, sodium nitrite, and Van Urk-Salkowski. Cytotoxic effects of both fractions on T47D cells were evaluated using MTT assay with a concentration series of 1.56; 3.12; 6.25; 12.5; 25 and 50 μg/mL. The TLC test showed that fractions A and B contained alkaloids with Rx values of 0.74 and 0.80 for fraction A and 0.74, 0.84, 0.92 for fraction B with regard to yohimbine using the mobile phase of n-buthanol:glacial acetic acid:distilled water (3:1:1 v/v/v). Moreover, an indole alkaloid was detected with Rx values of 0.80 and 0.84, respectively. Fractions A and B exhibited high cytotoxic effects on T47D cells with IC50 values of 2.57 and 2.73 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, overall the results of this study showed that fractions of Ficus septica contain alkaloids including indole alkaloid or its derivatives and possess a cytotoxic effect on T47D cells. This research supports the idea that alkaloids in F. septica have anticancer activity.

  5. Quantitative gas chromatography-olfactometry carried out at different dilutions of an extract. Key differences in the odor profiles of four high-quality Spanish aged red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V; Aznar, M; López, R; Cacho, J

    2001-10-01

    Four Spanish aged red wines made in different wine-making areas have been extracted, and the extracts and their 1:5, 1:50, and 1:500 dilutions have been analyzed by a gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) approach in which three judges evaluated odor intensity on a four-point scale. Sixty-nine different odor regions were detected in the GC-O profiles of wines, 63 of which could be identified. GC-O data have been processed to calculate averaged flavor dilution factors (FD). Different ANOVA strategies have been further applied on FD and on intensity data to check for significant differences among wines and to assess the effects of dilution and the judge. Data show that FD and the average intensity of the odorants are strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.892). However, the measurement of intensity represents a quantitative advantage in terms of detecting differences. For some odorants, dilution exerts a critical role in the detection of differences. Significant differences among wines have been found in 30 of the 69 odorants detected in the experiment. Most of these differences are introduced by grape compounds such as methyl benzoate and terpenols, by compounds released by the wood, such as furfural, (Z)-whiskey lactone, Furaneol, 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, 4-ethylphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, isoeugenol, and ethyl vanillate, by compounds formed by lactic acid bacteria, such as 2,3-butanedione and acetoine, or by compounds formed during the oxidative storage of wines, such as methional, sotolon, o-aminoacetophenone, and phenylacetic acid. The most important differences from a quantitative point of view are due to 2-methyl-3-mercaptofuran, 4-propylguaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, and isoeugenol.

  6. Annals of the International Geophysical Year solar radio emission during the International Geophysical Year

    CERN Document Server

    Smerd, S F

    1969-01-01

    Annals of the International Geophysical Year, Volume 34: Solar Radio Emission During the International Geophysical Year covers the significant solar radio emission events observed during the International Geophysical Year (IGY). This book is composed of six chapters, and begins with a summary of tabulated quantities describing solar radio emission during the IGY. The tabulated figures illustrate the method of recording the position of radio sources on the sun, the use of symbols in describing the structure of bursts observed at single frequencies, and the different types used in a spectral

  7. The Dynamics of Flat Surface Internal Geophysical Waves with Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compelli, Alan; Ivanov, Rossen I.

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional water wave system is examined consisting of two discrete incompressible fluid domains separated by a free common interface. In a geophysical context this is a model of an internal wave, formed at a pycnocline or thermocline in the ocean. The system is considered as being bounded at the bottom and top by a flatbed and wave-free surface respectively. A current profile with depth-dependent currents in each domain is considered. The Hamiltonian of the system is determined and expressed in terms of canonical wave-related variables. Limiting behaviour is examined and compared to that of other known models. The linearised equations as well as long-wave approximations are presented.

  8. Mathematical model of MMR inversion for geophysical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suabsagun Yooyuanyong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an analysis of the solution to a number of geophysical inverse problems which are generally non-unique. The mathematical inverse problem that arises is commonly ill-posed in the sense that small changes in the data lead to large changes in the solution. We conduct the inversion algorithm to explore the conductivity for the ground structure. The algorithm uses the data in the form of magnetic field measurements for magnetometric resistivity (MMR. The inversion example is performed to investigate the conductivity ground profile that best fits the observed data. The result is compared with the true model and discussed to show the efficiency of the method. The model for the inversion example with the apparent conductivity and the true conductivity are plotted to show the convergence of the algorithm.

  9. Geophysical constraints on geodynamical processes at convergent margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Shulgin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Convergent margins, being the boundaries between colliding lithospheric plates, form the most disastrous areas in the world due to intensive, strong seismicity and volcanism. We review global geophysical data in order to illustrate the effects of the plate tectonic processes at convergent margins...... on the crustal and upper mantle structure, seismicity, and geometry of subducting slab. We present global maps of free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies, heat flow, seismicity, seismic Vs anomalies in the upper mantle, and plate convergence rate, as well as 20 profiles across different convergent margins....... A global analysis of these data for three types of convergent margins, formed by ocean-ocean, ocean-continent, and continent-continent collisions, allows us to recognize the following patterns. (1) Plate convergence rate depends on the type of convergent margins and it is significantly larger when...

  10. Coastal geophysical data collected in 2016 nearshore Cape Canaveral, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Noreen A.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Okano, Shinobu; Gayes, Paul T.; Hill, Jenna C.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical data including multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, side scan sonar, and chirp subbottom were collected by Coastal Carolina University (CCU) Center for Marine and Wetland Studies (CMWS), Conway, South Carolina, in June 2016 in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) in the nearshore environment of Cape Canaveral, Florida. The goal of the effort was to broadly characterize the geology of the shelf to identify spatial linkages with previously measured coastal change and bathymetric variability (https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20151180). This USGS Data Release includes the: 1) processed elevation point data (xyz) and digital elevation model (DEM), 2) processed images of backscatter and side scan sonar (SSS), and 3) chirp subbottom profile data (segy and jpg). For further information regarding data collection and/or processing please see the metadata associated with this data release.

  11. The Dynamics of Flat Surface Internal Geophysical Waves with Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Compelli, Alan

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional water wave system is examined consisting of two discrete incompressible fluid domains separated by a free common interface. In a geophysical context this is a model of an internal wave, formed at a pycnocline or thermocline in the ocean. The system is considered as being bounded at the bottom and top by a flatbed and wave-free surface respectively. A current profile with depth-dependent currents in each domain is considered. The Hamiltonian of the system is determined and expressed in terms of canonical wave-related variables. Limiting behaviour is examined and compared to that of other known models. The linearised equations as well as long-wave approximations are presented.

  12. Surface Geophysical Measurements for Locating and Mapping Ice-Wedges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Tomaskovicova, Sonia; Larsen, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    With the presently observed trend of permafrost warming and degradation, the development and availability of effective tools to locate and map ice-rich soils and massive ground ice is of increasing importance. This paper presents a geophysical study of an area with polygonal landforms in order...... to test the applicability of DC electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to identifying and mapping ice-wedge occurrences. The site is located in Central West Greenland, and the ice-wedges are found in a permafrozen peat soil with an active layer of about 30 cm. ERT...... and GPR measurements give a coherent interpretation of possible ice-wedge locations, and active layer probing show a tendency for larger thaw depth in the major trench systems consistent with a significant temperature (at 10 cm depth) increase in these trenches identified by thermal profiling. Three...

  13. Effects of dietary onion ( extract supplementation on performance, apparent total tract retention of nutrients, blood profile and meat quality of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siska Aditya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary onion (Allium cepa extract (OE supplementation on growth performance, apparent total tract retention (ATTR, blood profile, carcass characteristics and meat quality in broilers. Methods Four hundred male broiler chicks (Ross 308, 3-d old were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments for 28 d feeding trial. Each treatment has five replications with 20 birds each. Four dietary treatments were designated according to the OE supplementation levels (0 as control, 5, 7.5, and 10 g of OE per kg of basal diet respectively. On d 28, a total of 20 birds from each treatment were subjected for ATTR, serum biochemical assay, carcass characteristic and organ weight measurement. Results Overall weight gain of OE 7.5 g/kg group was higher (p = 0.04 than control group. The ATTRs of dietary energy (p<0.01 and ether extract (p = 0.04 linearly increased with increasing levels of dietary OE. However, no difference in ATTR of dry matter and crude protein was evident. Furthermore, serum IgG concentration increased linearly (p<0.01 and quadratically (p = 0.03 with increasing OE supplementation. No differences in carcass dressing weight and amount of abdominal fat by treatments were observed. Also, the weight of organ including immune organ was not different among the treatments. The TBARS values of 10 d stored breast meat decreased linearly (p<0.01 and quadratically (p<0.01 with increasing dietary OE levels. The meat color was also affected, with lower (p<0.01 redness score in meats from OE supplemented groups. This study showed that dietary OE improved broiler weight gain presumably by increasing feed intake and ATTR of both energy and ether extract. The dietary OE increased serum IgG level and meat anti-oxidation capacity. Conclusion This study implies that the recommended level of dietary OE supplementation could be beneficial for improving broiler performance and meat quality.

  14. Effects of dietary onion (Allium cepa) extract supplementation on performance, apparent total tract retention of nutrients, blood profile and meat quality of broiler chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Siska; Ahammed, Musabbir; Jang, Seong Hun; Ohh, Sang Jip

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary onion (Allium cepa) extract (OE) supplementation on growth performance, apparent total tract retention (ATTR), blood profile, carcass characteristics and meat quality in broilers. Methods Four hundred male broiler chicks (Ross 308, 3-d old) were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments for 28 d feeding trial. Each treatment has five replications with 20 birds each. Four dietary treatments were designated according to the OE supplementation levels (0 as control, 5, 7.5, and 10 g of OE per kg of basal diet respectively). On d 28, a total of 20 birds from each treatment were subjected for ATTR, serum biochemical assay, carcass characteristic and organ weight measurement. Results Overall weight gain of OE 7.5 g/kg group was higher (p = 0.04) than control group. The ATTRs of dietary energy (p<0.01) and ether extract (p = 0.04) linearly increased with increasing levels of dietary OE. However, no difference in ATTR of dry matter and crude protein was evident. Furthermore, serum IgG concentration increased linearly (p<0.01) and quadratically (p = 0.03) with increasing OE supplementation. No differences in carcass dressing weight and amount of abdominal fat by treatments were observed. Also, the weight of organ including immune organ was not different among the treatments. The TBARS values of 10 d stored breast meat decreased linearly (p<0.01) and quadratically (p<0.01) with increasing dietary OE levels. The meat color was also affected, with lower (p<0.01) redness score in meats from OE supplemented groups. This study showed that dietary OE improved broiler weight gain presumably by increasing feed intake and ATTR of both energy and ether extract. The dietary OE increased serum IgG level and meat anti-oxidation capacity. Conclusion This study implies that the recommended level of dietary OE supplementation could be beneficial for improving broiler performance and meat quality. PMID:27809460

  15. Digital geologic and geophysical data of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persits, Feliks M.; Wandrey, C.J.; Milici, R.C.; Manwar, Abdullah

    1997-01-01

    The data set for these maps includes arcs, polygons, and labels that outline and describe the general geologic age and geophysical fields of Bangladesh. Political boundaries are provided to show the general location of administrative regions and state boundaries. Major base topographic data like cities, rivers, etc. were derived from the same paper map source as the geology.

  16. Geophysical tomography in engineering geology: an overview

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, D

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the tomographic interpretation method in engineering geophysics is presented, considering the two approaches of the deterministic tomography inversion, developed for rock elasticity analysis, and the probability tomography imaging developed in the domain of potential fields methods. The theoretical basis of both approaches is shortly outlined before showing a laboratory and a field application.

  17. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called 'data fusion' was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site.

  18. Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawickreme, Dushmantha H; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B

    2014-03-01

    Ecologists, ecohydrologists, and biogeochemists need detailed insights into belowground properties and processes, including changes in water, salts, and other elements that can influence ecosystem productivity and functioning. Relying on traditional sampling and observation techniques for such insights can be costly, time consuming, and infeasible, especially if the spatial scales involved are large. Geophysical imaging provides an alternative or complement to traditional methods to gather subsurface variables across time and space. In this paper, we review aspects of geophysical imaging, particularly electrical and electromagnetic imaging, that may benefit ecologists seeking clearer understanding of the shallow subsurface. Using electrical resistivity imaging, for example, we have been able to successfully show the effect of land-use conversions to agriculture on salt mobilization and leaching across kilometer-long transects and to depths of tens of meters. Recent advances in ground-penetrating radar and other geophysical imaging methods currently provide opportunities for subsurface imaging with sufficient detail to locate small (≥5 cm diameter) animal burrows and plant roots, observe soil-water and vegetation spatial correlations in small watersheds, estuaries, and marshes, and quantify changes in groundwater storage at local to regional scales using geophysical data from ground- and space-based platforms. Ecologists should benefit from adopting these minimally invasive, scalable imaging technologies to explore the subsurface and advance our collective research.

  19. Predictability of extreme values in geophysical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, A.E.; Holland, M.P.; Rabassa, P.; Broer, H.W.; Vitolo, R.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme value theory in deterministic systems is concerned with unlikely large (or small) values of an observable evaluated along evolutions of the system. In this paper we study the finite-time predictability of extreme values, such as convection, energy, and wind speeds, in three geophysical model

  20. Joint Inversion of Geochemical Data and Geophysical Logs for Lithology Identification in CCSD Main Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chengxiang; Pan, Heping; Luo, Miao

    2017-08-01

    The Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) main hole is located in the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt, providing significant opportunities for studying the metamorphic strata structure, kinetics process and tectonic evolution. Lithology identification is the primary and crucial stage for above geoscientific researches. To release the burden of log analyst and improve the efficiency of lithology interpretation, many algorithms have been developed to automate the process of lithology prediction. While traditional statistical techniques, such as discriminant analysis and K-nearest neighbors classifier, are incompetent in extracting nonlinear features of metamorphic rocks from complex geophysical log data; artificial intelligence algorithms are capable of solving nonlinear problems, but most of the algorithms suffer from tuning parameters to be global optimum to establish model rather than local optimum, and also encounter challenges in making the balance between training accuracy and generalization ability. Optimization methods have been applied extensively in the inversion of reservoir parameters of sedimentary formations using well logs. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate solution from the logging response equations of optimization method because of the strong overlapping of nonstationary log signals when applied in metamorphic formations. As oxide contents of each kinds of metamorphic rocks are relatively less overlapping, this study explores an approach, set in a metamorphic formation model and using the Broyden Fletcher Goldfarb Shanno (BFGS) optimization algorithm to identify lithology from oxide data. We first incorporate 11 geophysical logs and lab-collected geochemical data of 47 core samples to construct oxide profile of CCSD main hole by using backwards stepwise multiple regression method, which eliminates irrelevant input logs step by step for higher statistical significance and accuracy. Then we establish oxide response

  1. Geophysical and geochemical signatures of Gulf of Mexico seafloor brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Joye

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical, temperature, and discrete depth-stratified geochemical data illustrate differences between an actively venting mud volcano and a relatively quiescent brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico along the continental slope. Geophysical data, including laser-line scan mosaics and sub-bottom profiles, document the dynamic nature of both environments. Temperature profiles, obtained by lowering a CTD into the brine fluid, show that the venting brine was at least 10°C warmer than the bottom water. At the brine pool, two thermoclines were observed, one directly below the brine-seawater interface and a second about one meter below the first. At the mud volcano, substantial temperature variability was observed, with the core brine temperature being either slightly (~2°C in 1997 or substantially (19°C in 1998 elevated above bottom water temperature. Geochemical samples were obtained using a device called the "brine trapper" and concentrations of dissolved gases, major ions and nutrients were determined using standard techniques. Both brines contained about four times as much salt as seawater and steep concentration gradients of dissolved ions and nutrients versus brine depth were apparent. Differences in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium and potassium between the two brine fluids suggests that the fluids are derived from different sources or that brine-sediment reactions are more important at the mud volcano than the brine pool. Substantial concentrations of methane and ammonium were observed in both brines, suggesting that fluids expelled from deep ocean brines are important sources of methane and dissolved inorganic nitrogen to the surrounding environment.

  2. Geophysical and geochemical signatures of Gulf of Mexico seafloor brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Joye

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical, temperature, and discrete depth-stratified geochemical data illustrate differences between an actively venting mud volcano and a relatively quiescent brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico along the continental slope. Geophysical data, including laser-line scan mosaics and sub-bottom profiles, document the dynamic nature of both environments. Temperature profiles, obtained by lowering a CTD into the brine fluid, show that the venting brine was at least 10°C warmer than the bottom water. At the brine pool, thermal stratification was observed and only small differences in stratification were documented between three sampling times (1991, 1997 and 1998. In contrast, at the mud volcano, substantial temperature variability was observed, with the core brine temperature being slightly higher than bottom water (by 2°C in 1997 but substantially higher than bottom water (by 19°C in 1998. Detailed geochemical samples were obtained in 2002 using a device called the 'brine trapper' and concentrations of dissolved gases, major ions and nutrients were determined. Both brines contained about four times as much salt as seawater and steep concentration gradients of dissolved ions and nutrients versus brine depth were apparent. Differences in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium and potassium between the two brine fluids suggest that the fluids are derived from different sources, have different dilution/mixing histories, or that brine-sediment reactions are more important at the mud volcano. Substantial concentrations of methane, ammonium, and silicate were observed in both brines, suggesting that fluids expelled from deep ocean brines are important sources of these constituents to the surrounding environment.

  3. New airborne geophysical data from the Waterberg Coalfield

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, CJS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available in 1920, but little exploration has been done since. Coaltech Research Association commissioned an Airborne Geophysical Survey of the area to enhance the structural understanding of the basin. The airborne geophysical survey was a major contribution...

  4. Geophysics applications in critical zone science: emerging topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical studies have resulted in remarkable advances in characterization of critical zone. The geophysics applications uncover the relationships between structure and function in subsurface as they seek to define subsurface structural units with individual properties of retention and trans...

  5. INFLUENCE OF MORINGA OLEIFERA (DRUM-STICK FRUIT EXTRACT ON HAEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE FOLLOWING REPEATED EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVELS OF ARSENIC THROUGH FEED ON RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav R. Pachade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Moringa oleifera fruits hot methanolic extract (MFE, if any, in minimizing the adverse reactions of repeated exposure to arsenic trioxide (AT in feed was investigated in Wistar rats with reference to haematological profile. Three groups of rats each containing 10 (5male+5female were used. The group I served as negative control. Rats of group II were fed arsenic trioxide (AT alone @ 100 ppm in feed while those of group III simultaneously received AT (@100 ppm and MFE (50 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Blood samples were collected from retroorbital plexus for estimation of hematological parameters (haemoglobin, PCV, TEC, MCH, MCHC, MCV of different groups on 0 day, 15th day and 29th day respectively. Exposure to AT through feed in group II resulted in significant (P<0.05 decrease in haemoglobin, TEC and MCHC, accompanied by increased MCV, with no significant alteration of PCV or MCH of the rats. While rats of group III treated with AT (@100 ppm and MFE (50 mg/kg/day also resulted in same consequences as it was in group II but it was slightly less than that of group II suggesting of mild non significant protective effect.

  6. OH-PRED: prediction of protein hydroxylation sites by incorporating adapted normal distribution bi-profile Bayes feature extraction and physicochemical properties of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Cang-Zhi; He, Wen-Ying; Yao, Yu-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxylation of proline or lysine residues in proteins is a common post-translational modification event, and such modifications are found in many physiological and pathological processes. Nonetheless, the exact molecular mechanism of hydroxylation remains under investigation. Because experimental identification of hydroxylation is time-consuming and expensive, bioinformatics tools with high accuracy represent desirable alternatives for large-scale rapid identification of protein hydroxylation sites. In view of this, we developed a supporter vector machine-based tool, OH-PRED, for the prediction of protein hydroxylation sites using the adapted normal distribution bi-profile Bayes feature extraction in combination with the physicochemical property indexes of the amino acids. In a jackknife cross validation, OH-PRED yields an accuracy of 91.88% and a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.838 for the prediction of hydroxyproline sites, and yields an accuracy of 97.42% and a MCC of 0.949 for the prediction of hydroxylysine sites. These results demonstrate that OH-PRED increased significantly the prediction accuracy of hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine sites by 7.37 and 14.09%, respectively, when compared with the latest predictor PredHydroxy. In independent tests, OH-PRED also outperforms previously published methods.

  7. Differentiation of the volatile profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes by dynamic headspace extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, F; Careri, M; Mangia, A; Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M; Concina, I; Falasconi, M; Gobbi, E; Pardo, M; Sberveglieri, G

    2009-01-15

    The aromatic profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes was analyzed by the dynamic headspace extraction technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Canned tomatoes contaminated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus carbonarius were analyzed after 2 and 7 days. About 100 volatiles were detected, among which alcohols, aldehydes and ketones were the most abundant compounds. Gas chromatographic peak areas were used for statistical purposes. First, principal component analysis was carried out in order to visualize data trends and clusters. Then, linear discriminant analysis was performed in order to detect the set of volatile compounds ables to differentiate groups of analyzed samples. Five volatile compounds, i.e. ethanol, beta-myrcene, o-methyl styrene, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol and 1-octanol, were found to be able to better discriminate between uncontaminated and contaminated samples. Prediction ability of the calculated model was estimated to be 100% by the "leave-one-out" cross-validation. An electronic nose device was then used to analyze the same contaminated and not contaminated canned tomato samples. Preliminary results were compared with those obtained by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showing a good agreement.

  8. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  9. Geophysical characterisation of a rockslide in an alpine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godio, A.; de Bacco, G.; Strobbia, C.

    2003-04-01

    4000 m/s has been obtained, in agreement with the elastical properties of compact gneissic rock. The analysis of the Stoneley wave gave the S-wave velocity profile; the scattering and secondary sources of Stoneley waves identified the fractured zones of the borehole. The obtained relatively low S-wave velocity, around 2000 m/s, is probably strongly affected by the drilling and stress relief induced fracturing and by the radial transverse isotropic behaviour of the rock in the annular zone around the borehole. This suggestion has been confirmed by the results of the P and S ultrasonic log performed in the borehole; the low velocity of the S-wave is related to the reduced penetration of the elastic perturbation at the used high frequency of 30 kHz. The combined geophysical approach with direct calibration provided a good reliability and resolution of the in situ characterisation. The comparison of in situ and laboratory results allowed for the latter the extension and validation of their significance. The knowledge of the area permits a reliable slope stability analysis, and is an essential datum for the design of the tunnel and the stabilisations. References Johnston, J. J. and Ambos, E. L., 1994, Three-dimensional landslide structure from seismic refraction data analysis: A case study from Blind Canyon, northern Santa Ana Mountains, California, 64th Ann. Internat. Mtg: Soc. of Expl. Geophys., 799-801. Rix, G. J., Stokoe, K. H., II, Baldi, G. and Bruzzi, D., 1988, In-situ seismic testing of landslide debris in Valtellina, Italy using surface waves, 58th Ann. Internat. Mtg: Soc. of Expl. Geophys., Session:ENG1.2. Sinha, B. K., Papanastasiou, P. and Plona, T. J., 1997, Influence of triaxial stresses on borehole Stoneley and flexural dispersions, 67th Ann. Internat. Mtg: Soc. of Expl. Geophys., 258-261. Suzuki, K. and Higashi, S., 2001, Groundwater flow after heavy rain in landslide-slope area from 2-D inversion of resistivity monitoring data: Geophysics, Soc. of Expl

  10. High-resolution geophysical data from the inner continental shelf—Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Seth D.; Andrews, Brian D.; Foster, David S.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Schwab, William C.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) have cooperated to map approximately 410 square kilometers (km²) of the inner continental shelf in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. This report contains geophysical data collected by the USGS on three cruises conducted in 2009, 2010, and 2011, and additional bathymetry data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 2004. The geophysical data include (1) swath bathymetry using interferometric sonar and multibeam echosounder systems, (2) acoustic backscatter from sidescan sonar, and (3) seismic-reflection profiles from a chirp subbottom profiler. These spatial data support research on the Quaternary evolution of Buzzards Bay, the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution, and efforts to understand the type, distribution, and quality of subtidal marine habitats in the coastal ocean of Massachusetts.

  11. Geophysical and Chemical Weathering Signatures Across the Deep Weathered-Unweathered Granite Boundary of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D., Jr.; Bacon, A. R.; Brantley, S. L.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and chemical weathering at Earth's surface, we combine comprehensive chemical and physical analyses of a 70-m granite weathering profile in the Southern Piedmont in the southeastern United States. The research site is in the uplands of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory and is similar to many geomorphically stable, ancient, and highly-weathered Ultisol soils of the region. Surface and downhole geophysical analyses suggest significant physical changes to depths of about 40 m, where geophysical properties are consistent with competent and unweathered granite. At this depth, surface refraction velocities increase to >4.5 km/s; variations in downhole sonic velocities decrease by more than two-fold; and deviations in the downhole caliper log sharply decrease as well. Forty meters depth is also the depth of initiation of plagioclase feldspar weathering, as inferred from bulk geochemical measurement of the full 70-m deep core. Specifically, element-depth profiles, cast as mass transfer coefficient profiles using Ti and Zr as immobile elements, document inferred loss of plagioclase in the depth interval between 15 and 40-m depth. Plagioclase feldspar is the most abundant of the highly reactive minerals in the granite. Such a wide reaction front is characteristic of weathering granites. Some loss of K is observed at these depths but most K loss, as well as Mg loss, occurs at shallower depths. Nearby geophysical profiles and 3D stress models have been interpreted as showing that seismic velocities decrease at 40 m depth due to opening of fractures as rock is exhumed toward the surface. Given our interpretations of both the geochemical and geophysical data, we infer that the onset of chemical weathering of feldspar coincides with the opening of these fractures. The data highlight the ability of geochemistry and geophysics to complement each other and enrich our understanding of Earth's Critical Zone.

  12. Informing groundwater models with near-surface geophysical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan

    of the geophysical data. The CHI-S yielded a geophysical model that could never be obtained with a separate geophysical inversion. Furthermore, we applied a CHI-S to evaluate the potential for time-lapse relative gravimetry (TL-RG) and magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) to improve the estimation of aquifer...

  13. Reduction in hypercholesterolemia and risk of cardiovascular diseases by mixtures of plant food extract: a study on plasma lipid profile, oxidative stress and testosterone in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed, Doha A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was postulated to prepare and evaluate the influence of two plant food extract mixtures on plasma lipid profile, oxidative stress and testosterone levels in rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. The safety of the studied extract mixtures was evaluated through the determination of liver and kidney functions. The total phenolic contents, tocopherols, fatty acids and unsaponifiable matter (UNSAP in the extract mixtures were determined. Rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet were given a daily oral dose (300 mg/kg rat body weight of either mixture I or II for a month and compared with a control hypercholesterolemic group and a normal control group. Results showed that α-tocopherol was 0.750 and 4.017 mg, γ-tocopherol was 0.564 mg and 0 and δ-tocopherol was 15.23mg and 0.634mg/100g for mixtures I and II, respectively. The phenolic contents in mixtures I and II were 36.74 and 23.72 g gallic acid equivalent/100g mixture, respectively. The GLC investigation of UNSAP revealed that stigmasterol and b-sitosterol were the major phytosterols in mixtures I and II, respectively followed by campesterol in both. The GLC analysis of the fatty acids showed that oleic acid was the major fatty acid in both extract mixtures. Results from the animal experiment showed that feeding a hypercholesterolemic diet produced a significant increase in total lipids, total cholesterol (T-Ch, triglycerides (TGs, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLCh, T-Ch/HDL-Ch, TGs/HDL-Ch and malondialdehyde (MDA and a significant reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-Ch, vitamin E, b-carotene and testosterone. Rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet and given mixture I or II showed significant improvements in plasma lipid profile compared to the hypercholesterolemic control group. This improvement was associated with a significant reduction in oxidative stress reflected by an elevation in plasma levels of antioxidants (vitamin E and b-carotene and a

  14. Ninety Years of International Cooperation in Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Beer, T.

    2009-05-01

    Because applicable physical, chemical, and mathematical studies of the Earth system must be both interdisciplinary and international, the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) was formed in 1919 as an non-governmental, non-profit organization dedicated to advancing, promoting, and communicating knowledge of the Earth system, its space environment, and the dynamical processes causing change. The Union brings together eight International Associations that address different disciplines of Earth sciences. Through these Associations, IUGG promotes and enables studies in the geosciences by providing a framework for collaborative research and information exchange, by organizing international scientific assemblies worldwide, and via research publications. Resolutions passed by assemblies of IUGG and its International Associations set geophysical standards and promote issues of science policy on which national members agree. IUGG has initiated and/or vigorously supported collaborative international efforts that have led to highly productive worldwide interdisciplinary research programs, such as the International Geophysical Year and subsequent International Years (IPY, IYPE, eGY, and IHY), International Lithosphere Programme, World Climate Research Programme, Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, and Integrated Research on Risk Disaster. IUGG is inherently involved in the projects and programs related to climate change, global warming, and related environmental impacts. One major contribution has been the creation, through the International Council for Science (ICSU), of the World Data Centers and the Federation of Astronomical and Geophysical Data Analysis Services. These are being transformed to the ICSU World Data System, from which the data gathered during the major programs and data products will be available to researchers everywhere. IUGG cooperates with UNESCO, WMO, and some other U.N. and non-governmental organizations in the study of natural catastrophes

  15. Historical overview of geophysical exploration for hydrocarbon prospecting in Japan; Nippon no sekiyu kogyo ni okeru butsuri tanko gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Y. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes a historical overview of geophysical exploration for hydrocarbon prospecting in Japan. In general, history is divided into eras by the qualitative change. In the case of geophysical exploration, the history is desired to be divided by considering the both of qualitative change in the technology and that in the practical application. In the early time of geophysical prospecting, gravitational exploration, magnetic exploration, seismic refraction method and seismic reflection method were elementarily and successfully tried. In the era of classical geophysical exploration, seismic reflection method and gravitational/magnetic methods were basically completed, and accumulation structures of potential petroleum were discovered around existing oil fields. In the era of systematic geophysical exploration, techniques of underground geological reflection profiles were completed with digitalization, and systematic petroleum exploration was conducted. In the era of modern geophysical exploration, 3D seismic was put into practice, and the inversion accuracy was improved, in which the geophysical exploration could be contributed jointly with the geological techniques. New development era of geophysics is expected. 31 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Aerial geophysics contribution to geology of Crixas Greenstone Belt , Brazil; Contribuicao aerogeofisica a geologia do 'greenstone belt' da Faixa Crixas, Goias, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Marcelo de Lawrence Bassay; Rosa, Cassio Thyone A. de; Carmelo, Adriana C.; Souza, Julio Coelho Ferreira de; Pires, Augusto C.B. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil); Araujo, Albano A. de; Carvalho Junior, Osmar A. de [Infosat, XX, World Energy Council (WEC) (Austria)

    1993-07-01

    In this study we present the results obtained by interpreting geophysical data from the Crixas Greenstone Belt area. Magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometric profiles and maps were produced by reprocessing digital data belonging to the Brazil-Canada Geophysical project. Using the very detailed information revealed by the profiles processed in more adequate scale and the lateral continuity supplied by the maps, we obtained a more clear picture of the region. Despite of the strong correlation between profiles and maps with the presently known geology, observed discrepancies indicate targets for geological mapping and mineral exploration. (author)

  17. GEOPHYSICAL CONTRIBUTION TO EVALUATE THE HYDROTHERMAL POTENTIALITY IN EGYPT: CASE STUDY: HAMMAM FARAUN AND ABU SWIERA, SINAI, EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Ayman I

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The geothermal potentiality in Egypt has a minor significance in the aspects of the Egyptians life, while the hydraulic and hydrocarbonresources are more convenient. However, some other applications for the geothermal activity such as direct warming, pools, and physiotherapy make the research for geothermal as requested. In the present work, two locations with rather good geothermal potentiality will be studied; these are HammamFaraun and Abu Swiera (water temperature is about 70 °C; at Sinai Peninsula.
    The contribution of the geophysical techniques to evaluate such potentiality could be considered, as its capability to identifythe reservoir characteristics and its implementation is acceptable. Therefore, a geophysical survey program has been conductedin terms of seventeen vertical electrical soundings (VES and two wide profiles of Control Source Electromagnetic (CSEM forward step at HammamFaraun and two wide profiles of CSEM at Abu Swiera. The geophysical techniques yield information on the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, which is the most sensitive parameter to fluids in the rocks. 
    The analysis of the geophysical data, together with the field and geochemical studies lead to the conclusion that, the thermalwater in the subsurface formations might be considered as the preferred cause of the high conductivity in the subsurface on/close to the boarder of tectonically active regions, particularly, where the anomalous conductivity is correlated with high heat flow and other geophysical and geological parameters.

  18. COMPARISON OF FOURIER AND WAVELET TRANSFORMS IN GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan ALP

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was compared Fourier Transformation using widely in analysing of geophysics data and image processing and Wavelet Transformation using in image processing, boundary analysis and recently years in use geophysical data analysis. It was applicated and compared two transformations in the both geophysical data and fundamental functions. Then the results obtained were evaluated. In this study it was compared two transformation using earthquake records and Bouger gravity anomalies map of Hatay region geophysical data. At the end of the our study it was clearly seen that wavelet transform can be used by geophysical data analysing.

  19. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  20. Cardioprotective effects of aqueous Schizandra chinensis fruit extract on ovariectomized and balloon-induced carotid artery injury rat models: effects on serum lipid profiles and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Baek, In-Hee; Rhyu, Mee Ra

    2011-04-12

    The fruit from Schizandra chinensis, a member of the Magnoliaceae family, has been used to treat menopause-related symptoms. We have previously reported that an aqueous extract of Schizandra chinensis fruit (ScEx) caused vascular relaxation via the production of endothelial nitric oxide. Estrogen-like molecules are known to play a protective role in cardiovascular diseases through several mechanisms, but the cardioprotective effects of ScEx have not been clearly demonstrated. Therefore, we investigated the vasculoprotective effects of ScEx on ovariectomized (OVX) and balloon-induced carotid artery injury rat models. An aqueous extract of Schizandra chinensis (ScEx) was examined for its cardioprotective effects. To test the arterial response to injury, we applied the balloon-induced carotid artery model to OVX Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rats were subcutaneously administered vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 0.02 or 0.2mg/kg/day), or ScEx (0.2 or 2.0mg/kg/day) over the course of the study. Vessel morphology was assessed two weeks after injury. To identify the cardioprotective effects after ScEx treatment, we measured serum lipid profiles and blood pressure levels in the OVX- and sham-operated normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Serum lipid profiles were measured in OVX rats after five weeks of treatment with vehicle, E2 (0.5mg/kg/day), or ScEx (0.5 or 5.0mg/kg/day). Tail systolic blood pressure in OVX SHR was measured weekly. In the balloon-induced carotid artery injury model, treatment with E2 (0.2mg/kg/day) or ScEx (2.0mg/kg/day) reduced the intimal area and the intima-to-media ratio compared to control animals. Injection of ScEx or E2 reduced body weight gain but did not inhibit the decrease in uterine weight. Treatment with ScEx (5.0mg/kg/day) or E2 (0.5mg/kg/day) in OVX SD rats reduced total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and TC-(HDL-C)/HDL-C compared to control

  1. The geophysical impact of the Aristoteles mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Klingele, E.; Sabadini, R.; Tinti, S.; Zerbini, Suzanna

    1991-12-01

    The importance of a precise, high resolution gradiometric and magnetometric mission in some topics of geophysical interest is stressed. Ways in which the planned Aristoteles mission can allow the geophysical community to improve the knowledge and the physical understanding of several important geodynamical processes involving the coupled system consisting of the lithosphere, asthenosphere and upper mantle are discussed. Particular attention is devoted to the inversion of anomalous density structures in collision and subduction zones by means of the joint use of gradiometric and seismic tomographic data. Some modeling efforts accomplished to study the capability of the mission to invert the rheological parameters of the lithosphere and upper mantle through the gravimetric signals of internal and surface density anomalies are described.

  2. Geophysical and atmospheric evolution of habitable planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Frank; Chassefière, Eric; Breuer, Doris; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Kulikov, Yuri N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Biernat, Helfried K; Leblanc, Francois; Kallio, Esa; Lundin, Richard; Westall, Frances; Bauer, Siegfried J; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gröller, Hannes; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Hausleitner, Walter; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Leitzinger, Martin; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Motschmann, Uwe; Odert, Petra; Paresce, Francesco; Parnell, John; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rauer, Heike; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Spohn, Tilman; Stadelmann, Anja; Stangl, Günter; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth-like habitable planets is a complex process that depends on the geodynamical and geophysical environments. In particular, it is necessary that plate tectonics remain active over billions of years. These geophysically active environments are strongly coupled to a planet's host star parameters, such as mass, luminosity and activity, orbit location of the habitable zone, and the planet's initial water inventory. Depending on the host star's radiation and particle flux evolution, the composition in the thermosphere, and the availability of an active magnetic dynamo, the atmospheres of Earth-like planets within their habitable zones are differently affected due to thermal and nonthermal escape processes. For some planets, strong atmospheric escape could even effect the stability of the atmosphere.

  3. Effect of dietary supplementation of grape seed extract on the growth performance, lipid profile, antioxidant status and immune response of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, M H; Abdallah, F M; Ali, H A; Hernandez-Santana, A

    2017-05-01

    Grape seed extracts (GSE) contain several beneficial bioactive constituents; therefore, can be utilized as a potential feed additive in broiler chickens. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of supplementation of broiler chicken diets with GSE as a natural antioxidant at levels of 125, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm on the growth performance, serum lipid profile, liver glutathione-reduced, thigh muscle malondialdehyde and humoral immune response against Newcastle disease virus vaccines. This experiment was performed during the life-span of chickens from 0 to 42 days of age. The results of broilers fed on diet supplemented by GSE were compared with those fed on the basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented by butylated hydroxytoluene as a synthetic antioxidant (BHT, 125 ppm). No significant differences were observed in the growth performance, percent livability, total lipid, high and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterols when the use of GSE or BHT were compared with the control. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly decreased after intake of GSE compared with BHT in the feed diet. The glutathione-reduced level in liver tissues was significantly increased by inclusion of GSE, but not by BHT. Inclusion of GSE or BHT decreased significantly the malondialdehyde level found in meat tissue. The antibody titer against Newcastle disease virus vaccines was significantly elevated in 28 and 35-day-old broiler chickens fed with a diet supplemented with GSE or BHT, the former providing a higher response. It can be concluded that GSE can be used as an effective natural antioxidant and immunostimulant agent in broiler chicken diets, and that 125 to 250 ppm can be considered as the optimum dosage.

  4. Heat stress effect and given of hexane extract jaloh bark (Salix tetrasperma Roxb to cortisol level, triiodothyronine and hematology profile of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugito

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma concentration of cortisol and hematological profile on broiler chickens can be used as heat stress indicators. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of administration of n-hexane extract of jaloh bark (EHJ on heat-stressed broiler chicken. Thirty broilers, aged 20 days (strain Cobb, were randomly divided into 5 groups. The first group was external control (tCP i.e. chickens without heat stress and without EHJ administration. The second group was internal control (CP representing chickens given heat stress without EHJ administration. The third, fourth, and fifth groups were chickens given heat stress and EHJ administration at doses 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW, respectively symbolized as CP+EHJ5, CP+EHJ10, and CP+EHJ20. The experimental broilers were exposed to heat stress in constant temperature of 33 ± 1oC for 4 hours daily for 5 and 10 days. The EHJ was given 1 hour before temperature in the cage was raised and was given in daily basis. The level of cortisol in feces were measured from feces collected 1-2 hours before treatment, 3-4 hours after heat stress exposure, and 2-3 hours after heat stress termination. This research indicated that heat stress at temperature 33 ± 1oC during 2 and 4 hours increased cortisol excretion in feces (P<0.05 and increased ratio H : L (P<0.10. The EHJ at dose of 10 mg/kg BW relatively gave more protection from heat stress impact on broilers.

  5. Pomegranate extract demonstrate a selective estrogen receptor modulator profile in human tumor cell lines and in vivo models of estrogen deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, Sreekumar; Santhosh Kumar, Thankayyan R; Lakshmi, Baddireddi S; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2012-07-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are estrogen receptor (ER) ligands exhibiting tissue-specific agonistic or antagonistic biocharacter and are used in the hormonal therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancers. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to exert antiproliferative effects on human breast cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the tissue-specific estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of methanol extract of pericarp of pomegranate (PME). PME was evaluated for antiproliferative activity at 20-320 μg/ml on human breast (MCF-7, MDA MB-231) endometrial (HEC-1A), cervical (SiHa, HeLa), ovarian (SKOV3) carcinoma and normal breast fibroblast (MCF-10A) cells. Competitive radioactive binding studies were carried out to ascertain whether PME interacts with ER. The reporter gene assay measured the estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of PME in MCF-7 and MDA MB-231 cells transiently transfected with plasmids coding estrogen response elements with a reporter gene (pG5-ERE-luc) and wild-type ERα (hEG0-ER). PME inhibited the binding of [³H] estradiol to ER and suppressed the growth and proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells. PME binds ER and down-regulated the transcription of estrogen-responsive reporter gene transfected into breast cancer cells. The expressions of selected estrogen-responsive genes were down-regulated by PME. Unlike 17β-estradiol [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)] and tamoxifen (10 mg/kg BW), PME (50 and 100 mg/kg BW) did not increase the uterine weight and proliferation in ovariectomized mice and its cardioprotective effects were comparable to that of 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, our findings suggest that PME displays a SERM profile and may have the potential for prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancers with beneficial effects in other hormone-dependent tissues.

  6. Ceratonia siliqua L. hydroethanolic extract obtained by ultrasonication: antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds profile and effects in yogurts functionalized with their free and microencapsulated forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached, Irada; Barros, Lillian; Fernandes, Isabel P; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Rodrigues, Alírio E; Ferchichi, Ali; Barreiro, Maria Filomena; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-03-01

    Bioactive extracts were obtained from powdered carob pulp through an ultrasound extraction process and then evaluated in terms of antioxidant activity. Ten minutes of ultrasonication at 375 Hz were the optimal conditions leading to an extract with the highest antioxidant effects. After its chemical characterization, which revealed the preponderance of gallotannins, the extract (free and microencapsulated) was incorporated in yogurts. The microspheres were prepared using an extract/sodium alginate ratio of 100/400 (mg mg(-1)) selected after testing different ratios. The yogurts with the free extract exhibited higher antioxidant activity than the samples added with the encapsulated extracts, showing the preserving role of alginate as a coating material. None of the forms significantly altered the yogurt's nutritional value. This study confirmed the efficiency of microencapsulation to stabilize functional ingredients in food matrices maintaining almost the structural integrity of polyphenols extracted from carob pulp and furthermore improving the antioxidant potency of the final product.

  7. Development of geophysical data management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Sup; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Gu, Sung-Bon [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    (1) Development of a complete geophysical database system under C/S environment for data management. (2) Development of database system for the general user, who has not special knowledge of database, under the Internet environment. (3) Operation of the Web service for the general user. (4) Development of the stand-alone database system for a small-scale research group such as college and engineering consultant firms. (author). 15 refs.

  8. FY97 Geophysics Technology Area Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Under the High-frequency Active Auroral Research drag and to provide accurate winds and composition Program ( HAARP ), research was initiated to assess...Satellite Communications FY Fiscal Year GP Geophysics GPS Global Positioning System HAARP High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program BF High...and Combat Operations 3,14 Global Positioning System (GPS) ii,5,6,8,9,12,17 High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) 8,11 Industrial

  9. Geophysical, geological, environmental and technical program guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board has created a set of guidelines which describe the information needed by the Board for authorizations relating to geophysical, geological, environmental or geotechnical programs. The guidelines also describe the review process that will be followed in considering a proponent`s application. Since these guidelines are subordinate to the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act and the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation (Newfoundland) Act, proponents must refer to both in preparing their development applications.

  10. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); McEvilly, T.V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Morrison, H.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, tides, hydrological water redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. With only a few exceptions on the Earth surface, the temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have the capability of monitoring certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. These techniques include the very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler tracking, and the Global Positioning System, all entail global observational networks. While considerable advances have been made in observing and understanding of the dynamics of Earth's rotation, only the lowest-degree gravitational variations have been observed and limited knowledge of geocenter motion obtained. New space missions, projects and initiatives promise to further improve the measurements and hence our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding and modeling capability of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as the solid Earth's response to such changes in constraining the modeling of Earth's mechanical properties.

  12. Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, William I.

    2016-05-01

    Graduate students in the natural sciences - including not only geophysics and space physics but also atmospheric and planetary physics, ocean sciences, and astronomy - need a broad-based mathematical toolbox to facilitate their research. In addition, they need to survey a wider array of mathematical methods that, while outside their particular areas of expertise, are important in related ones. While it is unrealistic to expect them to develop an encyclopedic knowledge of all the methods that are out there, they need to know how and where to obtain reliable and effective insights into these broader areas. Here at last is a graduate textbook that provides these students with the mathematical skills they need to succeed in today's highly interdisciplinary research environment. This authoritative and accessible book covers everything from the elements of vector and tensor analysis to ordinary differential equations, special functions, and chaos and fractals. Other topics include integral transforms, complex analysis, and inverse theory; partial differential equations of mathematical geophysics; probability, statistics, and computational methods; and much more. Proven in the classroom, Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics features numerous exercises throughout as well as suggestions for further reading. * Provides an authoritative and accessible introduction to the subject * Covers vector and tensor analysis, ordinary differential equations, integrals and approximations, Fourier transforms, diffusion and dispersion, sound waves and perturbation theory, randomness in data, and a host of other topics * Features numerous exercises throughout * Ideal for students and researchers alike * An online illustration package is available to professors

  13. Inverse spatial principal component analysis for geophysical survey data interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingmou; Dehler, Sonya A.

    2015-04-01

    The starting point for data processing, visualization, and overlay with other data sources in geological applications often involves building a regular grid by interpolation of geophysical measurements. Typically, the sampling interval along survey lines is much higher than the spacing between survey lines because the geophysical recording system is able to operate with a high sampling rate, while the costs and slower speeds associated with operational platforms limit line spacing. However, currently available interpolating methods often smooth data observed with higher sampling rate along a survey line to accommodate the lower spacing across lines, and much of the higher resolution information is not captured in the interpolation process. In this approach, a method termed as the inverse spatial principal component analysis (isPCA) is developed to address this problem. In the isPCA method, a whole profile observation as well as its line position is handled as an entity and a survey collection of line entities is analyzed for interpolation. To test its performance, the developed isPCA method is used to process a simulated airborne magnetic survey from an existing magnetic grid offshore the Atlantic coast of Canada. The interpolation results using the isPCA method and other methods are compared with the original survey grid. It is demonstrated that the isPCA method outperforms the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Kriging (Geostatistical), and MINimum Curvature (MINC) interpolation methods in retaining detailed anomaly structures and restoring original values. In a second test, a high resolution magnetic survey offshore Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, was processed and the results are compared with other geological information. This example demonstrates the effective performance of the isPCA method in basin structure identification.

  14. Investigation of a playa lake bed using geophysical electrical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmenn, M.; Gurrola, H.; William, R.; Montalvo, R.; Horton, S.; Homberg, J.; Allen, T.; Bribiesca, E.; Lindsey, C.; Anderson, H.; Seshadri, S.; Manns, S.; Hassan, A.; Loren, C.

    2005-12-01

    The 2005 undergraduate applied geophysical class of Texas Tech University conducted a geophysical survey of a playa lake approximately 10 miles northwest of Lubbock Texas. The playa lake is primarily used as grazing land for two llamas and a hand full of sheep, and has been recently used as a dump for broken down sheds and barrels. Our goal was to model the subsurface of the transition from the playa to plains geology and investigate the possible contamination, of the soil and the data, by the metal dumped at the surface. We conducted our survey with and EM31 and homemade D.C. resistivity and SP equipment that allowed students to grasp the theories more clearly. SP readings were collected using clay pots constructed from terracotta pots and copper tubing purchased at the local hardware store and voltage measurements collected with handle held multi-meters. D.C. resistivity data were collected in a dipole-dipole array using 20 nine volt batteries connected in series with a large enough variable resistor and amp meter to regulate steady current flow. A multi meter was used to collect voltage readings. Wenner array data were collected using a home-made multi-filament cable connected switch box to allow a central user to regulate current and take voltage reading. A map of conductivity produced from a 10 m of EM31 reading show that conductivity anomalies mirror topography. The SP profiles show high values in the playa lake that drop off as we move from the clay rich lake bed to normal grassland. Analysis of both the Dipole-Dipole and Wenner array data support a model with 3 flat layers increasing in resistivity with depth. It appears that these remain flat passing beneath the playa and the playa is eroded into these layers.

  15. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts obtained from erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis) fruit using compressed propane and supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ciro E F; Scapinello, Jaqueline; Bohn, Aline; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Magro, Jacir Dall; Palliga, Marshall; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Tres, Marcus V

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, Ilex paraguariensis leaves are consumed in tea form or as typical drinks like mate and terere, while the fruits are discarded processing and has no commercial value. The aim of this work to evaluate phytochemical properties, total phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Ilex paraguariensis fruits obtained from supercritical CO2 and compressed propane extraction. The extraction with compressed propane yielded 2.72 wt%, whereas with supercritical CO2 1.51 wt% was obtained. The compound extracted in larger amount by the two extraction solvents was caffeine, 163.28 and 54.17 mg/g by supercritical CO2 and pressurized propane, respectively. The antioxidant activity was more pronounced for the supercritical CO2 extract, with no difference found in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus for the two extracts and better results observed for Escherichia coli when using supercritical CO2.

  16. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment

  17. Chlorophytum borivilianum root extract maintains near normal blood glucose, insulin and lipid profile levels and prevents oxidative stress in the pancreas of streptozotocin-induced adult male diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribabu, Nelli; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    The effect of C. borivilianum root on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbAIc), insulin and lipid profile levels in diabetes mellitus are not fully understood. This study therefore investigated the effect of C. borivilianum root on the above parameters and oxidative stress of the pancreas in diabetes. C. borivilianum root aqueous extract (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male diabetic rats for 28 days. Body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid profile levels and glucose homeostasis indices were determined. Histopathological changes and oxidative stress parameters i.e. lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant enzymes activity levels of the pancreas were investigated. C. borivilianum root extract treatment to diabetic rats maintained near normal body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and insulin levels with higher HOMA-β cell functioning index, number of Islets/pancreas, number of β-cells/Islets however with lower HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) index as compared to non-treated diabetic rats. Negative correlations between serum insulin and blood glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels were observed. C. borivilianum root extract administration prevented the increase in lipid peroxidation and the decrease in activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with mild histopathological changes in the pancreas of diabetic rats. C. borivilianum root maintains near normal levels of these metabolites and prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to the pancreas in diabetes.

  18. In Vivo Antiplasmodial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Analgesic Properties, and Safety Profile of Root Extracts of Haematostaphis barteri Hook F. (Anacardiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Nyarko Boampong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an endemic disease globally and the conundrum of drug resistance has led to the search for newer antimalarial agents. The root extract of H. barteri was evaluated for antimalarial, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory properties. The prophylactic effect of H. barteri on P. berghei was determined by pretreating mice with aqueous root extract of H. barteri (30–300 mg/kg, saline, and 1.2 mg/kg sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine for three days followed by 1 × 106 P. berghei inoculation. Parasite density was measured after 72 h. The curative antimalarial property of the extract was assessed by treating mice with extract, saline, and 1.14 : 6.9 mg/kg Artemether : Lumefantrine four days after 1 × 106 P. berghei inoculation. Selected organs were harvested for toxicity assessment. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of the extract was determined in the carrageenan and thermal tail withdrawal tests, respectively. The extract significantly reduced the parasite density in the prophylactic but not the curative study. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the extract were significant (P<0.05 only at the highest doses employed. Regeneration of hepatocytes was also evident in the extract treated groups. The extract has prophylactic but not curative activity on P. berghei-induced malaria. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic property of the extract occurred at the highest doses used.

  19. Geophysical anatomy of counter-slope scarps in sedimentary flysch rocks (Outer Western Carpathians)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tábořík, P.; Lenart, J.; Blecha, V.; Vilhelm, J.; Turský, O.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary geophysical survey, consisting of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR), shallow seismic refraction (SSR) and gravity survey (GS), was used to investigate the counter-slope scarps, one of the typical manifestations of the relaxed zones of rock massifs, and the possible initial stages of deep-seated landslides (DSLs). Two upper parts of the extensive DSLs within the Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mountains (Outer Western Carpathians - OWC) built by the sedimentary flysch rock were chosen as the testing sites. A combined geophysical survey on the flysch rocks was performed on both localities to enhance our present findings. The survey revealed that the ERT is able to reliably detect underground discontinuities, which are manifested at the ground surface by one of the typical landforms (tension cracks, trenches, pseudokarst sinkholes, double-crested ridges and counter-slope scarps). Previous studies suggested that bedrock discontinuities should be depicted by high-resistivity features within ERT surveying. According to SSR and GS, expected zones of weakened rock massif were not confirmed directly underneath the superficial landforms, but they were shifted. Based on the SSR and GS measurements, the depicted high-contrast transitions between high- and low-resistivity domains within the ERT profiles were newly identified as possible manifestation of bedrock discontinuities. The results of GPR measurements give only limited information on the sedimentary flysch rocks, due to shallow penetrating depth and locally strong signal attenuation. The combined results of multidisciplinary geophysical surveying confirmed an importance of employing more than one geophysical technique for integrated interpretations of measured data. Integrated interpretations of the measured geophysical data provided a new insight into massif disintegration and the geomorphic origin of the landforms related to the DSL.

  20. New geophysical electromagnetic method of archeological object research in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, O. A.; Khachay, O. Yu.; Attia, Magdi.

    2009-04-01

    The demand to the enhanced geophysical technique and device, in addition to the precise interpretation of the geophysical data, is the resolution of the geophysical complex research, especially by the absence of priory information about the researched place. Therefore, an approach to use the planshet method of electromagnetic induction in the frequency geometry was developed by Hachay. et al., 1997a, 1997b, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2005. The method was adapted to map and monitor the high complicated geological mediums, to determine the structural factors and criteria of the rock massif in the mine subsurface. The field observation and the way of interpretation make the new technology differ from other known earlier methods of field raying or tomography (Hachay et al., 1997c, 1999, and 2000).The 3D geoelectrical medium research is based on the concept of three staged interpreting of the alternating electromagnetic field in a frame of the block-layered isotropic medium with inclusion (Hachay 1997a, and 2002); in the first stage, the geoelectrical parameters of the horizontal block-layered medium, which includes the heterogeneities, are defined. In the second stage a geometrical model of the different local heterogeneities or groups inside the block-layered medium is constructed based on the local geoelectrical heterogeneities produced from the first stage after filtering the anomalous fields plunged in the medium. While in the third stage, the surfaces of the searched heterogeneities could be calculated in account of the physical parameters of the anomalous objects.For practical realization of that conception the system of observation for alternating electromagnetic field with use of vertical magnetic dipole was elaborated. Such local source of excitation and regular net of observations allows realizing overlapping by different angles of observation directions. As incoming data for interpretation, three components of modules of three components of magnetic field are

  1. An in vitro evaluation of the effects of a Yucca schidigera extract and chestnut tannins on composition and metabolic profiles of canine and feline faecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Carlo; Vecchiato, Carla Giuditta; Cardenia, Vladimiro; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Stefanelli, Claudio; Grandi, Monica; Gatta, Pier Paolo; Biagi, Giacomo

    2017-10-01

    The in vitro effect of a Yucca schidigera extract (YSE) and tannins from chestnut wood on composition and metabolic activity of canine and feline faecal microbiota was evaluated. Four treatments were carried out: control diet, chestnut tannins (CT), YSE and CT + YSE. The YSE was added to canine and feline faecal cultures at 0.1 g/l, while CT were added at 0.3 g/l for a 24-h incubation. A total of 130 volatile compounds were detected by means of headspace-solid phase microextraction gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. Several changes in the metabolite profiles of fermentation fluids were found, including a decrease of alcohols (-19%) and esters (-42%) in feline and canine inoculum, respectively, which was due to the antibacterial properties of tannins. In canine inoculum, after 6 h, YSE + CT caused lower cadaverine concentrations (-37%), while ammonia (-4%) and quinolone (-27%) were reduced by addition of CT. After 24 h, the presence of CT resulted in a decrease of sulphur compounds, such as dimethyl sulphide (-69%) and dimethyl disulphide (-20%). In feline faecal cultures, after 6 h, CT lowered the amount of indole (-48%), whereas YSE tended to decrease trimethylamine levels (-16%). Both in canine and feline inoculum, addition of CT and, to a minor extent, YSE affected volatile fatty acids patterns. In canine faecal cultures, CT exerted a marginal inhibitory effect on Escherichia coli population (-0.45 log 10 numbers of DNA copies/ml), while enterococci were increased (+2.06 log 10 numbers of DNA copies/ml) by YSE. The results from the present study show that YSE and tannins from chestnut wood exert different effects on the composition and metabolism of canine and feline faecal microbiota. In particular, the supplementation of YSE and tannins to diets for dogs and cats may be beneficial due to the reduction of the presence of some potentially toxic volatile metabolites in the animals' intestine.

  2. Combining geomorphological mapping and near surface geophysics (GPR and ERT) to study piping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Kondracka, Marta

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to provide a more comprehensive characterization of piping systems in mountainous areas under a temperate climate using geomorphological mapping and geophysical methods (electrical resistivity tomography - ERT and ground penetrating radar - GPR). The significance of piping in gully formation and hillslope hydrology has been discussed for many years, and most of the studies are based on surface investigations. However, it seems that most surface investigations underestimate this subsurface process. Therefore, our purpose was to estimate the scale of piping activity based on both surface and subsurface investigations. We used geophysical methods to detect the boundary of lateral water movement fostering pipe development and recognize the internal structure of the underlying materials. The survey was carried out in the Bereźnica Wyżna catchment, in the Bieszczady Mountains. (Eastern Carpathians, Poland), where pipes develop in Cambisols at a mean depth of about 0.7-0.8 m. The geophysical techniques that were used are shown to be successful in identifying pipes. GPR data suggest that the density of piping systems is much larger than that detectible from surface observations alone. Pipe length can be > 6.5-9.2% (maximum = 49%) higher than what surface mapping suggests. Thus, the significance of piping in hillslope hydrology and gully formation can be greater than previously assumed. These results also draw attention to the scale of piping activity in the Carpathians, where this process has been neglected for many years. The ERT profiles reveal areas affected by piping as places of higher resistivity values, which are an effect of a higher content of air-filled pores (due to higher soil porosity, intense biological activity, and well-developed soil structure). In addition, the ERT profiles show that the pipes in the study area develop at the soil-bedrock interface, probably above the layers of shales or mudstones which create a water restrictive layer

  3. Patent Documents as a Resource for Studies and Education in Geophysics - An Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    Patents are a highly neglected source of information in geophysics, although they supply a wealth of technical and historically relevant data and might be an important asset for researchers and students. The technical drawings and descriptions in patent documents provide insight into the personal work of a researcher or a scientific group and give detailed technical background information, show interdisciplinary solutions for similar problems, help to learn about inventions too advanced for their time but maybe useful now, and to explore the historical background and timelines of inventions and their inventors. It will be shown how to get access to patent documents and how to use them for research and education purposes. Exemplary inventions by well-known geoscientists or scientists in related fields will be presented to illustrate the usefulness of patent documents. The data pool used is the International Patent Classification (IPC) class G01V that the United Nations' World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) has set up mainly for inventions with key aspects in geophysics. This class contains approximately 235,000 patent documents (July 2016) for methods, apparatuses or scientific instruments developed during scientific projects or by geophysical companies. The patent documents can be accessed via patent databases. The most important patent databases are for free, search functionality is self-explanatory and the amount of information to be extracted is enormous. For example, more than 90 million multilingual patent documents are currently available online (July 2016) in DEPATIS database of the German Patent and Trade Mark Office or ESPACENET of the European Patent Office. To summarize, patent documents are a highly useful tool for educational and research purposes to strengthen students' and scientists' knowledge in a practically orientated geophysical field and to widen the horizon to adjacent technical areas. Last but not least, they also provide insight

  4. Sesquiterpene lactone containing extracts from two cultivars of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus) show distinctive chemical profiles and in vitro activity against Ostertagia ostertagi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena-Espinoza, Miguel Angel; Boas, Ulrik; Williams, Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated direct anthelmintic effects of sesquiterpene lactones (SL)-containing extracts from forage chicory against free-living and parasitic stages of Ostertagia ostertagi. Freeze-dried leaves from chicory cultivars ‘Spadona’ and ‘Puna II’ were extracted using methanol/water. Total...... SL were further fractionated by solid-phase extraction and resulting extracts were characterised by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). O. ostertagi eggs from faeces of mono-infected calves were hatched and L1 were used in a larval feeding inhibition assay (LFIA), while cultured L3 were...

  5. Geophysical Hunt for Chromite in Ophiolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubarik Ali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ophiolite of Oman are famous world over, and are favorite for exploring chromite, which is a source of chromium that is used widely in steel, nichrome, and plating and painting industries. The best known chromite deposits are found in the Bushveld complex of South africa, however countries like Pakistan and Oman are also contributing but less than 2% of the world production. Chromite is found in the mantle rocks such as peridotite and its altered products. Large economic deposits are generally found in stratiform structure and the smaller ones in pod-like or tabular lenses. In Oman the chromite deposits occur in Oman ophiolite (Semile, mainly in the mantle sequence comprising harzburgite and dunite. The mining efforts for chromite in Oman are in progress but not on scientific grounds. On a site called Izki (670 m asl the chromite was expected on the top of a hill in a small area (150x50 m of ophiolite, and mining through pitting procedure was tried over there but remained unsuccessful. Geophysical methods were applied in the same area to search out the possibility of the existence of the ore. Since chromite is denser, more conductive and magnetically less susceptible deposit as compared to the host rocks harzburgite and serpentinite, it is expected that the existence of a shallow sizable ore body would generate favorable gravity, magnetic, and resistivity signals. The integrated geophysical study (gravity, magnetic and resistivity reveals the probability of chromite within 30 m depth. For confirmation the drilling was recommended on a point upto a depth of 35 meters. The drilling could not be continued beyond 12 meters depth due to reasons known to the lease owner. The drilling showed harzburgite up to 8 meters depth, then a chromite layer of 0.7 meter thickness, after that harzburgite started for the next 3 meters depth. This state of affairs confirms not only the presence of chromite but also the revealing power of geophysics.

  6. Applications of geophysical methods to volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jeff; Dzurisin, Daniel; Finn, Carol A.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Lahusen, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    The array of geophysical technologies used in volcano hazards studies - some developed originally only for volcano monitoring - ranges from satellite remote sensing including InSAR to leveling and EDM surveys, campaign and telemetered GPS networks, electronic tiltmeters and strainmeters, airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys, short-period and broadband seismic monitoring, even microphones tuned for infrasound. They include virtually every method used in resource exploration except large-scale seismic reflection. By “geophysical ” we include both active and passive methods as well as geodetic technologies. Volcano monitoring incorporates telemetry to handle high-bandwith cameras and broadband seismometers. Critical geophysical targets include the flux of magma in shallow reservoir and lava-tube systems, changes in active hydrothermal systems, volcanic edifice stability, and lahars. Since the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in 1980, and the eruption at Pu’u O’o in Hawai’i beginning in 1983 and still continuing, dramatic advances have occurred in monitoring technology such as “crisis GIS” and lahar modeling, InSAR interferograms, as well as gas emission geochemistry sampling, and hazards mapping and eruption predictions. The on-going eruption of Mount St. Helens has led to new monitoring technologies, including advances in broadband Wi-Fi and satellite telemetry as well as new instrumentation. Assessment of the gap between adequate monitoring and threat at the 169 potentially dangerous Holocene volcanoes shows where populations are dangerously exposed to volcanic catastrophes in the United States and its territories . This paper focuses primarily on Hawai’ian volcanoes and the northern Pacific and Cascades volcanoes. The US Geological Survey, the US National Park System, and the University of Utah cooperate in a program to monitor the huge Yellowstone volcanic system, and a separate observatory monitors the restive Long Valley

  7. A fractured rock geophysical toolbox method selection tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Johnson, C.D.; Slater, L.D.; Robinson, J.L.; Williams, J.H.; Boyden, C.L.; Werkema, D.D.; Lane, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical technologies have the potential to improve site characterization and monitoring in fractured rock, but the appropriate and effective application of geophysics at a particular site strongly depends on project goals (e.g., identifying discrete fractures) and site characteristics (e.g., lithology). No method works at every site or for every goal. New approaches are needed to identify a set of geophysical methods appropriate to specific project goals and site conditions while considering budget constraints. To this end, we present the Excel-based Fractured-Rock Geophysical Toolbox Method Selection Tool (FRGT-MST). We envision the FRGT-MST (1) equipping remediation professionals with a tool to understand what is likely to be realistic and cost-effective when contracting geophysical services, and (2) reducing applications of geophysics with unrealistic objectives or where methods are likely to fail.

  8. The Expanding Marketplace for Applied Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N.; Sirles, P.

    2012-12-01

    While the image of geophysics for the proverbial "layman" often seems limited to volcanoes and earthquakes, and to the geoscientist this image enlarges to include oil or minerals exploration and whole earth studies, there has been a steady increase in the application of geophysics into the realm of "daily life", such as real estate deals, highway infrastructure, and flood protection. This expansion of applications can be attributed to the improved economics from advances in equipment and interpretation. Traditional geophysical methods that at one time often only fit within the budgets of oil, gas, and minerals exploration programs can now be economically applied to much smaller scale needs like contaminant mapping, landfill delineation, and levee investigations. A real-world, economic example of this expanding marketplace is our company, which began very small and was aimed almost exclusively at the minerals exploration market. Most of our growth has been in the last 10 years, when we have expanded to five offices and a staff with almost 40 geoscientist degrees (21 in geophysics); much of this growth has been in the non-oil, non-minerals arenas. While much of our work still includes minerals exploration, other projects this year include wind-farm foundation studies, cavity detection above underground nuclear tests, landfill studies, acid mine drainage problems, and leaks in evaporation ponds. A methodology example of this expanding market is the induced polarization (IP) survey, once primarily used for minerals exploration, particularly large porphyry copper deposits, but now efficient enough to also use in environmental studies. The IP method has been particularly useful in delineating and characterizing old, poorly documented landfills, and recent research suggests it may also be useful in monitoring the accelerated biodegradation processes used in some cases to rehabilitate the sites. Compared to temperature monitoring systems, IP may be more useful in providing

  9. Effect of regularization parameters on geophysical reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hui; Wang Zhaolei; Qiu Dongling; Li Guofa; Shen Jinsong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the edge-preserving regularization method in the reconstruction of physical parameters from geophysical data such as seismic and ground-penetrating radar data.In the regularization method a potential function of model parameters and its corresponding functions are introduced.This method is stable and able to preserve boundaries, and protect resolution.The effect of regularization depends to a great extent on the suitable choice of regularization parameters.The influence of the edge-preserving parameters on the reconstruction results is investigated and the relationship between the regularization parameters and the error of data is described.

  10. Predictability of extreme values in geophysical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Sterk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extreme value theory in deterministic systems is concerned with unlikely large (or small values of an observable evaluated along evolutions of the system. In this paper we study the finite-time predictability of extreme values, such as convection, energy, and wind speeds, in three geophysical models. We study whether finite-time Lyapunov exponents are larger or smaller for initial conditions leading to extremes. General statements on whether extreme values are better or less predictable are not possible: the predictability of extreme values depends on the observable, the attractor of the system, and the prediction lead time.

  11. Large natural geophysical events: planetary planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, J.B.; Smith, J.V.

    1984-09-01

    Geological and geophysical data suggest that during the evolution of the earth and its species, that there have been many mass extinctions due to large impacts from comets and large asteroids, and major volcanic events. Today, technology has developed to the stage where we can begin to consider protective measures for the planet. Evidence of the ecological disruption and frequency of these major events is presented. Surveillance and warning systems are most critical to develop wherein sufficient lead times for warnings exist so that appropriate interventions could be designed. The long term research undergirding these warning systems, implementation, and proof testing is rich in opportunities for collaboration for peace.

  12. High-resolution geophysical data from the sea floor surrounding the Western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Twichell, David C.; Foster, David S.; Worley, Charles R.; Irwin, Barry J.; Danforth, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Geophysical and geospatial data were collected in the nearshore area surrounding the western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts on the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael during September 2010 in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts, Office of Coastal Zone Management. This report describes the results of the short-term goals of this collaborative effort, which were to map the geology of the inner shelf zone of the western Elizabeth Islands and study the geologic processes that have contributed to its evolution. Data collected during the survey include: Bathymetric and sidescan-sonar data, chirp seismic-reflection data , sound velocity profiles, and navigation data. The long-term goals of this project are to provide high-resolution geophysical data that will support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and inventory subtidal marine habitat type and distribution within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  13. Geophysical survey in `Albanico El Paso` Cochabamba - Bolivia; Levantamento geofisico no `Albanico El Paso` Cochabamba - Bolivia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellert, N.; Rodas, C.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Ricaldi, V.; Jaldin, L.A. [Corporacion para el Desarrollo de Cochabamba (Bolivia)

    1994-12-31

    Vertical electrical soundings were measured in the Cochabamba sedimentary basin at several alluvial fans (locally called `abanicos`). This paper presents data from the Abanico El Paso. This research attempted to correlate geophysical data with the presence of paleo-channels inside the alluvial fans. These fans, mostly concentrated at the foot of the Cordilheira Ocidental, are about 1 km across and up to 4 km long. Data from deep wells were used to establish a correlation between the geophysical and hydrogeological data. The specific yield of the deep wells can be correlated with the grain size of the sediments. Apparent resistivity values of the vertical electrical soundings, for several AB/2 spacing were used to construct resistivity profiles, where the distance between each measured points correspond to the distances between the points where a vertical electrical sounding was measured. Once again, the electro-resistivity method demonstrated its potentiality as an exploration tool. (author). 3 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Complex geophysical investigation of the Kapušany landslide (Eastern Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kušnirák, David; Dostál, Ivan; Putiška, René; Mojzeš, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical survey is a very useful and popular tool used by engineering geologists to examine landslides. We present a case study from the Kapušany landslide, Eastern Slovakia, where a broad spectrum of geophysical methods were applied along two perpendicular profiles in order to compare the ability of the methods to detect as many structural features of the landslide as possible. The 2D Electrical Resistivity Tomography inverse model was capable of defining the geological structure of the landslide and defining the shear zone, however the resolution of the inverse model does not allow us to identify cracks or other minor features of the landslide. These, however, were well recorded in the results of Dipole Electromagnetic Imaging and the Self Potential method. In addition microgravimetry, Gamma-Ray Spectrometry and Soil Radon Emanometry were experimentally employed to validate the results obtained from electrical methods and afterwards final geological models, based on the integrated interpretation of all involved methods were constructed.

  15. Interface-Flattening Transform for EM Field Modeling in Tilted, Cylindrically-Stratified Geophysical Media

    CERN Document Server

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2016-01-01

    We propose and investigate an "interface-flattening" transformation, hinging upon Transformation Optics (T.O.) techniques, to facilitate the rigorous analysis of electromagnetic (EM) fields radiated by sources embedded in tilted, cylindrically-layered geophysical media. Our method addresses the major challenge in such problems of appropriately approximating the domain boundaries in the computational model while, in a full-wave manner, predicting the effects of tilting in the layers. When incorporated into standard pseudo-analytical algorithms, moreover, the proposed method is quite robust, as it is not limited by absorption, anisotropy, and/or eccentering profile of the cylindrical geophysical formations, nor is it limited by the radiation frequency. These attributes of the proposed method are in contrast to past analysis methods for tilted-layer media that often place limitations on the source and medium characteristics. Through analytical derivations as well as a preliminary numerical investigation, we anal...

  16. Geophysical Characterization of the Salna Sinking Zone, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Rambhatla G.; Mondal, Suman K.

    2013-01-01

    Infrastructure and communication facilities are repeatedly affected by ground deformation in Gharwal Himalaya, India; for effective remediation measures, a thorough understanding of the real reasons for these movements is needed. In this regard, we undertook an integrated geophysical and geotechnical study of the Salna sinking zone close to the Main Central Thrust in Garhwal Himalaya. Our geophysical data include eight combined electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and induced polarization imaging (IPI) profiles spanning 144-600 m, with 3-10 m electrode separation in the Wenner-Schlumberger configuration, and five micro-gravity profiles with 10-30 m station spacing covering the study region. The ERT sections clearly outline the heterogeneity in the subsurface lithology. Further, the ERT, IPI, and shaliness (shaleyness) sections infer the absence of clayey horizons and slip surfaces at depth. However, the Bouguer gravity analysis has revealed the existence of several faults in the subsurface, much beyond the reach of th