WorldWideScience

Sample records for extracellular proton release

  1. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  2. Lactoferrin Suppresses Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release in Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Koshu; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Nishi, Hiroshi; Herter, Jan M; Mayadas, Tanya; Hirohama, Daigoro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Kurosawa, Miho; Kagaya, Shinji; Hishikawa, Keiichi; Nangaku, Masaomi; Fujita, Toshiro; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Hirahashi, Junichi

    2016-08-01

    Neutrophils are central players in the innate immune system. They generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which protect against invading pathogens but are also associated with the development of autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases and thrombosis. Here, we report that lactoferrin, one of the components of NETs, translocated from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane and markedly suppressed NETs release. Furthermore, exogenous lactoferrin shrunk the chromatin fibers found in released NETs, without affecting the generation of oxygen radicals, but this failed after chemical removal of the positive charge of lactoferrin, suggesting that charge-charge interactions between lactoferrin and NETs were required for this function. In a model of immune complex-induced NET formation in vivo, intravenous lactoferrin injection markedly reduced the extent of NET formation. These observations suggest that lactoferrin serves as an intrinsic inhibitor of NETs release into the circulation. Thus, lactoferrin may represent a therapeutic lead for controlling NETs release in autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases.

  3. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  4. Kinetics of proton release and uptake by channelrhodopsin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nack, Melanie; Radu, Ionela; Schultz, Bernd-Joachim; Resler, Tom; Schlesinger, Ramona; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; del Val, Coral; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano; Bamann, Christian; Bamberg, Ernst; Heberle, Joachim

    2012-05-07

    Electrophysiological experiments showed that the light-activated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) pumps protons in the absence of a membrane potential. We determined here the kinetics of transient pH change using a water-soluble pH-indicator. It is shown that ChR2 released protons prior to uptake with a stoichiometry of 0.3 protons per ChR2. Comparison to the photocycle kinetics revealed that proton release and uptake match rise and decay of the P(3)(520) intermediate. As the P(3)(520) state also represents the conductive state of cation channeling, the concurrence of proton pumping and channel gating implies an intimate mechanistic link of the two functional modes. Studies on the E123T and S245E mutants show that these residues are not critically involved in proton translocation.

  5. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Wang; Li He; Guoqiang Bao; Xin He; Saijun Fan; Haichao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein,HMGBI,can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells,thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses.In this study we aimed to test the possibility that radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and release.Methods Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and rats were exposed to X-ray radiation,and HMGB1 translocation and release were then assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay,respectively.Results At a wide dose range(4.0-12.0 Gy),X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation,and triggered a time-and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo.The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was also associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability.Conclusions Radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes.

  6. Lactoferrin Suppresses Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshu Okubo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are central players in the innate immune system. They generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, which protect against invading pathogens but are also associated with the development of autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases and thrombosis. Here, we report that lactoferrin, one of the components of NETs, translocated from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane and markedly suppressed NETs release. Furthermore, exogenous lactoferrin shrunk the chromatin fibers found in released NETs, without affecting the generation of oxygen radicals, but this failed after chemical removal of the positive charge of lactoferrin, suggesting that charge-charge interactions between lactoferrin and NETs were required for this function. In a model of immune complex-induced NET formation in vivo, intravenous lactoferrin injection markedly reduced the extent of NET formation. These observations suggest that lactoferrin serves as an intrinsic inhibitor of NETs release into the circulation. Thus, lactoferrin may represent a therapeutic lead for controlling NETs release in autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases.

  7. Microbubbles-Assisted Ultrasound Triggers the Release of Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuana Yuana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbubbles-assisted ultrasound (USMB has shown promise in improving local drug delivery. The formation of transient membrane pores and endocytosis are reported to be enhanced by USMB, and they contribute to cellular drug uptake. Exocytosis also seems to be linked to endocytosis upon USMB treatment. Based on this rationale, we investigated whether USMB triggers exocytosis resulting in the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs. USMB was performed on a monolayer of head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu with clinically approved microbubbles and commonly used ultrasound parameters. At 2, 4, and 24 h, cells and EV-containing conditioned media from USMB and control conditions (untreated cells, cells treated with microbubbles and ultrasound only were harvested. EVs were measured using flow cytometric immuno-magnetic bead capture assay, immunogold electron microscopy, and western blotting. After USMB, levels of CD9 exposing-EVs significantly increased at 2 and 4 h, whereas levels of CD63 exposing-EVs increased at 2 h. At 24 h, EV levels were comparable to control levels. EVs released after USMB displayed a heterogeneous size distribution profile (30–1200 nm. Typical EV markers CD9, CD63, and alix were enriched in EVs released from USMB-treated FaDu cells. In conclusion, USMB treatment triggers exocytosis leading to the release of EVs from FaDu cells.

  8. Unraveling the mechanism of proton translocation in the extracellular half-channel of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaoxia; Gunner, M R

    2016-05-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, a light activated protein that creates a proton gradient in halobacteria, has long served as a simple model of proton pumps. Within bacteriorhodopsin, several key sites undergo protonation changes during the photocycle, moving protons from the higher pH cytoplasm to the lower pH extracellular side. The mechanism underlying the long-range proton translocation between the central (the retinal Schiff base SB216, D85, and D212) and exit clusters (E194 and E204) remains elusive. To obtain a dynamic view of the key factors controlling proton translocation, a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulation was performed for eight bacteriorhodopsin models varying in retinal isomer and protonation states of the SB216, D85, D212, and E204. The side-chain orientation of R82 is determined primarily by the protonation states of the residues in the EC. The side-chain reorientation of R82 modulates the hydrogen-bond network and consequently possible pathways of proton transfer. Quantum mechanical intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of proton-transfer in the methyl guanidinium-hydronium-hydroxide model system show that proton transfer via a guanidinium group requires an initial geometry permitting proton donation and acceptance by the same amine. In all the bacteriorhodopsin models, R82 can form proton wires with both the CC and the EC connected by the same amine. Alternatively, rare proton wires for proton transfer from the CC to the EC without involving R82 were found in an O' state where the proton on D85 is transferred to D212.

  9. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haqqani Arsalan S; Delaney Christie E; Tremblay Tammy-Lynn; Sodja Caroline; Sandhu Jagdeep K; Stanimirovic Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain ...

  10. Response of extracellular matrix regulators in mouse lung after exposure to photons, protons and simulated solar particle event protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian; Pecaut, Michael J; Coutrakon, George B; Slater, James M; Gridley, Daila S

    2009-07-01

    This study compared the effects of photons (gamma rays), protons and simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE) on the expression of profibrotic factors/extracellular matrix (ECM) regulators in lung tissue after whole-body irradiation. TGF-beta1, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2, -9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 and 2 (TIMP-1, -2) were assessed on days 4 and 21 in lungs from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 0 Gy or 2 Gy photons (0.7 Gy/min), protons (0.9 Gy/min) and sSPE (0.056 Gy/h). RT-PCR, histological and immunohistochemical techniques were used. The most striking changes included (1) up-regulation of TGF-beta1 by photons and sSPE, but not protons, at both times, (2) MMP-2 enhancement by photons and sSPEs, (3) TIMP-1 up-regulation by photons at both times, and (4) more collagen accumulation after exposure to either photons or sSPE than after exposure to protons. The findings demonstrate that expression of important ECM regulators was highly dependent upon the radiation regimen as well as the time after exposure. The data further suggest that irradiation during an SPE may increase an astronaut's risk for pulmonary complications. The greater perturbations after photon exposure compared to proton exposure have clinical implications and warrant further investigation.

  11. Influence of complement on neutrophil extracellular trap release induced by bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Lisa Joanne; Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle;

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release has generally been studied in the absence of serum, or at low concentrations of untreated or heat-inactivated serum. The influence of serum complement on NET release therefore remains unclear. We examined the DNA release induce...

  12. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymor......Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages......), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide...

  13. An extracellular proteasome releases endostatin from human collagen XVIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Pistilli, Maria L V; Schuppan, Detlef; Barroso, Madalena M S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Farias, Shirley; Lery, Letícia; Bauer, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Endostatin is a potent anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor protein capable of regressing tumors without inducing acquired resistance. Since it is a fragment of the parental molecule, collagen XVIII, its endogenous production depends on the activity of a specific proteolytic enzyme. While such an enzyme has been described in mice, a human counterpart has not been identified so far. Here, we searched for this enzyme by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide containing the cleavage site of human collagen XVIII. We found that the cleavage activity was present in various murine and human tumor cells but not in untransformed cells. It was ascribed to a large protein complex identified as an extracellular form of proteasome 20S. Since circulating proteasome 20S has recently emerged as an important marker of tumor progression, the possibility of proteasomes controlling the production of angiostatic endostatin may inspire the development of new anticancer therapies.

  14. The effect of clindamycin and amoxicillin on neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrzycka, Weronika; Moskalik, Aneta; Sieczkowska, Sandra; Manda-Handzlik, Aneta; Demkow, Urszula; Ciepiela, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are threads of nuclear DNA complexed with antimicrobial proteins released by neutrophils to extracellular matrix to bind, immobilise, and kill different pathogens. NET formation is triggered by different physiological and non-physiological stimulants. It is also suggested that antibiotics could be non-physiological compounds that influence NET release. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of clindamycin and amoxicillin on NET release and the phagocyte function of neutrophils. Neutrophils isolated from healthy donors by density centrifugation method were incubated with amoxicillin or clindamycin for two hours, and then NET release was stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). After three hours of incubation with PMA NETs were quantified as amount of extracellular DNA by fluorometry and visualised by immunofluorescent microscopy. The percent of phagocyting cells was measured by flow cytometry. We showed that amoxicillin induces NET formation (increase of extracellular DNA fluorescence, p = 0.03), while clindamycin had no influence on NET release (p > 0.05), as confirmed by quantitative measurement and fluorescent microscopy. Regarding phagocyte function, both antibiotics increased bacterial uptake (43.3% and 61.6% median increase for amoxicillin and clindamycin, respectively). We concluded that the ability of antibiotics to modulate NET release depends on the antibiotic used and is not associated with their ability to influence phagocytosis.

  15. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  16. Conformational Dynamics on the Extracellular Side of LeuT Controlled by Na+ and K+ Ions and the Protonation State of Glu(290)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khelashvili, George; Schmidt, Solveig Gaarde; Shi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    the unoccupied Na2 site of dopamine transporter following the release of the Na2-bound Na+. Here we evaluate with computational simulations and experimental measurements of ion affinities under corresponding conditions, the consequences of K+ binding in the Na2 site of LeuT, a bacterial homolog of NSS, when both......, point to the Glu290 protonation state as a main determinant in the structural reconfiguration of the extracellular vestibule of LeuT in which a “water gate” opens through coordinated motions of residues Leu25, Tyr108, and Phe253. The resulting water channel enables the binding/dissociation of the Na...

  17. Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides-ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, and ATP in particular, are cellular signal substances involved in the control of numerous (patho)physiological mechanisms. They provoke nucleotide receptor-mediated mechanisms in select target cells. But nucleotides can considerably expand their range of action. They function as primary messengers in intercellular communication by stimulating the release of other extracellular messenger substances. These in turn activate additional cellular mechanisms through their own receptors. While this applies also to other extracellular messengers, its omnipresence in the vertebrate organism is an outstanding feature of nucleotide signaling. Intercellular messenger substances released by nucleotides include neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors, a considerable variety of other proteins including enzymes, numerous cytokines, lipid mediators, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species. Moreover, nucleotides activate or co-activate growth factor receptors. In the case of hormone release, the initially paracrine or autocrine nucleotide-mediated signal spreads through to the entire organism. The examples highlighted in this commentary suggest that acting as ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release is one of the major functional roles of extracellular nucleotides. While initiation of messenger release by nucleotides has been unraveled in many contexts, it may have been overlooked in others. It can be anticipated that additional nucleotide-driven messenger functions will be uncovered with relevance for both understanding physiology and development of therapy.

  18. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications.

  19. Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate and lipopolysaccharide induce interleukin-1β release in canine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spildrejorde, Mari; Curtis, Stephen J; Curtis, Belinda L; Sluyter, Ronald

    2014-01-15

    Binding of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the damage-associated molecular pattern receptor P2X7 or the pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor Toll-like receptor (TLR)4, respectively, can induce the release of the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in humans and mice. However, the release of IL-1β in dogs remains poorly defined. Using a canine IL-1β enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, this study investigated whether ATP or LPS could induce IL-1β release in a canine blood-based assay. Short-term incubations (30 min) with ATP induced IL-1β release in LPS-primed canine blood, and this process could be near-completely impaired by the P2X7 antagonist, A438079. In contrast, ATP failed to induce IL-1β release from blood not primed with LPS. ATP-induced IL-1β release was observed with LPS-primed blood from eight different pedigrees or cross breeds. Long-term incubations (24h) with LPS induced IL-1β release in canine blood in a concentration-dependent manner. This process was not altered by co-incubation with A438079. LPS-induced IL-1β release was observed with blood from 10 different pedigrees or cross breeds. These results demonstrate that both extracellular ATP and LPS can induce IL-1β release in dogs, and that ATP- but not LPS-induced IL-1β release in blood is dependent on P2X7 activation. These findings support the role of both P2X7 and TLR4 in IL-1β release in dogs.

  20. Extracellular ATP in the Exocrine Pancreas – ATP Release, Signalling and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena

    ATP plays an important role as an autocrine/paracrine signalling molecule, being released from a number of tissues, in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. Released ATP induces Ca2+ - and/or cAMP - dependent cellular responses via activation of ubiquitously expressed P2X and P2......Y receptors. Previously, our group has shown that cholinergic stimulation of acini caused ATP release into ducts and ATP is an important regulator of ductal functions by being involved in ion and fluid secretion. Pancreatic duct cells are exposed to a number of stimuli, well known to induce ATP...... release. So far, the contribution of duct cells in purinergic signalling has never been studied. This work presents that both acinar and duct cells are sources of extracellular ATP in the exocrine pancreas. Here we show that duct cells release ATP in response to several physiological...

  1. Extracellular ATP in the Exocrine Pancreas – ATP Release, Signalling and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena

    ATP plays an important role as an autocrine/paracrine signalling molecule, being released from a number of tissues, in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. Released ATP induces Ca2+ - and/or cAMP - dependent cellular responses via activation of ubiquitously expressed P2X and P2......Y receptors. Previously, our group has shown that cholinergic stimulation of acini caused ATP release into ducts and ATP is an important regulator of ductal functions by being involved in ion and fluid secretion. Pancreatic duct cells are exposed to a number of stimuli, well known to induce ATP...... release. So far, the contribution of duct cells in purinergic signalling has never been studied. This work presents that both acinar and duct cells are sources of extracellular ATP in the exocrine pancreas. Here we show that duct cells release ATP in response to several physiological...

  2. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  3. Review article: immediate-release proton-pump inhibitor therapy--potential advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, C W

    2005-12-01

    The absorption of most oral proton-pump inhibitors is delayed by the enteric coating required to protect the acid-labile proton-pump inhibitor from degradation in the stomach and, as a result, antisecretory effect is also delayed. This article provides an overview of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a new immediate-release omeprazole [(IR-OME) Zegerid power for oral suspension; Santarus Inc., San Diego, CA, USA] and its potential advantages over delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors. Immediate-release omeprazole has a higher mean peak plasma omeprazole concentration (C(max)) and a significantly shorter mean time to reach C(max) (t(max)) than delayed-release omeprazole. Immediate-release omeprazole 40 mg has a prolonged antisecretory effect with median intragastric pH above 4.0 for 18.6 h/day at steady-state, after 7 days of once daily dosing. The sodium bicarbonate in immediate-release omeprazole protects the uncoated omeprazole from degradation by gastric acid. The accelerated antisecretory action of immediate-release omeprazole compared with delayed-release omeprazole may be due to the activation of proton pumps by the rapid neutralization of intragastric acid by the sodium bicarbonate. The faster onset of action seen with immediate-release omeprazole is not achieved by using an antacid with a delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor, because administering antacids with conventional delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors does not significantly enhance absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor. In conclusion, immediate-release omeprazole is associated with rapid absorption of omeprazole and rapid onset of antisecretory effect, without compromising the duration of acid suppression.

  4. ATP release and extracellular nucleotidase activity in erythrocytes and coronary circulation of rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Agnisola, Claudio; Novak, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that rainbow trout erythrocytes release ATP upon deoxygenation, a mechanism that enables mammalian erythrocytes to produce local vasodilation. We also investigated ATP release and ectonucleotidase activity in the coronary circulation of the isolated trout...... heart. Erythrocytes suspended in an albumin-containing saline and equilibrated at physiological Pco(2) showed negligible hemolysis (ATP. The elevation of extracellular [ATP] was higher in the presence of the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL 67156 than...... in its absence, revealing the presence of ectonucleotidase activity. The induction of either a slow (minutes) or a fast (seconds) decrease in hemoglobin O(2) saturation did not lead to additional ATP release. An elevation of Pco(2) was also without influence on erythrocyte ATP release. In the saline...

  5. ATP release and extracellular nucleotidase activity in erythrocytes and coronary circulation of rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Agnisola, Claudio; Novak, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that rainbow trout erythrocytes release ATP upon deoxygenation, a mechanism that enables mammalian erythrocytes to produce local vasodilation. We also investigated ATP release and ectonucleotidase activity in the coronary circulation of the isolated trout...... heart. Erythrocytes suspended in an albumin-containing saline and equilibrated at physiological Pco2 showed negligible hemolysis (ATP. The elevation of extracellular [ATP] was higher in the presence of the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL 67156 than...... in its absence, revealing the presence of ectonucleotidase activity. The induction of either a slow (minutes) or a fast (seconds) decrease in hemoglobin O2 saturation did not lead to additional ATP release. An elevation of Pco2 was also without influence on erythrocyte ATP release. In the saline...

  6. ATP release and extracellular nucleotidase activity in erythrocytes and coronary circulation of rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Agnisola, Claudio; Novak, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that rainbow trout erythrocytes release ATP upon deoxygenation, a mechanism that enables mammalian erythrocytes to produce local vasodilation. We also investigated ATP release and ectonucleotidase activity in the coronary circulation of the isolated trout...... heart. Erythrocytes suspended in an albumin-containing saline and equilibrated at physiological Pco2 showed negligible hemolysis (ATP. The elevation of extracellular [ATP] was higher in the presence of the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL 67156 than...... in its absence, revealing the presence of ectonucleotidase activity. The induction of either a slow (minutes) or a fast (seconds) decrease in hemoglobin O2 saturation did not lead to additional ATP release. An elevation of Pco2 was also without influence on erythrocyte ATP release. In the saline...

  7. Neutrophils recruited to sites of infection protect from virus challenge by releasing neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N; Wong, Connie H Y; Zemp, Franz J; McDonald, Braedon; Rahman, Masmudur M; Forsyth, Peter A; McFadden, Grant; Kubes, Paul

    2013-02-13

    Neutrophils mediate bacterial clearance through various mechanisms, including the release of mesh-like DNA structures or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria. Although neutrophils are also recruited to sites of viral infection, their role in antiviral innate immunity is less clear. We show that systemic administration of virus analogs or poxvirus infection induces neutrophil recruitment to the liver microvasculature and the release of NETs that protect host cells from virus infection. After systemic intravenous poxvirus challenge, mice exhibit thrombocytopenia and the recruitment of both neutrophils and platelets to the liver vasculature. Circulating platelets interact with, roll along, and adhere to the surface of adherent neutrophils, forming large, dynamic aggregates. These interactions facilitate the release of NETs within the liver vasculature that are able to protect host cells from poxvirus infection. These findings highlight the role of NETs and early tissue-wide responses in preventing viral infection.

  8. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqani Arsalan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes. Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially

  9. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqqani, Arsalan S; Delaney, Christie E; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Sodja, Caroline; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-10

    In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood-brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in 'externalizing' brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially interact with both primary astrocytes and cortical neurons

  10. Participation of dectin-1 receptor on NETs release against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: Role on extracellular killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão; Fernandes, Reginaldo Keller; de Almeida Balderramas, Helanderson; Rodrigues, Daniela Ramos; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; de Campos Soares, Ângela Maria Victoriano

    2016-02-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus from the Paracoccidioides genus, which is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a chronic, subacute or acute mycosis, with visceral and cutaneous involvement. This disease that is acquired through inhalation primarily attacks the lungs but, can spread to other organs. Phagocytic cells as neutrophils play an important role during innate immune response against this fungus, but studies on antifungal activities of these cells are scarce. In addition to their ability to eliminate pathogens by phagocytosis and antimicrobial secretions, neutrophils can trap and kill microorganisms by release of extracellular structures composed by DNA and antimicrobial proteins, called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Here, we provide evidence that P. brasiliensis virulent strain (P. brasiliensis 18) induces NETs release. These structures were well evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, and specific NETs compounds such as histone, elastase and DNA were shown by confocal microscopy. In addition, we have shown that dectin-1 receptor is the main PRR to which fungus binds to induce NETS release. Fungi were ensnared by NETs, denoting the role of these structures in confining the fungus, avoiding dissemination. NETs were also shown to be involved in fungus killing, since fungicidal activity detected before and mainly after neutrophils activation with TNF-α, IFN-γ and GM-CSF was significantly inhibited by cocultures treatment with DNAse.

  11. Physical exercise induces rapid release of small extracellular vesicles into the circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Frühbeis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs by default and in response to diverse stimuli for the purpose of cell communication and tissue homeostasis. EVs are present in all body fluids including peripheral blood, and their appearance correlates with specific physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we show that physical activity is associated with the release of nano-sized EVs into the circulation. Healthy individuals were subjected to an incremental exercise protocol of cycling or running until exhaustion, and EVs were isolated from blood plasma samples taken before, immediately after and 90 min after exercise. Small EVs with the size of 100–130 nm, that carried proteins characteristic of exosomes, were significantly increased immediately after cycling exercise and declined again within 90 min at rest. In response to treadmill running, elevation of small EVs was moderate but appeared more sustained. To delineate EV release kinetics, plasma samples were additionally taken at the end of each increment of the cycling exercise protocol. Release of small EVs into the circulation was initiated in an early phase of exercise, before the individual anaerobic threshold, which is marked by the rise of lactate. Taken together, our study revealed that exercise triggers a rapid release of EVs with the characteristic size of exosomes into the circulation, initiated in the aerobic phase of exercise. We hypothesize that EVs released during physical activity may participate in cell communication during exercise-mediated adaptation processes that involve signalling across tissues and organs.

  12. C. elegans ciliated sensory neurons release extracellular vesicles that function in animal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Silva, Malan; Haas, Leonard A; Morsci, Natalia S; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-03-03

    Cells release extracellular vesicles (ECVs) that play important roles in intercellular communication and may mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. Many fundamental aspects of ECV biogenesis and signaling have yet to be determined, with ECV detection being a challenge and obstacle due to the small size (100 nm) of the ECVs. We developed an in vivo system to visualize the dynamic release of GFP-labeled ECVs. We show here that specific Caenorhabdidits elegans ciliated sensory neurons shed and release ECVs containing GFP-tagged polycystins LOV-1 and PKD-2. These ECVs are also abundant in the lumen surrounding the cilium. Electron tomography and genetic analysis indicate that ECV biogenesis occurs via budding from the plasma membrane at the ciliary base and not via fusion of multivesicular bodies. Intraflagellar transport and kinesin-3 KLP-6 are required for environmental release of PKD-2::GFP-containing ECVs. ECVs isolated from wild-type animals induce male tail-chasing behavior, while ECVs isolated from klp-6 animals and lacking PKD-2::GFP do not. We conclude that environmentally released ECVs play a role in animal communication and mating-related behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. TLR-Activated Gap Junction Channels Protect Mice against Bacterial Infection through Extracellular UDP Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Juliang; Zhang, Guangxu; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Tan, Binghe; Lv, Zhangsheng; Liu, Mingyao; Ren, Hua; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular UDP (eUDP), released as a danger signal by stressed or apoptotic cells, plays an important role in a series of physiological processes. Although the mechanism of eUDP release in apoptotic cells has been well defined, how the eUDP is released in innate immune responses remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that UDP was released in both Escherichia coli-infected mice and LPS- or Pam3CSK4-treated macrophages. Also, LPS-induced UDP release could be significantly blocked by selective TLR4 inhibitor Atractylenolide I and selective gap junction inhibitors carbenoxolone and flufenamic acid (FFA), suggesting the key role of TLR signaling and gap junction channels in this process. Meanwhile, eUDP protected mice from peritonitis by reducing invaded bacteria that could be rescued by MRS2578 (selective P2Y6 receptor inhibitor) and FFA. Then, connexin 43, as one of the gap junction proteins, was found to be clearly increased by LPS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, if we blocked LPS-induced ERK signaling by U0126, the expression of connexin 43 and UDP release was also inhibited dramatically. In addition, UDP-induced MCP-1 secretion was significantly reduced by MRS2578, FFA, and P2Y6 mutation. Accordingly, pretreating mice with U0126 and Gap26 increased invaded bacteria and aggravated mice death. Taken together, our study reveals an internal relationship between danger signals and TLR signaling in innate immune responses, which suggests a potential therapeutic significance of gap junction channel-mediated UDP release in infectious diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Respiratory infections cause the release of extracellular vesicles: implications in exacerbation of asthma/COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suffwan Eltom

    Full Text Available Infection-related exacerbations of respiratory diseases are a major health concern; thus understanding the mechanisms driving them is of paramount importance. Despite distinct inflammatory profiles and pathological differences, asthma and COPD share a common clinical facet: raised airway ATP levels. Furthermore, evidence is growing to suggest that infective agents can cause the release of extracellular vesicle (EVs in vitro and in bodily fluids. ATP can evoke the P2X7/caspase 1 dependent release of IL-1β/IL-18 from EVs; these cytokines are associated with neutrophilia and are increased during exacerbations. Thus we hypothesized that respiratory infections causes the release of EVs in the airway and that the raised ATP levels, present in respiratory disease, triggers the release of IL-1β/IL-18, neutrophilia and subsequent disease exacerbations.To begin to test this hypothesis we utilised human cell-based assays, ex vivo murine BALF, in vivo pre-clinical models and human samples to test this hypothesis.Data showed that in a murine model of COPD, known to have increased airway ATP levels, infective challenge causes exacerbated inflammation. Using cell-based systems, murine models and samples collected from challenged healthy subjects, we showed that infection can trigger the release of EVs. When exposed to ATP the EVs release IL-1β/IL-18 via a P2X7/caspase-dependent mechanism. Furthermore ATP challenge can cause a P2X7 dependent increase in LPS-driven neutrophilia.This preliminary data suggests a possible mechanism for how infections could exacerbate respiratory diseases and may highlight a possible signalling pathway for drug discovery efforts in this area.

  15. Review article: similarities and differences among delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J R; Howden, C W

    2005-12-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors are acid-labile, and require an enteric coating to protect them from degradation in the stomach when given orally. However, this leads to delayed absorption and onset of action of the proton-pump inhibitor. This article aims to review the similarities and differences between the various formulations of delayed release proton-pump inhibitors. Delayed-release omeprazole and delayed-release lansoprazole have been suspended in sodium bicarbonate for tube administration; however, for omeprazole, absorption is further impaired and antisecretory effects are disappointing. Although such formulations may be more convenient for clinical use in certain patient groups, absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor is still influenced by residual enteric coating. There are few differences among the currently available delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors with respect to their pharmacodynamic effects during chronic administration. There are minor formulation-based pharmacokinetic differences among these agents, primarily reflected in their bioavailability following the first few doses. Differences in bioavailability may explain slight differences in the rate of onset of maximal antisecretory effect. However, minor pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences are not associated with meaningful differences in clinical outcomes.

  16. Vesicle-independent extracellular release of a proinflammatory outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressively progressing periodontitis. Extracellular release of bacterial outer membrane proteins has been suggested to mainly occur via outer membrane vesicles. This study investigated the presence and conservation of peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (AaPAL among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, the immunostimulatory effect of AaPAL, and whether live cells release this structural outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form independent of vesicles. Results The pal locus and its gene product were confirmed in clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunoblotting. Culturing under different growth conditions revealed no apparent requirement for the AaPAL expression. Inactivation of pal in a wild-type strain (D7S and in its spontaneous laboratory variant (D7SS resulted in pleiotropic cellular effects. In a cell culture insert model (filter pore size 0.02 μm, AaPAL was detected from filtrates when strains D7S and D7SS were incubated in serum or broth in the inserts. Electron microscopy showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans vesicles (0.05–0.2 μm were larger than the filter pores and that there were no vesicles in the filtrates. The filtrates were immunoblot negative for a cytoplasmic marker, cyclic AMP (cAMP receptor protein. An ex vivo model indicated cytokine production from human whole blood stimulated by AaPAL. Conclusion Free-soluble AaPAL can be extracellularly released in a process independent of vesicles.

  17. Conformational Dynamics on the Extracellular Side of LeuT Controlled by Na+ and K+ Ions and the Protonation State of Glu290.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelashvili, George; Schmidt, Solveig Gaarde; Shi, Lei; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Weinstein, Harel

    2016-09-16

    Ions play key mechanistic roles in the gating dynamics of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs). In recent microsecond scale molecular dynamics simulations of a complete model of the dopamine transporter, a NSS protein, we observed a partitioning of K(+) ions from the intracellular side toward the unoccupied Na2 site of dopamine transporter following the release of the Na2-bound Na(+) Here we evaluate with computational simulations and experimental measurements of ion affinities under corresponding conditions, the consequences of K(+) binding in the Na2 site of LeuT, a bacterial homolog of NSS, when both Na(+) ions and substrate have left, and the transporter prepares for a new cycle. We compare the results with the consequences of binding Na(+) in the same apo system. Analysis of >50-μs atomistic molecular dynamics and enhanced sampling trajectories of constructs with Glu(290), either charged or neutral, point to the Glu(290) protonation state as a main determinant in the structural reconfiguration of the extracellular vestibule of LeuT in which a "water gate" opens through coordinated motions of residues Leu(25), Tyr(108), and Phe(253) The resulting water channel enables the binding/dissociation of the Na(+) and K(+) ions that are prevalent, respectively, in the extracellular and intracellular environments.

  18. Time-dependent release of extracellular vesicle subpopulations in tumor CABA I cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Ilaria; Di Francesco, Marianna; Cantone, Laura; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Bollati, Valentina; Carta, Gaspare; Dolo, Vincenza

    2015-11-01

    Investigations into extracellular vesicles (EVs) have significantly increased since their role in physiological and pathological processes has become more clearly understood. Furthermore, it has become increasingly clear that several subpopulations of EVs exist, such as exosomes (EXOs) and microvesicles (MVs). Various methods and techniques used to identify and isolate the specific EVs subpopulations exist. However, these methods should be further elucidated. A deep understanding of the different factors that affect the EVs release may therefore be useful for the standardization of protocols and to establish guidelines for a more adequate analysis and correct inter‑laboratory comparison. In the present study, we investigated whether composition and molecular features of EVs altered over time following a trigger stimulus. Starved CABA I cells were stimulated with FBS and conditioned medium was collected after different time intervals (30 min and 4, 8 and 18 h). The dynamic of EVs release was time-dependent, as shown by the results of scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the time elapsed from the stimulus affected the size distribution (as highlighted by transmission electron microscopy and NanoSight assay), amount (in terms of the number of particles and protein amount) and molecular composition (CD63, HLA, Ago-2, gelatinases, and plasminogen activators) suggesting that, different EVs subpopulations were released at different time intervals following cell stimulation. Collectively, the results suggested that, parameters useful to standardize procedures for EVs isolation, including stimulation time should be considered.

  19. Histone deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A modulates the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Park, Myoung Soo; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Cho, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Kim, Cuk Seong; Park, Jin Bong; Irani, Kaikobad; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-06-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) can be acetylated via post-translational modification. We investigated the effect of an inhibitor of histone deacetylases on the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1 in HEK293 cells. Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, induced APE1/Ref-1 secretion without changing cell viability. In a fluorescence quantitative assay, the secreted APE1/Ref-1 was estimated to be about 10 ng/mL in response to TSA (1 μM). However, TSA did not induce the secretion of lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R). TSA also caused nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. Taken together, these findings suggest that APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation.

  20. Muscle Releases Alpha-Sarcoglycan Positive Extracellular Vesicles Carrying miRNAs in the Bloodstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Guescini

    Full Text Available In the past few years, skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ producing soluble factors, called myokines, that exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that muscle releases microRNAs into the bloodstream in response to physical exercise. These microRNAs affect target cells, such as hormones and cytokines. The mechanisms underlying microRNA secretion are poorly characterized at present. Here, we investigated whether muscle tissue releases extracellular vesicles (EVs, which carry microRNAs in the bloodstream under physiological conditions such as physical exercise. Using density gradient separation of plasma from sedentary and physically fit young men we found EVs positive for TSG101 and alpha-sarcoglycan (SGCA, and enriched for miR-206. Cytometric analysis showed that the SGCA+ EVs account for 1-5% of the total and that 60-65% of these EVs were also positive for the exosomal marker CD81. Furthermore, the SGCA-immuno captured sub-population of EVs exhibited higher levels of the miR-206/miR16 ratio compared to total plasma EVs. Finally, a significant positive correlation was found between the aerobic fitness and muscle-specific miRNAs and EV miR-133b and -181a-5p were significantly up-regulated after acute exercise. Thus, our study proposes EVs as a novel means of muscle communication potentially involved in muscle remodeling and homeostasis.

  1. Extracellular vesicles released following heat stress induce bystander effect in unstressed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mulcahy, Laura Ann; Jacobs, Laura Ann; Samuel, Priya; Akbar, Naveed; Pink, Ryan Charles; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Cells naïve to stress can display the effects of stress, such as DNA damage and apoptosis, when they are exposed to signals from stressed cells; this phenomenon is known as the bystander effect. We previously showed that bystander effect induced by ionising radiation are mediated by extracellular vesicles (EVs). Bystander effect can also be induced by other types of stress, including heat shock, but it is unclear whether EVs are involved. Here we show that EVs released from heat shocked cells are also able to induce bystander damage in unstressed populations. Naïve cells treated with media conditioned by heat shocked cells showed higher levels of DNA damage and apoptosis than cells treated with media from control cells. Treating naïve cells with EVs derived from media conditioned by heat shocked cells also induced a bystander effect when compared to control, with DNA damage and apoptosis increasing whilst the level of cell viability was reduced. We demonstrate that treatment of naïve cells with heat shocked cell-derived EVs leads to greater invasiveness in a trans-well Matrigel assay. Finally, we show that naïve cells treated with EVs from heat-shocked cells are more likely to survive a subsequent heat shock, suggesting that these EVs mediate an adaptive response. We propose that EVs released following stress mediate an intercellular response that leads to apparent stress in neighbouring cells but also greater robustness in the face of a subsequent insult.

  2. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universität Dresden, Tatzberg 47–49, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in

  3. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J McCoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf. Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases.In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections.Human innate immune cells are able to recognize, attach to and kill B. malayi

  4. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Ciaran J.; Reaves, Barbara J.; Giguère, Steeve; Coates, Ruby; Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Background Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf). Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs) in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases. Principal findings In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections. Conclusions/Significance Human innate immune cells are able to

  5. Histone deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A modulates the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Park, Myoung Soo; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Cho, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Kim, Cuk Seong; Park, Jin Bong [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Irani, Kaikobad [Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Jeon, Byeong Hwa, E-mail: bhjeon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Trichostatin A (TSA) increased APE1/Ref-1 secretion in HEK293 cells. •Lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R) was not secreted by TSA. •TSA induced cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. •APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation. -- Abstract: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) can be acetylated via post-translational modification. We investigated the effect of an inhibitor of histone deacetylases on the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1 in HEK293 cells. Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, induced APE1/Ref-1 secretion without changing cell viability. In a fluorescence quantitative assay, the secreted APE1/Ref-1 was estimated to be about 10 ng/mL in response to TSA (1 μM). However, TSA did not induce the secretion of lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R). TSA also caused nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. Taken together, these findings suggest that APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation.

  6. β2 integrin mediates hantavirus-induced release of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Martin J; Lalwani, Pritesh; Krautkrӓmer, Ellen; Peters, Thorsten; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Krüger, Renate; Hofmann, Jörg; Seeger, Karl; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2014-06-30

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses are emerging human pathogens that cause severe human disease. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood, as hantaviruses replicate in endothelial and epithelial cells without causing any cytopathic effect. We demonstrate that hantaviruses strongly stimulated neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Hantavirus infection induced high systemic levels of circulating NETs in patients and this systemic NET overflow was accompanied by production of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens. Analysis of the responsible mechanism using neutrophils from β2 null mice identified β2 integrin receptors as a master switch for NET induction. Further experiments suggested that β2 integrin receptors such as complement receptor 3 (CR3) and 4 (CR4) may act as novel hantavirus entry receptors. Using adenoviruses, we confirmed that viral interaction with β2 integrin induced strong NET formation. Collectively, β2 integrin-mediated systemic NET overflow is a novel viral mechanism of immunopathology that may be responsible for characteristic aspects of hantavirus-associated disease such as kidney and lung damage.

  7. Factor H Binds to Extracellular DNA Traps Released from Human Blood Monocytes in Response to Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Luke D.; Abdelfatah, Mahmoud A.; Jo, Emeraldo A. H.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Westermann, Martin; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Lorkowski, Stefan; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Upon systemic infection with human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans), human monocytes and polymorph nuclear neutrophilic granulocytes are the first immune cells to respond and come into contact with C. albicans. Monocytes exert immediate candidacidal activity and inhibit germination, mediate phagocytosis, and kill fungal cells. Here, we show that human monocytes spontaneously respond to C. albicans cells via phagocytosis, decondensation of nuclear DNA, and release of this decondensed DNA in the form of extracellular traps (called monocytic extracellular traps: MoETs). Both subtypes of monocytes (CD14++CD16−/CD14+CD16+) formed MoETs within the first hours upon contact with C. albicans. MoETs were characterized by the presence of citrullinated histone, myeloperoxidase, lactoferrin, and elastase. MoETs were also formed in response to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, indicating a general reaction of monocytes to infectious microbes. MoET induction differs from extracellular trap formation in macrophages as MoETs are not triggered by simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and inducer of extracellular traps in macrophages. Extracellular traps from both monocytes and neutrophils activate complement and C3b is deposited. However, factor H (FH) binds via C3b to the extracellular DNA, mediates cofactor activity, and inhibits the induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta in monocytes. Altogether, the results show that human monocytes release extracellular DNA traps in response to C. albicans and that these traps finally bind FH via C3b to presumably support clearance without further inflammation. PMID:28133459

  8. PML-RARa modulates the vascular signature of extracellular vesicles released by acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Garnier, Delphine; Lee, Tae Hoon; D'Asti, Esterina; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is believed to impact the vascular phenotype and microenvironment in cancer, at least in part, through mechanisms involving extracellular vesicles (EVs). We explored these questions in the context of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (NB4) expressing oncogenic fusion protein, PML-RARa and exquisitely sensitive to its clinically used antagonist, the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). We report that NB4 cells produce considerable numbers of EVs, which are readily taken up by cultured endothelial cells triggering their increased survival. NB4 EVs contain PML-RARa transcript, but no detectable protein, which is also absent in endothelial cells upon the vesicle uptake, thereby precluding an active intercellular trafficking of this oncogene in this setting. ATRA treatment changes the emission profile of NB4-related EVs resulting in preponderance of smaller vesicles, an effect that occurs in parallel with the onset of cellular differentiation. ATRA also increases IL-8 mRNA and protein content in NB4 cells and their EVs, while decreasing the levels of VEGF and tissue factor (TF). Endothelial cell uptake of NB4-derived EVs renders these cells more TF-positive and procoagulant, and this effect is diminished by pre-treatment of EV donor cells with ATRA. Profiling angiogenesis-related transcripts in intact and ATRA-treated APL cells and their EVs reveals multiple differences attributable to cellular responses and EV molecular packaging. These observations point to the potential significance of changes in the angiogenic signature and activity associated with EVs released from tumor cells subjected to targeted therapy.

  9. Characterisation of adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles released pre- and post-adipogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine D. Connolly

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are submicron vesicles released from many cell types, including adipocytes. EVs are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-driven cardiovascular disease, although the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs are not well described. We sought to define the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs before and after adipogenesis, hypothesising that adipogenesis would affect EV structure, molecular composition and function. Using 3T3-L1 cells, EVs were harvested at day 0 and day 15 of differentiation. EV and cell preparations were visualised by electron microscopy and EVs quantified by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA. EVs were then assessed for annexin V positivity using flow cytometry; lipid and phospholipid composition using 2D thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography; and vesicular protein content by an immuno-phenotyping assay. Pre-adipogenic cells are connected via a network of protrusions and EVs at both time points display classic EV morphology. EV concentration is elevated prior to adipogenesis, particularly in exosomes and small microvesicles. Parent cells contain higher proportions of phosphatidylserine (PS and show higher annexin V binding. Both cells and EVs contain an increased proportion of arachidonic acid at day 0. PREF-1 was increased at day 0 whilst adiponectin was higher at day 15 indicating EV protein content reflects the stage of adipogenesis of the cell. Our data suggest that EV production is higher in cells before adipogenesis, particularly in vesicles <300 nm. Cells at this time point possess a greater proportion of PS (required for EV generation whilst corresponding EVs are enriched in signalling fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and markers of adipogenesis, such as PREF-1 and PPARγ.

  10. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  11. Ligation of Signal Inhibitory Receptor on Leukocytes-1 Suppresses the Release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Kristof Van Avondt; Ruth Fritsch-Stork; Derksen, Ronald H W M; Linde Meyaard

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE), since netting neutrophils release potentially immunogenic autoantigens including histones, LL37, human neutrophil peptide (HNP), and self-DNA. In turn, these NETs activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells resulting in aggravation of inflammation and disease. How suppression of NET formation can be targeted for treatment has not been reported yet. Signal Inhibitory Receptor on Leuk...

  12. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  13. The Role of Extracellular Ca2+Influx, Intracellular Ca2+ Release and Calmodulin in Mouse Egg Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The effects of various Ca2+-modifying drugs on moue egg fertilization were studied. Ca2+ chelator, ethylen glycol-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-tetracetic acid (EGTA) ,and calmodulin (CaM) antagonist,trifluoperzaine (TFP) ,inhibited fertilization in a dose-dependent manner,whild Ca2+ channel bolcker,verapamil ,did not have any effect. When intracellular Ca2+ release was blocked by 8-(N, N-diethylamino) octy1-3,4,5-trimethoxy- benzonate (TMB-8) or the Ca2+ oscillations were inhibited by an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-AT- Pase,thapsigargin,the second polar body emission and pronuclear formation were significantly decreased. In contrast,inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ release via bolckage of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) production by neomycin or lithium did not affect fertilization. The results sugest that both extracellular influx,intracellu- lar Ca2+ release and CaM activation are required for normal fertilization. However ,extracellular influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and intracellular release induced by IP3 are not the only pathways for producing Ca2+ transients in moue eggs.

  14. The Role of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx,Intracellular Ca2+ Release and Calmodulin in Mouse Egg Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunQing-yuan; TanJing-he; 等

    1999-01-01

    The effects of various Ca2+-modifying drugs on moue egg fertilization were studied.Ca2+ chelator,ethylen glycol-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-tetracetic acid(EGTA),and calmodulin(CaM) antagonist,trifluoperzaine (TFP),inhibited fertilization in a dose-dependent manner,whild Ca2+ channel bolcker,verspamil,did not have any effect.When intracellular Ca2+ release was blocked by 8-(N,N-diethylamino) octy 1-3,4,5-trimethoxy-benzonate(TME-8) or the Ca2+ oscillations were inhibited by an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-At-Pase,thapsigargin,the second polar body emission and pronuclear formation were significantly decreased.In contrast,inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ release via bolckage of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) production by neomycin or lithium did not affect fertilization.The results sugest that both extracellular influx,intracellular Ca2+ release and CaM activation are required for mormal fertilization.However,extracellular influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and intracellular release induced by IP3 and not the only pathways for producing Ca2+ transients in moue eggs.

  15. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1/VSOP inhibits neutrophil granule release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Aratani, Yasuaki; Adissu, Hibret A; Miyawaki, Nana; Sasaki, Mari; Suzuki, Kazuo; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granule exocytosis is crucial for host defense and inflammation. Neutrophils contain 4 types of granules, the exocytotic release of which is differentially regulated. This exocytosis is known to be driven by diverse mediators, including calcium and nucleotides, but the precise molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We show in the present study that voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels are necessary for the proper release of azurophilic granules in neutrophils. On activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and IgG, neutrophils derived from Hvcn1 gene knockout mouse exhibited greater secretion of MPO and elastase than WT cells. In contrast, release of LTF enriched in specific granules was not enhanced in these cells. The excess release of azurophilic granules in Hv1/VSOP-deficient neutrophils was suppressed by inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity and, in part, by valinomycin, a potassium ionophore. In addition, Hv1/VSOP-deficient mice exhibited more severe lung inflammation after intranasal Candida albicans infection than WT mice. These findings suggest that the Hv channel acts to specifically dampen the release of azurophilic granules through, in part, the suppression of increased positive charges at the plasma membrane accompanied by the activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos Baltazar, Ludmila; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2016-03-30

    ABSTRACT

    Histoplasma capsulatumproduces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment ofH. capsulatumcells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bindH. capsulatumheat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion.

    IMPORTANCEDiverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a

  17. Role of melanin in release of extracellular enzymes and selection of aggressive isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Ramesh; Kumar, Manoj; Kushwaha, Chanda; Shah, Kavita; Joshi, Arun K

    2014-08-01

    Eighteen barley isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana belonging to wild and clonal type of black, mixed and white subpopulations were quantitatively assayed for their melanin content and aggressiveness with respect to production of some of the extracellular enzymes such as cellulase, pectinase, amylase and protease. Cellulase and pectinase constituted major portion of the enzymes recovered from the black, mixed and white isolates. Enzyme production and aggressiveness were relatively higher in melanin devoid or low melanin isolates. The melanin deficient isolates were also differentiated from black and mixed isolates on the basis of variation in internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA. Higher enzyme productions positively correlated with area under disease progress curve (AUDPC) and lesion development. Melanin content was negatively correlated with extracellular enzymes and aggressiveness of the isolates. Based on melanin content, lesion size, AUDPC and extracellular enzymes, the isolates were grouped in two major clusters (I and II) with further division of cluster II into two sub-clusters (II-A and II-B). The results appears to indicate a possible role of melanin in release of extracellular enzymes and hence in evolution and selection of aggressive isolates of B. sorokiniana in barley.

  18. Effect of Organic Acids and Protons on Release of Non-Exchangeable NH4+ in Flooded Paddy Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-Song; SHAO Xing-Hua; LIN Xian-Yong; H. W. SCHERER

    2005-01-01

    In a model experiment, which imitated the rhizosphere of rice, the effect of organic acids (oxalic acid, citric acid) and protons on the release of non-exchangeable NH4+ and the resin adsorption of N was studied in a paddy soil, typical for Zhejiang Province, China. Oxalic and citric acids under low pH conditions, in combination with proton secretion, favored the mobilization of NH4+ ions and increased resin adsorption of N. The release of non-exchangeable NH4+ was associated with less formation of iron oxides. These could coat clay minerals and thus hinder the diffusion of NH4+ ions out of the interlayer. Protons enhanced the release of NH4+, and then they could enter the wedge zones of the clay minerals and displace non-exchangeable NH4+ ions.

  19. Extracellular Adenosine Triphosphate Associated with Amphibian Erythrocytes: Inhibition of ATP Release by Anion Channel Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    ATP may mediate contraction in the urinary bladder of the rat and guinea-pig (53,63,99,238), relaxation in taenia coli (17,63,87,173,380,381) and...receptors. This uncertainty has been generated because of findings in rabbit anococcygeus muscle (405) and guinea-pig taenia coli (457), in which, as...and Holmberg, B. The effects of extracellularly -~ applied ATP and related compounds on electrical and mechanical activity of the smooth muscle taenia

  20. Functional surface engineering of quantum dot hydrogels for selective fluorescence imaging of extracellular lactate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Ding, Shushu; Cao, Sumei; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2016-06-15

    Selective and sensitive detection of extracellular lactate is of fundamental significance for studying the metabolic alterations in tumor progression. Here we report the rational design and synthesis of a quantum-dot-hydrogel-based fluorescent probe for biosensing and bioimaging the extracellular lactate. By surface engineering the destabilized quantum dot sol with Nile Blue, the destabilized Nile-Blue-functionalized quantum dot sol cannot only self-assemble forming quantum dot hydrogel but also monitor lactate in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor and lactate dehydrogenase through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Notably, the surface engineered quantum dot hydrogel show high selectivity toward lactate over common metal ions, amino acids and other small molecules that widely coexist in biological system. Moreover, the destabilized Nile-Blue-functionalized quantum dots can encapsulate isolated cancer cells when self-assembled into a hydrogel and thus specifically detect and image the extracellular lactate metabolism. By virtue of these properties, the functionalized quantum dot hydrogel was further successfully applied to monitor the effect of metabolic agents.

  1. Release of Extracellular Polymeric Substance and Disintegration of Anaerobic Granular Sludge under Reduced Sulfur Compounds-Rich Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Kobayashi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of reduced form of sulfur compounds on granular sludge was investigated. Significant release of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS from the granular sludge occurred in the presence of sulfide and methanethiol according to various concentrations. Granular sludge also showed a rapid increase in turbidity and decrease in diameter in accordance with sulfide concentration during the long-term shaking, suggesting that the strength of the granules was reduced with high-concentration sulfide. A continuous experiment of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors with different concentrations of sulfide (10, 200, 500 mg-S/L influence demonstrated that the reactor fed with higher concentration of sulfide allowed more washout of small particle-suspended solid (SS content and soluble carbohydrate and protein, which were considered as EPS released from biofilm. Finally, the presence of sulfide negatively affected methane production, chemical oxygen demand removal and sludge retention in operational performance.

  2. Amplicon-based metagenomic analysis of mixed fungal samples using proton release amplicon sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Tonge

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technology has revolutionised microbiology by allowing concurrent analysis of whole microbial communities. Here we developed and verified similar methods for the analysis of fungal communities using a proton release sequencing platform with the ability to sequence reads of up to 400 bp in length at significant depth. This read length permits the sequencing of amplicons from commonly used fungal identification regions and thereby taxonomic classification. Using the 400 bp sequencing capability, we have sequenced amplicons from the ITS1, ITS2 and LSU fungal regions to a depth of approximately 700,000 raw reads per sample. Representative operational taxonomic units (OTUs were chosen by the USEARCH algorithm, and identified taxonomically through nucleotide blast (BLASTn. Combination of this sequencing technology with the bioinformatics pipeline allowed species recognition in two controlled fungal spore populations containing members of known identity and concentration. Each species included within the two controlled populations was found to correspond to a representative OTU, and these OTUs were found to be highly accurate representations of true biological sequences. However, the absolute number of reads attributed to each OTU differed among species. The majority of species were represented by an OTU derived from all three genomic regions although in some cases, species were only represented in two of the regions due to the absence of conserved primer binding sites or due to sequence composition. It is apparent from our data that proton release sequencing technologies can deliver a qualitative assessment of the fungal members comprising a sample. The fact that some fungi cannot be amplified by specific "conserved" primer pairs confirms our recommendation that a multi-region approach be taken for other amplicon-based metagenomic studies.

  3. Leptin stimulates pituitary prolactin release through an extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Strom, Christina N; Bailey, Sean T

    2008-01-01

    Leptin was initially identified as a regulator of appetite and weight control centers in the hypothalamus, but appears to be involved in a number of physiological processes. This study was carried out to examine the possible role of leptin in regulating prolactin (PRL) release using the teleost...... pituitary model system. This advantageous system allows isolation of a nearly pure population of lactotropes in their natural, in situ aggregated state. The rostral pars distalis were dissected from tilapia pituitaries and exposed to varying concentrations of leptin (0, 1, 10, 100 nM) for 1 h. Release...... of PRL was stimulated by leptin in a potent and concentration-dependent manner. A time-course experiment showed that the strongest response in PRL release with leptin occurs within the first hour (approximately sixfold), and stimulation was sustained after 16 h (approximately twofold). Many...

  4. Saturated fatty acid palmitate induces extracellular release of histone H3: A possible mechanistic basis for high-fat diet-induced inflammation and thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Chandan [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Ito, Takashi [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Osaka (Japan); Shrestha, Binita; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Hashiguchi, Teruto [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Maruyama, Ikuro, E-mail: rinken@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •High-fat diet feeding and palmitate induces the release of nuclear protein histone H3. •ROS production and JNK signaling mediates the release of histone H3. •Extracellular histones induces proinflammatory and procoagulant response. -- Abstract: Chronic low-grade inflammation is a key contributor to high-fat diet (HFD)-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and atherosclerosis. The inflammation is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a HFD induces low-grade inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we show that histone H3, a major protein component of chromatin, is released into the extracellular space when mice are fed a HFD or macrophages are stimulated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. In a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, palmitate activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK signaling. Inhibitors of these pathways dampened palmitate-induced histone H3 release, suggesting that the extracellular release of histone H3 was mediated, in part, through ROS and JNK signaling. Extracellular histone activated endothelial cells toexpress the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and the procoagulant molecule tissue factor, which are known to contribute to inflammatory cell recruitment and thrombosis. These results suggest the possible contribution of extracellular histone to the pathogenesis of HFD-induced inflammation and thrombosis.

  5. Extracellular Release of CD11b by TLR9 Stimulation in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbum Kim

    Full Text Available CpG-DNA upregulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cell surface markers. Investigators have shown that CD11b (integrin αM regulates TLR-triggered inflammatory responses in the macrophages and dendritic cells. Therefore, we aimed to identify the effects of CpG-DNA on the expression of CD11b in macrophages. There was no significant change in surface expression of CD11b after CpG-DNA stimulation. However, CD11b was released into culture supernatants after stimulation with phosphorothioate-backbone modified CpG-DNA such as PS-ODN CpG-DNA 1826(S. In contrast, MB-ODN 4531 and non-CpG-DNA control (regardless of backbone type and liposome-encapsulation failed to induce release of CD11b. Therefore, the context of the CpG-DNA sequence and phosphorothioate backbone modification may regulate the effects of CpG-DNA on CD11b release. Based on inhibitor studies, CD11b release is mediated by p38 MAP kinase activation, but not by the PI3K and NF-κB activation. CD11b release is mediated by lysosomal degradation and by vacuolar acidification in response to CpG-DNA stimulation. The amount of CD11b in the exosome precipitant was significantly increased by CpG-DNA stimulation in vivo and in vitro depending on TLR9. Our observations perhaps give more insight into understanding of the mechanisms involved in CpG-DNA-induced immunomodulation in the innate immunity.

  6. Gravity loading induces adenosine triphosphate release and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mai; Arakawa, Toshiya; Okayama, Miki; Shitara, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2014-11-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) receives mechanical stress (MS) from dental occlusion or orthodontic tooth movement. Mechanical stress is thought to be a trigger for remodeling of the PDL and alveolar bone, although its signaling mechanism is still unclear. So we investigated the effect of MS on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation in PDL cells. Mechanical stress was applied to human PDL cells as centrifugation-mediated gravity loading. Apyrase, Ca(2+)-free medium and purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists were utilized to analyze the contribution of purinergic receptors to ERK phosphorylation. Gravity loading and ATP increased ERK phosphorylation by 5 and 2.5 times, respectively. Gravity loading induced ATP release from PDL cells by tenfold. Apyrase and suramin diminished ERK phosphorylation induced by both gravity loading and ATP. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions the phosphorylation by gravity loading was partially decreased, whereas ATP-induced phosphorylation was unaffected. Receptors P2Y4 and P2Y6 were prominently expressed in the PDL cells. Gravity loading induced ATP release and ERK phosphorylation in PDL fibroblasts, and ATP signaling via P2Y receptors was partially involved in this phosphorylation, which in turn would enhance gene expression for the remodeling of PDL tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant‐associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates fail to form a biofilm in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via overexpression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  8. Canine Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release Induced by the Apicomplexan Parasite Neospora caninum In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengkai; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja; He, Xuexiu; Wang, Xiaocen; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-01-01

    Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum) plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, neutrophil elastase (NE), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay® kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection. PMID:27843440

  9. Canine Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release Induced by the Apicomplexan Parasite Neospora caninum In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengkai; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja; He, Xuexiu; Wang, Xiaocen; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-01-01

    Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum) plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, neutrophil elastase (NE), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay(®) kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection.

  10. The extracellular release of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 nuclear protein is mediated by acetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho Carneiro, Vitor; Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Caetano de Abreu da Silva, Isabel; Furtado Madeira da Costa, Rodrigo [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Neto Paiva, Claudia; Torres Bozza, Marcelo [Departamento de Imunologia, Instituto de Microbiologia Professor Paulo de Goes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Rosado Fantappie, Marcelo, E-mail: fantappie@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2009-12-25

    Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) was revealed to be a substrate for the parasite histone acetyltransferases SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. We found that full-length SmHMGB1, as well as its HMG-box B (but not HMG-box A) were acetylated in vitro by SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. However, SmCBP1 was able to acetylate both substrates more efficiently than SmGCN5. Interestingly, the removal of the C-terminal acidic tail of SmHMGB1 (SmHMGB1{Delta}C) resulted in increased acetylation of the protein. We showed by mammalian cell transfection assays that SmHMGB1 and SmHMGB1{Delta}C were transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment. Importantly, after NaB treatment, SmHMGB1 was also present outside the cell. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of SmHMGB1 plays a role in cellular trafficking, culminating with its secretion to the extracellular milieu. The possible role of SmHMGB1 acetylation in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is discussed.

  11. Fluconazole treatment enhances extracellular release of red pigments in the fungus Monascus purpureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Sunil H; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Chandrashekar D; Patil, Satish V

    2017-03-15

    Traditional methods for the production of food grade pigments from fungus Monascus spp. are mostly relying on submerged fermentation. However, cell bound nature and intracellular accumulation of pigments in Monascus spp is the major hurdle in pigment production by submerged fermentation. The present study focused on the investigation of the effect of the antifungal agent, fluconazole on red pigment production from Monascus purpureus (NMCC-PF01). At the optimized concentration of fluconazole (30 μg/ml), pigment production was found to be enhanced by 88% after 96 h and it remained constant even after further incubation up to 168 h. An ergosterol, a sterol specific for fungi was also extracted and estimated as a function of fungal growth. The concentration of ergosterol in fluconazole-treated fermentation broth was reduced by 49% as compared to control broth. Thus it could be responsible for facilitating the release of intracellular and cell bound pigments. Nevertheless, the role of cell transporters in transporting out the red pigments cannot be ignored and deserves further attention. Qualitative analysis of red pigment by TLC, UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometric analysis (ESIMS) has confirmed the presence of well-known pigment, Rubropunctamine. In addition, this fermentation process produces citrinin-free pigments. This novel approach will be useful to facilitate increased pigment production by the release of intracellular or cell bound Monascus pigments.

  12. Outward potassium current oscillations in macrophage polykaryons: extracellular calcium entry and calcium-induced calcium release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraiva R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Outward current oscillations associated with transient membrane hyperpolarizations were induced in murine macrophage polykaryons by membrane depolarization in the absence of external Na+. Oscillations corresponded to a cyclic activation of Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IKCa probably correlated with variations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Addition of external Na+ (8 mM immediately abolished the outward current oscillations, suggesting that the absence of the cation is necessary not only for their induction but also for their maintenance. Oscillations were completely blocked by nisoldipine. Ruthenium red and ryanodine reduced the number of outward current cycles in each episode, whereas quercetin prolonged the hyperpolarization 2- to 15-fold. Neither low molecular weight heparin nor the absence of a Na+ gradient across the membrane had any influence on oscillations. The evidence suggests that Ca2+ entry through a pathway sensitive to Ca2+ channel blockers is elicited by membrane depolarization in Na+-free medium and is essential to initiate oscillations, which are also dependent on the cyclic release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+-sensitive stores; Ca2+ ATPase acts by reducing intracellular Ca2+, thus allowing slow deactivation of IKCa. Evidence is presented that neither a Na+/Ca2+ antiporter nor Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores participate directly in the mechanism of oscillation

  13. Canine neutrophil extracellular traps release induced by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora Caninum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengkai Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, NE and MPO within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay® kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine PMN. In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation, which suggests that N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation is a NADPH oxidase-, NE-, MPO-, SOCE-, ERK 1/2- and p38 MAPK-dependent cell death process. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection.

  14. On-chip immunoelectrophoresis of extracellular vesicles released from human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Takanori; Kato, Kei; Kobayashi, Masashi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes and microvesicles have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell biology and medicine. For a better understanding of EVs and further exploration of their applications, the development of analytical methods for biological nanovesicles has been required. In particular, considering the heterogeneity of EVs, methods capable of measuring individual vesicles are desired. Here, we report that on-chip immunoelectrophoresis can provide a useful method for the differential protein expression profiling of individual EVs. Electrophoresis experiments were performed on EVs collected from the culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells using a measurement platform comprising a microcapillary electrophoresis chip and a laser dark-field microimaging system. The zeta potential distribution of EVs that reacted with an anti-human CD63 (exosome and microvesicle marker) antibody showed a marked positive shift as compared with that for the normal immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype control. Thus, on-chip immunoelectrophoresis could sensitively detect the over-expression of CD63 glycoproteins on EVs. Moreover, to explore the applicability of on-chip immunoelectrophoresis to cancer diagnosis, EVs collected from the blood of a mouse tumor model were analyzed by this method. By comparing the zeta potential distributions of EVs after their immunochemical reaction with normal IgG, and the anti-human CD63 and anti-human CD44 (cancer stem cell marker) antibodies, EVs of tumor origin circulating in blood were differentially detected in the real sample. The result indicates that the present method is potentially applicable to liquid biopsy, a promising approach to the low-invasive diagnosis of cancer.

  15. On-chip immunoelectrophoresis of extracellular vesicles released from human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Akagi

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs including exosomes and microvesicles have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell biology and medicine. For a better understanding of EVs and further exploration of their applications, the development of analytical methods for biological nanovesicles has been required. In particular, considering the heterogeneity of EVs, methods capable of measuring individual vesicles are desired. Here, we report that on-chip immunoelectrophoresis can provide a useful method for the differential protein expression profiling of individual EVs. Electrophoresis experiments were performed on EVs collected from the culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells using a measurement platform comprising a microcapillary electrophoresis chip and a laser dark-field microimaging system. The zeta potential distribution of EVs that reacted with an anti-human CD63 (exosome and microvesicle marker antibody showed a marked positive shift as compared with that for the normal immunoglobulin G (IgG isotype control. Thus, on-chip immunoelectrophoresis could sensitively detect the over-expression of CD63 glycoproteins on EVs. Moreover, to explore the applicability of on-chip immunoelectrophoresis to cancer diagnosis, EVs collected from the blood of a mouse tumor model were analyzed by this method. By comparing the zeta potential distributions of EVs after their immunochemical reaction with normal IgG, and the anti-human CD63 and anti-human CD44 (cancer stem cell marker antibodies, EVs of tumor origin circulating in blood were differentially detected in the real sample. The result indicates that the present method is potentially applicable to liquid biopsy, a promising approach to the low-invasive diagnosis of cancer.

  16. Stored platelets alter glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid species, which are differentially transferred to newly released extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienimaeki-Roemer, Annika; Ruebsaamen, Katharina; Boettcher, Alfred; Orsó, Evelyn; Scherer, Max; Liebisch, Gerhard; Kilalic, Dzenan; Ahrens, Norbert; Schmitz, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Stored platelet concentrates (PLCs) for transfusion develop a platelet storage lesion (PSL), resulting in decreased platelet (PLT) viability and function. The processes leading to PSL have not been described in detail and no data describe molecular changes occurring in all three components of stored PLCs: PLTs, PLC extracellular vesicles (PLC-EVs), and plasma. Fifty PLCs from healthy individuals were stored under standard blood banking conditions for 5 days. Changes in cholesterol, glycerophospholipid, and sphingolipid species were analyzed in PLTs, PLC-EVs, and plasma by mass spectrometry and metabolic labeling. Immunoblots were performed to compare PLT and PLC-EV protein expression. During 5 days, PLTs transferred glycerophospholipids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids to newly formed PLC-EVs, which increased corresponding lipids by 30%. Stored PLTs significantly increased ceramide (Cer; +53%) and decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate (-53%), shifting sphingolipid metabolism toward Cer. In contrast, plasma accumulated minor sphingolipids. Compared to PLTs, fresh PLC-EVs were enriched in lysophosphatidic acid (60-fold) and during storage showed significant increases in cholesterol, sphingomyelin, dihydrosphingomyelin, plasmalogen, and lysophosphatidylcholine species, as well as accumulation of apolipoproteins A-I, E, and J/clusterin. This is the first detailed analysis of lipid species in all PLC components during PLC storage, which might reflect mechanisms active during in vivo PLT senescence. Stored PLTs reduce minor sphingolipids and shift sphingolipid metabolism toward Cer, whereas in the plasma fraction minor sphingolipids increase. The composition of PLC-EVs resembles that of lipid rafts and confirms their role as carriers of bioactive molecules and master regulators in vascular disease. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  17. Release of ATP from marginal cells in the cochlea of neonatal rats can be induced by changes in extracellular and intracellular ion concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenosine triphosphate (ATP plays an important role in the cochlea. However, the source of ATP and the mechanism by which it is released remain unclear. This study investigates the presence and release mechanism of ATP in vitro cultured marginal cells isolated from the stria vascularis of the cochlea in neonatal rats. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats aged 1-3 days old were used for isolation, in vitro culture, and purification of marginal cells. Cultured marginal cells were verified by flow cytometry. Vesicles containing ATP in these cells were identified by fluorescence staining. The bioluminescence assay was used for determination of ATP concentration in the extracellular fluid released by marginal cells. Assays for ATP concentration were performed when the ATP metabolism of cells was influenced, and ionic concentrations in intracellular and extracellular fluid were found to change. RESULTS: Evaluation of cultured marginal cells with flow cytometry revealed the percentage of fluorescently-labeled cells as 92.9% and 81.9%, for cytokeratin and vimentin, respectively. Quinacrine staining under fluorescence microscopy revealed numerous green, star-like spots in the cytoplasm of these cells. The release of ATP from marginal cells was influenced by changes in the concentration of intracellular and extracellular ions, namely extracellular K(+ and intra- and extracellular Ca(2+. Furthermore, changes in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+ induced by the inhibition of the phospholipase signaling pathway also influence the release of ATP from marginal cells. CONCLUSION: We confirmed the presence and release of ATP from marginal cells of the stria vascularis. This is the first study to demonstrate that the release of ATP from such cells is associated with the state of the calcium pump, K(+ channel, and activity of enzymes related to the phosphoinositide signaling pathway, such as adenylate cyclase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A(2.

  18. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release responses to endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones in goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Christian; Booth, Morgan; Habibi, Hamid R; Chang, John P

    2008-08-01

    The possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the stimulatory actions of two endogenous goldfish gonadotropin-releasing hormones (salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II) on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion was examined. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ERK and phosphorylated (p)ERK in goldfish brain, pituitary, liver, ovary, testis and muscle tissue extracts, as well as extracts of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells and HeLa cells. Interestingly, a third ERK-like immunoreactive band of higher molecular mass was detected in goldfish tissue and pituitary cell extracts in addition to the ERK1-p44- and ERK2-p42-like immunoreactive bands. Incubation of primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells with either a PKC-activating 4beta-phorbol ester (TPA) or a synthetic diacylglycerol, but not a 4alpha-phorbol ester, elevated the ratio of pERK/total (t)ERK for all three ERK isoforms. The stimulatory effects of TPA were attenuated by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the MEK inhibitor PD98059. sGnRH and cGnRH-II also elevated the ratio of pERK/tERK for all three ERK isoforms, in a time-, dose- and PD98059-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with PD98059 reduced the sGnRH-, cGnRH-II- and TPA-induced increases in gonadotropin subunit mRNA levels in Northern blot studies and sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release in cell column perifusion studies with goldfish pituitary cells. These results indicate that GnRH and PKC can activate ERK through MEK in goldfish pituitary cells. More importantly, the present study suggests that GnRH-induced gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release involve MEK/ERK signaling in goldfish.

  19. Pathways of proton transfer in the light-driven pump bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of proton transport in the light-driven pump bacteriorhodopsin is beginning to be understood. Light causes the all-trans to 13-cis isomerization of the retinal chromophore. This sets off a sequential and directed series of transient decreases in the pKa's of a) the retinal Schiff base, b) an extracellular proton release complex which includes asp-85, and c) a cytoplasmic proton uptake complex which includes asp-96. The timing of these pKa changes during the photoreaction cycle causes sequential proton transfers which result in the net movement of a proton across the protein, from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular surface.

  20. Mildly oxidized HDL decrease agonist-induced platelet aggregation and release of pro-coagulant platelet extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafelmeier, M; Fischer, A; Orsó, E; Konovalova, T; Böttcher, A; Liebisch, G; Matysik, S; Schmitz, G

    2017-05-01

    Stored platelet concentrates (PLCs) for therapeutic purpose, develop a platelet storage lesion (PSL), characterized by impaired platelet (PLT) viability and function, platelet extracellular vesicle (PL-EV) release and profound lipidomic changes. Whereas oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) activates PLTs and promotes atherosclerosis, effects linked to oxidized high-density lipoprotein (oxHDL) are poorly characterized. PLCs from blood donors were treated with native (nHDL) or mildly oxidized HDL (moxHDL) for 5days under blood banking conditions. Flow cytometry, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), aggregometry, immunoblot analysis and mass spectrometry were carried out to analyze PL-EV and platelet exosomes (PL-EX) release, PLT aggregation, protein expression, and PLT and plasma lipid composition. In comparison to total nHDL, moxHDL significantly decreased PL-EV release by -36% after 5days of PLT storage and partially reversed agonist-induced PLT aggregation. PL-EV release positively correlated with PLT aggregation. MoxHDL improved PLT membrane lipid homeostasis through enhanced uptake of lysophospholipids and their remodeling to corresponding phospholipid species. This also appeared for sphingomyelin (SM) and d18:0/d18:1 sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) at the expense of ceramide (Cer) and hexosylceramide (HexCer) leading to reduced Cer/S1P ratio as PLT-viability indicator. This membrane remodeling was associated with increased content of CD36 and maturation of scavenger receptor-B1 (SR-B1) protein in secreted PL-EVs. MoxHDL, more potently than nHDL, improves PLT-membrane lipid homeostasis, partially antagonizes PL-EV release and agonist-induced PLT aggregation. Altogether, this may be the result of more efficient phospho- and sphingolipid remodeling mediated by CD36 and SR-B1 in the absence of ABCA1 on PLTs. As in vitro supplement in PLCs, moxHDL has the potential to improve PLC quality and to prolong storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Releases Extracellular Vesicles That Are Associated with RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkiron, Cherie; Simonov, Denis; Muthukaruppan, Anita; Tsai, Peter; Dauros, Priscila; Green, Sasha; Hong, Jiwon; Print, Cristin G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterium-to-host signalling during infection is a complex process involving proteins, lipids and other diffusible signals that manipulate host cell biology for pathogen survival. Bacteria also release membrane vesicles (MV) that can carry a cargo of effector molecules directly into host cells. Supported by recent publications, we hypothesised that these MVs also associate with RNA, which may be directly involved in the modulation of the host response to infection. Methods and Results Using the uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain 536, we have isolated MVs and found they carry a range of RNA species. Density gradient centrifugation further fractionated and characterised the MV preparation and confirmed that the isolated RNA was associated with the highest particle and protein containing fractions. Using a new approach, RNA-sequencing of libraries derived from three different ‘size’ RNA populations (<50nt, 50-200nt and 200nt+) isolated from MVs has enabled us to now report the first example of a complete bacterial MV-RNA profile. These data show that MVs carry rRNA, tRNAs, other small RNAs as well as full-length protein coding mRNAs. Confocal microscopy visualised the delivery of lipid labelled MVs into cultured bladder epithelial cells and showed their RNA cargo labelled with 5-EU (5-ethynyl uridine), was transported into the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus. MV RNA uptake by the cells was confirmed by droplet digital RT-PCR of csrC. It was estimated that 1% of MV RNA cargo is delivered into cultured cells. Conclusions These data add to the growing evidence of pathogenic bacterial MV being associated a wide range of RNAs. It further raises the plausibility for MV-RNA-mediated cross-kingdom communication whereby they influence host cell function during the infection process. PMID:27500956

  2. Distribution of capsular types and production of muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Smith, H.E.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Peperkamp, K.; Vecht, U.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis strains (n=411), isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries were serotyped using specific antisera against serotype 1 to 28, and were phenotyped on the basis of their muramidase-released-protein (MRP) and extracellular-factor protein (EF) production. Overall, S. suis

  3. Protection of pigs against challenge with virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains by a muramidase-released protein and extracellular factor vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) vaccine in preventing infection and disease in pigs challenged either with a homologous or a heterologous Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strain (MRP EF ) was compared with the efficacy of a vaccine containing formalin-k

  4. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ly, David; Burgess, Janette K.; Brock, Thomas G.; Lee, Tak H.; Black, Judith L.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Van Ly D, Burgess JK, Brock TG, Lee TH, Black JL, Oliver BG. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 303: L239-L250, 2012. First published Ma

  5. High-density lipoprotein 3 and apolipoprotein A-I alleviate platelet storage lesion and release of platelet extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienimaeki-Roemer, Annika; Fischer, Astrid; Tafelmeier, Maria; Orsó, Evelyn; Konovalova, Tatiana; Böttcher, Alfred; Liebisch, Gerhard; Reidel, Armin; Schmitz, Gerd

    2014-09-01

    Stored platelet (PLT) concentrates (PLCs) for transfusion develop a PLT storage lesion (PSL), decreasing PLT viability and function with profound lipidomic changes and PLT extracellular vesicle (PL-EV) release. High-density lipoprotein 3 (HDL3 ) improves PLT homeostasis through silencing effects on PLT activation in vivo. This prompted us to investigate HDL3 and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) as PSL-antagonizing agents. Healthy donor PLCs were split into low-volume standard PLC storage bags and incubated with native (n)HDL3 or apoA-I from plasma ethanol fractionation (precipitate IV) for 5 days under standard blood banking conditions. Flow cytometry, Born aggregometry, and lipid mass spectrometry were carried out to analyze PL-EV release, PLT aggregation, agonist-induced PLT surface marker expression, and PLT and plasma lipid compositions. Compared to control, added nHDL3 and apoA-I significantly reduced PL-EV release by up to -62% during 5 days, correlating with the added apoA-I concentration. At the lipid level, nHDL3 and apoA-I antagonized PLT lipid loss (+12%) and decreased cholesteryl ester (CE)/free cholesterol (FC) ratios (-69%), whereas in plasma polyunsaturated/saturated CE ratios increased (+3%) and CE 16:0/20:4 ratios decreased (-5%). Administration of nHDL3 increased PLT bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate/phosphatidylglycerol (+102%) and phosphatidic acid/lysophosphatidic acid (+255%) ratios and improved thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6-induced PLT aggregation (+5%). nHDL3 and apoA-I improve PLT membrane homeostasis and intracellular lipid processing and increase CE efflux, antagonizing PSL-related reduction in PLT viability and function and PL-EV release. We suggest uptake and catabolism of nHDL3 into the PLT open canalicular system. As supplement in PLCs, nHDL3 or apoA-I from Fraction IV of plasma ethanol fractionation have the potential to improve PLC quality to prolong storage. © 2014 AABB.

  6. Extracellular vesicles released by CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells confer altered functional properties to CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Dawn T; Apollonio, Benedetta; Willimott, Shaun; Lezina, Larissa; Alharthi, Afaf; Ambrose, Ashley R; De Rossi, Giulia; Ramsay, Alan G; Wagner, Simon D

    2016-07-28

    The complex interplay between cancer cells, stromal cells, and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) regulates tumorigenesis and provides emerging targets for immunotherapies. Crosstalk between CD4(+) T cells and proliferating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) tumor B cells occurs within lymphoid tissue pseudofollicles, and investigating these interactions is essential to understand both disease pathogenesis and the effects of immunotherapy. Tumor-derived extracellular vesicle (EV) shedding is emerging as an important mode of intercellular communication in the TME. In order to characterize tumor EVs released in response to T-cell-derived TME signals, we performed microRNA (miRNA [miR]) profiling of EVs released from CLL cells stimulated with CD40 and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Our results reveal an enrichment of specific cellular miRNAs including miR-363 within EVs derived from CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells compared with parental cell miRNA content and control EVs from unstimulated CLL cells. We demonstrate that autologous patient CD4(+) T cells internalize CLL-EVs containing miR-363 that targets the immunomodulatory molecule CD69. We further reveal that autologous CD4(+) T cells that are exposed to EVs from CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells exhibit enhanced migration, immunological synapse signaling, and interactions with tumor cells. Knockdown of miR-363 in CLL cells prior to CD40/IL-4 stimulation prevented the ability of CLL-EVs to induce increased synapse signaling and confer altered functional properties to CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, these data reveal a novel role for CLL-EVs in modifying T-cell function that highlights unanticipated complexity of intercellular communication that may have implications for bidirectional CD4(+) T-cell:tumor interactions within the TME. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Developmental regulation and extracellular release of a VSG expression-site-associated gene product from Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Eleanor M; van Deursen, Frederick J; Jeacock, Laura; Smith, Katherine A; Maizels, Rick M; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Matthews, Keith

    2010-10-01

    Trypanosomes evade host immunity by exchanging variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coats. VSG genes are transcribed from telomeric expression sites, which contain a diverse family of expression-site-associated genes (ESAGs). We have discovered that the mRNAs for one ESAG family, ESAG9, are strongly developmentally regulated, being enriched in stumpy forms, a life-cycle stage in the mammalian bloodstream that is important for the maintenance of chronic parasite infections and for tsetse transmission. ESAG9 gene sequences are highly diverse in the genome and encode proteins with weak similarity to the massively diverse MASP proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi. We demonstrate that ESAG9 proteins are modified by N-glycosylation and can be shed to the external milieu, this being dependent upon coexpression with at least one other family member. The expression profile and extracellular release of ESAG9 proteins represents a novel and unexpected aspect of the transmission biology of trypanosomes in their mammalian host. We suggest that these molecules might interact with the external environment, with possible implications for infection chronicity or parasite transmission.

  8. Two different conformations in hepatitis C virus p7 protein account for proton transport and dye release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Siok Wan; Surya, Wahyu; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Torres, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    The p7 protein from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a 63 amino acid long polypeptide that is essential for replication, and is involved in protein trafficking and proton transport. Therefore, p7 is a possible target for antivirals. The consensus model for the channel formed by p7 protein is a hexameric or heptameric oligomer of α-helical hairpin monomers, each having two transmembrane domains, TM1 and TM2, where the N-terminal TM1 would face the lumen of this channel. A reported high-throughput functional assay to search for p7 channel inhibitors is based on carboxyfluorescein (CF) release from liposomes after p7 addition. However, the rationale for the dual ability of p7 to serve as an ion or proton channel in the infected cell, and to permeabilize membranes to large molecules like CF is not clear. We have recreated both activities in vitro, examining the conformation present in these assays using infrared spectroscopy. Our results indicate that an α-helical form of p7, which can transport protons, is not able to elicit CF release. In contrast, membrane permeabilization to CF is observed when p7 contains a high percentage of β-structure, or when using a C-terminal fragment of p7, encompassing TM2. We propose that the reported inhibitory effect of some small compounds, e.g., rimantadine, on both CF release and proton transport can be explained via binding to the membrane-inserted C-terminal half of p7, increasing its rigidity, in a similar way to the influenza A M2-rimantadine interaction.

  9. A novel method for high-throughput detection and quantification of neutrophil extracellular traps reveals ROS-independent NET release with immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaij, Tineke; Tengström, Fredrik C; Kamerling, Sylvia W A; Pusey, Charles D; Scherer, H Ulrich; Toes, Rene E M; Rabelink, Ton J; van Kooten, Cees; Teng, Y K Onno

    2016-06-01

    A newly-described first-line immune defence mechanism of neutrophils is the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Immune complexes (ICxs) induce low level NET release. As such, the in vitro quantification of NETs is challenging with current methodologies. In order to investigate the role of NET release in ICx-mediated autoimmune diseases, we developed a highly sensitive and automated method for quantification of NETs. After labelling human neutrophils with PKH26 and extracellular DNA with Sytox green, cells are fixed and automatically imaged with 3-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (3D-CLSM). NET release is then quantified with digital image analysis whereby the NET amount (Sytox green area) is corrected for the number of imaged neutrophils (PKH26 area). A high sensitivity of the assay is achieved by a) significantly augmenting the area of the well imaged (11%) as compared to conventional assays (0.5%) and b) using a 3D imaging technique for optimal capture of NETs, which are topologically superimposed on neutrophils. In this assay, we confirmed low levels of NET release upon human ICx stimulation which were positive for citrullinated histones and neutrophil elastase. In contrast to PMA-induced NET release, ICx-induced NET release was unchanged when co-incubated with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI). We were able to quantify NET release upon stimulation with serum from RA and SLE patients, which was not observed with normal human serum. To our knowledge, this is the first semi-automated assay capable of sensitive detection and quantification of NET release at a low threshold by using 3D CLSM. The assay is applicable in a high-throughput manner and allows the in vitro analysis of NET release in ICx-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  10. Effects of antiplatelet therapy on platelet extracellular vesicle release and procoagulant activity in health and in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David E; Ly, Ken; Aslam, Anoosha; Boland, John; Low, Joyce; Jarvis, Susan; Muller, David W; Joseph, Joanne E

    2016-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is commonly used to prevent recurrent ischemic events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Whilst their effects on platelet reactivity are well documented, it is unclear, however, whether antiplatelet therapy inhibits platelet extracellular vesicle (EV) release. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of antiplatelet therapy on platelet EV formation and procoagulant activity. Blood samples from 10 healthy controls not receiving antiplatelet therapy were incubated in vitro with aspirin or a P2Y12 inhibitor (MeSAMP). Blood samples from 50 patients receiving long-term dual antiplatelet therapy and undergoing coronary angiography were also studied. Platelet reactivity was assessed by Multiplate™ impedance aggregometry. Platelet EV formation and procoagulant activity of pretreated and untreated blood samples in response to arachidonic acid (AA), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ADP+PGE1, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP) stimulation were assessed by flow cytometry and Procoag-PL assays, respectively. Incubation of normal platelets with aspirin significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet reactivity, EV formation, and procoagulant activity, whilst MeSAMP significantly inhibited platelet reactivity and EV formation in response to AA, ADP, and TRAP, but had minimal effect on procoagulant activity. Most patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy showed an appropriate reduction in platelet reactivity in response to their treatment; however there was not complete inhibition of increased platelet and EV procoagulant activity in response to ADP, AA, or TRAP. In addition, we could not find any correlation between platelet reactivity and procoagulant activity in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy.

  11. Extracellular vesicles released from mesenchymal stromal cells modulate miRNA in renal tubular cells and inhibit ATP depletion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoso, Rafael S; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Araujo, Dayana S; Sant'Anna, Julliana F; Tetta, Ciro; Provero, Paolo; Quesenberry, Peter J; Vieyra, Adalberto; Einicker-Lamas, Marcelo; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in renal repair by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are not entirely elucidated. The paracrine secretion of bioactive molecules has been implicated in the protective effects. Besides soluble mediators, MSCs have been shown to release extracellular vesicles (EVs), involved in renal repair process for different injury models. EVs have been shown to mediate communication between cells through the transference of several molecules, like protein, bioactive lipids, mRNA, and microRNAs (miRNAs). The miRNAs are noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally modulate gene expression and are involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including those related to repair. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of MSC-EVs in the modulation of miRNAs inside renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) in an in vitro model of ischemia-reperfusion injury induced by ATP depletion. In this model we evaluated whether changes in miRNA expression were dependent on direct miRNA transfer or on transcription induction by MSC-EVs. The obtained results showed an enhanced incorporation of MSC-EVs in injured PTECs with protection from cell death. This biological effect was associated with EV-mediated miRNA transfer and with transcriptional modulation of miRNAs expressed by injured PTECs. Prediction of miRNA targets showed that miRNAs modulated in PTECs are involved in process of renal recovery with downregulation of coding-mRNAs associated with apoptosis, cytoskeleton reorganization, and hypoxia, such as CASP3 and 7, SHC1 and SMAD4. In conclusion, these results indicate that MSC-EVs may transfer and modulate the expression of several miRNAs involved in the repair and recovery process in PTECs.

  12. Effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Roger; Chen, Andrew; Sathyan, Gayatri; MacDiarmid, Scott; Gidwani, Shalini; Gupta, Suneel

    2005-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the bioavailability of the extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine. Forty-four healthy volunteers received each of 4 treatments in a 4-period crossover design. The treatments consisted of osmotically controlled extended-release oxybutynin chloride tablets at 10 mg/d or extended-release tolterodine tartrate capsules at 4 mg/d, with and without preceding treatment with 20 mg omeprazole daily for 4 days. Blood samples collected predose and at scheduled time points for 36 hours postdose were analyzed for oxybutynin and its active metabolite, N-desethyloxybutynin, or tolterodine and its active 5-hydroxymethyl metabolite, as appropriate. The AUCinfinity ratios for oxybutynin and its metabolite with and without prior omeprazole fell within the 80% to 125% range (accepted as the criterion for bioequivalence), as did those for tolterodine and its active moiety. The peak concentration ratios for oxybutynin and metabolite also conformed to this range; those for tolterodine did not. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole does not substantially alter the pharmacokinetic properties of extended-release oxybutynin but may alter those of extended-release tolterodine.

  13. Extra-cellular release and blood diffusion of BART viral micro-RNAs produced by EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baconnais Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a human epithelial malignancy consistently associated with the Epstein-Barr virus. The viral genome is contained in the nuclei of all malignant cells with abundant transcription of a family of viral microRNAs called BART miRNAs. MicroRNAs are well known intra-cellular regulatory elements of gene expression. In addition, they are often exported in the extra-cellular space and sometimes transferred in recipient cells distinct from the producer cells. Extra-cellular transport of the microRNAs is facilitated by various processes including association with protective proteins and packaging in secreted nanovesicles called exosomes. Presence of microRNAS produced by malignant cells has been reported in the blood and saliva of tumor-bearing patients, especially patients diagnosed with glioblastoma or ovarian carcinoma. In this context, it was decided to investigate extra-cellular release of BART miRNAs by NPC cells and their possible detection in the blood of NPC patients. To address this question, we investigated by quantitative RT-PCR the status of 5 microRNAs from the BART family in exosomes released by NPC cells in vitro as well as in plasma samples from NPC xenografted nude mice and NPC patients. Results We report that the BART miRNAs are released in the extra-cellular space by NPC cells being associated, at least to a large extent, with secreted exosomes. They are detected with a good selectivity in plasma samples from NPC xenografted nude mice as well as NPC patients. Conclusions Viral BART miRNAs are secreted by NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. They have enough stability to diffuse from the tumor site to the peripheral blood. This study provides a basis to explore their potential as a source of novel tumor biomarkers and their possible role in communications between malignant and non-malignant cells.

  14. Troglitazone induced cytosolic acidification via extracellular signal-response kinase activation and mitochondrial depolarization: complex I proton pumping regulates ammoniagenesis in proximal tubule-like LLC-PK1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Robert; Friday, Ellen; Turturro, Francesco; Welbourne, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    To determined the mechanism(s) through which troglitazone induces cytosolic acidification and glutamine-dependent ammoniagenesis in pig kidney derived LLC-PK1 cells. Acute experiments measured acid extrusion, acid production and simultaneous Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase activation. TRO-enhanced acid production was correlated with mitochondrial membrane potential and rotenone and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride, were employed to test specifically the role of Complex I proton pumping. Chronic experiments correlated inhibitors of Complex I with prevention of TRO-increased ammoniagenesis and affects on glutamine metabolism. Exposure to TRO acutely activated Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in a dose dependent manner associated with a fall in spontaneous cytosolic pH. Cytosolic acidosis was associated with both an increase in acid production and inhibition of sodium/hydrogen ion exchanger -mediated acid extrusion. Preventing TRO-induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase activation with Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase inhibitors blocked the increase in acid production, restored sodium/hydrogen ion exchanger-activity and prevented cytosolic acidification. Mechanistically, increased acid production was associated with a rapid mitochondrial depolarization and Complex I proton pumping. Blocking Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase activation prevented both the fall in Psim and the increased acid production suggesting that the former underlies the accelerated mitochondrial 'acid production'. Mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors EIPA and rotenone prevented increased acid production despite Extracellular Response Kinase activation and reduced sodium/hydrogen ion activity. Inhibition of Complex I prevented TRO's effects on glutamine metabolism. TRO induces cellular acidosis through Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase activation-associated acid production and impaired acid extrusion. Acutely, increased acid production reflects mitochondrial Complex I

  15. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and time intensity perceptual measurement of flavor release from lipid emulsions using trained human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Damian; Appelqvist, Ingrid; Piyasiri, Udayasika; Wooster, Tim J; Delahunty, Conor

    2011-05-11

    The effect of the fat component of liquid emulsions on dynamic "in-nose" flavor release was examined using a panel of trained human subjects (n = 6), proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), and time intensity (TI) sensory evaluation. A rigorous breathing and consumption protocol was developed, which synchronized subjects' breathing cycles and also the timing of sample introduction. Temporal changes in volatile release were measured in exhaled nostril breath by real-time PTR-MS. Corresponding changes in the perceived odor intensity could also be simultaneously measured using a push button TI device. The method facilitated accurate examination of both "preswallow" and "postswallow" phases of volatile release and perception. Volatile flavor compounds spanning a range of octanol/water partition coefficient (K(o/w)) values (1-1380) were spiked into water (0% fat) or lipid emulsions with various fat contents (2, 5, 10, and 20% fat). Replicate samples for each fat level were consumed according to the consumption protocol by six subjects. Statistical comparisons were made at the individual level and across the group for the effects of changes in the food matrix, such as fat content, on both pre- and postswallow volatile release. Significant group differences in volatile release parameters including area under the concentration curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (I(max)) were measured according to the lipid content of emulsions and volatile K(o/w). In a second experiment, using single compounds (2-heptanone, ethyl butanoate, and ethyl hexanoate), significant decreases in both in-nose volatile release and corresponding perceived odor intensities were measured with increasing fat addition. Overall, the effect of fat on in vivo release conformed to theory; fat had little effect on compounds with low K(o/w) values, but increased for volatiles with higher lipophilicity. In addition, significant pre- and postswallow differences were observed in AUC and I(max), as

  16. Histamine release induced from rat mast cells by the ionophore A23187 in the absence of extracellular calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1980-01-01

    Isolated rat mast cells were used to study whether ionophore A23187 could induce histamine release by mobilizing cellular calcium. The histamine release was a slow process which was completed after about 20 min incubation with A23187. The A23187-induced histamine release was inhibited after...... incubation of the cells with EDTA for 1 h in a 37 degrees C water bath in calcium-free medium. Reintroduction of calcium in excess of EDTA induced the release of histamine. The observations suggest that A23187 can induce histamine release by mobilizing a cellular pool of calcium....

  17. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils.

  18. Membrane vesicles containing matrix metalloproteinase-9 and fibroblast growth factor-2 are released into the extracellular space from mouse mesoangioblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Maria Elena; Geraci, Fabiana; Turturici, Giuseppina; Taverna, Simona; Albanese, Ida; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2010-07-01

    Certain proteins, including fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), have proved very effective in increasing the efficacy of mesoangioblast stem cell therapy in repairing damaged tissue. We provide the first evidence that mouse mesoangioblast stem cells release FGF-2 and MMP-9 in their active form through the production of membrane vesicles. These vesicles are produced and turned over continuously, but are stable for some time in the extracellular milieu. Mesoangioblasts shed membrane vesicles even under oxygen tensions that are lower than those typically used for cell culture and more like those of mouse tissues. These findings suggest that mesoangioblasts may themselves secrete paracrine signals and factors that make damaged tissues more amenable to cell therapy through the release of membrane vesicles. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Interaction between DNA and Drugs Having Protonable Basic Groups: Characterization through Affinity Constants, Drug Release Kinetics, and Conformational Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Liliana P; Baena, Yolima; Manzo, Rubén H

    2017-01-04

    This paper reports the in vitro characterization of the interaction between the phosphate groups of DNA and the protonated species of drugs with basic groups through the determination of the affinity constants, the reversibility of the interaction, and the effect on the secondary structure of the macromolecule. Affinity constants of the counterionic condensation DNA-drug were in the order of 10⁶. The negative electrokinetic potential of DNA decreased with the increase of the proportion of loading drugs. The drugs were slowly released from the DNA-drug complexes and had release kinetics consistent with the high degree of counterionic condensation. The circular dichroism profile of DNA was not modified by complexation with atenolol, lidocaine, or timolol, but was significantly altered by the more lipophilic drugs benzydamine and propranolol, revealing modifications in the secondary structure of the DNA. The in vitro characterization of such interactions provides a physicochemical basis that would contribute to identify the effects of this kind of drugs in cellular cultures, as well as side effects observed under their clinical use. Moreover, this methodology could also be projected to the fields of intracellular DNA transfection and the use of DNA as a carrier of active drugs.

  20. Interaction between DNA and Drugs Having Protonable Basic Groups: Characterization through Affinity Constants, Drug Release Kinetics, and Conformational Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana P. Alarcón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the in vitro characterization of the interaction between the phosphate groups of DNA and the protonated species of drugs with basic groups through the determination of the affinity constants, the reversibility of the interaction, and the effect on the secondary structure of the macromolecule. Affinity constants of the counterionic condensation DNA–drug were in the order of 106. The negative electrokinetic potential of DNA decreased with the increase of the proportion of loading drugs. The drugs were slowly released from the DNA–drug complexes and had release kinetics consistent with the high degree of counterionic condensation. The circular dichroism profile of DNA was not modified by complexation with atenolol, lidocaine, or timolol, but was significantly altered by the more lipophilic drugs benzydamine and propranolol, revealing modifications in the secondary structure of the DNA. The in vitro characterization of such interactions provides a physicochemical basis that would contribute to identify the effects of this kind of drugs in cellular cultures, as well as side effects observed under their clinical use. Moreover, this methodology could also be projected to the fields of intracellular DNA transfection and the use of DNA as a carrier of active drugs.

  1. Influence of radiographic contrast media on the nitric oxide release from human arterial and venous endothelial cells on extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, R P; Fuhrmann, R; Jung, F

    2013-01-01

    Radiographic contrast media (RCM) can vary widely in their physicochemical properties, e.g. the iodine concentration, osmolality, molecule structure, chemotoxicity, hydrophilicity, electric charge and viscosity. Besides the necessary effect of Roentgen ray absorption, which provides contrast-rich images of vessels, RCMs can have varying adverse effects. As one possible cause of microcirculatory disorders, changes in morphology and function of endothelial cells are discussed. Therefore, RCM media-induced release of nitric oxide from arterial as well as from venous endothelial cells in contact with two commercially available RCMs (Iodixanol and Iomeprol) was investigated. NO concentrations started to increase slightly in the HUVEC control cultures after 3 min incubation time, however, NO concentrations in the cultures incubated with Iomeprol 350 and Iodixanol 320 did not change over time (Iomeprol 350: p = 0.4905; Iodixanol 320: p = 0.784). On the whole, the time-dependent NO release differed for the three groups (RCM × time: p = 0.00224). This difference was due to the fact that, after incubation with the two contrast agents (Iodixanol 320: p = 0.0003; Iomeprol 350: p = 0.0168), less NO was released by the exposed HUVEC at 3 minutes and after 12 hours than by the control cells. In the control cultures of arterial endothelial cells as well as in cultures incubated with 30% v/v Iodixanol supplemented culture medium the NO release did not change. In those cultures of arterial endothelial cells supplemented with 30% v/v Iomeprol the NO release was significantly less than in control cultures and in cultures supplemented with Iodixanol (p = 0.021; p = 0.043). Inspite of a missing shear stress in our static plane vessel wall model there was a RCM-dependent difference in NO release from endothelial cells in vitro. The NO release from venous endothelial cells differed significantly from the NO release from arterial endothelial cells. While the administration of Iomeprol

  2. Enterococcus faecium biofilm formation: identification of major autolysin AtlAEfm, associated Acm surface localization, and AtlAEfm-independent extracellular DNA Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; Willems, Rob J L; Jansen, Pamela; Hendrickx, Antoni; Zhang, Xinglin; Bonten, Marc J M; Leavis, Helen L

    2013-04-16

    Enterococcus faecium is an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen causing biofilm-mediated infections in patients with medical devices. Insight into E. faecium biofilm pathogenesis is pivotal for the development of new strategies to prevent and treat these infections. In several bacteria, a major autolysin is essential for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release in the biofilm matrix, contributing to biofilm attachment and stability. In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the major autolysin of E. faecium E1162 by a bioinformatic genome screen followed by insertional gene disruption of six putative autolysin genes. Insertional inactivation of locus tag EfmE1162_2692 resulted in resistance to lysis, reduced eDNA release, deficient cell attachment, decreased biofilm, decreased cell wall hydrolysis, and significant chaining compared to that of the wild type. Therefore, locus tag EfmE1162_2692 was considered the major autolysin in E. faecium and renamed atlAEfm. In addition, AtlAEfm was implicated in cell surface exposure of Acm, a virulence factor in E. faecium, and thereby facilitates binding to collagen types I and IV. This is a novel feature of enterococcal autolysins not described previously. Furthermore, we identified (and localized) autolysin-independent DNA release in E. faecium that contributes to cell-cell interactions in the atlAEfm mutant and is important for cell separation. In conclusion, AtlAEfm is the major autolysin in E. faecium and contributes to biofilm stability and Acm localization, making AtlAEfm a promising target for treatment of E. faecium biofilm-mediated infections. IMPORTANCE Nosocomial infections caused by Enterococcus faecium have rapidly increased, and treatment options have become more limited. This is due not only to increasing resistance to antibiotics but also to biofilm-associated infections. DNA is released in biofilm matrix via cell lysis, caused by autolysin, and acts as a matrix stabilizer. In this study

  3. The importance of cell density in the interpretation of growth factor effects on collagenase IV activity release and extracellular matrix production from C6 astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M; McDonald, W; Del Maestro, R F

    1998-09-01

    We have examined the influence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the release of collagenase type IV activity and the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules using C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer culture. Collagenase type IV activity was significantly increased in a dose dependent manner in the low cell density group by treatment with FGF-2 and VEGF but significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion in the high cell density group. These results were corroborated using Western blot technique with an antibody to gelatinase A. Addition of exogenous laminin and fibronectin to the media decreased collagenase type IV activity in a dose dependent fashion with the minimum concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml. Laminin and fibronectin reached a concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml in only the high cell density group after treatment with the growth factors tested. These findings indicate that C6 astrocytoma cells appear to have two regulatory mechanisms for collagenase type IV activity which are dependent on cell density. In a low cell density, C6 astrocytoma cells respond to the dominant effect of FGF-2 and VEGF by increasing the release of collagenase IV activity. In a high cell density collagenase type IV activity is decreased due to it's down regulation by released ECM molecules in response to FGF-2 and VEGF. These regulatory mechanisms may be crucial to the understanding of the coordination of tumor-associated angiogenesis by malignant glial cells.

  4. NMDA receptor antagonism potentiates the L-DOPA-induced extracellular dopamine release in the subthalamic nucleus of hemi-parkinson rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Arfani, Anissa; Bentea, Eduard; Aourz, Najat; Ampe, Ben; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Massie, Ann; Sarre, Sophie; Smolders, Ilse; Michotte, Yvette

    2014-10-01

    Long term treatment with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is associated with several motor complications. Clinical improvement of this treatment is therefore needed. Lesions or high frequency stimulation of the hyperactive subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD), alleviate the motor symptoms and reduce dyskinesia, either directly and/or by allowing the reduction of the L-DOPA dose. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists might have similar actions. However it remains elusive how the neurochemistry changes in the STN after a separate or combined administration of L-DOPA and a NMDA receptor antagonist. By means of in vivo microdialysis, the effect of L-DOPA and/or MK 801, on the extracellular dopamine (DA) and glutamate (GLU) levels was investigated for the first time in the STN of sham and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. The L-DOPA-induced DA increase in the STN was significantly higher in DA-depleted rats compared to shams. MK 801 did not influence the L-DOPA-induced DA release in shams. However, MK 801 enhanced the L-DOPA-induced DA release in hemi-parkinson rats. Interestingly, the extracellular STN GLU levels remained unchanged after nigral degeneration. Furthermore, administration of MK 801 alone or combined with L-DOPA did not alter the STN GLU levels in both sham and DA-depleted rats. The present study does not support the hypothesis that DA-ergic degeneration influences the STN GLU levels neither that MK 801 alters the GLU levels in lesioned and non-lesioned rats. However, NMDA receptor antagonists could be used as a beneficial adjuvant treatment for PD by enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of l-DOPA at least in part in the STN.

  5. Protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate movement, attachment, pairing and egg release in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Ressurreição

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases C (PKCs and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using 'smart' antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance.

  6. AtlA Mediates Extracellular DNA Release, Which Contributes to Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation in an Experimental Rat Model of Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Shun, Chia-Tung; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Chia, Jean-San

    2017-09-01

    Host factors, such as platelets, have been shown to enhance biofilm formation by oral commensal streptococci, inducing infective endocarditis (IE), but how bacterial components contribute to biofilm formation in vivo is still not clear. We demonstrated previously that an isogenic mutant strain of Streptococcus mutans deficient in autolysin AtlA (ΔatlA) showed a reduced ability to cause vegetation in a rat model of bacterial endocarditis. However, the role of AtlA in bacterial biofilm formation is unclear. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis showed that extracellular DNA (eDNA) was embedded in S. mutans GS5 floes during biofilm formation on damaged heart valves, but an ΔatlA strain could not form bacterial aggregates. Semiquantification of eDNA by PCR with bacterial 16S rRNA primers demonstrated that the ΔatlA mutant strain produced dramatically less eDNA than the wild type. Similar results were observed with in vitro biofilm models. The addition of polyanethol sulfonate, a chemical lysis inhibitor, revealed that eDNA release mediated by bacterial cell lysis is required for biofilm initiation and maturation in the wild-type strain. Supplementation of cultures with calcium ions reduced wild-type growth but increased eDNA release and biofilm mass. The effect of calcium ions on biofilm formation was abolished in ΔatlA cultures and by the addition of polyanethol sulfonate. The VicK sensor, but not CiaH, was found to be required for the induction of eDNA release or the stimulation of biofilm formation by calcium ions. These data suggest that calcium ion-regulated AtlA maturation mediates the release of eDNA by S. mutans, which contributes to biofilm formation in infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. (Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  8. The potential role of cobalt ions released from metal prosthesis on the inhibition of Hv1 proton channels and the decrease in Staphyloccocus epidermidis killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Samira; El Chemaly, Antoun; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Bernard, Louis; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Infection by Staphylococcus epidermidis is a devastating complication of metal-on-metal (MM) total hip arthroplasty (THA). Neutrophils are the first line of defense against infection, and these innate immune cells are potentially exposed to Co(2+) ions released in the peri-prosthetic tissue by the wear of MM THA. The toxicity of Co(2+) is still debated, but Co(2+) is a potential inhibitor of the Hv1 proton channel that sustains the production of superoxide by neutrophils. In this study, we show that the Co(2+) concentration in peri-prosthetic tissue from patients with MM THA averages 53 μM and that such high concentrations of Co(2+) alter the antibacterial activity of human neutrophils in vitro by inhibiting Hv1 proton channels. We show that submillimolar concentrations of Co(2+) inhibit proton currents, impair the extrusion of cytosolic acid, and decrease the production of superoxide in human neutrophils. As a result, Co(2+) reduces the ability of human neutrophils to kill two strains of Staphyloccocus epidermidis by up to 7-fold at the maximal concentration tested of 100 μM Co(2+). By inhibiting proton channels, the Co(2+) ions released by metal prostheses might therefore promote bacterial infections in patients with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

  9. Phospholipase A(2) activation by poultry particulate matter is mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase in lung epithelial cells: regulation of interleukin-8 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sainath R; Piper, Melissa G; Patel, Rishi B; Sliman, Sean; Malireddy, Smitha; Zhao, Lingying; Baran, Christopher P; Nana-Sinkam, Patrick S; Wewers, Mark D; Romberger, Debra; Marsh, Clay B; Parinandi, Narasimham L

    2013-11-01

    The mechanisms of poultry particulate matter (PM)-induced agricultural respiratory disorders are not thoroughly understood. Hence, it is hypothesized in this article that poultry PM induces the release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by lung epithelial cells that is regulated upstream by the concerted action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). To test this hypothesis, the widely used cultured human lung epithelial cells (A549) were chosen as the model system. Poultry PM caused a significant activation of PLA2 in A549 cells, which was attenuated by AACOCF3 (cPLA2 inhibitor) and PD98059 (ERK-1/2 upstream inhibitor). Poultry PM induced upstream ERK-1/2 phosphorylation and downstream cPLA2 serine phosphorylation, in a concerted fashion, in cells with enhanced association of ERK-1/2 and cPLA2. The poultry PM-induced cPLA2 serine phosphorylation and IL-8 release were attenuated by AACOCF3, PD98059, and by transfection with dominant-negative ERK-1/2 DNA in cells. The poultry PM-induced IL-8 release by the bone marrow-derived macrophages of cPLA2 knockout mice was significantly lower. For the first time, this study demonstrated that the poultry PM-induced IL-8 secretion by human lung epithelial cells was regulated by cPLA2 activation through ERK-mediated serine phosphorylation, suggesting a mechanism of airway inflammation among poultry farm workers.

  10. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone positively regulates steroidogenesis via extracellular signal-regulated kinase in rat Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Yao; Hai-Yan Liu; Yu-Chun Gu; Shan-Shan Shi; Xiao-Qian Tao; Xiao-Jun Li; Yi-Feng Ge; Ying-Xia Cui; Guo-Bin Yang

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is secreted from neurons within the hypothalamus and is necessary for reproductive function in all vertebrates. GnRH is also found in organs outside of the brain and plays an important role in Leydig cell steroidogenesis in the testis. However, the signalling pathways mediating this function remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are involved in GnRH agonist (GnRHa)-induced testis steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Primary cultures of rat Leydig cells were established. The expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and the production of testosterone in response to GnRHa were examined at different doses and for different durations by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and radioimmunoassay (RIA). The effects of GnRHa on ERK1/2, JNK and p38 kinase activation were also investigated in the presence or absence of the MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 by Western blot analysis. GnRHa induced testosterone production and upregulated 3β-HSD expression at both the mRNA and protein levels; it also activated ERK1/2, but not JNK and p38 kinase. Although the maximum effects of GnRHa were observed at a concentration of 100 nmnol L-1 after 24 h, activation of ERK1/2 by GnRHa reached peak at 5 min and it returned to the basal level within 60 min. PD-98059 completely blocked the activation of ERK1/2, the upregulation of 3β-HSD and testosterone production. Our data show that GnRH positively regulates steroidogenesis via ERK signalling in rat Leydig cells. ERK1/2 activation by GnRH may be responsible for the induction of 3β-HSDgene expression and enzyme production, which may ultimately modulate steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells.

  12. Silencing of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene expression affects both the contents and the amounts of extracellular microvesicles released from HPV-positive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, Anja; Leitz, Jenny; Bulkescher, Julia; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2013-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes play a crucial role in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, the authors investigated whether silencing of endogenous HPV E6/E7 expression may influence the contents or amounts of extracellular microvesicles (eMVs) released from HPV-positive cancer cells. It was found that eMVs secreted from HeLa cells are enriched for Survivin protein. RNA interference studies revealed that maintenance of both intracellular and microvesicular Survivin amounts was strongly dependent on continuous E6/E7 expression. This indicates that intracellular HPV activities are translated into visible alterations of protein contents in eMVs. Besides Survivin, eMVs from HeLa cells contain additional members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family (XIAP, c-IAP1 and Livin). In contrast, no evidence for the presence of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in eMVs was obtained. Moreover, it was found that silencing of HPV E6/E7 expression led to a significant increase of exosomes-representing eMVs of endocytic origin-released from HeLa cells. This effect was associated with the reinduction of p53, stimulation of the p53 target genes TSAP6 and CHMP4C that can enhance exosome production and induction of senescence. Taken together, these results show that silencing of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression profoundly affects both the composition and amounts of eMVs secreted by HPV-positive cancer cells. This indicates that HPVs can induce molecular signatures in eMVs that may affect intercellular communication and could be explored for diagnostic purposes. © 2013 UICC.

  13. Proton production, regulation and pathophysiological roles in the mammalian brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Zheng Zeng; Tian-Le Xu

    2012-01-01

    The recent demonstration of proton signaling in C elegans muscle contraction suggests a novel mechanism for proton-based intercellular communication and has stimulated enthusiasm for exploring proton signaling in higher organisms.Emerging evidence indicates that protons are produced and regulated in localized space and time.Furthermore,identification of proton regulators and sensors in the brain leads to the speculation that proton production and regulation may be of major importance for both physiological and pathological functions ranging from nociception to learning and memory.Extracellular protons may play a role in signal transmission by not only acting on adjacent cells but also affecting the cell from which they were released.In this review,we summarize the upstream and downstream pathways of proton production and regulation in the mammalian brain,with special emphasis on the proton extruders and sensors that are critical in the homeostatic regulation of pH,and discuss their potential roles in proton signaling under normal and pathophysiological conditions.

  14. High serum levels of extracellular vesicles expressing malignancy-related markers are released in patients with various types of hematological neoplastic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, Antonella; Laurenzana, Ilaria; De Luca, Luciana; La Rocca, Francesco; Simeon, Vittorio; Trino, Stefania; D'Auria, Fiorella; Traficante, Antonio; Maietti, Maddalena; Izzo, Tiziana; D'Arena, Giovanni; Mansueto, Giovanna; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Laurenti, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Del Vecchio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Many cell types release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles (MVs), and apoptotic bodies, which play a role in physiology and diseases. Presence and phenotype of circulating EVs in hematological malignancies (HMs) remain largely unexplored.The aim of this study was to characterize EVs in peripheral blood of HM patients compared to healthy subjects (controls). We isolated serum EVs from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), multiple myeloma (MM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and controls. EVs were isolated from serum of peripheral blood by ultracentrifuge steps and analyzed by flow cytometry to define count, size, and immunophenotype. MV levels were significantly elevated in WM, HL, MM, AML, and some MPNs and, though at a lesser degree, in CLL and NHL as compared to healthy controls. HL, MM, and MPNs generated a population of MVs characterized by lower size (below 0.3 μm) when compared to controls. MVs from patients specifically expressed tumor-related antigens, such as CD19 in B cell neoplasms, CD38 in MM, CD13 in myeloid tumors, and CD30 in HL. Both total and antigen-specific count of MVs significantly correlated with different HM clinical features such as Rai stage in CLL, International Prognostic Scoring System in WM, International Staging System in MM, and clinical stage in HL. MVs may represent a novel biomarker in HMs.

  15. Arecoline excites the contraction of distal colonic smooth muscle strips in rats via the M3 receptor-extracellular Ca2+ influx - Ca2+ store release pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-Bao; Yang, Xiao; Tang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Chuan-Yong; Xie, Dong-Ping

    2010-04-01

    Areca is a Chinese herbal medicine that is widely used for constipation. However the mechanisms of its action are not clear. We investigated the effects of arecoline, the most active component of areca, on the motility of rat distal colonic smooth muscle strips. In longitudinal muscle of distal colon (LMDC) and circular muscle of distal colon (CMDC), arecoline increased the contraction in a dose-dependent manner. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) did not inhibit the effects of arecoline. The contractile response to arecoline was completely antagonized by atropine. 4-Diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (4-DAMP) strongly depressed the response to arecoline, but gallamine and methoctramine did not. Nifedipine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), and Ca2+-free Krebs solution with EGTA partly inhibited the effects of arecoline. The sum of Ca2+-free Krebs solution, EGTA, and 2-APB completely inhibited the effects of arecoline. The results show that arecoline stimulates distal colonic contraction in rats via the muscarinic (M3) receptor - extracellular Ca2+ influx - Ca2+ store release pathway. It is likely that the action of areca in relieving constipation is due to its stimulation of muscle contraction.

  16. Protein Characterization of Extracellular Microvesicles/Exosomes Released from Cytotoxin-Challenged Rat Cerebrocortical Mixed Culture and Mouse N2a Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhwani; Manek, Rachna; Raghavan, Vijaya; Wang, Kevin K

    2017-03-10

    A number of neuronal and glial proteins were previously found to be released in free-standing soluble form from cultured brain cells into cell-conditioned media. Here, we sought to examine if similar proteins are also contained in neural and astroglial cell-released extracellular microvesicles/exosomes (MV/E). In this study, MV/E were isolated from cell-conditioned media from control and cytotoxin-challenged rat cerebrocortical mixed culture (CTX) and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cytotoxin challenges included pro-necrosis calcium ionophore A23187, pro-apoptosis staurosporine (STS), and excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate. Based on established nanoparticle characterization method (dynamic light scattering, NanoTracker, and transmission electron microscopy), we confirmed that these released vesicles are in fact characteristic representation of MV/E by morphology (lipid bilayered vesicles) and by particle size (132-142 nm for CTX and 49-77 nm for N2a cells). We indeed identified neural cell body protein UCH-L1, axonal injury marker αII-spectrin and its breakdown products (SBDPs), astroglial markers GFAP and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP), dendritic protein BIII-tubulin, synaptic protein synaptophysin, and exosome marker Alix in microvesicles from CTX and/or N2a cells. Furthermore, SBDPs, GFAP-BDP, UCH-L1, and synaptophysin are especially dominant in MV/E isolated from cytotoxin-treated CTX cells. Similarly, SBDPs, βIII-tubulin, and UCH-L1 are more prominently observed in cytotoxin-challenged N2a cells. Lastly, when isolated MV/E from A23187- or STS-challenged N2a cells were introduced to healthy N2a culture, they are capable of evoking cytotoxicity in the latter. Taken together, our study identified that microvesicles/exosomes isolated form healthy and injured brain cells contain certain neural and astroglial proteins, as well as possibly other cytotoxic factors that are capable of propagating cytotoxic effects.

  17. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  18. Review article: putting immediate-release proton-pump inhibitors into clinical practice--improving nocturnal acid control and avoiding the possible complications of excessive acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, P O

    2005-12-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesphageal reflux is an under-appreciated clinical challenge. This condition may cause symptoms such as nocturnal heartburn, or it may be asymptomatic. In addition, patients may experience sleep disturbances that can potentially lead to complications such as erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus, and may be a risk factor for development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have traditionally been effective in treating both daytime and night-time reflux symptoms, but are limited in control of nocturnal acidity by their pharmacodynamic characteristics. This narrative review addresses the prevalence, impact and pharmacologic approaches used to control nocturnal acidity. Methods to optimize nocturnal acid control include careful attention to dosing schedule, using higher doses of PPIs, adding an histamine H2-receptor antagonist at bedtime to once or twice daily delayed-release PPI, or using immediate-release omeprazole (Zegerid powder for oral suspension; Santarus, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). This new formulation appears to provide sustained control of intragastric pH at steady state, and when dosed at bedtime, and may be effective in improving control of nocturnal pH and treating night-time GERD.

  19. L-glutamate released from activated microglia downregulates astrocytic L-glutamate transporter expression in neuroinflammation: the ‘collusion’ hypothesis for increased extracellular L-glutamate concentration in neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Junpei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system, astrocytic L-glutamate (L-Glu transporters maintain extracellular L-Glu below neurotoxic levels, but their function is impaired with neuroinflammation. Microglia become activated with inflammation; however, the correlation between activated microglia and the impairment of L-Glu transporters is unknown. Methods We used a mixed culture composed of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. To quantify L-Glu transporter function, we measured the extracellular L-Glu that remained 30 min after an application of L-Glu to the medium (the starting concentration was 100 μM. We determined the optimal conditions of lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment to establish an inflammation model without cell death. We examined the predominant subtypes of L-Glu transporters and the changes in the expression levels of these transporters in this inflammation model. We then investigated the role of activated microglia in the changes in L-Glu transporter expression and the underlying mechanisms in this inflammation model. Results Because LPS (10 ng/mL, 72 h caused a significant increase in the levels of L-Glu remaining but did not affect cell viability, we adopted this condition for our inflammation model without cell death. GLAST was the predominant L-Glu transporter subtype, and its expression decreased in this inflammation model. As a result of their release of L-Glu, activated microglia were shown to be essential for the significant decrease in L-Glu uptake. The serial application of L-Glu caused a significant decrease in L-Glu uptake and GLAST expression in the astrocyte culture. The hemichannel inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX inhibited L-Glu release from activated microglia and ameliorated the decrease in GLAST expression in the inflammation model. In addition, the elevation of the astrocytic intracellular L-Glu itself caused the downregulation of GLAST. Conclusions Our findings suggest that activated microglia trigger the

  20. Extra-cellular release and blood diffusion of BART viral micro-RNAs produced by EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baconnais Sonia; Amiel Corinne; Schneider Véronique; Témam Stéphane; Lang Philippe; Guigay Joël; Vérillaud Benjamin; Klibi Jihène; Bombik Izabela; Gelin Aurore; Gourzones Claire; Jimenez Anne-Sophie; Busson Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a human epithelial malignancy consistently associated with the Epstein-Barr virus. The viral genome is contained in the nuclei of all malignant cells with abundant transcription of a family of viral microRNAs called BART miRNAs. MicroRNAs are well known intra-cellular regulatory elements of gene expression. In addition, they are often exported in the extra-cellular space and sometimes transferred in recipient cells distinct from the produc...

  1. Extracellular ATP induces the release of calcium from intracellular stores without the activation of protein kinase C in Swiss 3T6 mouse fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, F.A.; Rozengurt, E.; Heppel, L.A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Exposure of Swiss 3T6 mouse fibroblasts to extracellular ATP stimulated the formation of inositol phosphates and mobilized intracellular calcium. The mobilization of intracellular calcium was verified by imaging of fura-2 fluorescence in individual cells and by monitoring the efflux of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} from preloaded cells. However, the authors found no activation of protein kinase C as measured by phosphorylation of an 80-kDa acidic protein and by transmodulation of the receptor for epidermal growth factor. A careful examination of the kinetics of the phosphorylation reaction (from 30 sec to 10 min) revealed no activation of protein kinase C by extracellular ATP at any time. The lack of activation of protein kinase C was demonstrated even when a concentration of ATP 10-fold higher than that required to give a strong Ca{sup 2+} signal was used. Extracellular ATP did not inhibit protein kinase C activation by fetal bovine serum, platelet-derived growth factor, or phorbol esters. The effects of ATP were also produced by UTP but not by ADP, AMP, or adenosine. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to induce the mobilization of intracellular calcium by an inositol phosphate-mediated pathway without the activation of protein kinase C.

  2. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  3. Route, mechanism, and implications of proton import during Na+/K+ exchange by native Na+/K+-ATPase pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedovato, Natascia; Gadsby, David C

    2014-04-01

    A single Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pumps three Na(+) outwards and two K(+) inwards by alternately exposing ion-binding sites to opposite sides of the membrane in a conformational sequence coupled to pump autophosphorylation from ATP and auto-dephosphorylation. The larger flow of Na(+) than K(+) generates outward current across the cell membrane. Less well understood is the ability of Na(+)/K(+) pumps to generate an inward current of protons. Originally noted in pumps deprived of external K(+) and Na(+) ions, as inward current at negative membrane potentials that becomes amplified when external pH is lowered, this proton current is generally viewed as an artifact of those unnatural conditions. We demonstrate here that this inward current also flows at physiological K(+) and Na(+) concentrations. We show that protons exploit ready reversibility of conformational changes associated with extracellular Na(+) release from phosphorylated Na(+)/K(+) pumps. Reversal of a subset of these transitions allows an extracellular proton to bind an acidic side chain and to be subsequently released to the cytoplasm. This back-step of phosphorylated Na(+)/K(+) pumps that enables proton import is not required for completion of the 3 Na(+)/2 K(+) transport cycle. However, the back-step occurs readily during Na(+)/K(+) transport when external K(+) ion binding and occlusion are delayed, and it occurs more frequently when lowered extracellular pH raises the probability of protonation of the externally accessible carboxylate side chain. The proton route passes through the Na(+)-selective binding site III and is distinct from the principal pathway traversed by the majority of transported Na(+) and K(+) ions that passes through binding site II. The inferred occurrence of Na(+)/K(+) exchange and H(+) import during the same conformational cycle of a single molecule identifies the Na(+)/K(+) pump as a hybrid transporter. Whether Na(+)/K(+) pump-mediated proton inflow may have any physiological or

  4. Streptococcus mutans extracellular DNA is upregulated during growth in biofilms, actively released via membrane vesicles, and influenced by components of the protein secretion machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I; Heim, Kyle P; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L Jeannine; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA.

  5. The histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA induces HSP60 nitration and its extracellular release by exosomal vesicles in human lung-derived carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Claudia; D'Anneo, Antonella; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Caruso Bavisotto, Celeste; Barone, Rosario; Emanuele, Sonia; Lo Cascio, Filippa; Mocciaro, Emanuele; Fais, Stefano; Conway De Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Lauricella, Marianna

    2016-05-17

    HSP60 undergoes changes in quantity and distribution in some types of tumors suggesting a participation of the chaperonin in the mechanism of transformation and cancer progression. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a member of a family of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), has anti-cancer potential but its interaction, if any, with HSP60 has not been elucidated. We investigated the effects of SAHA in a human lung-derived carcinoma cell line (H292). We analysed cell viability and cycle; oxidative stress markers; mitochondrial integrity; HSP60 protein and mRNA levels; and HSP60 post-translational modifications, and its secretion. We found that SAHA is cytotoxic for H292 cells, interrupting the cycle at the G2/M phase, which is followed by death; cytotoxicity is associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and diminution of intracellular levels of HSP60; HSP60 undergoes a post-translational modification and becomes nitrated; and nitrated HSP60 is exported via exosomes. We propose that SAHA causes ROS overproduction and mitochondrial dysfunction, which leads to HSP60 nitration and release into the intercellular space and circulation to interact with the immune system. These successive steps might constitute the mechanism of the anti-tumor action of SAHA and provide a basis to design supplementary therapeutic strategies targeting HSP60, which would be more efficacious than the compound alone.

  6. Low extracellular calcium enhances beta cell sensitivity to the stimulatory influence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on insulin release by islets from vitamin D3-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Dussert, A G; Delbancut, A P; Billaudel, B J

    1997-07-01

    The beneficial effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25 (OH)2 D3] on insulin secretion from beta cells in hypocalcemic vitamin D3-deficient rats is now well established. Moreover, few data concerning the mechanism of 1,25 (OH) 2D3 efficiency as a function of the severity of hypocalcemia. In the present experiment, we submitted islets from vitamin D3-deficient rats to in vitro exposure to a range of decreasing extracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]ex), from 0.5 mM to 0.6 mM, during a 6-h 10-8 M 1,25 (OH) 2D3 induction. Thereafter, we compared the effect of this pretreatment on the islets' insulin response to a given stimulus. Various stimuli were used, and we measured in parallel the variations of 86Rb+ and 45Ca2+ efflux and insulin release into the perifusion medium. In the presence of 1,25 (OH) 2D3, we observed an inverse correlation between the [Ca2+]ex pre-exposure and the amplitude of the insulin response to certain stimuli studied, suggesting that beta cells that were pre-exposed to low [Ca2+]ex became more sensitive to the beneficial effect of 1,25 (OH) 2D3 on insulin release. This effect was observed when beta cells were activated by acetylcholine but only during its second phase of stimulation, and more particularly with the barium plus theophylline stimulus. In contrast, insulin release was not affected by [Ca2+]ex pre-exposure during 1,25 (OH) 2D3 induction in response to acetylcholine during its first phase of stimulation, thus excluding any mechanism mediated via nutrient pathways, membrane depolarization, or inositol triphosphate (IP3)-dependent events. Moreover, the islets that were pre-exposed to a 10-fold [Ca2+]ex exhibited only a 50% lower 45Ca2+ content after 45Ca2+ loading, suggesting a different or relatively more efficient storage capacity in the presence of low extracellular calcium. Studies of 45Ca2+ efflux showed that the mobilization of Ca2+ stores induced by a barium plus theophylline stimulus, in the absence of calcium in the

  7. β-Hydroxybutyric acid inhibits growth hormone-releasing hormone synthesis and secretion through the GPR109A/extracellular signal-regulated 1/2 signalling pathway in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, S-P; Liu, B-R; Wang, J-F; Xue, W-J; Liu, H-M; Zeng, Y-L; Huang, B-X; Li, S-N; Lv, Q-K; Wang, W; Liu, J-X

    2015-03-01

    β-Hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) has recently been shown to regulate hormone synthesis and secretion in the hypothalamus. However, little is known about the effects of BHBA-mediated hormone regulation or the detailed mechanisms by which BHBA regulates growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesis and secretion. In the present study, we examined the expression of the BHBA receptor GPR109A in primary hypothalamic cell cultures. We hypothesised that BHBA regulates GHRH via GPR109A and its downstream signals. Initial in vivo studies conducted in rats demonstrated that GHRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus was strongly inversely correlated with BHBA levels in the cerebrospinal fluid during postnatal development (r = -0.89, P hypothalamus in both in vivo and in vitro, and this effect was also inhibited by PTX in vitro. In primary hypothalamic cells, BHBA activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinases, as shown by western blot analysis. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 with U0126 attenuated the BHBA-mediated reduction in Gsh-1 expression and GHRH synthesis and secretion. These results strongly suggest that BHBA directly regulates GHRH synthesis and secretion via the GPR109A/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway, and also that Gsh-1 is essential for this function. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  8. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  9. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Radici, Marco; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-01-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions and it allows...

  10. Zinc inhibition of bacterial cytochrome bc1 reveals the role of cytochrome b E295 in proton release at the Qo site†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Khoury, Youssef El; Francia, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Ciurli, Stefano; Venturoli, Giovanni; Hellwig, Petra; Daldal, Fevzi

    2011-01-01

    The cytochrome (cyt) bc1 complex (cyt bc1) plays a major role in the electrogenic extrusion of protons across the membrane responsible for the proton motive force to produce ATP. Proton-coupled electron transfer underlying the catalysis of cyt bc1 is generally accepted, but the molecular basis of coupling and associated proton efflux pathway(s) remains unclear. Herein we studied Zn2+-induced inhibition of Rhodobacter capsulatus cyt bc1 using enzyme kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrochemically-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy with the purpose to understand the Zn2+-binding mechanism and its inhibitory effect on cyt bc1 function. Analogous studies were carried out on a mutant of cyt b, E295, a residue previously proposed to bind Zn2+ on the basis of extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. ITC analysis indicated that mutation of E295 into valine, a non-coordinating residue, results in the reduction of Zn2+-binding affinity. The kinetic study showed that wild-type cyt bc1 and its E295V mutant have similar levels of apparent Km values for decylbenzohydroquinone as a substrate (4.9 ± 0.2 μM and 3.1 ± 0.4 μM, respectively), whereas their KI values for Zn2+ are 8.3 μM and 38.5 μM, respectively. The calorimetry-based KD values for the high affinity site of cyt bc1 are of the same order of magnitude as the KI values derived from the kinetic analysis. Furthermore, the FTIR signal of protonated acidic residues was perturbed in the presence of Zn2+, whereas the E295V mutant exhibited no significant change in electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra measured in the presence and absence of Zn2+. Our overall results indicate that the proton-active E295 residue near the Qo site of cyt bc1 can bind directly to Zn2+, resulting in a decrease of the electron transferring activity without changing drastically the redox potentials of the cofactors of the enzyme. We conclude that E295 is involved in proton efflux coupled to

  11. The Effect of Extracellular Components from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum on Membrane Transport in Vesicles Isolated from Bean Hypocotyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K R; Anderson, A J

    1987-06-01

    Extracellular components released from mycelia of the alpha and beta races of the bean pathogen, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, inhibited proton uptake in sealed vesicles prepared from bean hypocotyls. Differential sensitivity of ATP-driven proton transport to nitrate, vanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, and oligomycin suggested the vesicles were enriched for tonoplast. Anion stimulation of proton transport, by enhancement of ATPase activity and dissipation of the membrane potential, was consistent with this conclusion. Although fungal components inhibited the formation of a pH gradient, the membrane potential was unaffected and the ATPase activity slightly stimulated. These data suggest that the fungal components produce an electroneutral proton exchange. Proton transport in Dark Red Kidney bean tonoplast vesicles was inhibited by mycelial preparations from the incompatible alpha race and compatible beta race. Elicitor activity, however, was greater in the alpha race fractions. Elicitor purified from alpha race culture filtrate did not inhibit proton transport in vesicles isolated from Dark Red Kidney bean. Consequently, elicitor activity need not be associated with an ability to impair tonoplast function.

  12. The Effect of Extracellular Components from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum on Membrane Transport in Vesicles Isolated from Bean Hypocotyl 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Anderson, Anne J.

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components released from mycelia of the α and β races of the bean pathogen, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, inhibited proton uptake in sealed vesicles prepared from bean hypocotyls. Differential sensitivity of ATP-driven proton transport to nitrate, vanadate, N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, and oligomycin suggested the vesicles were enriched for tonoplast. Anion stimulation of proton transport, by enhancement of ATPase activity and dissipation of the membrane potential, was consistent with this conclusion. Although fungal components inhibited the formation of a pH gradient, the membrane potential was unaffected and the ATPase activity slightly stimulated. These data suggest that the fungal components produce an electroneutral proton exchange. Proton transport in Dark Red Kidney bean tonoplast vesicles was inhibited by mycelial preparations from the incompatible α race and compatible β race. Elicitor activity, however, was greater in the α race fractions. Elicitor purified from α race culture filtrate did not inhibit proton transport in vesicles isolated from Dark Red Kidney bean. Consequently, elicitor activity need not be associated with an ability to impair tonoplast function. PMID:16665456

  13. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Images related to Proton Therapy Videos related to Proton Therapy Sponsored by Please ...

  14. Neutrophils cast extracellular traps in response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Denkers, Eric Y

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular traps by neutrophils is a now well-established phenomenon that contributes to the innate response to extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. The importance of NETs during protozoan infection has been less explored, but recent findings suggest an emerging role for release of neutrophil-derived extracellular DNA in response to this class of microbial pathogens. The present review summarizes findings to date regarding elicitation of NETs by Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Eimeria bovis, and Leishmania spp.

  15. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Hikosaka, Koki

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  16. Mechanisms for proton release during water oxidation in the S2 to S3 and S3 to S4 transitions in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegbahn, Per E M

    2012-04-14

    The new high-resolution X-ray structure of photosystem II has allowed more detailed studies than before of water oxidation at the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In the present study the two final S-transitions of water oxidation are studied. The electron coupled proton transfers are followed from the center of the OEC to Asp61, which is considered as the start of the transfer chain through the protein to the lumenal side. It is found that the proton transfers occur in multiple steps. Structures of intermediates and energy diagrams are derived and compared to experimental observations. Since the new experimental structure of the OEC is very similar to the one suggested earlier by density functional calculations, the O-O bond formation step remains essentially the same as the one suggested five years ago. An interesting new result is that the barrier for proton transfer within the OEC actually competes with the O-O bond formation step of being rate-limiting.

  17. Model studies on the release of aroma compounds from structured and nonstructured oil systems using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Pascale; Pollien, Philippe; Rytz, Andreas; Leser, Martin E; Sagalowicz, Laurent; Blank, Imre; Spadone, Jean-Claude

    2007-03-07

    Relative retention, volatility, and temporal release of volatile compounds taken from aldehyde, ester, and alcohol chemical classes were studied at 70 degrees C in model systems using equilibrium static headspace analysis and real time dynamic headspace analysis. These systems were medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), sunflower oil, and two structured systems, i.e., water-in-oil emulsion and L2 phase (water-in-oil microemulsion). Hydrophilic domains of the emulsion type media retained specifically the hydrophilic compounds and alcohols. Four kinetic parameters characterizing the concentration- and time-dependent releases were extracted from the aroma release curves. Most of the kinetic parameter values were higher in structured systems than in oils particularly when using MCT. The oil nature was found to better control the dynamic release profiles than the system structures. The release parameters were well-related (i) to the volatile hydrophobicity as a function of the oil used and (ii) to the retention data in the specific case of the L2 phase due to a specific release behavior of alcohols.

  18. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  19. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  20. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  1. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  3. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis inhibits synaptic transmission by increasing ph buffering in the synaptic cleft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozan Vroman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms, highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca²⁺ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form

  4. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials - an ISEV position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig; Börger, Verena; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Chaput, Nathalie; Chatterjee, Devasis; Court, Felipe A; Del Portillo, Hernando A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Fraile, Lorenzo; Gho, Yong Song; Görgens, André; Gupta, Ramesh C; Hendrix, An; Hermann, Dirk M; Hill, Andrew F; Hochberg, Fred; Horn, Peter A; de Kleijn, Dominique|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481489X; Kordelas, Lambros; Kramer, Boris W; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Laitinen, Saara; Leonardi, Tommaso; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J; Lim, Sai Kiang; Lötvall, Jan; Maguire, Casey A; Marcilla, Antonio; Nazarenko, Irina; Ochiya, Takahiro; Patel, Tushar; Pedersen, Shona; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Pluchino, Stefano; Quesenberry, Peter; Reischl, Ilona G; Rivera, Francisco J; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schallmoser, Katharina; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074327941; Strunk, Dirk; Tonn, Torsten; Vader, Pieter; van Balkom, Bas W M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256594783; Wauben, Marca; Andaloussi, Samir El; Théry, Clotilde; Rohde, Eva; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information

  5. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials - an ISEV position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig; Börger, Verena; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Chaput, Nathalie; Chatterjee, Devasis; Court, Felipe A; Del Portillo, Hernando A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Fraile, Lorenzo; Gho, Yong Song; Görgens, André; Gupta, Ramesh C; Hendrix, An; Hermann, Dirk M; Hill, Andrew F; Hochberg, Fred; Horn, Peter A; de Kleijn, Dominique; Kordelas, Lambros; Kramer, Boris W; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Laitinen, Saara; Leonardi, Tommaso; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J; Lim, Sai Kiang; Lötvall, Jan; Maguire, Casey A; Marcilla, Antonio; Nazarenko, Irina; Ochiya, Takahiro; Patel, Tushar; Pedersen, Shona; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Pluchino, Stefano; Quesenberry, Peter; Reischl, Ilona G; Rivera, Francisco J; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schallmoser, Katharina; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Strunk, Dirk; Tonn, Torsten; Vader, Pieter; van Balkom, Bas W M; Wauben, Marca; Andaloussi, Samir El; Théry, Clotilde; Rohde, Eva; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information fro

  6. α1-Adrenoceptor-mediated Ca2+-entry from the extracellular fluid and Ca2+-release from intracellular stores: No role for α(1A,B)-adrenoceptor subtypes in the pithed rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwietert, H.R.; Mathy, M.-J.; Wilhelm, D.; Wilffert, B.; Pfaffendorf, M.; Van Zwieten, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that in the pithed rat preparation two subtypes of the α1-adrenoceptor are linked to two different signal transduction mechanisms, both of which contribute to vasoconstriction, one facilitating Ca2+-entry from the extracellular fluid (α(1A)) and one

  7. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  8. Proton geriatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Thomas W.; Nakagawa, Norio

    1984-07-01

    An SO(10) model with particle spectrum and low energy gauge group identical to that of minimal SU (5) below MX but with a nonstandard charge assignment is shown to agree with the experimental best value of sin2θw(Mw) and the lower bound on the proton lifetime.

  9. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  10. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  11. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  12. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  13. Signal Inhibitory Receptor on Leukocytes-1 Limits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps, but Preserves Intracellular Bacterial Killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Avondt, Kristof; van der Linden, Maarten; Naccache, Paul H; Egan, David A; Meyaard, Linde

    2016-01-01

    In response to microbial invasion, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill extracellular microbes. Alternatively, NET formation can result in tissue damage in inflammatory conditions and may perpetuate autoimmune disease. Intervention strategies that are aimed at m

  14. Intracellular drug release nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghua Meng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to elicit therapeutic effects, many drugs including small molecule anticancer drugs, proteins, siRNA, and DNA have to be delivered and released into the specific cellular compartments typically the cytoplasm or nucleus of target cells. Intracellular environment-responsive nanosystems that exhibit good extracellular stability while rapidly releasing drugs inside cancer cells have been actively pursued for effective cancer therapy. Here, we highlight novel designs of smart nanosystems that release drugs in response to an intracellular biological signal of cancer cells such as acidic pH in endo/lysosomal compartments, enzymes in lysosomes, and redox potential in cytoplasm and the cell nucleus.

  15. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle Formation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different phy...

  16. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zoraida Andreu Martínez; María eYáñez-Mó

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physi...

  17. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M. -J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  18. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist, tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker, nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca2+ entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca2+ release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca2+ influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca2+ influx pathway.

  19. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  20. Characterizing the proton loading site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianxun; Gunner, M R

    2014-08-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) uses the energy released by reduction of O2 to H2O to drive eight charges from the high pH to low pH side of the membrane, increasing the electrochemical gradient. Four electrons and protons are used for chemistry, while four more protons are pumped. Proton pumping requires that residues on a pathway change proton affinity through the reaction cycle to load and then release protons. The protonation states of all residues in CcO are determined in MultiConformational Continuum Electrostatics simulations with the protonation and redox states of heme a, a3, Cu(B), Y288, and E286 used to define the catalytic cycle. One proton is found to be loaded and released from residues identified as the proton loading site (PLS) on the P-side of the protein in each of the four CcO redox states. Thus, the same proton pumping mechanism can be used each time CcO is reduced. Calculations with structures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Paracoccus denitrificans, and bovine CcO derived by crystallography and molecular dynamics show the PLS functions similarly in different CcO species. The PLS is a cluster rather than a single residue, as different structures show 1-4 residues load and release protons. However, the proton affinity of the heme a3 propionic acids primarily determines the number of protons loaded into the PLS; if their proton affinity is too low, less than one proton is loaded.

  1. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  2. Vesicular mechanisms of traffic of fungal molecules to the extracellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Franzen, Anderson J; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Miranda, Kildare

    2013-08-01

    Fungal cells are efficient in releasing to the extracellular space molecules that lack typical secretion signals, including cytoplasmic components. Studies developed during the last five years indicate that extracellular vesicle formation is involved in the traffic of these intracellular components to the extracellular space. The cellular origin of these vesicles, however, is still unknown. Here we review the potential mechanisms involved in formation of fungal extracellular vesicles and consequent release of fungal molecules to the outer cellular space. We also propose that these compartments can originate from cytoplasmic subtractions whose formation is dependent on plasma membrane reshaping.

  3. Matricryptins and matrikines: biologically active fragments of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Salza, Romain

    2014-07-01

    Numerous extracellular proteins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) undergo limited enzymatic cleavage resulting in the release of fragments exerting biological activities, which are usually different from those of the full-length molecules. In this review, we define matrikines and matricryptins, which are bioactive fragments released from the extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans and GAGs and report their major biological activities. These fragments regulate a number of physiopathological processes including angiogenesis, cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases and wound healing. The challenges to translate these fragments from molecules biologically active in vitro and in experimental models to potential drugs are discussed in the last part of the review.

  4. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  5. The role of protonation in protein fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Martin D; Westh, Peter; Otzen, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins fibrillate at low pH despite a high population of charged side chains. Therefore exchange of protons between the fibrillating peptide and its surroundings may play an important role in fibrillation. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry to measure exchange of protons between...... buffer and the peptide hormone glucagon during fibrillation. Glucagon absorbs or releases protons to an extent which allows it to attain a net charge of zero in the fibrillar state, both at acidic and basic pH. Similar results are obtained for lysozyme. This suggests that side chain pKa values change...

  6. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  7. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  8. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  10. Proton pump inhibitors exert anti-allergic effects by reducing TCTP secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghee Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP is known to play a role in human allergic responses. TCTP has been identified outside of macrophages, in activated mononuclear cells, and in biological fluids from allergic patients. Even TCTP devoid of signal sequences, is secreted to extracellular environment by an yet undefined mechanism. This study is aimed at understanding the mechanism of TCTP release and its regulation. A secondary goal is to see if inhibitors of TCTP release can serve as potential anti-allergic asthmatic drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Western blotting assay in HEK293 and U937 cells, we found that TCTP secretion is reduced by omeprazole and pantoprazole, both of which are proton pump inhibitors. We then transfected HEK293 cells with proton pump expression vectors to search for the effects of exogeneously overexpressed H(+/K(+-ATPase on the TCTP secretion. Based on these in vitro data we checked the in vivo effects of pantoprazole in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced allergy. Omeprazole and pantoprazole reduced TCTP secretion from HEK293 and U937 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion and the secretion of TCTP from HEK293 cells increased when they over-expressed H(+/K(+-ATPase. In a murine model of ovalbumin-induced allergy, pretreatment with pantoprazole reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased goblet cells, and increased TCTP secretion induced by OVA challenge. CONCLUSION: Since Omeprazole and pantoprazole decrease the secretion of TCTP which is associated with the development of allergic reaction, they may have the potential to serve as anti-allergic (asthmatic drugs.

  11. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  12. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  13. Extracellular vesicles for clinical diagnostics of nervous system diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atai, N.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade there has emerged a new dimension in molecular studies which can be applied to gliomas (brain tumors). Extracellular vesicles (EVs), small structures containing genetic materials, are now known to be produced by glioma cells. These EVs, often many hundreds in number, are released

  14. Vesiclepedia: A Compendium for Extracellular Vesicles with Continuous Community Annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Kalra (Hina); R.J. Simpson (Richard); H. Ji (Hong); M. Aikawa (Masanori); P. Altevogt (Peter); P. Askenase (Philip); V.C. Bond (Vincent); F.E. Borràs (Francesc); X. Breakefield (Xandra); V. Budnik (Vivian); E. Buzas (Edit); G. Camussi (Giovanni); A. Clayton (Aled); E. Cocucci (Emanuele); J.M. Falcon-Perez (Juan); S. Gabrielsson (Susanne); Y.S. Gho (Yong Song); D. Gupta (Dwijendra); H.C. Harsha (H.); A. Hendrix (An); A.F. Hill (Andrew); J.M. Inal (Jameel); G.W. Jenster (Guido); E.-M. Krämer-Albers (Eva-Maria); S.K. Lim (Sai Kiang); A. Llorente (Alicia); J. Lötvall; A. Marcilla (Antonio); L. Mincheva-Nilsson (Lucia); I. Nazarenko (Irina); C.C.M. van Nieuwland (Carolien); E.N.M. Nolte-'t Hoen (Esther); A. Pandey (Akhilesh); T. Patel (Tushar); M.D. Piper; S. Pluchino (Stefano); T.S.K. Prasad (T. S. Keshava); L. Rajendran (Lawrence); L. Raposo (Luís); M. Record (Michel); G.E. Reid (Gavin); F. Sánchez-Madrid (Francisco); R.M. Schiffelers (Raymond); P. Siljander (Pia); A. Stensballe (Allan); W. Stoorvogel (Willem); D. Taylor (Deborah); C. Thery; H. Valadi (Hadi); B.W.M. van Balkom (Bas); R. Vázquez (Rolando); M. Vidal (Michel); M.H.M. Wauben (Marca); M. Yáñez-Mó (María); M. Zoeller (Margot); S. Mathivanan (Suresh)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractExtracellular vesicles (EVs) are membraneous vesicles released by a variety of cells into their microenvironment. Recent studies have elucidated the role of EVs in intercellular communication, pathogenesis, drug, vaccine and gene-vector delivery, and as possible reservoirs of biomarkers.

  15. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current da...

  16. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  17. The Role of Extracellular Vesicles: An Epigenetic View of the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrun Qian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes, microvesicles, and other extracellular vesicles are released by many cell types, including cancer cells and cancer-related immune cells. Extracellular vesicles can directly or indirectly facilitate the transfer of bioinformation to recipient cells or to the extracellular environment. In cancer, exosomes have been implicated in tumor initiation, proliferation, and metastasis. Extracellular vesicles can transmit proteins and nucleic acids that participate in DNA methylation, histone modification, and posttranscriptional regulation of RNA. Factors transmitted by extracellular vesicles reflect the donor cell status, and extracellular vesicles derived from tumor cells may be also responsible for altering expression of tumor promoting and tumor suppressing genes in recipient cells. Thus, circulating extracellular vesicles may act as biomarkers of cancer, and detection of these biomarkers may be applied to diagnosis or assessment of prognosis in patients with cancer.

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles isolated by acoustic trapping or differential centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezeli, Melinda; Gidlöf, Olof; Evander, Mikael; Bryl-Górecka, Paulina; Sathanoori, Ramasri; Gilje, Patrik; Pawlowski, Krzysztof; Horvatovich, Péter; Erlinge, David; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs), including microparticles (MPs) and exosomes, are submicron membrane vesicles released by diverse cell types upon activation or stress. Circulating ECVs are potential reservoirs of disease biomarkers, and the complexity of these vesicles is significantly lower compared

  19. Variation in activity of root extracellular phytase between genotypes of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Mohammad Farouq

    1997-01-01

    Barley genotypes grown in nutrient solution under P nutrient stress and sterile conditions were compared in activity of root-associated and root-released extracellular phytase. The activity of root-associated phytase of all genotypes was about 10 times higher than that of root-released phytase...... and the genotypes performed differently with regard to the activity of the enzymes. The winter barley genotype, Marinka had the highest activity of root-associated extracellular phytase which differed significantly from Alexis and Senate, but not from Regatta. Alexis showed the lowest activity of root......-released extracellular phytase which differed significantly from those of Marinka and Regatta, but not from Senate. Generally, there was a significant correlation between the activity of root-associated and released extracellular phytase....

  20. Proton- and ammonium- sensing by histaminergic neurons controlling wakefulness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvgenij eYanovsky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Orexinergic and histaminergic neurons in the posterior hypothalamus are involved in the control of arousal. Extracellular levels of acid /CO2 are fundamental physicochemical signals controlling wakefulness and breathing. Acidification excites orexinergic neurons like the chemosensory neurons in the brain stem. Hypercapnia induces c-Fos expression, a marker for increased neuronal activity, in the rat histaminergic tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN, but the mechanisms of this excitation are unknown. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are gated by protons and also by ammonium. Recordings in rat brain slices revealed now that acidification within the physiological range (pH from 7.3 to 7.0 as well as ammonium chloride (5mM excite histaminergic neurons. We detected variable combinations of 4 known types of ASICs in single TMN neurons, along with the pharmacological properties of pH-induced current. At pH 7.0 however, activation of ASICs in TMN neurons was negligible. Block of type I metabotropic glutamate receptors abolished proton- but not ammonium- induced excitation. Mouse TMN neurons were identified within a novel HDC-Cre transgenic reporter mouse line. In contrast to the rat these lacked pH 7.0-induced excitation and showed only a minimal response to the mGluR I agonist DHPG (0.5µM. Ammonium-induced excitation was similar in mouse and rat. Thus glutamate, which is released by glial cells and orexinergic axons amplifies CO2/acid-induced arousal through the recruitment of the histaminergic system in rat but not in mouse. These results are relevant for the understanding of neuronal mechanisms controlling H+/CO2-induced arousal in hepatic encephalopathy and obstructive sleep apnoea. The new HDC-Cre mouse model will be a useful tool for studying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the histaminergic system.

  1. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  2. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    -470.[12]Ye, Z. H., Sun, D. Y., Guo, J. F., Preliminary study on wheat cell wall calmodulin, Chin. Sci. Bull. (in Chinese), 1988.33(8): 624-626.[13]Li. J. X., Liu. J. W., Sun. D. Y., Immunoelectron microscopic localization of calmodulin in maize root cell, Cell Res., 1993,3: 11-19.[14]Li. J. X.. Sun. D. Y., Comparative studies on immunoreactivity of antibodies against plant and animal calmodulin, Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese), 1992, 34(4): 257-263.[15]Ye. Z. H.. Guo. J. F., Sun, D. Y., Studies on the cell wall calmodulin and calmodulin-binding protein of wheat etiolated coleoptiles, Acta Phytophysiologica Sinica (in Chinese), 1989, 15(3): 223-229.[16]Remgard. P.. Ekstrom. P. A. R., Ekstrom, A. et al., Calmodulin and in vitro regenerating frog sciatic herves: release and extracellular effects, European J. Neuroscience, 1995, 7: 1386-1392.[17]Cheung. M. Z., Duo, H. Y., Cheung, G. I., Localization of calmodulin in rabbit pancreas, Chinese J. of Experimental and Clinical Immunology (in Chinese), 1992, 4(6): 13-15.[18]Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil. S., Mitogenis role for extracellular calmodulin-like activity in normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells, Br. J. Haematol., 1992, 82: 151-160.[19]Goberdhan, N. J., Dawson, R. A., Freedlander, E. et al., Calmodulin-like protein as an extracellular mitogen for the keranocyte. Br. J. Dermatol., 1993, 129: 678-688.[20]Woodward, B. J., Lenton, E. A., Mac Neil, S., Requirement of preimplantation human embryos for extracellular calmodulin for development, Human Repro, 1993, 8(2): 272-276.[21]Houston. D. S.. Carson, C., Esmon, C. T., Endothelial cell and extracellular calmodulin inhibited monocyte tumor necrosis factor release and augment neutrophil elastase, The J. of Biol. Chem., 1997, 272(18): 11778-11785.[22]Li, H. B.. Cheng, G., Sun, D. Y., The effects of extracellular calmodulin on the cell proliferation of suspension cultured cell. Chin. Sci. Bull. (in Chinese), 1992, 37(19): 1804

  3. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  4. Noncoplanarity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, RGE; Gibson, BF; Li, Y; Liou, MK

    2002-01-01

    Using the soft-photon approximation, we address the issue of the importance of noncoplanarity effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung, We investigate the noncoplanar cross section as a function of the noncoplanarity angle (φ) over bar for the entire range of the photon polar angle psi(gamma). The (φ

  5. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  6. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  7. Structure of Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2003-01-01

    Electron--proton scattering in elastic and highly inelastic region is reviewed in a unified approach. The importance of parity--violating scattering due to electro--weak interference in probing the structure of proton is emphasized. The importance of longitudnal spin--spin asymmetry as well as parity violating longitudnal asymmetry to extract the structure functions of proton in both regions are discussed. The recoil polarization of proton in the elastic scattering is also discussed.

  8. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    in the skin tissue, but with significantly increased doses (up to 5000 Gy) compared to the average dose of 2 Gy, which was applied homogeneously in further skin samples for comparison. Gaussian-shaped minibeams of even larger sizes (σ=260 μm and 520 μm, inter-beam distance 1.8 mm) were analyzed in further experiments to evaluate the effect of increasing beam sizes as in deeper-lying tissues. Acute side effects were quantified via the MTT tissue viability test and the release of inflammatory proteins into the culture medium and showed improved results for minibeam compared to homogeneous irradiation. Genetic damage, an indicator for secondary tumor induction, was analyzed via the micronucleus test in the epidermal keratinocytes and was less than half for minibeams up to 180 μm size compared to homogeneous fields. Increasing minibeam sizes, i.e. increasing fractions of irradiated skin (receiving a dose higher than the average dose of 2 Gy) increased the number of micronuclei per divided cell, but never exceeded the genetic damage induced by a homogeneous dose distribution. A more authentic and representative in-vivo skin model, accounting for higher complexity with blood vessels, further cell types, follicles, glands and especially a working immune system, was used in the next step to further examine the side effects of minibeam radiotherapy compared to homogeneous irradiation. The central part of the ear of adult BALB/c mice was irradiated with 20 MeV protons, using an average dose of 60 Gy in a field of 7.2 x 7.2 mm{sup 2}. The 4 x 4 minibeams of nominal 6000 Gy had a size of 180 x 180 μm{sup 2} and inter-beam distances of 1.8 mm, as in previous in-vitro skin experiments. Minibeam irradiation induced no ear swelling or other visible skin reaction at any time, while significant ear swelling (up to 4-fold), skin reddening (erythema) and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3-4 weeks after irradiation. Loss of hair and sebaceous glands only

  9. Extracellular heat shock proteins: a new location, a new function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Antonio; Vazquez, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is a basic and well-conserved cellular response to an array of stresses. These proteins are involved in the repair of cellular damage induced by the stress, which is necessary for the salutary resolution from the insult. Moreover, they confer protection from subsequent insults, which has been coined stress tolerance. Because these proteins are expressed in subcellular compartments, it was thought that their function during stress conditions was circumscribed to the intracellular environment. However, it is now well established that HSPs can also be present outside cells where they appear to display a function different than the well-understood chaperone role. Extracellular HSPs act as alert stress signals priming other cells, particularly of the immune system, to avoid the propagation of the insult and favor resolution. Because the majority of HSPs do not possess a secretory peptide signal, they are likely to be exported by a nonclassic secretory pathway. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the export of HSPs, including translocation across the plasma membrane and release associated with lipid vesicles, as well as the passive release after cell death by necrosis. Extracellular HSPs appear in various flavors, including membrane-bound and membrane-free forms. All of these variants of extracellular HSPs suggest that their interactions with cells may be quite diverse, both in target cell types and the activation signaling pathways. This review addresses some of our current knowledge about the release and relevance of extracellular HSPs.

  10. Extracellular potassium homeostasis: insights from hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Kuo, Elizabeth; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-05-01

    Extracellular potassium makes up only about 2% of the total body's potassium store. The majority of the body potassium is distributed in the intracellular space, of which about 80% is in skeletal muscle. Movement of potassium in and out of skeletal muscle thus plays a pivotal role in extracellular potassium homeostasis. The exchange of potassium between the extracellular space and skeletal muscle is mediated by specific membrane transporters. These include potassium uptake by Na(+), K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase and release by inward-rectifier K(+) channels. These processes are regulated by circulating hormones, peptides, ions, and by physical activity of muscle as well as dietary potassium intake. Pharmaceutical agents, poisons, and disease conditions also affect the exchange and alter extracellular potassium concentration. Here, we review extracellular potassium homeostasis, focusing on factors and conditions that influence the balance of potassium movement in skeletal muscle. Recent findings that mutations of a skeletal muscle-specific inward-rectifier K(+) channel cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis provide interesting insights into the role of skeletal muscle in extracellular potassium homeostasis. These recent findings are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  12. Role of extracellular vesicles in de novo mineralization: an additional novel mechanism of cardiovascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Sophie E P; Aikawa, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membrane micro/nanovesicles secreted by many cell types into the circulation and the extracellular milieu in physiological and pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles, known as matrix vesicles, play a role in the mineralization of skeletal tissue, but emerging ultrastructural and in vitro studies have demonstrated their contribution to cardiovascular calcification as well. Cells involved in the progression of cardiovascular calcification release active vesicles capable of nucleating hydroxyapatite on their membranes. This review discusses the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular calcification and elaborates on this additional mechanism of calcification as an alternative pathway to the currently accepted mechanism of biomineralization via osteogenic differentiation.

  13. Origin of proton affinity to membrane/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichselbaum, Ewald; Österbauer, Maria; Knyazev, Denis G; Batishchev, Oleg V; Akimov, Sergey A; Hai Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Chao; Knör, Günther; Agmon, Noam; Carloni, Paolo; Pohl, Peter

    2017-07-03

    Proton diffusion along biological membranes is vitally important for cellular energetics. Here we extended previous time-resolved fluorescence measurements to study the time and temperature dependence of surface proton transport. We determined the Gibbs activation energy barrier ΔG (‡)r that opposes proton surface-to-bulk release from Arrhenius plots of (i) protons' surface diffusion constant and (ii) the rate coefficient for proton surface-to-bulk release. The large size of ΔG (‡)r disproves that quasi-equilibrium exists in our experiments between protons in the near-membrane layers and in the aqueous bulk. Instead, non-equilibrium kinetics describes the proton travel between the site of its photo-release and its arrival at a distant membrane patch at different temperatures. ΔG (‡)r contains only a minor enthalpic contribution that roughly corresponds to the breakage of a single hydrogen bond. Thus, our experiments reveal an entropic trap that ensures channeling of highly mobile protons along the membrane interface in the absence of potent acceptors.

  14. Microencapsulation technology by nature: Cell derived extracellular vesicles with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, A; Falus, A; Buzás, E

    2013-06-01

    Cell derived extracellular vesicles are submicron structures surrounded by phospholipid bilayer and released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The sizes of these vesicles roughly fall into the size ranges of microbes, and they represent efficient delivery platforms targeting complex molecular information to professional antigen presenting cells. Critical roles of these naturally formulated units of information have been described in many physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are not only potential biomarkers and possible pathogenic factors in numerous diseases, but they are also considered as emerging therapeutic targets and therapeutic vehicles. Strikingly, current drug delivery systems, designed to convey therapeutic proteins and peptides (such as liposomes), show many similarities to extracellular vesicles. Here we review some aspects of therapeutic implementation of natural, cell-derived extracellular vesicles in human diseases. Exploration of molecular and functional details of extracellular vesicle release and action may provide important lessons for the design of future drug delivery systems.

  15. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  16. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  17. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shin-Ichiro; Drummen, Gregor P C; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-02-06

    Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs), like a "message in a bottle" to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  18. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  19. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  20. Unusual isotopic composition of C-CO2 from sterilized soil microcosms: a new way to separate intracellular from extracellular respiratory metabolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéraval, Benoit; Alvarez, Gaël; Lehours, Anne Catherine; Amblard, Christian; Fontaine, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    The mineralization of organic C requires two main steps. First, microorganisms secrete exoenzymes in soil in order to depolymerize plant and microbial cell walls and release soluble substrates for microbial assimilation. The second step of mineralization, during which C is released as CO2, implies the absorption and utilization of solubilized substrates by microbial cells with the aim to produce energy (ATP). In cells, soluble substrates are carried out by a cascade of respiratory enzymes, along which protons and electrons are transferred from a substrate to oxygen. Given the complexity of this oxidative metabolism and the typical fragility of respiratory enzymes, it is traditionally considered that respiration (second step of C mineralization process) is strictly an intracellular metabolism process. The recurrent observations of substantial CO2 emissions in soil microcosms where microbial cells have been reduced to extremely low levels challenges this paradigm. In a recent study where some respiratory enzymes have shown to function in an extracellular context in soils, Maire et al. (2013) suggested that an extracellular oxidative metabolism (EXOMET) substantially contributes to CO2 emission from soils. This idea is supported by the recent publication of Blankinship et al., 2014 who showed the presence of active enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle on soil particles. Many controversies subsist in the scientific community due to the presence of non-proliferating but morphologically intact cells after irradiation that could substantially contribute to those soil CO2 emissions. To test whether a purely extracellular oxidative metabolism contribute to soil CO2 emissions, we combined high doses of gamma irradiations to different time of soil autoclaving. The presence of active and non-active cells in soil was checked by DNA and RNA extraction and by electronic microscopy. None active cells (RNA-containing cells) were detectable after irradiation, but some morphological

  1. Acid extrusion from human spermatozoa is mediated by flagellar voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishko, Polina V; Botchkina, Inna L; Fedorenko, Andriy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2010-02-05

    Human spermatozoa are quiescent in the male reproductive system and must undergo activation once introduced into the female reproductive tract. This process is known to require alkalinization of sperm cytoplasm, but the mechanism responsible for transmembrane proton extrusion has remained unknown because of the inability to measure membrane conductance in human sperm. Here, by successfully patch clamping human spermatozoa, we show that proton channel Hv1 is their dominant proton conductance. Hv1 is confined to the principal piece of the sperm flagellum, where it is expressed at unusually high density. Robust flagellar Hv1-dependent proton conductance is activated by membrane depolarization, an alkaline extracellular environment, endocannabinoid anandamide, and removal of extracellular zinc, a potent Hv1 blocker. Hv1 allows only outward transport of protons and is therefore dedicated to inducing intracellular alkalinization and activating spermatozoa. The importance of Hv1 for sperm activation makes it an attractive target for controlling male fertility.

  2. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes......, which are thought to be a source of extracellular DNA at sites of infections, increases the tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms toward aminoglycosides. Although biofilm-associated aminoglycoside tolerance recently has been linked to extracellular DNA-mediated activation of the pmr genes, we demonstrate...

  3. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  4. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  5. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  6. Neutrophil extracellular traps in tissue pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Kumar, Santosh; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are innate immune systems against invading pathogens. NETs are characterized as released DNA mixed with cytoplasmic antimicrobial proteins such as myeloperoxidase, proteinase3 and neutrophil elastase. While NETs are thought to have an important role in host defense, recent work has suggested that NETs contribute to tissue injury in non-infectious disease states. Uncontrolled NET formation in autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, cancers and thrombotic diseases can exacerbate a disease or even be a major initiator of tissue injury. But spotting NETs in tissues is not easy. Here we review the available histopathological evidence on the presence of NETs in a variety of diseases. We discuss technical difficulties and potential sources of misinterpretation while trying to detect NETs in tissue samples.

  7. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Kadota

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD.

  8. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of proton transport with quantum mechanically derived proton hopping rates (Q-HOP MD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Markus A.; Helms, Volkhard

    2001-11-01

    A very efficient scheme is presented to simulate proton transport by classical molecular dynamics simulation coupled with quantum mechanically derived proton hopping. Simulated proton transfer rates and proton diffusion constants for an excess proton in a box of water molecules are in good agreement with experimental data and with previous simulations that employed empirical valence bond (EVB) theory. For the first time, the proton occupancy of an aspartic acid residue in water was computed directly by MD simulations. Locally enhanced sampling or multi copy techniques were used to facilitate proton release in simulations of an imidazole ring in a solvent box. Summarizing, a quasiclassical description of proton transfer dynamics has been able to capture important kinetic and thermodynamic features of these systems at less than 50% computational overhead compared to standard molecular dynamics simulations. The method can be easily generalized to simulate the protonation equilibria of a large number of titratable sites. This should make it an attractive method to study proton transport in large biological systems.

  10. Extracellular ATP and P2X7 receptors in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Feuvre, Rosalind; Brough, David; Rothwell, Nancy

    2002-07-05

    Neuronal injury and cell death in the central nervous system (CNS) are underlying features of neurodegenerative disorders. However, our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved is still limited. Inflammatory processes mediated by cytokines, and interleukin-1 (IL-1) in particular, play a significant role in neuronal death following pathological insults. Despite this growing area of research, very little is known about the factors regulating the expression, cleavage and release of interleukin-1 in the brain. Recent studies on immune cells demonstrate that extracellular ATP can act as a potent stimulus for the maturation and release of interleukin-1beta, via activation of P2X7 receptors. Stimulation of P2X7 receptors with ATP has dramatic cytotoxic properties and a wider role in neurodegenerative processes is possible. This review discusses the potential involvement of extracellular ATP and P2X7 receptors as regulators of interleukin-1-mediated neuropathologies and thus as a mediator of cell death following pathological insults.

  11. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  12. Metabolic requirements for neutrophil extracellular traps formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, Oscar; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina Bertha; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    As part of the innate immune response, neutrophils are at the forefront of defence against infection, resolution of inflammation and wound healing. They are the most abundant leucocytes in the peripheral blood, have a short lifespan and an estimated turnover of 1010 to 1011 cells per day. Neutrophils efficiently clear microbial infections by phagocytosis and by oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. In 2004, a new neutrophil anti-microbial mechanism was described, the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA, histones and anti-microbial peptides. Several microorganisms, bacterial products, as well as pharmacological stimuli such as PMA, were shown to induce NETs. Neutrophils contain relatively few mitochondria, and derive most of their energy from glycolysis. In this scenario we aimed to analyse some of the metabolic requirements for NET formation. Here it is shown that NETs formation is strictly dependent on glucose and to a lesser extent on glutamine, that Glut-1, glucose uptake, and glycolysis rate increase upon PMA stimulation, and that NET formation is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-glucose, and to a lesser extent by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Moreover, when neutrophils were exposed to PMA in glucose-free medium for 3 hr, they lost their characteristic polymorphic nuclei but did not release NETs. However, if glucose (but not pyruvate) was added at this time, NET release took place within minutes, suggesting that NET formation could be metabolically divided into two phases; the first, independent from exogenous glucose (chromatin decondensation) and, the second (NET release), strictly dependent on exogenous glucose and glycolysis. PMID:25545227

  13. Killing by neutrophil extracellular traps: fact or folklore?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegazzi, Renzo; Decleva, Eva; Dri, Pietro

    2012-02-02

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are DNA structures released by dying neutrophils and claimed to constitute a new microbicidal mechanism. Killing by NET-forming cells is ascribed to these structures because it is prevented by preincubation with DNase, which has been shown to dismantle NETs, before addition of the target microorganisms. Curiously, the possibility that the microorganisms ensnared in NETs are alive has not been considered. Using Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans blastospores, we demonstrate that the microorganisms captured by NETs and thought to be killed are alive because they are released and recovered in cell medium by incubation with DNase. It is concluded that NETs entrap but do not kill microbes.

  14. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora;

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome enables monocytes and macrophages to release high levels of interleukin-1ß during inflammatory responses. Concentrations of extracellular calcium can increase at sites of infection, inflammation or cell activation. Here we show that increased extracellular cal......, and this effect was inhibited in GPRC6A(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that G-protein-coupled receptors can activate the inflammasome, and indicate that increased extracellular calcium has a role as a danger signal and amplifier of inflammation....

  15. Proton-proton physics in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, T K

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has several unique features which makes it an important contributor to proton-proton physics at the LHC, in addition to its specific design goal of studying the physics of strongly interacting matter in heavy-ion collisions. The unique capabilities include its low transverse momentum (\\pT) acceptance, excellent vertexing, particle identification over a broad \\pT range and jet reconstruction. In this report, a brief review of ALICE capabilities is given for studying bulk properties of produced particles which characterize the underlying events, and the physics of heavy-flavour, quarkonia, photons, di-leptons and jets.

  16. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  17. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando-IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd-CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles: potential roles in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier G de Jong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV consist of exosomes, which are released upon fusion of the multivesicular body with the cell membrane, and microvesicles, which are released directly from the cell membrane. EV can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes, including immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. The vast amount of processes that EV are involved in and the versatility of manner in which they can influence the behavior of recipient cells make EV an interesting source for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Successes in the fields of tumor biology and immunology sparked the exploration of the potential of EV in the field of regenerative medicine. Indeed, EV are involved in restoring tissue and organ damage, and may partially explain the paracrine effects observed in stem cell based therapeutic approaches. The function and content of EV may also harbor information that can be used in tissue engineering, in which paracrine signaling is employed to modulate cell recruitment, differentiation, and proliferation. In this review, we discuss the function and role of EV in regenerative medicine and elaborate on potential applications in tissue engineering.

  19. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  20. Proton transfer pathways in Photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and the 1.9-Å crystal structure of Photosystem II (Umena, Y., Kawakami, K., Shen, J.-R., and Kamiya, N. (2011) Nature 473, 55-60), we investigated the H-bonding environment of the redox active tyrosine, TyrD and obtained insights that help explain its slow redox kinetics and the stability of TyrD radical. The water molecule distal to TyrD, 4 Å away from the phenolic O of TyrD (OTyrD) , corresponds to the presence of the tyrosyl radical state. The water molecule proximal to TyrD, in H-bonding distance to OTyrD, corresponds to the presence of the unoxidised tyrosine. The H+ released upon oxidation of TyrD is transferred to the proximal water, which shifts to the distal position, triggering a concerted proton transfer pathway involving D2-Arg180 and a series of waters, through which the proton reaches the aqueous phase at D2-His61. The water movement linked to the ejection of the proton from the hydrophobic environment near TyrD makes oxidation slow and quasi-irreversible, explaining the great stability of the TyrD radical. A symmetry-related proton pathway associated with TyrZ is pointed out and this is associated with one of the Cl- sites. This may represent a proton pathway functional in the water oxidation cycle.

  1. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  2. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  3. Detection of fast light-activated H+ release and M intermediate formation from proteorhodopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeVita Anne

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteorhodopsin (pR is a light-activated proton pump homologous to bacteriorhodopsin and recently discovered in oceanic γ-proteobacteria. One perplexing difference between these two proteins is the absence in pR of homologues of bR residues Glu-194 and Glu-204. These two residues, along with Arg-82, have been implicated in light-activated fast H+ release to the extracellular medium in bR. It is therefore uncertain that pR carries out its physiological activity using a mechanism that is completely homologous to that of bR. Results A pR purification procedure is described that utilizes Phenylsepharose™ and hydroxylapatite columns and yields 85% (w/w purity. Through SDS-PAGE of the pure protein, the molecular weight of E.-coli-produced pR was determined to be 36,000, approximately 9,000 more than the 27,000 predicted by the DNA sequence. Post-translational modification of one or more of the cysteine residues accounts for 5 kDa of the weight difference as measured on a cys-less pR mutant. At pH 9.5 and in the presence of octylglucoside and diheptanoylphosphotidylcholine, flash photolysis results in fast H+ release and a 400-nm absorbing (M-like photoproduct. Both of these occur with a similar rise time (4–10 μs as reported for monomeric bR in detergent. Conclusions The presence of fast H+ release in pR indicates that either different groups are responsible for fast H+ release in pR and bR (i.e. that the H+ release group is not highly conserved; or, that the H+ release group is conserved and is therefore likely Arg-94 itself in pR (and Arg-82 in bR, correspondingly.

  4. Extracellular gluco-oligosaccharide degradation by Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Gerald N; Payea, Matthew J; Hurst, Logan R; Egan, Annie E; Martin, Brandon S; Periyannan, Gopal R

    2014-03-01

    The oligotrophic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has the ability to metabolize various organic molecules, including plant structural carbohydrates, as a carbon source. The nature of β-glucosidase (BGL)-mediated gluco-oligosaccharide degradation and nutrient transport across the outer membrane in C. crescentus was investigated. All gluco-oligosaccharides tested (up to celloheptose) supported growth in M2 minimal media but not cellulose or CM-cellulose. The periplasmic and outer membrane fractions showed highest BGL activity, but no significant BGL activity was observed in the cytosol or extracellular medium. Cells grown in cellobiose showed expression of specific BGLs and TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs). Carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone lowered the rate of cell growth in cellobiose but not in glucose, indicating potential cellobiose transport into the cell by a proton motive force-dependent process, such as TBDR-dependent transport, and facilitated diffusion of glucose across the outer membrane via specific porins. These results suggest that C. crescentus acquires carbon from cellulose-derived gluco-oligosaccharides found in the environment by extracellular and periplasmic BGL activity and TBDR-mediated transport. This report on extracellular degradation of gluco-oligosaccharides and methods of nutrient acquisition by C. crescentus supports a broader suite of carbohydrate metabolic capabilities suggested by the C. crescentus genome sequence that until now have not been reported.

  5. Energy Dependence of SEP Electron and Proton Onset Times

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hong; Gopalswamy, Nat; Cyr, Orville St

    2016-01-01

    We study the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events that were detected by GOES in the $>$ 10 MeV energy channel during December 2006 to March 2014. We derive and compare solar particle release (SPR) times for the 0.25--10.4 MeV electrons and 10--100 MeV protons for the 28 SEP events. In the study, the electron SPR times are derived with the time-shifting analysis (TSA) and the proton SPR times are derived using both the TSA and the velocity dispersion analysis (VDA). Electron anisotropies are computed to evaluate the amount of scattering for the events under study. Our main results include: 1)near-relativistic electrons and high-energy protons are released at the same time within 8 min for most (16 of 23) SEP events. 2)There exists a good correlation between electron and proton acceleration, peak intensity and intensity time profiles. 3) The TSA SPR times for 90.5 MeV and 57.4 MeV protons have maximum errors of 6 min and 10 min compared to the proton VDA release times, respectively, while the maximum err...

  6. Charge-Reversal APTES-Modified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with High Drug Loading and Release Controllability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Yi; Wang, Jine; Yang, Yang; Li, Yulin; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2016-07-13

    In this study, we demonstrate a facile strategy (DL-SF) for developing MSN-based nanosystems through drug loading (DL, using doxorubicin as a model drug) followed by surface functionalization (SF) of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) via aqueous (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) silylation. For comparison, a reverse functionalization process (i.e., SF-DL) was also studied. The pre-DL process allows for an efficient encapsulation (encapsulation efficiency of ∼75%) of an anticancer drug [doxorubicin (DOX)] inside MSNs, and post-SF allows in situ formation of an APTES outer layer to restrict DOX leakage under physiological conditions. This method makes it possible to tune the DOX release rate by increasing the APTES decoration density through variation of the APTES concentration. However, the SF-DL approach results in a rapid decrease in drug loading capacity with an increase in APTES concentration because of the formation of the APTES outer layer hampers the inner permeability of the DOX drug, resulting in a burst release similar to that of undecorated MSNs. The resulting DOX-loaded DL-SF MSNs present a slightly negatively charged surface under physiological conditions and become positively charged in and extracellular microenvironment of solid tumor due to the protonation effect under acidic conditions. These merits aid their maintenance of long-term stability in blood circulation, high cellular uptake by a kind of skin carcinoma cells, and an enhanced intracellular drug release behavior, showing their potential in the delivery of many drugs beyond anticancer chemotherapeutics.

  7. Strangeness in the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberg, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Both perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms contribute to strangeness in the proton sea. We have developed a hybrid model in which non-perturbative contributions are calculated in a meson cloud model which expands the proton in terms of meson-baryon states, and perturbative contributions are calculated in a statistical model which expands the proton in terms of quark-gluon states. The perturbative contributions are represented in the parton distributions of the ``bare'' hadrons in the meson cloud. We compare our results to the recent experimental data of ATLAS and HERMES. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  8. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  9. Proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase: insights from proton exchange kinetics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLoS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro (Osaka Univ. of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan))

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  11. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  12. The behaviors of Microcystis aeruginosa cells and extracellular microcystins during chitosan flocculation and flocs storage processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Hai-Yan; Ma, Chun-Xia; Hu, Wen-Rong; Sun, Feng

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to study the effects of chitosan on cell integrity and extracellular microcystins (MCs) of Microcystis aeruginosa cells during flocculation and flocs storage processes. The impacts of chitosan addition, flocculation stirring and flocs storage time were comprehensively detected to prevent or reduce cell lysis and MCs release. Response surface method (RSM) was applied to optimize the chitosan flocculation. Under chitosan concentration 7.31 mg/L and optimized mechanical conditions, 99% of M. aeruginosa cells were integrated removed. Furthermore, amounts of extracellular MCs were adsorbed by chitosan polymers in this process. With chitosan flocs protect, though cells showed some damage, extracellular MCs concentration in flocculated samples lower than background level within first 2 d. However, lots of MCs release was observed after 4d which may result from chitosan degradation and cells lysis. Therefore, chitosan flocs should be treated within 2d to prevent the adsorbed MCs releasing again.

  13. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  14. THEORY OF PROTON EMITTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. TALOU

    2000-08-01

    Modern theoretical methods used to interpret recent experimental data on ground-state proton emission near the proton drip line are reviewed. Most of them are stationary and are aimed to compute proton decay widths {Gamma}{sub p} only. Comparison is made between these approaches before being compared to experimental data. Our time-dependent approach based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for initial quasi-stationary single-proton states is then introduced. It is shown that much deeper insights into the physics of this clean multidimensional quantum tunneling effect can be accessed, and that in addition to {Gamma}{sub p}, other physical quantities could be tested experimentally, offering new stringent tests on nuclear physics models away from the valley of {beta}-stability. Finally, the necessity of using the TDSE approach in more complex, dynamical, problems is demonstrated.

  15. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  16. Organ-specific chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerra, R F; Nathanson, S D

    1989-05-01

    The preferential colonization of a distant organ by a circulating tumor cell (organ specific metastasis) may be regulated by chemotactic factors present within the extracellular matrix of the host organ. Organ-specific extracellular matrix was prepared from murine kidney and lung by high salt extraction and DNAase/RNAase digestion. A soluble protein fraction (S2) from each of the matricies was obtained by 4 M guanidine extraction and was tested for organ-specific chemotactic activity in a modified Boyden chamber. The lung colonizing B16-F10 and B16-BL6 tumor cell lines demonstrated organ-specific motility only toward the lung extract. The low metastasizing B16 parental line and liver colonizing B16-L4b line showed no preference for either lung or kidney. The lung activity resolves into five fractions by gel filtration chromatography, with the highest activity eluting at Mr approximately 71,000. Chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix may regulate the preferential colonization of an organ by stimulating the migration of tumor cells in a specific manner. These factors may be released during the degradation of the extracellular matrix.

  17. Proton transport in proton exchange membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmeisser, Jennifer Mary

    2007-01-01

    This work investigated several proton exchange membranes (PEMs): perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymers (Nafion®), sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (S-PEEK), radiation-grafted ethylenetetrafluoroethylene-grafted-poly(styrene sulfonic) acid (ETFE-g-PSSA), sulfonated trifluorostyrene-co-substituted trifluorostyrene (BAM®), sulfonated polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene-r-butylene)-b-polystyrene triblock copolymer (S-SEBS), and a series of novel photocurable polyelectrolytes. These polymer systems dif...

  18. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react to their co......Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  19. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Limits of proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  1. Extracellular MicroRNAs in Urologic Malignancies: Chances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs that are 19-23 nucleotides long, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, are involved in almost all biological mechanisms during carcinogenesis. Recent studies show that miRNAs released from live cells are detectable in body fluids and may be taken up by other cells to confer cell-cell communication. These released miRNAs (here referred to as extracellular miRNAs are often protected by RNA-binding proteins or embedded inside circulating microvesicles. Due to their relative stability, extracellular miRNAs are believed to be promising candidates as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease, or even as therapeutic agents for targeted treatment. In this review, we first describe biogenesis and characteristics of these miRNAs. We then summarize recent publications involving extracellular miRNA profiling studies in three representative urologic cancers, including: prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. We focus on the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential of these miRNAs in biological fluids, such as serum, plasma, and urine. Finally, we discuss advantages and challenges of these miRNAs in clinical applications.

  2. Extracellular proteins in pea root tip and border cell exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; VanEtten, Hans D; Tsaprailis, George; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-02-01

    Newly generated plant tissue is inherently sensitive to infection. Yet, when pea (Pisum sativum) roots are inoculated with the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca, most newly generated root tips remain uninfected even though most roots develop lesions just behind the tip in the region of elongation. The resistance mechanism is unknown but is correlated spatially with the presence of border cells on the cap periphery. Previously, an array of >100 extracellular proteins was found to be released while border cell separation proceeds. Here we report that protein secretion from pea root caps is induced in correlation with border cell separation. When this root cap secretome was proteolytically degraded during inoculation of pea roots with N. haematococca, the percentage of infected root tips increased from 4% +/- 3% to 100%. In control experiments, protease treatment of conidia or roots had no effect on growth and development of the fungus or the plant. A complex of >100 extracellular proteins was confirmed, by multidimensional protein identification technology, to comprise the root cap secretome. In addition to defense-related and signaling enzymes known to be present in the plant apoplast were ribosomal proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and others typically associated with intracellular localization but recently shown to be extracellular components of microbial biofilms. We conclude that the root cap, long known to release a high molecular weight polysaccharide mucilage and thousands of living cells into the incipient rhizosphere, also secretes a complex mixture of proteins that appear to function in protection of the root tip from infection.

  3. Effects of extraction procedures on metal binding properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from anaerobic granular sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abzac, D' P.; Bordas, F.; Hullebusch, E.; Lens, P.N.L.; Guibaud, G.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the extraction procedure of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on their proton/metal binding properties were studied. Nine extraction procedures (one control, four physical and four chemical procedures) were applied to four types of anaerobic granular sludges. The binding capaci

  4. An inhibitory effect of extracellular Ca2+ on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiong

    Full Text Available AIM: Neurotransmitter release is elicited by an elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i. The action potential triggers Ca(2+ influx through Ca(2+ channels which causes local changes of [Ca(2+](i for vesicle release. However, any direct role of extracellular Ca(2+ (besides Ca(2+ influx on Ca(2+-dependent exocytosis remains elusive. Here we set out to investigate this possibility on rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and chromaffin cells, widely used models for studying vesicle exocytosis. RESULTS: Using photolysis of caged Ca(2+ and caffeine-induced release of stored Ca(2+, we found that extracellular Ca(2+ inhibited exocytosis following moderate [Ca(2+](i rises (2-3 µM. The IC(50 for extracellular Ca(2+ inhibition of exocytosis (ECIE was 1.38 mM and a physiological reduction (∼30% of extracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](o significantly increased the evoked exocytosis. At the single vesicle level, quantal size and release frequency were also altered by physiological [Ca(2+](o. The calcimimetics Mg(2+, Cd(2+, G418, and neomycin all inhibited exocytosis. The extracellular Ca(2+-sensing receptor (CaSR was not involved because specific drugs and knockdown of CaSR in DRG neurons did not affect ECIE. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: As an extension of the classic Ca(2+ hypothesis of synaptic release, physiological levels of extracellular Ca(2+ play dual roles in evoked exocytosis by providing a source of Ca(2+ influx, and by directly regulating quantal size and release probability in neuronal cells.

  5. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  6. The P2X7 receptor is an important regulator of extracellular ATP levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBrandao-Burch

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Controlled ATP release has been demonstrated from many neuronal and non-neuronal cell types. Once released, extracellular ATP acts on cells in a paracrine manner via purinergic receptors. Considerable evidence now suggests that extracellular nucleotides, signalling via P2 receptors, play important roles in bone homeostasis modulating both osteoblast and osteoclast function. In this study, we demonstrate that mouse osteoclasts and their precursors constitutively release ATP into their extracellular environment. Levels were highest at day 2 (precursor cells, possibly reflecting the high number of red blood cells and accessory cells present. Mature osteoclasts constitutively released ATP in the range 0.05-0.5pmol/ml/cell. Both osteoclasts and osteoblasts express mRNA and protein for the P2X7 receptor. We found that in osteoclasts, expression levels are 4-fold higher in mature cells relative to precursors, whilst in osteoblasts expression remains relatively constant during differentiation. Selective antagonists (0.1-100µM AZ10606120, A438079 and KN-62 were used to determine whether this release was mediated via P2X7 receptors. AZ10606120, A438079 and KN-62, at 0.1-10µM, decreased ATP release by mature osteoclasts by up to 70%, 60% and 80%, respectively. No differences in cell viability were observed. ATP release also occurs via vesicular exocytosis; inhibitors of this process (1-100µM NEM or brefeldin A had no effect on ATP release from osteoclasts. P2X7 receptor antagonists (0.1-10µM also decreased ATP release from primary rat osteoblasts by up to 80%. These data show that ATP release via the P2X7 receptor contributes to extracellular ATP levels in osteoclast and osteoblast cultures, suggesting an important additional role for this receptor in autocrine/paracrine purinergic signalling in bone.

  7. Antiplatelet agents and proton pump inhibitors – personalizing treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Lin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Eugene Lin, Rajiv Padmanabhan, Majaz MoonisDepartment of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School and UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USAIntroduction: Antiplatelet therapy remains one of the cornerstones in the management of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke. However, a significant percentage of patients have concomitant gastroesophageal reflux or peptic ulcer disease that requires acid-reducing medications, the most powerful and effective being the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Antiplatelet efficacy, at least in vivo, and particularly for clopidogrel, has been shown to be reduced with concomitant proton pump inhibitor use. Whether this is clinically relevant is not clear from the limited studies available.Methods: We conducted an extensive review of studies available on Medline related to pharmacodynamic interactions between the antiplatelet medications and proton pump inhibitors as well as clinical studies that addressed this potential interaction.Results: Based on the present pharmacodynamic and clinical studies we did not find a significant interaction that would reduce the efficacy of antiplatelet agents with concomitant user of proton pump inhibitors.Conclusions: Patients on antiplatelet agents after a transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke can safely use aspirin, and extended release dipyridamole/aspirin with proton pump inhibitors. Patients on clopidogrel may use other acid-reducing drugs besides proton pump inhibitors. In rare cases where proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel have to be used concurrently, careful close monitoring for recurrent vascular events is required.Keywords: proton pump inhibitors, antiplatelet medications, clopidogrel, ischemic stroke, cardiovascular events

  8. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patie

  9. Binding and Transformation of Extracellular DNA in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Peng; HUANG Qiao-Yun; ZHANG Xue-Wen; CHEN Hao

    2005-01-01

    DNA is the genetic material of various organisms. Extracellular DNA adsorbed or bound on surface-active particles in soils has been shown to persist for long periods against nucleases degradation and still retain the ability to transform competent cells. This paper reviews some recent advances on the binding and transformation of extracellular DNA in soils,which is fundamental to understanding the nature of the soil, regulating biodiversity, and assessing the risk of releasing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) as well as being helpful for development of the genetic evolutional theory of bacteria. Several influencing factors, such as soil pH, ionic strength, soil surface properties, and characteristics of the DNA polymer, are discussed. To date, the understanding of the type of molecular binding sites and the conformation of adsorbed and bound DNA to soil particles is still in its infancy.

  10. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  11. Proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: energetic requirements and the role of two proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a superfamily of membrane bound enzymes catalyzing the exergonic reduction of molecular oxygen to water, producing an electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The gradient is formed both by the electrogenic chemistry, taking electrons and protons from opposite sides of the membrane, and by proton pumping across the entire membrane. In the most efficient subfamily, the A-family of oxidases, one proton is pumped in each reduction step, which is surprising considering the fact that two of the reduction steps most likely are only weakly exergonic. Based on a combination of quantum chemical calculations and experimental information, it is here shown that from both a thermodynamic and a kinetic point of view, it should be possible to pump one proton per electron also with such an uneven distribution of the free energy release over the reduction steps, at least up to half the maximum gradient. A previously suggested pumping mechanism is developed further to suggest a reason for the use of two proton transfer channels in the A-family. Since the rate of proton transfer to the binuclear center through the D-channel is redox dependent, it might become too slow for the steps with low exergonicity. Therefore, a second channel, the K-channel, where the rate is redox-independent is needed. A redox-dependent leakage possibility is also suggested, which might be important for efficient energy conservation at a high gradient. A mechanism for the variation in proton pumping stoichiometry over the different subfamilies of cytochrome oxidase is also suggested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracellular DNA affects NO content in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, L V; Alekseeva, A Yu; Konkova, M S; Kostyuk, S V; Ershova, E S; Smirnova, T D; Konorova, I L; Veiko, N N

    2010-08-01

    Fragments of extracellular DNA are permanently released into the blood flow due to cell apoptosis and possible de novo DNA synthesis. To find out whether extracellular DNA can affect the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), one of key vascular tone regulators, we studied in vitro effects of three artificial DNA probes with different sequences and 10 samples of extracellular DNA (obtained from healthy people and patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis) on NO synthesis in endothelial cell culture (HUVEC). For detection of NO in live cells and culture medium, we used a NO-specific agent CuFL penetrating into the cells and forming a fluorescent product FL-NO upon interaction with NO. Human genome DNA fragments affected the content of NO in endothelial cells; this effect depended on both the base sequence and concentration of DNA fragments. Addition of artificial DNA and extracellular DNA from healthy people into the cell culture in a low concentration (5 ng/ml) increased the detected NO concentration by 4-fold at most. Cytosine-guanine (CG)-rich fragment of the transcribed sequence of ribosomal repeat was the most powerful NO-inductor. The effect of DNA fragments on NO synthesis was comparable with that of low doses of oxidizing agents, H(2)O(2) and 17β-estradiol. Extracellular DNA samples obtained from patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis decreased NO content in cells and medium by 1.3-28 times compared to the control; the effect correlated with the content of CG-rich sequences.

  13. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences.

  14. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  15. Characterization and biological role of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wójtowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV form a heterogeneous population of mostly spherical membrane structures released by almost all cells, including tumour cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Their size varies from 30 nm to 1 μm, and size is one of the main criteria of the selection of two categories of EV: small (30-100 nm, more homogeneous exosomes and larger fragments (0.1-1 μm called membrane microvesicles or ectosomes. The presence of EV has already been detected in many human body fluids: blood, urine, saliva, semen and amniotic fluid. Formation of EV is tightly controlled, and their function and biochemical composition depend on the cell type they originate from. EV are the “vehicles” of bioactive molecules, such as proteins, mRNA and microRNA, and may play an important role in intercellular communication and modulation of e.g. immune system cell activity. In addition, on the surface of tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV, called oncosomes, several markers specific for cancer cells were identified, which indicates a role of TMV in tumour growth and cancer development. On the other hand, TMV may be an important source of tumour-associated antigens (TAA which can be potentially useful as biomarkers with prognostic value, as well as in development of new forms of targeted immunotherapy of cancer.

  16. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  17. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  18. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  20. Complexity of the influence of gangliosides on histamine release from human basophils and rat mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Svendsen, U G; Thastrup, Ole;

    1987-01-01

    The influence of exogenous addition of gangliosides on histamine release from human basophils and rat mast cells was examined in vitro. Gangliosides dose-dependently inhibited histamine release, and this inhibition was dependent on the ganglioside sialic acid content, since GT1b, having 3 sialic...... was reflected in the sensitivity of the cells to extracellular calcium, since inhibition of the release could be counteracted by increasing the extracellular concentration of calcium....

  1. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Periodontitis: A Web of Intrigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P C; Chicca, I J; Cooper, P R; Milward, M R; Chapple, I L C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent a novel paradigm in neutrophil-mediated immunity. NETs are believed to constitute a highly conserved antimicrobial strategy comprising decondensed nuclear DNA and associated histones that are extruded into the extracellular space. Associated with the web-like strands of DNA is an array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which facilitate the extracellular destruction of microorganisms that become entrapped within the NETs. NETs can be released by cells that remain viable or following a unique form of programmed cell death known as NETosis, which is dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the decondensing of the nuclear DNA catalyzed by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4. NETs are produced in response to a range of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa, as well as host-derived mediators. NET release is, however, not without cost, as the concomitant release of cytotoxic molecules can also cause host tissue damage. This is evidenced by a number of immune-mediated diseases, in which excess or dysfunctional NET production, bacterial NET evasion, and decreased NET removal are associated with disease pathogenesis. Periodontitis is the most prevalent infectious-inflammatory disease of humans, characterized by a dysregulated neutrophilic response to specific bacterial species within the subgingival plaque biofilm. Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cell involved in periodontitis and have previously been found to exhibit hyperactivity and hyperreactivity in terms of ROS production in chronic periodontitis patients. However, the contribution of ROS-dependent NET formation to periodontal health or disease remains unclear. In this focused review, we discuss the mechanisms, stimuli, and requirements for NET production; the ability of NET-DNA and NET-associated AMPs to entrap and kill pathogens; and the potential immunogenicity of NETs in disease. We also speculate on the potential

  2. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  3. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  4. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Tran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  5. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  6. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  7. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  8. Extracellular Vesicles in Heart Disease: Excitement for the Future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty M. Danielson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV, including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are released from numerous cell types and are involved in intercellular communication, physiological functions and the pathology of disease. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide range of cargo including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. The role of EVs in cardiac physiology and heart disease is an emerging field that has produced intriguing findings in recent years. This review will outline what is currently known about EVs in the cardiovascular system, including cellular origins, functional roles and utility as biomarkers and potential therapeutics.

  9. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information o

  10. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information o

  11. Microtubules regulate GEF-H1 in response to extracellular matrix stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Jessica N.; Ponik, Suzanne M.; Garcia-Mendoza, Maria G.; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Inman, David R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast epithelial cells sense the stiffness of the extracellular matrix through Rho-mediated contractility. In turn, matrix stiffness regulates RhoA activity. However, the upstream signaling mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the Rho exchange factor GEF-H1 mediates RhoA activation in response to extracellular matrix stiffness. We demonstrate the novel finding that microtubule stability is diminished by a stiff three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix, which leads to the activation of GEF-H1. Surprisingly, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway did not contribute to stiffness-induced GEF-H1 activation. Loss of GEF-H1 decreases cell contraction of and invasion through 3D matrices. These data support a model in which matrix stiffness regulates RhoA through microtubule destabilization and the subsequent release and activation of GEF-H1. PMID:22593214

  12. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  13. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  14. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  15. The Search for Proton Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  16. Extracellular N-acetylaspartate depletion in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Antonio; Sen, Jon; Petzold, Axel; Russo, Salvatore; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin; Tavazzi, Barbara; Vagnozzi, Roberto; Signoretti, Stefano; Amorini, Angela Maria; Bellia, Francesco; Lazzarino, Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is almost exclusively localized in neurons in the adult brain and is present in high concentration in the CNS. It can be measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and is seen as a marker of neuronal damage and death. NMR spectroscopy and animal models have shown NAA depletion to occur in various types of chronic and acute brain injury. We investigated 19 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Microdialysis was utilized to recover NAA, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol and glutamate, at 12-h intervals. These markers were correlated with survival and a 6-month Glasgow Outcome Score. Eleven patients died and eight survived. A linear mixed model analysis showed a significant effect of outcome and of the interaction between time of injury and outcome on NAA levels (p = 0.009 and p = 0.004, respectively). Overall, extracellular NAA was 34% lower in non-survivors. A significant non-recoverable fall was observed in this group from day 4 onwards, with a concomitant rise in lactate-pyruvate ratio and glycerol. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is a significant contributor to poor outcome following TBI and propose extracellular NAA as a potential marker for monitoring interventions aimed at preserving mitochondrial function.

  17. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  18. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  19. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  20. Extracellular ATP and adenosine : The Yin and Yang in immune responses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, M. M.; Saez, T.; de Vos, P.

    Extracellular adenosine 50-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine molecules are intimately involved in immune responses. ATP is mostly a pro-inflammatory molecule and is released during hypoxic condition and by necrotic cells, as well as by activated immune cells and endothelial cells. However, under

  1. Influence of extracellular polymeric substances on deposition and redeposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Suarez, C; Pasma, J; van der Borden, AJ; Wingender, J; Flemming, HC; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the initial adhesion of EPS-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG91 and SG81R1, a non-EPS-producing strain, to substrata with different hydrophobicity was investigated. The release of EPS by SG81 was concurrent with a decrease in s

  2. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Phenocopying of Metastatic Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, Anoek; Maynard, Carrie; Verweij, Frederik Johannes; Kamermans, Alwin; Schafer, Ronny; Beerling, Evelyne; Schiffelers, Raymond Michel; de Wit, Elzo; Berenguer, Jordi; Ellenbroek, Saskia Inge Johanna; Wurdinger, Thomas; Pegtel, Dirk Michiel; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer cells release heterogeneous populations of extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. In vitro experiments showed that EV uptake can lead to transfer of functional mRNA and altered cellular behavior. However, similar in vivo experiments remain challengin

  3. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C., E-mail: cinzia.talamonti@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Reggioli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Civinini, C. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Pallotta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  4. Low Earth orbit assessment of proton anisotropy using AP8 and AP9 trapped proton models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F; Walker, Steven A; Santos Koos, Lindsey M

    2015-04-01

    The completion of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community with an ideal evaluation and testing facility for future long duration human activities in space. Ionized and secondary neutral particles radiation measurements inside ISS form the ideal tool for validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear reaction cross sections and transport codes. Studies using thermo-luminescent detectors (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TPEC), and computer aided design (CAD) models of early ISS configurations confirmed that, as input, computational dosimetry at low Earth orbit (LEO) requires an environmental model with directional (anisotropic) capability to properly describe the exposure of trapped protons within ISS. At LEO, ISS encounters exposure from trapped electrons, protons and geomagnetically attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). For short duration studies at LEO, one can ignore trapped electrons and ever present GCR exposure contributions during quiet times. However, within the trapped proton field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of proton exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensity of trapped particles. Among the established trapped models are the historic AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. Since at LEO electrons have minimal exposure contribution to ISS, this work ignores the AE8 and AE9 components of the models and couples a measurement derived anisotropic trapped proton formalism to omnidirectional output from the AP8 and AP9 models, allowing the assessment of the differences between the two proton models. The assessment is done at a target point within the ISS-11A configuration (circa 2003) crew quarter (CQ) of Russian Zvezda service module (SM), during its ascending and descending nodes passes through the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The anisotropic formalism incorporates the contributions of proton narrow

  5. Low Earth orbit assessment of proton anisotropy using AP8 and AP9 trapped proton models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Walker, Steven A.; Santos Koos, Lindsey M.

    2015-04-01

    The completion of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community with an ideal evaluation and testing facility for future long duration human activities in space. Ionized and secondary neutral particles radiation measurements inside ISS form the ideal tool for validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear reaction cross sections and transport codes. Studies using thermo-luminescent detectors (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TPEC), and computer aided design (CAD) models of early ISS configurations confirmed that, as input, computational dosimetry at low Earth orbit (LEO) requires an environmental model with directional (anisotropic) capability to properly describe the exposure of trapped protons within ISS. At LEO, ISS encounters exposure from trapped electrons, protons and geomagnetically attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). For short duration studies at LEO, one can ignore trapped electrons and ever present GCR exposure contributions during quiet times. However, within the trapped proton field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of proton exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensity of trapped particles. Among the established trapped models are the historic AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. Since at LEO electrons have minimal exposure contribution to ISS, this work ignores the AE8 and AE9 components of the models and couples a measurement derived anisotropic trapped proton formalism to omnidirectional output from the AP8 and AP9 models, allowing the assessment of the differences between the two proton models. The assessment is done at a target point within the ISS-11A configuration (circa 2003) crew quarter (CQ) of Russian Zvezda service module (SM), during its ascending and descending nodes passes through the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The anisotropic formalism incorporates the contributions of proton narrow

  6. Horizontal Transmission of Cytosolic Sup35 Prions by Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prions are infectious protein particles that replicate by templating their aggregated state onto soluble protein of the same type. Originally identified as the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, prions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae are epigenetic elements of inheritance that induce phenotypic changes of their host cells. The prototype yeast prion is the translation termination factor Sup35. Prions composed of Sup35 or its modular prion domain NM are heritable and are transmitted vertically to progeny or horizontally during mating. Interestingly, in mammalian cells, protein aggregates derived from yeast Sup35 NM behave as true infectious entities that employ dissemination strategies similar to those of mammalian prions. While transmission is most efficient when cells are in direct contact, we demonstrate here that cytosolic Sup35 NM prions are also released into the extracellular space in association with nanometer-sized membrane vesicles. Importantly, extracellular vesicles are biologically active and are taken up by recipient cells, where they induce self-sustained Sup35 NM protein aggregation. Thus, in mammalian cells, extracellular vesicles can serve as dissemination vehicles for protein-based epigenetic information transfer.

  7. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  8. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise eKlein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS, eDNA and lipoteichoic acid (LTA. EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  9. Characterization of proton production and consumption associated with microbial metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Radhakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production or consumption of protons in growth medium during microbial metabolism plays an important role in determining the pH of the environment. Such pH changes resulting from microbial metabolism may influence the geochemical speciation of many elements in subsurface environments. Protons produced or consumed during microbial growth were measured by determining the amount of acid or base added in a 5 L batch bioreactor equipped with pH control for different species including Escherichia coli, Geobacter sulfurreducens, and Geobacter metallireducens. Results An in silico model was used to predict the proton secretion or consumption rates and the results were compared with the data. The data was found to confirm predictions of proton consumption during aerobic growth of E. coli with acetate as the carbon source. However, in contrast to proton consumption observed during aerobic growth of E. coli with acetate, proton secretion was observed during growth of Geobacter species with acetate as the donor and Fe(III as the extracellular electron acceptor. Conclusions In this study, we have also shown that the final pH of the medium can be either acidic or basic depending on the choice of the electron acceptor for the same electron donor. In all cases, the in silico model could predict qualitatively the proton production/consumption rates obtained from the experimental data. Therefore, measurements of pH equivalents generated or consumed during growth can help characterize the microbial physiology further and can be valuable for optimizing practical applications such as microbial fuel cells, where growth associated pH changes can limit current generation rates.

  10. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  11. Effects of thermal shocks on the release of radioisotopes and on molten metal target vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, Jacques; Benedikt, Michael; Catherall, R; Cyvoct, G; Fabich, A; Georg, U; Gilardoni, S S; Jonsson, O; Ravn, H L; Sgobba, Stefano; Bauer, G; Bruchertseifer, H; Graber, T; Gudermann, C; Ni, L; Rastani, R

    2003-01-01

    The ISOLDE pulsed proton beam peak power amounts to 500 MW during the 2.4 ms proton pulse. The fraction of the proton pulse energy deposited in the target material is at the origin of severe thermal shocks. Quantitative measurement of their effect on the release of radioelements from ISOLDE targets was obtained by comparison of release profiles measured under different proton beam settings. The thermal shock induced in liquids (Pb, Sn, La) lead to mechanical failure of ISOLDE molten metal target vessels. Failure analysis is presented and discussed in the light of the response of mercury samples submitted to the ISOLDE beam and monitored by high-speed optical systems.

  12. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located......, salt, and volume overload. In contrast, the events controlling the function of renin-secreting cells at the organ and cellular level are markedly less clear and remain mysterious in certain aspects. The unravelling of these mysteries has led to new and interesting insights into the process of renin...

  13. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  14. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  15. Zegerid--immediate-release omeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-11

    The FDA has approved marketing of Zegerid powder for oral suspension (Santarus), an immediate-release formulation of the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole (Prilosec, and others). All other oral PPIs are delayed-release, enteric-coated formulations designed to prevent degradation of the drug by gastric acid. Each 20- or 40-mg packet of Zegerid contains 1680 mg sodium bicarbonate, which protects the drug from gastric acid degradation. A dose of Zegerid contains 460 mg of sodium, which may be excessive for some patients. Zegerid is the first oral PPI to be approved by the FDA for reduction of risk of upper GI bleeding in critically ill patients. The drug may be useful for patients who are unable to swallow and have nasogastric (NG) tubes in place. Zegerid cost $70.00 for 14 days' treatment, compared to less than $10 for 14 tablets of Prilosec OTC.

  16. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and infection-related vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2012-11-01

    The innate immune system orchestrated by leukocytes primarily neutrophils, serves to remove dead and dying host cells and to provide protection against invasion by pathogens. Failure of this system results in the onset of sepsis leading to grave consequences for the host. Together with mechanical methods to physically isolate and remove the pathogen, neutrophils also release an important set of proinflammatory biological modulators that mediate recruitment of additional cells to a site of infection and amplify the innate protective response. Additionally, neutrophils release highly charged mixtures of DNA and nuclear proteins named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These electrostatically-charged adhesive networks trigger intrinsic coagulation, limit dispersion and entrap the pathogens. NETs also contain the neutrophil secretary granule-derived serine proteases, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G, known to regulate the reactivity of both neutrophils and platelets. Since the characterization of NETs in 2004, new studies of their functional effect in vivo continue to expand upon unexpected extracellular roles for DNA, and in doing so renew attention to the haemostatic role of the leukocyte. This review will provide a basic description of NETs and examine current knowledge of this important system of defense, including recent work illustrating a role for NETs in activation of thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs and total cell membranes (MBs from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  18. Immunometabolism of human autoimmune diseases: from metabolites to extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Candia, Paola; De Rosa, Veronica; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-26

    Immunometabolism focuses on the mechanisms regulating the impact of metabolism on lymphocyte activity and autoimmunity outbreak. The adipose tissue is long known to release adipokines, either pro- or anti-inflammatory factors bridging nutrition and immune function. More recently, adipocytes were discovered to also release extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing a plethora of biological molecules, including metabolites and microRNAs, which can regulate cell function/metabolism in distant tissues, suggesting that immune regulatory function by the adipose tissue may be far more complex than originally thought. Moreover, EVs were also identified as important mediators of immune cell-to-cell communication, adding a further microenvironmental mechanism of plasticity to fine-tune specific lymphocyte responses. This Review will first focus on the known mechanisms by which metabolism impacts immune function, presenting a systemic (nutrition and long-ranged adipokines) and a cellular point of view (metabolic pathway derangement in autoimmunity). It will then discuss the new discoveries concerning how EVs may act as nanometric vehicles integrating immune/metabolic responses at the level of the extracellular environment and affecting pathological processes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Acute uptake inhibition increases extracellular serotonin in the rat forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, J J; Auerbach, S B

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acute uptake inhibition on serotonin (5-HT) in the rat central nervous system was monitored by using in vivo dialysis. Peripheral administration of the selective 5-HT uptake blocker, fluoxetine, caused a dose-dependent increase in extracellular 5-HT in both the diencephalon and the striatum. Administration of fluoxetine or sertraline, another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor, caused a prolonged (24 hr) increase in 5-HT and decrease in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. In addition, fluoxetine and sertraline attenuated the 5-HT releasing effect of fenfluramine administered 24 hr later. Local infusion of fluoxetine into the diencephalon caused an increase in 5-HT that was twice as large as the effect of peripheral injection. Peripheral fluoxetine, by enhancing extracellular 5-HT in the raphe, probably resulted in activation of somatodendritic autoreceptors and inhibition of 5-HT neuronal discharge. Thus, the increase in 5-HT in the diencephalon after peripheral fluoxetine presumably reflected a balance between decreased release and inhibition of reuptake. In support of this, after first infusing fluoxetine into the diencephalon to maximally block reuptake, peripheral injection of the uptake inhibitor caused a decrease in 5-HT.

  20. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  1. Microfluidic filtration system to isolate extracellular vesicles from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ryan T; Kim, Junho; Jang, Su Chul; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2012-12-21

    Extracellular vesicles are released by various cell types, particularly tumor cells, and may be potential targets for blood-based cancer diagnosis. However, studies performed on blood-borne vesicles to date have been limited by lack of effective, standardized purification strategies. Using in situ prepared nanoporous membranes, we present a simple strategy employing a microfluidic filtration system to isolate vesicles from whole blood samples. This method can be applied to purify nano-sized particles from blood allowing isolation of intact extracellular vesicles, avoiding the need for laborious and potentially damaging centrifugation steps or overly specific antibody-based affinity purification. Porous polymer monoliths were integrated as membranes into poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips by benchtop UV photopolymerization through a mask, allowing precise positioning of membrane elements while preserving simplicity of device preparation. Pore size could be manipulated by changing the ratio of porogenic solvent to prepolymer solution, and was tuned to a size proper for extraction of vesicles. Using the membrane as a size exclusion filter, we separated vesicles from cells and large debris by injecting whole blood under pressure through the microfluidic device. To enhance isolation purity, DC electrophoresis was employed as an alternative driving force to propel particles across the filter and increase the separation efficiency of vesicles from proteins. From the whole blood of melanoma-grown mice, we isolated extracellular vesicles and performed RT-PCR to verify their contents of RNA. Melan A mRNA derived from melanoma tumor cells were found enriched in filtered samples, confirming the recovery of vesicles via their cargo. This filtration system can be incorporated into other on-chip processes enabling integrated sample preparation for the downstream analysis of blood-based extracellular vesicles.

  2. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  3. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  4. Fibrillin assemblies: extracellular determinants of tissue formation and fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivieri Jacopo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in tissue formation, homeostasis and repair, mutations in ECM components have catastrophic consequences for organ function and therefore, for the fitness and survival of the organism. Collagen, fibrillin and elastin polymers represent the architectural scaffolds that impart specific mechanic properties to tissues and organs. Fibrillin assemblies (microfibrils have the additional function of distributing, concentrating and modulating local transforming growth factor (TGF-β and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signals that regulate a plethora of cellular activities, including ECM formation and remodeling. Fibrillins also contain binding sites for integrin receptors, which induce adaptive responses to changes in the extracellular microenvironment by reorganizing the cytoskeleton, controlling gene expression, and releasing and activating matrix-bound latent TGF-β complexes. Genetic evidence has indicated that fibrillin-1 and fibrillin-2 contribute differently to the organization and structural properties of non-collagenous architectural scaffolds, which in turn translate into discrete regulatory outcomes of locally released TGF-β and BMP signals. Additionally, the study of congenital dysfunctions of fibrillin-1 has yielded insights into the pathogenesis of acquired connective tissue disorders of the connective tissue, such as scleroderma. On the one hand, mutations that affect the structure or expression of fibrillin-1 perturb microfibril biogenesis, stimulate improper latent TGF-β activation, and give rise to the pleiotropic manifestations in Marfan syndrome (MFS. On the other hand, mutations located around the integrin-binding site of fibrillin-1 perturb cell matrix interactions, architectural matrix assembly and extracellular distribution of latent TGF-β complexes, and lead to the highly restricted fibrotic phenotype of Stiff Skin syndrome. Understanding the molecular similarities and

  5. The "heartbeat of the proton"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Victor F.

    in 1970 he got the first limit on the Heavy Lepton mass together with a series of high precision QED measurements. But one story I will never forget in connection with the "heartbeat of the proton". After he succeeded with his friends Mario (Morpurgo) and Guido (Petrucci) to build the highest intensity antiproton beam at CERN, Nino came to my office and said more or less the following: "Viki, by changing the voltage of the electrostatic separator and a few other trivial details, in one night, I will be able to establish if the antideuteron exists with the correct expected deuteron mass". I told him that this was an experiment where he would get the Nobel prize if he found nothing. "But, there is a but", I added. "If you do not succeed in one night and if you destroy the beam, then I will not defend you. My green light is only valid if you really can check the existence of the antideuteron in a single night". Next morning, when I arrived at CERN, Nino was there with his graph where the antideuteron signal was exactly where it was expected to be. I remember the year, 1965, not the day. It was (and is) the birthday of Peter Standley who was at that time the PS Division Leader. I called him in my office and the antideuteron discovery at CERN was my and Nino's gift to our mutual friend Peter. I decided not to have a press-release and Nino agreed. A few weeks later we read in the newspaper that the antideuteron had been discovered by Lederman and Ting in the United States. They had decided to have a press-release. Nevertheless Nino's paper in Nuovo Cimento preceeds Leon's and Sam's publication in Physical Review.

  6. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  7. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  8. Proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  9. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  10. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  11. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurdinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles, such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies.

  12. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdinger, Thomas; Gatson, NaTosha N.; Balaj, Leonora; Kaur, Balveen; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Pegtel, D. Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles), such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:22888349

  13. Extracellular vesicles and a novel form of communication in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela eBasso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In numerous neurodegenerative diseases, the interplay between neurons and glia modulates the outcome and progression of pathology. One particularly intriguing mode of interaction between neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes is characterized by the release of extracellular vesicles that transport proteins, lipids, and nucleotides from one cell to another. Notably, several proteins that cause disease, including the prion protein and mutant SOD1, have been detected in glia-derived extracellular vesicles and observed to fuse with neurons and trigger pathology in vitro. Here we review the structural and functional characterization of such extracellular vesicles in neuron-glia interactions. Furthermore, we discuss possible mechanisms of extracellular vesicle biogenesis and release from activated glia and microglia, and their effects on neurons. Given that exosomes, the smallest type of extracellular vesicles, have been reported to recognize specific cellular populations and act as carriers of very specialized cargo, a thorough analysis of these vesicles may aid in their engineering in vitro and targeted delivery in vivo, opening opportunities for therapeutics.

  14. Extracellular DNA chelates cations and induces antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, bacterial polysaccharides and proteins, which are up to 1000-fold more antibiotic resistant than planktonic cultures. To date, extracellular DNA has been shown to function as a structural support to maintain Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm architecture. Here we show that DNA is a multifaceted component of P. aeruginosa biofilms. At physiologically relevant concentrations, extracellular DNA has antimicrobial activity, causing cell lysis by chelating cations that stabilize lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the outer membrane (OM. DNA-mediated killing occurred within minutes, as a result of perturbation of both the outer and inner membrane (IM and the release of cytoplasmic contents, including genomic DNA. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of DNA created a cation-limited environment that resulted in induction of the PhoPQ- and PmrAB-regulated cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance operon PA3552-PA3559 in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, DNA-induced expression of this operon resulted in up to 2560-fold increased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and 640-fold increased resistance to aminoglycosides, but had no effect on beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone resistance. Thus, the presence of extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix contributes to cation gradients, genomic DNA release and inducible antibiotic resistance. DNA-rich environments, including biofilms and other infection sites like the CF lung, are likely the in vivo environments where extracellular pathogens such as P. aeruginosa encounter cation limitation.

  15. Extracellular acidification synergizes with PDGF to stimulate migration of mouse embryo fibroblasts through activation of p38MAPK with a PTX-sensitive manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Caiyan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Clinical Medicine Research Center of the Affiliated Hospital, Inner Mongolia Medical University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Wu, Taoya; Bao, Muqiri; Bao, Liang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Tobo, Masayuki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Damirin, Alatangaole, E-mail: bigaole@imu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China)

    2015-05-01

    The elucidation of the functional mechanisms of extracellular acidification stimulating intracellular signaling pathway is of great importance for developing new targets of treatment for solid tumors, and inflammatory disorders characterized by extracellular acidification. In the present study, we focus on the regulation of extracellular acidification on intracellular signaling pathways in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). We found extracellular acidification was at least partly involved in stimulating p38MAPK pathway through PTX-sensitive behavior to enhance cell migration in the presence or absence of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Statistical analysis showed that the actions of extracellular acidic pH and PDGF on inducing enhancement of cell migration were not an additive effect. However, we also found extracellular acidic pH did inhibit the viability and proliferation of MEFs, suggesting that extracellular acidification stimulates cell migration probably through proton-sensing mechanisms within MEFs. Using OGR1-, GPR4-, and TDAG8-gene knock out technology, and real-time qPCR, we found known proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) were unlikely to be involved in the regulation of acidification on cell migration. In conclusion, our present study validates that extracellular acidification stimulates chemotactic migration of MEFs through activation of p38MAPK with a PTX-sensitive mechanism either by itself, or synergistically with PDGF, which was not regulated by the known proton-sensing GPCRs, TRPV1, or ASICs. Our results suggested that others proton-sensing GPCRs or ion channels might exist in MEFs, which mediates cell migration induced by extracellular acidification in the presence or absence of PDGF. - Highlights: • Acidic pH and PDGF synergize to stimulate MEFs migration via Gi/p38MAPK pathway. • Extracellular acidification inhibits the

  16. Protons, the thylakoid membrane, and the chloroplast ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, W

    1989-01-01

    of heuristic value to visualize CFoCF1 as a mechanical coupling device. Its maximum turnover number ranges up to 400 s-1 for ATP and 1200 s-1 for protons. At about 200 mV electric driving force this implied a conductance of about 1 fS. Its channel portion (CFo), however, has revealed a very large protonic conductance of 1 pS (three orders of magnitude greater than the protonic conductance of gramicidin around neutral pH). (6) The sight and smell of food increased LH serotonin release; this effect was detectable when local fluoxetine was used to block serotonin reuptake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Its Implications in Inflammation: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Rizo, Vidal; Martínez-Guzmán, Marco A.; Iñiguez-Gutierrez, Liliana; García-Orozco, Alejandra; Alvarado-Navarro, Anabell; Fafutis-Morris, Mary

    2017-01-01

    In addition to physical barriers, neutrophils are considered a part of the first line of immune defense. They can be found in the bloodstream, with a lifespan of 6–8 h, and in tissue, where they can last up to 7 days. The mechanisms that neutrophils utilize for host defense are phagocytosis, degranulation, cytokine production, and, the most recently described, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) production. NETs are DNA structures released due to chromatin decondensation and spreading, and they thus occupy three to five times the volume of condensed chromatin. Several proteins adhere to NETs, including histones and over 30 components of primary and secondary granules, among them components with bactericidal activity such as elastase, myeloperoxidase, cathepsin G, lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, gelatinase, proteinase 3, LL37, peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and others with bactericidal activity able to destroy virulence factors. Three models for NETosis are known to date. (a) Suicidal NETosis, with a duration of 2–4 h, is the best described model. (b) In vital NETosis with nuclear DNA release, neutrophils release NETs without exhibiting loss of nuclear or plasma membrane within 5–60 min, and it is independent of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the Raf/MERK/ERK pathway. (c) The final type is vital NETosis with release of mitochondrial DNA that is dependent on ROS and produced after stimuli with GM-CSF and lipopolysaccharide. Recent research has revealed neutrophils as more sophisticated immune cells that are able to precisely regulate their granular enzymes release by ion fluxes and can release immunomodulatory cytokines and chemokines that interact with various components of the immune system. Therefore, they can play a key role in autoimmunity and in autoinflammatory and metabolic diseases. In this review, we intend to show the two roles played by neutrophils: as a first line of defense against microorganisms and as a contributor to the pathogenesis of

  18. Proton Radiography Imager:Generates Synthetic Proton Radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-12

    ProRad is a computer program that is used to generate synthetic images of proton (or other charged particles) radiographs. The proton radiographs arc images that arc obtained by sending energetic protons (or electrons or positrons, for example) through 11 plasma where electric and/or magnetic fields alter the particles trajectory, Dnd the variations me imaged on RC film, image plate, or equivalent

  19. Proton transfer and energy coupling in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    A description of the rate constants and the energetics of the elementary reaction steps of the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin has been helpful in understanding the mechanism of proton transport in this light-driven pump. The evidence suggests a single unbranched reaction sequence, BR-hv----K in equilibrium with L in equilibrium with M1----M2 in equilibrium with N in equilibrium with O----BR, where coupling to the proton-motive force is at the energetically and mechanistically important M1----M2 step. The consequences of site-specific mutations expressed homologously in Halobacterium halobium have revealed characteristics of the Schiff base deprotonation in the L----M1 reaction, the reorientation of the Schiff base from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic side in the M1----M2 reaction, and the reprotonation of the Schiff base in the M2----N reaction.

  20. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Iraci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  1. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  2. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper......A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR...

  4. Bacteria‐Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen‐Chi; Tolker‐Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  5. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  6. Effect of exogenous phenols on superoxide production by extracellular peroxidase from wheat seedling roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasov, A V; Minibayeva, F V

    2009-07-01

    Competitive and complimentary relationships of various peroxidase substrates were studied to elucidate the enzymatic mechanisms underlying production of reactive oxygen species in plant cell apoplast. Dianisidine peroxidase released from wheat seedling roots was inhibited by ferulate and coniferol, while ferulic and coniferyl peroxidases were activated by o-dianisidine. Both ferulate and coniferol, when added together with hydrogen peroxide, stimulated superoxide production by extracellular peroxidase. We suggest that substrate-substrate activation of extracellular peroxidases is important for stress-induced oxidative burst in plant cells.

  7. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  8. Proton Fraction in Neutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰收; 陈列文

    2001-01-01

    The proton fraction in β-stable neutron stars is investigated within the framework of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction for the first time. The calculated results show that the proton fraction disappears at high density, which implies that the pure neutron matter may exist in the interior of neutron stars. The incompressibility of the nuclear equation-of-state is shown to be more important to determine the proton fraction. Meanwhile, it is indicated that the addition of muons in neutron stars will change the proton fraction. It is also found that the higher-order terms of the nuclear symmetry energy have obvious effects on the proton fraction and the parabolic law of the nuclear symmetry energy is not enough to determine the proton fraction.

  9. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  10. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  11. Proton-therapy, present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, R P; Rembado, D; Serrato, R

    1993-06-01

    At the moment, proton-therapy is the most advanced radiotherapeutic technique in cancer treatment. The use of the high energy proton beam (from 70 MeV to 200 MeV) lets a Bragg's peak be moved to different depths, so allowing personal radiotherapeutic treatment. In recent years, many proton-therapy centers have grown up throughout the world with very satisfactory clinical results, first of all in eye melanoma treatment. The future expectations are very promising, even if the very high installation and maintenance expenses of a synchrotron (for proton production) hinder the development of such a method.

  12. The Ca(2+)-ATPase pump facilitates bidirectional proton transport across the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel

    2017-03-28

    Ca(2+) transport across the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays an essential role in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, signalling, cell differentiation and muscle contractility. During SR Ca(2+) uptake and release, proton fluxes are required to balance the charge deficit generated by the exchange of Ca(2+) and other ions across the SR. During Ca(2+) uptake by the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), two protons are countertransported from the SR lumen to the cytosol, thus partially compensating for the charge moved by Ca(2+) transport. Studies have shown that protons are also transported from the cytosol to the lumen during Ca(2+) release, but a transporter that facilitates proton transport into the SR lumen has not been described. In this article we propose that SERCA forms pores that facilitate bidirectional proton transport across the SR. We describe the location and structure of water-filled pores in SERCA that form cytosolic and luminal pathways for protons to cross the SR membrane. Based on this structural information, we suggest mechanistic models for proton translocation to the cytosol during active Ca(2+) transport, and into the SR lumen during SERCA inhibition by endogenous regulatory proteins. Finally, we discuss the physiological consequences of SERCA-mediated bidirectional proton transport across the SR membrane of muscle and non-muscle cells.

  13. Real-time luminescence imaging of cellular ATP release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kishio; Sokabe, Masahiro; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2014-03-15

    Extracellular ATP and other purines are ubiquitous mediators of local intercellular signaling within the body. While the last two decades have witnessed enormous progress in uncovering and characterizing purinergic receptors and extracellular enzymes controlling purinergic signals, our understanding of the initiating step in this cascade, i.e., ATP release, is still obscure. Imaging of extracellular ATP by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence offers the advantage of studying ATP release and distribution dynamics in real time. However, low-light signal generated by bioluminescence reactions remains the major obstacle to imaging such rapid processes, imposing substantial constraints on its spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed an improved microscopy system for real-time ATP imaging, which detects ATP-dependent luciferin-luciferase luminescence at ∼10 frames/s, sufficient to follow rapid ATP release with sensitivity of ∼10 nM and dynamic range up to 100 μM. In addition, simultaneous differential interference contrast cell images are acquired with infra-red optics. Our imaging method: (1) identifies ATP-releasing cells or sites, (2) determines absolute ATP concentration and its spreading manner at release sites, and (3) permits analysis of ATP release kinetics from single cells. We provide instrumental details of our approach and give several examples of ATP-release imaging at cellular and tissue levels, to illustrate its potential utility.

  14. and extracellular laccase isoenzymes from Pleurotus ostreatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZMG

    Colonia Vicentina, Delegación Iztapalapa, 09340 México D.F., México. ... In this study, extracellular laccase enzymes produced by Pleurotus ostreatus was identified in .... the intracellular forms), through the modified zymography method of.

  15. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  16. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of relativity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of negative-energy states in proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a fully relativistic framework using the T matrix of Fleischer and Tjon. The contribution from negative-energy states in the single-scattering diagrams is shown to be large, indicating that relativistic effects

  18. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  19. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  20. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  1. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton decay of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Mukha, I; Sümmerer, K; Acosta, L; Alvarez, M A G; Casarejos, E; Chatillon, A; Cortina-Gil, D; Espino, J; Fomichev, A; García-Ramos, J E; Geissel, H; Gómez-Camacho, J; Hofmann, J; Kiselev, O; Korsheninnikov, A; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Yu; Martel, I; Nociforo, C; Ott, W; Pfützner, M; Rodriguez-Tajes, C; Roeckl, E; Stanoiu, M; Weick, H; Woods, P J

    2008-01-01

    Proton-proton correlations were observed for the two-proton decays of the ground states of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne. The trajectories of the respective decay products, $^{17}$Ne+p+p and $^{14}$O+p+p, were measured by using a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of fragments projected on planes transverse to the precursor momenta. The measured three-particle correlations reflect a genuine three-body decay mechanism and allowed us to obtain spectroscopic information on the precursors with valence protons in the $sd$ shell.

  2. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  3. Transverse spin effects in proton-proton scattering and $Q \\bar Q$ production

    OpenAIRE

    Goloskokov, S. V.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss transverse spin effects caused by the spin-flip part of the Pomeron coupling with the proton. The predicted spin asymmetries in proton-proton scattering and QQ production in proton-proton and lepton-proton reactions are not small and can be studied in future polarized experiments.

  4. Photochemistry and photoinduced proton-transfer by pharaonis phoborhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, N; Shimono, K; Iwamoto, M; Sudo, Y

    2001-11-01

    Phoborhodopsin (pR or sensory rhodopsin II, sRII) is a photoreceptor of the negative phototaxis of Halobacterium salinarum, and pharaonis phoborhodopsin (ppR or pharaonis sensory rhodopsin II, psRII) is a corresponding protein of Natronobacterium pharaonis. The photocycle of ppR is essentially as follows: ppR(498) --> ppRK(approximately 540) --> ppRKL(512) --> ppRL(488) --> ppRM(390) --> ppRO(560) --> ppR (numbers in parenthesis denote the maximum absorbance). The photocycle is very similar to that of bacteriorhodopsin, but the rate of initial pigment recovery is about two-orders of magnitude slower. By low-temperature spectroscopy, two K-intermediates were found but the L intermediate was not detected. The lack of L indicates extraordinary stability of K at low temperature. ppRM is photoactive similar to M of bR. The ground state ppR contains only all-trans retinal whereas ppRM and ppRO contain 13-cis and all-trans, respectively. ppR has the ability of light-induced proton transport from the inside to the outside. Proton uptake occurs at the formation of ppRO and the release at its decay. ppR associates with its transducer and this complex transmits a signal to the cytoplasm. The proton transport ability is lost when the complex forms, but the proton uptake and release still occur, suggesting that the proton movement is non-electrogenic (release and uptake occur from the same side). The stoichiometry of the complex between ppR and the transducer is 1 : 1. ppR or pR has absorption maximum at approximately 500 nm, which is blue-shifted from those of other archaeal rhodopsins. The molecular mechanism of this color regulation is not yet solved.

  5. Proton therapy - Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David

    2017-01-15

    In principle, proton therapy offers a substantial clinical advantage over conventional photon therapy. This is because of the unique depth-dose characteristics of protons, which can be exploited to achieve significant reductions in normal tissue doses proximal and distal to the target volume. These may, in turn, allow escalation of tumor doses and greater sparing of normal tissues, thus potentially improving local control and survival while at the same time reducing toxicity and improving quality of life. Protons, accelerated to therapeutic energies ranging from 70 to 250MeV, typically with a cyclotron or a synchrotron, are transported to the treatment room where they enter the treatment head mounted on a rotating gantry. The initial thin beams of protons are spread laterally and longitudinally and shaped appropriately to deliver treatments. Spreading and shaping can be achieved by electro-mechanical means to treat the patients with "passively-scattered proton therapy" (PSPT) or using magnetic scanning of thin "beamlets" of protons of a sequence of initial energies. The latter technique can be used to treat patients with optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), the most powerful proton modality. Despite the high potential of proton therapy, the clinical evidence supporting the broad use of protons is mixed. It is generally acknowledged that proton therapy is safe, effective and recommended for many types of pediatric cancers, ocular melanomas, chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Although promising results have been and continue to be reported for many other types of cancers, they are based on small studies. Considering the high cost of establishing and operating proton therapy centers, questions have been raised about their cost effectiveness. General consensus is that there is a need to conduct randomized trials and/or collect outcomes data in multi-institutional registries to unequivocally demonstrate the advantage of protons. Treatment planning and plan

  6. Pocket epithelium in the pathological setting for HMGB1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebe, N; Hara-Yokoyama, M; Iwasaki, K; Iseki, S; Okuhara, S; Podyma-Inoue, K A; Terasawa, K; Watanabe, A; Akizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Yanagishita, M; Izumi, Y

    2011-02-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus and also as a pro-inflammatory cytokine when released into extracellular fluids. The presence of higher levels of HMGB1 is reported in the gingival crevicular fluid from periodontal patients. Since the proliferation of bacteria within the periodontal pocket is closely involved in the exacerbation of periodontal disease, it is hypothesized that the periodontal pocket causes the release of HMGB1. Immunohistochemical staining of inflamed gingiva revealed that HMGB1 is exclusively dislocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the pocket epithelium, whereas it is mainly present in the nucleus in the gingival epithelium. Butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria populating the periodontal pocket, induced the passive release of HMGB1 as a result of eliciting necrosis in the human gingival epithelial cell line. Thus, the periodontal epithelium may provide a unique pathological setting for HMGB1 release by bacterial insult.

  7. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our...... aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan......-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient...

  8. Tomographic image of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Dupre, Raphael; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We determine, based on the latest experimental Deep Virtual Compton Scattering experimental data, the dependence of the spatial size of the proton on the quark's longitudinal momentum. This results in a three-dimensional momentum-space image and tomography of the proton.

  9. The Pathophysiology of Extracellular Hemoglobin Associated with Enhanced Oxidative Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Rifkind

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC, oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV-ferrylHb and oxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(IIIHb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers enter cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern for increased hemolysis due to hemolytic anemia. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, does not further increase extracellular Hb.

  10. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  11. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romaine; C; Nichols; Soon; Huh; Zuofeng; Li; Michael; Rutenberg

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy.

  12. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  13. Glutamic acid 242 is a valve in the proton pump of cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaila, Ville R. I.; Verkhovsky, Michael I.; Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2008-01-01

    Aerobic life is based on a molecular machinery that utilizes oxygen as a terminal electron sink. The membrane-bound cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water in mitochondria and many bacteria. The energy released in this reaction is conserved by pumping protons across the mitochondrial or bacterial membrane, creating an electrochemical proton gradient that drives production of ATP. A crucial question is how the protons pumped by CcO are prevented from flowing backwards during the process. Here, we show by molecular dynamics simulations that the conserved glutamic acid 242 near the active site of CcO undergoes a protonation state-dependent conformational change, which provides a valve in the pumping mechanism. The valve ensures that at any point in time, the proton pathway across the membrane is effectively discontinuous, thereby preventing thermodynamically favorable proton back-leakage while maintaining an overall high efficiency of proton translocation. Suppression of proton leakage is particularly important in mitochondria under physiological conditions, where production of ATP takes place in the presence of a high electrochemical proton gradient. PMID:18430799

  14. Potassium softens vascular endothelium and increases nitric oxide release

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of aldosterone, plasma sodium in the high physiological range stiffens endothelial cells and reduces the release of nitric oxide. We now demonstrate effects of extracellular potassium on stiffness of individual cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells by using the tip of an atomic force microscope as a mechanical nanosensor. An acute increase of potassium in the physiological range swells and softens the endothelial cell and increases the release of nitric oxide. A high physio...

  15. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Introducing the Next Small Big Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Hina; Drummen, Gregor P C; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-02-06

    Intercellular communication was long thought to be regulated exclusively through direct contact between cells or via release of soluble molecules that transmit the signal by binding to a suitable receptor on the target cell, and/or via uptake into that cell. With the discovery of small secreted vesicular structures that contain complex cargo, both in their lumen and the lipid membrane that surrounds them, a new frontier of signal transduction was discovered. These "extracellular vesicles" (EV) were initially thought to be garbage bags through which the cell ejected its waste. Whilst this is a major function of one type of EV, i.e., apoptotic bodies, many EVs have intricate functions in intercellular communication and compound exchange; although their physiological roles are still ill-defined. Additionally, it is now becoming increasingly clear that EVs mediate disease progression and therefore studying EVs has ignited significant interests among researchers from various fields of life sciences. Consequently, the research effort into the pathogenic roles of EVs is significantly higher even though their protective roles are not well established. The "Focus on extracellular vesicles" series of reviews highlights the current state of the art regarding various topics in EV research, whilst this review serves as an introductory overview of EVs, their biogenesis and molecular composition.

  16. Facile preparation of salivary extracellular vesicles for cancer proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Xia, Zhijun; Shang, Zhi; Sun, Kaibo; Niu, Xiaomin; Qian, Liqiang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Xiao, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane surrounded structures released by cells, which have been increasingly recognized as mediators of intercellular communication. Recent reports indicate that EVs participate in important biological processes and could serve as potential source for cancer biomarkers. As an attractive EVs source with merit of non-invasiveness, human saliva is a unique medium for clinical diagnostics. Thus, we proposed a facile approach to prepare salivary extracellular vesicles (SEVs). Affinity chromatography column combined with filter system (ACCF) was developed to efficiently remove the high abundant proteins and viscous interferences of saliva. Protein profiling in the SEVs obtained by this strategy was compared with conventional centrifugation method, which demonstrated that about 70% more SEVs proteins could be revealed. To explore its utility for cancer proteomics, we analyzed the proteome of SEVs in lung cancer patients and normal controls. Shotgun proteomic analysis illustrated that 113 and 95 proteins have been identified in cancer group and control group, respectively. Among those 63 proteins that have been consistently discovered only in cancer group, 12 proteins are lung cancer related. Our results demonstrated that SEVs prepared through the developed strategy are valuable samples for proteomics and could serve as a promising liquid biopsy for cancer.

  17. Myeloid extracellular vesicles: messengers from the demented brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eNigro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e. AD, PD, and ALS. Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are in the spotlight of investigations on neurological disorders. Myeloid cells, such as infiltrating macrophages and microglia, have been described as having both protective and destructive features in neurological disorders, thus identification of their functional phenotype during disease evolution would be of paramount importance. Extracellular vesicles, namely exosomes and shed vesicles, are released by virtually any cell type and can be detected and identified in terms of cell origin in biological fluids. They therefore constitute an ideal tool to access information on cells residing in an inaccessible site such as the brain. We will review here available information on extracellular vesicles detection in neurological disorders with special emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Introducing the Next Small Big Thing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Kalra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication was long thought to be regulated exclusively through direct contact between cells or via release of soluble molecules that transmit the signal by binding to a suitable receptor on the target cell, and/or via uptake into that cell. With the discovery of small secreted vesicular structures that contain complex cargo, both in their lumen and the lipid membrane that surrounds them, a new frontier of signal transduction was discovered. These “extracellular vesicles” (EV were initially thought to be garbage bags through which the cell ejected its waste. Whilst this is a major function of one type of EV, i.e., apoptotic bodies, many EVs have intricate functions in intercellular communication and compound exchange; although their physiological roles are still ill-defined. Additionally, it is now becoming increasingly clear that EVs mediate disease progression and therefore studying EVs has ignited significant interests among researchers from various fields of life sciences. Consequently, the research effort into the pathogenic roles of EVs is significantly higher even though their protective roles are not well established. The “Focus on extracellular vesicles” series of reviews highlights the current state of the art regarding various topics in EV research, whilst this review serves as an introductory overview of EVs, their biogenesis and molecular composition.

  19. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PROTONATION STATES OF HUMAN LACTOFERRIN IRON-BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Anghel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the protonation states of ionizable groups of human lactoferrin in various conformations were investigated theoretically, at physiological pH (7.365. These calculations show that the transition of the protein from a conformation to another one is accompanied by changes in the protonation state of specific amino acid residues. Analysis of the pKa calculatons underlined the importance of participation of two arginines and one lysine in the opening / closing of the protein. In addition, it was found that the mechanism of iron release depends on the protonation state of TYR-192. Protonated state of this residue in the closed form of lactoferrin will trigger the opening of protein and release of iron ions.

  20. Emerging roles for extracellular vesicles in parasitic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Matthias; Johnson, Patricia J

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released by cells and contain a complex mixture of proteins, genetic information and lipids. EVs mediate cell:cell communication by transferring their molecular cargo between cells. EVs, initially discovered in mammalian systems, have been demonstrated to play critical role in immunology and cancer biology. More recently, EVs have been identified in a broad range of both unicellular and multicellular parasites. In this review we focus on the emerging roles for EVs in parasitic infections. Parasite-derived EVs can transfer virulence factors and drug-resistance markers, modify host cell gene expression and promote parasite adherence and host cell proliferation. EVs can also suppress or stimulate host immune responses. Thus, EVs are likely important in determining the outcome of parasitic infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracellular nucleotide derivatives protect cardiomyctes against hypoxic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golan, O; Issan, Y; Isak, A

    2011-01-01

    in cardioprotection against hypoxic stress has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and nucleosides in protective effects in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia. METHODS AND RESULTS: Rat cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with various extracellular nucleotides...... and nucleosides, before or during hypoxic stress. The results revealed that GTP or CTP exhibit cardioprotective ability, as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, by propidium iodide (PI) staining, by cell morphology, and by preserved mitochondrial activity. Pretreatment with various P2 antagonists...... (suramin, RB-2, or PPADS) did not abolish the cardioprotective effect of the nucleotides. Moreover, P2Y₂ -/- , P2Y₄ -/-, and P2Y₂ -/-/P2Y₄ -/- receptor knockouts mouse cardiomyocytes were significantly protected against hypoxic stress when treated with UTP. These results indicate that the protective effect...

  2. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  3. Ion-proton pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  4. Ion-proton pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  5. L-glutamine provides acid resistance for Escherichia coli through enzymatic release of ammonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peilong Lu; Dan Ma; Yuling Chen; Yingying Guo; Guo-Qiang Chen; Haiteng Deng; Yigong Shi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria,exemplified by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E.coli),,rely on elaborate acid resistance systems to survive acidic environment (such as the stomach).Comprehensive understanding of bacterial acid resistance is important for prevention and clinical treatment.In this study,we report a previously uncharacterized type of acid resistance system in E.coli that relies on L-glutamine (Gln),one of the most abundant food-borne free amino acids.Upon uptake into E.coli,Gln is converted to L-glutamate (Glu) by the acid-activated glutaminase YbaS,with concomitant release of gaseous ammonia.The free ammonia neutralizes proton,resulting in elevated intracellular pH under acidic environment.We show that YbaS and the amino acid antiporter GadC,which exchanges extracellular Gln with intracellular Glu,together constitute an acid resistance system that is sufficient for E.coli survival under extremely acidic environment.

  6. TOL Plasmid Carriage Enhances Biofilm Formation and Increases Extracellular DNA Content in Pseudomonas Putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; D'Alvise, Paul; Yankelovich, T.;

    of extracellular polymeric substances: TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNAse I treatment. eDNA was observed as ominous fibrous structures. Quantitative analysis of live and dead cells in static cultures was performed by flow cytometry......Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal...... combined with specific cytostains; release of cytoplasmic material was assayed by a β-glucosidase assay. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads to increased biofilm formation...

  7. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  8. Extracellular vesicles: Pharmacological modulators of the peripheral and central signals governing obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbank, Edward; Martinez, M Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its metabolic resultant dysfunctions such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, grouped as the "metabolic syndrome", are chronic inflammatory disorders that represent one of the most severe epidemic health problems. The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, leading to an excess of body fat and an increase of cardiovascular and diabetes risks, is regulated by the interaction between central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral signals in order to regulate behavior and finally, the metabolism of peripheral organs. At present, pharmacological treatment of obesity comprises actions in both CNS and peripheral organs. In the last decades, the extracellular vesicles have emerged as participants in many pathophysiological regulation processes. Whether used as biomarkers, targets or even tools, extracellular vesicles provided some promising effects in the treatment of a large variety of diseases. Extracellular vesicles are released by cells from the plasma membrane (microvesicles) or from multivesicular bodies (exosomes) and contain lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding, and non-coding RNAs. Owing to their composition, extracellular vesicles can (i) activate receptors at the target cell and then, the subsequent intracellular pathway associated to the specific receptor; (ii) transfer molecules to the target cells and thereby change their phenotype and (iii) be used as shuttle of drugs and, thus, to carry specific molecules towards specific cells. Herein, we review the impact of extracellular vesicles in modulating the central and peripheral signals governing obesity.

  9. Extracellular vesicles: structure, function, and potential clinical uses in renal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T. Borges

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the role of extracellular vesicles in various diseases including cancer has been increasing. Extracellular vesicles include microvesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, and argosomes, and are classified by size, content, synthesis, and function. Currently, the best characterized are exosomes and microvesicles. Exosomes are small vesicles (40-100 nm involved in intercellular communication regardless of the distance between them. They are found in various biological fluids such as plasma, serum, and breast milk, and are formed from multivesicular bodies through the inward budding of the endosome membrane. Microvesicles are 100-1000 nm vesicles released from the cell by the outward budding of the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles is very broad, with applications including a route of drug delivery and as biomarkers for diagnosis. Extracellular vesicles extracted from stem cells may be used for treatment of many diseases including kidney diseases. This review highlights mechanisms of synthesis and function, and the potential uses of well-characterized extracellular vesicles, mainly exosomes, with a special focus on renal functions and diseases.

  10. Differential effects of pyrethroid insecticides on extracellular dopamine in the striatum of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak Hossain, Muhammad; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sato, Norio; Sato, Itaru; Takewaki, Tadashi; Suzuki, Koichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi; Kobayashi, Haruo

    2006-11-15

    In order to obtain a more complete understanding of pyrethroid neurotoxicity, effects of the pyrethroid insecticides, allethrin (type I), cyhalothrin (type II) and deltamethrin (type II) on extracellular levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in the striatum of conscious rats were studied by in vivo microdialysis. Rats were treated i.p. with pyrethroids or vehicle. Allethrin had a dual effect on DA release. The increase in the extracellular level of striatal DA by 10 mg/kg allethrin reached a maximum of 178% of baseline but 20 and 60 mg/kg inhibited DA release to 63% and 52% of baseline with a peak effect at 60-80 min after injection. Cyhalothrin 10, 20 and 60 mg/kg inhibited DA release to 65%, 56% and 45% of basal release, respectively, with a peak time of inhibition 40-80 min past injection. Deltamethrin (10 and 20 mg/kg) increased DA release to maximum of 187% and 252% of basal release whereas 60 mg/kg first reduced the efflux for 40 min to 50% of basal release and then increased the efflux to a maximum of 344% of basal release with a peak time of 120 min. Local infusion of 1 microM tetrodotoxin, a Na(+) blocker through the dialysis probe completely prevented the effect of allethrin (10 and 60 mg/kg), cyhalothrin (60 mg/kg) and deltamethrin (20 mg/kg) on DA release but only partially blocked the effects of 60 mg/kg deltamethrin. The effect of deltamethrin (60 mg/kg) on DA release was completely prevented by local infusion of 10 microM nimodipine, an L-type Ca(++) channel blocker. All three pyrethroids did not alter the extracellular levels of DOPAC, 3-MT and HVA except that 20 and 60 mg/kg of allethrin and cyhalothrin increased 3-MT levels. Effect of the pyrethroids on synaptosomal DA uptake was also examined. The DA uptake was decreased in rats exposed to 60 mg/kg of allethrin and cyhalothrin but was increased in rats exposed to 60 mg/kg of deltamethrin. Our results demonstrate that striatal DA release and DA uptake are differentially affected by type I

  11. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  12. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  13. M1 Protein Allows Group A Streptococcal Survival in Phagocyte Extracellular Traps through Cathelicidin Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Lauth, Xavier; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; McNamara, Case W; Myskowski, Sandra; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Beall, Bernard; Ghosh, Partho; Richard L Gallo; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    M1 protein contributes to Group A Streptococcus (GAS) systemic virulence by interfering with phagocytosis and through proinflammatory activities when released from the cell surface. Here we identify a novel role of M1 protein in the stimulation of neutrophil and mast cell extracellular trap formation, yet also subsequent survival of the pathogen within these DNA-based innate defense structures. Targeted mutagenesis and heterologous expression studies demonstrate M1 protein promotes resistance...

  14. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastat...

  15. Antimicrobial activity of mast cells: Role and relevance of extracellular DNA traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Möllerherm

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs have been shown to release their nuclear DNA and subsequently form mast cell extracellular traps (MCETs comparable to neutrophil extracellular traps, which are able to entrap and kill various microbes. The formation of extracellular traps is associated with the disruption of the nuclear membrane, leads to mixing of nuclear compounds with granule components and causes the death of the cell, a process called ETosis. The question arises why do MCs release MCETs although they are very well known as multifunctional long-living sentinel cells? In the first place, MCs are known to play a role during allergic reactions and certain parasitic infections. Nonetheless, they are also critical components of the early host innate immune response to bacterial and fungal pathogens: MCs contribute to the initiation of the early immune response by recruiting effector cells including neutrophils and macrophages by locally releasing inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α. Moreover, various studies exhibit that MCs are able to eliminate microbes through intracellular as well as extracellular antimicrobial mechanisms including MCET-formation similar to that of professional phagocytes. The actual literature leads to the suggestion that MCET-formation is not the result of passive release of DNA and granule proteins during cellular disintegration, but rather an active and controlled process in response to specific stimulation which contributes to the innate host defense. This review will discuss the different known aspects of the antimicrobial activities of MCs with special focus on MCETs and their role and relevance during infection and inflammation.

  16. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments.

  17. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3− to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  18. A characterization of DNA release in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures and biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allesen-Holm, Marie; Barken, Kim Bundvig; Yang, Liang;

    2006-01-01

    to whole-genome DNA. Evidence that the extracellular DNA in P. aeruginosa biofilms and cultures is generated via lysis of a subpopulation of the bacteria was obtained through experiments where extracellular beta-galactosidase released from lacZ-containing P. aeruginosa strains was assessed. Experiments......Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces extracellular DNA which functions as a cell-to-cell interconnecting matrix component in biofilms. Comparison of extracellular DNA and chromosomal DNA by the use of polymerase chain reaction and Southern analysis suggested that the extracellular DNA is similar...... with the wild type and lasIrhlI, pqsA, pqsL and fliMpilA mutants indicated that the extracellular DNA is generated via a mechanism which is dependent on acyl homoserine lactone and Pseudomonas quinolone signalling, as well as on flagella and type IV pili. Microscopic investigation of flow chamber-grown wild...

  19. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  20. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  1. Review of immediate-release omeprazole for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, Donald

    2005-11-01

    Immediate-release omeprazole (Zegerid, Santarus) is the first immediate-release oral proton pump inhibitor to reach the market. As a powder formulation for oral suspension, it is indicated for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive oesophagitis, duodenal ulcer and gastric ulcer, and is the only proton pump inhibitor approved for the reduction of risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill patients. Administration of immediate-release omeprazole at bedtime results in a rapid and sustained elevation of gastric pH, and seems to provide better night time control of gastric acidity than that observed with conventional morning dosing of delayed-release proton pump inhibitors. The immediate-release formulation may provide a good treatment option for patients who require flexible dosing, quick onset of action and nocturnal gastric acid control.

  2. Polarized protons and Siberian snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics

    1999-07-01

    The lecture started with a brief review of the history of polarized proton beams. Then it described the unexpected and still unexplained large transverse spin effects found in high energy proton spin experiments at the ZGS, AGS, and Fermilab. Next there was detailed discussion of Siberian snakes and some of their tests at the IUCF Cooler Ring. Finally there was a review of the use of Siberian Snakes in some possible high energy polarized proton beams at RHIC, HERA and Fermilab. Since a similar lecture is being published elsewhere, this manuscript will only contain this brief summary and the references. (author)

  3. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  4. The proton-proton scattering without Coulomb force renormalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glöckle W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate numerically that proton-proton (pp scattering observables can be determined directly by standard short range methods using a screened pp Coulomb force without renormalization. We numerically investigate solutions of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS equation for an exponentially screened Coulomb potential. For the limit of large screening radii we confirm analytically predicted properties for off-shell, half-shell and on-shell elements of the Coulomb t-matrix.

  5. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  6. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-05-30

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model.

  7. Aspects of the fundamental theory of proton-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1973-01-01

    After recalling the existence of a high energy bound on proton-proton total cross-sections, the author discusses the various phenomena which occur when these cross-sections rise and especially when they have the qualitative behaviour of the bound: rising elastic cross- sections, shrinking diffraction peak, validity of the Pomeranchuk theorem for total and elastic cross-sections, existence of a positive real part of the forward amplitude at high energies. (16 refs).

  8. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  9. Proton radiography to improve proton radiotherapy: Simulation study at different proton beam energies

    CERN Document Server

    Biegun, A K; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E R; van Beuzekom, M; Visser, J; Brandenburg, S

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4\\% and even up to 10\\% in region containing bone~\\cite{USchneider1995,USchneider1996,WSchneider2000,GCirrone2007,HPaganetti2012,TPlautz2014,GLandry2013,JSchuemann2014}. As a consequence, part of a tumor may receive no dose, or a very high dose can be delivered in healthy ti\\-ssues and organs at risks~(e.g. brain stem)~\\cite{ACKnopf2013}. A transmission radiograph of high-energy protons measuring proton stopping powers directly will allow to reduce these uncertainties, and thus improve the quality of treatment. The best way to obtain a sufficiently accurate radiograph is by tracking individual protons traversing the phantom (patient)~\\cite{GCirrone2007,TPlautz2014,VSipala2013}. In our simulations ...

  10. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoupil, Dalibor; Bydžovský, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2) and hyperon (3/2) resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*'s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  11. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoupil Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2 and hyperon (3/2 resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*’s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  12. Proton Football European Championship 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Check out the European championship of proton football 2016 at CERN. Produced by: CERN Audiovisual Productions Service Director: Jacques Fichet Editor: Jacques Fichet Music : Burnt of Jingle Punks You can follow us on:

  13. A New Proton CT Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Coutrakon, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rykalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Naimuddin, M

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction, and preliminary testing of a second generation proton CT scanner is presented. All current treatment planning systems at proton therapy centers use X-ray CT as the primary imaging modality for treatment planning to calculate doses to tumor and healthy tissues. One of the limitations of X-ray CT is in the conversion of X-ray attenuation coefficients to relative (proton) stopping powers, or RSP. This results in more proton range uncertainty, larger target volumes and therefore, more dose to healthy tissues. To help improve this, we present a novel scanner capable of high dose rates, up to 2~MHz, and large area coverage, 20~x~24~cm$^2$, for imaging an adult head phantom and reconstructing more accurate RSP values.

  14. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  15. Protonation Equilibrium of Linear Homopolyacids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požar J.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a short summary of investigations dealing with protonation equilibrium of linear homopolyacids, in particularly those of high charge density. Apart from the review of experimental results which can be found in the literature, a brief description of theoretical models used in processing the dependence of protonation constants on monomer dissociation degree and ionic strength is given (cylindrical model based on Poisson-Boltzmann equation, cylindrical Stern model, the models according to Ising, Högfeldt, Mandel and Katchalsky. The applicability of these models regarding the polyion charge density, electrolyte concentration and counterion type is discussed. The results of Monte Carlo simulations of protonation equilibrium are also briefly mentioned. In addition, frequently encountered errors connected with calibration of of glass electrode and the related unreliability of determined protonation constants are pointed out.

  16. Theoretical Studies of Proton Radioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ldia S Ferreira; Enrico Maglione

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, we will discuss the most recent theoretical approaches developed by our group, to understand the mechanisms of decay by one proton emission, and the structure and shape of exotic nuclei at the limits of stability.

  17. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  18. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  19. Exploring the proton spin structure

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spin structure of the proton is one of the main challenges in hadronic physics. While the concepts of spin and orbital angular momentum are pretty clear in the context of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the generalization of these concepts to quantum field theory encounters serious difficulties. It is however possible to define meaningful decompositions of the proton spin that are (in principle) measurable. We propose a summary of the present situation including recent developments and prospects of future developments.

  20. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  1. High intensity protons in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  2. Proton interactions with high multiplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, A G; Ardashev, E N; Avdeichikov, V V; Balandin, V P; Basiladze, S G; Batouritski, M A; Berezhnev, S F; Bogdanova, G A; Borzunov, Yu T; Budilov, V A; Chentsov, Yu A; Golovkin, V F; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Grishin, N I; Grishkevich, Ya V; Ermakov, G G; Ermolov, P F; Furmanets, N F; Karmanov, D E; Karpov, A V; Kekelidze, G D; Kireev, V I; Kiryakov, A A; Kholodenko, A G; Kokoulina, E S; Konstantinov, V V; Kramarenko, V N; Kubarovsky, A V; Kulikov, A K; Kuraev, E A; Kurchaninov, L L; Kutov, A Ya; Kuzmin, N A; Leflat, G I Lanschikov A K; Lobanov, I S; Lobanova, E V; Lutov, S I; Lysan, V N; Merkin, M M; Mitrofanov, G A; Myalkovskiy, V V; Nikitin, V A; Peshehonov, V D; Petrov, V S; Petukhov, Y P; Pleskach, A V; Polkovnikov, M K; Popov, V V; Riadovikov, V N; Ronzhin, V N; Rufanov, I A; Senko, V A; Shalanda, N A; Soldatov, M M; Spiryakin, V I; Terletskiy, A V; Tikhonova, L A; Tsyupa, Yu P; Vishnevskaya, A M; Volkov, V Yu; Vorobiev, A P; Voronin, A G; Yakimchuk, V I; Yukaev, A I; Zapolskii, V N; Zhidkov, N K; Zotkin, S A; Zverev, E G

    2011-01-01

    Project Thermalization (Experiment SERP-E-190 at IHEP) is aimed to study the proton - proton interactions at 50 GeV with large number of secondary particles. In this report the experimentally measured topological cross sections are presented taking into account the detector response and procession efficiency. These data are in good agreement with gluon dominance model. The comparison with other models is also made and shows no essential discrepancies.

  3. Cells release subpopulations of exosomes with distinct molecular and biological properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willms, Eduard; Johansson, Henrik J.; Mäger, Imre; Lee, Yi; Blomberg, K. Emelie M.; Sadik, Mariam; Alaarg, Amr Muhmed Sabry Abdelhakeem; Smith, C.I. Edvard; Lehtio, Janne; El Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Vader, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Cells release nano-sized membrane vesicles that are involved in intercellular communication by transferring biological information between cells. It is generally accepted that cells release at least three types of extracellular vesicles (EVs): apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. While a

  4. Cells release subpopulations of exosomes with distinct molecular and biological properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willms, Eduard; Johansson, Henrik J; Mäger, Imre; Lee, Yi; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Sadik, Mariam; Alaarg, Amr; Smith, C I Edvard; Lehtiö, Janne; El Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A; Vader, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Cells release nano-sized membrane vesicles that are involved in intercellular communication by transferring biological information between cells. It is generally accepted that cells release at least three types of extracellular vesicles (EVs): apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. While a wi

  5. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Ermakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2 that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments.

  6. Differentially timed extracellular signals synchronize pacemaker neuron clocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Collins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized neuronal activity is vital for complex processes like behavior. Circadian pacemaker neurons offer an unusual opportunity to study synchrony as their molecular clocks oscillate in phase over an extended timeframe (24 h. To identify where, when, and how synchronizing signals are perceived, we first studied the minimal clock neural circuit in Drosophila larvae, manipulating either the four master pacemaker neurons (LNvs or two dorsal clock neurons (DN1s. Unexpectedly, we found that the PDF Receptor (PdfR is required in both LNvs and DN1s to maintain synchronized LNv clocks. We also found that glutamate is a second synchronizing signal that is released from DN1s and perceived in LNvs via the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluRA. Because simultaneously reducing Pdfr and mGluRA expression in LNvs severely dampened Timeless clock protein oscillations, we conclude that the master pacemaker LNvs require extracellular signals to function normally. These two synchronizing signals are released at opposite times of day and drive cAMP oscillations in LNvs. Finally we found that PdfR and mGluRA also help synchronize Timeless oscillations in adult s-LNvs. We propose that differentially timed signals that drive cAMP oscillations and synchronize pacemaker neurons in circadian neural circuits will be conserved across species.

  7. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  8. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  9. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  10. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  11. The design features cells use to build their transmembrane proton gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Koder, Ronald

    2017-02-01

    Organisms store energy from food and sunlight as an electrochemical gradient across the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and bacteria. The gradient arises from differences in the concentration of protons and ions on the negative (N) and positive (P) sides of these membranes. This perspective describes how the proton gradient is formed. One strategy is the movement of electrons but not protons across a membrane-embedded protein from a site of proton-releasing oxidative chemistry on the P-side of the protein to a site of proton-binding reductive chemistry on the N-side. Alternately, protons are directly pumped across membrane-embedded proteins, which have gated proton transfer pathways that are opened and closed, as well as internal sites where the proton affinity varies as the protein goes through the reaction cycle. The molecules that carry out these roles are complex, utilizing non-amino acid cofactors and earth-abundant metals. However, these are also potential sources of high-energy toxic byproducts. Understanding these reactions can open the door to their rational redesign, with possible beneficial effects as far-reaching as improving the global food supply, preventing neurodegenerative diseases, and better understanding the role of metabolism in aging.

  12. Voltage-gated proton currents in microglia of distinct morphology and functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, R; Heinemann, U; Eder, C

    1999-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements were performed to investigate voltage-gated proton currents (I(PR)) in cultured murine microglia of distinct morphology and functional state. We studied I(PR) in ameboid microglia of untreated cultures, in ameboid microglia which had been activated by lipopolysaccharide, and in ramified microglia which had been exposed to astrocyte-conditioned medium. Proton currents of these three microglia populations did not differ regarding their activation threshold or the voltage dependence of steady-state activation. Moreover, pharmacological properties of I(PR) were similar: proton currents were sensitive to extracellularly applied Zn2+ or La3+, and could be abolished by each of those at a concentration of 100 microM. In the presence of extracellular Na+, I(PR) was decreased to a similar small extent due to activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger in all microglial populations. In contrast, proton currents of microglia differed between the three cell populations with respect to their current density and their time-course of activation: in comparison with untreated microglia, the current density of I(PR) was reduced by about 50% in microglia after their treatment with either lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium. Moreover, I(PR) activated significantly more slowly in cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium than in untreated cells. It can be concluded that the distinct H+ current characteristics of the three microglial populations do not correlate with the functional state of the cells.

  13. A Multiple Scattering Theory for Proton Penetration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dai-Lun; WU Zhang-Wen; JIANG Steve-Bin; LUO Zheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ We extend the electron small-angle multiple scattering theory to proton penetration. After introducing the concept of narrow energy spectra, the proton energy loss process is included in the proton deep penetration theory. It precisely describes the whole process of proton penetration. Compared to the Monte Carlo method,this method maintains the comparable precision and possesses much higher computational efficiency. Thus, it shows the real feasibility of applying this algorithm to proton clinical radiation therapy.

  14. Extracellular cytochrome c as an intercellular signaling molecule regulating microglial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Ayden; Bajwa, Ekta; Klegeris, Andis

    2017-09-01

    Cytochrome c is well known to be released from mitochondria into the cytosol where it can initiate apoptosis. Recent studies indicate that cytochrome c is also released into the extracellular space by both healthy and damaged cells, where its function is not well understood. We hypothesized that extracellular cytochrome c could function as an intercellular signaling molecule of the brain, which is recognized by brain microglia. These cells belong to the mononuclear phagocyte system and can be activated by endogenous substances associated with diverse pathologies including trauma, ischemic damage and neurodegenerative diseases. Three different cell types were used to model microglia. Respiratory burst activity, nitric oxide production and cytotoxic secretions were measured following exposure of microglial cells to cytochrome c. We showed that extracellular cytochrome c primed the respiratory burst response of differentiated HL-60 cells, enhanced nitric oxide secretion by BV-2 cells, and augmented cytotoxicity of differentiated THP-1 cells. We demonstrated that the effects of cytochrome c on microglia-like cells were at least partially mediated by the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) signaling pathway. Extracellular cytochrome c can interact with microglia TLR4 and modulate select functions of these brain immune cells. Our data identifies extracellular cytochrome c as a potential intercellular signaling molecule, which may be recognized by microglia causing or enhancing their immune activation. The data obtained support targeting TLR4 and JNK signaling as potential treatment strategies for brain diseases characterized by excessive cellular death and activation of microglia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of novel atypical antipsychotic, blonanserin, on extracellular neurotransmitter level in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohoyama, Keiko; Yamamura, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Shiroyama, Takashi; Tanii, Hisashi; Okada, Motohiro

    2011-02-25

    To clarify the mechanisms of action of blonanserin, an atypical antipsychotic drug, we studied the effects of systemic administration of blonanserin and risperidone on extracellular levels of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex using microdialysis, and neuronal firing in the ventral tegmental area, locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe nucleus and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus using radiotelemetry. The binding affinities of blonanserin to D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the rat brain were confirmed and found to be similar. Blonanserin transiently increased neuronal firing in locus coeruleus and ventral tegmental area but not in dorsal raphe nucleus or mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, whereas risperidone increased the firing in locus coeruleus, ventral tegmental area and dorsal raphe nucleus but not in mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Blonanserin persistently increased frontal extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine but not serotonin, GABA or glutamate, whereas risperidone persistently increased those of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin but not GABA or glutamate. These results suggest a pharmacological correlation between the stimulatory effects of these antipsychotics on frontal monoamine release and neuronal activity in monoaminergic nuclei. Inhibition of the α(2) adrenoceptor increased extracellular monoamine levels and enhanced blonanserin-induced increase in extracellular serotonin level. These results indicated that the combination of antagonism of D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors contribute to the rise in extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine, and that α(2) adrenoceptors play important roles in frontal serotonin release. They also suggest that blonanserin-induced activation of monoaminergic transmission could be, at least partially, involved in atypical antipsychotic properties of blonanserin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  17. Manifestation of proton structure in ridge-like correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiczek, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the CMS collaboration reported a long range in rapidity, near-side ('ridge-like') angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions, so called ridge effect. This surprising observation suggests the presence of a collective flow that resembles the one believed to produce a similar correlation hydrodynamically in heavy-ion collisions. If the hydrodynamic description is valid then the effect is triggered by the initial spatial anisotropy of the colliding matter. Estimating this anisotropy within different models of the proton internal structure in comparison with measured angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collision data could in principle discriminate between different proton models. Inspired by recent theoretical developments, we propose several phenomenological models of the proton structure. Subsequently, we calculate the anisotropy coefficients of the dense matter formed in proton-proton collisions within the formalism of the Monte Carlo Glauber model. We find that some p...

  18. Expression of intra- and extracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Hanna K; Garcia-Laorden, Maria Isabel; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Parry, Christopher M; Maude, Rapeephan R; Dondorp, Arjen M; Faiz, Mohammed Abul; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, Willem Joost

    2017-07-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhi, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes are serine proteases promoting cytotoxic lymphocytes mediated eradication of intracellular pathogens via the induction of cell death and which can also play a role in inflammation. We aimed to characterize the expression of extracellular and intracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever and whether the extracellular levels of granzyme correlated with IFN-γ release. We analyzed soluble protein levels of extracellular granzyme A and B in healthy volunteers and patients with confirmed S. Typhi infection on admission and day of discharge, and investigated whether this correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ release, a cytokine significantly expressed in typhoid fever. The intracellular expression of granzyme A, B and K in subsets of lymphocytic cells was determined using flow cytometry. Patients demonstrated a marked increase of extracellular granzyme A and B in acute phase plasma and a correlation of both granzymes with IFN-γ release. In patients, lower plasma levels of granzyme B, but not granzyme A, were found at day of discharge compared to admission, indicating an association of granzyme B with stage of disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of typhoid fever patients had a higher percentage of lymphocytic cells expressing intracellular granzyme A and granzyme B, but not granzyme K, compared to controls. The marked increase observed in extra- and intracellular levels of granzyme expression in patients with typhoid fever, and the correlation with stage of disease, suggests a role for granzymes in the host response to this disease.

  19. Expression of intra- and extracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Laorden, Maria Isabel; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Maude, Rapeephan R.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Faiz, Mohammed Abul; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, Willem Joost

    2017-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever, caused by the intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhi, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes are serine proteases promoting cytotoxic lymphocytes mediated eradication of intracellular pathogens via the induction of cell death and which can also play a role in inflammation. We aimed to characterize the expression of extracellular and intracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever and whether the extracellular levels of granzyme correlated with IFN-γ release. Methods and principal findings We analyzed soluble protein levels of extracellular granzyme A and B in healthy volunteers and patients with confirmed S. Typhi infection on admission and day of discharge, and investigated whether this correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ release, a cytokine significantly expressed in typhoid fever. The intracellular expression of granzyme A, B and K in subsets of lymphocytic cells was determined using flow cytometry. Patients demonstrated a marked increase of extracellular granzyme A and B in acute phase plasma and a correlation of both granzymes with IFN-γ release. In patients, lower plasma levels of granzyme B, but not granzyme A, were found at day of discharge compared to admission, indicating an association of granzyme B with stage of disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of typhoid fever patients had a higher percentage of lymphocytic cells expressing intracellular granzyme A and granzyme B, but not granzyme K, compared to controls. Conclusion The marked increase observed in extra- and intracellular levels of granzyme expression in patients with typhoid fever, and the correlation with stage of disease, suggests a role for granzymes in the host response to this disease. PMID:28749963

  20. The effects of extracellular acidosis on neurons and glia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S A; Pulsinelli, W A; Clarke, W Y; Kraig, R P; Plum, F

    1989-08-01

    Cerebral lactic acid, a product of ischemic anaerobic glycolysis, may directly contribute to ischemic brain damage in vivo. In this study we evaluated the effects of extracellular acid exposure on 7-day-old cultures of embryonic rat forebrain. Mixed neuronal and glial cultures were exposed to either lactic or hydrochloric acid to compare the toxicities of relatively permeable and impermeable acids. Neurons were relatively resistant to extra-cellular HCl acidosis, often surviving 10-min exposures to pH 3.8. In the same cultures, immunochemically defined astrocytes survived 10-min HCl exposures to a maximum acidity of pH 4.2. Similarly, axonal bundles defasciculated in HCl-titrated media below pH 4.4, although their constituent fibers often survived pH 3.8. Cell death occurred at higher pH in cultures subjected to lactic acidosis than in those exposed to HCl. Over half of forebrain neurons and glia subjected for 10 min to lactic acidification failed to survive exposure to pH 4.9. Longer 1-h lactic acid incubations resulted in cell death below pH 5.2. The potent cytotoxicity of lactic acid may be a direct result of the relatively rapid transfer of its neutral protonated form across cell membranes. This process would rapidly deplete intracellular buffer stores, resulting in unchecked cytosolic acidification. Neuronal and glial death from extracellular acidosis may therefore be a function of both the degree and the rapidity of intracellular acidification.

  1. Proton activity of the Sun in current solar cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chuan; Fang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of 7 large solar proton events (SPEs) of current solar cycle 24 (from 2009 January up to date). They were recorded by GOES spacecraft with highest proton fluxes over 200 pfu for energies $>$10 MeV. In situ particle measurements show that: (1) The profiles of the proton fluxes are highly dependent of the locations of their solar sources, namely flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs); (2) The solar particle release (SPR) times fall in the decay phase of the flare emission, and are in accordance with the times when the CMEs travel to an average height of 7.9 solar radii; (3) The time differences between the SPR and the flare peak are also dependent of the locations of the solar active regions (ARs). The results tend to support the concept of proton acceleration by the CME-driven shock, even though there exists a possibility of particle acceleration at flare site with subsequent perpendicular diffusion of accelerated particles in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We derive the integral ...

  2. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  3. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors.

  4. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  5. Extracellular pH regulates bone cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Timothy R

    2008-02-01

    The skeletons of land vertebrates contain a massive reserve of alkaline mineral (hydroxyapatite), which is ultimately available to buffer metabolic H+ if acid-base balance is not maintained within narrow limits. The negative impact of acidosis on the skeleton has long been known but was thought to result from passive, physicochemical dissolution of bone mineral. This brief, selective review summarizes what is now known of the direct functional responses of bone cells to extracellular pH. We discovered that bone resorption by cultured osteoclasts is stimulated directly by acid. The stimulatory effect is near-maximal at pH 7.0, whereas above pH 7.4, resorption is switched off. In bone organ cultures, H+-stimulated bone mineral release is almost entirely osteoclast-mediated, with a negligible physicochemical component. Acidification is the key requirement for osteoclasts to excavate resorption pits in all species studied to date, and extracellular H+ may thus be regarded as the long-sought osteoclast activation factor. Acid-activated osteoclasts can be stimulated further by agents such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand. Osteoclasts may respond to pH changes via H+-sensing ion channels such as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a nociceptor that is also activated by capsaicin. Acidosis also exerts a powerful, reciprocal inhibitory effect on the mineralization of bone matrix by cultured osteoblasts. This is caused by increased hydroxyapatite solubility at low pH, together with selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, which is required for mineralization. Diets or drugs that shift acid-base balance in the alkaline direction may provide useful treatments for bone loss disorders.

  6. Medulloblastoma exosome proteomics yield functional roles for extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Epple

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are the most prevalent malignant pediatric brain tumors. Survival for these patients has remained largely the same for approximately 20 years, and our therapies for these cancers cause significant health, cognitive, behavioral and developmental sequelae for those who survive the tumor and their treatments. We obviously need a better understanding of the biology of these tumors, particularly with regard to their migratory/invasive behaviors, their proliferative propensity, and their abilities to deflect immune responses. Exosomes, virus-sized membrane vesicles released extracellularly from cells after formation in, and transit thru, the endosomal pathway, may play roles in medulloblastoma pathogenesis but are as yet unstudied in this disease. Here we characterized exosomes from a medulloblastoma cell line with biochemical and proteomic analyses, and included characterization of patient serum exosomes. Further scrutiny of the proteomic data suggested functional properties of the exosomes that are relevant to medulloblastoma tumor biology, including their roles as proliferation stimulants, their activities as attractants for tumor cell migration, and their immune modulatory impacts on lymphocytes. Aspects of this held true for exosomes from other medulloblastoma cell lines as well. Additionally, pathway analyses suggested a possible role for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A; however, inhibition of the protein's activity actually increased D283MED cell proliferation/clonogenecity, suggesting that HNF4A may act as a tumor suppressor in this cell line. Our work demonstrates that relevant functional properties of exosomes may be derived from appropriate proteomic analyses, which translate into mechanisms of tumor pathophysiology harbored in these extracellular vesicles.

  7. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  8. A simple solution of the proton crisis

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2014-01-01

    In this work we suggest a simple theoretical model of the proton able to effectively solve proton spin crisis. Within domain of applicability of this simple model proton consists only of two u quarks and one d quarks (two of which have spin opposite to proton and one identical to proton) and one neutral vector phi meson (with spin two times larger than proton spin and directed identically to proton spin). This model is in full agreement not only with existing DIS experiments, but also with spin and electric charge conservation as well as in a satisfactory agreement with rest mass-energy conservation (since phi meson mass is close to proton rest mass). Our model opens an interesting possibility of the solution of the quarks and leptons families problem (proton is not an absolutely non-strange particle, but only a particle with almost totally effectively hidden strange).

  9. The effects of thioperamide on extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA in the rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Natalie; Shoblock, James R

    2009-12-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3R) are presynaptic heteroreceptors that negatively modulate the release of histamine and other neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine. Blocking H3 receptors with antagonists/inverse agonists has been shown to be procognitive and this effect has often been associated with increases in acetylcholine transmission. H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the prefrontal cortex, an area associated with cognitive performance. While the procognitive effects of H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists may depend on alterations to acetylcholine or histamine release, other transmitters involved in cognitive processing such as glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may also be involved. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of thioperamide, an H3 receptor antagonist, on extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA in the prefrontal cortex. By means of in vivo microdialysis on freely moving Sprague Dawley rats, samples were collected and assayed via high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection. Replacement of calcium with magnesium revealed that the release of GABA, but not glutamate, was calcium-dependent. Thioperamide (10-20 mg/kg) did not affect basal glutamate or GABA release. Perfusion with a high concentration of potassium (100 mM) increased GABA, but not glutamate, release and thioperamide (20 mg/kg) attenuated the effects of high potassium on GABA release. These data indicate that H3 receptors in the prefrontal cortex can enhance stimulated GABA release, but do not regulate basal levels of glutamate or GABA.

  10. Towards a proton imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C., E-mail: Carlo.Civinini@fi.infn.i [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Capineri, L. [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Mazzaglia, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Menichelli, D.; Pieri, S. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Hadron therapy for tumor treatment is nowadays used in several medical centres. The main advantage in using protons or light ions beams is the possibility of tightly shaping the radiation dose to the target volume. Presently the spatial accuracy of the therapy is limited by the uncertainty in stopping power distribution, which is derived, for each treatment, from the photon attenuation coefficients measured by X-ray tomography. A direct measurement of the stopping powers will help in reducing this uncertainty. This can be achieved by using a proton beam and a detection system able to reconstruct a tomography image of the patient. As a first step towards such a system an apparatus able to perform a proton transmission radiography (pCR) has been designed. It consists of a silicon microstrip tracker, measuring proton trajectories, and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to determine the particle residual energy. Proton beam and laboratory tests have been performed on the system components prototypes: the main results will be shown and discussed.

  11. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  12. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  13. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  14. ω Meson Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, W.; Abdel-Bary, M.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Clement, H.; Dietrich, J.; Doroshkevich, E.; Dshemuchadse, S.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Eyrich, W.; Freiesleben, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Jäkel, R.; Karsch, L.; Kilian, K.; Kuhlmann, E.; Marcello, S.; Morsch, H. P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Schroeder, W.; Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Teufel, A.; Ucar, A.; Wenzel, R.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Zupranski, P.

    One of the experimental programs at the TOF spectrometer located at the COSY-accelerator (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany) is the study of ω-meson production in proton proton collisions (pp → ppω). Recently, a measurement was performed with a polarized beam at an excess energy of ɛ = 129 MeV, which offers the possibility to analyze polarization observables of this reaction channel for the first time. The analyzing power (Ay) of the pp → ppω-reaction was determined to be compatible with zero.

  15. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B; Nolan, Thomas J; Abraham, David

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system's first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system.

  16. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  17. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  18. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  19. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  20. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  1. Carbenoxolone inhibits Pannexin1 channels through interactions in the first extracellular loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Kevin; Kawate, Toshimitsu

    2016-02-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) is an ATP release channel important for controlling immune responses and synaptic strength. Various stimuli including C-terminal cleavage, a high concentration of extracellular potassium, and voltage have been demonstrated to activate Panx1. However, it remains unclear how Panx1 senses and integrates such diverse stimuli to form an open channel. To provide a clue on the mechanism underlying Panx1 channel gating, we investigated the action mechanism of carbenoxolone (CBX), the most commonly used small molecule for attenuating Panx1 function triggered by a wide range of stimuli. Using a chimeric approach, we discovered that CBX reverses its action polarity and potentiates the voltage-gated channel activity of Panx1 when W74 in the first extracellular loop is mutated to a nonaromatic residue. A systematic mutagenesis study revealed that conserved residues in this loop also play important roles in CBX function, potentially by mediating CBX binding. We extended our experiments to other Panx1 inhibitors such as probenecid and ATP, which also potentiate the voltage-gated channel activity of a Panx1 mutant at position 74. Notably, probenecid alone can activate this mutant at a resting membrane potential. These data suggest that CBX and other inhibitors, including probenecid, attenuate Panx1 channel activity through modulation of the first extracellular loop. Our experiments are the first step toward identifying a previously unknown mode of CBX action, which provide insight into the role of the first extracellular loop in Panx1 channel gating.

  2. Extracellular ATP acts as a damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP signal in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwamu eTanaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants have evolved effective mechanisms to protect themselves from environmental stresses. Damaged (i.e., wounded plants recognize a variety of endogenous molecules as danger signals, referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. ATP is among the molecules that are released by cell damage, and recent evidence suggests that ATP can serve as a DAMP. Although little studied in plants, extracellular ATP is well known for its signaling role in animals, including acting as a DAMP during the inflammatory response and wound healing. If ATP acts outside the cell, then it is reasonable to expect that it is recognized by a plasma membrane-localized receptor. Recently, DORN1, a lectin receptor kinase, was shown to recognize extracellular ATP in Arabidopsis. DORN1 is the founding member of a new purinoceptor subfamily, P2K (P2 receptor Kinase, which is plant-specific. P2K1 (DORN1 is required for ATP-induced cellular responses (e.g., cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression. Genetic analysis of loss-of-function mutants and overexpression lines showed that P2K1 participates in the plant wound response, consistent with the role of ATP as a DAMP. In this review, we summarize past research on the roles and mechanisms of extracellular ATP signaling in plants, and discuss the direction of the future research of extracellular ATP as a DAMP signal.

  3. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Slim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature.... Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C. The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry, was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment

  4. High Intensity Secondary Beams Driven by Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, John; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Intensity Frontier effort within the 2013 Community Summer Study, a workshop on the proton machine capabilities was held (High Intensity Secondary Beams Driven by Proton Beams) April 17-20, 2013 at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Primary aims of the workshop were to understand: 1) the beam requirements for proposed high intensity proton beam based measurements; 2) the capabilities of existing world-wide high power proton machines; 3) proton facility upgrade plans and proposals for new facilities; 4) and to document the R&D needs for proton accelerators and target systems needed to support proposed intensity frontier measurements. These questions are addressed in this summary.

  5. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  6. Proton therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Michael S; Flampouri, Stella; Hoppe, Bradford S

    2014-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma has gone from an incurable disease to one for which the majority of patients will be cured. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy achieves the best disease control rates and results in many long-term survivors. As a result, a majority of long-term Hodgkin lymphoma survivors live to experience severe late treatment-related complications, especially cardiovascular disease and second malignancies. The focus of research and treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma is to maintain the current high rates of disease control while reducing treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Efforts to reduce late treatment complications focus on improvements in both systemic therapies and radiotherapy. Herein we review the basis for the benefits of proton therapy over conventional X-ray therapy. We review outcomes of Hodgkin lymphoma treated with proton therapy, and discuss the ability of protons to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk and the impact on the most significant late complications related to the treatment.

  7. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  8. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  9. Extracellular conversion of adiponectin hexamers into trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-a; Nuñez, Martha; Briggs, David B.; Laskowski, Bethany L.; Chhun, Jimmy J.; Eleid, Joseph K.; Quon, Michael J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that exists as trimers, hexamers and larger species collectively referred to as HMW (high-molecular-weight) adiponectin. Whether hexamers or HMW adiponectin serve as precursors for trimers outside the circulation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that adiponectin trimers can be generated from larger oligomers secreted from primary rat adipose cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Purified hexameric, but not HMW, adiponectin converted into trimers in conditioned media separated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes or, more efficiently, when enclosed in the dialysis membrane in the presence of adipocytes. Several lines of evidence indicate that the conversion is mediated by an extracellular redox system. First, N-terminal epitope-tagged hexamers converted into trimers without proteolytic removal of the tag. Secondly, appearance of trimers was associated with conversion of disulfide-bonded dimers into monomers. Thirdly, thiol-reactive agents inhibited conversion into trimers. Consistent with a redox-based mechanism, purified hexamers reductively converted into trimers in defined glutathione redox buffer with reduction potential typically found in the extracellular environment while the HMW adiponectin remained stable. In addition, conversion of hexamers into trimers was enhanced by NADPH, but not by NADP+. Collectively, these data strongly suggest the presence of an extracellular redox system capable of converting adiponectin oligomers. PMID:22973892

  10. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  11. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  12. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  13. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Biofilms Inhibit the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Yi, Li; Yu, Ningwei; Wang, Guangyu; Ma, Zhe; Lin, Huixing; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Invasive infections caused by Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) has emerged as a clinical problem in recent years. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an important mechanism for the trapping and killing of pathogens that are resistant to phagocytosis. Biofilm formation can protect bacteria from being killed by phagocytes. Until now, there have only been a few studies that focused on the interactions between bacterial biofilms and NETs. SS2 in both a biofilm state and a planktonic cell state were incubated with phagocytes and NETs, and bacterial survival was assessed. DNase I and cytochalasin B were used to degrade NET DNA or suppress phagocytosis, respectively. Extracellular DNA was stained with impermeable fluorescent dye to quantify NET formation. Biofilm formation increased up to 6-fold in the presence of neutrophils, and biofilms were identified in murine tissue. Both planktonic and biofilm cells induced neutrophils chemotaxis to the infection site, with neutrophils increasing by 85.1 and 73.8%, respectively. The bacteria in biofilms were not phagocytized. The bactericidal efficacy of NETs on the biofilms and planktonic cells were equal; however, the biofilm extracellular matrix can inhibit NET release. Although biofilms inhibit NETs release, NETs appear to be an important mechanism to eliminate SS2 biofilms. This knowledge advances the understanding of biofilms and may aid in the development of treatments for persistent infections with a biofilm component. PMID:28373968

  14. Circular RNAs Co-Precipitate with Extracellular Vesicles: A Possible Mechanism for circRNA Clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Lasda

    Full Text Available Backspliced circular RNAs (circRNAs are prevalent in many eukaryotic systems and are spliced from thousands of different genes. Where examined, circRNAs are often highly stable and the mechanisms by which cells degrade and/or clear circRNAs from the cells are unknown. Here we investigated the possibility that cells can eliminate circRNAs into extracellular space, possibly within released vesicles such as exosomes and microvesicles. From three different cell lines and examining multiple circRNAs, we show that extracellular vesicle (EVs preparations recovered from cell culture conditioned media contain established circRNAs. Moreover, these circRNAs are enriched over their linear counterparts within EV preparations when compared to the producing cells. This supports the idea that expulsion from cells into extracellular space, as by EVs release, can be a mechanism by which cells clear circRNAs. Moreover, since EVs can be taken up by other cells, excreted circRNAs could contribute to cell to cell communication.

  15. A thermonuclease of Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances bacterial escape from killing by neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Richard A; Stevens, Jacqueline S; Apicella, Michael A; Criss, Alison K

    2015-07-15

    Acute gonorrhea is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation that is insufficient to clear Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Activated neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs), which are composed of chromatin and decorated with antimicrobial proteins. The N. gonorrhoeae NG0969 open reading frame contains a gene (nuc) that encodes a putatively secreted thermonuclease (Nuc) that contributes to biofilm remodeling. Here, we report that Nuc degrades NETs to help N. gonorrhoeae resist killing by neutrophils. Primary human neutrophils released NETs after exposure to N. gonorrhoeae, but NET integrity declined over time with Nuc-containing bacteria. Recombinant Nuc and conditioned medium from Nuc-containing N. gonorrhoeae degraded human neutrophil DNA and NETs. NETs were found to have antimicrobial activity against N. gonorrhoeae, and Nuc expression enhanced N. gonorrhoeae survival in the presence of neutrophils that released NETs. We propose that Nuc enables N. gonorrhoeae to escape trapping and killing by NETs during symptomatic infection, highlighting Nuc as a multifunctional virulence factor for N. gonorrhoeae.

  16. Cellular ATP release in the lung and airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Ito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is a universal energy source synthesized by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic glycolysis and transported by the vesicular nucleotide transporter for storage in secretory vesicles. Extracellular ATP regulates physiological functions and homeostasis of the respiratory system and is associated with pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Thus, modulation of ATP and purinergic signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach to pulmonary disease. ATP is released from alveolar epithelial cells, airway epithelial cells, airway smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in response to various chemical and mechanical stimuli. In addition to conductive pathways such as connexins and pannexins, vesicular exocytosis is involved in the mechanisms of ATP release from the cells. Imaging approaches enable us to visualize ATP release from not only cultured cells but also lung tissue ex vivo. Extracellular vesicles, exosomes and membrane-derived microvesicles, containing cytoplasmic proteins, mRNA and microRNA, represent important mediators of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular microenvironment. However, it is not known whether extracellular vesicles contain ATP as an intercellular messenger. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of cellular ATP release and purinergic signaling in the respiratory system.

  17. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  18. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  19. Proton therapy of hypophyseal adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirakova, E.I.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Lyass, F.M.; Snigireva, R.Ya.; Krymskij, V.A. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Nejrokhirurgii; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental' noj Ehndokrinologii i Khimii Gormonov)

    1983-10-01

    The authors present the results of proton therapy in 59 patients with different hypophyseal adenomas. The period of observation lasted from 6 mos. to 5 yrs. Irradiation was done using a multifield-convergent method and a proton beam of the ITEF synchrotron. The beam energy was 200 MeV, the beam diameter 7-15 mm. Radiation response and immediate results were evaluated for all the patients. The least favorable results were noted in the patients with prolactinomas, for which, in addition to irradiation, parlodel therapy is needed. No marked radiation reactions, neurological complications and manifestations of hypopituitarism were observed with the chosen doses and schemes of irradiation.

  20. Protons in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cavalletti, R; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiarini, A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Feng, C C; Fiandrini, E; Finelli, F; Fisher, P H; Flaminio, R; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lolli, M; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Massera, F; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mezzanotte, F; Mezzenga, R; Mihul, A; Molinari, G; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Pancaldi, G; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilastrini, R; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Postolache, V; Prati, E; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Recupero, S; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torromeo, G; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A

    2000-01-01

    The proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 200 GeV was measuredby the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 atan altitude of 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the observed spectrum isparameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a substantial secondspectrum was observed concentrated at equatorial latitudes with a flux ~ 70m^-2 sec^-1 sr^-1. Most of these second spectrum protons follow a complicatedtrajectory and originate from a restricted geographic region.

  1. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  2. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  3. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  4. Dissociation between lactate and proton exchange in muscle during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Juel, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva

    1997-01-01

    , the difference between net proton and lactate release was positive throughout exercise and of similar magnitude in N and H. 5. The present data suggest that (1) H+ exchange in muscle during submaximal exercise can to a large extent occur through mechanisms other than via coupling to lactate; (2) muscle transport...

  5. Insights into proton translocation in cbb3 oxidase from MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheda, Catarina A; Pisliakov, Andrei V

    2017-05-01

    Heme-copper oxidases are membrane protein complexes that catalyse the final step of the aerobic respiration, namely the reduction of oxygen to water. The energy released during catalysis is coupled to the active translocation of protons across the membrane, which contributes to the establishment of an electrochemical gradient that is used for ATP synthesis. The distinctive C-type (or cbb3) cytochrome c oxidases, which are mostly present in proteobacteria, exhibit a number of unique structural and functional features, including high catalytic activity at low oxygen concentrations. At the moment, the functioning mechanism of C-type oxidases, in particular the proton transfer/pumping mechanism presumably via a single proton channel, is still poorly understood. In this work we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and continuum electrostatics calculations to obtain atomic-level insights into the hydration and dynamics of a cbb3 oxidase. We provide the details of the water dynamics and proton transfer pathways for both the "chemical" and "pumped" protons, and show that formation of protonic connections is strongly affected by the protonation state of key residues, namely H243, E323 and H337. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Charge-Neutral Constant pH Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using a Parsimonious Proton Buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnini, Serena; Ullmann, R Thomas; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2016-03-08

    In constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, the protonation states of titratable sites can respond to changes of the pH and of their electrostatic environment. Consequently, the number of protons bound to the biomolecule, and therefore the overall charge of the system, fluctuates during the simulation. To avoid artifacts associated with a non-neutral simulation system, we introduce an approach to maintain neutrality of the simulation box in constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, while maintaining an accurate description of all protonation fluctuations. Specifically, we introduce a proton buffer that, like a buffer in experiment, can exchange protons with the biomolecule enabling its charge to fluctuate. To keep the total charge of the system constant, the uptake and release of protons by the buffer are coupled to the titration of the biomolecule with a constraint. We find that, because the fluctuation of the total charge (number of protons) of a typical biomolecule is much smaller than the number of titratable sites of the biomolecule, the number of buffer sites required to maintain overall charge neutrality without compromising the charge fluctuations of the biomolecule, is typically much smaller than the number of titratable sites, implying markedly enhanced simulation and sampling efficiency.

  7. Multiscale simulations reveal key features of the proton-pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ruibin; Swanson, Jessica M J; Peng, Yuxing; Wikström, Mårten; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-07-05

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces oxygen to water and uses the released free energy to pump protons across the membrane. We have used multiscale reactive molecular dynamics simulations to explicitly characterize (with free-energy profiles and calculated rates) the internal proton transport events that enable proton pumping during first steps of oxidation of the fully reduced enzyme. Our results show that proton transport from amino acid residue E286 to both the pump loading site (PLS) and to the binuclear center (BNC) are thermodynamically driven by electron transfer from heme a to the BNC, but that the former (i.e., pumping) is kinetically favored whereas the latter (i.e., transfer of the chemical proton) is rate-limiting. The calculated rates agree with experimental measurements. The backflow of the pumped proton from the PLS to E286 and from E286 to the inside of the membrane is prevented by large free-energy barriers for the backflow reactions. Proton transport from E286 to the PLS through the hydrophobic cavity and from D132 to E286 through the D-channel are found to be strongly coupled to dynamical hydration changes in the corresponding pathways and, importantly, vice versa.

  8. Mutant breeding of ornamental trees for creating variations with high value using Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, H. J.; Lim, J. H.; Woo, S. M.; Hwang, M. J.; Pyo, S. H.; Woo, J. S. [Phygen Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    It is necessary to induce the improved strains of ornamental plants with more disease-resistant and useful for landscape or phytoremediation. Mutation breeding has played an important role in crop improvement, and more than 2,000 mutant cultivars have been released. For the induction of mutation, gamma rays and X-rays are widely used as a mutagen. Proton beam had higher energy than -ray and worked with localized strength, so that proton-beam radiation could be valuable tool to induce useful strains of ornamental plants. Proton ion beam irradiation was used to induce a useful mutant in rice, chrysanthemum, carnation, and so on in Japan. Also, proton ion beam was used to select a useful host strain, in polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a member of biodegradable plastic, could be overproduced in Korea. Therefore, we surmise that the effects of proton beam is different from those of gamma rays and X-rays, and we expect proton beam to be a new mutagen. This research was conducted to investigate the proton-beam radiation sensitivity and seed germination rate of the various ornamental plants like as Albizia julibrissin, Ficus religiosa, Rhus chinensis, Sorbaria sorbilfolia and Spiraea chinensis, to survey the quantitative characteristics of proton beam induced strains. To induce the variants of ornamental plants, seeds were irradiated at the dose of 0{approx}2kGy of proton beam at room temperature. Proton beam energy level was 45 MeV and was irradiated at dose of 0{approx}2kGy by MC-50 Cyclotron. After irradiation, to assess the effects of proton beam on radiation sensitivity and morphological changes of the plants and the seed germination rate were analysed. By the proton beam radiation, the germination rate decreased at the higher dose. The other hand, the germination rate of Rhus chinensis increased the dose higher, so that it need to investigate the germination rate over 2kGy radiation. The effects of mutation induction by proton beam irradiation on seeds in Lagerstroemia

  9. β-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Shuwei; LI; Zhankui; XIE; Yuanxiang; HUANG; Wenxue; SH

    2005-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the experimental study on β-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line published by our group during the period of 1996―2004, namely the first observation of the β-delayed proton decays of 9 new nuclides in the rare-earth region and the new measurements of β-delayed proton decays of 5 nuclides in the mass (90 region near the N = Z line with the aid of the "p-γ" coincidence in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In the meantime some important experimental technique details were supplemented. The experimental results, including the half-lives, spins, parities, deformations and production reaction cross sections for the 14 nuclei were summarized and compared with the current nuclear-model predictions, and then the following points were represented. (1) The experimental half-lives for 85Mo and 92Rh as well as the predicted "waiting point" nuclei 89Ru and 93Pd are 5―10 times longer than the theoretical predictions given by M(o)ller et al. using a macroscopic-microscopic model. It considerably influences the predictions of the abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp-process. (2) The current-model predictions are not consistent with the experimental assignments of the spins and parities for the proton drip-line nuclei 142Ho and 128Pm. However, the nuclear potential energy surface (PES) calculated by using a Woods- Saxon-Strutinsky method reproduced the experimental results. (3) The Alice code overestimated the production reaction cross sections of the studied 9 rare-earth nuclei by one order of magnitude or two, while HIVAP code overestimated them by one order of magnitude approximately.

  10. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Conesa del Valle, Z; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B Z; Lansberg, J P; Lourenço, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Thereafter, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in a broader perspective, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  11. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa del Valle, Z. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Corcella, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E.Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy); Fleuret, F. [LLR, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Ferreiro, E.G. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and IGFAE, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Kartvelishvili, V. [Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB,United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Kopeliovich, B. [Departamento de Fisica Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Instituto de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias e Ingenieria and Centro, Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Lansberg, J.P. [IPNO, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France); Lourenco, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Martinez, G. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, Nantes (France); Papadimitriou, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois, 60510, U.S.A (United States); Satz, H. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld (Germany); Scomparin, E. [INFN Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino, I-10125 (Italy); Ullrich, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Teryaev, O. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Vogt, R. [Physics Divsion, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Physics Department, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang, J.X. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2011-05-15

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  12. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We pe

  13. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    OpenAIRE

    Guo-Liang Ma; Adam Bzdak

    2014-01-01

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton-parton cross-section of $\\sigma=1.5 - 3$ mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  14. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  15. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references.

  16. Voltage-gated proton (H(v)1) channels, a singular voltage sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Karen; Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Contreras, Gustavo F; Morera, Francisco J; Neely, Alan; Latorre, Ramon; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2015-11-14

    The main role of voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is to extrude protons from the intracellular milieu when, mediated by different cellular processes, the H(+) concentration increases. Hv1 are exquisitely selective for protons and their structure is homologous to the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels like sodium, potassium, and calcium channels. In clear contrast to the classical voltage-dependent channels, Hv1 lacks a pore domain and thus permeation necessarily occurs through the voltage sensing domain. Hv1 channels are activated by depolarizing voltages, and increases in internal proton concentration. It has been proposed that local conformational changes of the transmembrane segment S4, driven by depolarization, trigger the molecular rearrangements that open Hv1. However, it is still unclear how the electromechanical coupling is achieved between the VSD and the potential pore, allowing the proton flux from the intracellular to the extracellular side. Here we provide a revised view of voltage activation in Hv1 channels, offering a comparative scenario with other voltage sensing channels domains.

  17. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail.

  18. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Sjoholm, O.R.; Yankelevich, T.;

    2010-01-01

    : TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNase I treatment. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads......Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal...... laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances...

  19. Therapeutic application of extracellular vesicles in acute and chronic renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Jordi; Diekmann, Fritz; Campistol, Josep M; Ramírez-Bajo, María José

    2016-07-23

    A new cell-to-cell communication system was discovered in the 1990s, which involves the release of vesicles into the extracellular space. These vesicles shuttle bioactive particles, including proteins, mRNA, miRNA, metabolites, etc. This particular communication has been conserved throughout evolution, which explains why most cell types are capable of producing vesicles. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in the regulation of different physiological processes, as well as in the development and progression of several diseases. EVs have been widely studied over recent years, especially those produced by embryonic and adult stem cells, blood cells, immune system and nervous system cells, as well as tumour cells. EV analysis from bodily fluids has been used as a diagnostic tool for cancer and recently for different renal diseases. However, this review analyses the importance of EVs generated by stem cells, their function and possible clinical application in renal diseases and kidney transplantation.

  20. Stem cell-extracellular vesicles as drug delivery systems: New frontiers for silk/curcumin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perteghella, Sara; Crivelli, Barbara; Catenacci, Laura; Sorrenti, Milena; Bruni, Giovanna; Necchi, Vittorio; Vigani, Barbara; Sorlini, Marzio; Torre, Maria Luisa; Chlapanidas, Theodora

    2017-03-30

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel carrier-in-carrier system based on stem cell-extracellular vesicles loaded of silk/curcumin nanoparticles by endogenous technique. Silk nanoparticles were produced by desolvation method and curcumin has been selected as drug model because of its limited water solubility and poor bioavailability. Nanoparticles were stable, with spherical geometry, 100nm in average diameter and the drug content reached about 30%. Cellular uptake studies, performed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), showed the accumulation of nanoparticles in the cytosol around the nuclear membrane, without cytotoxic effects. Finally, MSCs were able to release extracellular vesicles entrapping silk/curcumin nanoparticles. This combined biological-technological approach represents a novel class of nanosystems, combining beneficial effects of both regenerative cell therapies and pharmaceutical nanomedicine, avoiding the use of viable replicating stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in neural cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Anna M; Sapoń, Karolina; Janas, Teresa; Stowell, Michael H B; Janas, Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    The function of human nervous system is critically dependent on proper interneuronal communication. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles are emerging as a novel form of information exchange within the nervous system. Intraluminal vesicles within multivesicular bodies (MVBs) can be transported in neural cells anterogradely or retrogradely in order to be released into the extracellular space as exosomes. RNA loading into exosomes can be either via an interaction between RNA and the raft-like region of the MVB limiting membrane, or via an interaction between an RNA-binding protein-RNA complex with this raft-like region. Outflow of exosomes from neural cells and inflow of exosomes into neural cells presumably take place on a continuous basis. Exosomes can play both neuro-protective and neuro-toxic roles. In this review, we characterize the role of exosomes and microvesicles in normal nervous system function, and summarize evidence for defective signaling of these vesicles in disease pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Kroemer, Guido; Perfettini, Jean-Luc

    2011-08-29

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches. © 2011 Séror et al.

  3. LHC Availability 2016: Proton Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Restart to Technical Stop 3 (TS3) in 2016. This covers the whole proton physics production period of 2016. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  4. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study

  5. Emerging technologies in proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Jacobus M.; Lomax, Antony J.

    An increasing number of proton therapy facilities are being planned and built at hospital based centers. Most facilities are employing traditional dose delivery methods. A second generation of dose application techniques, based on pencil beam scanning, is slowly being introduced into the

  6. The size of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebel, T., E-mail: tbn@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Antognini, A. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Amaro, F. D. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Biraben, F. [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Cardoso, J. M. R. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Covita, D. S. [Universidade de Aveiro, I3N, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Dax, A.; Dhawan, S. [Yale University, Physics Department (United States); Fernandes, L. M. P. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Giesen, A. [Dausinger and Giesen GmbH (Germany); Graf, T. [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Strahlwerkzeuge (Germany); Haensch, T. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Indelicato, P.; Julien, L. [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Kao, C.-Y. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg, Departement de Physique (Switzerland); Kottmann, F. [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik (Switzerland); Bigot, E. Le [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Liu, Y.-W. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Lopes, J. A. M. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); and others

    2012-12-15

    The root-mean-square (rms) charge radius r{sub p} of the proton has so far been known only with a surprisingly low precision of about 1% from both electron scattering and precision spectroscopy of hydrogen. We have recently determined r{sub p} by means of laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift in the exotic 'muonic hydrogen' atom. Here, the muon, which is the 200 times heavier cousin of the electron, orbits the proton with a 200 times smaller Bohr radius. This enhances the sensitivity to the proton's finite size tremendously. Our new value r{sub p} = 0.84184 (67) fm is ten times more precise than the generally accepted CODATA-value, but it differs by 5 standard deviations from it. A lively discussion about possible solutions to the 'proton size puzzle' has started. Our measurement, together with precise measurements of the 1S-2S transition in regular hydrogen and deuterium, also yields improved values of the Rydberg constant, R{sub {infinity} } = 10,973,731.568160 (16) m{sup - 1}.

  7. Playing with Protons CREATIONS Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2017-01-01

    This document describes Playing with Protons, a CMS education initiative that seeks to enhance teachers’ pedagogical practice with creative, hands-on methodologies through which 10-12 year old students can, in turn, get engaged effectively with science, technology and innovation.

  8. Solid-state proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remick, R.J.; Jewulski, J.; Osif, T.

    1989-01-01

    Work on this project is divided into three tasks. In the first, a comprehensive literature review was performed for the purpose of collecting data on solid proton conductors. The data was then analyzed with the goal of correlating physical and chemical characteristics with protonic conductivity in order to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. In the second task, the results of the correlation study were used to choose an electrolyte system in which to work and to aid in the formulation of new candidate proton conductors. Under the third task, a universal test stand was constructed which can measure both electronic and protonic conductivity and which can be converted to use as a solid state fuel cell test stand. Samples of doped SrCe{sub 0.95}Yb{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} have been coated with palladium electrodes and the mechanism responsible for ionic conductivity through this material is currently under study. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  10. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  11. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  12. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Schwab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical TLR and NFkB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of

  13. Extracellular acidosis impairs P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and migration of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, Antonia; Okonji, Emeka; Deca, Diana; Wei, Wei-Chun; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage and immune cell of the brain and are critically involved in combating disease and assaults on the brain. Virtually all brain pathologies are accompanied by acidosis of the interstitial fluid, meaning that microglia are exposed to an acidic environment. However, little is known about how extracellular acidosis impacts on microglial function. The activity of microglia is tightly controlled by 'on' and 'off' signals, the presence or absence of which results in generation of distinct phenotypes in microglia. Activation of G protein coupled purinergic (P2Y) receptors triggers a number of distinct behaviours in microglia, including activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Using pharmacological tools and fluorescence imaging of the murine cerebellar microglia cell line C8B4, we show that extracellular acidosis interferes with P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling in these cells. Distinct P2Y receptors give rise to signature intracellular Ca(2+) signals, and Ca(2+) release from stores and Ca(2+) influx are differentially affected by acidotic conditions: Ca(2+) release is virtually unaffected, whereas Ca(2+) influx, mediated at least in part by store-operated Ca(2+) channels, is profoundly inhibited. Furthermore, P2Y1 and P2Y6-mediated stimulation of migration is inhibited under conditions of extracellular acidosis, whereas basal migration independent of P2Y receptor activation is not. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an acidic microenvironment impacts on P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, thereby influencing microglial responses and responsiveness to extracellular signals. This may result in altered behaviour of microglia under pathological conditions compared with microglial responses in healthy tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Seper

    Full Text Available The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  15. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  16. Proton Testing: Opportunities, Pitfalls and Puzzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Although proton SEE testing can place constraints on some heavy-ion SEE susceptibilities, it is important to quantify residual risk that protons may not reveal all SEE susceptibilities in a system. We examine the relative strengths and limitations of proton and heavy-ion SEE testing and how these may be affected by technology scaling and high-Z materials in the device.

  17. Proton structure functions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  18. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...... the extraction (Figure 1.a and 1.b). Comparing to cells in control group, MR-1 treated at 38 °C for EPS extraction showed different electrochemical characterizations as revealed by differential pulse voltammetry (Figure 1.c). EPS extracted from MR-1 also was proved to be electrochemically active. The present...

  19. Effects of thermal shocks on the release of radioisotopes and on molten metal target vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettry, J. E-mail: jacques.lettry@cern.ch; Arnau, G.; Benedikt, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Catherall, R.; Georg, U.; Cyvogt, G.; Fabich, A.; Jonsson, O.; Ravn, H.; Sgobba, S.; Bauer, G.; Brucherstseifer, H.; Graber, T.; Guedermann, C.; Ni, L.; Rastani, R

    2003-05-01

    The ISOLDE pulsed proton beam peak power amounts to 500 MW during the 2.4 {mu}s proton pulse. The fraction of the proton pulse energy deposited in the target material is at the origin of severe thermal shocks. Quantitative measurement of their effect on the release of radioelements from ISOLDE targets was obtained by comparison of release profiles measured under different proton beam settings. The thermal shock induced in liquids (Pb, Sn, La) lead to mechanical failure of ISOLDE molten metal target vessels. Failure analysis is presented and discussed in the light of the response of mercury samples submitted to the ISOLDE beam and monitored by high-speed optical systems.

  20. Resorbable extracellular matrix grafts in urologic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Santucci

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is an increasingly large body of literature concerning tissue-engineering products that may be used in urology. Some of these are quite complex (such as multilayer patient-specific cell-seeded implants yet the most simple and successful products to date are also the most uncomplicated: resorbable acellular extra-cellular matrices (ECMs harvested from animals. ECMs have been used in a variety of difficult urologic reconstruction problems, and this review is intended to summarize this complex literature for the practicing urologist. METHODS: Medline search of related terms such as "SIS, small intestinal submucosa, ECM, extracellular matrix, acellular matrix and urologic reconstruction". Manuscripts missed in the initial search were taken from the bibliographies of the primary references. RESULTS: Full review of potential clinical uses of resorbable extra-cellular matrices in urologic reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, the "state of the art" in tissue engineering solutions for urologic reconstruction means resorbable acellular xenograft matrices. They show promise when used as a pubovaginal sling or extra bolstering layers in ureteral or urethral repairs, although recent problems with inflammation following 8-ply pubovaginal sling use and failures after 1- and 4-ply SIS repair of Peyronie's disease underscore the need for research before wide adoption. Preliminary data is mixed concerning the potential for ECM urethral patch graft, and more data is needed before extended uses such as bladder augmentation and ureteral replacement are contemplated. The distant future of ECMs in urology likely will include cell-seeded grafts with the eventual hope of producing "off the shelf" replacement materials. Until that day arrives, ECMs only fulfill some of the requirements for the reconstructive urologist.