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Sample records for extracellular proteins including

  1. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  2. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  4. Economical evolution: microbes reduce the synthetic cost of extracellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel R; Chapman, Matthew R

    2010-08-24

    Protein evolution is not simply a race toward improved function. Because organisms compete for limited resources, fitness is also affected by the relative economy of an organism's proteome. Indeed, many abundant proteins contain relatively high percentages of amino acids that are metabolically less taxing for the cell to make, thus reducing cellular cost. However, not all abundant proteins are economical, and many economical proteins are not particularly abundant. Here we examined protein composition and found that the relative synthetic cost of amino acids constrains the composition of microbial extracellular proteins. In Escherichia coli, extracellular proteins contain, on average, fewer energetically expensive amino acids independent of their abundance, length, function, or structure. Economic pressures have strategically shaped the amino acid composition of multicomponent surface appendages, such as flagella, curli, and type I pili, and extracellular enzymes, including type III effector proteins and secreted serine proteases. Furthermore, in silico analysis of Pseudomonas syringae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and over 25 other microbes spanning a wide range of GC content revealed a broad bias toward more economical amino acids in extracellular proteins. The synthesis of any protein, especially those rich in expensive aromatic amino acids, represents a significant investment. Because extracellular proteins are lost to the environment and not recycled like other cellular proteins, they present a greater burden on the cell, as their amino acids cannot be reutilized during translation. We hypothesize that evolution has optimized extracellular proteins to reduce their synthetic burden on the cell.

  5. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  6. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in “cell wall organization and biogenesis”, “response to stimulus” and “protein metabolism”. It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions. PMID:28248232

  7. In vitro Determination of Extracellular Proteins from Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Juliano S.; Santiago, André S.; Toledo, Marcelo A. S.; Horta, Maria A. C.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Anete P.

    2016-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes economic losses in important agricultural crops. Xylem vessel occlusion caused by biofilm formation is the major mechanism underlying the pathogenicity of distinct strains of X. fastidiosa. Here, we provide a detailed in vitro characterization of the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa. Based on the results, we performed a comparison with a strain J1a12, which cannot induce citrus variegated chlorosis symptoms when inoculated into citrus plants. We then extend this approach to analyze the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa in media supplemented with calcium. We verified increases in extracellular proteins concomitant with the days of growth and, consequently, biofilm development (3–30 days). Outer membrane vesicles carrying toxins were identified beginning at 10 days of growth in the 9a5c strain. In addition, a decrease in extracellular proteins in media supplemented with calcium was observed in both strains. Using mass spectrometry, 71 different proteins were identified during 30 days of X. fastidiosa biofilm development, including proteases, quorum-sensing proteins, biofilm formation proteins, hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, chaperones, toxins, antitoxins, and extracellular vesicle membrane components. PMID:28082960

  8. Extracellular heat shock proteins: a new location, a new function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Antonio; Vazquez, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is a basic and well-conserved cellular response to an array of stresses. These proteins are involved in the repair of cellular damage induced by the stress, which is necessary for the salutary resolution from the insult. Moreover, they confer protection from subsequent insults, which has been coined stress tolerance. Because these proteins are expressed in subcellular compartments, it was thought that their function during stress conditions was circumscribed to the intracellular environment. However, it is now well established that HSPs can also be present outside cells where they appear to display a function different than the well-understood chaperone role. Extracellular HSPs act as alert stress signals priming other cells, particularly of the immune system, to avoid the propagation of the insult and favor resolution. Because the majority of HSPs do not possess a secretory peptide signal, they are likely to be exported by a nonclassic secretory pathway. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the export of HSPs, including translocation across the plasma membrane and release associated with lipid vesicles, as well as the passive release after cell death by necrosis. Extracellular HSPs appear in various flavors, including membrane-bound and membrane-free forms. All of these variants of extracellular HSPs suggest that their interactions with cells may be quite diverse, both in target cell types and the activation signaling pathways. This review addresses some of our current knowledge about the release and relevance of extracellular HSPs.

  9. Protein Complexes in Urine Interfere with Extracellular Vesicle Biomarker Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Magda Wachalska; Danijela Koppers-Lalic; Monique van Eijndhoven; Michiel Pegtel; Geldof, Albert A.; Lipinska, Andrea D.; R. Jeroen van Moorselaar; Irene V. Bijnsdorp

    2016-01-01

    Urine exosomes (extracellular vesicles; EVs) contain (micro)RNA (miRNA) and protein biomarkers that are useful for the non-invasive diagnosis of various urological diseases. However, the urinary Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) complex, which forms at reduced temperatures, may affect EV isolation and may also lead to contamination by other molecules including microRNAs (miRNAs). There‐ fore, we compared the levels of three miRNAs within the purified EV fraction and THP- protein-network. Urine was ...

  10. Recent advances in the study of zebrafish extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and pleomorphic structure consisting of numerous proteins that together regulate a variety of cellular and morphogenetic events beginning as early as gastrulation. The zebrafish genome encodes a similar complement of ECM proteins as found in other vertebrate organisms including glycoproteins, fibrous proteins, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and interacting or modifying proteins such as integrins and matrix metalloproteinases. As a genetic model system combined with its amenability to high-resolution microscopic imaging, the zebrafish allows interrogation of ECM protein structure and function in both the embryo and adult. Accumulating data have identified important roles for zebrafish ECM proteins in processes as diverse as cell polarity, migration, tissue mechanics, organ laterality, muscle contraction, and regeneration. In this review, I highlight recently published data on these topics that demonstrate how the ECM proteins fibronectin, laminin, and collagen contribute to zebrafish development and adult homeostasis.

  11. Extracellular Proteins: Novel Key Components of Metal Resistance in Cyanobacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Pereira, Sara B; Bovea-Marco, Miquel; Futschik, Matthias E; Tamagnini, Paula; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities, and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias toward the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  12. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  13. Sulfur activation-related extracellular proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cheng-gui; ZHANG Rui-yong; XIA Jin-lan; ZHANG Qian; NIE Zhen-yuan

    2008-01-01

    The fractions of the extracellular proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on two different energy substrates,elemental sulfur and ferrous sulfate,were selectively prepared with hot water treatment and distinctly shown by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.Some protein spots with apparently higher abundance in sulfur energy substrate than in ferrous sulfate energy substrate were identified by using MALDI-TOF/TOF.Based on peptide mass fingerprints and bioinformatical analysis,the extracellular proteins were classified according to their functions as conjugal transfer protein,pilin,vacJ lipoprotein,polysaccharide deacetylase family protein,Ser/Thr protein phosphatase family protein and hypothetical proteins.Several extracellular proteins were found abundant in thiol groups and with CXXC functional motif,these proteins may be directly involved in the sulfur activation by use of their thiol group (Pr-SH) to bond the elemental sulfur.

  14. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  15. Immunoproteomic analysis of outer membrane proteins and extracellular proteins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae JL03 serotype 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious respiratory infection in pigs, and all the 15 serotypes are able to cause disease. Current vaccines including subunit vaccines could not provide satisfactory protection against A. pleuropneumoniae. In this study, the immunoproteomic approach was applied to the analysis of extracellular and outer membrane proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae JL03 serotype 3 for the identification of novel immunogenic proteins for A. pleuropneumoniae. Results A total of 30 immunogenic proteins were identified from outer membrane and extracellular proteins of JL03 serotype 3, of which 6 were known antigens and 24 were novel immunogenic proteins for A. pleuropneumoniae. Conclusion These data provide information about novel immunogenic proteins for A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 3, and are expected to aid in development of novel vaccines against A. pleuropneumoniae.

  16. Secretion and extracellular space travel of Wnt proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Julia Christina; Boutros, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Wnt signaling pathways control many processes during development, stem cell maintenance and homeostasis, and their aberrant regulation has been linked to diseases in man including diabetes, neurodegeneration and cancer. Wnts are hydrophobic proteins, however, quite paradoxically, they can travel over distances to induce cell-type specific responses. While there has been an initial focus on elucidating the intracellular signaling cascade, discoveries in the past few years have shed light on a highly complex, and regulated secretory process that guides Wnt proteins through the exocytic pathway. Wnt proteins are at least in portion packaged onto extracellular carriers such as exosomes. Similar to dysregulation of components in the Wnt receiving cell, failure to regulate Wnt secretion has been linked to cancer. Here, we review recent discoveries on factors and processes implicated in Wnt secretion.

  17. Extracellular matrix proteins modulate asthmatic airway smooth muscle cell proliferation via an autocrine mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Peter R A; Burgess, Janette K; Underwood, P Anne; Au, Wendy; Poniris, Maree H; Tamm, Michael; Ge, Qi; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway remodeling is a key feature of persistent asthma and includes alterations in the extracellular matrix protein profile around the airway smooth muscle (ASM) and hyperplasia of the ASM. We have previously shown that nonasthmatic ASM cells in culture produce a range of extracellular

  18. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  19. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  20. Extracellular proteins in pea root tip and border cell exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; VanEtten, Hans D; Tsaprailis, George; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-02-01

    Newly generated plant tissue is inherently sensitive to infection. Yet, when pea (Pisum sativum) roots are inoculated with the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca, most newly generated root tips remain uninfected even though most roots develop lesions just behind the tip in the region of elongation. The resistance mechanism is unknown but is correlated spatially with the presence of border cells on the cap periphery. Previously, an array of >100 extracellular proteins was found to be released while border cell separation proceeds. Here we report that protein secretion from pea root caps is induced in correlation with border cell separation. When this root cap secretome was proteolytically degraded during inoculation of pea roots with N. haematococca, the percentage of infected root tips increased from 4% +/- 3% to 100%. In control experiments, protease treatment of conidia or roots had no effect on growth and development of the fungus or the plant. A complex of >100 extracellular proteins was confirmed, by multidimensional protein identification technology, to comprise the root cap secretome. In addition to defense-related and signaling enzymes known to be present in the plant apoplast were ribosomal proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and others typically associated with intracellular localization but recently shown to be extracellular components of microbial biofilms. We conclude that the root cap, long known to release a high molecular weight polysaccharide mucilage and thousands of living cells into the incipient rhizosphere, also secretes a complex mixture of proteins that appear to function in protection of the root tip from infection.

  1. The molecular elasticity of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhauser, Andres F.; Marszalek, Piotr E.; Erickson, Harold P.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    1998-05-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are thought to provide a rigid mechanical anchor that supports and guides migrating and rolling cells. Here we examine the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin by using atomic-force-microscopy techniques. Our results indicate that tenascin is an elastic protein. Single molecules of tenascin could be stretched to several times their resting length. Force-extension curves showed a saw-tooth pattern, with peaks of force at 137pN. These peaks were ~25nm apart. Similar results have been obtained by study of titin. We also found similar results by studying recombinant tenascin fragments encompassing the 15 fibronectin type III domains of tenascin. This indicates that the extensibility of tenascin may be due to the stretch-induced unfolding of its fibronectin type III domains. Refolding of tenascin after stretching, observed when the force was reduced to near zero, showed a double-exponential recovery with time constants of 42 domains refolded per second and 0.5 domains per second. The former speed of refolding is more than twice as fast as any previously reported speed of refolding of a fibronectin type III domain,. We suggest that the extensibility of the modular fibronectin type III region may be important in allowing tenascin-ligand bonds to persist over long extensions. These properties of fibronectin type III modules may be of widespread use in extracellular proteins containing such domain,.

  2. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including

  3. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including

  4. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  5. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  6. [Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzan, Aleksandra; Chwiłkowska, Agnieszka; Kobielarz, Magdalena; Pezowicz, Celina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-10-29

    Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins' expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such as pyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  7. Changes of β3 Integrins and Extracellular Matrix Proteins in the Endometrium of Unexplained Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王化丽; 曲陆荣; 何丽霞; 张颐

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of β3 integrins and extracellular matrix proteins including fibronectin (FN) , laminin (LN) and collagen type Ⅳ (CL type Ⅳ) on the endometrium of secretory phase from 31 fertile women (fertility group)and 34 women with unexplained infertility (infertility group) by a histochemical method. The results were as follows : In glandular epithelium, β3 integrin appeared in the mid secretory phase and continued to late secretory phase in the fertility group, but was not expressed during the secretory phase in the infertility group.Extracellular matrix proteins from the fertility group were expressed more strongly in mid secretory phase than that in the early secretory phase, and were weakest in the late secretory phase. Compared with the fertility group, the levels of extracellular matrix proteins in the infertility group were elevated in the secretory phase. In conclusion: our current study demonstrate that fie integrin and extracellular matrix proteins are expressed at different levels in the endometrium during the menstrual cycle. They are involved in endometrial changes during the menstrual cycle and during the implantation of the blastocyst. Their unusual expression result in the failure of implantation.

  8. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  9. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  10. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorca-Guiliani A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network. Keywords: cancer, extracellular matrix, lysyl oxidase, metastasis

  11. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Ryan S; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-09-15

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis.

  12. Expression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Protein in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Han Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, which can increase reactiveoxygen species (ROS production by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The formationof ROS induces oxidative stress and activates oxidative damage-inducing genes in cells. Noresearch has been published on oxidative damage-related extracellular superoxide dismutase(EC-SOD protein levels in human diabetic skin. We investigated the expression of EC-SOD indiabetic skin compared with normal skin tissue in vivo.Methods The expression of EC-SOD protein was evaluated by western blotting in 6 diabeticskin tissue samples and 6 normal skin samples. Immunohistochemical staining was also carriedout to confirm the EC-SOD expression level in the 6 diabetic skin tissue samples.Results The western blotting showed significantly lower EC-SOD protein expression in thediabetic skin tissue than in the normal tissue. Immunohistochemical examination of EC-SODprotein expression supported the western blotting analysis.Conclusions Diabetic skin tissues express a relatively small amount of EC-SOD protein andmay not be protected against oxidative stress. We believe that EC-SOD is related to the alteredmetabolic state in diabetic skin, which elevates ROS production.

  13. Characterization of canine platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagalli, Alessandra; Pero, Maria Elena; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Cestaro, Anna; Signoriello, Simona; Lombardi, Pietro; Avallone, Luigi

    2011-07-01

    Canine platelets have been extensively studied but little is known about specific aspects such as adhesion. Platelet adhesion is a critical step during haemostasis and thrombosis as well as during inflammatory and immunopathogenic responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesive properties of canine platelets using fibrinogen and collagen as substrates immobilized on plates. Adhesion was monitored for 120 min and the effect of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was assayed. The results showed that canine platelets displayed good adhesion activity that was significantly time-dependent. Moreover, ADP was able to enhance platelet adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. The findings aid knowledge of the adhesion process and suggest a specific role of surface platelet receptors in mediating the interaction with extracellular matrix proteins.

  14. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Capossela

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  15. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-04-04

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  16. Paparan zat besi pada ekspresi protein spesifik extracellular polymeric substance biofilm Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchella Hendrayanti W

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study of biofilms bacteria could be an alternative of preventive treatment in reducing prevalence of aggressive periodontitis in the community, because biofilm protects the bacteria from environmental conditions, including the attack of immune system and antimicrobial. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a major cause of bacterial aggressive periodontitis. Purpose: This study aims to examine the iron exposure to specific protein expression of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm. Methods: Protein containing EPS biofilm was isolated from cultures of A.actinomycetemcomitans. The protein was processed through several procedures: electrophoresis , electroelution , immunization of rabbits , serum isolation , and purification of antibodies. After the Western blotting procedure the antibody was used. Protein containing EPS biofilms exposed to iron, then once again isolated from cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The electrophoresis and Western blotting were done on the isolated protein. Results: The result showed that the the expression of specific proteins in EPS biofilm decreased in response to iron exposure. Conclusions: Iron exposure could influenced the specific protein expression in EPS biofilm of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.Latar belakang: Penelitian terhadap bakteri biofilm dapat menjadi alternatif perawatan preventif dalam menurunkan prevalensi periodontitis agresif di masyarakat, karena biofilm melindungi bakteri terhadap kondisi lingkungan, termasuk serangan sistem imun dan antimikroba. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans merupakan bakteri penyebab utama periodontitis agresif. Tujuan: Studi ini bertujuan meneliti paparan zat besi terhadap ekspresi protein spesifik extracellular polymeric substance (EPS Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Metode: Protein yang mengandung EPS biofilm diisolasi dari kultur A. actinomycetemcomitans. Protein yang diisolasi

  17. Importance of the extracellular loops in G protein-coupled receptors for ligand recognition and receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, M C; van Westen, G J P; Li, Q; IJzerman, A P

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the major drug target of medicines on the market today. Therefore, much research is and has been devoted to the elucidation of the function and three-dimensional structure of this large family of membrane proteins, which includes multiple conserved transmembrane domains connected by intra- and extracellular loops. In the last few years, the less conserved extracellular loops have garnered increasing interest, particularly after the publication of several GPCR crystal structures that clearly show the extracellular loops to be involved in ligand binding. This review will summarize the recent progress made in the clarification of the ligand binding and activation mechanism of class-A GPCRs and the role of extracellular loops in this process.

  18. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorca-Guiliani, Alejandro; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-25

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network.

  19. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorca-Guiliani, Alejandro; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network. PMID:24348049

  20. Extracellular proteome of Trichoderma harzianum to identify proteins with biotechnological value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ambrosino P; Lorito M; Scala V; Marra R; Vinale F; Soriente I; Ferraioli S; Carbone V; Ruocco M; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichoderma harzianum strain T22 parasitizes and controls many phytopatogenic fungi and is applied commercially as biological control agent. The production of hydrolitic enzymes appears to be a key factor in the parasitic process. We tested the endo-esochitinolitic and glucanolitic activities of culture filtrates of T22 grown under carbon and nitrogen starvation or in presence of biomass or cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea , Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum. The highest level of enzimatic activities was found in culture where the mycoparasite interacted with a phytopathogenic fungus. Therefore we used a proteomic approach to investigate changes in the complex mixture of extracellular proteins secreted by T. harzianum strain T22 in order to identify proteins of potential biotechnology value for commercial and industrial use. Proteome technology has greatly enhanced our ability to conduct functional genomics studies. Nevertheless only a few studies have been published so far on the fungal extracellular proteome. Sample preparation remains the most critical step in analyses based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and it requires to be optimized for each specific application. In this study, our first aim was to set up the extraction protocol of the extracellular proteins secreted by T . harzianum strain T22 when it was grown in vitro . The secreted proteins were analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and substantial changes in the extracellular proteome of the mycoparasite have been observed. Comparing the 2D maps of the fungus grown in minimal medium with glycerol as carbon source (used as control condition) with those obtained in inducing conditions, a lot of novel proteins appeared. The higher number of novel and upregulated spots was obtained in the presence of Rhizoctonia solani biomass. Other spots were specifically up-regulated by the interaction with different plant pathogens. Differentially expressed

  1. Phytophthora infestans has a plethora of phospholipase D enzymes including a subclass that has extracellular activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J G Meijer

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol.

  2. Role of the extracellular matrix-located Mac-2 binding protein as an interactor of the Wnt proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkarainen, Timo; Nurmi, Tuomas; Sasaki, Takako; Bergmann, Ulrich; Vainio, Seppo

    2017-09-30

    The Wnt proteins constitute a conserved family of secreted palmitoleate-containing signaling proteins that play important roles in development and tissue homeostasis. Their hydrophobic nature has raised the question of how the proteins are transported outside the cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that several different mechanisms, including transport by lipoprotein particles and exosomes, may contribute to this process. Here, we expressed epitope-tagged Wnt4 in HEK293 cells, and identified Mac-2 binding protein (Mac-2BP) as its binding partner in the serum-free conditioned medium. Serine-to-alanine substitution at the conserved fatty acid-conjugation site did not affect Mac-2BP binding. Subsequent studies showed that Mac-2BP may be a general Wnt interactor. It is found in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of various tissues, where it forms unusual oligomeric ring-like structures. Its functions appear to include interactions with cells and certain ECM components. Intriguingly, both Wnt signaling and Mac-2BP expression are upregulated in many types of cancer. Our studies on the four-domain Mac-2BP indicate a crucial role in Wnt binding for the C-terminal domain that bears no sequence similarity to any other protein. Mac-2BP may have a role in regulating the extracellular spreading and storage of the Wnts, thereby modulating their bioavailability and stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular IL-33 cytokine, but not endogenous nuclear IL-33, regulates protein expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Violette; Cayrol, Corinne; Farache, Dorian; Roga, Stéphane; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-03

    IL-33 is a nuclear cytokine from the IL-1 family that plays important roles in health and disease. Extracellular IL-33 activates a growing number of target cells, including group 2 innate lymphoid cells, mast cells and regulatory T cells, but it remains unclear whether intracellular nuclear IL-33 has additional functions in the nucleus. Here, we used a global proteomic approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry to compare the extracellular and intracellular roles of IL-33 in primary human endothelial cells, a major source of IL-33 protein in human tissues. We found that exogenous extracellular IL-33 cytokine induced expression of a distinct set of proteins associated with inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous nuclear IL-33 expression using two independent RNA silencing strategies had no reproducible effect on the endothelial cell proteome. These results suggest that IL-33 acts as a cytokine but not as a nuclear factor regulating gene expression in endothelial cells.

  4. Abnormal recruitment of extracellular matrix proteins by excess Notch3 ECD: a new pathomechanism in CADASIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Haddad, Iman; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Fouillot-Panchal, Maï; Riani, Meriem; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Dussaule, Claire; Cognat, Emmanuel; Vinh, Joelle; Joutel, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, one of the most common inherited small vessel diseases of the brain, is characterized by a progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix accumulation. The disease is caused by highly stereotyped mutations within the extracellular domain of the NOTCH3 receptor (Notch3(ECD)) that result in an odd number of cysteine residues. While CADASIL-associated NOTCH3 mutations differentially affect NOTCH3 receptor function and activity, they all are associated with early accumulation of Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates in small vessels. We still lack mechanistic explanation to link NOTCH3 mutations with small vessel pathology. Herein, we hypothesized that excess Notch3(ECD) could recruit and sequester functionally important proteins within small vessels of the brain. We performed biochemical, nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemical analyses, using cerebral and arterial tissue derived from patients with CADASIL and mouse models of CADASIL that exhibit vascular lesions in the end- and early-stage of the disease, respectively. Biochemical fractionation of brain and artery samples demonstrated that mutant Notch3(ECD) accumulates in disulphide cross-linked detergent-insoluble aggregates in mice and patients with CADASIL. Further proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses identified two functionally important extracellular matrix proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) and vitronectin (VTN) that are sequestered into Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates. Using cultured cells, we show that increased levels or aggregation of Notch3 enhances the formation of Notch3(ECD)-TIMP3 complex, promoting TIMP3 recruitment and accumulation. In turn, TIMP3 promotes complex formation including NOTCH3 and VTN. In vivo, brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL exhibit elevated levels of both insoluble cross

  5. Extracellular matrix proteins: A positive feedback loop in lung fibrosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.E.; Boeijen, F.R.; Emson, C.L.; Turner, S.M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Smit, T.H.; Stoop, R.; Everts, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix. This not only affects tissue architecture and function, but it also influences fibroblast behavior and thus disease progression. Here we describe the expression of elastin, type V collagen and tenascin C during the

  6. The modulation of platelet adhesion and activation by chitosan through plasma and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Cheng, Bill; McCarthy, Simon J; Jung, MoonSun; Whitelock, John M

    2011-10-01

    Chitosan has been shown to promote initial wound closure events to prevent blood loss. Platelet adhesion and activation are crucial early events in these processes after traumatic bleeding leading to thrombus formation. Platelet adhesion to chitosan was found to be enhanced in the presence of adsorbed plasma and extracellular matrix proteins and was found to be primarily mediated by α(IIb)β(3) integrins, while α(2)β(1) integrins were found to be involved in platelet adhesion to collagen and perlecan. Platelets were found to be activated by chitosan, as shown by an increase in the expression of α(IIb)β(3) integrins and P-selectin, while the extent of activation was modulated by the presence of proteins including perlecan and fibrinogen. Collagen-coated chitosan was found to activate platelets to the same extent as either chitosan or collagen alone. These data support the role of plasma and extracellular matrix proteins in promoting chitosan mediated platelet adhesion and activation supporting the hypothesis that chitosan promotes wound healing via these interactions.

  7. A Novel Mechanism for Protein Delivery by the Type 3 Secretion System for Extracellularly Secreted Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Dominguez, Farid; Huerta-Cantillo, Jazmin; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2017-03-28

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) is essential for bacterial virulence through delivering effector proteins directly into the host cytosol. Here, we identified an alternative delivery mechanism of virulence factors mediated by the T3SS, which consists of the association of extracellularly secreted proteins from bacteria with the T3SS to gain access to the host cytosol. Both EspC, a protein secreted as an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) autotransporter, and YopH, a protein detected on the surface of Yersinia, require a functional T3SS for host cell internalization; here we provide biophysical and molecular evidence to support the concept of the EspC translocation mechanism, which requires (i) an interaction between EspA and an EspC middle segment, (ii) an EspC translocation motif (21 residues that are shared with the YopH translocation motif), (iii) increases in the association and dissociation rates of EspC mediated by EspA interacting with EspD, and (iv) an interaction of EspC with the EspD/EspB translocon pore. Interestingly, this novel mechanism does not exclude the injection model (i.e., EspF) operating through the T3SS conduit; therefore, T3SS can be functioning as an internal conduit or as an external railway, which can be used to reach the translocator pore, and this mechanism appears to be conserved among different T3SS-dependent pathogens.IMPORTANCE The type 3 secretion system is essential for injection of virulence factors, which are delivered directly into the cytosol of the host cells for usurping and subverting host processes. Recent studies have shown that these effectors proteins indeed travel inside an "injectisome" conduit through a single step of translocation by connecting the bacterium and host cell cytoplasms. However, all findings are not compatible with this model. For example, both YopH, a protein detected on the surface of Yersinia, and EspC, an autotransporter protein secreted by enteropathogenic E. coli, require a functional T3

  8. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorca-Guiliani A; Erler JT

    2013-01-01

    Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Exte...

  9. Stroma and extracellular matrix proteins in canine tumours

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, studies on temporal and spatial changes in stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in canine gastrointestinal (GIT) tumours and canine transmissible venereal (CTVT) tumours are described. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, and ECM changes were investigated. We found that the myofibroblast is the most common stromal cell in canine GIT epithelial tumours and most likely originated from pre-existing fibroblast...

  10. Enrichment of Extracellular Matrix Proteins from Tissues and Digestion into Peptides for Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naba, Alexandra; Clauser, Karl R; Hynes, Richard O

    2015-07-23

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex meshwork of cross-linked proteins that provides biophysical and biochemical cues that are major regulators of cell proliferation, survival, migration, etc. The ECM plays important roles in development and in diverse pathologies including cardio-vascular and musculo-skeletal diseases, fibrosis, and cancer. Thus, characterizing the composition of ECMs of normal and diseased tissues could lead to the identification of novel prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and potential novel therapeutic targets. However, the very nature of ECM proteins (large in size, cross-linked and covalently bound, heavily glycosylated) has rendered biochemical analyses of ECMs challenging. To overcome this challenge, we developed a method to enrich ECMs from fresh or frozen tissues and tumors that takes advantage of the insolubility of ECM proteins. We describe here in detail the decellularization procedure that consists of sequential incubations in buffers of different pH and salt and detergent concentrations and that results in 1) the extraction of intracellular (cytosolic, nuclear, membrane and cytoskeletal) proteins and 2) the enrichment of ECM proteins. We then describe how to deglycosylate and digest ECM-enriched protein preparations into peptides for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry.

  11. Long polar fimbriae of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 bind to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Cantero, Lidia; Vidal, Roberto; Botkin, Douglas J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2011-09-01

    Adherence to intestinal cells is a key process in infection caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several adhesion factors that mediate the binding of EHEC to intestinal cells have been described, but the receptors involved in their recognition are not fully characterized. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins might act as receptors involved in the recognition of enteric pathogens, including EHEC. In this study, we sought to characterize the binding of EHEC O157:H7 to ECM proteins commonly present in the intestine. We found that EHEC prototype strains as well as other clinical isolates adhered more abundantly to surfaces coated with fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV. Further characterization of this phenotype, by using antiserum raised against the LpfA1 putative major fimbrial subunit and by addition of mannose, showed that a reduced binding of EHEC to ECM proteins was observed in a long polar fimbria (lpf) mutant. We also found that the two regulators, H-NS and Ler, had an effect in EHEC Lpf-mediated binding to ECM, supporting the roles of these tightly regulated fimbriae as adherence factors. Purified Lpf major subunit bound to all of the ECM proteins tested. Finally, increased bacterial adherence was observed when T84 cells, preincubated with ECM proteins, were infected with EHEC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interaction of Lpf and ECM proteins contributes to the EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Induction of Extracellular Matrix-Remodeling Genes by the Senescence-Associated Protein APA-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Jennifer A.; Williams, Dawnnica K.; Robinson, Kristin L.; Ozer, Harvey L.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2002-01-01

    Human fibroblasts undergo cellular senescence after a finite number of divisions, in response to the erosion of telomeres. In addition to being terminally arrested in the cell cycle, senescent fibroblasts express genes that are normally induced upon wounding, including genes that remodel the extracellular matrix. We have identified the novel zinc finger protein APA-1, whose expression increased in senescent human fibroblasts independent of telomere shortening. Extended passage, telomerase-immortalized fibroblasts had increased levels of APA-1 as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16. In fibroblasts, APA-1 was modified by the ubiquitin-like protein SUMO-1, which increased APA-1 half-life, possibly by blocking ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Overexpression of APA-1 did not cause cell cycle arrest; but, it induced transcription of the extracellular matrix-remodeling genes MMP1 and PAI2, which are associated with fibroblast senescence. MMP1 and PAI2 transcript levels also increased in telomerase-immortalized fibroblasts that had high levels of APA-1, demonstrating that the matrix-remodeling phenotype of senescent fibroblasts was not induced by telomere attrition alone. APA-1 was able to transactivate and bind to the MMP1 promoter, suggesting that APA-1 is a transcription factor that regulates expression of matrix-remodeling genes during fibroblast senescence. PMID:12370286

  13. Utilization for protein synthesis in individual rat organs of extracellular 2-ketoisocaproate relative to utilization of extracellular leucine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, T.; Yagi, M.; Walser, M.

    1989-07-01

    Rats were given constant intravenous infusions of (/sup 3/H)-leucine plus (1-/sup 14/C)-2-ketoisocaproate (KIC). Specific activities of plasma leucine and plasma KIC reached plateaus by two to three hours. /sup 3/H specific activity of KIC was 85% +/- 2% of that in leucine. /sup 14/C specific activity of leucine was 36% +/- 2% of that in KIC. The /sup 14/C//sup 3/H ratios in leucine and KIC were constant from the earliest sampling time (one hour) at 0.65 +/- 0.03 and 2.20 +/- 0.07, respectively. In various tissues, /sup 14/C//sup 3/H in free leucine and in tissue protein were approximately equal, but in most organs these ratios were significantly greater than the ratio /sup 14/C//sup 3/H in plasma leucine. From these data we estimate that the fraction of leucine incorporated into protein in individual organs derived from extracellular KIC rather than extracellular leucine varies from zero (in liver and bone marrow) to 35% to 45% (in brain and heart), and comprises 12% in the body as a whole.

  14. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  15. Clotting protein - An extracellular matrix (ECM) protein involved in crustacean hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2017-09-21

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells in crustaceans are organized in lobule-like structures surrounded by different types of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in a Hematopoietic tissue (HPT). Here we show that the clotting protein (CP) is part of the ECM in HPT and is secreted during HPT cell culture. The formation of a filamentous network of CP was observed in HPT cell culture. A high amount of CP protein was detected at the surfaces of undifferentiated cells (round-shaped) compared with migrating cells (spindle shaped). Co-localization of the CP protein and TGase activity was observed on the cell surface and filamentous network between cells. A role for CP together with collagen was revealed in a 3D culture in which a collagen-I matrix was immobilized with CP or supplemented with CP. The results showed possible functions of CP, collagen, TGase and cytokine Ast1 in the regulation of HPT progenitor cell behavior. This is the first study to provide insight into the role of CP, which probably not only participates in clot formation but also functions as an ECM component protein controlling hematopoietic stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Mediate HIV-1 gp120 Interactions with α4β7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, David; Guo, Wenjin; Cleveland, Brad; von Haller, Priska; Eng, Jimmy K; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Arthos, James; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2017-08-16

    Gut-homing α4β7(high) CD4(+) T lymphocytes have been shown to be preferentially targeted by Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV), and are implicated in HIV pathogenesis. Previous studies demonstrated that HIV envelope protein gp120 binds and signals through α4β7, and that this likely contributes to the infection of α4β7(high) T cells and promotes cell-to-cell virus transmission. Structures within the second variable loop (V2) of gp120, including the tripeptide motif LDV/I, are thought to mediate gp120-α4β7 binding. However, lack of α4β7 binding has been reported in gp120 proteins containing LDV/I, and the precise determinants of gp120-α4β7 binding are not fully defined. In this work, we report the novel finding that fibronectins mediate indirect gp120-α4β7 interactions. We show that Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells used to express recombinant gp120 produced fibronectins and other extracellular matrix proteins that co-purified with gp120. CHO fibronectins were able to mediate the binding of a diverse panel of gp120 proteins to α4β7 in an in vitro cell binding assay. The V2 loop was not required for fibronectin-mediated binding of gp120 to α4β7, nor did V2-specific antibodies block this interaction. Removal of fibronectin through anion exchange chromatography abrogated V2-independent gp120-α4β7 binding. Additionally, we showed a recombinant human fibronectin fragment mediated gp120-α4β7 interactions in a similar manner to CHO fibronectin. These findings provide an explanation for the apparent contradictory observations regarding the gp120-α4β7 interaction and offer new insights into the potential role of fibronectin and other extracellular matrix proteins in HIV-1 biology.IMPORTANCE Immune tissues within the gut are severely damaged by HIV, and this plays an important role in the development of AIDS. Integrin α4β7 plays a major role in the trafficking of lymphocytes, including CD4(+) T cells, into gut lymphoid tissues. Previous reports

  17. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Karen; Saldivia, Natalia; Förstera, Benjamín; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are pivotal for central nervous system (CNS) development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axon guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during CNS development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn toward the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons. PMID:27733818

  18. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Stanic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules are pivotal for central nervous system development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axonal guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during central nervous system development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn towards the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons.

  19. [Characterization of the extracellular proteasomes and its interacting proteins by iTRAQ mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭkova, Iu Ia; Kulichkova, V A; Ermolaeva, Iu B; Bottrill, A; Barlev, N A; Tsimokha, A S

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the extracellular proteasomes by isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantifications (iTRAQ) mass spectrometry has been carried out. Here we show a standard set of 26S proteasomal subunits in the composition of the extracellular proteasomes. Moreover, extracellular proteasomes have a number of PA200 activators, which, as previously thought, are localized in the cell nucleus. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of subunits of the extracellular proteasomes were revealed by iTRAQ mass spectrometry. For the first time we have identified several ubiquitination and acetylation sites on subunits alpha2 (K196), alpha4 (K189 and K234), alpha6 (K217), and Rpn6 (A2). We have revealed a large number of proteasome-interacting proteins that are involved in various cell processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, translation, cytoskeletal proteins and the proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Immunoblot analysis has confirmed the interactions between purified extracellular proteasomes and nine proteins which were randomly selected from the set of interacting proteins.

  20. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common genetic neuropathy with an incidence of 1 in 2600. Several forms of CMT have been identified arising from different genomic abnormalities such as CMT1 including CMT1A, CMT1B, and CMTX. CMT1 with associated peripheral nervous system (PNS) demyelination, the most frequent diagnosis, demonstrates slowed nerve conduction velocities and segmental demyelination upon nerve biopsy. One of its subtypes, CMT1A, presents a 1.5-Mb duplication in the p11-p12 region of the human chromosome 17 which encodes peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). CMT1B, a less common form, arises from the mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene on chromosome 1, region q22-q23, which encodes the major structural component of the peripheral myelin. A rare type of CMT1 has been found recently and is caused by point mutations in early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), encoding a zinc finger transcription factor in Schwann cells. In addition, CMTX, an X-linked form of CMT, arises from a mutation in the connexin-32 gene. Myelin protein zero, associated with CMT1B, is a transmembrane protein of 219 amino acid residues. Human MPZ consists of three domains: 125 residues constitute the glycosylated immunoglobulin-like extracellular domain; 27 residues span the membrane; and 67 residues comprise the highly basic intracellular domain. MPZ makes up approximately 50% of the protein content of myelin, and is expressed predominantly in Schwann cells, the myelinating cell of the PNS. Myelin protein zero, a homophilic adhesion molecule, is a member of the immunoglobulin super-family and is essential for normal myelin structure and function. In addition, MPZ knockout mice displayed abnormal myelin that severely affects the myelination pathway, and overexpression of MPZ causes congenital hypomyelination of peripheral nerves. Myelin protein zero mutations account for {approx}5% of patients with CMT. To date, over 125

  1. Importance of extracellular proteins in maintaining structural integrity of aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanghui; Liu, Yu

    2013-12-01

    Aerobic granules developed through self-immobilization of microorganisms are compact and structured microbial consortia embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This study investigated the contribution of extracellular proteins (PN) to maintaining the structural integrity of aerobic granule. It was found that hydrolysis of PN induced by Proteinase K led to significant disintegration of aerobic granules, whereas a substantial reduction of extracellular polysaccharides (PS) was also observed. It was proposed that hydrolysis of extracellular proteins present in the EPS matrix of aerobic granules led to collapse of the EPS matrix, and subsequent disintegration of aerobic granule. These suggested that extracellular proteins would be essential for maintaining structural stability of EPS matrix of aerobic granules. In addition, it was revealed that production of signaling molecules, such as autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) was also inhibited probably due to hydrolysis of quorum sensing receptor proteins by Proteinase K. This in turn provided an additional explanation for the observed Proteinase K-triggered dispersal of aerobic granules.

  2. Gap junctional protein Cx43 is involved in the communication between extracellular vesicles and mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares, Ana Rosa; Martins-Marques, Tania; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Teresa; Ferreira, Joao Vasco; Catarino, Steve; Pinho, Maria Joao; Zuzarte, Monica; Anjo, Sandra Isabel; Manadas, Bruno; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Pereira, Paulo; Girao, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular communication is vital to ensure tissue and organism homeostasis and can occur directly, between neighbour cells via gap junctions (GJ), or indirectly, at longer distances, through extracellular vesicles, including exosomes. Exosomes, as intercellular carriers of messenger molecules, m

  3. The planar cell polarity protein VANGL2 coordinates remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B Blairanne; Mundell, Nathan; Dunlap, Julie; Jessen, Jason

    2012-07-01

    Understanding how planar cell polarity (PCP) is established, maintained, and coordinated in migrating cell populations is an important area of research with implications for both embryonic morphogenesis and tumor cell invasion. We recently reported that the PCP protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) regulates the endocytosis and cell surface level of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14 or MT1-MMP). Here, we further discuss these findings in terms of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, cell migration, and zebrafish gastrulation. We also demonstrate that VANGL2 function impacts the focal degradation of ECM by human cancer cells including the formation or stability of invadopodia. Together, our findings implicate MMP14 as a downstream effector of VANGL2 signaling and suggest a model whereby the regulation of pericellular proteolysis is a fundamental aspect of PCP in migrating cells.

  4. Identification of an extracellular antifungal protein from the endophytic fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prabuddha; Kamdar, Maulik R; Mandal, Santi M; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2013-02-01

    An extracellular antifungal protein of 28 kDa (exAFP-C28) was identified from an endophytic fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM-06. After purification, the MIC value of exAFP-C28 against Candida albicans, a well-known human pathogenic fungus was found to be 32 μg/mL that unaffected the human red blood cells. The antifungal activity associated with exAFP-C28 was manifested by the increased membrane permeability of C. albicans cells followed by disruption. Proteomics and bioinformatics analyses revealed that several peptide fragments of exAFP-C28 have identity with the bacterial 50S ribosomal protein L10, and a stretch of 55 amino acids of two peptide fragments corresponding to the Nterminus of L10 protein is capable of forming amphipathic helix required for membrane penetration. Taken together, our results suggest that the exAFP-C28 protein from Colletotrichum sp. DM-06 is a promising therapeutic agent in controlling candidiasis disease in animals including humans.

  5. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Khang, Gilson; Soker, Shay

    2013-02-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation.

  6. A conformationally constrained peptidomimetic binds to the extracellular region of HER2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banappagari, Sashikanth; Ronald, Sharon; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D

    2010-12-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor kinases (other members include EGFR or HER1, HER3, and HER4) that are involved in signaling cascades for cell growth and differentiation. It is well established that HER2-mediated heterodimerization has important implications in cancer. Deregulation of signaling pathways and overexpression of HER2 is known to occur in cancer cells, indicating a role of HER2 in tumorigenesis. Therefore, blocking HER2-mediated signaling has potential therapeutic value. We have designed several peptidomimetics to inhibit HER2-mediated signaling for cell growth. One of the compounds (HERP5, Arg-beta Naph-Phe) exhibited antiproliferative activity with IC(50) values in the micromolar-to-nanomolar range in breast cancer cell lines. Binding of fluorescently labeled HERP5 to HER2 protein was evaluated by fluorescence assay, microscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results indicated that HERP5 binds to the extracellular region of the HER2 protein. Structure of the peptidomimetic HERP5 was studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. Based on these results a model was proposed for HER2-EGFR dimerization and possible blocking by HERP5 peptidomimetic using a protein-protein docking method.

  7. Extracellular monomeric tau protein is sufficient to initiate the spread of tau protein pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Claire H; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2014-01-10

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau.

  8. Human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete the extracellular matrix protein, thrombospondin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Clark, R A

    1987-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) a glycoprotein originally identified as the endogenous lectin of platelets, is also synthesized by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, pneumocytes, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Thrombospondin is subdivided into functional domains which bind specifically to heparin, fibronectin, collagen, and to specific cellular receptors. It is found within the basement membranes of kidney, lung, smooth muscle, and skin. Thus TSP may serve as an important link between cells and matrices. Thrombospondin also has been reported at the epidermal-dermal junction. We wished to determine whether human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete TSP. Pure human keratinocytes were grown in defined medium without fibroblast feeder layers. Immunofluorescent staining with either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies to human platelet TSP yielded specific granular staining within the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. Culture media and cellular lysates were harvested from cultures metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Trichloroacetic acid precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and autoradiography revealed a major labeled band comigrating with purified platelet TSP in both the media and the cellular lysates. Immunoprecipitation with either the polyclonal or the monoclonal anti-TSP antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography identified this band as TSP. Thus keratinocytes in culture synthesize and secrete TSP. Thrombospondin may play an important role in epidermal interactions with extracellular matrix.

  9. Detection of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation products in the extracellular matrix of human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Linton, Stuart M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    for 83-96% of the total oxidized protein side-chain products detected in these plaques. Oxidation of matrix components extracted from healthy artery tissue, and model proteins, with reagent HOCl is shown to give rise to a similar pattern of products to those detected in advanced human lesions......Oxidation is believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. Oxidized lipids, sterols and proteins have been detected in early, intermediate and advanced human lesions at elevated levels. The spectrum of oxidized side-chain products detected on proteins from homogenates of advanced human lesions has...... by activated monocytes (and possibly macrophages) and is a highly basic protein, it would be expected to associate with polyanions such as the glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix, and might result in damage being localized at such sites. In this study proteins extracted from extracellular matrix...

  10. M1 Protein Allows Group A Streptococcal Survival in Phagocyte Extracellular Traps through Cathelicidin Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Lauth, Xavier; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; McNamara, Case W; Myskowski, Sandra; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Beall, Bernard; Ghosh, Partho; Richard L Gallo; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    M1 protein contributes to Group A Streptococcus (GAS) systemic virulence by interfering with phagocytosis and through proinflammatory activities when released from the cell surface. Here we identify a novel role of M1 protein in the stimulation of neutrophil and mast cell extracellular trap formation, yet also subsequent survival of the pathogen within these DNA-based innate defense structures. Targeted mutagenesis and heterologous expression studies demonstrate M1 protein promotes resistance...

  11. Extracellular matrix proteins and the dynamics of dentin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, William T; Brunn, Jan C; Qin, Chunlin; McKee, Marc D

    2002-01-01

    Dentinogenesis involves controlled reactions that result in conversion of unmineralized predentin to dentin when apatite crystals are formed. This process is dynamic: Maturation events occur within predentin beginning at the proximal layer and progressing to the predentin-dentin (PD) border. One type of controlled reaction is the proteolytic processing of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) to dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), by cleavage of at least three highly conserved peptide bonds. We postulate that this processing event represents an activation step, resulting in release of DPP, which is active in its effects on formation and growth of apatite crystals. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DPM1), present as a processed fragment (57-kD protein) in bone, is seen in dentin on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as one intact protein of 150-200 kD. Anti-57-kD antibodies elicit immunoreactivity in bone, dentin, and cellular cementum. In bone, the reactivity is associated with osteocytes and their cell processes. Similarly, dentin shows reactivity in odontoblasts, predentin, and the odontoblast processes. In summary, the processing of large sialic acid-rich proteins into smaller fragments may be an important part of the controlled conversion of predentin to dentin and osteoid to bone.

  12. Conformal nanopatterning of extracellular matrix proteins onto topographically complex surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Jallerat, Quentin; Szymanski, John M; Feinberg, Adam W

    2015-02-01

    Our Patterning on Topography (PoT) printing technique enables fibronectin, laminin and other proteins to be applied to biomaterial surfaces in complex geometries that are inaccessible using traditional soft lithography techniques. Engineering combinatorial surfaces that integrate topographical and biochemical micropatterns enhances control of the biotic-abiotic interface. Here, we used this method to understand cardiomyocyte response to competing physical and chemical cues in the microenvironment.

  13. Salicylic acid enhances Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adhesin protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Lucía P; Barbagelata, María S; Cheung, Ambrose L; Sordelli, Daniel O; Buzzola, Fernanda R

    2011-11-01

    One of the virulence factors required by Staphylococcus aureus at the early stages of infection is Eap, a secreted adhesin that binds many host proteins and is upregulated by the two-component regulatory system saeRS. The S. aureus Newman strain harbors a mutation in saeS that is thought to be responsible for the high level of Eap expression in this strain. This study was designed to ascertain whether salicylic acid (SAL) affects the expression of Eap and the internalization of S. aureus into epithelial cells. The strain Newman treated with SAL exhibited increased levels of eap transcription and protein expression. Furthermore, SAL treatment increased the eap promoter activity. SAL treatment enhanced Eap expression in the Newman and in other S. aureus strains that do not carry the mutation in saeS. Internalization of S. aureus eap and sae mutants into the MAC-T epithelial cells was significantly decreased compared with the wild-type counterparts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a low concentration of SAL increased S. aureus Eap expression possibly due to enhancement of sae. SAL may create the conditions for S. aureus persistence in the host, not only by decreasing the capsular polysaccharide expression as shown before, but also by enhancing Eap expression.

  14. BIBF1120 inhibits fibroblasts proliferation and production of the extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette; Munk, Lizzie; Jaffar, Jade; Black, Judith; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) transforming growth factorbeta 1 (TGFβ1) induces excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition leading to fibrosis. Our recent studies have shown that the glycoprotein fibulin-1 is increased in serum and lung tissue from pa

  15. Natural antigenic differences in the functionally equivalent extracellular DNABII proteins of bacterial biofilms provide a means for targeted biofilm therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, C J; Davey, M E; Bakaletz, L O; Goodman, S D

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria that persist in the oral cavity exist within complex biofilm communities. A hallmark of biofilms is the presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which consists of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins, including the DNABII family of proteins. The removal of DNABII proteins from a biofilm results in the loss of structural integrity of the eDNA and the collapse of the biofilm structure. We examined the role of DNABII proteins in the biofilm structure of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Co-aggregation with oral streptococci is thought to facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis within the biofilm community. We demonstrate that DNABII proteins are present in the EPS of both S. gordonii and P. gingivalis biofilms, and that these biofilms can be disrupted through the addition of antisera derived against their respective DNABII proteins. We provide evidence that both eDNA and DNABII proteins are limiting in S. gordonii but not in P. gingivalis biofilms. In addition, these proteins are capable of complementing one another functionally. We also found that whereas antisera derived against most DNABII proteins are capable of binding a wide variety of DNABII proteins, the P. gingivalis DNABII proteins are antigenically distinct. The presence of DNABII proteins in the EPS of these biofilms and the antigenic uniqueness of the P. gingivalis proteins provide an opportunity to develop therapies that are targeted to remove P. gingivalis and biofilms that contain P. gingivalis from the oral cavity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells.

  17. Protective immunity against tuberculosis induced by vaccination with major extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the world's leading cause of death in humans from a single infectious agent. A safe and effective vaccine against this scourge is urgently needed. This study demonstrates that immunization with the 30-kDa major secretory protein, alone or in combination with other abundant extracellular proteins of M. tuberculosis, induces strong cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity against aerosol ...

  18. The extracellular EXO protein mediates cell expansion in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Florian; Lisso, Janina; Lange, Peggy; Müssig, Carsten

    2009-02-13

    The EXO (EXORDIUM) gene was identified as a potential mediator of brassinosteroid (BR)-promoted growth. It is part of a gene family with eight members in Arabidopsis. EXO gene expression is under control of BR, and EXO overexpression promotes shoot and root growth. In this study, the consequences of loss of EXO function are described. The exo loss of function mutant showed diminished leaf and root growth and reduced biomass production. Light and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that impaired leaf growth is due to reduced cell expansion. Epidermis, palisade, and spongy parenchyma cells were smaller in comparison to the wild-type. The exo mutant showed reduced brassinolide-induced cotyledon and hypocotyl growth. In contrast, exo roots were significantly more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of synthetic brassinolide. Apart from reduced growth, exo did not show severe morphological abnormalities. Gene expression analyses of leaf material identified genes that showed robust EXO-dependent expression. Growth-related genes such as WAK1, EXP5, and KCS1, and genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism showed weaker expression in exo than in wild-type plants. However, the vast majority of BR-regulated genes were normally expressed in exo. HA- and GFP-tagged EXO proteins were targeted to the apoplast. The EXO gene is essential for cell expansion in leaves. Gene expression patterns and growth assays suggest that EXO mediates BR-induced leaf growth. However, EXO does not control BR-levels or BR-sensitivity in the shoot. EXO presumably is involved in a signalling process which coordinates BR-responses with environmental or developmental signals. The hypersensitivity of exo roots to BR suggests that EXO plays a diverse role in the control of BR responses in the root.

  19. PECM: prediction of extracellular matrix proteins using the concept of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Pingping; Zhao, Xiaowei; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2014-12-21

    The extracellular matrix proteins (ECMs) are widely found in the tissues of multicellular organisms. They consist of various secreted proteins, mainly polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The ECMs involve the exchange of materials and information between resident cells and the external environment. Accurate identification of ECMs is a significant step in understanding the evolution of cancer as well as promises wide range of potential applications in therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. In this paper, an accurate computational method named PECM is proposed for identifying ECMs. Here, we explore various sequence-derived discriminative features including evolutionary information, predicted secondary structure, and physicochemical properties. Rather than simply combining the features which may bring information redundancy and unwanted noises, we use Fisher-Markov selector and incremental feature selection approach to search the optimal feature subsets. Then, we train our model by the technique of support vector machine (SVM). PECM achieves good prediction performance with the ACC scores about 86% and 90% on testing and independent datasets, which are competitive with the state-of-the-art ECMs prediction tools. A web-server named PECM which implements the proposed approach is freely available at http://59.73.198.144:8088/PECM/.

  20. Adhesive properties, extracellular protein production, and metabolism in the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain when grown in the presence of mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Borja; Saad, Naima; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, Maria C

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, and how it reacts to the presence of mucin in its extracellular milieu. Parameters studied included cell clustering, adhesion to mucin, extracellular protein production, and formation of final metabolites. L. rhamnosus GG was found to grow efficiently in the presence of glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, or mucin (partially purified or purified) as sole carbon sources. However, it was unable to grow using other mucin constituents, such as fucose or glucuronic acid. Mucin induced noticeable changes in all the parameters studied when compared with growth using glucose, including in the formation of cell clusters, which were easily disorganized with trypsin. Mucin increased adhesion of the bacterium, and modulated the production of extracellular proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that mucin was not degraded during L. rhamnosus GG growth, suggesting that this bacterium is able to partially use the glucidic moiety of glycoprotein. This study goes some way towards developing an understanding of the metabolic and physiological changes that L. rhamnosus GG undergoes within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Expression of Nonfusion Extracellular Porcine Zona Pellucida Protein 3β in E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To obtain the recombinant nonfusion extracellular porcine zona pellucida protein 3β (pZP3β ) in E. coliMethods By modificated the transition initiation region (TIR) in primers, synthetic nucleotide was gained by PCR. Such gene was cloned into pET-3c vector and trans-formed into E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS.Results The recombinant nonfusion extracellular pZP3β was expressed in E. coli to 10% of total cellular proteins, and identified by the Western blot method.Conclusion Modification of nucleotide without changing amino acid sequences is an effective means to increase non fusion expression rate of recombinant proteins, such as pZP3β in E. coli.

  2. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Modulate Antimigratory and Apoptotic Effects of Doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Said

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticancer drug resistance is a multifactorial process that includes acquired and de novo drug resistances. Acquired resistance develops during treatment, while de novo resistance is the primary way for tumor cells to escape chemotherapy. Tumor microenvironment has been recently shown to be one of the important factors contributing to de novo resistance and called environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR. Two forms of EMDR have been described: soluble factor-mediated drug resistance (SFM-DR and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR. Anthracyclines, among the most potent chemotherapeutic agents, are widely used in clinics against hematopoietic and solid tumors. Their main mechanism of action relies on the inhibition of topoisomerase I and/or II and the induction of apoptosis. Beyond this well-known antitumor activity, it has been recently demonstrated that anthracyclines may display potent anti-invasive effects when used at subtoxic concentrations. In this paper, we will describe two particular modes of EMDR by which microenvironment may influence tumor-cell response to one of these anthracyclines, doxorubicin. The first one considers the influence of type I collagen on the antimigratory effect of doxorubicin (CAM-DR. The second considers the protection of tumor cells by thrombospondin-I against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis (SFM-DR.

  3. Modulating cell adhesion dynamics on carbon nanotube monolayer engineered with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ning; Wong, Chee C; Gong, Ying X; Tan, Samuel C W; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2010-04-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may have potentials for tissue engineering applications because of their unparalleled physical properties, little has been known on the cell adhesion mechanisms on model CNT monolayer pertaining to the design of novel cell therapeutics device. In this study, the adhesion dynamics of primary porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on CNT monolayer were elucidated with confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy. Moreover, CNT monolayer (CNT-ML) was functionalized with two typical extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN) in order to promote its biocompatibility. First, it is shown by atomic force microscopy that the topographical features of CNT-ML were dependent on the types of immobilized ECM protein. Second, significant time lag in adhesion contact evolution (around 10 min) for PEFs was found on both CNT-ML and CNT-COL compared to the negligible time lag on CNT-FN. It was found that adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces reached steady state at 60 and 30 min after cell seeding compared to 70 min on CNT-ML surface. At steady state, the adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces was about twice as much than that on the CNT-ML surface. Moreover, immobilization of collagen or fibronectin on CNT monolayer led to an increase in seeding efficiency and proliferation rate of PEFs. Scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining together demonstrated that PEFs displayed an elongated morphology and highly polarized actin network on both CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces, whereas PEFs displayed nonuniform cell morphology and actin organization on the CNT-ML surface. Overall, our results demonstrated that the biophysical responses and biological behavior of PEFs on unmodified or functionalized CNT monolayer were different. Functionalization of CNT through extracellular matrix

  4. The effects of extracellular matrix proteins on neutrophil-endothelial interaction--a roadway to multiple therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2012-06-01

    Polymorphoneuclear leukocytes or neutrophils, a major component of white blood cells, contribute to the innate immune response in humans. Upon sensing changes in the microenvironment, neutrophils adhere to the vascular wall, migrate through the endothelial cell (EC)-pericyte bilayer, and subsequently through the extracellular matrix to reach the site of inflammation. These cells are capable of destroying microbes, cell debris, and foreign proteins by oxidative and non-oxidative processes. While primarily mediators of tissue homeostasis, there are an increasing number of studies indicating that neutrophil recruitment and transmigration can also lead to host-tissue injury and subsequently inflammation-related diseases. Neutrophil-induced tissue injury is highly regulated by the microenvironment of the infiltrated tissue, which includes cytokines, chemokines, and the provisional extracellular matrix, remodeled through increased vascular permeability and other cellular infiltrates. Thus, investigation of the effects of matrix proteins on neutrophil-EC interaction and neutrophil transmigration may help identify the proteins that induce pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. This area of research presents an opportunity to identify therapeutic targets in inflammation-related diseases. This review will summarize recent literature on the role of neutrophils and the effects of matrix proteins on neutrophil-EC interactions, with focus on three different disease models: 1) atherosclerosis, 2) COPD, and 3) tumor growth and progression. For each disease model, inflammatory molecules released by neutrophils, important regulatory matrix proteins, current anti-inflammatory treatments, and the scope for further research will be summarized.

  5. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Manganese Transport Protein C (MntC) Is an Extracellular Matrix- and Plasminogen-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Natália; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; da Silva, Ludmila Bezerra; de Castro, Íris Arantes; Monaris, Denize; Masuda, Hana Paula; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Arêas, Ana Paula Mattos

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus – particularly nosocomial infections - represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM). Manganese transport protein C (MntC), a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ε-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the α and β chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation. PMID:25409527

  7. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps contain calprotectin, a cytosolic protein complex involved in host defense against Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin F Urban

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs. NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps contain calprotectin, a cytosolic protein complex involved in host defense against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Constantin F; Ermert, David; Schmid, Monika; Abu-Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Nacken, Wolfgang; Brinkmann, Volker; Jungblut, Peter R; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2009-10-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora;

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome enables monocytes and macrophages to release high levels of interleukin-1ß during inflammatory responses. Concentrations of extracellular calcium can increase at sites of infection, inflammation or cell activation. Here we show that increased extracellular cal......, and this effect was inhibited in GPRC6A(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that G-protein-coupled receptors can activate the inflammasome, and indicate that increased extracellular calcium has a role as a danger signal and amplifier of inflammation....

  11. Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eLallemand

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based recombinant protein production systems have gained an extensive interest over the past few years, because of their reduced cost and relative safety. Although the first products are now reaching the market, progress are still needed to improve plant hosts and strategies for biopharming. Targeting recombinant proteins toward the extracellular space offers several advantages in terms of protein folding and purification, but degradation events are observed, due to endogenous peptidases. This paper focuses on the analysis of extracellular proteolytic activities in two production systems: cell cultures and root-secretion (rhizosecretion, in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Proteolytic activities of extracellular proteomes (secretomes were evaluated in vitro against two substrate proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA and human serum immunoglobulins G (hIgGs. Both targets were found to be degraded by the secretomes, BSA being more prone to proteolysis than hIgGs. The analysis of the proteolysis pH-dependence showed that target degradation was mainly dependent upon the production system: rhizosecretomes contained more peptidase activity than extracellular medium of cell suspensions, whereas variations due to plant species were smaller. Using class-specific peptidase inhibitors, serine and metallopeptidases were found to be responsible for degradation of both substrates. An in-depth in silico analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data from Arabidopsis was then performed and led to the identification of a limited number of serine and metallo-peptidases that are consistently expressed in both production systems. These peptidases should be prime candidates for further improvement of plant hosts by targeted silencing.

  12. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  14. Rhinovirus infection induces extracellular matrix protein deposition in asthmatic and nonasthmatic airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuo, Curtis; Lim, Sam; King, Nicholas J C; Johnston, Sebastian L; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    Airway remodeling, which includes increases in the extracellular matrix (ECM), is a characteristic feature of asthma and is correlated to disease severity. Rhinovirus (RV) infections are associated with increased risk of asthma development in young children and are the most common cause of asthma ex

  15. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Chung

    Full Text Available Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its

  16. Design and Construction of Artificial Extracellular Matrix (aECM) Proteins from Escherichia coli for Skin Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Pearlie S J; Tjin, Monica S; Fong, Eileen

    2015-06-11

    Recombinant technology is a versatile platform to create novel artificial proteins with tunable properties. For the last decade, many artificial proteins that have incorporated functional domains derived from nature (or created de novo) have been reported. In particular, artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins have been developed; these aECM proteins consist of biological domains taken from fibronectin, laminins and collagens and are combined with structural domains including elastin-like repeats, silk and collagen repeats. To date, aECM proteins have been widely investigated for applications in tissue engineering and wound repair. Recently, Tjin and coworkers developed integrin-specific aECM proteins designed for promoting human skin keratinocyte attachment and propagation. In their work, the aECM proteins incorporate cell binding domains taken from fibronectin, laminin-5 and collagen IV, as well as flanking elastin-like repeats. They demonstrated that the aECM proteins developed in their work were promising candidates for use as substrates in artificial skin. Here, we outline the design and construction of such aECM proteins as well as their purification process using the thermo-responsive characteristics of elastin.

  17. [Comparative proteomics analysis of extracellular proteins from Listeria monocytogenes and its isogenic prfA deletion mutant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuelan; Bai, Chunguang; Wang, Guoliang; Jia, Yanyan; Qu, Jin; Fu, Hong; Gao, Yunfei; Jiao, Xin'an

    2013-04-04

    Positive regulatory factor A (PrfA) protein plays a key role in the pathogenicity of Listeria monocytogenes by regulating the expression of virulence genes. We studied the regulation functions of PrfA and its role in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) virulence. Extracellular proteins were obtained from the supernatants of parental strain LM4 and mutant strain LM4deltaprfA cultured in minimal medium. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix associated laser dissociation/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI- TOF-MS) to analyze the differences of secreted proteins between LM4 and LM4deltaprfA. The electrophoresis results show that 31 different spots, 19 spots corresponding 12 proteins were identified by MALDI- TOF-MS. Some virulence related proteins were verified, such as InlC, ActA and LLO. Some new proteins that are regulated by PrfA include D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase, dipeptide Glycine and Trytophan (GW) repeat-containing surface protein, transcriptional regulator and some hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Real-time quantitative PCR was conducted to verify the proteomics results. The mRNA expression level of hly, actA and inlC gene was significantly reduced, and that of D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and GW repeat-containing surface protein's synthesis also had a reduction in LM4deltaprfA strain. PrfA plays key roles on the regulation of genes in LIPI- I and LIPI- II.

  18. [Aspergillus ochraceus myxomycetes produce extracellular proteinases--protein C activators of blood plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmolovskiĭ, A A; Kreĭer, V G; Kurakov, A V; Baranova, N A; Egorov, N S

    2012-01-01

    Natural isolates of Aspergillus ochraceus myxomycetes from soil and plant remains from various regions have been screened. The isolated strains were characterized by similar cultural and morphological features and an identical nucleotide sequence in the ITS1-5,8S-ITS2 region of rDNA. The ability of the extracellular proteinases of A. ochraceus myxomycetes to activate protein C of blood plasma has been established. Differences are revealed in the accumulation of proteinases activating protein C and proteinases with thrombin- and plasmin-like activities in the growth dynamics of producers.

  19. Dentin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins: comparison to bone ECM and contribution to dynamics of dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, William T; Brunn, Jan C; Qin, Chunlin

    2003-01-01

    Dentinogenesis involves the initial odontoblastic synthesis of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) and predentin that is converted to dentin when the collagen fibrils become mineralized. Since the width of predentin is rather uniform, we postulate that extracellular events regulate dentinogenesis. Similarly, osteogenesis involves an initial unmineralized osteoid that is mineralized and converted to bone. To gain insights into these two processes, we compared ECM proteins in bone with those in dentin, focusing upon the sialic acid (SA)-rich proteins. We observed qualitative similarities between the SA-rich proteins, but distinct differences in the amounts of osteopontin (OPN) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). OPN, a predominant protein in bone, was found in much smaller amounts in dentin. Conversely, DSP was abundant in dentin ECM, but found sparingly in bone. Molecular cloning experiments indicate that coding sequences for DSP and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) are found on the same mRNA. We believe that the initial form of the precursor protein DSPP is inactive in influencing the mineralization process and that it must be activated by cleavage of peptide bonds in conserved regions. Thus, unknown proteinases would act on DSPP, possibly at the mineralization front, and liberate active DPP, which plays an initiation and regulatory role in the formation of apatite crystals. This post-translational processing reaction would represent an important control point in dentinogenesis. Recently, we identified uncleaved DSPP in dentin extracts, which should allow us to test portions of our hypothesis.

  20. Human epidermal keratinocyte cell response on integrin-specific artificial extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Monica Suryana; Chua, Alvin Wen Choong; Ma, Dong Rui; Lee, Seng Teik; Fong, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    Cell-matrix interactions play critical roles in regulating cellular behavior in wound repair and regeneration of the human skin. In particular, human skin keratinocytes express several key integrins such as alpha5beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha2beta1 for binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) present in the basement membrane in uninjured skin. To mimic these key integrin-ECM interactions, artificial ECM (aECM) proteins containing functional domains derived from laminin 5, type IV collagen, fibronectin, and elastin are prepared. Human skin keratinocyte cell responses on the aECM proteins are specific to the cell-binding domain present in each construct. Keratinocyte attachment to the aECM protein substrates is also mediated by specific integrin-material interactions. In addition, the aECM proteins are able to support the proliferation of keratinocyte stem cells, demonstrating their promise for use in skin tissue engineering.

  1. Yeast Two-Hybrid Screening for Proteins that Interact with the Extracellular Domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, You; Li, Yinan; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which amyloid β plaques are a pathological characteristic. Little is known about the physiological functions of amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Based on its structure as a type I transmembrane protein, it has been proposed that APP might be a receptor, but so far, no ligand has been reported. In the present study, 9 proteins binding to the extracellular domain of APP were identified using a yeast two-hybrid system. After confirming the interactions in the mammalian system, mutated PLP1, members of the FLRT protein family, and KCTD16 were shown to interact with APP. These proteins have been reported to be involved in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) and axon guidance. Therefore, our results shed light on the mechanisms of physiological function of APP in AD, PMD, and axon guidance.

  2. Single proteins that serve linked functions in intracellular and extracellular microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radisky, Derek C.; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Hirai, Yohei; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    Maintenance of organ homeostasis and control of appropriate response to environmental alterations requires intimate coordination of cellular function and tissue organization. An important component of this coordination may be provided by proteins that can serve distinct, but linked, functions on both sides of the plasma membrane. Here we present a novel hypothesis in which non-classical secretion can provide a mechanism through which single proteins can integrate complex tissue functions. Single genes can exert a complex, dynamic influence through a number of different processes that act to multiply the function of the gene product(s). Alternative splicing can create many different transcripts that encode proteins of diverse, even antagonistic, function from a single gene. Posttranslational modifications can alter the stability, activity, localization, and even basic function of proteins. A protein can exist in different subcellular localizations. More recently, it has become clear that single proteins can function both inside and outside the cell. These proteins often lack defined secretory signal sequences, and transit the plasma membrane by mechanisms separate from the classical ER/Golgi secretory process. When examples of such proteins are examined individually, the multifunctionality and lack of a signal sequence are puzzling - why should a protein with a well known function in one context function in such a distinct fashion in another? We propose that one reason for a single protein to perform intracellular and extracellular roles is to coordinate organization and maintenance of a global tissue function. Here, we describe in detail three specific examples of proteins that act in this fashion, outlining their specific functions in the extracellular space and in the intracellular space, and we discuss how these functions may be linked. We present epimorphin/syntaxin-2, which may coordinate morphogenesis of secretory organs (as epimorphin) with control of

  3. Differential expression of extracellular matrix proteins in senescent and young human fibroblasts: a comparative proteomics and microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyeong Eun; Kwon, Joseph; Rhim, Ji-Heon; Choi, Jong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Junsoo; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2011-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an essential structural framework for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, and undergoes progressive changes during senescence. To investigate changes in protein expression in the extracellular matrix between young and senescent fibroblasts, we compared proteomic data (LTQ-FT) with cDNA microarray results. The peptide counts from the proteomics analysis were used to evaluate the level of ECM protein expression by young cells and senescent cells, and ECM protein expression data were compared with the microarray data. After completing the comparative analysis, we grouped the genes into four categories. Class I included genes with increased expression levels in both analyses, while class IV contained genes with reduced expression in both analyses. Class II and Class III contained genes with an inconsistent expression pattern. Finally, we validated the comparative analysis results by examining the expression level of the specific gene from each category using Western blot analysis and semiquantitative RT-PCR. Our results demonstrate that comparative analysis can be used to identify differentially expressed genes.

  4. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  5. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

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    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  6. Casein phosphopeptides drastically increase the secretion of extracellular proteins in Aspergillus awamori. Proteomics studies reveal changes in the secretory pathway

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    Kosalková Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secretion of heterologous animal proteins in filamentous fungi is usually limited by bottlenecks in the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway. Results Using the secretion of bovine chymosin in Aspergillus awamori as a model, we found a drastic increase (40 to 80-fold in cells grown with casein or casein phosphopeptides (CPPs. CPPs are rich in phosphoserine, but phosphoserine itself did not increase the secretion of chymosin. The stimulatory effect is reduced about 50% using partially dephosphorylated casein and is not exerted by casamino acids. The phosphopeptides effect was not exerted at transcriptional level, but instead, it was clearly observed on the secretion of chymosin by immunodetection analysis. Proteomics studies revealed very interesting metabolic changes in response to phosphopeptides supplementation. The oxidative metabolism was reduced, since enzymes involved in fermentative processes were overrepresented. An oxygen-binding hemoglobin-like protein was overrepresented in the proteome following phosphopeptides addition. Most interestingly, the intracellular pre-protein enzymes, including pre-prochymosin, were depleted (most of them are underrepresented in the intracellular proteome after the addition of CPPs, whereas the extracellular mature form of several of these secretable proteins and cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes was greatly overrepresented in the secretome of phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Another important 'moonlighting' protein (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which has been described to have vesicle fusogenic and cytoskeleton formation modulating activities, was clearly overrepresented in phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Conclusions In summary, CPPs cause the reprogramming of cellular metabolism, which leads to massive secretion of extracellular proteins.

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix proteins secreted by hypertrophic scar with normal skin fibroblasts

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    Li Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hypertrophic scars (HSs is a fibroproliferative disorder of abnormal wound healing. HSs usually characterize excessive proliferation of fibroblasts, abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM during wound healing, associated with cosmetic, functional, and psychological problems. Owing to the role of ECM proteins in scar formation, we comparatively analyzed matrix proteins secreted by normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs and HS fibroblasts (HSFs. The acetone-extracted secreted proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, and identified by mass spectrometry (MS. Based on Go annotation of MS data, the profiling of ECM proteins was established and scar-related proteins have been screened out. The functions of several ECM proteins identified by MS have been discussed, such as collagens I, VI, XII, fibronectin, decorin, lumican, and protein procollagen C endopeptidase enhancer 1 (PCPE-1. Among them, the MS result of PCPE-1 was supported by Western blotting that PCPE-1 from HSFs were significantly upregulated than that from NSFs. It is suggested that PCPE-1 could be a potential target for scar treatment. The exploration of scar related proteins may provide new perspectives on understanding the mechanism of scar formation and open a new way to scar treatment and prevention.

  8. Potential Autoepitope within the Extracellular Region of Contactin-Associated Protein-like 2 in Mice

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    Obregon, Demian F.; Zhu, Yuyan; Bailey, Antoinette R.; Portis, Samantha M.; Hou, Huayan; Zeng, Jin; Stock, Saundra L.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Bengtson, Michael A.; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Aims Implicated in autoimmune encephalitis, neuromyotonia and genetic forms of autism, here we report that contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) contains a potential autoepitope within the extracellular region. Methodology CNTNAP2 sequence-similar regions (CSSRs) from human pathogens were identified. Sera from autistic and control children were obtained and analyzed for the presence of antibodies able to bind CSSRs. One such candidate CSSR was evaluated for evidence of autoimmune responses to CNTNAP2 in a mouse model of acute infection. Results Autistic and control children sera contained antibodies able to discrete regions of CNTNAP2. In a murine model of acute infection, a CSSR derived from the N-terminal extracellular region of CNTNAP2 resulted in anti-CNTNAP2 antibody production, proinflammatory cytokine elevation, cerebellar and cortical white matter T-cell infiltration as well as motor dysfunction. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that CNTNAP2 contains a potential autoepitope within the extracellular region. PMID:24466509

  9. The Role of Structural Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

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    Andrea Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in the modulation of cancer cell invasion. In urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC the role of ECM proteins has been widely studied. The mechanisms, which are involved in the development of invasion, progression and generalization, are complex, depending on the interaction of ECM proteins with each other as well as with cancer cells. The following review will focus on the pathogenetic role and prognostic value of structural proteins, such as laminins, collagens, fi bronectin (FN, tenascin (Tn-C and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 in UC. In addition, the role of integrins mediating the interaction of ECM molecules and cancer cells will be addressed, since integrin-mediated FN, Tn-C and TSP1 interactions seem to play an important role during tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis.

  10. Extracellular matrix family proteins that are potential targets of Dd-STATa in Dictyostelium discoideum.

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    Shimada, Nao; Nishio, Keiko; Maeda, Mineko; Urushihara, Hideko; Kawata, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Dd-STATa is a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, which is activated by cAMP and is thereby translocated into the nuclei of anterior tip cells of the prestalk region of the slug. By using in situ hybridization analyses, we found that the SLF308 cDNA clone, which contains the ecmF gene that encodes a putative extracellular matrix protein and is expressed in the anterior tip cells, was greatly down-regulated in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. Disruption of the ecmF gene, however, resulted in almost no phenotypic change. The absence of any obvious mutant phenotype in the ecmF-null mutant could be due to a redundancy of similar genes. In fact, a search of the Dictyostelium whole genome database demonstrates the existence of an additional 16 homologues, all of which contain a cellulose-binding module. Among these homologues, four genes show Dd-STATa-dependent expression, while the others are Dd-STATa-independent. We discuss the potential role of Dd-STATa in morphogenesis via its effect on the interaction between cellulose and these extracellular matrix family proteins.

  11. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins: tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 in prostatic adenocarcinoma

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    Monika Ulamec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The interchanged stromal-epithelial relations and altered expression profiles of various extracellular matrix (ECM proteins creates a suitable microenvironment for cancer development and growth. We support the opinion that remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM plays an important role in the cancer progression. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of ECM proteins tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 in prostatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: Glands and surrounding stroma were analyzed in randomly selected specimens from 52 patients with prostate cancer and 28 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP. To evaluate the intensity of tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 expression the percentage of positively immunostained stromal cells was examined.Results: Compared to BPH, stroma of prostatic adenocarcinoma showed statistically significant increase in tenascin-C expression (p<0.001, predominantly around neoplastic glands, while fibronectin (p=0.001 and galectin-3 (p<0.001 expression in the same area was decreased.Conclusions: Our study confirms changes in the expression of ECM proteins of prostate cancer which may have important role in the cancer development.

  12. Serum-free culture alters the quantity and protein composition of neuroblastoma-derived extracellular vesicles

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    Jinghuan Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs play a significant role in cell–cell communication in numerous physiological processes and pathological conditions, and offer promise as novel biomarkers and therapeutic agents for genetic diseases. Many recent studies have described different molecular mechanisms that contribute to EV biogenesis and release from cells. However, little is known about how external stimuli such as cell culture conditions can affect the quantity and content of EVs. While N2a neuroblastoma cells cultured in serum-free (OptiMEM conditions did not result in EVs with significant biophysical or size differences compared with cells cultured in serum-containing (pre-spun conditions, the quantity of isolated EVs was greatly increased. Moreover, the expression levels of certain vesicular proteins (e.g. small GTPases, G-protein complexes, mRNA processing proteins and splicing factors, some of which were previously reported to be involved in EV biogenesis, were found to be differentially expressed in EVs under different culture conditions. These data, therefore, contribute to the understanding of how extracellular factors and intracellular molecular pathways affect the composition and release of EVs.

  13. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

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    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  14. Current serological possibilities for the diagnosis of arthritis with special focus on proteins and proteoglycans from the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Farrugia, Brooke L; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Whitelock, John M

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses our current understanding of how the expression and turnover of components of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) have been investigated, both as molecular markers of arthritis and as indicators of disease progression. The cartilage ECM proteome is well studied; it contains proteoglycans (aggrecan, perlecan and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor), collagens and glycoproteins (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, fibronectin and lubricin) that provide the structural and functional changes in arthritis. However, the changes that occur in the carbohydrate structures, including glycosaminoglycans, with disease are less well studied. Investigations of the cartilage ECM proteome have revealed many potential biomarkers of arthritis. However, a clinical diagnostic or multiplex assay is yet to be realized due to issues with specificity to the pathology of arthritis. The future search for clinical biomarkers of arthritis is likely to involve both protein and carbohydrate markers of the ECM through the application of glycoproteomics.

  15. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.

  16. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical detection of keratins and extracellular matrix proteins in lizard skin cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Polazzi, Elisabetta

    2012-04-01

    The present study shows the localization of epidermal and dermal proteins produced in lizard skin cultivated in vitro. Cells from the skin have been cultured for up to one month to detect the expression of keratins, actin, vimentin and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, elastin and collagen I). Keratinocytes and dermal cells weakly immunoreact for Pan-Cytokeratin but not with the K17-antibody at the beginning of the cell culture when numerous keratin bundles are present in keratinocyte cytoplasm. The dense keratin network disappears after 7-12 days in culture, and K17 becomes detectable in both keratinocytes and mesenchymal cells isolated from the dermis. While most epidermal cells are lost after 2 weeks of in vitro cultivation dermal cells proliferate and form a pellicle of variable thickness made of 3-8 cell layers. The fibroblasts of this dermal equivalent produces an extracellular matrix containing chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, collagen I, elastic fibers and fibronectin, explaining the attachment of the pellicle to the substratum. The study indicates that after improving keratinocyte survival a skin equivalent for lizard epidermis would be feasible as a useful tool to analyze the influence of the dermis on the process of epidermal differentiation and the control of the shedding cycle in squamates.

  17. Apextrin, a novel extracellular protein associated with larval ectoderm evolution in Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, E S; Sly, B J; Andrews, M E; Raff, R A

    1999-07-01

    During the evolution of direct development in the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma major modifications occurred, which allowed the precocious formation of adult-specific structures and led to a novel larval body that surrounds these structures. The HeET-1 gene was isolated in a differential screen for transcripts enriched in the early embryos of H. erythrogramma relative to those of its indirect-developing congener, H. tuberculata. HeET-1 was unique among the three genes found in that no homologous transcript was detected in H. tuberculata total embryonic RNA blots. To verify this apparently extreme differential expression of the HeET-1 genes in Heliocidaris, we isolated the HeET-1 homologue from H. tuberculata genomic DNA and used it to probe blots of poly(A)+ RNA prepared from H. tuberculata embryos. It is expressed in H. tuberculata embryos at levels undetectable by this technique. The predicted amino acid sequence of HeET-1 suggested that it encodes a novel secreted protein. To assess the function of HeET-1, we raised polyclonal antisera to the HeET-1-encoded protein. We find that it is present in eggs in a type of secretory vesicle and that this maternal pool is gradually secreted after fertilization. As cells acquire apical-basal polarity in the blastula the protein becomes localized to the apical extracellular matrix, leading us to name the protein apextrin. The apical extracellular localization of apextrin is maintained in the columnar cells of the larval ectoderm until their internalization at metamorphosis. Ingressing mesenchyme cells rapidly endocytose apextrin upon leaving the vegetal plate. Comparison with fibropellin III, an apical lamina component, suggests that apextrin is an extracellular protein that is in tighter association with the plasma membrane than is the hyalin layer or apical lamina. We propose that apextrin is involved in apical cell adhesion and that its high level of expression may represent an adaptive cooption necessary for

  18. The extracellular matrix protein TGFBI induces microtubule stabilization and sensitizes ovarian cancers to paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Mills, Anthony D; Ibrahim, Ashraf E K; Temple, Jillian; Blenkiron, Cherie; Vias, Maria; Massie, Charlie E; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; McGeoch, Adam; Crawford, Robin; Nicke, Barbara; Downward, Julian; Swanton, Charles; Bell, Stephen D; Earl, Helena M; Laskey, Ronald A; Caldas, Carlos; Brenton, James D

    2007-12-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) can induce chemotherapy resistance via AKT-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. Here, we show that loss of the ECM protein TGFBI (transforming growth factor beta induced) is sufficient to induce specific resistance to paclitaxel and mitotic spindle abnormalities in ovarian cancer cells. Paclitaxel-resistant cells treated with recombinant TGFBI protein show integrin-dependent restoration of paclitaxel sensitivity via FAK- and Rho-dependent stabilization of microtubules. Immunohistochemical staining for TGFBI in paclitaxel-treated ovarian cancers from a prospective clinical trial showed that morphological changes of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity were restricted to areas of strong expression of TGFBI. These data show that ECM can mediate taxane sensitivity by modulating microtubule stability.

  19. Extracellular matrix proteins regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qike K.; Lee, KangAe; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells undergo transdifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) upon treatment with matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3). In rigid microenvironments, MMP3 upregulates expression of Rac1b, which translocates to the cell membrane to promote induction of reactive oxygen species and EMT. Here we examine the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in this process. Our data show that the basement membrane protein laminin suppresses the EMT response in MMP3-treated cells, whereas fibronectin promotes EMT. These ECM proteins regulate EMT via interactions with their specific integrin receptors. α6-integrin sequesters Rac1b from the membrane and is required for inhibition of EMT by laminin. In contrast, α5-integrin maintains Rac1b at the membrane and is required for the promotion of EMT by fibronectin. Understanding the regulatory role of the ECM will provide insight into mechanisms underlying normal and pathological development of the mammary gland. PMID:23660532

  20. In Vivo Analysis of Extracellular Proteins in Rat Brains with a Newly Developed Intracerebral Microdialysis Probe

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    Nakamura,Mitsuo

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptides and proteins in the extracellular space in the central nervous system were investigated in vivo using an intracerebral microdialysis probe. The molecular cut-off of the hollow fiber which was used for the probe was approximately 100 kDa. We examined recovery rates of several compounds in vitro. The recovery rates of proteins and peptides were between 7-28%, with the exceptions of substance P and insulin-like growth factor I. The recovery rates of monoamines and their metabolites were 22-40%. In in vivo studies, two major proteins with apparent molecular weights of 62 kDa and 12 kDa, and several minor proteins (28 kDa, 43 kDa, 52 kDa and 70 kDa were detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the dialysate from a probe implanted in the striatum of anesthetized rats. These results suggest that the newly developed, intracerebral microdialysis probe might be useful for investigating the dynamic changes of peptides and proteins in the central nervous system.

  1. Distinct biophysical mechanisms of focal adhesion kinase mechanoactivation by different extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jihye; Tajik, Arash; Sun, Jie; Guan, Jun-Lin; Humphries, Martin J; Craig, Susan E; Shekaran, Asha; García, Andrés J; Lu, Shaoying; Lin, Michael Z; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yingxiao

    2013-11-26

    Matrix mechanics controls cell fate by modulating the bonds between integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, it remains unclear how fibronectin (FN), type 1 collagen, and their receptor integrin subtypes distinctly control force transmission to regulate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, a crucial molecular signal governing cell adhesion/migration. Here we showed, using a genetically encoded FAK biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, that FN-mediated FAK activation is dependent on the mechanical tension, which may expose its otherwise hidden FN synergy site to integrin α5. In sharp contrast, the ligation between the constitutively exposed binding motif of type 1 collagen and its receptor integrin α2 was surprisingly tension-independent to induce sufficient FAK activation. Although integrin α subunit determines mechanosensitivity, the ligation between α subunit and the ECM proteins converges at the integrin β1 activation to induce FAK activation. We further discovered that the interaction of the N-terminal protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin basic patch with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate is crucial during cell adhesion to maintain the FAK activation from the inhibitory effect of nearby protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin acidic sites. Therefore, different ECM proteins either can transmit or can shield from mechanical forces to regulate cellular functions, with the accessibility of ECM binding motifs by their specific integrin α subunits determining the biophysical mechanisms of FAK activation during mechanotransduction.

  2. Shotgun proteomics and network analysis between plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins from rat olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yisong; Teng, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiaoxu; Song, Qing; Lu, Rong; Xiong, Jixian; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Nianju; Zeng, Yu; Long, Jia; Cao, Rui; Lin, Yong; He, Quanze; Chen, Ping; Lu, Ming; Liang, Songping

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a special type of glial cells that have characteristics of both astrocytes and Schwann cells. Evidence suggests that the regenerative capacity of OECs is induced by soluble, secreted factors that influence their microenvironment. These factors may regulate OECs self-renewal and/or induce their capacity to augment spinal cord regeneration. Profiling of plasma membrane and extracellular matrix through a high-throughput expression proteomics approach was undertaken to identify plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins of OECs under serum-free conditions. 1D-shotgun proteomics followed with gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to screen proteins from primary culture rat OECs. Four hundred and seventy nonredundant plasma membrane proteins and 168 extracellular matrix proteins were identified, the majority of which were never before reported to be produced by OECs. Furthermore, plasma membrane and extracellular proteins were classified based on their protein-protein interaction predicted by STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data. The proteomic profiling of the OECs plasma membrane proteins and their connection with the secretome in serum-free culture conditions provides new insights into the nature of their in vivo microenvironmental niche. Proteomic analysis for the discovery of clinical biomarkers of OECs mechanism warrants further study.

  3. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  4. Calcite formation in soft coral sclerites is determined by a single reactive extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-09-09

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called "calcite and aragonite seas." Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that -OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature.

  5. RAGE-mediated extracellular matrix proteins accumulation exacerbates HySu-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Daile; He, Yuhu; Zhu, Qian; Liu, Huan; Zuo, Caojian; Chen, Guilin; Yu, Ying; Lu, Ankang

    2017-05-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins accumulation contributes to the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rare and fatal cardiovascular condition defined by high pulmonary arterial pressure, whether primary, idiopathic, or secondary to other causes. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is constitutively expressed in the lungs and plays an important role in ECM deposition. Nonetheless, the mechanisms by which RAGE mediates ECM deposition/formation in pulmonary arteries and its roles in PAH progression remain unclear. Expression of RAGE and its activating ligands, S100/calgranulins and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), were increased in both human and mouse pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) under hypoxic conditions and were also strikingly upregulated in pulmonary arteries in hypoxia plus SU5416 (HySu)-induced PAH in mice. RAGE deletion alleviated pulmonary arterial pressure and restrained extracellular matrix accumulation in pulmonary arteries in HySu-induced PAH murine model. Moreover, blocking RAGE activity with a neutralizing antibody in human PASMCs, or RAGE deficiency in mouse PASMCs exposed to hypoxia, suppressed the expression of fibrotic proteins by reducing TGF-β1 expression. RAGE reconstitution in deficient mouse PASMCs restored hypoxia-stimulated TGF-β1 production via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathway activation and subsequently increased ECM protein expression. Interestingly, HMGB1 acting on RAGE, not toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induced ECM deposition in PASMCs. Finally, in both idiopathic PAH patients and HySu-induced PAH mice, soluble RAGE (sRAGE) levels in serum were significantly elevated compared to those in controls. Activation of RAGE facilitates the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by increase of ECM deposition in pulmonary arteries. Our results indicate that sRAGE may be a potential biomarker for PAH diagnosis and disease severity, and that RAGE may be a promising target for

  6. Regulatory roles of microtubule-associated proteins in neuronal morphogenesis. Involvement of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of recent investigations, the cytoskeleton can be viewed as a cytoplasmic system of interconnected filaments with three major integrative levels: self-assembling macromolecules, filamentous polymers, e.g., microtubules, intermediate filaments and actin filaments, and supramolecular structures formed by bundles of these filaments or networks resulting from cross-bridges between these major cytoskeletal polymers. The organization of this biological structure appears to be sensitive to fine spatially and temporally dependent regulatory signals. In differentiating neurons, regulation of cytoskeleton organization is particularly relevant, and the microtubule-associated protein (MAP tau appears to play roles in the extension of large neuritic processes and axons as well as in the stabilization of microtubular polymers along these processes. Within this context, tau is directly involved in defining neuronal polarity as well as in the generation of neuronal growth cones. There is increasing evidence that elements of the extracellular matrix contribute to the control of cytoskeleton organization in differentiating neurons, and that these regulations could be mediated by changes in MAP activity. In this brief review, we discuss the possible roles of tau in mediating the effects of extracellular matrix components on the internal cytoskeletal arrays and its organization in growing neurons.

  7. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas [Hema-Quebec, Research and Development Department, Quebec City, G1V 5C3, PQ (Canada); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: nicolas.pineault@hema-quebec.qc.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, G1V 0A6, PQ (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  8. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Betül; Mantovani, Diego; Pineault, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  9. An ensemble method with hybrid features to identify extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic composite of secreted proteins that play important roles in numerous biological processes such as tissue morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis. Furthermore, various diseases are caused by the dysfunction of ECM proteins. Therefore, identifying these important ECM proteins may assist in understanding related biological processes and drug development. In view of the serious imbalance in the training dataset, a Random Forest-based ensemble method with hybrid features is developed in this paper to identify ECM proteins. Hybrid features are employed by incorporating sequence composition, physicochemical properties, evolutionary and structural information. The Information Gain Ratio and Incremental Feature Selection (IGR-IFS) methods are adopted to select the optimal features. Finally, the resulting predictor termed IECMP (Identify ECM Proteins) achieves an balanced accuracy of 86.4% using the 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, which is much higher than results obtained by other methods (ECMPRED: 71.0%, ECMPP: 77.8%). Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves significantly improved performance over ECMPP and ECMPRED. These results indicate that IECMP is an effective method for ECM protein prediction, which has a more balanced prediction capability for positive and negative samples. It is anticipated that the proposed method will provide significant information to fully decipher the molecular mechanisms of ECM-related biological processes and discover candidate drug targets. For public access, we develop a user-friendly web server for ECM protein identification that is freely accessible at http://iecmp.weka.cc.

  10. Augmented expression of urokinase plasminogen activator and extracellular matrix proteins associates with multiple myeloma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rehan; Gupta, Nidhi; Kumar, Raman; Sharma, Manoj; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Alpana

    2014-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) represents a B cell malignancy, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells. Interactions between tumor cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) are of importance for tumor invasion and metastasis. Protein levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and fibulin 1, nidogen and laminin in plasma and serum respectively and mRNA levels of these molecules in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined in 80 subjects by using ELISA and quantitative PCR and data was analyzed with severity of disease. Pearson correlation was determined to observe interrelationship between different molecules. A statistical significant increase for ECM proteins (laminin, nidogen and fibulin 1) and uPA at circulatory level as well as at mRNA level was observed compared to healthy controls. The levels of these molecules in serum might be utilized as a marker of active disease. Significant positive correlation of all ECM proteins with uPA was found and data also correlates with severity of disease. Strong association found between ECM proteins and uPA in this study supports that there might be interplay between these molecules which can be targeted. This study on these molecules may help to gain insight into processes of growth, spread, and clinical behavior of MM.

  11. Structure of the extracellular portion of CD46 provides insights into its interactions with complement proteins and pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B David Persson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46 is a central component of the innate immune system. CD46 protects autologous cells from complement attack by binding to complement proteins C3b and C4b and serving as a cofactor for their cleavage. Recent data show that CD46 also plays a role in mediating acquired immune responses, and in triggering autophagy. In addition to these physiologic functions, a significant number of pathogens, including select adenoviruses, measles virus, human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6, Streptococci, and Neisseria, use CD46 as a cell attachment receptor. We have determined the crystal structure of the extracellular region of CD46 in complex with the human adenovirus type 11 fiber knob. Extracellular CD46 comprises four short consensus repeats (SCR1-SCR4 that form an elongated structure resembling a hockey stick, with a long shaft and a short blade. Domains SCR1, SCR2 and SCR3 are arranged in a nearly linear fashion. Unexpectedly, however, the structure reveals a profound bend between domains SCR3 and SCR4, which has implications for the interactions with ligands as well as the orientation of the protein at the cell surface. This bend can be attributed to an insertion of five hydrophobic residues in a SCR3 surface loop. Residues in this loop have been implicated in interactions with complement, indicating that the bend participates in binding to C3b and C4b. The structure provides an accurate framework for mapping all known ligand binding sites onto the surface of CD46, thereby advancing an understanding of how CD46 acts as a receptor for pathogens and physiologic ligands of the immune system.

  12. Structure of the extracellular portion of CD46 provides insights into its interactions with complement proteins and pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B David Persson

    Full Text Available The human membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46 is a central component of the innate immune system. CD46 protects autologous cells from complement attack by binding to complement proteins C3b and C4b and serving as a cofactor for their cleavage. Recent data show that CD46 also plays a role in mediating acquired immune responses, and in triggering autophagy. In addition to these physiologic functions, a significant number of pathogens, including select adenoviruses, measles virus, human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6, Streptococci, and Neisseria, use CD46 as a cell attachment receptor. We have determined the crystal structure of the extracellular region of CD46 in complex with the human adenovirus type 11 fiber knob. Extracellular CD46 comprises four short consensus repeats (SCR1-SCR4 that form an elongated structure resembling a hockey stick, with a long shaft and a short blade. Domains SCR1, SCR2 and SCR3 are arranged in a nearly linear fashion. Unexpectedly, however, the structure reveals a profound bend between domains SCR3 and SCR4, which has implications for the interactions with ligands as well as the orientation of the protein at the cell surface. This bend can be attributed to an insertion of five hydrophobic residues in a SCR3 surface loop. Residues in this loop have been implicated in interactions with complement, indicating that the bend participates in binding to C3b and C4b. The structure provides an accurate framework for mapping all known ligand binding sites onto the surface of CD46, thereby advancing an understanding of how CD46 acts as a receptor for pathogens and physiologic ligands of the immune system.

  13. Symposium: Role of the extracellular matrix in mammary development. Regulation of milk protein and basement membrane gene expression: The influence of the extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggeler, J.; Park, C.S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Synthesis and secretion of milk proteins ({alpha}-casein, {beta}-casein, {gamma}-casein, and transferrin) by cultured primary mouse mammary epithelial cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix. In cells grown on released or floating type I collagen gels, mRNA for {beta}-casein and transferrin is increased as much as 30-fold over cells grown on plastic. Induction of {beta}-casein expression depends strongly on the presence of lactogenic hormones, especially prolactin, in the culture. When cells are plated onto partially purified reconstituted basement membrane, dramatic changes in morphology and milk protein gene expression are observed. Cells cultured on the matrix for 6 to 8 d in the presence of prolactin, insulin, and hydrocortisone form hollow spheres and duct-like structures that are completely surrounded by matrix. The cells lining these spheres appear actively secretory and are oriented with their apices facing the lumen. Hybridization experiments indicate that mRNA for {beta}-casein can be increased as much as 70-fold in these cultures. Because > 90% of the cultured cells synthesize immunoreactive {beta}-casein, as compared with only 40% of cells in the late pregnant gland, the matrix appears to be able to induce protein expression in previously silent cells. Synthesis of laminin and assembly of a mammary-specific basal lamina by cells cultured on different extracellular matrices also appears to depend on the presence of lactogenic hormones. These studies provide support for the concept of dynamic reciprocity in which complex interactions between extracellular matrix and the cellular cytoskeleton contribute to the induction and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression in the mammary gland.

  14. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Extracellular matrix proteins as temporary coating for thin-film neural implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Deprez, Marjolijn; Turner, Neill; Kil, Dries; van Kuyck, Kris; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Nuttin, Bart; Badylak, Stephen; Puers, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the suitability of a thin sheet of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins as a resorbable coating for temporarily reinforcing fragile or ultra-low stiffness thin-film neural implants to be placed on the brain, i.e. microelectrocorticographic (µECOG) implants. Approach. Thin-film polyimide-based electrode arrays were fabricated using lithographic methods. ECM was harvested from porcine tissue by a decellularization method and coated around the arrays. Mechanical tests and an in vivo experiment on rats were conducted, followed by a histological tissue study combined with a statistical equivalence test (confidence interval approach, 0.05 significance level) to compare the test group with an uncoated control group. Main results. After 3 months, no significant damage was found based on GFAP and NeuN staining of the relevant brain areas. Significance. The study shows that ECM sheets are a suitable temporary coating for thin µECOG neural implants.

  16. Endometrial inflammation and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins induced by Mycoplasma bovis in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengyao; Wang, Guoqing; Lv, Tingting; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Xie, Guanghong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Rongfeng

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma bovis infection can cause endometrial inflammation leading to infertility and involuntary culling in dairy cows. Because extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins affect the adherence of mycoplasma to eukaryotic cell surface, they may play a role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial inflammatory response and ECM protein expression induced by M bovis. Endometrial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and mRNA and protein expression of collagen IV (CL-IV), fibronectin (FN), and laminin (LN) were evaluated 10, 20, and 30 days after M bovis intrauterine infusion in breed cows 18 days postpartum. The presence of the bacteria in the uterus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Endometrial TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in the treatment group were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 20 and 30 days after infusion. Endometrial CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression increased (P < 0.01) 20 days after infusion in all groups. However, the increase was more pronounced in the treatment group and reactive expressions were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 10, 20, and 30 days after infusion. In conclusion, M bovis triggered endometrial inflammatory response and increased CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression. The abnormal expression of ECM these proteins may promote the pathogenic effects of M bovis that lead to endometrial tissue damage and infertility.

  17. Effect of pH, salt and chemical rinses on bacterial attachment to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfakar, Siti Shahara; White, Jason D; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Microbial contamination of carcass surfaces occurs during slaughter and post-slaughter processing steps, therefore interventions are needed to enhance meat safety and quality. Although many studies have been done at the macro-level, little is known about specific processes that influence bacterial attachment to carcass surfaces, particularly the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In the present study, the effect of pH and salt (NaCl, KCl and CaCl2) on attachment of Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates to dominant ECM proteins: collagen I, fibronectin, collagen IV and laminin were assessed. Also, the effects of three chemical rinses commonly used in abattoirs (2% acetic acid, 2% lactic acid and 10% trisodium phosphate (TSP)) were tested. Within a pH range of 5-9, there was no significant effect on attachment to ECM proteins, whereas the effect of salt type and concentration varied depending on combination of strain and ECM protein. A concentration-dependant effect was observed with NaCl and KCl (0.1-0.85%) on attachment of E. coli M23Sr, but only to collagen I. One-tenth percent CaCl2 produced the highest level of attachment to ECM proteins for E. coli M23Sr and EC614. In contrast, higher concentrations of CaCl2 increased attachment of E. coli EC473 to collagen IV. Rinses containing TSP produced >95% reduction in attachment to all ECM proteins. These observations will assist in the design of targeted interventions to prevent or disrupt contamination of meat surfaces, thus improving meat safety and quality.

  18. Concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with affinity for extracellular matrix in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus A sign of vascular damage in patients with diabetic nephropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Rossing, P.; Jensen, T.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate protein concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with reported affinity for extracellular matrix (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, antithrombin III, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) in comparison with proteins with no reported affinity (albumin

  19. Concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with affinity for extracellular matrix in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus A sign of vascular damage in patients with diabetic nephropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Rossing, P.; Jensen, T.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate protein concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with reported affinity for extracellular matrix (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, antithrombin III, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) in comparison with proteins with no reported affinity

  20. Expression of Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Basal Membranes During Fetal Nephron Development in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan GÜRCÜ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the distribution of laminin, collagen type IV, nidogen and fibronectine during metanephric development in fetal mouse kidney by immunohistochemistry. Stain density of basement membranes of tubules, glomerules and mesangial matrix were compared in pre-capillary, immature glomerular and mature glomerular stages of fetal kidney. All the matrix proteins were strongly stained in precapillary stage. In immature glomerular stage, a strong staining was observed for fibronectin. Staining intensity was slightly decreased for the other proteins in this stage. In mature glomerular stage, diminished staining for all proteins was observed similar to the previous stage, except fibronectin. The strongest immunoreactions were found for fibronectin and nidogen in all investigated stages. In general, there was a similar staining intensity for all glycoproteins during maturation except for laminin. It was thought that the distribution of extracellular matrix molecules plays an important role for the kidney development. Interactions amoung these molecules probably crucial on cell behavior like migration, proliferation and differentiation in normal development of the nephron.

  1. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins in chondrocyte-derived matrices on chondrocyte functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamada, Tomoe; Chen, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cartilaginous phenotype during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes is a major barrier to the application of chondrocytes for tissue engineering. In previous study, we showed that dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the passage culture was delayed by matrices formed by primary chondrocytes (P0-ECM). In this study, we investigated bovine chondrocyte functions when being cultured on isolated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-coated substrata and P0-ECM. Low chondrocyte attachment was observed on aggrecan-coated substratum and P0-ECM. Cell proliferation on aggrecan- and type II collagen/aggrecan-coated substrata and P0-ECM was lower than that on the other ECM protein (type I collagen and type II collagen)-coated substrata. When chondrocytes were subcultured on aggrecan-coated substratum, decline of cartilaginous gene expression was delayed, which was similar to the cells subcultured on P0-ECM. These results indicate that aggrecan plays an important role in the regulation of chondrocyte functions and P0-ECM may be a good experimental control for investigating the role of each ECM protein in cartilage ECM.

  2. Establishment and characterization of human engineered cells stably expressing large extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Daekee; Kang, Gwang-Sik; Han, Dong Keun; Park, Kwideok; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel-coated culture plates have been used to study the relationship between the ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior. However, it is unclear whether ECM-coated dishes mimic the natural ECM microenvironment because the architecture of the ECM is constructed of randomly distributed fibers. The purpose of this study was the production and confirmation of human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as collagen I/II and fibronectin. First, large (over 10 kb) ECM vectors encoding human collagen I/II and fibronectin were constructed and the circular vectors were linearized. Second, the linear ECM vectors were introduced into immortalized human embryonic kidney cells using various transfection methods. The polyethylenimine and liposome methods showed higher efficiencies than electroporation for transfection of these large vectors. Third, human ECM engineered cells were established by stable integration of the vector into the genomic DNA and resulted in stable overexpression of mRNA and proteins. In summary, human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as human collagen I/II and fibronectin were successfully prepared, and secretion of the ECM components into the surrounding environment was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Thus, human ECM engineered cells naturally secreting ECM components could be valuable for studying the relationship between the native ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior.

  3. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  4. Extracellular regulation of sperm transmembrane adenylyl cyclase by a forward motility stimulating protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Dey

    Full Text Available Forward motility stimulating factor (FMSF, a glycoprotein isolated from buffalo serum, binds to the surface of the mature sperm cells to promote their progressive motility. This article reports the mode of signal transduction of this extracellular factor in goat sperm. The mechanism was investigated by assaying intracellular second messenger level and forward motility in presence of different pharmacological modulators. Mg++-dependent Forskolin responsive form of transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC of goat spermatozoa was probed for its involvement in FMSF action. Dideoxyadenosine, a selective inhibitor of tmACs, was used to identify the role of this enzyme in the scheme of FMSF-signaling. Involvement of the α-subunit of G-protein in this regard has been inspected using GTPγS. Participation of protein kinase A (PKA and tyrosine kinase was checked using IP20 and genistein, respectively. FMSF promotes tmAC activity in a dose-dependent manner through receptor/G-protein activation to enhance intracellular cAMP and forward motility. Motility boosting effects of this glycoprotein are almost lost in presence of dideoxyadenosine. But, FMSF displayed substantial motility promoting activity when movement of spermatozoa was inhibited with KH7, the specific inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase indicating tmAC to be the primary target of FMSF action. Involvement of cAMP in mediating FMSF action was confirmed by the application of dibutyryl cAMP. Observed motility regulatory effects with IP20 and genistein indicate contribution of PKA and tyrosine kinase in FMSF activity; enhanced phosphorylation of a tyrosine containing ≈50 kDa protein was detected in this regard. FMSF initiates a novel signaling cascade to stimulate tmAC activity that augments intracellular cAMP, which through downstream crosstalk of phosphokinases leads to enhanced forward motility in mature spermatozoa. Thus, this article for the first time describes conventional tm

  5. Nell1-deficient mice have reduced expression of extracellular matrix proteins causing cranial and vertebral defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Jayashree [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shannon, Mark E. [Applied Biosystems; Johnson, Mahlon D. [University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine; Ruff, David W. [Applied Biosystems; Hughes, Lori A [ORNL; Kerley, Marilyn K [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian Nell1 gene encodes a protein kinase C-b1 (PKC-b1) binding protein that belongs to a new class of cell-signaling molecules controlling cell growth and differentiation. Over-expression of Nell1 in the developing cranial sutures in both human and mouse induces craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of the growing cranial bone fronts. Here, we report the generation, positional cloning and characterization of Nell16R, a recessive, neonatal-lethal point mutation in the mouse Nell1 gene, induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. Nell16R has a T!A base change that converts a codon for cysteine into a premature stop codon [Cys(502)Ter], resulting in severe truncation of the predicted protein product and marked reduction in steady-state levels of the transcript. In addition to the expected alteration of cranial morphology, Nell16R mutants manifest skeletal defects in the vertebral column and ribcage, revealing a hitherto undefined role for Nell1 in signal transduction in endochondral ossification. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays of 219 genes showed an association between the loss of Nell1 function and reduced expression of genes for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins critical for chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Several affected genes are involved in the human cartilage disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and other disorders associated with spinal curvature anomalies. Nell16R mutant mice are a new tool for elucidating basic mechanisms in osteoblast and chrondrocyte differentiation in the developing skull and vertebral column and understanding how perturbations in the production of ECM proteins can lead to anomalies in these structures.

  6. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  7. The functions of grainy head-like proteins in animals and fungi and the evolution of apical extracellular barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Paré

    Full Text Available The Grainy head (GRH family of transcription factors are crucial for the development and repair of epidermal barriers in all animals in which they have been studied. This is a high-level functional conservation, as the known structural and enzymatic genes regulated by GRH proteins differ between species depending on the type of epidermal barrier being formed. Interestingly, members of the CP2 superfamily of transcription factors, which encompasses the GRH and LSF families in animals, are also found in fungi--organisms that lack epidermal tissues. To shed light on CP2 protein function in fungi, we characterized a Neurospora crassa mutant lacking the CP2 member we refer to as grainy head-like (grhl. We show that Neurospora GRHL has a DNA-binding specificity similar to that of animal GRH proteins and dissimilar to that of animal LSF proteins. Neurospora grhl mutants are defective in conidial-spore dispersal due to an inability to remodel the cell wall, and we show that grhl mutants and the long-known conidial separation-2 (csp-2 mutants are allelic. We then characterized the transcriptomes of both Neurospora grhl mutants and Drosophila grh mutant embryos to look for similarities in the affected genes. Neurospora grhl appears to play a role in the development and remodeling of the cell wall, as well as in the activation of genes involved in defense and virulence. Drosophila GRH is required to activate the expression of many genes involved in cuticular/epidermal-barrier formation. We also present evidence that GRH plays a role in adult antimicrobial defense. These results, along with previous studies of animal GRH proteins, suggest the fascinating possibility that the apical extracellular barriers of some animals and fungi might share an evolutionary connection, and that the formation of physical barriers in the last common ancestor was under the control of a transcriptional code that included GRH-like proteins.

  8. Biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of CEBiP-like LysM domain-containing extracellular proteins in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegmann, Judith; Uhlenbroich, Sandra; Shinya, Tomonori; Martinez, Yves; Lefebvre, Benoit; Shibuya, Naoto; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2011-07-01

    The chitin elicitor-binding protein (CEBiP) from rice was the first plant lysin motif (LysM) protein for which the biological and biochemical function had been established. It belongs to a plant-specific family of extracellular LysM proteins (LYMs) for which we analyzed the phylogeny. LYMs are present in vascular plants only, where an early gene duplication event might have resulted in two types which were retained in present day genomes. LYMs consist of a signal peptide, three consecutive LysMs, separated by cysteine pairs, and a C-terminal region without any known signature, whose length allows the distinction between the two types, and which may be followed by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor motif. We analyzed a representative of each type, MtLYM1 and MtLYM2, from Medicago truncatula at the biochemical level and with respect to their expression patterns and observed some similarities but also marked differences. MtLYM1 and MtLYM2 proved to be very different with regard to abundance and apparent molecular mass on SDS-PAGE. Both undergo several post-translational modifications, including N-glycosylation and the addition of a GPI anchor, which would position the proteins at the outer face of the plasma membrane. Only MtLYM2, but not MtLYM1, showed specific binding to biotinylated N-acetylchitooctaose in a manner similar to CEBiP, which belongs to the same type. We postulate that LYM2-type proteins likely function in the perception of chitin-related molecules, whereas possible functions of LYM1-type proteins remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The functions of grainy head-like proteins in animals and fungi and the evolution of apical extracellular barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Adam; Kim, Myungjin; Juarez, Michelle T; Brody, Stuart; McGinnis, William

    2012-01-01

    The Grainy head (GRH) family of transcription factors are crucial for the development and repair of epidermal barriers in all animals in which they have been studied. This is a high-level functional conservation, as the known structural and enzymatic genes regulated by GRH proteins differ between species depending on the type of epidermal barrier being formed. Interestingly, members of the CP2 superfamily of transcription factors, which encompasses the GRH and LSF families in animals, are also found in fungi--organisms that lack epidermal tissues. To shed light on CP2 protein function in fungi, we characterized a Neurospora crassa mutant lacking the CP2 member we refer to as grainy head-like (grhl). We show that Neurospora GRHL has a DNA-binding specificity similar to that of animal GRH proteins and dissimilar to that of animal LSF proteins. Neurospora grhl mutants are defective in conidial-spore dispersal due to an inability to remodel the cell wall, and we show that grhl mutants and the long-known conidial separation-2 (csp-2) mutants are allelic. We then characterized the transcriptomes of both Neurospora grhl mutants and Drosophila grh mutant embryos to look for similarities in the affected genes. Neurospora grhl appears to play a role in the development and remodeling of the cell wall, as well as in the activation of genes involved in defense and virulence. Drosophila GRH is required to activate the expression of many genes involved in cuticular/epidermal-barrier formation. We also present evidence that GRH plays a role in adult antimicrobial defense. These results, along with previous studies of animal GRH proteins, suggest the fascinating possibility that the apical extracellular barriers of some animals and fungi might share an evolutionary connection, and that the formation of physical barriers in the last common ancestor was under the control of a transcriptional code that included GRH-like proteins.

  10. Prion Protein on Astrocytes or in Extracellular Fluid Impedes Neurodegeneration Induced by Truncated Prion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly; Race, Richard; Baumann, Frank; Aguzzi, Adriano; Chesebro, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is a host-encoded membrane-anchored glycoprotein which is required for susceptibility to prion disease. PrP may also be important for normal brain functions such as hippocampal spatial memory. Previously transgenic mice expressing amino terminally truncated mouse PrP (Δ32–134) spontaneously developed a fatal disease associated with degeneration of cerebellar granular neurons as well as vacuolar degeneration of deep cerebellar and brain stem white matter. This disease could...

  11. Down regulation of NO signaling in Trypanosoma cruzi upon parasite-extracellular matrix interaction: changes in protein modification by nitrosylation and nitration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, the causative agent of Chagas' disease in humans, to components of the extracellular matrix (ECM is an important step in host cell invasion. The signaling events triggered in the parasite upon binding to ECM are less explored and, to our knowledge, there is no data available regarding •NO signaling.Trypomastigotes were incubated with ECM for different periods of time. Nitrated and S-nitrosylated proteins were analyzed by Western blotting using anti-nitrotyrosine and S-nitrosyl cysteine antibodies. At 2 h incubation time, a decrease in NO synthase activity, •NO, citrulline, arginine and cGMP concentrations, as well as the protein modifications levels have been observed in the parasite. The modified proteins were enriched by immunoprecipitation with anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies (nitrated proteins or by the biotin switch method (S-nitrosylated proteins and identified by MS/MS. The presence of both modifications was confirmed in proteins of interest by immunoblotting or immunoprecipitation.For the first time it was shown that T. cruzi proteins are amenable to modifications by S-nitrosylation and nitration. When T. cruzi trypomastigotes are incubated with the extracellular matrix there is a general down regulation of these reactions, including a decrease in both NOS activity and cGMP concentration. Notwithstanding, some specific proteins, such as enolase or histones had, at least, their nitration levels increased. This suggests that post-translational modifications of T. cruzi proteins are not only a reflex of NOS activity, implying other mechanisms that circumvent a relatively low synthesis of •NO. In conclusion, the extracellular matrix, a cell surrounding layer of macromolecules that have to be trespassed by the parasite in order to be internalized into host cells, contributes to the modification of •NO signaling in the parasite, probably an essential move for the ensuing invasion step.

  12. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  13. Design and characterization of artificial extracellular matrix proteins for use as small-diameter vascular grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    Synthetic small-diameter vascular grafts often fail within three years of implantation. The underlying causes of graft failure are thought to be (i) a mismatch in the mechanical properties between the graft and host material and (ii) an inability of the graft to support the adhesion of endothelial cells. To address these two issues, artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins contain elastin-like regions to provide physical integrity and cell-binding domains derived from fibronectin to promote endothelial cell attachment. Using recombinant protein technology, a family of artificial proteins was created with differing ratios of elastin-like regions to cell-binding domains, with variable placement of amino acid crosslinking residues, and with differing identity of cell-binding domain. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) adhere in a sequence-specific manner to aECM proteins, secrete basal levels of key fibrinolytic regulators, and are capable of resisting a physiologically relevant detachment force. HUVEC spread more quickly and adhere more firmly to aECM proteins that contain the RGD versus the CS5 cell-binding domain. Decreasing the density of RGD cell-binding domains results in decreased HUVEC adhesion. Furthermore, amino acid selection even at sites up to 16 residues away from the cell-binding domain impacts HUVEC spreading and adhesion. HUVEC also adhere more strongly to stiffer aECM films. Therefore, the identity, density, and context of the cell-binding domain as well as the elastic modulus of the substrate are all important variables in influencing cell-substrate interactions. Proper amino acid sequence choice also influences the susceptibility of aECM proteins to elastase proteolysis; modifying 3% of the amino acid side chains results in a 7-fold reduction in degradation rate. An alternative strategy to decrease degradation involves incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid, 5,5,5-trifluoroisoleucine, into the favored proteolytic cut site

  14. Extracellular Microvesicles from Astrocytes Contain Functional Glutamate Transporters: Regulation by Protein Kinase C and Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain-Daniel eGosselin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate transport through astrocytic excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 is paramount for neural homeostasis. EAAT-1 has been reported in secreted extracellular microvesicles (eMV, such as exosomes and because the Protein Kinase C (PKC family controls the sub-cellular distribution of EAATs, we have explored whether PKCs drive EAATs into eMV. Using rat primary astrocytes, confocal immunofluorescence and ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient we here report that PKC activation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA reorganizes EAAT-1 distribution and reduces functional [3H]-aspartate reuptake. Western-blots show that EAAT-1 is present in eMV from astrocyte conditioned medium, together with NaK ATPase and glutamine synthetase all being further increased after PMA treatment. However, nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals that PKC activation did not change particle concentration. Functional analysis indicates that eMV have the capacity to reuptake [3H]-aspartate. In vivo, we demonstrate that spinal astrocytic reaction induced by peripheral nerve lesion (spared nerve injury, SNI is associated with a phosphorylation of PKC δ together with a shift of EAAT distribution ipsilaterally. Ex vivo, spinal explants from SNI rats release eMV with an increased content of NaK ATPase, EAAT-1 and EAAT-2. These data indicate PKC and cell activation as important regulators of EAAT-1 incorporation in eMV, and raise the possibility that microvesicular EAAT-1 may exert extracellular functions. Beyond a putative role in neuropathic pain, this phenomenon may be important for understanding neural homeostasis and a wide range of neurological diseases associated with astrocytic reaction as well as non-neurological diseases linked to eMV release.

  15. Sec24D-dependent transport of extracellular matrix proteins is required for zebrafish skeletal morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnalee Sarmah

    Full Text Available Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum (ER to Golgi is primarily conducted by coated vesicular carriers such as COPII. Here, we describe zebrafish bulldog mutations that disrupt the function of the cargo adaptor Sec24D, an integral component of the COPII complex. We show that Sec24D is essential for secretion of cartilage matrix proteins, whereas the preceding development of craniofacial primordia and pre-chondrogenic condensations does not depend on this isoform. Bulldog chondrocytes fail to secrete type II collagen and matrilin to extracellular matrix (ECM, but membrane bound receptor beta1-Integrin and Cadherins appear to leave ER in Sec24D-independent fashion. Consequently, Sec24D-deficient cells accumulate proteins in the distended ER, although a subset of ER compartments and Golgi complexes as visualized by electron microscopy and NBD C(6-ceramide staining appear functional. Consistent with the backlog of proteins in the ER, chondrocytes activate the ER stress response machinery and significantly upregulate BiP transcription. Failure of ECM secretion hinders chondroblast intercalations thus resulting in small and malformed cartilages and severe craniofacial dysmorphology. This defect is specific to Sec24D mutants since knockdown of Sec24C, a close paralog of Sec24D, does not result in craniofacial cartilage dysmorphology. However, craniofacial development in double Sec24C/Sec24D-deficient animals is arrested earlier than in bulldog/sec24d, suggesting that Sec24C can compensate for loss of Sec24D at initial stages of chondrogenesis, but Sec24D is indispensable for chondrocyte maturation. Our study presents the first developmental perspective on Sec24D function and establishes Sec24D as a strong candidate for cartilage maintenance diseases and craniofacial birth defects.

  16. EXTRACELLULAR PROTEINS PRODUCED BY DIFFERENT SPECIES OF THE FUNGUS TRICHODERMA ON SECONDARY PAPER MILL SLUDGE SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Vaskova,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kraft pulping is the most commonly used pulping process in the pulp and paper industry. In this process wood chips are chemically delignified using sodium sulfide and sodium hydroxide. Delignification is usually followed by mechanical fiberization and a bleaching process of the resulting wood pulp. In addition to lignin-free wood pulp, this process also produces waste that contains residues of used chemicals, lignin, cellulose, hemicelluloses, and small amounts of other wood components. Because of the worldwide large-scale production of paper, the sludge from paper mills contributes significantly to environmental pollution. Although there have been great efforts being made to utilize this lignin-rich material, sludge is mostly disposed in landfills or incinerated in a boiler. This research project used secondary sludge as a substrate for 7 wood-decay fungi taxonomically belonging to the genus Trichoderma. The examined fungi expressed the capability of consuming sludge components as a carbon source to produce extracellular proteins. The proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis. Before and after fungi cultivation, the sludge was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR.

  17. Adhesion of the human pathogen Sporothrix schenckii to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.C. Lima

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis. This subcutaneous mycosis may disseminate in immunocompromised individuals and also affect several internal organs and tissues, most commonly the bone, joints and lung. Since adhesion is the first step involved with the dissemination of pathogens in the host, we have studied the interaction between S. schenckii and several extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. The binding of two morphological phases of S. schenckii, yeast cells and conidia, to immobilized type II collagen, laminin, fibronectin, fibrinogen and thrombospondin was investigated. Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (poly-HEMA was used as the negative control. Cell adhesion was assessed by ELISA with a rabbit anti-S. schenckii antiserum. The results indicate that both morphological phases of this fungus can bind significantly to type II collagen, fibronectin and laminin in comparison to the binding observed with BSA (used as blocking agent. The adhesion rate observed with the ECM proteins (type II collagen, fibronectin and laminin was statistically significant (P<0.05 when compared to the adhesion obtained with BSA. No significant binding of conidia was observed to either fibrinogen or thrombospondin, but yeast cells did bind to the fibrinogen. Our results indicate that S. schenckii can bind to fibronectin, laminin and type II collagen and also show differences in binding capacity according to the morphological form of the fungus.

  18. Divergent patterns of extracellular matrix protein expression in neonatal versus adult liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Leonid; Resnick, Murray B; Konikoff, Fred; Schuppan, Delphan; Bujanover, Yoram; Lerner, Aaron; Belson, Amir; Lifschitz, Beatriz; Reif, Shimon

    2003-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) expression is subject to distinct changes during ontogeny, and the natural course of liver fibrosis in neonates is thought to differ from that in adults. We compared the expression and distribution of main ECM components between neonatal and adult liver fibrosis. Liver biopsies from infants with neonatal cholestasis and fibrosis were compared to adult biopsies exhibiting an equivalent stage of fibrosis. All biopsies were examined by immunohistochemistry (indirect ABC method) for the ECM proteins, collagens I, III, IV, and VI, laminin, and fibronectin. Infants (aged 1-8 months) with neonatal hepatitis (n = 3), extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) (n = 5), and normal histology (n = 2) were compared with 9 adults (aged 17-70 years) with chronic hepatitis (n = 3), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) (n = 4), and normal histology (n = 2). Collagens I, III, and IV and fibronectin were significantly increased in neonatal hepatitis with mild fibrosis (score hepatitis and extrahepatic biliary atresia with mild fibrosis. In infants with moderate to severe fibrosis (score > or = 6), only collagen I was increased in comparison to adults, whereas collagen VI expression was identical in all groups, irrespective of the degree of fibrosis. Expression of matrix proteins was not different in infants and adults without fibrosis. The increased perisinusoidal deposition of certain ECM components in infants with active hepatitis and mild fibrosis may point to an underlying difference in the mechanism or stimulus of fibrogenesis in neonates as compared to adults.

  19. Influence of extracellular matrix proteins and substratum topography on corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vijaykrishna; McKee, Clayton; Cheung, Wai; Naik, Rachel; Nealey, Paul F; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    The basement membrane (BM) of the corneal epithelium presents biophysical cues in the form of topography and compliance that can impact the phenotype and behaviors of cells and their nuclei through modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. In addition, it is also well known that the intrinsic biochemical attributes of BMs can modulate cell behaviors. In this study, the influence of the combination of exogenous coating of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) (fibronectin-collagen [FNC]) with substratum topography was investigated on cytoskeletal architecture as well as alignment and migration of immortalized corneal epithelial cells. In the absence of FNC coating, a significantly greater percentage of cells aligned parallel with the long axis of the underlying anisotropically ordered topographic features; however, their ability to migrate was impaired. Additionally, changes in the surface area, elongation, and orientation of cytoskeletal elements were differentially influenced by the presence or absence of FNC. These results suggest that the effects of topographic cues on cells are modulated by the presence of surface-associated ECM proteins. These findings have relevance to experiments using cell cultureware with biomimetic biophysical attributes as well as the integration of biophysical cues in tissue-engineering strategies and the development of improved prosthetics.

  20. Alterations in junctional proteins, inflammatory mediators and extracellular matrix molecules in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Gyftopoulos, Alex A; Brown, Karen L; Hansen, Molly; Butcher, Kathy F; Eidelwein, Alexandra P; Noel, Robert A; Rabon, Edd; Posta, Allison; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory atopic disease of the esophagus, causes massive eosinophil infiltration, basal cell hyperplasia, and sub-epithelial fibrosis. To elucidate cellular and molecular factors involved in esophageal tissue damage and remodeling, we examined pinch biopsies from EoE and normal pediatric patients. An inflammation gene array confirmed that eotaxin-3, its receptor CCR3 and interleukins IL-13 and IL-5 were upregulated. An extracellular matrix (ECM) gene array revealed upregulation of CD44 & CD54, and of ECM proteases (ADAMTS1 & MMP14). A cytokine antibody array showed a marked decrease in IL-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist and an increase in eotaxin-2 and epidermal growth factor. Western analysis indicated reduced expression of intercellular junction proteins, E-cadherin and claudin-1 and increased expression of occludin and vimentin. We have identified a number of novel genes and proteins whose expression is altered in EoE. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

  1. Protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate movement, attachment, pairing and egg release in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Ressurreição

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases C (PKCs and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using 'smart' antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance.

  2. Switch-like genes populate cell communication pathways and are enriched for extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have placed gene expression in the context of distribution profiles including housekeeping, graded, and bimodal (switch-like. Single-gene studies have shown bimodal expression results from healthy cell signaling and complex diseases such as cancer, however developing a comprehensive list of human bimodal genes has remained a major challenge due to inherent noise in human microarray data. This study presents a two-component mixture analysis of mouse gene expression data for genes on the Affymetrix MG-U74Av2 array for the detection and annotation of switch-like genes. Two-component normal mixtures were fit to the data to identify bimodal genes and their potential roles in cell signaling and disease progression. Results Seventeen percent of the genes on the MG-U74Av2 array (1519 out of 9091 were identified as bimodal or switch-like. KEGG pathways significantly enriched for bimodal genes included ECM-receptor interaction, cell communication, and focal adhesion. Similarly, the GO biological process "cell adhesion" and cellular component "extracellular matrix" were significantly enriched. Switch-like genes were found to be associated with such diseases as congestive heart failure, Alzheimer's disease, arteriosclerosis, breast neoplasms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, and type I and type II diabetes. In diabetes alone, over two hundred bimodal genes were in a different mode of expression compared to normal tissue. Conclusion This research identified and annotated bimodal or switch-like genes in the mouse genome using a large collection of microarray data. Genes with bimodal expression were enriched within the cell membrane and extracellular environment. Hundreds of bimodal genes demonstrated alternate modes of expression in diabetic muscle, pancreas, liver, heart, and adipose tissue. Bimodal genes comprise a candidate set of biomarkers for a large number of disease states because

  3. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  4. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  5. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Ning; Gong Yingxue; Chan, Vincent; Liao Kin [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chian, Kerm Sin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: askliao@ntu.edu.sg

    2008-03-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10{sup -7} J m{sup -2}) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute.

  6. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  7. Altered distribution of extracellular matrix proteins in the periodontal ligament of periostin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Chihiro; Hongo, Hiromi; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hasegawa, Tomoka; de Freitas, Paulo Henrique Luiz; Yamada, Tamaki; Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Suzuki, Reiko; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Li, Minqi; Kudo, Akira; Iida, Junichiro; Amizuka, Norio

    2014-06-01

    Verifying whether periostin affects the distribution of type I collagen, fibronectin and tenascin C in the periodontal ligament (PDL) is important to contribute to a more thorough understanding of that protein's functions. In this study, we have histologically examined incisor PDL of mandibles in 20 week-old male wild-type and periostin-deficient (periostin-/-) mice, by means of type I collagen, fibronectin, tenascin C, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, matrix metallo-proteinase (MMP)-1 and F4/80-positive monocyte/macrophage immunostaining, transmission electron microscopy and quantitative analysis of cell proliferation. Wild-type PDL featured well-arranged layers of collagen bundles intertwined with PDL cells, whose longitudinal axis ran parallel to the collagen fibers. However, cells in the periostin-/- PDL were irregularly distributed among collagen fibrils, which were also haphazardly arranged. Type I collagen and fibronectin reactivity was seen throughout the wild-type PDL, while in the periostin-/- PDL, only focal, uneven staining for these proteins could be seen. Similarly, tenascin C staining was evenly distributed in the wild-type PDL, but hardly seen in the periostin-/- PDL. MMP-1 immunoreactivity was uniformly distributed in the wild-type PDL, but only dotted staining could be discerned in the periostin-/- PDL. F4/80-positive monocyte/macrophages were found midway between tooth- and bone-related regions in the wild-type PDL, a pattern that could not be observed in the periostin-/- PDL. In summary, periostin deficiency may not only cause PDL collagen fibril disorganization, but could also affect the distribution of other major extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and tenascin C.

  8. Tissue transglutaminase colocalizes with extracellular matrix proteins in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Mieke; van der Wildt, Berend; Schul, Emma; Bol, John G J M; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Drukarch, Benjamin; Wilhelmus, Micha M M

    2013-04-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a key histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D). CAA is characterized by amyloid-beta (Aβ) depositions and remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in brain vessels and plays an important role in the development and progression of both AD and HCHWA-D. Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) modulates the ECM by molecular cross-linking of ECM proteins. Here, we investigated the distribution pattern, cellular source, and activity of tTG in CAA in control, AD, and HCHWA-D cases. We observed increased tTG immunoreactivity and colocalization with Aβ in the vessel wall in early stage CAA, whereas in later CAA stages, tTG and its cross-links were present in halos enclosing the Aβ deposition. In CAA, tTG and its cross-links at the abluminal side of the vessel were demonstrated to be either of astrocytic origin in parenchymal vessels, of fibroblastic origin in leptomeningeal vessels, and of endothelial origin at the luminal side of the deposited Aβ. Furthermore, the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin colocalized with the tTG-positive halos surrounding the deposited Aβ in CAA. However, we observed that in situ tTG activity was present throughout the vessel wall in late stage CAA. Together, our data suggest that tTG and its activity might play a differential role in the development and progression of CAA, possibly evolving from direct modulation of Aβ aggregation to cross-linking of ECM proteins resulting in ECM restructuring.

  9. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta is expressed in the form of proteoglycan and binds to the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnea, G; Grumet, M; Milev, P;

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular domain of receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTP beta) exhibits striking sequence similarity with a soluble, rat brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (3F8 PG). Immunoprecipitation experiments of cells transfected with RPTP beta expression vector and metabolically...... labeled with [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine indicate that the transmembrane form of RPTP beta is indeed a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The 3F8 PG is therefore a variant form composed of the entire extracellular domain of RPTP beta probably generated by alternative RNA splicing. Previous...

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular secreted proteins expressed by two pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii clinical isolates and a non-pathogenic ATCC strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-Ming; Lin, Wei-Chen; Li, Sung-Chou; Shih, Min-Hsiu; Chan, Wen-Ching; Shin, Jyh-Wei; Huang, Fu-Chin

    2016-07-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a serious ocular disease caused by pathogenic Acanthamoeba gaining entry through wounds in the corneal injury; generally, patients at risk for contracting AK wear contact lenses, usually over a long period of time. Moreover, pathogenic Acanthamoeba causes serious consequences: it makes the cornea turbid and difficult to operate on, including procedures such as enucleation of the eyeball. At present, diagnosis of this disease is not straightforward, and treatment is very demanding. We have established the comparative transcriptome and extracellular secreted proteomic database according to the non-pathogenic strain ATCC 30010 and the pathogenic strains NCKU_B and NCKU_D. We identified 44 secreted proteins successfully, 10 consensus secreted proteins and 34 strain-specific secreted proteins. These proteins may provide targets for therapy and immuno-diagnosis of Acanthamoeba infections. This study shows a suitable approach to identify secreted proteins in Acanthamoeba and provides new perspectives for the study of molecules potentially involved in the AK.

  11. Quantification of extracellular matrix proteins from a rat lung scaffold to provide a molecular readout for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ryan C; Calle, Elizabeth A; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Niklason, Laura E; Hansen, Kirk C

    2015-04-01

    The use of extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues for engineered organ generation, holds enormous potential in the field of regenerative medicine. To support organ engineering efforts, we developed a targeted proteomics method to extract and quantify extracellular matrix components from tissues. Our method provides more complete and accurate protein characterization than traditional approaches. This is accomplished through the analysis of both the chaotrope-soluble and -insoluble protein fractions and using recombinantly generated stable isotope labeled peptides for endogenous protein quantification. Using this approach, we have generated 74 peptides, representing 56 proteins to quantify protein in native (nondecellularized) and decellularized lung matrices. We have focused on proteins of the ECM and additional intracellular proteins that are challenging to remove during the decellularization procedure. Results indicate that the acellular lung scaffold is predominantly composed of structural collagens, with the majority of these proteins found in the insoluble ECM, a fraction that is often discarded using widely accepted proteomic methods. The decellularization procedure removes over 98% of intracellular proteins evaluated and retains, to varying degrees, proteoglycans and glycoproteins of the ECM. Accurate characterization of ECM proteins from tissue samples will help advance organ engineering efforts by generating a molecular readout that can be correlated with functional outcome to drive the next generation of engineered organs.

  12. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Actions of Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 Caused by Extracellular Acidification in Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lai Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular acidification occurs under physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as exercise, ischemia, and inflammation. It has been shown that acidosis has various adverse effects on bone. In recent years there has been increasing evidence which indicates that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1 is a pH-sensing receptor and mediates a variety of extracellular acidification-induced actions on bone cells and other cell types. Recent studies have shown that OGR1 is involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation, survival, and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, OGR1 also regulates acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral discs. These observations demonstrate the importance of OGR1 in skeletal development and metabolism. Here, we provide an overview of OGR1 regulation ofosteoclasts, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and the molecular actions of OGR1 induced by extracellular acidification in the maintenance of bone health.

  14. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  15. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans: extracellular matrix proteins that regulate immunity of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylock-Jacobs, Sarah; Keough, Michael B; Lau, Lorraine; Yong, V Wee

    2011-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of scaffolding molecules that also plays an important role in cell signalling, migration and tissue structure. In the central nervous system (CNS), the ECM is integral to the efficient development/guidance and survival of neurons and axons. However, changes in distribution of the ECM in the CNS may significantly enhance pathology in CNS disease or following injury. One group of ECM proteins that is important for CNS homeostasis is the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Up-regulation of these molecules has been demonstrated to be both desirable and detrimental following CNS injury. Taking cues from arthritis, where there is a strong anti-CSPG immune response, there is evidence that suggests that CSPGs may influence immunity during CNS pathological conditions. This review focuses on the role of CSPGs in CNS pathologies as well as in immunity, both from a viewpoint of how they may inhibit repair and exacerbate damage in the CNS, and how they are involved in activation and function of peripheral immune cells, particularly in multiple sclerosis. Lastly, we address how CSPGs may be manipulated to improve disease outcomes.

  16. Nanoscale viscoelasticity of extracellular matrix proteins in soft tissues: A multiscale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Amir K; Heris, Hossein K; Mongeau, Luc; Javid, Farhad

    2014-02-01

    It is hypothesized that the bulk viscoelasticity of soft tissues is determined by two length-scale-dependent mechanisms: the time-dependent response of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins at the nanometer scale and the biophysical interactions between the ECM solid structure and interstitial fluid at the micrometer scale. The latter is governed by poroelasticity theory assuming free motion of the interstitial fluid within the porous ECM structure. In a recent study (Heris, H.K., Miri, A.K., Tripathy, U., Barthelat, F., Mongeau, L., 2013. J. Mech. Behav. Biomed. Mater.), atomic force microscopy was used to measure the response of porcine vocal folds to a creep loading and a 50-nm sinusoidal oscillation. A constitutive model was calibrated and verified using a finite element model to accurately predict the nanoscale viscoelastic moduli of ECM. A generally good correlation was obtained between the predicted variation of the viscoelastic moduli with depth and that of hyaluronic acids in vocal fold tissue. We conclude that hyaluronic acids may regulate vocal fold viscoelasticity. The proposed methodology offers a characterization tool for biomaterials used in vocal fold augmentations.

  17. The extracellular release of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 nuclear protein is mediated by acetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho Carneiro, Vitor; Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Caetano de Abreu da Silva, Isabel; Furtado Madeira da Costa, Rodrigo [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Neto Paiva, Claudia; Torres Bozza, Marcelo [Departamento de Imunologia, Instituto de Microbiologia Professor Paulo de Goes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Rosado Fantappie, Marcelo, E-mail: fantappie@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2009-12-25

    Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) was revealed to be a substrate for the parasite histone acetyltransferases SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. We found that full-length SmHMGB1, as well as its HMG-box B (but not HMG-box A) were acetylated in vitro by SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. However, SmCBP1 was able to acetylate both substrates more efficiently than SmGCN5. Interestingly, the removal of the C-terminal acidic tail of SmHMGB1 (SmHMGB1{Delta}C) resulted in increased acetylation of the protein. We showed by mammalian cell transfection assays that SmHMGB1 and SmHMGB1{Delta}C were transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment. Importantly, after NaB treatment, SmHMGB1 was also present outside the cell. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of SmHMGB1 plays a role in cellular trafficking, culminating with its secretion to the extracellular milieu. The possible role of SmHMGB1 acetylation in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is discussed.

  18. Carbon nanotube interaction with extracellular matrix proteins producing scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonelli FM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda MP Tonelli,1 Anderson K Santos,1 Katia N Gomes,2 Eudes Lorençon,2 Silvia Guatimosim,3 Luiz O Ladeira,2 Rodrigo R Resende11Cell Signaling and Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Intracellular Cardiomiocyte Signaling Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, BrazilAbstract: In recent years, significant progress has been made in organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction, and the use of artificial prostheses to treat the loss or failure of an organ or bone tissue. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to carbon nanotubes and collagen composite materials and their applications in the field of tissue engineering due to their minimal foreign-body reactions, an intrinsic antibacterial nature, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and the ability to be molded into various geometries and forms such as porous structures, suitable for cell ingrowth, proliferation, and differentiation. Recently, grafted collagen and some other natural and synthetic polymers with carbon nanotubes have been incorporated to increase the mechanical strength of these composites. Carbon nanotube composites are thus emerging as potential materials for artificial bone and bone regeneration in tissue engineering.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, tissue engineering, extracellular matrix proteins, collagen, hyaluronic acid, stem cells

  19. A systems-level approach to parental genomic imprinting: the imprinted gene network includes extracellular matrix genes and regulates cell cycle exit and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Adhami, Hala; Evano, Brendan; Le Digarcher, Anne; Gueydan, Charlotte; Dubois, Emeric; Parrinello, Hugues; Dantec, Christelle; Bouschet, Tristan; Varrault, Annie; Journot, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restrains the expression of ∼ 100 eutherian genes in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. The reason for this selective targeting of genes with seemingly disparate molecular functions is unclear. In the present work, we show that imprinted genes are coexpressed in a network that is regulated at the transition from proliferation to quiescence and differentiation during fibroblast cell cycle withdrawal, adipogenesis in vitro, and muscle regeneration in vivo. Imprinted gene regulation is not linked to alteration of DNA methylation or to perturbation of monoallelic, parent-of-origin-dependent expression. Overexpression and knockdown of imprinted gene expression alters the sensitivity of preadipocytes to contact inhibition and adipogenic differentiation. In silico and in cellulo experiments showed that the imprinted gene network includes biallelically expressed, nonimprinted genes. These control the extracellular matrix composition, cell adhesion, cell junction, and extracellular matrix-activated and growth factor-activated signaling. These observations show that imprinted genes share a common biological process that may account for their seemingly diverse roles in embryonic development, obesity, diabetes, muscle physiology, and neoplasm.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor ligands as new extracellular targets for the metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Møller, Henrik D.; Sumer, Eren U

    2009-01-01

    The function of S100A4, a member of the calcium-binding S100 protein family, has been associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Although an essential pro-metastatic role of extracellular S100A4 in tumor progression has been demonstrated, the identification of the precise underlying mechanisms...... and protein partners (receptors) has remained elusive. To identify putative targets for extracellular S100A4, we screened a phage display peptide library using S100A4 as bait. We identified three independent peptide motifs with varying affinities for the S100A4 protein. Sequence analyses indicated...... that the most abundant peptide mimicked the F/YCC motif present in the epidermal growth factor domain of ErbB receptor ligands. S100A4 selectively interacted with a number of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, demonstrating highest affinity for amphiregulin. Importantly, we found that S100A4...

  1. Microfibril-associated Protein 4 Binds to Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) and Colocalizes with SP-A in the Extracellular Matrix of the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa H.; Shipley, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an oligomeric collectin that recognizes lipid and carbohydrate moieties present on broad range of micro-organisms, and mediates microbial lysis and clearance. SP-A also modulates multiple immune-related functions including cytokine production and chemotaxis...... for phagocytes. Here we describe the molecular interaction between the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and SP-A. MFAP4 is a collagen-binding molecule containing a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain and a N-terminal located integrin-binding motif. We produced recombinant MFAP4...... with a molecular mass of 36 and 66 kDa in the reduced and unreduced states respectively. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical crosslinking showed that MFAP4 forms oligomers of four dimers. We demonstrated calcium-dependent binding between MFAP4 and human SP-A1 and SP-A2. No binding was seen to recombinant SP-A...

  2. Immunoproteomic Analysis of Antibody Responses to Extracellular Proteins of Candida albicans Revealing the Importance of Glycosylation for Antigen Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Knüpfer, Uwe; Kasper, Lydia; Wielsch, Natalie; Hube, Bernhard; Kortgen, Andreas; Bauer, Michael; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimopoulos, George; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2016-08-05

    During infection, the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans undergoes a yeast-to-hypha transition, secretes numerous proteins for invasion of host tissues, and modulates the host's immune response. Little is known about the interplay of C. albicans secreted proteins and the host adaptive immune system. Here, we applied a combined 2D gel- and LC-MS/MS-based approach for the characterization of C. albicans extracellular proteins during the yeast-to-hypha transition, which led to a comprehensive C. albicans secretome map. The serological responses to C. albicans extracellular proteins were investigated by a 2D-immunoblotting approach combined with MS for protein identification. On the basis of the screening of sera from candidemia and three groups of noncandidemia patients, a core set of 19 immunodominant antibodies against secreted proteins of C. albicans was identified, seven of which represent potential diagnostic markers for candidemia (Xog1, Lip4, Asc1, Met6, Tsa1, Tpi1, and Prx1). Intriguingly, some secreted, strongly glycosylated protein antigens showed high cross-reactivity with sera from noncandidemia control groups. Enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins secreted from hyphae significantly impaired sera antibody recognition. Furthermore, deglycosylation of the recombinantly produced, secreted aspartyl protease Sap6 confirmed a significant contribution of glycan epitopes to the recognition of Sap6 by antibodies in patient's sera.

  3. The Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adherence protein promotes bacterial internalization by keratinocytes independent of fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bur, Stephanie; Preissner, Klaus T; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, the leading causal pathogen of skin infections, is strongly associated with skin atopy, and a number of bacterial adhesins allow the microbe to adhere to and invade eukaryotic cells. One of these adhesive molecules is the multifunctional extracellular adherence protein (Eap), which is overexpressed in situ in authentic human wounds and was shown to delay wound healing in experimental models. Yet, its role during invasion of keratinocytes is not clearly defined. By using a gentamicin/lysostaphin protection assay we demonstrate here that preincubation of HaCaT cells or primary keratinocytes with Eap results in a concentration-dependent significant increase in staphylococcal adhesion, followed by an even more pronounced internalization of bacteria by eukaryotic cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that Eap increased both the number of infected eukaryotic cells and the bacterial load per infected cell. Moreover, treatment of keratinocytes with Eap strongly enhanced the internalization of coagulase-negative staphylococci, as well as of E. coli, and markedly promoted staphylococcal invasion into extended-culture keratinocytes, displaying expression of keratin 10 and involucrin as differentiation markers. Thus, wound-related staphylococcal Eap may provide a major cellular invasin function, thereby enhancing the pathogen's ability to hide from the host immune system during acute and chronic skin infection.

  4. Extracellular administration of BCL2 protein reduces apoptosis and improves survival in a murine model of sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Iwata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe sepsis and septic shock are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In experimental sepsis there is prominent apoptosis of various cell types, and genetic manipulation of death and survival pathways has been shown to modulate organ injury and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of extracellular administration of two anti-apoptotic members of the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2 family of intracellular regulators of cell death in a murine model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. We show that intraperitoneal injection of picomole range doses of recombinant human (rh BCL2 or rhBCL2A1 protein markedly improved survival as assessed by surrogate markers of death. Treatment with rhBCL2 or rhBCL2A1 protein significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the intestine and heart following CLP, and this was accompanied by increased expression of endogenous mouse BCL2 protein. Further, mice treated with rhBCL2A1 protein showed an increase in the total number of neutrophils in the peritoneum following CLP with reduced neutrophil apoptosis. Finally, although neither BCL2 nor BCL2A1 are a direct TLR2 ligand, TLR2-null mice were not protected by rhBCL2A1 protein, indicating that TLR2 signaling was required for the protective activity of extracellularly adminsitered BCL2A1 protein in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment with rhBCL2A1 or rhBCL2 protein protects mice from sepsis by reducing apoptosis in multiple target tissues, demonstrating an unexpected, potent activity of extracellularly administered BCL2 BH4-domain proteins.

  5. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  6. Thrombopoietin potentiates the protein-kinase-C-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1998-12-15

    The thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor is expressed in the megakaryocytic lineage from late progenitors to platelets. We investigated the effect of TPO on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation pathway in human platelets. TPO by itself did not activate ERK1, ERK2 and protein kinase C (PKC), whereas TPO directly enhanced the PKC-dependent activation of ERKs induced by other agonists including thrombin and phorbol esters, without affecting the PKC activation by those agonists. TPO did not activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases, MEK1 and MEK2, but activated Raf-1 and directly augmented the PKC-mediated MEK activation, suggesting that TPO primarily potentiates the ERK pathway through regulating MEKs or upstream steps of MEKs including Raf-1. The MEK inhibitor PD098059 failed to affect not only thrombin-induced or phorbol ester-induced aggregation, but also potentiation of aggregation by TPO, denying the primary involvement of ERKs and MEKs in those events. ERKs and MEKs were located mainly in the detergent-soluble/non-cytoskeletal fractions. ERKs but not MEKs were relocated to the cytoskeleton following platelet aggregation and actin polymerization. These data indicate that TPO synergizes with other agonists in the ERK activation pathway of platelets and that this synergy might affect functions of the cytoskeleton possibly regulated by ERKs.

  7. Extracellular functions of glycolytic enzymes of parasites: unpredicted use of ancient proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arreaza, Amaranta; Acosta, Hector; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis; Michels, Paul A M; Avilán, Luisana

    2014-02-01

    In addition of their usual intracellular localization where they are involved in catalyzing reactions of carbohydrate and energy metabolism by glycolysis, multiple studies have shown that glycolytic enzymes of many organisms, but notably pathogens, can also be present extracellularly. In the case of parasitic protists and helminths, they can be found either secreted or attached to the surface of the parasites. At these extracellular localizations, these enzymes have been shown to perform additional, very different so-called "moonlighting" functions, such as acting as ligands for a variety of components of the host. Due to this recognition, different extracellular glycolytic enzymes participate in various important parasite-host interactions such as adherence and invasion of parasites, modulation of the host's immune and haemostatic systems, promotion of angiogenesis, and acquisition of specific nutrients by the parasites. Accordingly, extracellular glycolytic enzymes are important for the invasion of the parasites and their establishment in the host, and in determining their virulence.

  8. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  9. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans.

  10. Expression at a 20L scale and purification of the extracellular domain of the Schistosoma mansoni TSP-2 recombinant protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Elena; Kwityn, Clifford; Zhan, Bin; Gillespie, Portia; Brelsford, Jill; Deumic, Vehid; Plieskatt, Jordan; Rezende, Wanderson C; Tsao, Eric; Kalampanayil, Bose; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-01-01

    A novel recombinant protein vaccine for human schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni is under development. The Sm-TSP-2 schistosomiasis vaccine is comprised of a 9 kDa recombinant protein corresponding to the extracellular domain of a unique S. mansoni tetraspanin. Here, we describe the cloning and the expression of the external loop of Sm-TSP-2 recombinant protein secreted by Pichia Pink™ the process development at 20L scale fermentation, and the two-steps purification, which resulted in a protein recovery yield of 31% and a protein purity of 97%. The developed processes are suitable for the production of purified protein for subsequent formulation and Phase 1 clinical studies. PMID:23899507

  11. EcmPred: Prediction of extracellular matrix proteins based on random forest with maximum relevance minimum redundancy feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar Umar

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of tissues of multicellular organisms. It consists of secreted macromolecules, mainly polysaccharides and glycoproteins. Malfunctions of ECM proteins lead to severe disorders such as marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, numerous chondrodysplasias, and skin diseases. In this work, we report a random forest approach, EcmPred, for the prediction of ECM proteins from protein sequences. EcmPred was trained on a dataset containing 300 ECM and 300 non-ECM and tested on a dataset containing 145 ECM and 4187 non-ECM proteins. EcmPred achieved 83% accuracy on the training and 77% on the test dataset. EcmPred predicted 15 out of 20 experimentally verified ECM proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome, we predicted novel ECM proteins validated with gene ontology and InterPro. The dataset and standalone version of the EcmPred software is available at http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/Extracellular_matrix_proteins/EcmPred. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. EcmPred: prediction of extracellular matrix proteins based on random forest with maximum relevance minimum redundancy feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Hartmann, Enno; Martinetz, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of tissues of multicellular organisms. It consists of secreted macromolecules, mainly polysaccharides and glycoproteins. Malfunctions of ECM proteins lead to severe disorders such as marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, numerous chondrodysplasias, and skin diseases. In this work, we report a random forest approach, EcmPred, for the prediction of ECM proteins from protein sequences. EcmPred was trained on a dataset containing 300 ECM and 300 non-ECM and tested on a dataset containing 145 ECM and 4187 non-ECM proteins. EcmPred achieved 83% accuracy on the training and 77% on the test dataset. EcmPred predicted 15 out of 20 experimentally verified ECM proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome, we predicted novel ECM proteins validated with gene ontology and InterPro. The dataset and standalone version of the EcmPred software is available at http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/Extracellular_matrix_proteins/EcmPred.

  13. Extracellular matrix proteins expression profiling in chemoresistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly--over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis.

  14. Extracellular matrix proteins interact with cell-signaling pathways in modifying risk of achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Colleen J; van der Merwe, Lize; Cook, Jill; Handley, Christopher J; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between variants within genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and components of cell-signaling pathways within the extracellular matrix, and determine the relative contribution of these variants to Achilles tendinopathy risk in a polygenic model. A total of 339 asymptomatic control participants and 179 participants clinically diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy were genotyped for variants within six genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and three genes encoding components of cell-signaling pathways. Logistic regression, stepwise selection, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to select and evaluate genetic interactions and determine the relative contribution of these variants to overall genetic risk. The strongest, best fit polygenic risk model included the variables sex, three COL27A1 variants (rs4143245; rs1249744; rs946053), COL5A1 rs12722, CASP8 rs1045485, and CASP8 rs2824129 with an area under the ROC curve of 0.737 and the maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity indicators equal to 134%. Significant interactions between genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and genes encoding components of the cell-signaling pathways modify risk of Achilles tendinopathy.

  15. Association of Levels of Antibodies from Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Extracellular Proteins of Food and Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Hevia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract mucosa and is related to an abnormal immune response to commensal bacteria. Our aim of the present work has been to explore the levels of antibodies (IgG and IgA raised against extracellular proteins produced by LAB and its association with IBD. We analyzed, by Western-blot and ELISA, the presence of serum antibodies (IgA and IgG developed against extracellular protein fractions produced by different food bacteria from the genera Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. We used a sera collection consisting of healthy individuals (HC, n=50, Crohn's disease patients (CD, n=37, and ulcerative colitis patients (UC, n=15. Levels of IgA antibodies developed against a cell-wall hydrolase from Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus GG (CWH were significantly higher in the IBD group (P<0.002; n=52. The specificity of our measurements was confirmed by measuring IgA antibodies developed against the CWH peptide 365-VNTSNQTAAVSAS-377. IBD patients appeared to have different immune response to food bacteria. This paper sets the basis for developing systems for early detection of IBD, based on the association of high levels of antibodies developed against extracellular proteins from food and probiotic bacteria.

  16. [Expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases in the subcutaneous fascia of rats and their changes after acupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue-mei; Yang, Chun; Yuan, Lin; Diao, Jian-xin; Zhang, Xue-quan; Huang, Yong; Dai, Jing-xing; Qiu, Xiao-zhong; Yu, Lei

    2009-04-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture on the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) in the subcutaneous fascia of SD rats. Eighteen SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=3) including 5 acupuncture groups and a control group. The rats in the 5 acupuncture groups received electro-acupuncture therapy in the regions of the inguinal groove, and at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 36 h after the last therapy, the superfacial fascia surrounding the acupuncture point (about 1.5 cm in diameter) were collected. The fascia tissues at the corresponding sites and at the acupoint Zusanli (ST36) were obtained from the control rats. The expression of ERK1/2 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) in the tissues were detected by Western blotting. ERK1/2 and p-ERK1/2 expressions were detected in the tissues harvested from both the acupoint and the non-acupoint in the control rats with similar expression intensities. In the rats of each acupuncture group, ERK1/2 expression was significantly increased on the acupuncture side in comparison with the control side. The normal loose connective tissue may participate in tissue proliferation and differentiation possibly via phosphorylation of ERK. Acupuncture can promote the signal transduction pathway of ERK, which can be a possible mechanism for the effect of acupuncture in modulating the physiopathological conditions.

  17. Production of extracellular biopolymers and identification of intracellular proteins and Rhizobium tropici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, José; Figueiredo, Marcia; Silva, Marcia; Malta, Marília; Vendruscolo, Claire; Almeida, Hélio

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify species of rhizobia (from the IPA 403 and IPA 49 isolates), to assess the physico-chemical characteristics of the biopolymers produced by these rhizobia and to determine the soluble intracellular proteins that are present in these rhizobia. The polysaccharides containing acetyl and pyruvic acid groups that were produced by different strains that had been cultivated in yeast extract mannitol (YEM) medium for 132, 144, and 168 h were evaluated for yield, viscosity, and concentration. Based on the analysis of their partial 16S rDNA sequences, both isolates were identified as Rhizobium tropici. The polymers produced in liquid YEM medium were recovered, dried and weighed to determine culture yield. Soluble intracellular proteins were identified through the techniques of 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry for cultures that were cultivated for 168 h. The largest biopolymer yield and the highest viscosity and concentration of acetyl and pyruvic acids were obtained from the IPA 403 isolate after 168 h of culture. The proteins that were identified for the CIAT 899 isolate included elongation factor TU, a chaperone; GroE/GroEs and a putative glycosyltransferase, all of which catalyze the production of polysaccharides. For the IPA 403 strain, dinitrogenase and nitrogenase iron proteins were found. In the IPA 49 strain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was found along with two other proteins, the beta subunit of an electron-transferring flavoprotein and a dehydrogenase.

  18. Extra-cellular matrix proteins induce matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity and increase airway smooth muscle contraction in asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha K Rogers

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling describes the histopathological changes leading to fixed airway obstruction in patients with asthma and includes extra-cellular matrix (ECM deposition. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 is present in remodelled airways but its relationship with ECM proteins and the resulting functional consequences are unknown. We used airway smooth muscle cells (ASM and bronchial biopsies from control donors and patients with asthma to examine the regulation of MMP-1 by ECM in ASM cells and the effect of MMP-1 on ASM contraction. Collagen-I and tenascin-C induced MMP-1 protein expression, which for tenascin-C, was greater in asthma derived ASM cells. Tenascin-C induced MMP-1 expression was dependent on ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK activation and attenuated by function blocking antibodies against the β1 and β3 integrin subunits. Tenascin-C and MMP-1 were not expressed in normal airways but co-localised in the ASM bundles and reticular basement membrane of patients with asthma. Further, ECM from asthma derived ASM cells stimulated MMP-1 expression to a greater degree than ECM from normal ASM. Bradykinin induced contraction of ASM cells seeded in 3D collagen gels was reduced by the MMP inhibitor ilomastat and by siRNA knockdown of MMP-1. In summary, the induction of MMP-1 in ASM cells by tenascin-C occurs in part via integrin mediated MAPK signalling. MMP-1 and tenascin-C are co-localised in the smooth muscle bundles of patients with asthma where this interaction may contribute to enhanced airway contraction. Our findings suggest that ECM changes in airway remodelling via MMP-1 could contribute to an environment promoting greater airway narrowing in response to broncho-constrictor stimuli and worsening asthma symptoms.

  19. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  20. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  1. An essential requirement for β1 integrin in the assembly of extracellular matrix proteins within the vascular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlo, Kirsten A; Noel, Onika D V; Vora, Roshni; LaRussa, Marie; Fassler, Reinhard; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2012-05-01

    β1 integrin has been shown to contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, adhesion and mechanosensation in vitro. Here we showed that deletion of β1 integrin at the onset of smooth muscle differentiation resulted in interrupted aortic arch, aneurysms and failure to assemble extracellular matrix proteins. These defects result in lethality prior to birth. Our data indicates that β1 integrin is not required for the acquisition, but it is essential for the maintenance of the smooth muscle cell phenotype, as levels of critical smooth muscle proteins are gradually reduced in mutant mice. Furthermore, while deposition of extracellular matrix was not affected, its structure was disrupted. Interestingly, defects in extracellular matrix and vascular wall assembly, were restricted to the aortic arch and its branches, compromising the brachiocephalic and carotid arteries and to the exclusion of the descending aorta. Additional analysis of β1 integrin in the pharyngeal arch smooth muscle progenitors was performed using wnt1Cre. Neural crest cells deleted for β1 integrin were able to migrate to the pharyngeal arches and associate with endothelial lined arteries; but exhibited vascular remodeling defects and early lethality. This work demonstrates that β1 integrin is dispensable for migration and initiation of the smooth muscle differentiation program, however, it is essential for remodeling of the pharyngeal arch arteries and for the assembly of the vessel wall of their derivatives. It further establishes a critical role of β1 integrin in the protection against aneurysms that is particularly confined to the ascending aorta and its branches.

  2. Knocking out Bcsas1 in Botrytis cinerea impacts growth, development, and secretion of extracellular proteins, which decreases virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanquan; Qin, Guozheng; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2014-06-01

    Pathogenic fungi usually secrete a series of virulence factors to the extracellular environment to facilitate infection. Rab GTPases play a central role in the secretory pathway. To explore the function of Rab/GTPase in filamentous fungi, we knocked out a Rab/GTPase family gene, Bcsas1, in Botrytis cinerea, an aggressive fungal pathogen that infects more than 200 plant species. A detailed analysis was conducted on the virulence and the secretory capability of the mutants. The results indicated that knockout of Bcsas1 inhibited hyphal development and reduced sporulation of B. cinerea on potato dextrose agar plates resulting in reduced virulence on various fruit hosts. Knocking out the Bcsas1 gene led to an accumulation of transport vesicles at the hyphal tip, significantly reduced extracellular protein content, and lowered the activity of polygalacturonase and xylanase in the extracellular medium. However, mutation of Bcsas1 did not affect the expression of genes encoding polygalacturonase and xylanase, suggesting the secretion of these two family enzymes was suppressed in the mutant. Moreover, a comparative analysis of the secretome provided further evidence that the disruption of Bcsas1 in mutant strains significantly depressed the secretion of polysaccharide hydrolases and proteases. The results indicate that Bcsas1, the Rab8/SEC4-like gene, plays a crucial role in development, protein secretion, and virulence of B. cinerea.

  3. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  4. Extracellular BCL2 proteins are danger-associated molecular patterns that reduce tissue damage in murine models of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Iwata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury contributes to organ dysfunction in a variety of clinical disorders, including myocardial infarction, stroke, organ transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. Recent investigations have demonstrated that apoptosis as an important mechanism of cell death leading to organ dysfunction following I/R. Intracellular danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs released during cell death can activate cytoprotective responses by engaging receptors of the innate immune system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ischemia was induced in the mouse hind limb by tourniquet or in the heart by coronary artery ligation. Reperfusion injury of skeletal or cardiac muscle was markedly reduced by intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injection of recombinant human (rhBCL2 protein or rhBCL2-related protein A1 (BCL2A1 (50 ng/g given prior to ischemia or at the time of reperfusion. The cytoprotective activity of extracellular rhBCL2 or rhBCL2A1 protein was mapped to the BH4 domain, as treatment with a mutant BCL2 protein lacking the BH4 domain was not protective, whereas peptides derived from the BH4 domain of BCL2 or the BH4-like domain of BCL2A1 were. Protection by extracellular rhBCL2 or rhBCL2A1 was associated with a reduction in apoptosis in skeletal and cardiac muscle following I/R, concomitant with increased expression of endogenous mouse BCL2 (mBCL2 protein. Notably, treatment with rhBCL2A1 protein did not protect mice deficient in toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 or the adaptor protein, myeloid differentiation factor-88 (MyD88. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment with cytokine-like doses of rhBCL2 or rhBCL2A1 protein or BH4-domain peptides reduces apoptosis and tissue injury following I/R by a TLR2-MyD88-dependent mechanism. These findings establish a novel extracellular cytoprotective activity of BCL2 BH4-domain proteins as potent cytoprotective DAMPs.

  5. [Prokaryotic expression of S2 extracellular domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein and its fusion with Hela cell membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Ai-Hua; Deng, Peng; Wu, Xiang-Ling; Li, Tao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Xu, Jia; Jiang, Yong

    2009-03-01

    To construct the expression plasmid of S2 extracellular domain (S2ED) of SARS-coronavirus (SARS- Cov) spike protein (S protein) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to obtain the fusion protein expressed in prokaryotic cells. S2ED based on bioinformatics prediction and EGFP sequence were amplified by PCR and inserted into pET-14b plasmid. The recombinant protein His-S2ED-EGFP was expressed in E. coli by IPTG induction. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose beads, the soluble fractions of the fusion protein were collected and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The fusion of S2ED with Hela cell membranes was observed with fluorescent microscope. The pET-14b-S2ED-EGFP plasmid was correctly constructed and highly expressed in BL21 (DE3). When incubated with Hela cells, the purified protein could not internalize through membrane fusion. The expression plasmid containing S2ED of SARS-Cov S protein and EGFP sequence is constructed successfully. Although the recombinant protein obtained has not shown the expected fusion effect with Hela cell membrane, this work may enrich the understanding of the process of membrane fusion mediated by S2 protein and lay the foundation for future study of targeting cell transport system based on cell-specific binding peptide.

  6. Method for generation of peptide-specific IgY antibodies directed to Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen binding protein epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Maciej; Grzywa, Renata; Łupicka-Słowik, Agnieszka; Skoreński, Marcin; Bobrek, Kamila; Nowak, Daria; Boivin, Stephane; Brown, Eric L; Oleksyszyn, Józef; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    The IgY antibodies offer an attractive alternative to mammalian IgGs in research, diagnosis and medicine. The isolation of immunoglobulin Y from the egg yolks is efficient and economical, causing minimal suffering to animals. Here we present the methodology for the production of IgY antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and its peptidyl epitope (spanning residues 127-140). The Efb is an extracellular, adhesion protein which binds both human fibrinogen and complement C3 protein thus contributing to the high infectious potential of this pathogen. The selected epitope of Efb protein is responsible for the interaction with C3. The immunochemical characterization of both anti-Efb and epitope-specific IgY antibodies revealed their similar avidity, titer, and reactivity profile, although some differences in the hen's immune response to administered antigens is discussed.

  7. The extracellular proteome of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB‐12 reveals proteins with putative roles in probiotic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Svensson, Birte; Viborg, Alexander Holm

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert health‐promoting effects on the human host, as demonstrated for numerous strains of the genus Bifidobacterium. To unravel the proteins involved in the interactions between the host and the extensively used and well‐studied probiotic strain Bifidobacte......Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert health‐promoting effects on the human host, as demonstrated for numerous strains of the genus Bifidobacterium. To unravel the proteins involved in the interactions between the host and the extensively used and well‐studied probiotic strain...... Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB‐12, proteins secreted by the bacterium, i.e. belonging to the extracellular proteome present in the culture medium, were identified by 2‐DE coupled with MALDI‐TOF MS. Among the 74 distinct proteins identified, 31 are predicted to carry out their physiological role either...

  8. Stiffness of natural extra-cellular vesicles is governed by membrane protein content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorkin, R.; Huisjes, R.H.; Vorselen, D.; Ofir-Birin, Y.; Roos, W.H.; Regev-Rudzki, N.; Schiffelers, R.M.; Wuite, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of intercellular communication, being involved both in maintaining normal physiology as well as spreading of a wide range of diseases. In order to successfully deliver their cargo, EVs need to be taken up by the target cells. Several studies sugge

  9. Stiffness of natural extra-cellular vesicles is governed by membrane protein content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorkin, R.; Huisjes, R.H.; Vorselen, D.; Ofir-Birin, Y.; Roos, W.H.; Regev-Rudzki, N.; Schiffelers, R.M.; Wuite, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of intercellular communication, being involved both in maintaining normal physiology as well as spreading of a wide range of diseases. In order to successfully deliver their cargo, EVs need to be taken up by the target cells. Several studies

  10. HEPARINS MODULATE EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A; BERDEN, JHM

    Heparins blunt the development of glomerulosclerosis in several disease models in the rat and this protective effect may be related to suppression of glomerular cell proliferation. In this study the direct effect of heparins on another key event in glomerulosclerosis, extracellular matrix (ECM)

  11. Insights into the Mechanisms Involved in the Expression and Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Sun, L; Xiao, L; Han, Y; Fu, X; Xiong, X; Xu, X; Liu, Y; Yang, S; Liu, F; Kanwar, Y S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) is believed to be a major microvascular complication of diabetes. The hallmark of DN includes deposition of Extracellular Matrix (ECM) proteins, such as, collagen, laminin and fibronectin in the mesangium and renal tubulo-interstitium of the glomerulus and basement membranes. Such an increased expression of ECM leads to glomerular and tubular basement membranes thickening and increase of mesangial matrix, ultimately resulting in glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The characteristic morphologic glomerular mesangial lesion has been described as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodule, and the process at times is referred to as diabetic nodular glomerulosclerosis. Thus, the accumulation of ECM proteins plays a critical role in the development of DN. The relevant mechanism(s) involved in the increased ECM expression and their regulation in the kidney in diabetic state has been extensively investigated and documented in the literature. Nevertheless, there are certain other mechanisms that may yet be conclusively defined. Recent studies demonstrated that some of the new signaling pathways or molecules including, Notch, Wnt, mTOR, TLRs and small GTPase may play a pivotal role in the modulation of ECM regulation and expression in DN. Such modulation could be operational for instance Notch through Notch1/Jagged1 signaling, Wnt by Wnt/β- catenin pathway and mTOR via PI3-K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. All these pathways may be critical in the modulation of ECM expression and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. In addition, TLRs, mainly the TLR2 and TLR4, by TLR2- dependent and TGF-β-dependent conduits, may modulate ECM expression and generate a fibrogenic response. Small GTPase like Rho, Ras and Rab family by targeting relevant genes may also influence the accumulation of ECM proteins and renal fibrosis in hyperglycemic states. This review summarizes the recent information about the role and mechanisms by which these molecules and signaling pathways

  12. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    ...) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC...

  13. Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies Are Associated With Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in the Sputum in Relatives of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoruelle, M Kristen; Harrall, Kylie K; Ho, Linh; Purmalek, Monica M; Seto, Nickie L; Rothfuss, Heather M; Weisman, Michael H; Solomon, Joshua J; Fischer, Aryeh; Okamoto, Yuko; Kelmenson, Lindsay B; Parish, Mark C; Feser, Marie; Fleischer, Chelsie; Anderson, Courtney; Mahler, Michael; Norris, Jill M; Kaplan, Mariana J; Cherrington, Brian D; Holers, V Michael; Deane, Kevin D

    2017-06-01

    Studies suggest that rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related autoimmunity is initiated at a mucosal site. However, the factors associated with the mucosal generation of this autoimmunity are unknown, especially in individuals who are at risk of future RA. Therefore, we tested anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in the sputum of RA-free first-degree relatives (FDRs) of RA patients and patients with classifiable RA. We evaluated induced sputum and serum samples from 67 FDRs and 20 RA patients for IgA anti-CCP and IgG anti-CCP, with cutoff levels for positivity determined in a control population. Sputum was also evaluated for cell counts, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for protein/nucleic acid complexes, and total citrulline. Sputum was positive for IgA and/or IgG anti-CCP in 14 of 20 RA patients (70%) and 17 of 67 FDRs (25%), including a portion of FDRs who were serum anti-CCP negative. In the FDRs, elevations of sputum IgA and IgG anti-CCP were associated with elevated sputum cell counts and NET levels. IgA anti-CCP was associated with ever smoking and with elevated sputum citrulline levels. Anti-CCP is elevated in the sputum of FDRs, including seronegative FDRs, suggesting that the lung may be a site of anti-CCP generation in this population. The association of anti-CCP with elevated cell counts and NET levels in FDRs supports a hypothesis that local airway inflammation and NET formation may drive anti-CCP production in the lung and may promote the early stages of RA development. Longitudinal studies are needed to follow the evolution of these processes relative to the development of systemic autoimmunity and articular RA. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Oral lichen sclerosus expressing extracellular matrix proteins and IgG4-positive plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Aquino Xavier, Flavia Calo; Prates, Alisio Alves; Gurgel, Clarissa Araujo; De Souza, Tulio Geraldo; Andrade, Rodrigo Guimaraes; Goncalves Ramos, Eduardo Antonio; Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana Maria; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2014-09-16

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a mucocutaneous disease with uncommon oral involvement. The etiology is not yet well understood, but LS has been associated with autoimmune, genetic, and immunological factors. We report a 47-year-old man with LS that exhibited an asymptomatic white plaque with red patches on the maxillary alveolar mucosa extending to the labial mucosa. He had no other skin disease. Positive immunostaining for tenascin and scarcity of fibronectin suggested extracellular matrix reorganization. Elastin immunostaining indicated a reduction of elastic fibers. Immunoexpression of collagen IV in blood vessels and its absence in the epithelial basement membrane, together with diffuse MMP-9 immunoexpression, suggested altered proteolytic activity. Mast cell staining bordering areas of sclerosis indicated a possible role in the synthesis of collagen. IgG4 positivity in plasma cells suggested a role in the fibrogenesis. This is an unusual presentation of oral LS and we discuss immunohistochemical findings regarding cellular and extracellular matrix components.

  15. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  16. Ethanol impairs muscarinic receptor-induced neuritogenesis in rat hippocampal slices: Role of astrocytes and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gennaro; Guizzetti, Marina; Dao, Khoi; Mattison, Hayley A; Costa, Lucio G

    2011-12-01

    In an in vitro co-culture system of astrocytes and neurons, stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in astrocytes had been shown to cause neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons, and this effect was inhibited by ethanol. The present study sought to confirm these earlier findings in a more complex system, in vitro rat hippocampal slices in culture. Exposure of hippocampal slices to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (1mM for 24h) induced neurite outgrowth in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which was mediated by activation of muscarinic M3 receptors. Specifically, carbachol induced a >4-fold increase in the length of the longest neurite, and a 4-fold increase in the length of minor neurites and in the number of branches. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol (50mM) resulted in significant inhibition of the effects induced by carbachol on all parameters measured. Neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons is dependent on various permissive factors that are produced and released by glial cells. In hippocampal slices carbachol increased the levels of two extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin and laminin-1, by 1.6-fold, as measured by Western blot. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol significantly inhibited these increases. Carbachol-induced increases in levels of extracellular matrix proteins were antagonized by a M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, function-blocking fibronectin or laminin-1 antibodies antagonized the effect of carbachol on neurite outgrowth. These results indicate that in hippocampal slices stimulation of muscarinic M3 receptors induces neurite outgrowth, which is mediated by fibronectin and laminin-1, two extracellular matrix proteins released by astrocytes. By decreasing fibronectin and laminin levels ethanol prevents carbachol-induced neuritogenesis. These findings highlight the importance of glial-neuronal interactions as important targets in the developmental neurotoxicity of alcohol.

  17. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes.

  18. Comparison of two chemical extraction methods for proteins and polysaccharides of Spirogyra fluviatilis in extracellular polymeric substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuiping; Lee, Yichao

    2017-05-01

    Under natural circumstances, Spirogyra fluviatilis excretes large amounts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and forms a mucilage layer. This study used two algal EPS extraction methods such as NH4OH and formaldehyde-NaOH to compare the extraction yields of EPS and the levels of its primary components of polysaccharides and proteins. The results indicated that the extraction yields of EPS using formaldehyde-NaOH and NH4OH are 8.05 mg EPS/g-fresh algae and 5.26 mg EPS/g-fresh algae, respectively. The ratio of proteins to polysaccharides in EPS is around 0.24 to 0.34, which is not a significant difference between the two extraction methods. In other words, the level of polysaccharides is always higher than the level of proteins in EPS extraction with both two methods

  19. The human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina W;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...... the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (hNHE1) as a membrane scaffold protein for ERK2 and show direct hNHE1-ERK1/2 interaction in cellular contexts. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and immunofluorescence analysis we demonstrate that ERK2 scaffolding by hNHE1 occurs by one of three D...... and ERK2, and provides a molecular mechanism for the important ERK2 scaffolding function of the membrane protein hNHE1, which regulates the phosphorylation of both hNHE1 and ERK2....

  20. Efficient production and purification of extracellular domain of human FGFR-Fc fusion proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska-Wedzina, Aleksandra; Borek, Aleksandra; Chudzian, Julia; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Otlewski, Jacek

    2014-07-01

    The family of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) plays an important role in cell growth, survival, differentiation and angiogenesis. The three immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains of FGFR (D1, D2, and D3) are critical for ligand binding and specificity towards fibroblast growth factor and heparan sulfate. Fibroblast growth factor receptors are overexpressed in a wide variety of tumors, such as breast, bladder, and prostate cancer, and therefore they are attractive targets for different types of anticancer therapies. In this study, we have cloned, expressed in CHO cells and purified Fc-fused extracellular domains of different types of FGFRs (ECD_FGFR1a-Fc, ECD_FGFR1b-Fc, ECD_FGFR2a-Fc, ECD_FGFR2b-Fc, ECD_FGFR3a-Fc, ECD_FGFR3b-Fc, ECD_FGFR4a-Fc, ECD_FGFR4b-Fc), which could be used as molecular targets for the selection of specific antibodies. The fusion proteins were analyzed using gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and mass spectrometry. To facilitate their full characterization, the fusion proteins were deglycosylated using PNGase F enzyme. With an optimized transient transfection protocol and purification procedure we were able to express the proteins at a high level and purify them to homogeneity.

  1. Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Alkaline Phosphatase and Pyrophosphate as Molecular Determinants of Bone, Tooth, Kidney and Vascular Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Marc D.

    2008-09-01

    Progress in biomineralization research in recent years has identified, characterized and described functions for key noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins regulating crystal growth in the skeleton and dentition. Some of these same proteins expressed in soft tissues undergoing pathologic calcification also inhibit ectopic crystal growth. In addition to extracellular matrix proteins regulating matrix mineralization, the enzyme tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase—which is highly expressed by cells in mineralized tissues—cleaves pyrophosphate, an anionic small-molecule inhibitor of mineralization. Together with the required mineral ion availability necessary for crystal growth, these molecular determinants appear to function in limiting the spread of pathologic calcification seen in soft tissues such as blood vessels and kidneys. Osteopontin, in particular, is a potent calcification inhibitor that accumulates in mineralized tissues and in calcified deposits during vascular calcification and nephrolithiasis/urolithiasis. Additional research is required to establish the exact temporal sequence in which the molecular determinants of pathologic calcification appear relative to mineral crystal growth in different tissues, and to establish their relationship (if any) to the activation of osteogenic differentiation programs.

  2. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 decreases the concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid in amygdale kindling rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui CHEN; Cui-cui WANG; Xia XIAO; Li WEI; Guoxiong XU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was responsible for drug resistence in refractory epilepsy in amygdale kindling rats.Methods:Rat amygdale kindling was used as a model of refractory epilepsy.The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein in the brains was examined using RT-PCR and Western blot.MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus were studied with immunohistochemical staining.The rats were intraperitoneally injected with phenytoin (50 mg/kg) or carbamazepine (20 mg/kg),and their concentrations in the cortical extracellular fluid were measured using microdialysis and HPLC.Probenecid,a MRP1 inhibitor (40 mmol/L,50 μL) was administered through an inflow tube into the cortex 30 min before injection of the antiepileptic drugs.Results:The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus in amygdale kindling rats compared with the control group.Furthermore,the number of MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus was also significantly increased in amygdale kindling rats.Microdialysis studies showed that the concentrations of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the cortical extracellular fluid were significantly decreased in amygdale kindling rats.Pre-administration of probenecid could restore the concentrations back to their control levels.Conclusion:Up-regulation of MRP1 is responsible for the resistance of brain cells to antiepileptic drugs in the amygdale kindling rats.

  3. Degradation of extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin and laminin) by serine-proteinases isolated from Lonomia achelous caterpillar hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Sara; Guerrero, Belsy; Salazar, Ana M; Gil, Amparo; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L

    2006-09-01

    Lonomia achelous is a caterpillar distributed in southern Venezuela and in northern Brazil that causes an acute hemorrhagic syndrome in people who have contact with its bristles. The effect of the crude hemolymph and its chromatographic fractions (FDII, Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2) on extracellular matrix proteins was studied. The chromatographic fractions show activities similar to plasmin and urokinase. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both lonomins appear as a protein band of 25 kDa under reduced conditions. By exclusion chromatography, the molecular weights of Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2 were 26.5 and 24.5 kDa, respectively. Fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin were degraded by all venom components. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, under reduced conditions, shows that lonomins degrade fibronectin in four main fragments of 116, 60, 50 and 30 kDa. Molecular exclusion chromatography in native conditions shows that the molecular masses of these fragments are > or = 300, 62 and 27 kDa. The proteolytic effect of lonomins was abolished by benzamidine/HCl, iodoacetic acid and aprotinin. The extracellular matrix protein degradation together with the fibrino(geno)lytic activity of hemolymph and its fractions could explain, in part, the hemorrhagic syndrome, and the wound dehiscence in persons who have had contact with the L. achelous caterpillar.

  4. Extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1 plasma levels are associated with increased cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra

    INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Fibulin-1 is one of the few extracellular matrix proteins present in blood in high concentrations. We aimed to define the relationship between plasma fibulin-1 levels and risk markers of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. METHODS: Plasma fibulin-1...... of plasma fibulin-1. CONCLUSIONS: Increased plasma fibulin-1 levels were associated with impaired kidney function and diabetes. Fibulin-1 levels were also associated with hemodynamic cardiovascular risk markers. We conclude, that fibulin-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease observed...

  5. Neovibsanin B increases extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells via activation of Smad signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao; Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xu-Ling; Qu, Shen; Lan, Xian-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of neovibsanin B on the synthesis and deposition of ECM proteins and the signalling pathways used in optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. For investigation of the signalling pathway used by neovibsanin B, ONH cells were treated with neovibsanin B. Western blot and immunostaining analyses were used to examine the phosphorylation of proteins involved in Smad and non-Smad signalling pathway. The results revealed that ONH cells on treatment with neovibsanin B showed enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Neovibsanin B induced phosphorylation of canonical signalling proteins, Smad2/3. However phosphorylation of non-canonical signalling proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) 1/2 remained unaffected. There was also increase in co-localization of pSmad2/3 with Co-Smad4 in the nucleus of ONH astrocytes and LC cells indicating activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway. Treatment of ONH cells with SIS3, inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation reversed the neovibsanin B stimulated ECM expression as well as activation of canonical pathway signalling molecules. In addition, inhibition of Smad2 or Smad3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed neovibsanin B stimulated ECM protein synthesis in ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Thus neovibsanin B utilizes the canonical Smad signalling pathway to stimulate ECM synthesis in human ONH cells. The neovibsanin B induced ECM synthesis and activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway may be due to its effect on transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). However, further studies are under process to understand the mechanism.

  6. Factor H-related protein 5 interacts with pentraxin 3 and the extracellular matrix and modulates complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csincsi, Ádám I; Kopp, Anne; Zöldi, Miklós; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Uzonyi, Barbara; Hebecker, Mario; Caesar, Joseph J E; Pickering, Matthew C; Daigo, Kenji; Hamakubo, Takao; Lea, Susan M; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Józsi, Mihály

    2015-05-15

    The physiological roles of the factor H (FH)-related proteins are controversial and poorly understood. Based on genetic studies, FH-related protein 5 (CFHR5) is implicated in glomerular diseases, such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, dense deposit disease, and CFHR5 nephropathy. CFHR5 was also identified in glomerular immune deposits at the protein level. For CFHR5, weak complement regulatory activity and competition for C3b binding with the plasma complement inhibitor FH have been reported, but its function remains elusive. In this study, we identify pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as a novel ligand of CFHR5. Binding of native CFHR5 to PTX3 was detected in human plasma and the interaction was characterized using recombinant proteins. The binding of PTX3 to CFHR5 is of ∼2-fold higher affinity compared with that of FH. CFHR5 dose-dependently inhibited FH binding to PTX3 and also to the monomeric, denatured form of the short pentraxin C-reactive protein. Binding of PTX3 to CFHR5 resulted in increased C1q binding. Additionally, CFHR5 bound to extracellular matrix in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and competed with FH for binding. Altogether, CFHR5 reduced FH binding and its cofactor activity on pentraxins and the extracellular matrix, while at the same time allowed for enhanced C1q binding. Furthermore, CFHR5 allowed formation of the alternative pathway C3 convertase and supported complement activation. Thus, CFHR5 may locally enhance complement activation via interference with the complement-inhibiting function of FH, by enhancement of C1q binding, and by activating complement, thereby contributing to glomerular disease.

  7. Extracellular ATP Promotes Stomatal Opening of Arabidopsis thaliana through Heterotrimeric G Protein Subunit and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hua Hao; Wei-Xia Wang; Chen Chen; Yu-Fang Wang; Ting Liu; Xia Li; Zhong-Lin Shang

    2012-01-01

    In recent years,adenosine tri-phosphate(ATP)has been reported to exist in apoplasts of plant cells as a signal molecule.Extracellular ATP(eATP)plays important roles in plant growth,development,and stress tolerance.Here,extracellular ATP was found to promote stomatal opening of Arabidopsis thaliana in light and darkness.ADP,GTP,and weakly hydrolyzable ATP analogs(ATPγS,Bz-ATP,and 2meATP)showed similar effects,whereas AMP and adenosine did not affect stomatal movement.Apyrase inhibited stomatal opening.ATP-promoted stomatal opening was blocked by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor(diphenylene iodonium)or deoxidizer(dithiothreitol),and was impaired in null mutant of NADPH oxidase(atrbohD/F).Added ATP triggered ROS generation in guard cells via NADPH oxidase.ATP also induced Ca2+ influx and H+ efflux in guard cells.In atrbohD/F,ATP-induced ion flux was strongly suppressed.In null mutants of the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit,ATP-promoted stomatal opening,cytoplasmic ROS generation,Ca2+ influx,and H+ efflux were all suppressed.These results indicated that eATP-promoted stomatal opening possibly involves the heterotrimeric G protein,ROS,cytosolic Ca2+,and plasma membrane H+-ATPase.

  8. Characterization of Co-Cultivation of Cyanobacteria on Growth, Productions of Polysaccharides and Extracellular Proteins, Nitrogenase Activity, and Photosynthetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuizhao; Wang, Libo; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Shiping; Tang, Tao; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Quanyu; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria as biofertilizers are benefit to reduce the use of chemical fertilizers and reestablish the ecological system in soil. In general, several strains of cyanobacteria were involved in the biofertilizers. The co-cultivation of cyanobacteria were characterized on growth profile, production of polysaccharides and extracellular proteins, nitrogenase activity, and photosynthetic activity for three selected N2-fixing cyanobacteria, Anabaena cylindrica (B1611 and F243) and Nostoc sp. (F280). After eight-day culture, the highest dry weights were obtained in F280 pure culture and co-cultivation of B1611 and F280. Higher production of extracellular proteins and cell-bonding polysaccharides (CPS) were observed in co-cultivations compared with pure culture. The highest released polysaccharides (RPS) contents were obtained in pure culture of F280 and co-cultivation of F280 and F243. Galactose and glucose were major components of CPS and RPS in all samples. Trehalose was a specific component of RPS in F280 pure culture. Based on the monosaccharide contents of CPS and RPS, F280 was the dominant species in the related treatments of co-cultivation. The nitrogenase activities in all treatments exhibited a sharp rise at the late stage while a significant decrease existed when three cyanobacteria strains were mixed. Photosynthetic activities for all treatments were determined with rapid light curve, and the related parameters were estimated.

  9. Diversity of extracellular proteins during the transition from the ‘proto-apicomplexan’ alveolates to the apicomplexan obligate parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Templeton, Thomas J.

    2015-11-20

    The recent completion of high-coverage draft genome sequences for several alveolate protozoans – namely, the chromerids, Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis ; the perkinsid Perkinsus marinus ; the apicomplexan, Gregarina niphandrodes , as well as high coverage transcriptome sequence information for several colpodellids, allows for new genome-scale comparisons across a rich landscape of apicomplexans and other alveolates. Genome annotations can now be used to help interpret fine ultrastructure and cell biology, and guide new studies to describe a variety of alveolate life strategies, such as symbiosis or free living, predation, and obligate intracellular parasitism, as well to provide foundations to dissect the evolutionary transitions between these niches. This review focuses on the attempt to identify extracellular proteins which might mediate the physical interface of cell–cell interactions within the above life strategies, aided by annotation of the repertoires of predicted surface and secreted proteins encoded within alveolate genomes. In particular, we discuss what descriptions of the predicted extracellular proteomes reveal regarding a hypothetical last common ancestor of a pre-apicomplexan alveolate – guided by ultrastructure, life strategies and phylogenetic relationships – in an attempt to understand the evolution of obligate parasitism in apicomplexans.

  10. ADAM 12 cleaves extracellular matrix proteins and correlates with cancer status and stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Roopali; Wewer, Ulla M; Zurakowski, David

    2004-01-01

    ADAM 12 is a member of a family of disintegrin-containing metalloproteases that have been implicated in a variety of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, and cancer. We purified ADAM 12 from the urine of breast cancer patients via Q-Sepharose anion exchange and gelatin-Sepharose aff......ADAM 12 is a member of a family of disintegrin-containing metalloproteases that have been implicated in a variety of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, and cancer. We purified ADAM 12 from the urine of breast cancer patients via Q-Sepharose anion exchange and gelatin......-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Four peptides were identified that spanned the amino acid sequence of ADAM 12. Immunoblot analysis using ADAM 12-specific antibodies detected an approximately 68-k......Da band identified as the mature form of ADAM 12. To characterize catalytic properties of ADAM 12, full-length ADAM 12-S was expressed in COS-7 cells and purified. Substrate specificity studies demonstrated that ADAM 12-S degrades gelatin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin but not type I collagen...

  11. The human Na+/H+ exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina Wilkens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...... the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (hNHE1) as a membrane scaffold protein for ERK2 and show direct hNHE1-ERK1/2 interaction in cellular contexts. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and immunofluorescence analysis we demonstrate that ERK2 scaffolding by hNHE1 occurs by one of three D...... in vitro, in a distinct temporal order, with the phosphorylation rates at the individual sites being modulated by the docking sites in a distant dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: This work characterizes a new type of scaffolding complex, which we term a "shuffle complex", between the disordered hNHE1-tail...

  12. miR-29c induction contributes to downregulation of vascular extracellular matrix proteins by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tsai-Der; Pearce, William J; Khorram, Omid

    2015-07-15

    Maternal undernutrition increases maternal glucocorticoids (GCs) and alters microRNA expression in offspring. Given that the mechanisms of GC action on vascular development are not clear, this study examined the influence of GCs on microRNA 29c (miR-29c) and its predicted targets in primary rat aorta smooth muscle cells (RAOSMCs). Dexamethasone (Dex) and corticosterone (Cor) time-dependently increased miR-29c expression and reduced collagen type III (Col3A1), collagen type IV (Col4A5), elastin (ELN), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) protein in RAOSMCs. These effects were blocked by mifepristone. These genes were also targeted by miR-29c, as confirmed by a significant decrease in luciferase reporter activity of Col3A1 (34%), Col4A5 (45%), ELN (17%), and MMP2 (28%). In cells transfected with reporter plasmids, including the 3'-untranslated region of genes targeted by miR-29c, treatment with Dex or Cor also resulted in decreases in luciferase activity. Gain or loss of function of miR-29c significantly altered mRNA expression of Col3A1 (26% and 26%, respectively), Col4A5 (28% and 32%, respectively), and MMP2 (24% and 14%, respectively) but did not affect ELN. Gain or loss of function of miR-29c also significantly altered protein levels of Col3A1 (51% and 16%, respectively), Col4A5 (56% and 22%, respectively), ELN (53% and 71%, respectively), and MMP2 (28% and 53%, respectively). Coincubation of anti-miR-29c with Dex or Cor partially attenuated the effects of these steroids on protein expression of Col3A1 (25% and 24%, respectively), Col4A5 (26% and 44%, respectively), ELN (31% and 55%, respectively), and MMP2 (46% and 26%, respectively) in RAOSMCs compared with anti-miR negative controls. Our results demonstrate that GCs regulate the expression of Col3A1, Col4A5, ELN, and MMP2, at least in part, through induction of miR-29c.

  13. Induction of trans-resveratrol and extracellular pathogenesis-related proteins in elicited suspension cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Almagro, Lorena; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén; Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, Maria Angeles

    2013-02-15

    Suspension-cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell were used to investigate the effects of methyljasmonate, ethylene and salicylic acid separately or in combination with cyclodextrins on both trans-resveratrol production and the induction of defense responses. The results showed that the addition of methyljasmonate or ethylene to suspension-cultured cells jointly treated with cyclodextrins and salicylic acid provoked a decrease of trans-resveratrol levels suggesting that salicylic acid has a negative and antagonistic effect with methyljasmonate or ethylene on trans-resveratrol production. Likewise, the exogenous application of these compounds induced the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins. Analysis of the extracellular proteome showed the presence of amino acid sequences homologous to an specific β-1,3-glucanase, class III peroxidases and a β-1,4-mannanase, which suggests that these signal molecules could play a role in mediating defense-related gene product expression in V. vinifera cv Monastrell. Apart from these inducible proteins, other proteins were found in both the control and elicited cell cultures of V. vinifera. These included class IV chitinase, polygalacturonase inhibitor protein and reticuline oxidase-like protein, suggesting that their expression is constitutive being involved in the modification of the cell wall architecture during cell culture growth and in the prevention of pathogen attack. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant‐associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates fail to form a biofilm in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via overexpression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  15. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, M.; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (m...

  16. Proteome of cell wall-extracts from pathogenic Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: Comparison among morphological phases, isolates, and reported fungal extracellular vesicle proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa V.G. Longo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We identified non-covalently linked cell wall proteins from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeasts and mycelia, with focus on the yeast pathogenic phase, and correlated them with reported fungal extracellular vesicle proteins. We studied isolates Pb3 and Pb18, which evoke distinct patterns of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis and represent two phylogenetic groups. Proteins were extracted mildly with dithiothreitol, trypsinized, and peptides analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Among 132 yeast-exclusive sequences, 92 were Pb18-exclusive. About 80% of total proteins were classified as secretory, mostly showing non-conventional signals. Extracellular vesicular transportation could be involved, since 60% had orthologs reported in fungal extracellular vesicles.

  17. Immunochemical homology between elasmobranch scale and tooth extracellular matrix proteins in Cephaloscyllium ventriosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, N; Bessem, C; Bringas, P; Slavkin, H C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were designed to test the hypothesis that homologous proteins are expressed in elasmobranch scale, tooth enameloid, and mammalian enamel. Using indirect immunohistochemistry and high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting, mouse enamel proteins were compared with placoid scale and enameloid proteins from the swell shark, Cephaloscyllium ventriosum. Swiss Webster mouse molar teeth show a characteristic enamel protein pattern consisting of two anionic enamel proteins of 72 kDa (pI 5.8) and 46 kDa (pI 5.5) and several more basic and lower-molecular-weight enamel polypeptides. Both anionic and basic classes of enamel proteins cross-reacted with either antiamelogenin or antienamelin antibodies. Placoid scale and tooth enameloid contained two anionic proteins identified as 58 kDa (pI 5.7) and 46 kDa (pI 5.5), which cross-reacted with either antimouse amelogenin or antihuman enamelin IgG antibodies. A minor antigenically related protein of 43 kDa (pI 6.2) was detected. Immunochemical staining showed localization within placoid scale, swell shark inner enamel epithelia, enameloid, and mouse inner enamel epithelia and enamel. We interpret these results to suggest that both placoid scale and enameloid proteins share epitopes and that these epitopes are also shared with mammalian enamel proteins. Based on molecular weights, isoelectric pH values, and amino acid compositions, placoid scale and enameloid ECM proteins do not contain amelogenin proteins. We suggest that enamelinlike proteins are highly conserved during vertebrate evolution and that these relatively anionic macromolecules may serve a primary function in the initiation of calcium hydroxyapatite formation during enameloid biomineralization.

  18. Bone regeneration with osteogenically enhanced mesenchymal stem cells and their extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bret H; McCarley, Matthew R; Krause, Ulf; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Froese, Jeremiah J; McNeill, Eoin P; Chaput, Christopher D; Sampson, H Wayne; Gregory, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Although bone has remarkable regenerative capacity, about 10% of long bone fractures and 25% to 40% of vertebral fusion procedures fail to heal. In such instances, a scaffold is employed to bridge the lesion and accommodate osteoprogenitors. Although synthetic bone scaffolds mimic some of the characteristics of bone matrix, their effectiveness can vary because of biological incompatibility. Herein, we demonstrate that a composite prepared with osteogenically enhanced mesenchymal stem cells (OEhMSCs) and their extracellular matrix (ECM) has an unprecedented capacity for the repair of critical-sized defects of murine femora. Furthermore, OEhMSCs do not cause lymphocyte activation, and ECM/OEhMSC composites retain their in vivo efficacy after cryopreservation. Finally, we show that attachment to the ECM by OEhMSCs stimulates the production of osteogenic and angiogenic factors. These data demonstrate that composites of OEhMSCs and their ECM could be utilized in the place of autologous bone graft for complex orthopedic reconstructions.

  19. Effects of various extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seongkyun; Hong, Yoonmi; Lee, Insu; Huh, Dongeun; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Sun Min

    2013-01-01

    We present the physical and biochemical effects of extracellular matrixes (ECMs) on HL-1 cardiomyocytes. ECMs play major roles in cell growth, adhesion and the maintenance of native cell functions. We investigated the effects of 6 different cell culture systems: 5 different ECM-treated surfaces (fibronectin, laminin, collagen I, gelatin and a gelatin/fibronectin mixture) and 1 nontreated surface. Surface morphology was scanned and analyzed using atomic force microscopy in order to investigate the physical effects of ECMs. The attachment, growth, viability, proliferation and phenotype of the cells were analyzed using phase-contrast microscopy and immunocytochemistry to elucidate the biochemical effects of ECMs. Our study provides basic information for understanding cell-ECM interactions and should be utilized in future cardiac cell research and tissue engineering.

  20. Distribution of capsular types and production of muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Smith, H.E.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Peperkamp, K.; Vecht, U.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis strains (n=411), isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries were serotyped using specific antisera against serotype 1 to 28, and were phenotyped on the basis of their muramidase-released-protein (MRP) and extracellular-factor protein (EF) production. Overall, S. suis

  1. Preconcentrating (within the broth) secreted extracellular proteins during a bakers' yeast fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effler, W.T. Jr.; Pandey, N.K.; Tanner, R.D.; Malaney, G.W.; Scott, C.D. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    Proteins secreted by yeast during the fermentation process are spacially fractionated (concentrated at a particular vertical position) within the fermentation vessel due to the phenomenon of bubble fractionation, despite moderately vigorous mixing. The degree of fractionation is influenced by the conditions in which the fermentation takes place. The broth pH strongly influences the extent of fractionation of specific proteins. In addition fractionation is enhanced under anaerobic conditions, presumably because there are more CO2 bubbles present for hydrophobic protein adsorption. The addition of moderate levels of salt to the broth reduces the fractionation for most (but not all) of the proteins.

  2. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis.

  3. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, J A; Rossen, J W A; Sitaram, C K; Kimenai, F F P; Simons-Oosterhuis, Y; Laffeber, C; Büller, H A; Einerhand, A W C

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular proteins that interact with NSP4, a

  4. Comparison of efficacies of different bone substitutes adhered to osteoblasts with and without extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ling Tseng

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: The results indicated that ECM proteins increased cell attachment to bone substitutes in vitro. The preferential affinity of different bone substitutes to certain ECM proteins was evident. Cerasorb and BoneCeramic had better MG63 human osteosarcoma cell adhesion ability than Bio-Oss and MBCP.

  5. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, J A; Rossen, J W A; Sitaram, C K; Kimenai, F F P; Simons-Oosterhuis, Y; Laffeber, C; Büller, H A; Einerhand, A W C

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular proteins that interact with NSP4, a

  6. Biophysical insights into how surfaces, including lipid membranes, modulate protein aggregation related to neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Burke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD, associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and nonspecific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (subcellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes.

  7. Anchorless surface associated glycolytic enzymes from Lactobacillus plantarum 299v bind to epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenting, Jacob; Beck, Hans Christian; Vrang, Astrid; Riemann, Holger; Ravn, Peter; Hansen, Anne Maria; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv; Israelsen, Hans; Madsen, Søren

    2013-06-12

    An important criterion for the selection of a probiotic bacterial strain is its ability to adhere to the mucosal surface. Adhesion is usually mediated by proteins or other components located on the outer cell surface of the bacterium. In the present study we characterized the adhesive properties of two classical intracellular enzymes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and enolase (ENO) isolated from the outer cell surface of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. None of the genes encoded signal peptides or cell surface anchoring motifs that could explain their extracellular location on the bacterial surface. The presence of the glycolytic enzymes on the outer surface was verified by western blotting using polyclonal antibodies raised against the specific enzymes. GAPDH and ENO showed a highly specific binding to plasminogen and fibronectin whereas GAPDH but not ENO showed weak binding to mucin. Furthermore, a pH dependent and specific binding of GAPDH and ENO to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells at pH 5 but not at pH 7 was demonstrated. The results showed that these glycolytic enzymes could play a role in the adhesion of the probiotic bacterium L. plantarum 299v to the gastrointestinal tract of the host. Finally, a number of probiotic as well non-probiotic Lactobacillus strains were analyzed for the presence of GAPDH and ENO on the outer surface, but no correlation between the extracellular location of these enzymes and the probiotic status of the applied strains was demonstrated.

  8. The Protective Effects of Erythropoietin on Rat Glomerular Podocytes in Culture are Modulated by Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Krtil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Podocytes are typically cultured on collagen I; however, collagen I is absent from healthy glomerular basement membranes. Erythropoietin (EPO is thought to protect podocytes in vivo. Here, we studied how various types of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins and EPO affect podocytes in culture. Methods: Primary rat podocytes were replated on collagen I, collagen IV, whole ECM extract, laminin, or bare plastic. Cellular adhesion (8 hours after plating, proliferation (5 days, 10 % serum, and resistance to serum deprivation (3 days, 0.5 % serum were assessed. BrdU incorporation and expression of podocyte-specific markers were employed as measures of cellular proliferation and differentiation, respectively. qPCR was used to verify expression of EPO receptor in cultured podocytes. Results: Cellular adhesion was similar on all ECM proteins and unaffected by EPO. Proliferation was accelerated by laminin and the ECM extract, but the final cell density was similar on all ECM surfaces. Collagen IV supported the serum-deprived cells better than the other ECM proteins. EPO (2-20 ng/ml improved viability of serum-deprived podocytes on collagen I, collagen IV, and ECM, but not on laminin or bare plastic. The cells expressed mRNA for EPO receptor. Conclusion: The physiological ECM proteins are more supportive of primary podocytic cultures compared with collagen I. The protective effects of EPO during serum deprivation are modulated by the cultivation surface.

  9. Matrilin-2, an extracellular adaptor protein, is needed for the regeneration of muscle, nerve and other tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    va Korpos; Ferenc Dek; Ibolya Kiss

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) performs essential functions in the differentiation, maintenance and remodeling of tissues during development and regeneration, and it undergoes dynamic chang-es during remodeling concomitant to alterations in the cell-ECM interactions. Here we discuss recent data addressing the critical role of the widely expressed ECM protein, matrilin-2 (Matn2) in the timely onset of differentiation and regeneration processes in myogenic, neural and other tissues and in tumorigenesis. As a multiadhesion adaptor protein, it interacts with other ECM proteins and integrins. Matn2 promotes neurite outgrowth, Schwann cell migration, neuromuscular junc-tion formation, skeletal muscle and liver regeneration and skin wound healing. Matn2 deposition by myoblasts is crucial for the timely induction of the global switch toward terminal myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration by affecting transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein 7/Smad and other signal transduction pathways. Depending on the type of tissue and the pathomechanism, Matn2 can also promote or suppress tumor growth.

  10. A novel peptide can mimic extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein to block the activation of complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya-ping; Dong, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yu; Lu, Qiang; Feng, Jian-nan; Tan, Xiao-rong; Yang, Guang

    2013-07-01

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bi-functional protein, which can specifically bind fibrinogen with its N terminus and inhibit deposition of C3b on the surface of S. aureus with its C terminus. Here, we screened the epitopes of Efb using phage display. Four peptides with consensus motif were screened. This consensus motif was identical to C terminus (161-164) of Efb. In the further investigation, it was found the synthesized peptide EC1 (154-165aa of Efb) could specifically bind C3/C3b and subsequently to block the activation of complement. Meanwhile, EC1 could inhibit the interaction between Efb and C3/C3b. Moreover, the interaction between the mutant protein of EmC1 (Efb without EC1) and C3 was decreased. And, the effect on the complement system of the mutant protein was dramatically declined compared with Efb. Our finding suggested that the peptide EC1 could mimic Efb to block complement system activation via binding C3.

  11. Contribution of cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus to its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melero José A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mature F protein of all known isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV contains fifteen absolutely conserved cysteine (C residues that are highly conserved among the F proteins of other pneumoviruses as well as the paramyxoviruses. To explore the contribution of the cysteines in the extracellular domain to the fusion activity of HRSV F protein, each cysteine was changed to serine. Mutation of cysteines 37, 313, 322, 333, 343, 358, 367, 393, 416, and 439 abolished or greatly reduced cell surface expression suggesting these residues are critical for proper protein folding and transport to the cell surface. As expected, the fusion activity of these mutations was greatly reduced or abolished. Mutation of cysteine residues 212, 382, and 422 had little to no effect upon cell surface expression or fusion activity at 32°C, 37°C, or 39.5°C. Mutation of C37 and C69 in the F2 subunit either abolished or reduced cell surface expression by 75% respectively. None of the mutations displayed a temperature sensitive phenotype.

  12. Coating extracellular matrix proteins on a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass substrate for improved cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiro-taka; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Harada, Ichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass surface is superior to an untreated glass surface for coating with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins when used as a cell culture substrate to observe cell physiology and behavior. We found that MDCK cells cultured on untreated glass coated with ECM removed the coated ECM protein and secreted different ECM proteins. In contrast, the cells did not remove the coated ECM protein when seeded on (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated (i.e., silanized) glass coated with ECM. Furthermore, the morphology and motility of cells grown on silanized glass differed from those grown on non-treated glass, even when both types of glass were initially coated with laminin. We also found that cells on silanized glass coated with laminin had higher motility than those on silanized glass coated with fibronectin. Based on our results, we suggest that silanized glass is a more suitable cell culture substrate than conventional non-treated glass when coated by ECM for observations of ECM effects on cell physiology.

  13. Retbindin is an extracellular riboflavin-binding protein found at the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ryan A; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Naash, Muna I

    2015-02-20

    Retbindin is a novel retina-specific protein of unknown function. In this study, we have used various approaches to evaluate protein expression, localization, biochemical properties, and function. We find that retbindin is secreted by the rod photoreceptors into the inter-photoreceptor matrix where it is maintained via electrostatic forces. Retbindin is predominantly localized at the interface between photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium microvilli, a region critical for retinal function and homeostasis. Interestingly, although it is associated with photoreceptor outer segments, retbindin's expression is not dependent on their presence. In vitro, retbindin is capable of binding riboflavin, thus implicating the protein as a metabolite carrier between the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. Altogether, our data show that retbindin is a novel photoreceptor-specific protein with a unique localization and function. We hypothesize that retbindin is an excellent candidate for binding retinal flavins and possibly participating in their transport from the extracellular space to the photoreceptors. Further investigations are warranted to determine the exact function of retbindin in retinal homeostasis and disease.

  14. Ubiquitous overexpression of a transgene encoding the extracellular portion of the Drosophila Roughest-Irregular Chiasm C protein induces early embryonic lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIVIA MODA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The cell adhesion molecule Rst-irreC is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily involved in several important developmental processes in Drosophila, including axonal pathfinding in the optic lobe and programmed cell death and pigment cell differentiation in the pupal retina. As an initial step towards the "in vivo'' functional analysis of this protein we have generated transgenic fly stocks carrying a truncated cDNA construct encoding only the extracellular domain of Rst-IrreC under the transcriptional control of the heat shock inducible promoter hsp70. We show that heat-shocking embryos bearing the transgene during the first 8hs of development lead to a 3-4 fold reduction in their viability compared to wild type controls. The embryonic lethality can already be produced by applying the heat pulse in the first 3hs of embryonic development, does not seem to be suppressed in the absence of wildtype product and is progressively reduced as the heat treatment is applied later in embryogenesis. These results are compatible with the hypothesis of the lethal phenotype being primarily due to heterophilic interactions between Rst-IrreC extracellular domain and an yet unknown ligand.

  15. Amylase-Binding Protein B of Streptococcus gordonii Is an Extracellular Dipeptidyl-Peptidase▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Biswendu; Paju, Susanna; Haase, Elaine M.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Tanzer, Jason M.; Frank A Scannapieco

    2008-01-01

    The oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus gordonii interacts with salivary amylase via two amylase-binding proteins, AbpA and AbpB. Based on sequence analysis, the 20-kDa AbpA protein is unique to S. gordonii, whereas the 82-kDa AbpB protein appears to share sequence homology with other bacterial dipeptidases. The aim of this study was to verify the peptidase activity of AbpB and further explore its potential functions. The abpB gene was cloned, and histidine-tagged AbpB (His-AbpB) was expre...

  16. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, M; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-09-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (mean survival: 34.2% +/- 9.0% of albumin, P less than 0.0001) despite similar efficient ingestion of extracellular bacteria. Enhancement of killing was observed when surfaces were coated with purified constituents of extracellular matrix, i.e., fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, vitronectin, or type IV collagen. In addition to matrix proteins, the tetrapeptide RGDS (the sequence recognized by integrins) crosslinked to surface bound albumin was also active (survival: 74.5% +/- 5.5% of albumin, P less than 0.02), and fibronectin-increased killing was inhibited by soluble RGDS. Chemiluminescence measurements and experiments with CGD neutrophils revealed that both oxygen-dependent and -independent bactericidal mechanisms are involved. In conclusion, matrix proteins enhance intracellular bactericidal activity of adherent neutrophils, presumably by integrin recognition of RGDS-containing ligands. These results indicate a role for extracellular matrix proteins in the enhancement of the host defense against pyogenic infections.

  17. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway in depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yingquan; Qiao, Mingqi

    2013-03-25

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  18. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  19. BmECM25, from the silkworm Bombyx mori, is an extracellular matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ziliang; Xu, Yunmin; Ma, Bi; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-10-01

    BmECM25 (previously reported as BmVMP25) was previously predicted as a gene encoding the vitelline membrane protein in silkworm, Bombyx mori. In this study, we investigated the detail temporal and spatial patterns of BmECM25 protein. Western blot results showed that BmECM25 was expressed in the follicular epithelium cells from stages -6 to +1, and was then secreted into the oocytes. However, the abundance of BmECM25 decreased during the subsequent oogenesis and finally disappeared in the mature follicles. Immunofluorescence detection showed that BmECM25 locates inside the VM layer and forms a discontinuous layer. These features of BmECM25 suggest that it is an oocyte membrane matrix protein, not a vitelline membrane protein.

  20. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.W. Rossen (John); C.K. Sitaram; F.F.P. Kimenai; Y. Simons-Oosterhuis (Ytje); C. Laffeber; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular

  1. Cooperative regulation of substrate stiffness and extracellular matrix proteins in skin wound healing of axolotls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Yu; Wu, Cheng-Han; Wang, Mu-Hui; Chen, Bo-Sung; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Urodele amphibians (Ambystoma mexicanum), unique among vertebrates, can regenerate appendages and other body parts entirely and functionally through a scar-free healing process. The wound epithelium covering the amputated or damaged site forms early and is essential for initiating the subsequent regenerative steps. However, the molecular mechanism through which the wound reepithelializes during regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we developed an in vitro culture system that mimics an in vivo wound healing process; the biomechanical properties in the system were precisely defined and manipulated. Skin explants that were cultured on 2 to 50 kPa collagen-coated substrates rapidly reepithelialized within 10 to 15 h; however, in harder (1 GPa) and other extracellular matrices (tenascin-, fibronectin-, and laminin-coated environments), the wound epithelium moved slowly. Furthermore, the reepithelialization rate of skin explants from metamorphic axolotls cultured on a polystyrene plate (1 GPa) increased substantially. These findings afford new insights and can facilitate investigating wound epithelium formation during early regeneration using biochemical and mechanical techniques.

  2. Cooperative Regulation of Substrate Stiffness and Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Skin Wound Healing of Axolotls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yu Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urodele amphibians (Ambystoma mexicanum, unique among vertebrates, can regenerate appendages and other body parts entirely and functionally through a scar-free healing process. The wound epithelium covering the amputated or damaged site forms early and is essential for initiating the subsequent regenerative steps. However, the molecular mechanism through which the wound reepithelializes during regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we developed an in vitro culture system that mimics an in vivo wound healing process; the biomechanical properties in the system were precisely defined and manipulated. Skin explants that were cultured on 2 to 50 kPa collagen-coated substrates rapidly reepithelialized within 10 to 15 h; however, in harder (1 GPa and other extracellular matrices (tenascin-, fibronectin-, and laminin-coated environments, the wound epithelium moved slowly. Furthermore, the reepithelialization rate of skin explants from metamorphic axolotls cultured on a polystyrene plate (1 GPa increased substantially. These findings afford new insights and can facilitate investigating wound epithelium formation during early regeneration using biochemical and mechanical techniques.

  3. Red blood cell lysate modulates the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-11-01

    During the early stage of wound healing process, blood clots can be served as a temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) to let skin cell migration and proliferation. The red blood cells are generally thought as inert bystanders in the early and inflammatory phase of wound healing. Here, we provide evidence that red blood cells (RBC) also play an important role in modulation of key ECM components such as type-I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we used western blot analysis and showed a significant increase in the level of MMP-1, 2, 3. Furthermore, we found that RBC lysate significantly down-regulates type-I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin while up-regulates fibronectin expression in dermal fibroblasts. To further explore the mechanism by which RBC lysate modulates MMP-1 expression, the effect of inhibitors for three MAPK signaling pathways on RBC inducing MMP-1 expression by dermal fibroblasts were tested. The result showed that the inhibitor of ERK1/2 could abrogate the stimulatory effect of RBC lysate on MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Consistently, RBC treatment results in an increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in dermal fibroblast. In conclusion, these findings suggest that RBC lysate can modulate the expression of MMPs and key ECM components which are important in healing process.

  4. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Alleviates Extracellular Matrix Accumulation in High Glucose-Induced Renal Fibroblasts through mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular matrix accumulation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Although AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has been found to inhibit extracellular matrix synthesis by experiments in vivo and vitro, its role in alleviating the deposition of extracellular matrix in renal interstitial fibroblasts has not been well defined. Methods: Currently, we conducted this study to investigate the effects of AMPK on high glucose-induced extracellular matrix synthesis and involved intracellular signaling pathway by using western blot in the kidney fibroblast cell line (NRK-49f. Results: Collagen IV protein levels were significantly increased by high glucose in a time-dependent manner. This was associated with a decrease in Thr72 phosphorylation of AMPK and an increase in phosphorylation of mTOR on Ser2448. High glucose-induced extracellular matrix accumulation and mTOR activation were significantly inhibited by the co-treatment of rAAV-AMPKα1312 (encoding constitutively active AMPKα1 whereas activated by r-AAV-AMPKα1D157A (encoding dominant negative AMPKα1. In cultured renal fibroblasts, overexpression of AMPKα1D157A upregulated mTOR signaling and matrix synthesis, which were ameliorated by co-treatment with the inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings indicate that AMPK exerts renoprotective effects by inhibiting the accumulation of extracellular matrix through mTOR signaling pathway.

  5. Extracellular Fibrinogen-binding Protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the Formation of Platelet-Leukocyte Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bagby, Stefan; Pula, Giordano

    2016-02-05

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to platelets proceeds via two independent mechanisms: fibrinogen-mediated and fibrinogen-independent. By proteomic analysis of Efb-interacting proteins within platelets and confirmation by pulldown assays followed by immunoblotting, we identified P-selectin and multimerin-1 as novel Efb interaction partners. The interaction of both P-selectin and multimerin-1 with Efb is independent of fibrinogen. We focused on Efb interaction with P-selectin. Excess of P-selectin extracellular domain significantly impaired Efb binding by activated platelets, suggesting that P-selectin is the main receptor for Efb on the surface of activated platelets. Efb-N interaction with P-selectin inhibited P-selectin binding to its physiological ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), both in cell lysates and in cell-free assays. Because of the importance of P-selectin-PSGL-1 binding in the interaction between platelets and leukocytes, we tested human whole blood and found that Efb abolishes the formation of platelet-monocyte and platelet-granulocyte complexes. In summary, we present evidence that in addition to its documented antithrombotic activity, Efb can play an immunoregulatory role via inhibition of P-selectin-PSGL-1-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes.

  6. Extracellular heat-shock protein 70 aggravates cerulein-induced pancreatitis through toll-like receptor-4 in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jun-min; WANG Rong; LIU Hong-xiang; LI Yuan; ZENG Yu-jian; ZHOU Zong-guang; LIU Hai-yi; XU Bing; WANG Ling; ZHOU Bin

    2008-01-01

    Background In patients suffering from acute pancreatitis, the pathogenesis is not completely understood, and several recent studies in vitro suggested that heat shock proteins might play an important role in cell signaling. To investigate the possible role of extracellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in pancreatitis, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-deficient and wild-type mice were administered with exogenous Hsp70 during the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP).Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by 5 intraperitoneal injections of cerulein at hourly intervals, and then treated with recombinant Hsp70 through the caudal vein 4 hours after the start of cerulein injections. Subsequently serum amylase and serum cytokines levels were detected. Histologic alteration of the pancreas was evaluated. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) concentrations and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in both pancreas and lungs were analyzed. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-KB) activation in pancreatic tissue was measured using a sensitive RelA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Treatment with recombinant Hsp70 to wild-type mice in CIP resulted in significant aggravation of inflammation in pancreas, elevated levels of serum cytokines, up-regulation of pulmonary MPO activity and increase of lung tissues TNF-α concentrations. In contrast, treatment with Hsp70 to TLR4-deficient mice had little effect on serum cytokines levels, pancreatic inflammation, pulmonary MPO activity and TNF-a concentrations.Conclusions The results suggest that extracellular HspTO might induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)-Iike response in vivo and TLR4 might be involved in the Hsp70-mediated activation of inflammatory reaction in the progression of CIP without infection.

  7. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  8. Streptococcus mutans extracellular DNA is upregulated during growth in biofilms, actively released via membrane vesicles, and influenced by components of the protein secretion machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I; Heim, Kyle P; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L Jeannine; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA.

  9. A novel ER J-protein DNAJB12 accelerates ER-associated degradation of membrane proteins including CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yo-hei; Kimura, Taiji; Momohara, Shuku; Takeuchi, Masato; Tani, Tokio; Kimata, Yukio; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Kohno, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic Hsc70/Hsp70 are known to contribute to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation of membrane proteins. However, at least in mammalian cells, its partner ER-localized J-protein for this cellular event has not been identified. Here we propose that this missing protein is DNAJB12. Protease protection assay and immunofluorescence study revealed that DNAJB12 is an ER-localized single membrane-spanning protein carrying a J-domain facing the cytosol. Using co-immunoprecipitation assay, we found that DNAJB12 is able to bind Hsc70 and thus can recruit Hsc70 to the ER membrane. Remarkably, cellular overexpression of DNAJB12 accelerated the degradation of misfolded membrane proteins including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but not a misfolded luminal protein. The DNAJB12-dependent degradation of CFTR was compromised by a proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, suggesting that this process requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Conversely, knockdown of DNAJB12 expression attenuated the degradation of CFTR. Thus, DNAJB12 is a novel mammalian ER-localized J-protein that plays a vital role in the quality control of membrane proteins.

  10. Identification of novel extracellular protein for PCB/biphenyl metabolism in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atago, Yuki; Shimodaira, Jun; Araki, Naoto; Bin Othman, Nor'azizi; Zakaria, Zuriati; Fukuda, Masao; Futami, Junichiro; Hara, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (RHA1) degrades polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) via co-metabolism with biphenyl. To identify the novel open reading frames (ORFs) that contribute to PCB/biphenyl metabolism in RHA1, we compared chromatin immunoprecipitation chip and transcriptomic data. Six novel ORFs involved in PCB/biphenyl metabolism were identified. Gene deletion mutants of these 6 ORFs were made and were tested for their ability to grow on biphenyl. Interestingly, only the ro10225 deletion mutant showed deficient growth on biphenyl. Analysis of Ro10225 protein function showed that growth of the ro10225 deletion mutant on biphenyl was recovered when exogenous recombinant Ro10225 protein was added to the culture medium. Although Ro10225 protein has no putative secretion signal sequence, partially degraded Ro10225 protein was detected in conditioned medium from wild-type RHA1 grown on biphenyl. This Ro10225 fragment appeared to form a complex with another PCB/biphenyl oxidation enzyme. These results indicated that Ro10225 protein is essential for the formation of the PCB/biphenyl dioxygenase complex in RHA1.

  11. Multistep processing of the secretion leader of the extracellular protein Epx1 in Pichia pastoris and implications for protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Puxbaum, Verena; Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    Secretion leaders are required to direct nascent proteins to the secretory pathway. They are of interest in the study of intracellular protein transport, and are required for the production of secretory recombinant proteins. Secretion leaders are processed in two steps in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Although yeast cells typically contain about 150 proteins entering the secretory pathway, only a low number of proteins are actually secreted to the cell supernatant. Analysis of the secretome of the yeast Pichia pastoris revealed that the most abundant secretory protein, which we named Epx1, belongs to the cysteine-rich secretory protein family CRISP. Surprisingly, the Epx1 secretion leader undergoes a three-step processing on its way to the cell exterior instead of the usual two-step processing. The Kex2 cleavage site within the P. pastoris Epx1 leader is not conserved in the homologues of most other yeasts. We studied the effect of exchanging the Kex2-cleavage motif on the secretory behaviour of reporter proteins fused to variants of the Epx1 leader sequence, and observed mistargeting for some but not all of the variants using fluorescence microscopy. By targeting several recombinant human proteins for secretion, we revealed that a short variant of the leader sequence, as well as the Epx1 signal sequence alone, resulted in the correct N-termini of the secreted proteins. Both leader variants proved to be very efficient, even exceeding the secretion levels obtained with commonly used secretion leaders. Taken together, the novel Epx1 secretion leader sequences are a valuable tool for recombinant protein production as well as basic research of intracellular transport.

  12. Colonization of the meat extracellular matrix proteins by O157 and non-O157 enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagnot, Caroline; Caccia, Nelly; Loukiadis, Estelle; Ganet, Sarah; Durand, Alexandra; Bertin, Yolande; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-10-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are anthropozoonotic agents that range third among food-borne pathogens respective to their incidence and dangerousness in the European Union. EHEC are Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) responsible for foodborne poisoning mainly incriminated to the consumption of contaminated beef meat. Among the hundreds of STEC serotypes identified, EHEC mainly belong to O157:H7 but non-O157 can represent 20 to 70% of EHEC infections per year. Seven of those serogroups are especially of high-risk for human health, i.e. O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O104. While meat can be contaminated all along the food processing chain, EHEC contamination essentially occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. Investigating bacterial colonization to the skeletal-muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, it appeared that environmental factors influenced specific and non-specific bacterial adhesion of O157 and non-O157 EHEC as well as biofilm formation. Importantly, mechanical treatment (i.e. shaking, centrifugation, pipetting and vortexing) inhibited and biased the results of bacterial adhesion assay. Besides stressing the importance of the protocol to investigate bacterial adhesion to ECM proteins, this study demonstrated that the colonization abilities to ECM proteins vary among EHEC serogroups and should ultimately be taken into consideration to evaluate the risk of contamination for different types of food matrices.

  13. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now...... obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....... This molecular architecture is novel for an extracellular matrix molecule, but it resembles that of a group of intracellular proteins, including some proposed to stabilize the mitotic chromosome scaffold. We have previously proposed a similar stabilizing role for bamacan in the basement membrane matrix...

  14. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.thiel@uks.eu

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  15. An improved and robust DNA immunization method to develop antibodies against extracellular loops of multi-transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Meredith; Bhakta, Sunil; Vij, Rajesh; Randle, Steven; Kallop, Dara; Chiang, Vicki; Hötzel, Isidro; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Ervin, Karen E; Li, Bing; Weimer, Robby M; Polakis, Paul; Scheller, Richard H; Junutula, Jagath R; Hongo, Jo-Anne S

    2014-01-01

    Multi-transmembrane proteins are especially difficult targets for antibody generation largely due to the challenge of producing a protein that maintains its native conformation in the absence of a stabilizing membrane. Here, we describe an immunization strategy that successfully resulted in the identification of monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to extracellular epitopes of a 12 transmembrane protein, multi-drug resistant protein 4 (MRP4). These monoclonal antibodies were developed following hydrodynamic tail vein immunization with a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-based plasmid expressing MRP4 cDNA and were characterized by flow cytometry. As expected, the use of the immune modulators fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor positively enhanced the immune response against MRP4. Imaging studies using CMV-based plasmids expressing luciferase showed that the in vivo half-life of the target antigen was less than 48 h using CMV-based plasmids, thus necessitating frequent boosting with DNA to achieve an adequate immune response. We also describe a comparison of plasmids, which contained MRP4 cDNA with either the CMV or CAG promoters, used for immunizations. The observed luciferase activity in this comparison demonstrated that the CAG promoter-containing plasmid pCAGGS induced prolonged constitutive expression of MRP4 and an increased anti-MRP4 specific immune response even when the plasmid was injected less frequently. The method described here is one that can be broadly applicable as a general immunization strategy to develop antibodies against multi-transmembrane proteins, as well as target antigens that are difficult to express or purify in native and functionally active conformation.

  16. An Impermeant Ganetespib Analog Inhibits Extracellular Hsp90-Mediated Cancer Cell Migration that Involves Lysyl Oxidase 2-like Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Jessica [Department of Natural Sciences, Assumption College, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wong, Daniel S. [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Burlison, Joseph A.; Ying, Weiwen [Synta Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Jay, Daniel G., E-mail: daniel.jay@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) activates a number of client proteins outside of cancer cells required for migration and invasion. Therefore, eHsp90 may serve as a novel target for anti-metastatic drugs as its inhibition using impermeant Hsp90 inhibitors would not affect the numerous vital intracellular Hsp90 functions in normal cells. While some eHsp90 clients are known, it is important to establish other proteins that act outside the cell to validate eHsp90 as a drug target to limit cancer spread. Using mass spectrometry we identified two precursor proteins Galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and Lysyl oxidase 2-like protein (LOXL2) that associate with eHsp90 in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell conditioned media and confirmed that LOXL2 binds to eHsp90 in immunoprecipitates. We introduce a novel impermeant Hsp90 inhibitor STA-12-7191 derived from ganetespib and show that it is markedly less toxic to cells and can inhibit cancer cell migration in a dose dependent manner. We used STA-12-7191 to test if LOXL2 and G3BP are potential eHsp90 clients. We showed that while LOXL2 can increase wound healing and compensate for STA-12-7191-mediated inhibition of wound closure, addition of G3BP had no affect on this assay. These findings support of role for LOXL2 in eHsp90 stimulated cancer cell migration and provide preliminary evidence for the use of STA-12-7191 to inhibit eHsp90 to limit cancer invasion.

  17. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.W. Rossen (John); C.K. Sitaram; F.F.P. Kimenai; Y. Simons-Oosterhuis (Ytje); C. Laffeber; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular prote

  18. Characterizing the Escherichia coli O157:H7 proteome including protein associations with higher order assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rembert Pieper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent outbreak of severe infections with Shiga toxin (Stx producing Escherichia coli (STEC serotype O104:H4 highlights the need to understand horizontal gene transfer among E. coli strains, identify novel virulence factors and elucidate their pathogenesis. Quantitative shotgun proteomics can contribute to such objectives, allowing insights into the part of the genome translated into proteins and the connectivity of biochemical pathways and higher order assemblies of proteins at the subcellular level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined protein profiles in cell lysate fractions of STEC strain 86-24 (serotype O157:H7, following growth in cell culture or bacterial isolation from intestines of infected piglets, in the context of functionally and structurally characterized biochemical pathways of E. coli. Protein solubilization in the presence of Triton X-100, EDTA and high salt was followed by size exclusion chromatography into the approximate M(r ranges greater than 280 kDa, 280-80 kDa and 80-10 kDa. Peptide mixtures resulting from these and the insoluble fraction were analyzed by quantitative 2D-LC-nESI-MS/MS. Of the 2521 proteins identified at a 1% false discovery rate, representing 47% of all predicted E. coli O157:H7 gene products, the majority of integral membrane proteins were enriched in the high M(r fraction. Hundreds of proteins were enriched in a M(r range higher than that predicted for a monomer supporting their participation in protein complexes. The insoluble STEC fraction revealed enrichment of aggregation-prone proteins, including many that are part of large structure/function entities such as the ribosome, cytoskeleton and O-antigen biosynthesis cluster. SIGNIFICANCE: Nearly all E. coli O157:H7 proteins encoded by prophage regions were expressed at low abundance levels or not detected. Comparative quantitative analyses of proteins from distinct cell lysate fractions allowed us to associate uncharacterized

  19. Hinderin, a five-domains protein including coiled-coil motifs that binds to SMC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiselli Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural maintenance of chromosome proteins SMC1 and SMC3 play an important role in the maintenance of chromosomal integrity by preventing the premature separation of the sister chromatids at the onset of anaphase. The two proteins are constitutive components of the multimeric complex cohesin and form dimers by interacting at their central globular regions. Results In order to identify proteins that by binding to SMC3 may interfere with the protein dimerization process, a human cDNA library was screened by the yeast two-hybrid system by using the hinge region of SMC3 as bait. This has lead to the identification of Hinderin, a novel five domains protein including two coiled-coil motifs and sharing a strikingly structural similarity to the SMC family of proteins. Hinderin is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Orthologue forms of the protein are present in other vertebrates but not in lower organisms. A mapping of the interaction sites revealed that the N- and C-terminal globular domains mediate the binding of Hinderin to SMC3. Hinderin/SMC3 complexes could be recovered by immunoprecipitation from cell lysates using an anti-SMC3 antibody, thus demonstrating that the two proteins interact in vivo. On the contrary, Hinderin did not interact with SMC1. In vivo the rate of SMC1/SMC3 interaction was decreased by the ectopic expression of Hinderin. Conclusions Hinderin is a novel binding partner of SMC3. Based on its ability to modulate SMC1/SMC3 interaction we postulate that Hinderin affects the availability of SMC3 to engage in the formation of multimeric protein complexes.

  20. Determination of processed animal proteins, including meat and bone meal, in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gizzi, G.; Holst, von C.; Baeten, V.; Berben, G.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of processed animal proteins (PAP), including meat and bone meal (MBM) from various species, in animal feed was investigated. It was demonstrated that microscopy is the most reliable method for enforcing the current total MBM ban in the European Uion (EU). It was shown that near

  1. Determination of processed animal proteins, including meat and bone meal, in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gizzi, G.; Holst, von C.; Baeten, V.; Berben, G.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of processed animal proteins (PAP), including meat and bone meal (MBM) from various species, in animal feed was investigated. It was demonstrated that microscopy is the most reliable method for enforcing the current total MBM ban in the European Uion (EU). It was shown that near infrare

  2. Morinda citrifolia Linn. Reduces Parasite Load and Modulates Cytokines and Extracellular Matrix Proteins in C57BL/6 Mice Infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Souza, Fernando; Cardoso, Flávia de Oliveira; Souza, Bruno Vinicius da Conceição; do Valle, Tânia Zaverucha; de Sá, Joicy Cortez; Oliveira, Iara Dos Santos da Silva; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Moragas Tellis, Carla Junqueira; Chagas, Maria do Socorro Dos Santos; Behrens, Maria Dutra; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2016-08-01

    The absence of an effective vaccine and the debilitating chemotherapy for Leishmaniasis demonstrate the need for developing alternative treatments. Several studies conducted with Morinda citrifolia have shown various biological activities, including antileishmanial activity, however its mechanisms of action are unknown. This study aimed to analyze the in vivo activity of M. citrifolia fruit juice (Noni) against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis in C57BL/6 mice. M. citrifolia fruit juice from the Brazilian Amazon has shown the same constitution of other juices produced around the world and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified five compounds: deacetylasperulosidic acid, asperulosidic acid, rutin, nonioside B and nonioside C. Daily intragastric treatment with Noni was carried out after 55 days of L. (L.) amazonensis infection in C57BL/6 mice. Parasitic loads, cytokine and extracellular protein matrix expressions of the lesion site were analyzed by qPCR. Histopathology of the lesion site, lymph nodes and liver were performed to evaluate the inflammatory processes. Cytokines and biochemical parameters of toxicity from sera were also evaluated. The Noni treatment at 500 mg.kg-1.day-1 for 60 days decreased the lesion size and parasitic load in the footpad infected with L. (L.) amazonensis. The site of infection also showed decreased inflammatory infiltrates and decreased cytokine expressions for IL-12, TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-10. On the other hand, Noni treatment enhanced the extracellular matrix protein expressions of collagen IV, fibronectin and laminin in the infected footpad as well collagen I and II, fibronectin and laminin in the mock-infected footpads. No toxicity was observed at the end of treatment. These data show the efficacy of Noni treatment.

  3. Morinda citrifolia Linn. Reduces Parasite Load and Modulates Cytokines and Extracellular Matrix Proteins in C57BL/6 Mice Infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Souza, Fernando; Cardoso, Flávia de Oliveira; Souza, Bruno Vinicius da Conceição; do Valle, Tânia Zaverucha; de Sá, Joicy Cortez; Oliveira, Iara dos Santos da Silva; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Moragas Tellis, Carla Junqueira; Chagas, Maria do Socorro dos Santos; Behrens, Maria Dutra

    2016-01-01

    The absence of an effective vaccine and the debilitating chemotherapy for Leishmaniasis demonstrate the need for developing alternative treatments. Several studies conducted with Morinda citrifolia have shown various biological activities, including antileishmanial activity, however its mechanisms of action are unknown. This study aimed to analyze the in vivo activity of M. citrifolia fruit juice (Noni) against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis in C57BL/6 mice. M. citrifolia fruit juice from the Brazilian Amazon has shown the same constitution of other juices produced around the world and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis identified five compounds: deacetylasperulosidic acid, asperulosidic acid, rutin, nonioside B and nonioside C. Daily intragastric treatment with Noni was carried out after 55 days of L. (L.) amazonensis infection in C57BL/6 mice. Parasitic loads, cytokine and extracellular protein matrix expressions of the lesion site were analyzed by qPCR. Histopathology of the lesion site, lymph nodes and liver were performed to evaluate the inflammatory processes. Cytokines and biochemical parameters of toxicity from sera were also evaluated. The Noni treatment at 500 mg.kg-1.day-1 for 60 days decreased the lesion size and parasitic load in the footpad infected with L. (L.) amazonensis. The site of infection also showed decreased inflammatory infiltrates and decreased cytokine expressions for IL-12, TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-10. On the other hand, Noni treatment enhanced the extracellular matrix protein expressions of collagen IV, fibronectin and laminin in the infected footpad as well collagen I and II, fibronectin and laminin in the mock-infected footpads. No toxicity was observed at the end of treatment. These data show the efficacy of Noni treatment. PMID:27579922

  4. The incorporation of extracellular matrix proteins in protein polymer hydrogels to improve encapsulated beta-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenken-Rothkopf, Liese N; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Davis, Nicolynn E; Forster, Ryan; Barron, Annelise E; Fontaine, Magali J

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial encapsulation of islets has been proposed to improve the long-term success of islet transplantation by recreating a suitable microenvironment and enhancing cell-matrix interactions that affect cellular function. Protein polymer hydrogels previously showed promise as a biocompatible scaffold by maintaining high cell viability. Here, enzymatically-crosslinked protein polymers were used to investigate the effects of varying scaffold properties and of introducing ECM proteins on the viability and function of encapsulated MIN6 β-cells. Chemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel were modified by altering the protein concentrations while collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin were incorporated to reestablish cell-matrix interactions lost during cell isolation. Rheology indicated all hydrogels formed quickly, resulting in robust, elastic hydrogels with Young's moduli similar to soft tissue. All hydrogels tested supported both high MIN6 β-cell viability and function and have the potential to serve as an encapsulation platform for islet cell delivery in vivo.

  5. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism.

  6. Extracellular collagenases and the endocytic receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180, cooperate in fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2007-01-01

    The collagens of the extracellular matrix are the most abundant structural proteins in the mammalian body. In tissue remodeling and in the invasive growth of malignant tumors, collagens constitute an important barrier, and consequently, the turnover of collagen is a rate-limiting process...... in these events. A recently discovered turnover route with importance for tumor growth involves intracellular collagen degradation and is governed by the collagen receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP or Endo180). The interplay between this mechanism and extracellular...... collagenolysis is not known. In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a new, composite collagen breakdown pathway. Thus, fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation proceeds preferentially as a sequential mechanism in which extracellular collagenolysis is followed by uPARAP/Endo180-mediated endocytosis...

  7. Biophysical and formulation studies of the Schistosoma mansoni TSP-2 extracellular domain recombinant protein, a lead vaccine candidate antigen for intestinal schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Curti, Elena; Rezende, Wanderson C; Kwityn, Clifford; Zhan, Bin; Gillespie, Portia; Plieskatt, Jordan; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Volkin, David B; Hotez, Peter J; Middaugh, C Russell; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-11-01

    A candidate vaccine to prevent human schistosomiasis is under development. The vaccine is comprised of a recombinant 9 kDa antigen protein corresponding to the large extracellular domain of a tetraspanin surface antigen protein of Schistosoma mansoni, Sm-TSP-2. Here, we describe the biophysical profile of the purified, recombinant Sm-TSP-2 produced in the yeast PichiaPink, which in preclinical studies in mice was shown to be an effective vaccine against intestinal schistosomiasis. Biophysical techniques including circular dichroism, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence and light scattering were employed to generate an empirical phase diagram, a color based map of the physical stability of the vaccine antigen over a wide range of temperatures and pH. From these studies a pH range of 6.0-8.0 was determined to be optimal for maintaining the stability and conformation of the protein at temperatures up to 25 °C. Sorbitol, sucrose and trehalose were selected as excipients that prevented physical degradation during storage. The studies described here provide guidance for maximizing the stability of soluble recombinant Sm-TSP-2 in preparation of its further development as a vaccine.

  8. The F-BAR protein PSTPIP1 controls extracellular matrix degradation and filopodia formation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, Taylor W; Bennin, David A; Bing, Xinyu; Eickhoff, Jens C; Grahf, Daniel C; Bellak, Jason M; Seroogy, Christine M; Ferguson, Polly J; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2014-04-24

    PSTPIP1 is a cytoskeletal adaptor and F-BAR protein that has been implicated in autoinflammatory disease, most notably in the PAPA syndrome: pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne. However, the mechanism by which PSTPIP1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and contributes to disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we show that endogenous PSTPIP1 negatively regulates macrophage podosome organization and matrix degradation. We identify a novel PSTPIP1-R405C mutation in a patient presenting with aggressive pyoderma gangrenosum. Identification of this mutation reveals that PSTPIP1 regulates the balance of podosomes and filopodia in macrophages. The PSTPIP1-R405C mutation is in the SRC homology 3 (SH3) domain and impairs Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) binding, but it does not affect interaction with protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST. Accordingly, WASP inhibition reverses the elevated F-actin content, filopodia formation, and matrix degradation induced by PSTPIP1-R405C. Our results uncover a novel role for PSTPIP1 and WASP in orchestrating different types of actin-based protrusions. Our findings implicate the cytoskeletal regulatory functions of PSTPIP1 in the pathogenesis of pyoderma gangrenosum and suggest that the cytoskeleton is a rational target for therapeutic intervention in autoinflammatory disease.

  9. Analysis of proteins in the extracellular matrix of the plant pathogenic fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoga, D; Ek, B; Tunlid, A

    2001-04-13

    A method was developed for isolating and sequencing proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of germlings and hyphae of filamentous fungi. Surface proteins of the cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana were labelled with a membrane impermeable biotinylating agent and extracted using a glycine-HCl buffer. Extracted proteins were purified by affinity binding to streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads or by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four of the biotinylated proteins from the ECM of B. sorokiniana were isolated, in gel digested with trypsin and partly sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry. No significant sequence similarities to proteins in databases were obtained.

  10. PPARdelta promotes wound healing by up-regulating TGF-beta1-dependent or -independent expression of extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Sun Ah; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Eun Sil; Eun, So Young; Kim, Gil Hyeong; Park, Myung Hyun; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Chang, Ki Churl; Lee, Jae Heun; Seo, Han Geuk

    2010-06-01

    Although the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta has been implicated in the wound healing process, its exact role and mechanism of action have not been fully elucidated. Our previous findings showed that PPARdelta induces the expression of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, which has been implicated in the deposit of extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we demonstrate that administration of GW501516, a specific PPARdelta ligand, significantly promoted wound closure in the experimental mouse and had a profound effect on the expression of collagen types I and III, alpha-smooth muscle actin, pSmad3 and TGF-beta1, which play a pivotal role in wound healing processes. Activation of PPARdelta increased migration of human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts in in vitro scrape-wounding assays. Addition of a specific ALK5 receptor inhibitor SB431542 significantly suppressed GW501516-induced migration of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In these cells, activated PPARdelta also induced the expression of collagen types I and III and fibronectin in a TGF-beta1-dependent or -independent manner. The effect of PPARdelta on the expression of type III collagen was dually regulated by the direct binding of PPARdelta and Smad3 to a direct repeat-1 site and a Smad-binding element, respectively, of the type III gene promoter. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PPARdelta plays an important role in skin wound healing in vivo and that it functions by accelerating extracellular matrix-mediated cellular interactions in a process mediated by the TGF-beta1/Smad3 signaling-dependent or - independent pathway.

  11. An efficient protocol to enhance the extracellular production of recombinant protein from Escherichia coli by the synergistic effects of sucrose, glycine, and Triton X-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ru-Meng; Yang, Hong-Ming; Yu, Chang-Mei; Zhang, Wei-Fen; Tang, Jin-Bao

    2016-10-01

    Targeting recombinant proteins at highly extracellular production in the culture medium of Escherichia coli presents a significant advantage over cytoplasmic or periplasmic expression. In this work, a recombinant protein between ZZ protein and alkaline phosphatase (rZZ-AP) was constructed. Because rZZ-AP has the IgG-binding capacity and enzymatic activity, it can serve as an immunoreagent in immunoassays. However, only a very small portion of rZZ-AP is generally secreted into the aqueous medium under conventional cultivation procedure. Hence, we emphasized on the optimization of the culture procedures and attempted to dramatically enhance the yield of extracellular rZZ-AP from E. coli HB101 host cells by adding sucrose, glycine, and Triton X-100 in the culture medium. Results showed that the extracellular production of rZZ-AP in the culture medium containing 5% sucrose, 1% glycine, and 1% Triton X-100 was 18.6 mg/l, which was 18.6-fold higher than that without the three chemicals. And the β-galactosidase activity test showed that the increased extracellular rZZ-AP was not due to cell lysis. Further analysis suggested a significant interaction effect among the three chemicals for the enhancement of extracellular production. Ultrastructural analysis indicated that the enhancement may be due to the influence of sucrose, glycine, and Triton X-100 on the periplasmic osmolality, permeability, or integrity of the cell wall, respectively. This proposed approach presents a simple strategy to enhance the extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins in the E. coli system at the process of cell cultivation.

  12. The effect of extracellular matrix proteins on the cellular response of HUVECS and HOBS after covalent immobilization onto titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Martin; Kämmerer, Peer W; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Luszpinski, Marie-Anne; Förch, Renate; Brieger, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Biomimetic surface modifications are regarded as promising approach to stimulate cellular behavior at the interface of implant materials. Aim of the study was an evaluation of the cellular response of human umbilical cord cells (HUVECS) and human osteoblasts (HOBS) on titanium covalently coated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins fibrinogen, collagen, laminin, and osteopontin. For the surface modification, titanium discs were first amino-functionalized by plasma polymerization of allylamine. The ECM protein conjugation was performed using the linker molecule α, ω-bis-N-hydroxysuccinimide polyethylene glycol (Di-NHS linker). For surface characterization, infrared spectroscopy and fluorescein isothiocyanate staining (FITC) were used to evaluate the presence and distribution of primary amines in the plasma polymer film. Real-time analyses of the respective protein conjugation processes were performed via surface plasmon resonance kinetic measurements. All ECM proteins were immobilized successfully. Furthermore, the biological functionality of the conjugated factors fibronectin and collagen could be proven as they led to a distinct stimulation of cell adhesion of HUVECS and HOBS when compared to the control group. The highest cell coverage of HUVECS was observed on fibronectin-modified surfaces with approximately 35% and on collagen with 33% after 24 h (PT: 9.4%). For laminin, no additional effect was observed, and for osteopontin, only a slight enhancement of cell adhesion was found. A similar, cell-stimulating tendency of fibronectin and collagen was seen as well after 3 and 7 days. Biomimetic surface modification via plasma polymerization is a powerful method for biomolecule conjugation with a high retention of biological functionality and offer promising clinical perspectives.

  13. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L.; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M.; Vannieuwenhze, Michael S.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure-function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division.

  14. Computational Prediction of O-linked Glycosylation Sites that Preferentially Map on Intrinsically Disordered Regions of Extracellular Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fukuchi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O-glycosylation of mammalian proteins is one of the important posttranslational modifications. We applied a support vector machine (SVM to predict whether Ser or Thr is glycosylated, in order to elucidate the O-glycosylation mechanism. O-glycosylated sites were often found clustered along the sequence, whereas other sites were located sporadically. Therefore, we developed two types of SVMs for predicting clustered and isolated sites separately. We found that the amino acid composition was effective for predicting the clustered type, whereas the site-specific algorithm was effective for the isolated type. The highest prediction accuracy for the clustered type was 74%, while that for the isolated type was 79%. The existence frequency of amino acids around the O-glycosylation sites was different in the two types: namely, Pro, Val and Ala had high existence probabilities at each specific position relative to a glycosylation site, especially for the isolated type. Independent component analyses for the amino acid sequences around O-glycosylation sites showed the position-specific existences of the identified amino acids as independent components. The O-glycosylation sites were preferentially located within intrinsically disordered regions of extracellular proteins: particularly, more than 90% of the clustered O-GalNAc glycosylation sites were observed in intrinsically disordered regions. This feature could be the key for understanding the non-conservation property of O-glycosylation, and its role in functional diversity and structural stability.

  15. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-27

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure-function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division.

  16. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-06-10

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:27030011

  19. Protection of pigs against challenge with virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains by a muramidase-released protein and extracellular factor vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) vaccine in preventing infection and disease in pigs challenged either with a homologous or a heterologous Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strain (MRP EF ) was compared with the efficacy of a vaccine containing formalin-k

  20. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ly, David; Burgess, Janette K.; Brock, Thomas G.; Lee, Tak H.; Black, Judith L.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Van Ly D, Burgess JK, Brock TG, Lee TH, Black JL, Oliver BG. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 303: L239-L250, 2012. First published Ma

  1. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Boukpessi; S. Menashi; L. Camoin; J.M. ten Cate; M. Goldberg; C. Chaussain-Miller

    2008-01-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecule

  2. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte adhesi

  3. Molecular Characterization of the Multiple Interactions of SpsD, a Surface Protein from Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, with Host Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampiero Pietrocola

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, a commensal and pathogen of dogs and occasionally of humans, expresses surface proteins potentially involved in host colonization and pathogenesis. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of SpsD, a surface protein of S. pseudintermedius reported as interacting with extracellular matrix proteins and corneocytes. A ligand screen and Western immunoblotting revealed that the N-terminal A domain of SpsD bound fibrinogen, fibronectin, elastin and cytokeratin 10. SpsD also interfered with thrombin-induced fibrinogen coagulation and blocked ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The binding site for SpsD was mapped to residues 395-411 in the fibrinogen γ-chain, while binding sites in fibronectin were localized to the N- and C-terminal regions. SpsD also bound to glycine- and serine-rich omega loops within the C-terminal tail region of cytokeratin 10. Ligand binding studies using SpsD variants lacking the C-terminal segment or containing an amino-acid substitution in the putative ligand binding site provided insights into interaction mechanism of SpsD with the different ligands. Together these data demonstrate the multi-ligand binding properties of SpsD and illustrate some interesting differences in the variety of ligands bound by SpsD and related proteins from S. aureus.

  4. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  5. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors.

  6. Influence of select extracellular matrix proteins on mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic commitment in three-dimensional contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Bayona, Silvia; Guiza-Arguello, Viviana; Qu, Xin; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Hahn, Mariah S

    2012-12-01

    Growth factors have been shown to be powerful mediators of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenic differentiation. However, their use in tissue engineered scaffolds not only can be costly but also can induce undesired responses in surrounding tissues. Thus, the ability to specifically promote MSC osteogenic differentiation in the absence of exogenous growth factors via the manipulation of scaffold material properties would be beneficial. The current work examines the influence of select extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on MSC osteogenesis toward the goal of developing scaffolds with intrinsically osteoinductive properties. Fibrinogen (FG), fibronectin (FN) and laminin-1 (LN) were chosen for evaluation due to their known roles in bone morphogenesis or bone fracture healing. These proteins were conjugated into poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels and their effects on encapsulated 10T½ MSCs were evaluated. Specifically, following 1week of culture, mid-term markers of various MSC lineages were examined in order to assess the strength and specificity of the observed osteogenic responses. PEG-LN gels demonstrated increased levels of the osteogenic transcription factor osterix relative to day 0 levels. In addition, PEG-FG and PEG-LN gels were associated with increased deposition of bone ECM protein osteocalcin relative to PEG-FN gels and day 0. Importantly, the osteogenic response associated with FG and LN appeared to be specific in that markers for chondrocytic, smooth muscle cell and adipocytic lineages were not similarly elevated relative to day 0 in these gels. To gain insight into the integrin dynamics underlying the observed differentiation results, initial integrin adhesion and temporal alterations in cell integrin profiles were evaluated. The associated results suggest that α(2), α(v) and α(6) integrin subunits may play key roles in integrin-mediated osteogenesis.

  7. Artificial extracellular matrix proteins containing phenylalanine analogues biosynthesized in bacteria using T7 expression system and the PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Akinori; Kondo, Shiori; Ito, Akihiro; Furukawa, Yuya; Higuchi, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Takatoshi; Kwon, Inchan

    2011-10-10

    In vivo incorporation of phenylalanine (Phe) analogues into an artificial extracellular matrix protein (aECM-CS5-ELF) was accomplished using a bacterial expression host that harbors the mutant phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS) with an enlarged binding pocket. Although the Ala294Gly/Thr251Gly mutant PheRS (PheRS**) under the control of T5 promoter allows incorporation of some Phe analogues into a protein, the T5 system is not suitable for material science studies because the amount of materials produced is not sufficient due to the moderate strength of the T5 promoter. This limitation can be overcome by using a pair of T7 promoter and T7 RNA polymerase instead. In the T7 expression system, it is difficult, however, to achieve a high incorporation level of Phe analogues, due to competition of Phe analogues for incorporation with the residual Phe that is required for synthesis of active T7 RNA polymerase. In this study, we prepared the PheRS** under T7 promoter and optimized culture condition to improve both the incorporation level of recombinant aECM protein and the incorporation level of Phe analogues. Incorporation and expression levels tend to increase in the case of p-azidophenylalanine, p-iodophenylalanine, and p-acetylphenylalanine. We evaluated the lower critical transition temperature, which is dependent on the incorporation ratio and the turbidity decreased when the incorporation level increased. Circular dichromism measurement indicated that this tendency is based on conformational change from random coil to β-turn structure. We demonstrated that polyethylene glycol (PEG) can be conjugated at reaction site of Phe analogues incorporated. We also demonstrated that the increased hydrophilicity of elastin-like sequences in the aECM-CS5-ELF made by PEG conjugation could suppress nonspecific adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

  8. Adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to extracellular matrix proteins collagens and fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitsumoto, Yasuo; Morita, Naomi; Yamazoe, Ryosuke; Tagomori, Mika; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Katayama, Seiichi

    2014-02-01

    The adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to collagens, gelatin, fibronectin (Fn), Fn-prebound collagens, and Fn-prebound gelatin were investigated. C. perfringens could bind to Fn-prebound collagen type II, type III, and gelatin, but not to gelatin or collagens except for collagen type I directly. Recombinant Fn-binding proteins of C. perfringens, rFbpA and rFbpB, were used to examine Fn-mediated bacterial adherence to collagen type I. In the presence of rFbps, C. perfringens adherence to Fn-prebound collagen type I was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Fn was not released from the coated collagen type I by the presence of rFbps, and rFbps did not bind to collagen type I. Thus, the inhibition of C. perfringens binding to Fn-prebound collagen type I by rFbps could not be explained by the removal of Fn from collagen or by the competitive binding of rFbps to collagen. Instead, both rFbps were found to bind to C. perfringens. These results suggest the possibility that rFbps may bind to the putative Fn receptor expressed on C. perfringens and competitively inhibit Fn binding to C. perfringens.

  9. Extracellular ATP induces the release of calcium from intracellular stores without the activation of protein kinase C in Swiss 3T6 mouse fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, F.A.; Rozengurt, E.; Heppel, L.A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Exposure of Swiss 3T6 mouse fibroblasts to extracellular ATP stimulated the formation of inositol phosphates and mobilized intracellular calcium. The mobilization of intracellular calcium was verified by imaging of fura-2 fluorescence in individual cells and by monitoring the efflux of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} from preloaded cells. However, the authors found no activation of protein kinase C as measured by phosphorylation of an 80-kDa acidic protein and by transmodulation of the receptor for epidermal growth factor. A careful examination of the kinetics of the phosphorylation reaction (from 30 sec to 10 min) revealed no activation of protein kinase C by extracellular ATP at any time. The lack of activation of protein kinase C was demonstrated even when a concentration of ATP 10-fold higher than that required to give a strong Ca{sup 2+} signal was used. Extracellular ATP did not inhibit protein kinase C activation by fetal bovine serum, platelet-derived growth factor, or phorbol esters. The effects of ATP were also produced by UTP but not by ADP, AMP, or adenosine. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to induce the mobilization of intracellular calcium by an inositol phosphate-mediated pathway without the activation of protein kinase C.

  10. Neuronal nitric oxide contributes to neuroplasticity-associated protein expression through cGMP, protein kinase G, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Iadecola, Costantino

    2011-05-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) has long been implicated in brain plasticity. However, it is unclear how this short-lived mediator contributes to the long-term molecular changes underlying neuroplasticity, which typically require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and gene expression. To address this issue, we used a neuroplasticity model based on treatment of neuronal cultures with bicuculline and a model of experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex. In neuronal cultures, NOS inhibition attenuated the bicuculline-induced activation of ERK and the expression of c-Fos, Egr-1, Arc, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins essential for neuroplasticity. Furthermore, inhibition of the NO target soluble guanylyl cyclase or of the cGMP effector kinase protein kinase G (PKG) reduced both ERK activation and plasticity-related protein expression. NOS inhibition did not affect phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-established ERK nuclear target, but it attenuated the nuclear accumulation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 and suppressed the activation of Elk-1, another transcription factor target of ERK. Consistent with these in vitro observations, induction of c-Fos, Egr-1, and BDNF was attenuated in the D1 cortical barrel of nNOS(-/-) mice subjected to single whisker experience. These results establish nNOS-derived NO as a key factor in the expression of proteins involved in neuroplasticity, an effect mediated through cGMP, PKG, and ERK signaling. These actions of NO do not depend on CREB phosphorylation but may involve TORC1 and Elk-1. Our data unveil a previously unrecognized link between neuronal NO and the molecular machinery responsible for the sustained synaptic changes underlying neuroplasticity.

  11. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Marc D; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N; Barros, Nilana M T; Millán, José L; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth - where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix - is essential for dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition in which teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibers (Sharpey's fibers) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth-suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here, with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia, respectively, where the levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In X-linked hypophosphatemia, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins, such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein and osteopontin, and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them, such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich-motif peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease.

  12. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation sites and docking domain on the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr cooperatively regulate ERK2-Tpr interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomastek, Tomás; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Burack, W Richard; Tiwari, Divya; Kumar, Devanand; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2008-11-01

    Identifying direct substrates of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and understanding how those substrates are selected is central to understanding how these ubiquitously activated enzymes generate diverse biological responses. In previous work, we identified several new candidate substrates for the MAPK ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2), including the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr (translocated promoter region). In this report, we identify sites on Tpr for ERK2 phosphorylation and binding and demonstrate their functional interaction. ERK2 phosphorylation and dimerization are necessary for ERK2-Tpr binding, and this occurs through a DEF (docking site for ERK2, FXF) domain on Tpr. Surprisingly, the DEF domain and the phosphorylation sites displayed positive cooperativity to promote ERK2 binding to Tpr, in contrast to substrates where phosphorylation reduces binding. Ectopic expression or depletion of Tpr resulted in decreased movement of activated ERK2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, implying a role for Tpr in ERK2 translocation. Collectively, the data provide direct evidence that a component of the nuclear pore complex is a bona fide substrate of ERK2 in vivo and that activated ERK2 stably associates with this substrate after phosphorylation, where it could play a continuing role in nuclear pore function. We propose that Tpr is both a substrate and a scaffold for activated ERKs.

  13. Dynamic regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK by protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56γ1 in nuclei induces cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Kawahara

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signalling plays a central role in various biological processes, including cell migration, but it remains unknown what factors directly regulate the strength and duration of ERK activation. We found that, among the B56 family of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A regulatory subunits, B56γ1 suppressed EGF-induced cell migration on collagen, bound to phosphorylated-ERK, and dephosphorylated ERK, whereas B56α1 and B56β1 did not. B56γ1 was immunolocalized in nuclei. The IER3 protein was immediately highly expressed in response to costimulation of cells with EGF and collagen. Knockdown of IER3 inhibited cell migration and enhanced dephosphorylation of ERK. Analysis of the time course of PP2A-B56γ1 activity following the costimulation showed an immediate loss of phosphatase activity, followed by a rapid increase in activity, and this activity then remained at a stable level that was lower than the original level. Our results indicate that the strength and duration of the nuclear ERK activation signal that is initially induced by ERK kinase (MEK are determined at least in part by modulation of the phosphatase activity of PP2A-B56γ1 through two independent pathways.

  14. Electrical stimulation of neural stem cells mediated by humanized carbon nanotube composite made with extracellular matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Nadine Wong Shi; Jan, Edward; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges to engineering neural interfaces is to minimize their immune response toward implanted electrodes. One potential approach is to manufacture materials that bear greater structural resemblance to living tissues and by utilizing neural stem cells. The unique electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them excellent candidates for neural interfaces, but their adoption hinges on finding approaches for "humanizing" their composites. Here we demonstrated the fabrication of layer-by-layer assembled composites from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and laminin, which is an essential part of human extracellular matrix. Laminin-SWNT thin films were found to be conducive to neural stem cells (NSC) differentiation and suitable for their successful excitation. We observed extensive formation of functional neural network as indicated by the presence of synaptic connections. Calcium imaging of the NSCs revealed generation of action potentials upon the application of a lateral current through the SWNT substrate. These results indicate that the protein-SWNT composite can serve as materials foundation of neural electrodes with chemical structure better adapted with long-term integration with the neural tissue.

  15. Binding to extracellular matrix proteins and formation of biogenic amines by food-associated coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitter, Marion; Geng, Bettina; Hertel, Christian

    2011-02-28

    In connection with a study on the DNA microarray based detection of genes involved in safety and technologically relevant properties (Seitter (née Resch) et al., 2011), food-associated coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were investigated phenotypically with regard to their ability to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) and to produce biogenic amines. The properties have been shown to be involved in the colonization of injured tissue and invasion into host cells as well as in pharmacologic effects on humans, respectively. The CNS exhibited a low, but nevertheless clearly measurable ECM binding capacity, except for strains of Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus succinus, which show a comparable or even higher binding to fibrinogen and fibronectin than that of the control strain Staphylococcus aureus Cowan. Formation of biogenic amines could be often detected in S. carnosus, S. condimenti and S. strains, but rarely in S. equorum and not in S. succinus and S. xylosus strains. Mostly, 2-phenylethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine were formed by resting cells in amounts 100 mg/l) of 2-phenylethylamine and putrescine. This study confirmed the need of consideration of ECM binding and biogenic amine formation in the safety assessment of CNS used in the production of fermented foods.

  16. Flavonoids suppress human glioblastoma cell growth by inhibiting cell metabolism, migration, and by regulating extracellular matrix proteins and metalloproteinases expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Balbino L; Oliveira, Mona N; Coelho, Paulo L C; Pitanga, Bruno P S; da Silva, Alessandra B; Adelita, Taís; Silva, Victor Diógenes A; Costa, Maria de F D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Tardy, Marcienne; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Costa, Silvia L

    2015-12-01

    The malignant gliomas are very common primary brain tumors with poor prognosis, which require more effective therapies than the current used, such as with chemotherapy drugs. In this work, we investigated the effects of several polyhydroxylated flavonoids namely, rutin, quercetin (F7), apigenin (F32), chrysin (F11), kaempferol (F12), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone (F2) in human GL-15 glioblastoma cells. We observed that all flavonoids decreased the number of viable cells and the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, they damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, inducing apoptosis. Flavonoids also induced a delay in cell migration, related to a reduction in filopodia-like structures on the cell surface, reduction on metalloproteinase (MMP-2) expression and activity, as well as an increase in intra- and extracellular expression of fibronectin, and intracellular expression of laminin. Morphological changes were also evident in adherent cells characterized by the presence of a condensed cell body with thin and long cellular processes, expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Therefore, these flavonoids should be tested as potential antitumor agents in vitro and in vivo in other malignant glioma models.

  17. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, Tamara; Carrillo-García, Carmen; Veit, Nadine; Courts, Cornelius; Glassmann, Alexander; Janzen, Viktor; Madea, Burkhard; Reinartz, Markus; Harzen, Anne; Nowak, Michael; Perner, Sven; Winter, Jochen; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  18. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Role of reactive oxygen species in extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation and 6-hydroxydopamine cytotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scott M Kulich; Charleen T Chu

    2003-02-01

    A number of reports indicate the potential for redox signalling via extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) during neuronal injury. We have previously found that sustained ERK activation contributes to toxicity elicited by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the B65 neuronal cell line. To determine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in mediating ERK activation and 6-OHDA toxicity, we examined the effects of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD1), and metalloporphyrin antioxidants (‘SOD mimetics’) on 6-OHDA-treated cells. We found that catalase and metalloporphyrin antioxidants not only conferred protection against 6-OHDA but also inhibited development of sustained ERK phosphorylation in both differentiated and undifferentiated B65 cells. However, exogenously added SOD1 and heat-inactivated catalase had no effect on either toxicity or sustained ERK phosphorylation. This correlation between antioxidant protection and inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced sustained ERK phosphorylation suggests that redox regulation of ERK signalling cascades may contribute to neuronal toxicity.

  20. Role of extracellular matrix protein CabA in resistance of Vibrio vulnificus biofilms to decontamination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Byungho; Jo, Youmi; Choi, Sang Ho

    2016-11-07

    Biofilms are recalcitrant and raise safety problems in the food industry. In this study, the role of CabA, an extracellular matrix protein, in the resistance of the biofilms of Vibrio vulnificus, a foodborne pathogen, to decontamination strategies was investigated. Biofilms of the cabA mutant revealed reduced resistance to detachment by vibration and disinfection by sodium hypochlorite compared to the biofilms of the parental wild type in vitro. The reduced resistance of the cabA mutant biofilms was complemented by introducing a recombinant cabA, indicating that the reduced resistance of the cabA mutant biofilms is caused by the inactivation of cabA. The expression of cabA was induced in cells bound to oyster, the primary vehicle of the pathogen. The cabA mutant biofilms on oyster are defective in biomass and resistance to detachment and disinfection. The bacterial cells in the wild-type biofilms are clustered by filaments which are not apparent in the cabA mutant biofilms. The combined results indicated that CabA contributes to the structural integrity of V. vulnificus biofilms possibly by forming filaments in the matrix and thus rendering the biofilms robust, suggesting that CabA could be a target to control V. vulnificus biofilms on oyster. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibo Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl2 treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE, longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone.

  2. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Saibo; Lin, Huimin; Deng, Shang-gui

    2015-01-01

    The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH) were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH) were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl2 treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone. PMID:26633476

  3. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Saibo; Lin, Huimin; Deng, Shang-Gui

    2015-12-01

    The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH) were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH) were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl₂ treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone.

  4. Parathyroid hormone inhibits TGF-β/Smad signaling and extracellular matrix proteins upregulation in rat mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang-Fang; Xiao, Ze-Ling; Chen, Hong-Min; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Bai-Fang

    2016-09-23

    Accumulation of glomerular matrix is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy. TGF-β1 is a major cytokine mediating the production of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on TGF-β1 and high glucose-induced upregulation of ECM proteins in primary mesangial cells from Sprague-Dawley rat. The results showed that PTH pretreatment prevented TGF-β1 and high glucose-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation and consequent upregulation of fibronectin and type IV collagen within 4 h. The inhibitory effect of PTH is due to PTH1R activation, because knocking down PTH 1 receptor (PTH1R) by RNA interference reversed the inhibitory effect of PTH on TGF-β1 and high glucose-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation and ECM upregulation. Furthermore, it is found that PTH1R associated with TGF-β type II receptor (TβR II) and both receptors internalized into the cytoplasm when mesangial cells were stimulated with PTH alone. The internalization of TβR II might reduce the amount of membrane TβR II, attenuate the sensitivity of mesangial cells to TGF-β1, and therefore inhibit Smad activation and ECM upregulation induced by TGF-β1 and high glucose. Further studies are needed to know whether the endocytic receptors are to be degraded or recycled, and evaluate the role of PTH in TGF-β1 signaling more comprehensively.

  5. Plasma concentrations of extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1 are related to cardiovascular risk markers in chronic kidney disease and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholze Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibulin-1 is one of a few extracellular matrix proteins present in blood in high concentrations. We aimed to define the relationship between plasma fibulin-1 levels and risk markers of cardiovascular disease. Methods Plasma fibulin-1 was determined in subjects with chronic kidney disease (n = 32; median age 62.5, inter-quartile range 51 – 73 years and 60 age-matched control subjects. Among kidney disease patients serological biomarkers related to cardiovascular disease (fibrinogen, interleukin 6, C-reactive protein were measured. Arterial applanation tonometry was used to determine central hemodynamic and arterial stiffness indices. Results We observed a positive correlation of fibulin-1 levels with age (r = 0.38; p = 0.033, glycated hemoglobin (r = 0.80; p = 0.003, creatinine (r = 0.35; p = 0.045, and fibrinogen (r = 0.39; p = 0.027. Glomerular filtration rate and fibulin-1 were inversely correlated (r = −0.57; p = 0.022. There was a positive correlation between fibulin-1 and central pulse pressure (r = 0.44; p = 0.011 and central augmentation pressure (r = 0.55; p = 0.001. In a multivariable regression model, diabetes, creatinine, fibrinogen and central augmentation pressure were independent predictors of plasma fibulin-1. Conclusion Increased plasma fibulin-1 levels were associated with diabetes and impaired kidney function. Furthermore, fibulin-1 levels were associated with hemodynamic cardiovascular risk markers. Fibulin-1 is a candidate in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease observed in chronic kidney disease and diabetes.

  6. Human resting extracellular heat shock protein 72 concentration decreases during the initial adaptation to exercise in a hot, humid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen C.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 72 is a cytosolic protein that also is present in the circulation. Extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) is inducible by exercise and is suggested to act as a danger signal to the immune system. The adaptive response of eHsp72 to repeated exercise-heat exposures in humans remains to be determined. An intracellular animal study found a reduced Hsp72 response, with no change in resting levels, during heat stress after a single day of passive heat acclimation. The current study therefore tested whether adaptations in human eHsp72 levels would similarly occur 24 hours after a single exercise-heat exposure. Seven males completed cycle exercise (42.5% V̇O2peak for 2 hours) in a hot, humid environment (38°C, 60% relative humidity) on each of 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein before exercise and 0 hours and 22 hours postexercise for the analysis of eHsp72. Exercise-heat stress resulted in enhanced eHsp72, with a similar absolute increase found on both days (day 1: 1.26 ng/mL [0.80 ng/mL]; day 2: 1.29 ng/mL [1.60 ng/mL]). Resting eHsp72 decreased from rest on day 1 to day 2's 22-hour postexercise sample (P < 0.05). It is suggested that the reduction in resting eHsp72 after 2 consecutive exercise-heat exposures is possibly due to an enhanced removal from the circulation, for either immunoregulatory functions, or for improved cellular stress tolerance in this initial, most stressful period of acclimation. PMID:16817318

  7. Biophysical characterization of the olfactomedin domain of myocilin, an extracellular matrix protein implicated in inherited forms of glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Orwig

    Full Text Available Myocilin is an eye protein found in the trabecular extracellular matrix (TEM, within the anatomic region that controls fluid flow. Variants of myocilin, localized to its olfactomedin (OLF domain, have been linked to inherited forms of glaucoma, a disease associated with elevated intraocular pressure. OLF domains have also been implicated in psychiatric diseases and cancers by their involvement in signaling, neuronal growth, and development. However, molecular characterization of OLFs has been hampered by challenges in recombinant expression, a hurdle we have recently overcome for the myocilin OLF domain (myoc-OLF. Here, we report the first detailed solution biophysical characterization of myoc-OLF to gain insight into its structure and function. Myoc-OLF is stable in the presence of glycosaminoglycans, as well as in a wide pH range in buffers with functional groups reminiscent of such glycosaminoglycans. Circular dichroism (CD reveals significant β-sheet and β-turn secondary structure. Unexpectedly, the CD signature is reminiscent of α-chymotrypsin as well as another ocular protein family, the βγ-crystallins. At neutral pH, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and CD melts indicate a highly cooperative transition with a melting temperature of ∼55 °C. Limited proteolysis combined with mass spectrometry reveals that the compact core structural domain of OLF consists of approximately residues 238-461, which retains the single disulfide bond and is as stable as the full myoc-OLF construct. The data presented here inform new testable hypotheses for interactions with specific TEM components, and will assist in design of therapeutic agents for myocilin glaucoma.

  8. Localization of the domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter DsrA involved in serum resistance and binding to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi.

  9. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular proteins expressed by various clonal types of Staphylococcus aureus and during planktonic growth and biofilm development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Sahab Atshan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is well known for its biofilm formation with rapid emergence of new clones circulating worldwide. The main objectives of the study were 1 to identify possible differences in protein expression among various and closely related clonal types of S. aureus, 2 to establish the differences in protein expression in terms of size of protein spots and its intensities between bacteria which are grown statically (biofilm formation with that of under aeration and agitation, and 3 to compare the differences in protein expression as a function of time (in hours. In this study, we selected six clinical isolates comprising two similar (MRSA-527 and MRSA-524 and four different (MRSA-139, MSSA-12E, MSSA-22d, and MSSA-10E types identified by spa typing, MLST and SCCmec typing. We performed 2D gel migration comparison. Also, two MRSA isolates (527 and 139 were selected to determine quantitative changes in the level of extracellular proteins at different biofilm growth time points of 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h. The study was done using a strategy that combines 2-DGE and LC-MS/MS analysis for absolute quantification and identification of the extracellular proteins. The 2DGE revealed that the proteomic profiles for the isolates belonging to the similar spa, MLST and SCCmec types were still quite different. Among the extracellular proteins secreted at different time points of biofilm formation, significant changes in protein expression were observed at 48 h incubation as compared to the exponential growth at 12 h incubation. The main conclusion of the work is that the authors do observe differences among isolates, and growth conditions do influence the protein content at different time points of biofilm formation.

  11. Heat-shock protein 70 modulates toxic extracellular α-synuclein oligomers and rescues trans-synaptic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, Karin M; Ruf, Wolfgang P; Putcha, Preeti; Joyner, Daniel; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Glabe, Charles; Hyman, Bradley T; McLean, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    The paradoxical appearance of aggregated α-synuclein (αsyn) in naive transplanted embryonic stem cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) brains has recently been reported, highlighting the possibility of neuron to neuron transmission of αsyn in PD. Here, we demonstrate in a cellular model the presence of αsyn oligomers in the extracellular space, their uptake by neurons, retrograde axonal transport to cell soma, and detrimental effects on neighboring cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that Hsp70 chaperones αsyn in the extracellular space and reduces extracellular αsyn oligomer formation and related toxicity. These novel findings provide evidence that extracellular αsyn oligomers may represent a crucial player in the propagation of pathology in PD, with their modulation by Hsp70 representing a potential new target for therapeutic interventions.

  12. Including Functional Annotations and Extending the Collection of Structural Classifications of Protein Loops (ArchDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Hermoso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Loops represent an important part of protein structures. The study of loop is critical for two main reasons: First, loops are often involved in protein function, stability and folding. Second, despite improvements in experimental and computational structure prediction methods, modeling the conformation of loops remains problematic. Here, we present a structural classification of loops, ArchDB, a mine of information with application in both mentioned fields: loop structure prediction and function prediction. ArchDB (http://sbi.imim.es/archdb is a database of classified protein loop motifs. The current database provides four different classification sets tailored for different purposes. ArchDB-40, a loop classification derived from SCOP40, well suited for modeling common loop motifs. Since features relevant to loop structure or function can be more easily determined on well-populated clusters, we have developed ArchDB-95, a loop classification derived from SCOP95. This new classification set shows a ∼40% increase in the number of subclasses, and a large 7-fold increase in the number of putative structure/function-related subclasses. We also present ArchDB-EC, a classification of loop motifs from enzymes, and ArchDB-KI, a manually annotated classification of loop motifs from kinases. Information about ligand contacts and PDB sites has been included in all classification sets. Improvements in our classification scheme are described, as well as several new database features, such as the ability to query by conserved annotations, sequence similarity, or uploading 3D coordinates of a protein. The lengths of classified loops range between 0 and 36 residues long. ArchDB offers an exhaustive sampling of loop structures. Functional information about loops and links with related biological databases are also provided. All this information and the possibility to browse/query the database through a web-server outline an useful tool with application in the

  13. Sub-inhibitory tigecycline concentrations induce extracellular matrix binding protein Embp dependent Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Julian; Henke, Hanae A; Hector, Nina; Both, Anna; Christner, Martin; Büttner, Henning; Kaplan, Jeffery B; Rohde, Holger

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infections are notoriously reluctant to antibiotic treatment. Here we studied the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid and tigecycline on S. epidermidis 1585 biofilm formation, expression of extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and potential implications for S. epidermidis - macrophage interactions. Penicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid had no biofilm augmenting effect at any of the concentrations tested. In contrast, at sub-inhibitory concentrations tigecycline and oxacillin exhibited significant biofilm inducing activity. In S. epidermidis 1585, SarA is a negative regulator of giant 1 MDa Embp, and down regulation of sarA induces Embp-dependent assembly of a multi-layered biofilm architecture. Dot blot immune assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and qPCR showed that under biofilm inducing conditions, tigecycline augmented embp expression compared to the control grown without antibiotics. Conversely, expression of regulator sarA was suppressed, suggesting that tigecycline exerts its effects on embp expression through SarA. Tigecycline failed to induce biofilm formation in embp transposon mutant 1585-M135, proving that under these conditions Embp up-regulation is necessary for biofilm accumulation. As a functional consequence, tigecycline induced biofilm formation significantly impaired the up-take of S. epidermidis by mouse macrophage-like cell line J774A.1. Our data provide novel evidence for the molecular basis of antibiotic induced biofilm formation, a phenotype associated with inherently increased antimicrobial tolerance. While this could explain failure of antimicrobial therapies, persistence of S. epidermidis infections in the presence of sub-inhibitory antimicrobials is additionally propelled by biofilm-related impairment of macrophage-mediated pathogen eradication.

  14. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on macrophage differentiation, growth, and function: comparison of liquid and agar culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Both spaceflight and skeletal unloading suppress the haematopoietic differentiation of macrophages (Sonnenfeld et al., Aviat. Space Environ. Med., 61:648-653, 1990; Armstrong et al., J. Appl. Physiol., 75:2734-2739, 1993). The mechanism behind this reduction in haematopoiesis has yet to be elucidated. However, changes in bone marrow extracellular matrix (ECM) may be involved. To further understand the role of ECM products in macrophage differentiation, we have performed experiments evaluating the effects of fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV on macrophage development and function. Bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured on four different ECM substrates in liquid culture medium showed less growth than those cultured on plastic. Significant morphological differences were seen on each of the substrates used. Phenotypically and functionally, as measured by class II major histocompatibility molecule (MHCII) expression, MAC-2 expression, and the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), these macrophages were similar. In contrast, bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in suspension, using agar, showed no difference in growth when exposed to ECM proteins. However, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion was affected by fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that the ECM products fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV have profound effects on macrophage development and function. Additionally, we suggest that an ECM-supplemented agar culture system provides an environment more analogous to in vivo bone marrow than does a traditional liquid culture system.

  15. Expression at a 20L scale and purification of the extracellular domain of the Schistosoma mansoni TSP-2 recombinant protein: a vaccine candidate for human intestinal schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Elena; Kwityn, Clifford; Zhan, Bin; Gillespie, Portia; Brelsford, Jill; Deumic, Vehid; Plieskatt, Jordan; Rezende, Wanderson C; Tsao, Eric; Kalampanayil, Bose; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-11-01

    A novel recombinant protein vaccine for human schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni is under development. The Sm-TSP-2 schistosomiasis vaccine is comprised of a 9 kDa recombinant protein corresponding to the extracellular domain of a unique S. mansoni tetraspanin. Here, we describe the cloning and the expression of the external loop of Sm-TSP-2 recombinant protein secreted by Pichia Pink the process development at 20L scale fermentation, and the two-steps purification, which resulted in a protein recovery yield of 31% and a protein purity of 97%. The developed processes are suitable for the production of purified protein for subsequent formulation and Phase 1 clinical studies.

  16. Protein Characterization of Extracellular Microvesicles/Exosomes Released from Cytotoxin-Challenged Rat Cerebrocortical Mixed Culture and Mouse N2a Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhwani; Manek, Rachna; Raghavan, Vijaya; Wang, Kevin K

    2017-03-10

    A number of neuronal and glial proteins were previously found to be released in free-standing soluble form from cultured brain cells into cell-conditioned media. Here, we sought to examine if similar proteins are also contained in neural and astroglial cell-released extracellular microvesicles/exosomes (MV/E). In this study, MV/E were isolated from cell-conditioned media from control and cytotoxin-challenged rat cerebrocortical mixed culture (CTX) and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cytotoxin challenges included pro-necrosis calcium ionophore A23187, pro-apoptosis staurosporine (STS), and excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate. Based on established nanoparticle characterization method (dynamic light scattering, NanoTracker, and transmission electron microscopy), we confirmed that these released vesicles are in fact characteristic representation of MV/E by morphology (lipid bilayered vesicles) and by particle size (132-142 nm for CTX and 49-77 nm for N2a cells). We indeed identified neural cell body protein UCH-L1, axonal injury marker αII-spectrin and its breakdown products (SBDPs), astroglial markers GFAP and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP), dendritic protein BIII-tubulin, synaptic protein synaptophysin, and exosome marker Alix in microvesicles from CTX and/or N2a cells. Furthermore, SBDPs, GFAP-BDP, UCH-L1, and synaptophysin are especially dominant in MV/E isolated from cytotoxin-treated CTX cells. Similarly, SBDPs, βIII-tubulin, and UCH-L1 are more prominently observed in cytotoxin-challenged N2a cells. Lastly, when isolated MV/E from A23187- or STS-challenged N2a cells were introduced to healthy N2a culture, they are capable of evoking cytotoxicity in the latter. Taken together, our study identified that microvesicles/exosomes isolated form healthy and injured brain cells contain certain neural and astroglial proteins, as well as possibly other cytotoxic factors that are capable of propagating cytotoxic effects.

  17. A Venom Gland Extracellular Chitin-Binding-Like Protein from Pupal Endoparasitoid Wasps, Pteromalus Puparum, Selectively Binds Chitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitin-binding proteins (CBPs are present in many species and they act in a variety of biological processes. We analyzed a Pteromalus puparum venom apparatus proteome and transcriptome and identified a partial gene encoding a possible CBP. Here, we report cloning a full-length cDNA of a sequence encoding a chitin-binding-like protein (PpCBP from P. puparum, a pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae. The cDNA encoded a 96-amino-acid protein, including a secretory signal peptide and a chitin-binding peritrophin-A domain. Phylogenetic analysis of chitin binding domains (CBDs of cuticle proteins and peritrophic matrix proteins in selected insects revealed that the CBD of PpCBP clustered with the CBD of Nasonia vitripennis. The PpCBP is specifically expressed in the venom apparatus of P. puparum, mostly in the venom gland. PpCBP expression was highest at day one after adult eclosion and much lower for the following five days. We produced a recombinant PpCBP and binding assays showed the recombinant protein selectively binds chitin but not cellulose in vitro. We infer that PpCBP serves a structural role in the venom reservoir, or may be injected into the host to help wound healing of the host exoskeleton.

  18. A large-scale expression strategy for multimeric extracellular protein complexes using Drosophila S2 cells and its application to the recombinant expression of heterodimeric ligand-binding domains of taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Atsuko; Nango, Eriko; Ashikawa, Yuji

    2017-08-19

    Many of the extracellular proteins or extracellular domains of plasma membrane proteins exist or function as homo- or heteromeric multimer protein complexes. Successful recombinant production of such proteins is often achieved by co-expression of the components using eukaryotic cells via the secretory pathway. Here we report a strategy addressing large-scale expression of hetero-multimeric extracellular domains of plasma membrane proteins and its application to the extracellular domains of a taste receptor. The target receptor consists of a heterodimer of T1r2 and T1r3 proteins, and their extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) are responsible for the perception of major taste substances. However, despite the functional importance, recombinant production of the heterodimeric proteins has so far been unsuccessful. We achieved the successful preparation of the heterodimeric LBD by use of Drosophila S2 cells, which have a high secretory capacity, and by the establishment of a stable high-expression clone producing both subunits at a comparable level. The method overcame the problems encountered in the conventional transient expression of the receptor protein in insect cells using baculovirus or vector lipofection, which failed in the proper heterodimer production because of the biased expression of T1r3LBD over T1r2LBD. The large-scale expression methodology reported here may serve as one of the considerable strategies for the preparation of multimeric extracellular protein complexes. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  19. Amelogenin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other hard-to-heal wounds: experimental and clinical evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, M.; Dini, V.; Vowden, P.;

    2008-01-01

    Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins that, under physiological conditions, self-assemble into globular aggregates up to micron-sizes. Studies with periodontal fibroblasts indicate that attachment to these structures increases the endogenous secretion of multiple growth factors and cell...... therapy demonstrated in the RCT are being repeated in "real life" situations and that amelogenin therapy may also have a role to play in the treatment of other wound types such as diabetic foot ulcers Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  20. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  1. Extracellular vesicles--Their role in the packaging and spread of misfolded proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Bradley M; Hill, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Many cell types, including neurons, are known to release small membranous vesicles known as exosomes. In addition to their protein content these vesicles have recently been shown to contain messenger RNA (mRNA) and micro RNA (miRNA) species. Roles for these vesicles include cell-cell signalling, removal of unwanted proteins, and transfer of pathogens (including prion-like misfolded proteins) between cells, such as infectious prions. Prions are the infectious particles that are responsible for transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Exosomes are also involved in processing the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). As exosomes can be isolated from circulating fluids such as serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), they provide a potential source of biomarkers for neurological conditions. Here, we review the roles these vesicles play in neurodegenerative disease and highlight their potential in diagnosing these disorders through analysis of their RNA content.

  2. [The influence of substrate from extracellular matrix proteins on karyotypic variability of the Indian muntjac skin fibroblast two cell lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polianskaia, G G; Kol'tsova, A M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cell culture conditions on numerical and structural karyotypic variability was investigated in two Indian muntjac skin fibroblast "markerless" cell lines, M and MT. The cells cultivated on the substrate consisting of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), synthesized by human mesenchymal stem cells (SC5-MSC). The character of cell distribution for chromosome number of cell line M changed after cultivation for 1 and 4 days as compared to control cells, which were cultured on hydrophilic surface without ECM-coating. These changes involve a significant decrease in frequency of cells with modal numbers of chromosomes and an increase in frequency of cells with lower chromosome numbers. Many new types of additional structural variants of the karyotype (SVK) appear. MT cell line, differing from M line in the number of homologous chromosomes, demonstrated similar with M line the character of cell distribution for chromosome number only for 1 day after cultivating on the ECM-substrate, but not after 4 days in the same culture conditions, no difference from the control cells was observed. The observed alterations seem to be due to disturbances in correct chromosome segregation process, which were caused by abrupt shift in the cell culture conditions. The analysis of the structural karyotypic variability revealed significant increase in frequency of chromosomal aberrations in M cell line for 1 and 4 days in culture on the ECM-substrate as compared to the control cells. The frequency of dicentric chromosomes (telomeric associations) was increased and constituted more than 50% of all chromosome aberrations. No increase in frequency of chromosome aberrations was observed for MT cells cultured in the same conditions. The obtained results show that the cell lines of the same origin but of different karyotypic structure react to substrate in a different way. In contrast to M line, in MT line a fast normalization of numerical karyotypic characteristics and no enhancement

  3. Spatial and temporal analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in the developing murine heart: a blueprint for regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kevin P; Jung, Jangwook P; Tran, Quyen A; Hsu, Shao-Pu P; Iida, Rioko; Ajeti, Visar; Campagnola, Paul J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Squirrell, Jayne M; Lyons, Gary E; Ogle, Brenda M

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the embryonic heart guides assembly and maturation of cardiac cell types and, thus, may serve as a useful template, or blueprint, for fabrication of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. Surprisingly, characterization of the ECM with cardiac development is scattered and fails to comprehensively reflect the spatiotemporal dynamics making it difficult to apply to tissue engineering efforts. The objective of this work was to define a blueprint of the spatiotemporal organization, localization, and relative amount of the four essential ECM proteins, collagen types I and IV (COLI, COLIV), elastin (ELN), and fibronectin (FN) in the left ventricle of the murine heart at embryonic stages E12.5, E14.5, and E16.5 and 2 days postnatal (P2). Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging identified fibrillar collagens at E14.5, with an increasing density over time. Subsequently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to compare the spatial distribution, organization, and relative amounts of each ECM protein. COLIV was found throughout the developing heart, progressing in amount and organization from E12.5 to P2. The amount of COLI was greatest at E12.5 particularly within the epicardium. For all stages, FN was present in the epicardium, with highest levels at E12.5 and present in the myocardium and the endocardium at relatively constant levels at all time points. ELN remained relatively constant in appearance and amount throughout the developmental stages except for a transient increase at E16.5. Expression of ECM mRNA was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and allowed for comparison of amounts of ECM molecules at each time point. Generally, COLI and COLIII mRNA expression levels were comparatively high, while COLIV, laminin, and FN were expressed at intermediate levels throughout the time period studied. Interestingly, levels of ELN mRNA were relatively low at early time points (E12.5), but increased significantly by P2. Thus

  4. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  5. Coordinated Regulation of the Neutral Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 and the Protein Phosphatase Subunit GADD34 Promotes Adaptation to Increased Extracellular Osmolarity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokowski, Dawid; Jobava, Raul; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Farabaugh, Kenneth; Wu, Jing; Majumder, Mithu; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Snider, Martin D.; Bussolati, Ovidio; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to shrinkage induced by increased extracellular osmolarity via programmed changes in gene transcription and mRNA translation. The immediate response to this stress includes the induction of expression of the neutral amino acid transporter SNAT2. Increased SNAT2-mediated uptake of neutral amino acids is an essential adaptive mechanism for restoring cell volume. In contrast, stress-induced phosphorylation of the α subunit of the translation initiation factor eIF2 (eIF2α) can promote apoptosis. Here we show that the response to mild hyperosmotic stress involves regulation of the phosphorylation of eIF2α by increased levels of GADD34, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The induction of GADD34 was dependent on transcriptional control by the c-Jun-binding cAMP response element in the GADD34 gene promoter and posttranscriptional stabilization of its mRNA. This mechanism differs from the regulation of GADD34 expression by other stresses that involve activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). ATF4 was not translated during hyperosmotic stress despite an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation. The SNAT2-mediated increase in amino acid uptake was enhanced by increased GADD34 levels in a manner involving decreased eIF2α phosphorylation. It is proposed that the induction of the SNAT2/GADD34 axis enhances cell survival by promoting the immediate adaptive response to stress. PMID:26041779

  6. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness.A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression.HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern.

  7. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Giorgio; Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A; Donald, Naomi A; Páldi, Katalin; Hannah, Matthew A; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes.

  8. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils.

  9. Modification of EGF-like module 1 of thrombospondin-1, an animal extracellular protein, by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is known to be subject to three unusual carbohydrate modifications: C-mannosylation, O-fucosylation, and O-glucosylation. We now describe a fourth: O-β-N-acetylglucosaminylation. Previously, O-β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-β-GlcNAc was found on a threonine in the loop between the fifth and sixth cysteines of the 20(th epidermal growth factor (EGF-like module of Drosophila Notch. A BLAST search based on the Drosophila Notch loop sequence identified a number of human EGF-like modules that contain a similar sequence, including EGF-like module 1 of TSP-1 and its homolog, TSP-2. TSP-1, which has a potentially modifiable serine in the loop, reacted in immuno-blots with the CTD110.6 anti-O-GlcNAc antibody. Antibody reactivity was diminished by treatment of TSP-1 with β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. TSP-2, which lacks a potentially modifiable serine/threonine in the loop, did not react with CTD110.6. Analysis of tandem modules of TSP-1 localized reactivity of CTD110.6 to EGF-like module 1. Top-down mass spectrometric analysis of EGF-like module 1 demonstrated the expected modifications with glucose (+162 Da and xylose (+132 Da separately from modification with N-acetyl hexosamine (+203 Da. Mass spectrometric sequence analysis localized the +203-Da modification to Ser580 in the sequence (575CPPGYSGNGIQC(586. These results demonstrate that O-β-N-acetylglucosaminylation can occur on secreted extracellular matrix proteins as well as on cell surface proteins.

  10. Association of Protein Translation and Extracellular Matrix Gene Sets with Breast Cancer Metastasis: Findings Uncovered on Analysis of Multiple Publicly Available Datasets Using Individual Patient Data Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilotpal Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Microarray analysis has revolutionized the role of genomic prognostication in breast cancer. However, most studies are single series studies, and suffer from methodological problems. We sought to use a meta-analytic approach in combining multiple publicly available datasets, while correcting for batch effects, to reach a more robust oncogenomic analysis.The aim of the present study was to find gene sets associated with distant metastasis free survival (DMFS in systemically untreated, node-negative breast cancer patients, from publicly available genomic microarray datasets.Four microarray series (having 742 patients were selected after a systematic search and combined. Cox regression for each gene was done for the combined dataset (univariate, as well as multivariate - adjusted for expression of Cell cycle related genes and for the 4 major molecular subtypes. The centre and microarray batch effects were adjusted by including them as random effects variables. The Cox regression coefficients for each analysis were then ranked and subjected to a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA.Gene sets representing protein translation were independently negatively associated with metastasis in the Luminal A and Luminal B subtypes, but positively associated with metastasis in Basal tumors. Proteinaceous extracellular matrix (ECM gene set expression was positively associated with metastasis, after adjustment for expression of cell cycle related genes on the combined dataset. Finally, the positive association of the proliferation-related genes with metastases was confirmed.To the best of our knowledge, the results depicting mixed prognostic significance of protein translation in breast cancer subtypes are being reported for the first time. We attribute this to our study combining multiple series and performing a more robust meta-analytic Cox regression modeling on the combined dataset, thus discovering 'hidden' associations. This methodology seems to yield new and

  11. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  12. Involvement of heterotrimeric G protein in signal transduc-tion of extracellular calmodu-lin in regulating rbcS expres-sion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The role of heterotrimeric G protein in signal transduction pathway of extracellular calmodulin in regulating rbcS expression was examined in suspension-cultured cells of transgenic tobacco. Pharmalogical experiments indicated that G protein agonist cholera toxin enhanced rbcS expression and heterotrimeric G protein antagonist pertussis toxin inhibited rbcS expression in transgenic tobacco cells. Pertussis toxin also inhibited the enhancement effect caused by exogenous purified calmodulin on rbcS expression, whereas cholera toxin completely reversed the inhibitory effects caused by anti-calmodulin serum on rbcS expression. The right side-out vesicles from tobacco cell membrane were purified, which contained all of substrates for fluometric assay of GTPase activity. Exogenous purified calmodulin, when adding directly to the medium of plasma membrane vesicles, significantly activated GTPase activity in the right side-out plasma membrane vesicles, and this increase in GTPase activity was completely inhibited both by hetero-trimeric G proteins antagonist pertussis toxin and nonhy-drolyzable GTP analogs GMP-PCP. These results provided the evidence that heterotrimeric G proteins may be involved in signal transduction pathways of extracellular calmodulin to regulate rbcS gene expression.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals metabolic alterations, calcium dysregulation, and increased expression of extracellular matrix proteins in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Bruno Menezes; Matsumura, Cintia Y; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Gawlik, Kinga I; Acosta, Helena; Wernhoff, Patrik; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-11-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy with laminin α2 chain deficiency (MDC1A) is one of the most severe forms of muscular disease and is characterized by severe muscle weakness and delayed motor milestones. The genetic basis of MDC1A is well known, yet the secondary mechanisms ultimately leading to muscle degeneration and subsequent connective tissue infiltration are not fully understood. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying MDC1A, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of affected muscles (diaphragm and gastrocnemius) from laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice, using multidimensional protein identification technology combined with tandem mass tags. Out of the approximately 700 identified proteins, 113 and 101 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed in the diseased gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles compared with normal muscles. A large portion of these proteins are involved in different metabolic processes, bind calcium, or are expressed in the extracellular matrix. Our findings suggest that metabolic alterations and calcium dysregulation could be novel mechanisms that underlie MDC1A and might be targets that should be explored for therapy. Also, detailed knowledge of the composition of fibrotic tissue, rich in extracellular matrix proteins, in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle might help in the design of future anti-fibrotic treatments. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000978 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000978).

  14. Comparative proteomic profiling of human osteoblast-derived extracellular matrices identifies proteins involved in mesenchymal stromal cell osteogenic differentiation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, Marta; van der Eerden, Bram C; Kan, Yik-Yang; Alves, Rodrigo D; Demmers, Jeroen A; van de Peppel, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Johannes P

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic component of tissue architecture that physically supports cells and actively influences their behavior. In the context of bone regeneration, cell-secreted ECMs have become of interest as they reproduce tissue-architecture and modulate the promising properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We have previously created an in vitro model of human osteoblast-derived devitalized ECM that was osteopromotive for MSCs. The aim of this study was to identify ECM regulatory proteins able to modulate MSC differentiation to broaden the spectrum of MSC clinical applications. To this end, we created two additional models of devitalized ECMs with different mineralization phenotypes. Our results showed that the ECM derived from osteoblast-differentiated MSCs had increased osteogenic potential compared to ECM derived from undifferentiated MSCs and non-ECM cultures. Proteomic analysis revealed that structural ECM proteins and ribosomal proteins were upregulated in the ECM from undifferentiated MSCs. A similar response profile was obtained by treating osteoblast-differentiating MSCs with Activin-A. Extracellular proteins were upregulated in Activin-A ECM, whereas mitochondrial and membrane proteins were downregulated. In summary, this study illustrates that the composition of different MSC-secreted ECMs is important to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These models of devitalized ECMs could be used to modulate MSC properties to regulate bone quality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein attenuated extracellular matrix deposit by inhibiting phospho-Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in kidneys of diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Hao, Jun; Li, Lisha; Li, Fan; Liu, Shuxia; Duan, Huijun

    2016-06-10

    Glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial extracellular matrix deposit and fibrosis are the main features of diabetic nephropathy, which are mediated by activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) is known as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt pathway. Whether CTMP regulates renal extracellular matrix metabolism of diabetic nephropathy is still not known. Here, renal decreased CTMP, enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1, α-SMA and extracellular matrix deposit are found in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high glucose decreases CTMP expression accompanied by enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA in cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HKC), which are effectively prevented by transfection of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Moreover, delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector into kidneys via tail vein of diabetic mice increases CTMP expression by 8.84 times followed by 60.00%, 76.50% and 24.37% decreases of phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA compared with diabetic mice receiving pYr-adshuttle-4 vector. Again, increased renal extracellular matrix accumulation of diabetic mice is also inhibited with delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Our results indicate that CTMP attenuates renal extracellular matrix deposit by regulating the phosphorylation of Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA expression in diabetic mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Extracellular Y-box binding protein-1 promotes proliferation and metastasis of HepG2 cells through Notch3 receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J; Li, P; Zou, L; Chen, P; Zhang, L P

    2016-03-20

    To clarify whether HepG2 cells actively secrete Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) under stress conditions, and to investigate the pathological significance and mechanism of action of extracellular YB-1. HepG2 cells were stimulated and treated by gradient concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and adriamycin, the supernatant of the culture solution was collected by centrifugation, and the established chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) was used for real-time quantitative determination of YB-1 level in the supernatant. The co-immunoprecipitation assay was used to detect whether extracellular YB-1 specifically bound to Notch3 receptor, and Western blot was used to measure the expression of Notch-NICD. The gradient concentrations of recombinant YB-1 were co-cultured with HepG2 cells, and MTT and migration assays were used to analyze the proliferation and invasion/metastasis of HepG2 cells. One-way analysis of variance was used for comparison of data between multiple groups. The results of CLIA confirmed that the level of extracellular YB-1 in the supernatant was significantly higher than that in the control group (F= 10.54,PHepG2 cells (F= 9.405,PHepG2 cells can actively secrete YB-1 via non-classical pathways. Extracellular YB-1 can specifically bind to Notch3 receptor and further up-regulate its expression, and then promote the proliferation and invasion/metastasis of HepG2 cells. This study lays a foundation for further clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and investigating the biological relationship between extracellular YB-1 and malignant tumors.

  17. Commercial cow milk contains physically stable extracellular vesicles expressing immunoregulatory TGF-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartijn C H Pieters

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, have been identified in all biological fluids and rediscovered as an important part of the intercellular communication. Breast milk also contains extracellular vesicles and the proposed biological function is to enhance the antimicrobial defense in newborns. It is, however, unknown whether extracellular vesicles are still present in commercial milk and, more importantly, whether they retained their bioactivity. Here, we characterize the extracellular vesicles present in semi-skimmed cow milk available for consumers and study their effect on T cells.Extracellular vesicles from commercial milk were isolated and characterized. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles contained several immunomodulating miRNAs and membrane protein CD63, characteristics of exosomes. In contrast to RAW 267.4 derived extracellular vesicles the milk-derived extracellular vesicles were extremely stable under degrading conditions, including low pH, boiling and freezing. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles were easily taken up by murine macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, we found that they can facilitate T cell differentiation towards the pathogenic Th17 lineage. Using a (CAGA12-luc reporter assay we showed that these extracellular vesicles carried bioactive TGF-β, and that anti-TGF-β antibodies blocked Th17 differentiation.Our findings show that commercial milk contains stable extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, and carry immunoregulatory cargo. These data suggest that the extracellular vesicles present in commercial cow milk remains intact in the gastrointestinal tract and exert an immunoregulatory effect.

  18. High ω-3:ω-6 fatty acids ratio increases fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in human ectopic endometrial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanaki, Korosh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shabani, Mahdi; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis, a common chronic inflammatory disorder, is defined by the atypical growth of endometrium- like tissue outside of the uterus. Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and fatty acid binding protein4 (FABP4) play several important roles in the inflammatory diseases. Objective: Due to reported potential anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in cultured endometrial cells. Materials and Methods: Ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissues obtained from 15 women were snap frozen. After thawing and tissue digestion, primary mixed stromal and endometrial epithelial cell culture was performed for 8 days in culture mediums supplemented with normal and high ratios of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. sPLA2-IIa in the culture medium and FABP4 level was determined using enzyme immuno assay (EIA) technique. Results: Within ectopic endometrial cells group, the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa were remarkably increased under high ω-3 PUFA exposure compared with control condition (p=0.014 and p=0.04 respectively). Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs may increase the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa in ectopic endometrial cells, since sPLAIIa and FABP4 may affect endometriosis via several mechanisms, more relevant studies are encouraged to know the potential effect of increased cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa on endometriosis. PMID:25709631

  19. Glutamine deficiency in extracellular fluid exerts adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2014-05-01

    Characteristic feature of critical illness, such as trauma and sepsis, is muscle wasting associated with activated oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine) and enhanced release of glutamine (GLN) to the blood. GLN consumption in visceral tissues frequently exceeds its release from muscle resulting in GLN deficiency that may exert adverse effects on the course of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of GLN depletion in extracellular fluid on GLN production and protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as a model of sepsis. After 24 h, soleus muscle (SOL, slow-twitch, red muscle) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch, white muscle) were isolated and incubated in a medium containing 0.5 mM GLN or without GLN. L-[1-(14)C]leucine was used to estimate protein synthesis and leucine oxidation, 3-methylhistidine release was used to evaluate myofibrillar protein breakdown. CLP increased GLN release from muscle, protein breakdown and leucine oxidation, and decreased protein synthesis. The effects were more pronounced in EDL. Alterations induced by laparotomy were similar to those observed in sepsis, but of a lower extent. GLN deficiency in medium enhanced GLN release and decreased intramuscular GLN concentration, decreased protein synthesis in muscles of intact and laparotomized rats, and enhanced leucine oxidation in SOL of intact and protein breakdown in SOL of laparotomized rats. It is concluded that (1) fast-twitch fibers are more sensitive to septic stimuli than slow-twitch fibers, (2) extracellular GLN deficiency may exert adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle, and (3) muscles of healthy and laparotomized animals are more sensitive to GLN deficiency than muscles of septic animals.

  20. A modified box model including charge regulation for protein adsorption in a spherical polyelectrolyte brush

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Wittemann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments showed significant adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in spherical polyelectrolyte brushes (SPB) consisting of polyacrylic acid, even for pH values above the isoelectric point of the protein, when both protein and polyion are negatively charged. To describe these experimenta

  1. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Excess adipose tissue represents a major risk factor for the development of colon cancer with inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC), promoting a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Serum samples obtained from 79 subjects [26 lean (LN) and 53 obese (OB)] were used in the study. Enrolled subjects were further subclassified according to the established diagnostic protocol for CC (44 without CC and 35 with CC). Anthropometric measurements as well as circulating metabolites and hormones were determined. Circulating concentrations of the ECM proteins osteopontin (OPN), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40), tenascin C (TNC) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) were determined by ELISA. Significant differences in circulating OPN, YKL-40 and TNC concentrations between the experimental groups were observed, being significantly increased due to obesity (Pcolon cancer (Pobesity (Pobese patients with CC exhibit increased circulating levels of OPN, YKL-40 and TNC providing further evidence for the influence of obesity on CC development via ECM proteins, representing promising diagnostic biomarkers or target molecules for therapeutics.

  2. X-ray crystallographic studies of the extracellular domain of the first plant ATP receptor, DORN1, and the orthologous protein from Camelina sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie; Chakraborty, Sayan; Xu, Guozhou (NCSU)

    2016-10-26

    Does not respond to nucleotides 1 (DORN1) has recently been identified as the first membrane-integral plant ATP receptor, which is required for ATP-induced calcium response, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and defense responses inArabidopsis thaliana. In order to understand DORN1-mediated ATP sensing and signal transduction, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies were conducted on the extracellular domain of DORN1 (atDORN1-ECD) and that of an orthologous protein,Camelina sativalectin receptor kinase I.9 (csLecRK-I.9-ECD or csI.9-ECD). A variety of deglycosylation strategies were employed to optimize the glycosylated recombinant atDORN1-ECD for crystallization. In addition, the glycosylated csI.9-ECD protein was crystallized at 291 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected at 4.6 Å resolution from a single crystal. The crystal belonged to space groupC222 orC2221, with unit-cell parametersa= 94.7,b= 191.5,c= 302.8 Å. These preliminary studies have laid the foundation for structural determination of the DORN1 and I.9 receptor proteins, which will lead to a better understanding of the perception and function of extracellular ATP in plants.

  3. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90{beta} secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-{beta}1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Shigeki [Functional Genomics Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kulkarni, Ashok B., E-mail: ak40m@nih.gov [Functional Genomics Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-{beta} activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 {beta} (HSP90{beta}) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90{beta} into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-{beta}1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90{beta}. Thus, extracellular HSP90{beta} is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1 modulating TGF-{beta} signaling in the extracellular domain. -- Research highlights: {yields} Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex. {yields} This complex consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. {yields} The release of the mature ligand from LAP is the first step in TGF-{beta} activation. {yields} We identified for the first time a novel mechanism for this activation process. {yields} Heat shock protein 90 {beta} is discovered as a negative regulator for this process.

  4. An approach to including protein quality when assessing the net contribution of livestock to human food supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, P; Knaus, W; Zollitsch, W

    2016-11-01

    The production of protein from animal sources is often criticized because of the low efficiency of converting plant protein from feeds into protein in the animal products. However, this critique does not consider the fact that large portions of the plant-based proteins fed to animals may be human-inedible and that the quality of animal proteins is usually superior as compared with plant proteins. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess changes in protein quality in the course of the transformation of potentially human-edible plant proteins into animal products via livestock production; data from 30 Austrian dairy farms were used as a case study. A second aim was to develop an approach for combining these changes with quantitative aspects (e.g. with the human-edible feed conversion efficiency (heFCE), defined as kilogram protein in the animal product divided by kilogram potentially human-edible protein in the feeds). Protein quality of potentially human-edible inputs and outputs was assessed using the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score and the digestible indispensable amino acid score, two methods proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to describe the nutritional value of proteins for humans. Depending on the method used, protein scores were between 1.40 and 1.87 times higher for the animal products than for the potentially human-edible plant protein input on a barn-gate level (=protein quality ratio (PQR)). Combining the PQR of 1.87 with the heFCE for the same farms resulted in heFCE×PQR of 2.15. Thus, considering both quantity and quality, the value of the proteins in the animal products for human consumption (in this case in milk and beef) is 2.15 times higher than that of proteins in the potentially human-edible plant protein inputs. The results of this study emphasize the necessity of including protein quality changes resulting from the transformation of plant proteins to animal proteins when

  5. Determination of processed animal proteins, including meat and bone meal, in animal feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Giséile; von Holst, Christoph; Baeten, Vincent; Berben, Gilbert; van Raamsdonk, Leo

    2004-01-01

    An intercomparison study was conducted to determine the presence of processed animal proteins (PAPs), including meat and bone meal (MBM) from various species, in animal feed. The performances of different methods, such as microscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunoassays, and a protocol based on iquid chromatography (LC), were compared. Laboratories were asked to analyze for PAPs from all terrestrial animals and fish (total PAPs); mammalian PAPs; ruminant PAPs; and porcine PAPs. They were free to use their method of choice. In addition, laboratories using microscopy were asked to determine the presence of PAPs from terrestrial animals, which is applicable only to microscopy. For total PAPs microscopy, LC and some immunoassays showed sufficient results at a concentration as low as 0.1% MBM in the feed. In contrast, PCR was not fit for purpose. In differentiating between MBM from terrestrial animals and fishmeal, microscopy detected 0.5% of terrestrial MBM in feed in the presence of 5% fishmeal, but was less successful when the concentration of MBM from terrestrial animals was 0.1%. The animal-specific determination of MBM from mammals or, more specifically from either ruminants or pigs, by PCR showed poor results, as indicated by a high number of false-positive and false-negative results. The only PCR method that scored quite well was applied by a member of the organizer team of the study. Immunoassays scored much better than PCR, showing sufficient sensitivity but some deficiency in terms of specificity. The results also demonstrated that the reliable determination of MBM from ruminants has not been resolved, especially for low concentrations of MBM (0.1%) in feed. Comparison of the results for mammalian MBM from all methods indicated that, for control purposes, the immunoassay method, especially when applied as dipsticks, could be used as a rapid screening method combined with microscopy to confirm the positive samples. However, implementation of such a

  6. CD73 protein as a source of extracellular precursors for sustained NAD+ biosynthesis in FK866-treated tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozio, Alessia; Sociali, Giovanna; Sturla, Laura; Caffa, Irene; Soncini, Debora; Salis, Annalisa; Raffaelli, Nadia; De Flora, Antonio; Nencioni, Alessio; Bruzzone, Santina

    2013-09-06

    NAD(+) is mainly synthesized in human cells via the "salvage" pathways starting from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide riboside (NR). The inhibition with FK866 of the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), catalyzing the first reaction in the "salvage" pathway from nicotinamide, showed potent antitumor activity in several preclinical models of solid and hematologic cancers. In the clinical studies performed with FK866, however, no tumor remission was observed. Here we demonstrate that low micromolar concentrations of extracellular NAD(+) or NAD(+) precursors, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and NR, can reverse the FK866-induced cell death, this representing a plausible explanation for the failure of NAMPT inhibition as an anti-cancer therapy. NMN is a substrate of both ectoenzymes CD38 and CD73, with generation of NAM and NR, respectively. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD38 and CD73 in providing ectocellular NAD(+) precursors for NAD(+) biosynthesis and in modulating cell susceptibility to FK866. By specifically silencing or overexpressing CD38 and CD73, we demonstrated that endogenous CD73 enables, whereas CD38 impairs, the conversion of extracellular NMN to NR as a precursor for intracellular NAD(+) biosynthesis in human cells. Moreover, cell viability in FK866-treated cells supplemented with extracellular NMN was strongly reduced in tumor cells, upon pharmacological inhibition or specific down-regulation of CD73. Thus, our study suggests that genetic or pharmacologic interventions interfering with CD73 activity may prove useful to increase cancer cell sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors.

  7. Adenovirus-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation during the late phase of infection enhances viral protein levels and virus progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schümann, Michael; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    during the late phase of infection. Pharmacologic inhibition of ERK phosphorylation reduced virus recovery by >100-fold. Blocking MEK/ERK signaling affected virus DNA replication and mRNA levels only weakly but strongly reduced the amount of viral proteins, independently of the kinases MNK1 and PKR....... Hence, adenovirus induces the oncogenic Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway to enhance viral progeny by sustaining the levels of viral proteins. Concerning therapy, our results suggest that the use of Raf/MEK/ERK inhibitors will interfere with the propagation of oncolytic adenoviruses.......The Raf/mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)/ERK signaling cascade enhances tumor cell proliferation in many cases. Here, we show that adenovirus type 5, a small DNA tumor virus used in experimental cancer therapy, strongly induces ERK phosphorylation...

  8. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  9. Enhanced production of functional extracellular single chain variable fragment against HIV-1 matrix protein from Escherichia coli by sequential simplex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intachai, Kannaporn; Singboottra, Panthong; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Butr-Indr, Bordin

    2015-01-01

    The optimal culture condition for extracellular recombinant single chain variable fragment anti HIV-1 p17 protein (scFv anti-p17) production in Escherichia coli HB2151 was investigated by the sequential simplex optimization (SS) method. Five variable parameters were submitted in the fermentation process. The most favorable condition obtained from 19 independent experiments was as followed: 58 µM of IPTG induction to 1.7 OD600 nm at 25.5°C for 16 h with 202 rpm agitation rate. The amount of secreted scFv anti-p17 at the optimal condition was 38% higher than under the control condition. The binding activity of soluble extracellular scFv anti-p17 protein increased 95.5% and 73.2% in comparison with the control condition and non-optimized condition respectively. The soluble scFv anti-p17 from crude HB2151 lysated was subsequently purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with His-tag. The purified scFv anti-p17 was intact and retained its antigen-binding affinity against HIV-1 p17. We demonstrated that the sequential simplex optimization method was a key for exertion of high yield with fewer experimental requirements for acquiring of large scale secretory protein production.

  10. Enhancement of phytosterols, taraxasterol and induction of extracellular pathogenesis-related proteins in cell cultures of Solanum lycopersicum cv Micro-Tom elicited with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Zuleika; Almagro, Lorena; Sabater-Jara, Ana B; Calderón, Antonio A; Pedreño, María Angeles; Ferrer, María Angeles

    2012-07-15

    Suspension-cultured cells of Solanum lycopersicum cv Micro-Tom were used to evaluate the effect of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, separately or in combination, on the induction of defense responses. An extracellular accumulation of two sterols (isofucosterol and β-sitosterol) and taraxasterol, a common tomato fruit cuticular triterpene, were observed. Their levels were higher in Micro-Tom tomato suspension cultured cells elicited with cyclodextrins than in control and methyl jasmonate-treated cells. Also, their accumulation profiles during the cell growth phase were markedly different. The most striking feature in response to cyclodextrin treatments was the observed enhancement of taraxasterol accumulation. Likewise, the exogenous application of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins induced the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins. Analysis of the extracellular proteome showed the presence of amino acid sequences homologous to pathogenesis-related 1 and 5 proteins, a cationic peroxidase and a biotic cell death-associated protein, which suggests that methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins could play a role in mediating defense-related gene product expression in S. lycopersicum cv Micro-Tom. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current da...

  12. The multifunctional role of the pallilysin-associated Treponema pallidum protein, Tp0750, in promoting fibrinolysis and extracellular matrix component degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Simon; Russell, Shannon; Hof, Rebecca; Roberts, Alanna K; Cullen, Paul; Irvine, Kyle; Smith, Derek S; Borchers, Christoph H; Tonkin, Michelle L; Boulanger, Martin J; Cameron, Caroline E

    2014-02-01

    The mechanisms that facilitate dissemination of the highly invasive spirochaete, Treponema pallidum, are incompletely understood. Previous studies showed the treponemal metalloprotease pallilysin (Tp0751) possesses fibrin clot degradation capability, suggesting a role in treponemal dissemination. In the current study we report characterization of the functionally linked protein Tp0750. Structural modelling predicts Tp0750 contains a von Willebrand factor type A (vWFA) domain, a protein-protein interaction domain commonly observed in extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding proteins. We report Tp0750 is a serine protease that degrades the major clot components fibrinogen and fibronectin. We also demonstrate Tp0750 cleaves a matrix metalloprotease (MMP) peptide substrate that is targeted by several MMPs, enzymes central to ECM remodelling. Through proteomic analyses we show Tp0750 binds the endothelial fibrinolytic receptor, annexin A2, in a specific and dose-dependent manner. These results suggest Tp0750 constitutes a multifunctional protein that is able to (1) degrade infection-limiting clots by both inhibiting clot formation through degradation of host coagulation cascade proteins and promoting clot dissolution by complexing with host proteins involved in the fibrinolytic cascade and (2) facilitate ECM degradation via MMP-like proteolysis of host components. We propose that through these activities Tp0750 functions in concert with pallilysin to enable T. pallidum dissemination.

  13. Air Filter Devices Including Nonwoven Meshes of Electrospun Recombinant Spider Silk Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gregor; Jokisch, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Based on the natural sequence of Araneus diadematus Fibroin 4 (ADF4), the recombinant spider silk protein eADF4(C16) has been engineered. This highly repetitive protein has a molecular weight of 48kDa and is soluble in different solvents (hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), formic acid and aqueous buffers). eADF4(C16) provides a high potential for various technical applications when processed into morphologies such as films, capsules, particles, hydrogels, coatings, fibers and nonwoven meshes. Due to their chemical stability and controlled morphology, the latter can be used to improve filter materials. In this protocol, we present a procedure to enhance the efficiency of different air filter devices, by deposition of nonwoven meshes of electrospun recombinant spider silk proteins. Electrospinning of eADF4(C16) dissolved in HFIP results in smooth fibers. Variation of the protein concentration (5-25% w/v) results in different fiber diameters (80-1,100 nm) and thus pore sizes of the nonwoven mesh. Post-treatment of eADF4(C16) electrospun from HFIP is necessary since the protein displays a predominantly α-helical secondary structure in freshly spun fibers, and therefore the fibers are water soluble. Subsequent treatment with ethanol vapor induces formation of water resistant, stable β-sheet structures, preserving the morphology of the silk fibers and meshes. Secondary structure analysis was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and subsequent Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD). The primary goal was to improve the filter efficiency of existing filter substrates by adding silk nonwoven layers on top. To evaluate the influence of electrospinning duration and thus nonwoven layer thickness on the filter efficiency, we performed air permeability tests in combination with particle deposition measurements. The experiments were carried out according to standard protocols. PMID:23685883

  14. The Role of Extracellular Vesicles: An Epigenetic View of the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrun Qian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes, microvesicles, and other extracellular vesicles are released by many cell types, including cancer cells and cancer-related immune cells. Extracellular vesicles can directly or indirectly facilitate the transfer of bioinformation to recipient cells or to the extracellular environment. In cancer, exosomes have been implicated in tumor initiation, proliferation, and metastasis. Extracellular vesicles can transmit proteins and nucleic acids that participate in DNA methylation, histone modification, and posttranscriptional regulation of RNA. Factors transmitted by extracellular vesicles reflect the donor cell status, and extracellular vesicles derived from tumor cells may be also responsible for altering expression of tumor promoting and tumor suppressing genes in recipient cells. Thus, circulating extracellular vesicles may act as biomarkers of cancer, and detection of these biomarkers may be applied to diagnosis or assessment of prognosis in patients with cancer.

  15. The extracellular matrix protein laminin α2 regulates the maturation and function of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Michael J; McClenahan, Freyja K; Leiton, Cindy V; Aranmolate, Azeez; Shan, Xiwei; Colognato, Holly

    2014-11-12

    Laminins are major constituents of the gliovascular basal lamina of the blood-brain barrier (BBB); however, the role of laminins in BBB development remains unclear. Here we report that Lama2(-/-) mice, lacking expression of the laminin α2 subunit of the laminin-211 heterotrimer expressed by astrocytes and pericytes, have a defective BBB in which systemically circulated tracer leaks into the brain parenchyma. The Lama2(-/-) vascular endothelium had significant abnormalities, including altered integrity and composition of the endothelial basal lamina, inappropriate expression of embryonic vascular endothelial protein MECA32, substantially reduced pericyte coverage, and tight junction abnormalities. Additionally, astrocytic endfeet were hypertrophic and lacked appropriately polarized aquaporin4 channels. Laminin-211 appears to mediate these effects at least in part by dystroglycan receptor interactions, as preventing dystroglycan expression in neural cells led to a similar set of BBB abnormalities and gliovascular disturbances, which additionally included perturbed vascular endothelial glucose transporter-1 localization. These findings provide insight into the cell and molecular changes that occur in congenital muscular dystrophies caused by Lama2 mutations or inappropriate dystroglycan post-translational modifications, which have accompanying brain abnormalities, including seizures. Our results indicate a novel role for laminin-dystroglycan interactions in the cooperative integration of astrocytes, endothelial cells, and pericytes in regulating the BBB.

  16. The extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus acts as a proliferation and migration repressing factor that alters the cell morphology of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeis, Janina; Peisker, Henrik; Backes, Christian S; Bur, Stephanie; Hölters, Sebastian; Thewes, Nicolas; Greiner, Markus; Junker, Christian; Schwarz, Eva C; Hoth, Markus; Junker, Kerstin; Preissner, Klaus T; Jacobs, Karin; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Staphyloccocus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause for superficial and deep seated wound infections. The pathogen is equipped with a large arsenal of virulence factors, which facilitate attachment to various eukaryotic cell structures and modulate the host immune response. One of these factors is the extracellular adherence protein Eap, a member of the "secretable expanded repertoire adhesive molecules" (SERAM) protein family that possesses adhesive and immune modulatory properties. The secreted protein was previously shown to impair wound healing by interfering with host defense and neovascularization. However, its impact on keratinocyte proliferation and migration, two major steps in the re-epithelialization process of wounds, is not known. Here, we report that Eap affects the proliferation and migration capacities of keratinocytes by altering their morphology and adhesive properties. In particular, treatment of non-confluent HaCaT cell cultures with Eap resulted in cell morphology changes as well as a significant reduction in cell proliferation and migration. Eap-treated HaCaT cells changed their appearance from an oblong via a trapezoid to an astral-like shape, accompanied by decreases in cell volume and cell stiffness, and exhibited significantly increased cell adhesion. Eap had a similar influence on endothelial and cancer cells, indicative for a general effect of Eap on eukaryotic cell morphology and functions. Specifically, Eap was found to interfere with growth factor-stimulated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that is known to be responsible for cell shape modulation, induction of proliferation and migration of epithelial cells. Western blot analyses revealed that Eap blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)-stimulated HaCaT cells. Together, these data add another antagonistic mechanism of Eap in wound healing, whereby the

  17. The Arabidopsis thaliana vernalization response requires a polycomb-like protein complex that also includes VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Craig C; Robertson, Masumi; Tanner, Greg; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Helliwell, Chris A

    2006-09-26

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the promotion of flowering by cold temperatures, vernalization, is regulated via a floral-repressive MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Vernalization leads to the epigenetic repression of FLC expression, a process that requires the polycomb group (PcG) protein VERNALIZATION 2 (VRN2) and the plant homeodomain protein VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3). We demonstrate that the repression of FLC by vernalization requires homologues of other Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 proteins and VRN2. We show in planta that VRN2 and VIN3 are part of a large protein complex that can include the PcG proteins FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM, CURLY LEAF, and SWINGER. These findings suggest a single protein complex is responsible for histone deacetylation at FLC and histone methylation at FLC in vernalized plants. The abundance of the complex increases during vernalization and declines after plants are returned to higher temperatures, consistent with the complex having a role in establishing FLC repression.

  18. Characterization of extracellular matrix proteins during wound healing in the lamina propria of vocal fold in a canine model: a long-term and consecutive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Xu, Wen; Ling, Wei; Wang, Qi; Wu, Yan; Han, Demin

    2014-06-01

    The characterization of vocal fold wound healing can be reflected by the changes of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the lamina propria. Although the expression of ECM proteins after vocal fold injury has been widely studied, such observations have lacked time continuity and integrity of marker proteins. In this study, we observed the morphology of injured vocal folds in a canine model. We used immunofluorescence staining to evaluate the expression and distribution of ECM proteins, such as collagen, elastin, hyaluronic acid, decorin and fibronectin, from 15 days to 6 months after injury. The results showed that large amounts of ECM proteins were secreted 15-40 days after injury. Collagen and fibronectin secretion increased significantly, and were disorderly deposited. The secretion of decorin and elastin increased slightly, while hyaluronic acid decreased. The 15-40 day post-injury period may be the critical intervention stage in wound healing of vocal folds. From 3 to 6 months after injury, the secretion of ECM proteins declined. However, collagen and fibronectin secretion were still significantly higher than normal with irregular arrangement, while the secretion of elastin, hyaluronic acid and decorin decreased significantly at 6 months. This led to vocal fold inelasticity and stiffness, which required effective long-term interventions to treat scar formation.

  19. Virus-induced dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by increased levels of fibrotic extracellular matrix proteins and reduced amounts of energy-producing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Phong, Truong Q; Steil, Leif; Sauter, Martina; Salazar, Manuela G; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kroemer, Heyo K; Felix, Stephan B; Völker, Uwe; Klingel, Karin; Hammer, Elke

    2011-11-01

    The most relevant clinical phenotype resulting from chronic enteroviral myocarditis is dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Mice of the susceptible mouse strain A.BY/SnJ mimick well human DCM since they develop as a consequence of persistent infection and chronic inflammation a dilation of the heart ventricle several weeks after coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection. Therefore, this model is well suited for the analysis of changes in the heart proteome associated with DCM. Here, we present a proteomic survey of the dilated hearts based on differential fluorescence gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric centered methods in comparison to age-matched non-infected hearts. In total, 101 distinct proteins, which belong to categories immunity and defense, cell structure and associated proteins, energy metabolism and protein metabolism/modification differed in their levels in both groups. Levels of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism and electron transport chain were found to be significantly reduced in infected mice suggesting a decrease in energy production in CVB3-induced DCM. Furthermore, proteins associated with muscle contraction (MLRV, MLRc2, MYH6, MyBPC3), were present in significantly altered amounts in infected mice. A significant increase in the level of extracellular matrix proteins in the dilated hearts indicates cardiac remodeling due to fibrosis.

  20. Modification of the secretion pattern of proteases, inflammatory mediators, and extracellular matrix proteins by human aortic valve is key in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Gil-Dones, Felix; Dardé, Veronica M; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; Lopez, Juan-Antonio; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2013-09-01

    One of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine is to identify candidate biomarker proteins. Secretome analysis is particularly relevant in this search as it focuses on a subset of proteins released by a cell or tissue under certain conditions. The sample can be considered as a plasma subproteome and it provides a more direct approximation to the in vivo situation. Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. Using a proteomic analysis of the secretome from aortic stenosis valves we could identify candidate markers related to this pathology, which may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we have designed a method to validate the origin of secreted proteins, demonstrating their synthesis and release by the tissue and ruling out blood origin. The nLC-MS/MS analysis showed the labeling of 61 proteins, 82% of which incorporated the label in only one group. Western blot and selective reaction monitoring differential analysis, revealed a notable role of the extracellular matrix. Variation in particular proteins such as PEDF, cystatin and clusterin emphasizes the link between aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis. In particular, certain proteins variation in secretome levels correlates well, not only with label incorporation trend (only labeled in aortic stenosis group) but, more importantly, with alterations found in plasma from an independent cohort of samples, pointing to specific candidate markers to follow up in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic intervention.

  1. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263.

  2. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; He, Qiang; Li, Ying-Ying; Li, Ce; Bai, Yu-Long; Hu, Yong-Shan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of 'learned non-use' and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model) group, a CIMT + model (CIMT) group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi.

  3. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of ′learned non-use′ and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model group, a CIMT + model (CIMT group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi.

  4. Evaluation of cultured human dermal- and dermo-epidermal substitutes focusing on extracellular matrix components: Comparison of protein and RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostendorp, Corien; Meyer, Sarah; Sobrio, Monia; van Arendonk, Joyce; Reichmann, Ernst; Daamen, Willeke F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of full-thickness skin defects with split-thickness skin grafts is generally associated with contraction and scar formation and cellular skin substitutes have been developed to improve skin regeneration. The evaluation of cultured skin substitutes is generally based on qualitative parameters focusing on histology. In this study we focused on quantitative evaluation to provide a template for comparison of human bio-engineered skin substitutes between clinical and/or research centers, and to supplement histological data. We focused on extracellular matrix proteins since these components play an important role in skin regeneration. As a model we analyzed the human dermal substitute denovoDerm and the dermo-epidermal skin substitute denovoSkin. The quantification of the extracellular matrix proteins type III collagen and laminin 5 in tissue homogenates using western blotting analysis and ELISA was not successful. The same was true for assaying lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in crosslinking of matrix molecules. As an alternative, gene expression levels were measured using qPCR. Various RNA isolation procedures were probed. The gene expression profile for specific dermal and epidermal genes could be measured reliably and reproducibly. Differences caused by changes in the cell culture conditions could easily be detected. The number of cells in the skin substitutes was measured using the PicoGreen dsDNA assay, which was found highly quantitative and reproducible. The (dis) advantages of assays used for quantitative evaluation of skin substitutes are discussed.

  5. An avidin-like domain that does not bind biotin is adopted for oligomerization by the extracellular mosaic protein fibropellin

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, Itai; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Xiahui; Cantor, Charles R.; Weng, Zhiping

    2005-01-01

    The protein avidin found in egg white seems optimized for binding the small vitamin biotin as a stable homotetramer. Indeed, along with its streptavidin ortholog in the bacterium Streptomyces avidinii, this protein shows the strongest known noncovalent bond of a protein with a small ligand. A third known member of the avidin family, as similar to avidin as is streptavidin, is found at the C-terminal ends of the multidomain fibropellin proteins found in sea urchin. The fibropellins form a laye...

  6. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases control expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Juliane; Lerche Hansen, Jakob; Haunsø, Stig;

    2002-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates G protein-coupled receptors resulting in uncoupling from G proteins. Receptors modulate GRK2 expression, however the mechanistic basis for this effect is largely unknown. Here we report a novel mechanism by which receptors use...

  7. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...... the extraction (Figure 1.a and 1.b). Comparing to cells in control group, MR-1 treated at 38 °C for EPS extraction showed different electrochemical characterizations as revealed by differential pulse voltammetry (Figure 1.c). EPS extracted from MR-1 also was proved to be electrochemically active. The present...

  8. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess adipose tissue represents a major risk factor for the development of colon cancer with inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC), promoting a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Methods Serum samples obtained from 79 subjects [26 lean (LN) and 53 obese (OB)] were used in the study. Enrolled subjects were further subclassified according to the established diagnostic protocol for CC (44 without CC and 35 with CC). Anthropometric measurements as well as circulating metabolites and hormones were determined. Circulating concentrations of the ECM proteins osteopontin (OPN), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40), tenascin C (TNC) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) were determined by ELISA. Results Significant differences in circulating OPN, YKL-40 and TNC concentrations between the experimental groups were observed, being significantly increased due to obesity (P<0.01) and colon cancer (P<0.05). LCN-2 levels were affected by obesity (P<0.05), but no differences were detected regarding the presence or not of CC. A positive association (P<0.05) with different inflammatory markers was also detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, we herein show for the first time that obese patients with CC exhibit increased circulating levels of OPN, YKL-40 and TNC providing further evidence for the influence of obesity on CC development via ECM proteins, representing promising diagnostic biomarkers or target molecules for therapeutics. PMID:27612200

  9. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  10. 问号钩体56601株外分泌蛋白功能研究%Function analysis of str. 56601 extracellular proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂志文; 梁振山; 曾令兵

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the virulence function of extracellular lipoproteins (including LA_3469, LA_2413, LA_2823 and LB_194) from the in vivo and in vitro differentially expressed L. interrogans str.56601. Methods We constructed recombinants in vitro for expression and purification of the four extracellular lipoproteins. In addition, we evaluated the adhesion ability of differ-ent extracellular lipoproteins and ECMs by ELISA. Results Both LA_3469 and LA_2413 canadhesion to Laminin, Collagen I and Collagen IV. Furthermore, LA_3469 alsocan bind to Fibronectin. Conclusion Combined the previous studies, we considered that the extracellular lipoprotein of L.interrogans, LA_3469, could be an important virulence factor during the leptospiral process.%目的:探讨体内外差异表达的问号钩体56601株外分泌脂蛋白(LA_3469、LA_2413、LA_2823和LB_194)的致病功能。方法利用体外重组表达技术,在体外表达、纯化四个外分泌脂蛋白。采用ELISA的方法,检测钩体外分泌脂蛋白与不同细胞外基质的黏附功能。结果 LA_3469与LA_2413能够与细胞外基质Laminin、Collagen I 以及Collagen IV 发生黏附作用,LA_3469还能够与Fibronectin 发生黏附作用。结论结合前期的研究,提示问号钩体外分泌脂蛋白LA_3469可能是钩体致病过程中的一个重要的致病因子。

  11. Equilibrium-phase MR angiography: Comparison of unspecific extracellular and protein-binding gadolinium-based contrast media with respect to image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb-Eigner, Katharina; Taupitz, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contrast and image quality of whole-body equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR angiography using a non-protein-binding unspecific extracellular gadolinium-based contrast medium with that of two contrast media with different protein-binding properties. 45 patients were examined using either 15 mL of gadobutrol (non-protein-binding, n = 15), 32 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (weakly protein binding, n = 15) or 11 mL gadofosveset trisodium (protein binding, n = 15) followed by equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography of four consecutive anatomic regions. The time elapsed between the contrast injection and the beginning of the equilibrium-phase image acquisition in the respective region was measured and was up to 21 min. Signal intensity was measured in two vessels per region and in muscle tissue. Relative contrast (RC) values were calculated. Vessel contrast, artifacts and image quality were rated by two radiologists in consensus on a five-point scale. Compared with gadobutrol, gadofosveset trisodium revealed significantly higher RC values only when acquired later than 15 min after bolus injection. Otherwise, no significant differences between the three contrast media were found regarding vascular contrast and image quality. Equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography using a weakly protein-binding or even non-protein-binding contrast medium is equivalent to using a stronger protein-binding contrast medium when image acquisition is within the first 15 min after contrast injection, and allows depiction of the vasculature with high contrast and image quality. The protein-binding contrast medium was superior for imaging only later than 15 min after contrast medium injection.

  12. The lateral membrane organization and dynamics of myelin proteins PLP and MBP are dictated by distinct galactolipids and the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Hande; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Hendrix, Jelle; de Jonge, Jenny C; Lamb, Don C; Hoekstra, Dick; Kahya, Nicoletta; Baron, Wia

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, lipid-protein interactions are pivotal for myelin maintenance, as these interactions regulate protein transport to the myelin membrane as well as the molecular organization within the sheath. To improve our understanding of the fundamental properties of myelin, we focused here on the lateral membrane organization and dynamics of peripheral membrane protein 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) and transmembrane protein proteolipid protein (PLP) as a function of the typical myelin lipids galactosylceramide (GalC), and sulfatide, and exogenous factors such as the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-2 and fibronectin, employing an oligodendrocyte cell line, selectively expressing the desired galactolipids. The dynamics of MBP were monitored by z-scan point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), while PLP dynamics in living cells were investigated by circular scanning FCS. The data revealed that on an inert substrate the diffusion rate of 18.5-kDa MBP increased in GalC-expressing cells, while the diffusion coefficient of PLP was decreased in sulfatide-containing cells. Similarly, when cells were grown on myelination-promoting laminin-2, the lateral diffusion coefficient of PLP was decreased in sulfatide-containing cells. In contrast, PLP's diffusion rate increased substantially when these cells were grown on myelination-inhibiting fibronectin. Additional biochemical analyses revealed that the observed differences in lateral diffusion coefficients of both proteins can be explained by differences in their biophysical, i.e., galactolipid environment, specifically with regard to their association with lipid rafts. Given the persistence of pathological fibronectin aggregates in multiple sclerosis lesions, this fundamental insight into the nature and dynamics of lipid-protein interactions will be instrumental in developing myelin regenerative strategies.

  13. Elevated extracellular calcium increases fibroblast growth factor-2 gene and protein expression levels via a cAMP/PKA dependent pathway in cementoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Sousuke; Nemoto, Eiji; Ebe, Yukari; Somerman, Martha J; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2010-09-01

    Cementoblasts, tooth root lining cells, are responsible for laying down cementum on the root surface, a process that is indispensable for establishing a functional periodontal ligament. Cementoblasts share phenotypical features with osteoblasts. Elevated levels of extracellular Ca(2+) have been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of extracellular Ca(2+) signaling in cementogenesis has not been examined. Using RT-PCR, we found that elevated levels of extracellular Ca(2+) increase fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 gene expression with a peak at 6h. Pretreatment with a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, or an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, MDL-12,330A, inhibited Ca(2+)-stimulated Fgf-2 expression. In contrast, pretreatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X or the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 did not affect the expression of Fgf-2 transcripts, suggesting that the increase in Fgf-2 expression was dependent on the PKA but not the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Treatment with an activator of adenylate cyclase, forskolin, or a cell-permeable analog of cAMP, 8-Br-cAMP, enhanced Ca(2+)-stimulated Fgf-2 expression, but a single treatment with forskolin or 8-Br-cAMP did not, suggesting that cAMP generation is indispensable but not sufficient for Ca(2+)-stimulated FGF2 expression. Next, we examined the cation specificity of the putative receptor and showed that treatment with trivalent/divalent inorganic ions, Ca(2+), Gd(3+), Sr(2+), or Al(3+), caused a dose-dependent increase in Fgf-2 mRNA levels in a cAMP-dependent fashion, whereas Mg(2+) and the organic ions neomycin and spermine had no effect on Fgf-2 gene expression levels. These findings suggest that an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism is present in cementoblasts and its activation leads to FGF-2 stimulation in a cAMP/PKA dependent fashion. Understanding the pathway regulating key genes involved in modulating the

  14. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  15. Extracellular vesicles shed by melanoma cells contain a modified form of H1.0 linker histone and H1.0 mRNA-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Puleo, Veronica; Colletta, Oriana; Fricano, Anna; Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are now recognized as a fundamental way for cell-to-cell horizontal transfer of properties, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Most of EV-mediated cross-talk among cells depend on the exchange of proteins, and nucleic acids, among which mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs such as different species of miRNAs. Cancer cells, in particular, use EVs to discard molecules which could be dangerous to them (for example differentiation-inducing proteins such as histone H1.0, or antitumor drugs), to transfer molecules which, after entering the surrounding cells, are able to transform their phenotype, and even to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance. Herein we report that melanoma cells not only secrete EVs which contain a modified form of H1.0 histone, but also transport the corresponding mRNA. Given the already known role in tumorigenesis of some RNA binding proteins (RBPs), we also searched for proteins of this class in EVs. This study revealed the presence in A375 melanoma cells of at least three RBPs, with apparent MW of about 65, 45 and 38 kDa, which are able to bind H1.0 mRNA. Moreover, we purified one of these proteins, which by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was identified as the already known transcription factor MYEF2. PMID:27633859

  16. The Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse bleb phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Petros; Makrygiannis, Apostolos K; Chalepakis, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Fras1 and the structurally related proteins Frem1, Frem2, and Frem3, comprise a novel family of extracellular matrix proteins, which localize in a similar fashion underneath the lamina densa of epithelial basement membranes. They are involved in the structural adhesion of the skin epithelium to its underlying mesenchyme. Deficiency in the individual murine Fras1/Frem genes gives rise to the bleb phenotype, which is equivalent to the human hereditary disorder Fraser syndrome, characterized by cryptophthalmos (hidden eyes), embryonic skin blistering, renal agenesis, and syndactyly. Recent studies revealed a functional cooperation between the Fras1/Frem gene products, in which Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 are simultaneously stabilized at the lowermost region of the basement membrane by forming a macromolecular ternary complex. Loss of any of these proteins results in the collapse of the protein assembly, thus providing a molecular explanation for the highly similar phenotypic defects displayed by the respective mutant mice. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, and interplay between the proteins of the Fras1/Frem family and further propose a possible scenario for the evolution of the corresponding genes.

  17. The impact of various preanalytical treatments on the phenotype of small extracellular vesicles in blood analyzed by protein microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Rikke; Søndergaard, Evo K L; Varming, Kim;

    2016-01-01

    The research field of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is increasing immensely and the potential uses of EVs seem endless. They are found in large numbers in various body fluids, and blood samples may well serve as liquid biopsies. However, these small membrane-derived entities of cellular origin...... are not straightforward to work with in regard to isolation and characterization. A broad range of relevant preanalytical issues was tested, with a focus on the phenotypic impact of smaller EVs. The influences of the i) blood collection tube used, ii) incubation time before the initial centrifugation, iii) transportation...... that samples collected in different blood collection tubes suffered to varying degrees from the preanalytical treatments tested here. There is no unequivocal answer to the questions asked. However, in general, the period of time and prospective transportation before the initial centrifugation, choice...

  18. Generation of priming mesenchymal stem cells with enhanced potential to differentiate into specific cell lineages using extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na Rae; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Young Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Choonghyo; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eunsong; Lim, Jeong Mook; Lee, Seung Tae

    2013-07-01

    Poor understanding of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has resulted in a low differentiation yield, and has hindered their application in medicine. As a solution, priming MSCs sensitive to signaling, thus stimulating differentiation into a specific cell lineage, may improve the differentiation yield. To demonstrate this, priming MSCs were produced by using a gelatin matrix for the isolation of primary MSCs from bone-marrow-derived primary cells. Subsequently, cellular characteristics and sensitivity to specific differentiation signals were analyzed at passage five. Compared to non-priming MSCs, priming MSCs showed no significant differences in cellular characteristics, but demonstrated a significant increase in sensitivity to neurogenic differentiation signals. These results demonstrate that generation of priming MSCs by specific extracellular signaling increases the rate of differentiation into a cell-specific lineage.

  19. Expression of cathepsin D in urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: an immunohistochemical study including correlations with extracellular matrix components, CD44, p53, Rb, c-erbB-2 and the proliferation indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioachim, Elli; Charchanti, Antonia; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Athanassiou, Evangelia; Bafa, Maria; Agnantis, Niki J

    2002-01-01

    The immunohistochemical Cathepsin D (CD) expression of tumor and stromal cells was investigated in a series of 77 urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder with the intention to evaluate its prognostic significance and its contribution to the metastatic potential of bladder cancer. CD expression (clone D13A) was correlated with the expression of extracellular matrix components (collagen type IV, laminin, fibronectin), CD44, p53, pRb, proliferation indices (PCNA and MIB1) as well as with other conventional clininopathological features. CD expression (> 10% of positive tumor cells) was observed in 77.9% of the carcinomas. Stromal CD expression was detected in all cases. Linear collagen type IV and laminin deposit at the tumor-stroma border (in > 25% of the BM) was found in 26% and 57.6% of the cases, respectively. The CD of cancer cells (CCCD) was inversely-correlated with the CD of the stromal cells (p = 0.039), tumor grade (p = 0.0028), tumor stage (p = 0.0046), p53 protein (p = 0.05) and positively-correlated with CD44 (p = 0.002) and pRb (p = 0.05). The stromal cells CD (SCCD) showed a statistically significant positive correlation with tumor grade (p < 0.0001) and stage (p = 0.0001), and the proliferation indices PCNA and MIB1 (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0002, respectively). These data suggest that both CD of tumor and stromal cells could play important roles in the expansion of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

  20. Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Msh Pilin Proteins are Involved in Extracellular Electron Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    comparison of the 16 MR-1 Msh pilin complex proteins to Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar El Tor (tax id: 686) using the BLAST-search algorithm [21] for proteins... Vibrio cholerae mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin type 4 pilus gene locus. J Bacteriol 1999;181:1110–7. [23] Ringeisen BR, Henderson E, Wu PK...BLASTp) with default algorithm parameters. Sequence homology of MR-1 Msh proteins to the well-studied Msh pilin complex from V. cholera [22] allowed

  1. Tandem mass spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Joshua F; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Monroe, Matthew E; Aldrich, Joshua T; Clauss, Therese R W; Purvine, Samuel O; Wang, Zihao; Camp, David G; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Stanley, Pamela; Hart, Gerald W; Hunt, Donald F; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D

    2012-05-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a reversible posttranslational modification of Ser and Thr residues on cytosolic and nuclear proteins of higher eukaryotes catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT). O-GlcNAc has recently been found on Notch1 extracellular domain catalyzed by EGF domain-specific OGT. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of brain proteins has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, understanding specific functions of O-GlcNAcylation in AD has been impeded by the difficulty in characterization of O-GlcNAc sites on proteins. In this study, we modified a chemical/enzymatic photochemical cleavage approach for enriching O-GlcNAcylated peptides in samples containing ∼100 μg of tryptic peptides from mouse cerebrocortical brain tissue. A total of 274 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were identified. Of these, 168 were not previously known to be modified by O-GlcNAc. Overall, 458 O-GlcNAc sites in 195 proteins were identified. Many of the modified residues are either known phosphorylation sites or located proximal to known phosphorylation sites. These findings support the proposed regulatory cross-talk between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation. This study produced the most comprehensive O-GlcNAc proteome of mammalian brain tissue with both protein identification and O-GlcNAc site assignment. Interestingly, we observed O-β-GlcNAc on EGF-like repeats in the extracellular domains of five membrane proteins, expanding the evidence for extracellular O-GlcNAcylation by the EGF domain-specific OGT. We also report a GlcNAc-β-1,3-Fuc-α-1-O-Thr modification on the EGF-like repeat of the versican core protein, a proposed substrate of Fringe β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases.

  2. Poly(A) RNAs including coding proteins RNAs occur in plant Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedojadło, Janusz; Kubicka, Ewa; Kalich, Beata; Smoliński, Dariusz J

    2014-01-01

    The localisation of poly(A) RNA in plant cells containing either reticular (Allium cepa) or chromocentric (Lupinus luteus, Arabidopsis thaliana) nuclei was studied through in situ hybridisation. In both types of nuclei, the amount of poly(A) RNA was much greater in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. In the nuclei, poly(A) RNA was present in structures resembling nuclear bodies. The molecular composition as well as the characteristic ultrastructure of the bodies containing poly(A) RNA demonstrated that they were Cajal bodies. We showed that some poly(A) RNAs in Cajal bodies code for proteins. However, examination of the localisation of active RNA polymerase II and in situ run-on transcription assays both demonstrated that CBs are not sites of transcription and that BrU-containing RNA accumulates in these structures long after synthesis. In addition, it was demonstrated that accumulation of poly(A) RNA occurs in the nuclei and CBs of hypoxia-treated cells. Our findings indicated that CBs may be involved in the later stages of poly(A) RNA metabolism, playing a role storage or retention.

  3. Poly(A RNAs including coding proteins RNAs occur in plant Cajal bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Niedojadło

    Full Text Available The localisation of poly(A RNA in plant cells containing either reticular (Allium cepa or chromocentric (Lupinus luteus, Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei was studied through in situ hybridisation. In both types of nuclei, the amount of poly(A RNA was much greater in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. In the nuclei, poly(A RNA was present in structures resembling nuclear bodies. The molecular composition as well as the characteristic ultrastructure of the bodies containing poly(A RNA demonstrated that they were Cajal bodies. We showed that some poly(A RNAs in Cajal bodies code for proteins. However, examination of the localisation of active RNA polymerase II and in situ run-on transcription assays both demonstrated that CBs are not sites of transcription and that BrU-containing RNA accumulates in these structures long after synthesis. In addition, it was demonstrated that accumulation of poly(A RNA occurs in the nuclei and CBs of hypoxia-treated cells. Our findings indicated that CBs may be involved in the later stages of poly(A RNA metabolism, playing a role storage or retention.

  4. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  5. A Venom Gland Extracellular Chitin-Binding-Like Protein from Pupal Endoparasitoid Wasps, Pteromalus Puparum, Selectively Binds Chitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) existed in various species and involved in different biology processes. In the present study, we cloned a full length cDNA of chitin-binding protein-like (PpCBP-like) from Pteromalus puparum, a pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae. PpCBP-like encoded a 96 putative amin...

  6. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah J; Kroon, Johan T M; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell-cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  7. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  8. Pivotal roles of the outer membrane polysaccharide export and polysaccharide copolymerase protein families in export of extracellular polysaccharides in gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Leslie; Mainprize, Iain L; Naismith, James H; Whitfield, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Many bacteria export extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS). These polymers exhibit remarkably diverse structures and play important roles in the biology of free-living, commensal, and pathogenic bacteria. EPS and CPS production represents a major challenge because these high-molecular-weight hydrophilic polymers must be assembled and exported in a process spanning the envelope, without compromising the essential barrier properties of the envelope. Emerging evidence points to the existence of molecular scaffolds that perform these critical polymer-trafficking functions. Two major pathways with different polymer biosynthesis strategies are involved in the assembly of most EPS/CPS: the Wzy-dependent and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent pathways. They converge in an outer membrane export step mediated by a member of the outer membrane auxiliary (OMA) protein family. OMA proteins form outer membrane efflux channels for the polymers, and here we propose the revised name outer membrane polysaccharide export (OPX) proteins. Proteins in the polysaccharide copolymerase (PCP) family have been implicated in several aspects of polymer biogenesis, but there is unequivocal evidence for some systems that PCP and OPX proteins interact to form a trans-envelope scaffold for polymer export. Understanding of the precise functions of the OPX and PCP proteins has been advanced by recent findings from biochemistry and structural biology approaches and by parallel studies of other macromolecular trafficking events. Phylogenetic analyses reported here also contribute important new insight into the distribution, structural relationships, and function of the OPX and PCP proteins. This review is intended as an update on progress in this important area of microbial cell biology.

  9. Ultrastructural localization of extracellular matrix proteins of the lymph node cortex: evidence supporting the reticular network as a pathway for lymphocyte migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobocinski Gregg P

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lymph node (LN is a crossroads of blood and lymphatic vessels allowing circulating lymphocytes to efficiently recognize foreign molecules displayed on antigen presenting cells. Increasing evidence indicates that after crossing high endothelial venules, lymphocytes migrate within the node along the reticular network (RN, a scaffold of fibers enwrapped by fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC. Light microscopy has shown that the RN contains specific extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, which are putative molecular "footholds" for migration, and are known ligands for lymphocyte integrin adhesion receptors. Results To investigate whether ECM proteins of the RN are present on the outer surface of the FRC and are thus accessible to migrating lymphocytes, ultrastructural immunohistochemical staining of cynomolgus monkey LN was performed using antibodies to human ECM proteins that were successfully employed at the light microscopic level. The fibrillar collagens I and III were observed primarily within the reticular network fibers themselves. In contrast, the matrix proteins laminin, fibronectin, collagen IV, and tenascin were observed within the reticular fibers and also on the outer membrane surface of the FRC. Conclusions These findings suggest a molecular basis for how the RN functions as a pathway for lymphocyte migration within the lymph node.

  10. Cold-Inducible RNA-Binding Protein Bypasses Replicative Senescence in Primary Cells through Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1 and 2 Activation▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Callejas, Francisco B.; Castellvi, Josep; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Carnero, Amancio; Fernández-Marcos, Pablo J.; Serrano, Manuel; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Lleonart, Matilde E.

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are immortalized cells whose proliferation rate is comparable to that of carcinogenic cells. To study the expression of embryonic stem cell genes in primary cells, genetic screening was performed by infecting mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with a cDNA library from embryonic stem cells. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) was identified due to its ability to bypass replicative senescence in primary cells. CIRP enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and treatment with an MEK inhibitor decreased the proliferation caused by CIRP. In contrast to CIRP upregulation, CIRP downregulation decreased cell proliferation and resulted in inhibition of phosphorylated ERK1/2 inhibition. This is the first evidence that ERK1/2 activation, through the same mechanism as that described for a Val12 mutant K-ras to induce premature senescence, is able to bypass senescence in the absence of p16INK4a, p21WAF1, and p19ARF upregulation. Moreover, these results show that CIRP functions by stimulating general protein synthesis with the involvement of the S6 and 4E-BP1 proteins. The overall effect is an increase in kinase activity of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex, which is in accordance with the proliferative capacity of CIRP MEFs. Interestingly, CIRP mRNA and protein were upregulated in a subgroup of cancer patients, a finding that may be of relevance for cancer research. PMID:19158277

  11. The Extracellular Heme-binding Protein HbpS from the Soil Bacterium Streptomyces reticuli Is an Aquo-cobalamin Binder*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Fedosov, Sergey N.; Wedderhoff, Ina; Che, Edith N.; Torda, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli interacts with iron ions and heme. It also acts in concert with the two-component sensing system SenS-SenR in response to oxidative stress. Sequence comparisons suggested that the protein may bind a cobalamin. UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed binding (Kd = 34 μm) to aquo-cobalamin (H2OCbl+) but not to other cobalamins. Competition experiments with the H2OCbl+-coordinating ligand CN− and comparison of mutants identified a histidine residue (His-156) that coordinates the cobalt ion of H2OCbl+ and substitutes for water. HbpS·Cobalamin lacks the Asp-X-His-X-X-Gly motif seen in some cobalamin binding enzymes. Preliminary tests showed that a related HbpS protein from a different species also binds H2OCbl+. Furthermore, analyses of HbpS-heme binding kinetics are consistent with the role of HbpS as a heme-sensor and suggested a role in heme transport. Given the high occurrence of HbpS-like sequences among Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, our findings suggest a great functional versatility among these proteins. PMID:25342754

  12. PME-1 protects extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A; Hector, Melissa E; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C; Westermarck, Jukka

    2009-04-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies; however, the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here, we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A promotes basal ERK pathway activity and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically, PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and protein kinase C. In malignant gliomas, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (n=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells and suggest an important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas.

  13. Proteomics reveals drastic increase of extracellular matrix proteins collagen and dermatopontin in the aged mdx diaphragm model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease of childhood caused by primary abnormalities in the gene coding for the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The mdx mouse is an established animal model of various aspects of X-linked muscular dystrophy and is widely used for studying fundamental mechanisms of dystrophinopathy and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat one of the most frequent gender-specific diseases in humans. In order to determine global changes in the muscle proteome with the progressive deterioration of mdx tissue with age, we have characterized diaphragm muscle from mdx mice at three ages (8-weeks, 12-months and 22-months) using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Altered expression levels in diaphragm of 8-week vs. 22-month mice were shown to occur in 11 muscle-associated proteins. Aging in the mdx diaphragm seems to be associated with a drastic increase in the extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and dermatopontin, the molecular chaperone αB-crystallin, and the intermediate filament protein vimentin, suggesting increased accumulation of connective tissue, an enhanced cellular stress response and compensatory stabilization of the weakened membrane cytoskeleton. These proteomic findings establish the aged mdx diaphragm as an excellent model system for studying secondary effects of dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle tissue.

  14. Activation of Yes-Associated Protein in Low-Grade Meningiomas Is Regulated by Merlin, Cell Density, and Extracellular Matrix Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motomura, Kazuya; Alim, Adiljan; Tanaka, Ichidai; Senga, Takeshi; Harada, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Ryuichi; Sumiyoshi, Naoyuki; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2015-07-01

    The NF2 gene product Merlin is a protein containing ezrin, radixin, and moesin domains; it is a member of the 4.1 protein superfamily associated with the membrane cytoskeleton and also interacts with cell surface molecules. The mammalian Hippo cascade, a downstream signaling cascade of merlin, inactivates the Yes-associated protein (YAP). Yes-associated protein is activated by loss of the NF2 gene and functions as an oncogene in meningioma cells; however, the factors controlling YAP expression, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization in meningiomas have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that merlin expression is heterogeneous in 1 NF2 gene-negative and 3 NF2 gene-positive World Health Organization grade I meningiomas. In the NF2 gene-positive meningiomas, regions with low levels of merlin (tumor rims) had greater numbers of cells with nuclear YAP versus regions with high merlin levels (tumor cores). Merlin expression and YAP phosphorylation were also affected by cell density in the IOMM-Lee and HKBMM human meningioma cell lines; nuclear localization of YAP was regulated by cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness in IOMM-Lee cells. These results suggest that cell density and ECM stiffness may contribute to the heterogeneous loss of merlin and increased nuclear YAP expression in human meningiomas.

  15. Characterization of Genes Encoding Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Wheat Including the Specific Role of PDI in the Formation of Gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Ewa; Demska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The results of phylogenetic analyses revealed that the family of plant PDI may comprise of at least eight different subfamilies with varying numbers and positions of active centers while retention signals in the endoplasmic reticulum may be present or absent. At least one gene has been cloned for each phylogenetic group. Other phylogenetic analyses have indicated that the family of PDIlike proteins consists of ten classes, the first five of which include proteins equipped with two thioredoxin domains. These results indicate complexity and diversity of the family of protein disulfide isomerase in plants. The study of molecular characteristics of PDI in some cereal species have shown that this enzyme participates in the maturation of secretory proteins and also in the formation of albuminous substances in endosperm, in the mechanism of formation of disulfide bonds and polymerization of gluten polypeptides in wheat. The mechanism of formation of disulfide linkage was tested through in vitro experiments. However, it is not entirely certain whether it reflects their formation in vivo. The results of researches suggest that protein folding and disulfide bond formation occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. PDI plays a prominent role among enzymes involved in posttranslational modification of proteins. The main goal of this work is to present research data on protein disulfide isomerase, which may be a leading research objective in the area of wheat gluten and the impact of PDI on the baking quality of wheat flour.

  16. Disruption of microbial biofilms by an extracellular protein isolated from epibiotic tropical marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra H Dusane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine epibiotic bacteria produce bioactive compounds effective against microbial biofilms. The study examines antibiofilm ability of a protein obtained from a tropical marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis D1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: B. licheniformis strain D1 isolated from the surface of green mussel, Perna viridis showed antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Candida albicans BH, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and biofouling Bacillus pumilus TiO1 cultures. The antimicrobial activity was lost after treatment with trypsin and proteinase K. The protein was purified by ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the antimicrobial agent to be a 14 kDa protein designated as BL-DZ1. The protein was stable at 75°C for 30 min and over a pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. The sequence alignment of the MALDI-fingerprint showed homology with the NCBI entry for a hypothetical protein (BL00275 derived from B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 with the accession number gi52082584. The protein showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value of 1.6 µg/ml against C. albicans. Against both P. aeruginosa and B. pumilus the MIC was 3.12 µg/ml. The protein inhibited microbial growth, decreased biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed biofilms of the representative cultures in polystyrene microtiter plates and on glass surfaces. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We isolated a protein from a tropical marine strain of B. licheniformis, assigned a function to the hypothetical protein entry in the NCBI database and described its application as a potential antibiofilm agent.

  17. Disruption of Microbial Biofilms by an Extracellular Protein Isolated from Epibiotic Tropical Marine Strain of Bacillus licheniformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusane, Devendra H.; Damare, Samir R.; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V.; Ramaiah, N.; Venugopalan, Vayalam P.; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine epibiotic bacteria produce bioactive compounds effective against microbial biofilms. The study examines antibiofilm ability of a protein obtained from a tropical marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis D1. Methodology/Principal Findings B. licheniformis strain D1 isolated from the surface of green mussel, Perna viridis showed antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Candida albicans BH, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and biofouling Bacillus pumilus TiO1 cultures. The antimicrobial activity was lost after treatment with trypsin and proteinase K. The protein was purified by ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed the antimicrobial agent to be a 14 kDa protein designated as BL-DZ1. The protein was stable at 75°C for 30 min and over a pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. The sequence alignment of the MALDI-fingerprint showed homology with the NCBI entry for a hypothetical protein (BL00275) derived from B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 with the accession number gi52082584. The protein showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1.6 µg/ml against C. albicans. Against both P. aeruginosa and B. pumilus the MIC was 3.12 µg/ml. The protein inhibited microbial growth, decreased biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed biofilms of the representative cultures in polystyrene microtiter plates and on glass surfaces. Conclusion/Significance We isolated a protein from a tropical marine strain of B. licheniformis, assigned a function to the hypothetical protein entry in the NCBI database and described its application as a potential antibiofilm agent. PMID:23691235

  18. Native SDS-PAGE: High Resolution Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins With Retention of Native Properties Including Bound Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B.; Wobig, William J.; Petering, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is commonly used to obtain high resolution separation of complex mixtures of proteins. The method initially denatures the proteins that will undergo electrophoresis. Although covalent structural features of resolved proteins can be determined with SDS-PAGE, functional properties are destroyed, including the presence of non-covalently bound metal ions. To address this shortcoming, blue-native (BN)-PAGE has been introduced. This method retains functional properties but at the cost of protein resolving power. To address the need for a high resolution PAGE method that results in the separation of native proteins, experiments tested the impact of changing the conditions of SDS-PAGE on the quality of protein separation and retention of functional properties. Removal of SDS and EDTA from the sample buffer together with omission of a heating step had no effect on the results of PAGE. Reduction of SDS in the running buffer from 0.1% to 0.0375% together with deletion of EDTA also made little impact on the quality of the electrophoretograms of fractions of pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell proteome in comparison with that achieved with the SDS-PAGE method. The modified conditions were called native (N)SDS-PAGE. Retention of Zn2+ bound in proteomic samples increased from 26 to 98% upon shifting from standard to modified conditions. Moreover, seven of nine model enzymes, including four Zn2+ proteins that were subjected to NSDS-PAGE retained activity. All nine were active in BN-PAGE, whereas all underwent denaturation during SDS-PAGE. Metal retention after electrophoresis was additionally confirmed using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and in-gel Zn-protein staining using the fluorophore TSQ. PMID:24686569

  19. Matricryptins and matrikines: biologically active fragments of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Salza, Romain

    2014-07-01

    Numerous extracellular proteins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) undergo limited enzymatic cleavage resulting in the release of fragments exerting biological activities, which are usually different from those of the full-length molecules. In this review, we define matrikines and matricryptins, which are bioactive fragments released from the extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans and GAGs and report their major biological activities. These fragments regulate a number of physiopathological processes including angiogenesis, cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases and wound healing. The challenges to translate these fragments from molecules biologically active in vitro and in experimental models to potential drugs are discussed in the last part of the review.

  20. Changes in extracellular matrix (ECM and ECM-associated proteins in the metastatic progression of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikes Robert A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa is no exception to the multi-step process of metastasis. As PCa progresses, changes occur within the microenvironments of both the malignant cells and their targeted site of metastasis, enabling the necessary responses that result in successful translocation. The majority of patients with progressing prostate cancers develop skeletal metastases. Despite advancing efforts in early detection and management, there remains no effective, long-term cure for metastatic PCa. Therefore, the elucidation of the mechanism of PCa metastasis and preferential establishment of lesions in bone is an intensive area of investigation that promises to generate new targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will survey what is currently know concerning PCa interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM and the roles of factors within the tumor and ECM microenvironments that contribute to metastasis. These will be discussed within the context of changes in expression and functional heterodimerization patterns of integrins, changes in ECM expression and reorganization by proteases facilitating invasion. In this context we also provide a brief summary of how growth factors (GFs, cytokines and regulatory signaling pathways favor PCa metastasis to bone.

  1. Integrin-mediated interactions with extracellular matrix proteins for nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgen, D T; Gilchrist, C L; Richardson, W J; Isaacs, R E; Brown, C R; Yang, K L; Chen, J; Setton, L A

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the human intervertebral disc is rich in molecules that interact with cells through integrin-mediated attachments. Porcine nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have been shown to interact with laminin (LM) isoforms LM-111 and LM-511 through select integrins that regulate biosynthesis and cell attachment. Since human NP cells lose many phenotypic characteristics with age, attachment and interaction with the ECM may be altered. Expression of LM-binding integrins was quantified for human NP cells using flow cytometry. The cell-ECM attachment mechanism was determined by quantifying cell attachment to LM-111, LM-511, or type II collagen after functionally blocking specific integrin subunits. Human NP cells express integrins β1, α3, and α5, with over 70% of cells positive for each subunit. Blocking subunit β1 inhibited NP cell attachment to all substrates. Blocking subunits α1, α2, α3, and α5 simultaneously, but not individually, inhibits NP cell attachment to laminins. While integrin α6β1 mediated porcine NP cell attachment to LM-111, we found integrins α3, α5, and β1 instead contributed to human NP cell attachment. These findings identify integrin subunits that may mediate interactions with the ECM for human NP cells and could be used to promote cell attachment, survival, and biosynthesis in cell-based therapeutics.

  2. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in drug‑resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) development leads to resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Microarray methods can provide information regarding new candidate genes that can play a role in resistance to cytostatic drugs. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into cancer tissue as well as increased apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we report changes in the ECM and related gene expression pattern in methotrexate-, cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, vincristine-, topotecan- and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the W1 ovarian cancer cell line. The resistant variants of the W1 cell line were generated by stepwise selection of cells with an increasing concentration of the indicated drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Genome U219 Array Strips were used for hybridizations. Independent t-tests were used to determinate the statistical significance of results. Genes whose expression levels were higher than the assumed threshold (upregulated, >5-fold and downregulated, 20-fold. These genes were: ITGB1BP3, COL3A1, COL5A2, COL15A1, TGFBI, DCN, LUM, MATN2, POSTN and EGFL6. The expression of seven genes decreased very significantly: ITGA1, COL1A2, LAMA2, GPC3, KRT23, VIT and HMCN1. The expression pattern of ECM and related genes provided the preliminary view into the role of ECM components in cytostatic drug resistance of cancer cells. The exact role of the investigated genes in drug resistance requires further investigation.

  3. An extended gene protein/products Boolean network model including post-transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benso, Alfredo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Politano, Gianfranco; Savino, Alessandro; Vasciaveo, Alessandro

    2014-05-07

    Networks Biology allows the study of complex interactions between biological systems using formal, well structured, and computationally friendly models. Several different network models can be created, depending on the type of interactions that need to be investigated. Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) are an effective model commonly used to study the complex regulatory mechanisms of a cell. Unfortunately, given their intrinsic complexity and non discrete nature, the computational study of realistic-sized complex GRNs requires some abstractions. Boolean Networks (BNs), for example, are a reliable model that can be used to represent networks where the possible state of a node is a boolean value (0 or 1). Despite this strong simplification, BNs have been used to study both structural and dynamic properties of real as well as randomly generated GRNs. In this paper we show how it is possible to include the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism (a key process mediated by small non-coding RNA molecules like the miRNAs) into the BN model of a GRN. The enhanced BN model is implemented in a software toolkit (EBNT) that allows to analyze boolean GRNs from both a structural and a dynamic point of view. The open-source toolkit is compatible with available visualization tools like Cytoscape and allows to run detailed analysis of the network topology as well as of its attractors, trajectories, and state-space. In the paper, a small GRN built around the mTOR gene is used to demonstrate the main capabilities of the toolkit. The extended model proposed in this paper opens new opportunities in the study of gene regulation. Several of the successful researches done with the support of BN to understand high-level characteristics of regulatory networks, can now be improved to better understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation for example as a network-wide noise-reduction or stabilization mechanisms.

  4. An extended gene protein/products boolean network model including post-transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Networks Biology allows the study of complex interactions between biological systems using formal, well structured, and computationally friendly models. Several different network models can be created, depending on the type of interactions that need to be investigated. Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) are an effective model commonly used to study the complex regulatory mechanisms of a cell. Unfortunately, given their intrinsic complexity and non discrete nature, the computational study of realistic-sized complex GRNs requires some abstractions. Boolean Networks (BNs), for example, are a reliable model that can be used to represent networks where the possible state of a node is a boolean value (0 or 1). Despite this strong simplification, BNs have been used to study both structural and dynamic properties of real as well as randomly generated GRNs. Results In this paper we show how it is possible to include the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism (a key process mediated by small non-coding RNA molecules like the miRNAs) into the BN model of a GRN. The enhanced BN model is implemented in a software toolkit (EBNT) that allows to analyze boolean GRNs from both a structural and a dynamic point of view. The open-source toolkit is compatible with available visualization tools like Cytoscape and allows to run detailed analysis of the network topology as well as of its attractors, trajectories, and state-space. In the paper, a small GRN built around the mTOR gene is used to demonstrate the main capabilities of the toolkit. Conclusions The extended model proposed in this paper opens new opportunities in the study of gene regulation. Several of the successful researches done with the support of BN to understand high-level characteristics of regulatory networks, can now be improved to better understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation for example as a network-wide noise-reduction or stabilization mechanisms. PMID:25080304

  5. Fungus-mediated preferential bioleaching of waste material such as fly - ash as a means of producing extracellular, protein capped, fluorescent and water soluble silica nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ali Khan

    Full Text Available In this paper, we for the first time show the ability of the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum in the bioleaching of waste material such as Fly-ash for the extracellular production of highly crystalline and highly stable, protein capped, fluorescent and water soluble silica nanoparticles at ambient conditions. When the fungus Fusarium oxysporum is exposed to Fly-ash, it is capable of selectively leaching out silica nanoparticles of quasi-spherical morphology within 24 h of reaction. These silica nanoparticles have been completely characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX.

  6. Commitment to the CD4 lineage mediated by extracellular signal-related kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase and lck signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, L L; Hedrick, S M

    1999-12-15

    The development of T cells results in a concordance between the specificity of the TCR for MHC class I and class II molecules and the expression of CD8 and CD4 coreceptors. Based on analogy to simple metazoan models of organ development and lineage commitment, we sought to determine whether extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway signaling acts as an inductive signal for the CD4 lineage. Here, we show that, by altering the intracellular signaling involving the Erk/MAP kinase pathway, T cells with specificity for MHC class I can be diverted to express CD4, and, conversely, T cells with specificity for MHC class II can be diverted to express CD8. Furthermore, we find that activation of the src-family tyrosine kinase, p56lck is an upstream mediator of lineage commitment. These results suggest a simple mechanism for lineage commitment in T cell development.

  7. Amelogenin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other hard-to-heal wounds: experimental and clinical evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, M.; Dini, V.; Vowden, P.

    2008-01-01

    proliferation. Pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that cutaneous wounds benefit from treatment with amelogenins. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) involving patients with hard-to-heal venous leg ulcers (VLUs) (ie, ulcers with a surface > or = area 10 cm2 and duration of > or = 6 months) showed...... therapy demonstrated in the RCT are being repeated in "real life" situations and that amelogenin therapy may also have a role to play in the treatment of other wound types such as diabetic foot ulcers Udgivelsesdato: 2008......Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins that, under physiological conditions, self-assemble into globular aggregates up to micron-sizes. Studies with periodontal fibroblasts indicate that attachment to these structures increases the endogenous secretion of multiple growth factors and cell...

  8. The extracellular adherence protein from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement by blocking formation of the C3 proconvertase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehl, Jordan L; Stapels, Daphne A C; Garcia, Brandon L; Ramyar, Kasra X; Keightley, Andrew; Ruyken, Maartje; Syriga, Maria; Sfyroera, Georgia; Weber, Alexander B; Zolkiewski, Michal; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2014-12-15

    The pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus actively evades many aspects of human innate immunity by expressing a series of small inhibitory proteins. A number of these proteins inhibit the complement system, which labels bacteria for phagocytosis and generates inflammatory chemoattractants. Although the majority of staphylococcal complement inhibitors act on the alternative pathway to block the amplification loop, only a few proteins act on the initial recognition cascades that constitute the classical pathway (CP) and lectin pathway (LP). We screened a collection of recombinant, secreted staphylococcal proteins to determine whether S. aureus produces other molecules that inhibit the CP and/or LP. Using this approach, we identified the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) as a potent, specific inhibitor of both the CP and LP. We found that Eap blocked CP/LP-dependent activation of C3, but not C4, and that Eap likewise inhibited deposition of C3b on the surface of S. aureus cells. In turn, this significantly diminished the extent of S. aureus opsonophagocytosis and killing by neutrophils. This combination of functional properties suggested that Eap acts specifically at the level of the CP/LP C3 convertase (C4b2a). Indeed, we demonstrated a direct, nanomolar-affinity interaction of Eap with C4b. Eap binding to C4b inhibited binding of both full-length C2 and its C2b fragment, which indicated that Eap disrupts formation of the CP/LP C3 proconvertase (C4b2). As a whole, our results demonstrate that S. aureus inhibits two initiation routes of complement by expression of the Eap protein, and thereby define a novel mechanism of immune evasion.

  9. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (α-syn is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD. This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397 [1]. α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively. For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002256 to PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002256 to 10.6019/http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002263.

  10. Placental extracellular vesicles and feto-maternal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M; Chamley, L W

    2015-01-29

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. An avidin-like domain that does not bind biotin is adopted for oligomerization by the extracellular mosaic protein fibropellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Itai; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Xiahui; Cantor, Charles R; Weng, Zhiping

    2005-02-01

    The protein avidin found in egg white seems optimized for binding the small vitamin biotin as a stable homotetramer. Indeed, along with its streptavidin ortholog in the bacterium Streptomyces avidinii, this protein shows the strongest known noncovalent bond of a protein with a small ligand. A third known member of the avidin family, as similar to avidin as is streptavidin, is found at the C-terminal ends of the multidomain fibropellin proteins found in sea urchin. The fibropellins form a layer known as the apical lamina that surrounds the sea urchin embryo throughout development. Based upon the structure of avidin, we deduced a structural model for the avidin-like domain of the fibropellins and found that computational modeling predicts a lack of biotin binding and the preservation of tetramerization. To test this prediction we expressed and purified the fibropellin avidin-like domain and found it indeed to be a homotetramer incapable of binding biotin. Several lines of evidence suggest that the avidin-like domain causes the entire fibropellin protein to tetramerize. We suggest that the presence of the avidin-like domain serves a structural (tetrameric form) rather than functional (biotin-binding) role and may therefore be a molecular instance of exaptation-the modification of an existing function toward a new function. Finally, based upon the oligomerization of the avidin-like domain, we propose a model for the overall structure of the apical lamina.

  12. Cytocompatibility of novel extracellular matrix protein analogs of biodegradable polyester polymers derived from α-hydroxy amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecht, Shimon; Cohen-Arazi, Naomi; Cohen, Gadi; Ettinger, Keren; Momic, Tatjana; Kolitz, Michal; Naamneh, Majdi; Katzhendler, Jehoshua; Domb, Abraham J; Lazarovici, Philip; Lelkes, Peter I

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges in regenerative medicine is the development of novel biodegradable materials to build scaffolds that will support multiple cell types for tissue engineering. Here we describe the preparation, characterization, and cytocompatibility of homo- and hetero-polyesters of α-hydroxy amino acid derivatives with or without lactic acid conjugation. The polymers were prepared by a direct condensation method and characterized using gel permeation chromatography, (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, optical activity, and solubility. The surface charge of the polymers was evaluated using zeta potential measurements. The polymers were coated onto glass cover slips followed by characterization using nano-surface profiler, thin film reflectometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their interaction with endothelial and neuronal cells was assessed using adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation assays. Of the characterized polymers, Poly-HOVal-LA, but not Poly-(D)HOPhe, significantly augmented nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation of the PC12 pheochromcytoma cells. In contrast, Poly-HOLeu increased by 20% the adhesion of endothelial cells, but did not affect PC12 cell differentiation. NGF-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells grown on the different polymers was similar to the effect observed for cells cultured on collagen type I. While no significant association could be established between charge and the differentiative/proliferative properties of the polymers, AFM analysis indicated augmentation of NGF-induced neuronal differentiation on smooth polymer surfaces. We conclude that overall selective cytocompatibility and bioactivity might render α-hydroxy amino acid polymers useful as extracellular matrix-mimicking materials for tissue engineering.

  13. Estrogens increase the expression of fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix protein secreted by human ovarian cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clinton, GM; Rougeot, C; Derancourt, J; Roger, P; Defrenne, A; Godyna, S; Argraves, WS; Rochefort, H

    1996-01-01

    Ovarian cancers have a high ability to invade the peritoneal cavity and some are stimulated by estrogens, In an attempt to understand the mode of action of estrogens on these cancer cells and to develop new markers, we have characterized estrogen-regulated proteins, This study,vas aimed at identifyi

  14. Two heterologously expressed Planobispora rosea proteins cooperatively induce Streptomyces lividans thiostrepton uptake and storage from the extracellular medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süssmuth Roderich D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bacterial artificial chromosomal library of Planobispora rosea, a genetically intractable actinomycete strain, was constructed using Escherichia coli-Streptomyces artificial chromosome (ESAC and screened for the presence of genes known to be involved in the biosynthesis of antibiotics. Results One clone with a 40 kb insert showed antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria. Insert sequence analysis and subcloning experiments revealed that the bioactivity was due to a 3.5 kb DNA fragment containing two open reading frames. These orfs encode two proteins with high similarity to a putative membrane protein of Streptomyces coelicolor and to the nogalamycin resistance protein SnorO of Streptomyces nogalater, respectively. The role of these two Orfs is unknown in Planobispora. Disruption and complementation experiments revealed that both proteins are necessary for the antibacterial activity and chemical analysis demonstrated that the antibiotic activity was due to thiostrepton, antibiotic used as recombinant clone selection marker. Conclusion Two Planobispora rosea orfs are responsible for increasing intracellular amounts and storage of thiostrepton in Streptomyces lividans.

  15. Venom allergen-like proteins in secretions of plant-parasitic nematodes activate and suppress extracellular plant immune receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Torres, J.L.

    2014-01-01

      Parasitic worms threaten human, animal and plant health by infecting people, livestock and crops worldwide. Animals and plants share an anciently evolved innate immune system. Parasites modulate this immune system by secreting proteins to maintain their parasitic lifestyle. This thesis descr

  16. Structure-Based Assignment of Ile, Leu, and Val Methyl Groups in the Active and Inactive Forms of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yao; Warner, Lisa R; Latham, Michael P; Ahn, Natalie G; Pardi, Arthur

    2015-07-21

    Resonance assignments are the first step in most NMR studies of protein structure, function, and dynamics. Standard protein assignment methods employ through-bond backbone experiments on uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled proteins. For larger proteins, this through-bond assignment procedure often breaks down due to rapid relaxation and spectral overlap. The challenges involved in studies of larger proteins led to efficient methods for (13)C labeling of side chain methyl groups, which have favorable relaxation properties and high signal-to-noise. These methyls are often still assigned by linking them to the previously assigned backbone, thus limiting the applications for larger proteins. Here, a structure-based procedure is described for assignment of (13)C(1)H3-labeled methyls by comparing distance information obtained from three-dimensional methyl-methyl nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectroscopy with the X-ray structure. The Ile, Leu, or Val (ILV) methyl type is determined by through-bond experiments, and the methyl-methyl NOE data are analyzed in combination with the known structure. A hierarchical approach was employed that maps the largest observed "NOE-methyl cluster" onto the structure. The combination of identification of ILV methyl type with mapping of the NOE-methyl clusters greatly simplifies the assignment process. This method was applied to the inactive and active forms of the 42-kDa ILV (13)C(1)H3-methyl labeled extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), leading to assignment of 60% of the methyls, including 90% of Ile residues. A series of ILV to Ala mutants were analyzed, which helped confirm the assignments. These assignments were used to probe the local and long-range effects of ligand binding to inactive and active ERK2.

  17. [Relationship between the included levels of coffee pulp and the protein content in rations for monogastric animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Brenes, R A; Bendaña, G; González, J M; Braham, J E; Bressani, R

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of including fresh and ensilaged coffee pulp in rations for monogastric animals, and find the best protein and coffee pulp levels in rations for rats. Fresh coffee pulp and pulp ensilaged for 12 months were used; both kinds of pulp were sun-dried before incorporating them into the rations. The chemical analyses of the pulps revealed a lower content in caffeine, tannins, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in the ensilaged pulp than in fresh coffee pulp. Thirty-two experimental rations were prepared, 16 with fresh coffee pulp and 16 with the ensilaged by-product, distributed into four different protein levels (10, 15, 20 and 25%), and three levels of pulp (15, 30 and 45%) for each protein level. The rations thus prepared were fed to Wistar albino rats for a six-week period. The parameters used to measure the effect of the two types of pulp were mortality rate, food consumption, weight gain, food conversion and apparent digestibility of the rations. Ensilaged pulp had a higher nutritive value, lower toxicity and better digestibility than fresh pulp. The increase in the protein level of the ration resulted in partial protection against the negative effects of coffee pulp on the performance of animals, since this improved as the protein level of the ration increased.

  18. The extracellular matrix: Structure, composition, age-related differences, tools for analysis and applications for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kular, Jaspreet K; Basu, Shouvik; Sharma, Ram I

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a structural support network made up of diverse proteins, sugars and other components. It influences a wide number of cellular processes including migration, wound healing and differentiation, all of which is of particular interest to researchers in the field of tissue engineering. Understanding the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix will aid in exploring the ways the extracellular matrix can be utilised in tissue engineering applications especially as a scaffold. This review summarises the current knowledge of the composition, structure and functions of the extracellular matrix and introduces the effect of ageing on extracellular matrix remodelling and its contribution to cellular functions. Additionally, the current analytical technologies to study the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-related cellular processes are also reviewed.

  19. Adhesions of extracellular surface-layer associated proteins in Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Xiang, Xinling; Lu, Qianhui; Zhang, Lanwei; Ma, Fang; Wang, Linlin

    2016-02-01

    Surface-layer associated proteins (SLAP) that envelop Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei M5-L and Lactobacillus casei Q8-L cell surfaces are involved in the adherence of these strain to the human intestinal cell line HT-29. To further elucidate some of the properties of these proteins, we assessed the yields and expressions of SLAP under different incubation conditions. An efficient and selective extraction of SLAP was obtained when cells of Lactobacillus were treated with 5 M LiCl at 37°C in aerobic conditions. The SLAP of Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L in cell extracts were visualized by SDS-PAGE and identified by Western blotting with sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin-labeled HT-29 cells as adhesion proteins. Atomic force microscopy contact imaging revealed that Lactobacillus strains M5-L and Q8-L normally display a smooth, homogeneous surface, whereas the surfaces of M5-L and Q8-L treated with 5 M LiCl were rough and more heterogeneous. Analysis of adhesion forces revealed that the initial adhesion forces of 1.41 and 1.28 nN obtained for normal Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L strains, respectively, decreased to 0.70 and 0.48 nN, respectively, following 5 M LiCl treatment. Finally, the dominant 45-kDa protein bands of Lactobacillus Q8-L and Lactobacillus M5-L were identified as elongation factor Tu and surface antigen, respectively, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  20. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus J; Babauta, Jerome T; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R; Clarke, Thomas A; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Rosso, Kevin M; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Shi, Liang

    2014-12-01

    The multi-heme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC) and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC) respectively. Here, we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  1. Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, Joshua F.; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wang, Zihao; Camp, David G.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Stanley, Pamela; Hart, Gerald W.; Hunt, Donald F.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-08

    O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a reversible post-translational modification of Ser and Thr residues on cytosolic and nuclear proteins found in all higher eukaryotes. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of brain proteins has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, understanding specific functions of O-GlcNAcylation in AD has been impeded by the difficulty in characterization of O-GlcNAc sites on proteins. In this study, we modified a chemical/enzymatic photochemical cleavage approach for enriching O-GlcNAcylated peptides in samples containing {approx}100 {micro}g of tryptic peptides from mouse cerebrocortical brain tissue. A total of 274 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were identified. Of these 168 were not previously known to be modified by O-GlcNAc. Overall, 458 O-GlcNAc sites on Ser and Thr residues in 195 proteins were identified. Many of the modified residues are either known phosphorylation sites or located in close proximity to known phosphorylation sites. These findings support the proposed regulatory crosstalk between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation. This study produced the most comprehensive O-GlcNAc proteome of mammalian brain tissue with both protein identification and O-GlcNAc site assignment. Interestingly, we observed O-{beta}-GlcNAc on EGF-like repeats in the extracellular domains of five membrane proteins, thus representing the first evidence for extracellular O-GlcNAcylation in mammalian systems by the ER-resident O-GlcNAc transferase (EOGT). We also report a GlcNAc-{beta}-1,3-Fuc-{alpha}-1-O-Thr modification on the EGF-like repeat of the Versican core protein, a novel substrate of Fringe {beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases.

  2. Amelogenin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other hard-to-heal wounds: Experimental and clinical evidence  ||FREE PAPER||

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Romanelli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Marco Romanelli1, Valentina Dini1, Peter Vowden2, Magnus S Ågren31Department of Dermatology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Vascular Unit, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, United Kingdom; 3Department of Surgery K, Bispebjerg Hospitals, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins that, under physiological conditions, self-assemble into globular aggregates up to micron-sizes. Studies with periodontal fibroblasts indicate that attachment to these structures increases the endogenous secretion of multiple growth factors and cell proliferation. Pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that cutaneous wounds benefit from treatment with amelogenins. A randomized controlled trial (RCT involving patients with hard-to-heal venous leg ulcers (VLUs (ie, ulcers with a surface area ≥10 cm2 and duration of ≥6 months showed that the application of amelogenin (Xelma®, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden as an adjunct treatment to compression results in significant reduction in ulcer size, improvement in the state of ulcers, reduced pain, and a larger proportion of ulcers with low levels of exudate, compared with treatment with compression alone. Amelogenin therapy was also shown to be safe to use in that there were no significant differences in adverse events noted between patients treated with amelogenin plus compression and those treated with compression alone. Case study evaluations indicate that the benefits of amelogenin therapy demonstrated in the RCT are being repeated in “real life” situations and that amelogenin therapy may also have a role to play in the treatment of other wound types such as diabetic foot ulcers.Keywords: extracellular matrix, amelogenin, venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pyoderma gangrenosum

  3. Latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein-3 and fibulin-1C interact with the extracellular domain of the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidels Leon

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The membrane-bound cell-surface precursor and soluble forms of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF contribute to many cellular developmental processes. The widespread occurrence of HB-EGF in cell and tissue types has led to observations of its role in such cellular and tissue events as tumor formation, cell migration, extracellular matrix formation, wound healing, and cell adherence. Several studies have reported the involvement of such extracellular matrix proteins as latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein, TGF-β, and fibulin-1 in some of these processes. To determine whether HB-EGF interacts with extracellular matrix proteins we used the extracellular domain of proHB-EGF in a yeast two-hybrid system to screen a monkey kidney cDNA library. cDNA clones containing nucleotide sequences encoding domains of two proteins were obtained and their derived amino acid sequences were evaluated. Results From ≈ 3 × 106 screened monkey cDNA clones, cDNA clones were recovered that contained nucleotide sequences encoding domains of the monkey latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein-3 (MkLTBP-3 and fibulin-1C protein. The amino acid sequence derived from the MkLTBP-3 gene shared 98.6% identity with human LTBP-3 and 86.7% identity with mouse LTBP-3 amino acid sequences. The amino acid sequence derived from the monkey fibulin-1C gene shared 97.2% identity with human fibulin-1C. Yeast two-hybrid screens indicate that LTBP-3 and fibulin-1C interact with proHB-EGF through their calcium-binding EGF-like modules. Conclusions The interactions of the extracellular domain of proHB-EGF with LTBP-3 and fibulin-1C suggest novel functions for HB-EGF between cell and tissue surfaces.

  4. EVpedia: an integrated database of high-throughput data for systemic analyses of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Kyum Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of extracellular vesicles is a general cellular activity that spans the range from simple unicellular organisms (e.g. archaea; Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to complex multicellular ones, suggesting that this extracellular vesicle-mediated communication is evolutionarily conserved. Extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids with a mean diameter of 20–1,000 nm, which are known to contain various bioactive molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here, we present EVpedia, which is an integrated database of high-throughput datasets from prokaryotic and eukaryotic extracellular vesicles. EVpedia provides high-throughput datasets of vesicular components (proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, and lipids present on prokaryotic, non-mammalian eukaryotic, and mammalian extracellular vesicles. In addition, EVpedia also provides an array of tools, such as the search and browse of vesicular components, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis, network analysis of vesicular proteins and mRNAs, and a comparison of vesicular datasets by ortholog identification. Moreover, publications on extracellular vesicle studies are listed in the database. This free web-based database of EVpedia (http://evpedia.info might serve as a fundamental repository to stimulate the advancement of extracellular vesicle studies and to elucidate the novel functions of these complex extracellular organelles.

  5. Nano scale proteomics revealed the presence of regulatory proteins including three FT-Like proteins in phloem and xylem saps from rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Shigyo, Mikao; Nakano, Ryouhei; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2008-05-01

    The main physiological roles of phloem and xylem in higher plants involve the transport of water, nutrients and metabolites. They are also involved, however, in whole plant events including stress responses and long-distance signaling. Phloem and xylem saps therefore include a variety of proteins. In this study, we have performed a shotgun analysis of the proteome of phloem and xylem saps from rice, taking advantage of the complete and available genomic information for this plant. Xylem sap was prepared using the root pressure method, whereas phloem sap was prepared with a unique method with the assistance of planthoppers to ensure the robustness of the detected proteins. The technical difficulties caused by the very limited availability of rice samples were overcome by the use of nano-flow liquid chromatography linked to a mass spectrometer. We identified 118 different proteins and eight different peptides in xylem sap, and 107 different proteins and five different peptides in phloem sap. Signal transduction proteins, putative transcription factors and stress response factors as well as metabolic enzymes were identified in these saps. Interestingly, we found the presence of three TERMINAL FLOWER 1/FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like proteins in phloem sap. The detected FT-like proteins were not rice Hd3a (OsFTL2) itself that acted as a non-cell-autonomous signal for flowering control, but they were members of distinct subfamilies of the FT family with differential expression patterns. These results imply that proteomics on a nano scale is a potent tool for investigation of biological processes in plants.

  6. Proteins dominate in the surface layers formed on materials exposed to extracellular polymeric substances from bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wikieł, Agata J; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo T; Eloy, Pierre; Genet, Michel J; Moura, José J G; Sand, Wolfgang; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C; Rouxhet, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    The chemical compositions of the surface conditioning layers formed by different types of solutions (from isolated EPS to whole culture media), involving different bacterial strains relevant for biocorrosion were compared, as they may influence the initial step in biofilm formation. Different substrata (polystyrene, glass, steel) were conditioned and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Peak decomposition and assignment were validated by correlations between independent spectral data and the ubiquitous presence of organic contaminants on inorganic substrata was taken into account. Proteins or peptides were found to be a major constituent of all conditioning layers and polysaccharides were not present in appreciable concentrations; the proportion of nitrogen which may be due to DNA was lower than 15%. There was no significant difference between the compositions of the adlayers formed from different conditioning solutions, except for the adlayers produced with tightly bound EPS extracted from D. alaskensis.

  7. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS......It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...

  8. Involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway in multidrug resistance induced by HBx in hepatoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Guan; Xiao-Ping Chen; Hong Zhu; Shun-Feng Luo; Bin Cao; Lei Ding

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanism of the influence of HBx protein on multidrug resistance associated genes:multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1), multidrug related protein (MRP-1), lung resistance related protein (LRP) in hepatoma cells and the potential role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway in this process.METHODS: A cell model stably expressing the HBx protein was established by liposome-mediated transfection of HBx gene into HepG2 cell line. The expression of multidrug resistance associated genes and proteins was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. AnnexinV-FITC/PI assay was used to confirm the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype of transfected cells by fluorescence cytometry (FACS). The ERK/MAPK pathway activation was measured by Western blot through comparing the ratio of phosphorylation of ERK/MAPK to total ERK/MAPK protein. After treated with the ERK/MAPK pathway inhibitor U0126, the HBx-expressing cells were harvested. Then RT-PCR, Western blot and FACS were used to analyze the alterations in the expression of multidrug resistance associated genes and the MDR phenotype after exposure.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the transfected cells showed a higher expression of MDR associated genes and proteins. Marked elevations in MDR-1 (64.3%), MRP-1 (87.5%) and LRP (90.8%) were observed in the transfected cells (P<0.05). RT-PCR revealed that the over-expression of MDR associated proteins was due to amplification of such genes (MDR1 2.9 fold, MRP1 1.67 fold, LRP1.95 fold).Furthermore, we found that the ERK/MAPK activity was remarkably high in the HBx-expressing cells. The activation of ERK/MAPK, as measured by the ratio of phosphorylated ERK bands normalized to the total ERK bands, was increased by 2.3-fold in HBx-transfected cells compared with cells transfected with the empty vector. After treated with the ERK/MAPK pathway inhibitor, the level of MDR associated genes and proteins in the

  9. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  10. Micropatterning Extracellular Matrix Proteins on Electrospun Fibrous Substrate Promote Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation Toward Neurogenic Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaqiong; Wen, Feng; Chen, Huizhi; Pal, Mintu; Lai, Yuekun; Zhao, Allan Zijian; Tan, Lay Poh

    2016-01-13

    In this study, hybrid micropatterned grafts constructed via a combination of microcontact printing and electrospinning techniques process were utilized to investigate the influencing of patterning directions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation to desired phenotypes. We found that the stem cells could align and elongate along the direction of the micropattern, where they randomly distributed on nonmicropatterned surfaces. Concomitant with patterning effect of component on stem cell alignment, a commensurate increase on the expression of neural lineage commitment markers, such as microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), Nestin, NeuroD1, and Class III β-Tubulin, were revealed from mRNA expression by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and MAP2 expression by immunostaining. In addition, the effect of electrospun fiber orientation on cell behaviors was further examined. An angle of 45° between the direction of micropatterning and orientation of aligned fibers was verified to greatly prompt the outgrowth of filopodia and neurogenesis of hMSCs. This study demonstrates that the significance of hybrid components and electrospun fiber alignment in modulating cellular behavior and neurogenic lineage commitment of hMSCs, suggesting promising application of porous scaffolds with smart component and topography engineering in clinical regenerative medicine.

  11. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymor......Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages......), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolat