WorldWideScience

Sample records for extracellular ph pho

  1. Acidic pH and divalent cation sensing by PhoQ are dispensable for systemic salmonellae virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Kevin G; Delbecq, Scott P; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Dove, Katja K; Prost, Lynne R; Daley, Margaret E; Zeth, Kornelius; Klevit, Rachel E; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-05-23

    Salmonella PhoQ is a histidine kinase with a periplasmic sensor domain (PD) that promotes virulence by detecting the macrophage phagosome. PhoQ activity is repressed by divalent cations and induced in environments of acidic pH, limited divalent cations, and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP). Previously, it was unclear which signals are sensed by salmonellae to promote PhoQ-mediated virulence. We defined conformational changes produced in the PhoQ PD on exposure to acidic pH that indicate structural flexibility is induced in α-helices 4 and 5, suggesting this region contributes to pH sensing. Therefore, we engineered a disulfide bond between W104C and A128C in the PhoQ PD that restrains conformational flexibility in α-helices 4 and 5. PhoQ(W104C-A128C) is responsive to CAMP, but is inhibited for activation by acidic pH and divalent cation limitation. phoQ(W104C-A128C) Salmonella enterica Typhimurium is virulent in mice, indicating that acidic pH and divalent cation sensing by PhoQ are dispensable for virulence.

  2. Modulation by extracellular pH of low- and high-voltage-activated calcium currents of rat thalamic relay neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M J; Meis, S; Munsch, T; Pape, H C

    2001-03-01

    The effects of changes in the extracellular pH (pH(o)) on low-voltage- (LVA) and high-voltage- (HVA) activated calcium currents of acutely isolated relay neurons of the ventrobasal thalamic complex (VB) were examined using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Modest extracellular alkalinization (pH 7.3 to 7.7) reversibly enlarged LVA calcium currents by 18.6 +/- 3.2% (mean +/- SE, n = 6), whereas extracellular acidification (pH 7.3 to 6.9) decreased the current by 24.8 +/- 3.1% (n = 9). Normalized current amplitudes (I/I(7.3)) fitted as a function of pH(o) revealed an apparent pK(a) of 6.9. Both, half-maximal activation voltage and steady-state inactivation were significantly shifted to more negative voltages by 2-4 mV on extracellular alkalinization and to more positive voltages by 2-3 mV on extracellular acidification, respectively. Recovery from inactivation of LVA calcium currents was not significantly affected by changes in pH(o). In contrast, HVA calcium currents were less sensitive to changes in pH(o). Although extracellular alkalinization increased maximal HVA current by 6.0 +/- 2.0% (n = 7) and extracellular acidification decreased it by 11.9 +/- 0.02% (n = 11), both activation and steady-state inactivation were only marginally affected by the moderate changes in pH(o) used in the present study. The results show that calcium currents of thalamic relay neurons exhibit different pH(o) sensitivity. Therefore activity-related extracellular pH transients might selectively modulate certain aspects of the electrogenic behavior of thalamic relay neurons.

  3. Regulation of the voltage-insensitive step of HERG activation by extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinlian; Bett, Glenna C L

    2010-06-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG, Kv11.1, KCNH2) voltage-gated K(+) channels dominate cardiac action potential repolarization. In addition, HERG channels play a role in neuronal and smooth cell excitability as well as cancer pathology. Extracellular pH (pH(o)) is modified during myocardial ischemia, inflammation, and respiratory alkalosis, so understanding the response of HERG channels to changes in pH is of clinical significance. The relationship between pH(o) and HERG channel gating appears complex. Acidification has previously been reported to speed, slow, or have no effect on activation. We therefore undertook comprehensive analysis of the effect of pH(o) on HERG channel activation. HERG channels have unique and complex activation gating characteristics with both voltage-sensitive and voltage-insensitive steps in the activation pathway. Acidosis decreased the activation rate, suppressed peak current, and altered the sigmoidicity of gating near threshold potentials. At positive voltages, where the voltage-insensitive transition is rate limiting, pH(o) modified the voltage-insensitive step with a pK(a) similar to that of histidine. Hill coefficient analysis was incompatible with a coefficient of 1 but was well described by a Hill coefficient of 4. We derived a pH(o)-sensitive term for a five-state Markov model of HERG channel gating. This model demonstrates the mechanism of pH(o) sensitivity in HERG channel activation. Our experimental data and mathematical model demonstrate that the pH(o) sensitivity of HERG channel activation is dominated by the pH(o) sensitivity of the voltage-insensitive step, in a fashion that is compatible with the presence of at least one proton-binding site on each subunit of the channel tetramer.

  4. Pho4 Is Essential for Dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans to the Host Brain by Promoting Phosphate Uptake and Growth at Alkaline pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman-Francis, Keren; Desmarini, Desmarini; Juillard, Pierre G.; Li, Cecilia; Stifter, Sebastian A.; Feng, Carl G.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Grau, Georges E. R.; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphate acquisition by fungi is regulated by the phosphate-sensing and acquisition (PHO) signaling pathway. Cryptococcus neoformans disseminates from the lung to the brain and is the commonest cause of fungal meningitis worldwide. To investigate the contribution of PHO signaling to cryptococcal dissemination, we characterized a transcription factor knockout strain (hlh3Δ/pho4Δ) defective in phosphate acquisition. Despite little similarity with other fungal Pho4 proteins, Hlh3/Pho4 functioned like a typical phosphate-responsive transcription factor in phosphate-deprived cryptococci, accumulating in nuclei and triggering expression of genes involved in phosphate acquisition. The pho4Δ mutant strain was susceptible to a number of stresses, the effect of which, except for alkaline pH, was alleviated by phosphate supplementation. Even in the presence of phosphate, the PHO pathway was activated in wild-type cryptococci at or above physiological pH, and under these conditions, the pho4Δ mutant had a growth defect and compromised phosphate uptake. The pho4Δ mutant was hypovirulent in a mouse inhalation model, where dissemination to the brain was reduced dramatically, and markedly hypovirulent in an intravenous dissemination model. The pho4Δ mutant was not detected in blood, nor did it proliferate significantly when cultured with peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, dissemination of infection and the pathogenesis of meningitis are dependent on cryptococcal phosphate uptake and stress tolerance at alkaline pH, both of which are Pho4 dependent. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcal meningitis is fatal without treatment and responsible for more than 500,000 deaths annually. To be a successful pathogen, C. neoformans must obtain an adequate supply of essential nutrients, including phosphate, from various host niches. Phosphate acquisition in fungi is regulated by the PHO signaling cascade, which is activated when intracellular phosphate decreases below a critical

  5. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde

    pH in dental biofilm is a key virulence factor for the development of caries lesions. The complex three-dimensional architecture of dental biofilms leads to steep gradients of nutrients and metabolites, including organic acids, across the biofilm. For decades, measuring pH in dental biofilm has...... been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit to monitor horizontal pH gradients in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic techniques, such as fluorescence lifetime imaging or pH...... ratiometry, can be employed to map the pH landscape in dental biofilm with more detail. However, when pH sensitive fluorescent probes are used to visualize pH in biofilms, it is crucial to differentiate between extracellular and intracellular pH. Intracellular microbial pH and pH in the extracellular matrix...

  6. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  7. Analysis list: pho [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pho Cell line,Embryo + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ph...o.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/pho.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/ky...ushu-u/dm3/target/pho.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/pho.Cell_line.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/pho.Embryo.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cell_line.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Embryo.gml ...

  8. The PhoP/PhoQ system and its role in Serratia marcescens pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Julieta; Castelli, María Eugenia; Di Venanzio, Gisela; Colombo, María Isabel; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2012-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is able to invade, persist, and multiply inside nonphagocytic cells, residing in nonacidic, nondegradative, autophagosome-like vacuoles. In this work, we have examined the physiological role of the PhoP/PhoQ system and its function in the control of critical virulence phenotypes in S. marcescens. We have demonstrated the involvement of the PhoP/PhoQ system in the adaptation of this bacterium to growth on scarce environmental Mg(2+), at acidic pH, and in the presence of polymyxin B. We have also shown that these environmental conditions constitute signals that activate the PhoP/PhoQ system. We have found that the two S. marcescens mgtE orthologs present a conserved PhoP-binding motif and demonstrated that mgtE1 expression is PhoP dependent, reinforcing the importance of PhoP control in magnesium homeostasis. Finally, we have demonstrated that phoP expression is activated intracellularly and that a phoP mutant strain is defective in survival inside epithelial cells. We have shown that the Serratia PhoP/PhoQ system is involved in prevention of the delivery to degradative/acidic compartments.

  9. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  10. Extracellular pH regulates bone cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Timothy R

    2008-02-01

    The skeletons of land vertebrates contain a massive reserve of alkaline mineral (hydroxyapatite), which is ultimately available to buffer metabolic H+ if acid-base balance is not maintained within narrow limits. The negative impact of acidosis on the skeleton has long been known but was thought to result from passive, physicochemical dissolution of bone mineral. This brief, selective review summarizes what is now known of the direct functional responses of bone cells to extracellular pH. We discovered that bone resorption by cultured osteoclasts is stimulated directly by acid. The stimulatory effect is near-maximal at pH 7.0, whereas above pH 7.4, resorption is switched off. In bone organ cultures, H+-stimulated bone mineral release is almost entirely osteoclast-mediated, with a negligible physicochemical component. Acidification is the key requirement for osteoclasts to excavate resorption pits in all species studied to date, and extracellular H+ may thus be regarded as the long-sought osteoclast activation factor. Acid-activated osteoclasts can be stimulated further by agents such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand. Osteoclasts may respond to pH changes via H+-sensing ion channels such as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a nociceptor that is also activated by capsaicin. Acidosis also exerts a powerful, reciprocal inhibitory effect on the mineralization of bone matrix by cultured osteoblasts. This is caused by increased hydroxyapatite solubility at low pH, together with selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, which is required for mineralization. Diets or drugs that shift acid-base balance in the alkaline direction may provide useful treatments for bone loss disorders.

  11. Ratiometric imaging of extracellular pH in bacterial biofilms with C-SNARF-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier E; Greve, Matilde; Raarup, Merete K; Nyvad, Bente; Dige, Irene

    2015-02-01

    pH in the extracellular matrix of bacterial biofilms is of central importance for microbial metabolism. Biofilms possess a complex three-dimensional architecture characterized by chemically different microenvironments in close proximity. For decades, pH measurements in biofilms have been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit the monitoring of horizontal pH gradients in biofilms in real time. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy can overcome these problems, but none of the hitherto employed methods differentiated accurately between extracellular and intracellular microbial pH and visualized extracellular pH in all areas of the biofilms. Here, we developed a method to reliably monitor extracellular biofilm pH microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4, choosing dental biofilms as an example. Fluorescent emissions of C-SNARF-4 can be used to calculate extracellular pH irrespective of the dye concentration. We showed that at pH values of biofilm and visualized the entire bacterial biomass in in vivo-grown dental biofilms with unknown species composition. We then employed digital image analysis to remove the bacterial biomass from the microscopic images and adequately calculate extracellular pH values. As a proof of concept, we monitored the extracellular pH drop in in vivo-grown dental biofilms fermenting glucose. The combination of pH ratiometry with C-SNARF-4 and digital image analysis allows the accurate monitoring of extracellular pH in bacterial biofilms in three dimensions in real time and represents a significant improvement to previously employed methods of biofilm pH measurement.

  12. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces...... the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms....... pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique...

  13. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragot, Sabine A; Kertesz, Michael A; Bünemann, Else K

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples.

  14. The voltage dependence of GABAA receptor gating depends on extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2005-11-28

    Recent studies have indicated that changes in extracellular pH and in membrane voltage affect the gamma-amino-n-butyric acid type A receptor gating mainly by altering desensitization and binding. To test whether the effects of membrane potential and pH are additive, their combined actions were investigated. By analyzing the current responses to rapid gamma-amino-n-butyric acid applications, we found that the current to voltage relationship was close to linear at acid pH but the increasing pH induced an inward rectification. Desensitization was enhanced at depolarizing potentials, but this strongly depended on pH, being weak at acidic and strong at basic pH values. A similar trend was observed for the onset rate of responses to saturating gamma-amino-n-butyric acid concentration. These data provide evidence that the voltage sensitivity of GABAA receptors depends on extracellular pH.

  15. The voltage dependence of GABAA receptor gating depends on extracellular pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that changes in extracellular pH and in membrane voltage affect the γ-amino-n-butyric acid type A receptor gating mainly by altering desensitization and binding. To test whether the effects of membrane potential and pH are additive, their combined actions were investigated. By analyzing the current responses to rapid γ-amino-n-butyric acid applications, we found that the current to voltage relationship was close to linear at acid pH but the increasing pH induced an inward rectification. Desensitization was enhanced at depolarizing potentials, but this strongly depended on pH, being weak at acidic and strong at basic pH values. A similar trend was observed for the onset rate of responses to saturating γ-amino-n-butyric acid concentration. These data provide evidence that the voltage sensitivity of GABAA receptors depends on extracellular pH. PMID:16272885

  16. Extracellular pH dynamically controls cell surface delivery of functional TRPV5 channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, T.T.; Oancea, E.; Groot, T. de; Topala, C.N.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Extracellular pH has long been known to affect the rate and magnitude of ion transport processes among others via regulation of ion channel activity. The Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) channel constitutes the apical entry gate in Ca(2+)-transporting cells, contribu

  17. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms Using C-SNARF-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene

    H-sensitive ratiometric dye and as a bacterial stain. We tested the method on natural 48-h in-situ-grown dental biofilms from two individuals. Four biofilms per person were collected on standardized glass slabs mounted in intra-oral appliances. Digital image analysis was employed to remove the bacterial biomass from...... the microscopic images in order to exclusively determine extracellular pH. We monitored the pH drop at the biofilm-substratum interface in six microscopic fields of view per biofilm for 1h after exposure to 0.4% glucose. Results: Extracellular pH dropped rapidly in all specimens. In both individuals, analysis...... with C-SNARF-4 and digital image analysis allows monitoring of extracellular pH in in-situ biofilms without destroying the complex three-dimensional biofilm architecture. Within the limitations of this study using young biofilms and only two individuals the data suggest that biofilm pH differs more...

  18. The effects of extracellular pH and hydroxycinnamic acids influence the intracellular pH of Brettanomyces bruxellensis DSM 7001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolongo, Simona; Siegumfeldt, Henrik; Aabo, Thomas Ask

    2014-01-01

    and intracellular pH changes in B. bruxellensis DSM 7001, in response to extracellular pH, as well as to the presence of an energy source and hydroxycinnamic acids, have been investigated in this paper by means of Fluorescent Ratio Imaging Microscopy (FRIM). The results show that B. bruxellensis DSM 7001 is able...

  19. Effect of pH values on the extracellular polysaccharide secreted by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans during chalcopyrite bioleaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run-lan Yu; Jing Liu; Jian-xi Tan; Wei-min Zeng; Li-juan Shi; Guo-hua Gu; Wen-qing Qin; Guan-zhou Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The pH value plays an important role in the bioleaching of sulphide minerals. The effect of pH values on the extracellular poly-saccharide secreted by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was investigated in different phases of bacterial growth during chalcopyrite bioleach-ing. It is found that extracellular polysaccharide secretion from the cells attached to chalcopyrite is more efficiently than that of the free cells in the bioleaching solution. Three factors, pH values, the concentration of soluble metal ions, and the bacterial growth and metabolism, affect extracellular polysaccharide secretion in the free cells, and are related to the bacterial growth phase. Extracellular polysaccharide secretion from the attached cells is mainly dependent on the pH value of the bacterial culture.

  20. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in vivo in the presence and absence of sucrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Baelum, Vibeke; Nyvad, Bente

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply. DESIG...

  1. Extracellular pH defense against lactic acid in untrained and trained altitude residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, D; Rojas, J; Serrato, M; Reyes, O; Coy, L; Mora, M

    2008-05-01

    The assumption that buffering at altitude is deteriorated by bicarbonate (bi) reduction was investigated. Extracellular pH defense against lactic acidosis was estimated from changes (Delta) in lactic acid ([La]), [HCO3-], pH and PCO2 in plasma, which equilibrates with interstitial fluid. These quantities were measured in earlobe blood during and after incremental bicycle exercise in 10 untrained (UT) and 11 endurance-trained (TR) highlanders (2,600 m). During exercise the capacity of non-bicarbonate buffers (betanbi=-Delta[La]. DeltapH(-1)-Delta[HCO3-]. DeltapH(-1)) amounted to 40+/-2 (SEM) and 28+/-2 mmol l(-1) in UT and TR, respectively (P<0.01). During recovery beta (nbi) decreased to 20 (UT) and 16 (TR) mmol l(-1) (P<0.001) corresponding to values expected from hemoglobin, dissolved protein and phosphate concentrations related to extracellular fluid (ecf). This was accompanied by a larger decrease of base excess after than during exercise for a given Delta[La]. betabi amounted to 37-41 mmol l(-1) being lower than at sea level. The large exercise betanbi was mainly caused by increasing concentrations of buffers due to temporary shrinking of ecf. Tr has lower betanbi in spite of an increased Hb mass mainly because of an expanded ecf compared to UT. In highlanders betanbi is higher than in lowlanders because of larger Hb mass and reduced ecf and counteracts the decrease in [HCO3-]. The amount of bicarbonate is probably reduced by reduction of the ecf at altitude but this is compensated by lower maximal [La] and more effective hyperventilation resulting in attenuated exercise acidosis at exhaustion.

  2. Extracellular pH Modulates Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Cell Metabolism and Susceptibility to the Mitochondrial Inhibitor Niclosamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is a lethal variant of prostate cancer that is associated with castrate-resistant growth, metastasis, and mortality. The tumor environment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer is heterogeneous and characterized by hypoxia, necrosis, and numerous mitoses. Although acidic extracellular pH has been implicated in aggressive cancer features including metastasis and therapeutic resistance, its role in neuroendocrine prostate cancer physiology and metabolism has not yet been explored. We used the well-characterized PNEC cell line as a model to establish the effects of extracellular pH (pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.5 on neuroendocrine prostate cancer cell metabolism. We discovered that alkalinization of extracellular pH converted cellular metabolism to a nutrient consumption-dependent state that was susceptible to glucose deprivation, glutamine deprivation, and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG mediated inhibition of glycolysis. Conversely, acidic pH shifted cellular metabolism toward an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS-dependent state that was susceptible to OXPHOS inhibition. Based upon this mechanistic knowledge of pH-dependent metabolism, we identified that the FDA-approved anti-helminthic niclosamide depolarized mitochondrial potential and depleted ATP levels in PNEC cells whose effects were enhanced in acidic pH. To further establish relevance of these findings, we tested the effects of extracellular pH on susceptibility to nutrient deprivation and OXPHOS inhibition in a cohort of castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines C4-2B, PC-3, and PC-3M. We discovered similar pH-dependent toxicity profiles among all cell lines with these treatments. These findings underscore a potential importance to acidic extracellular pH in the modulation of cell metabolism in tumors and development of an emerging paradigm that exploits the synergy of environment and therapeutic efficacy in cancer.

  3. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis inhibits synaptic transmission by increasing ph buffering in the synaptic cleft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozan Vroman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms, highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca²⁺ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form

  4. Effect of pH, salt and chemical rinses on bacterial attachment to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfakar, Siti Shahara; White, Jason D; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Microbial contamination of carcass surfaces occurs during slaughter and post-slaughter processing steps, therefore interventions are needed to enhance meat safety and quality. Although many studies have been done at the macro-level, little is known about specific processes that influence bacterial attachment to carcass surfaces, particularly the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In the present study, the effect of pH and salt (NaCl, KCl and CaCl2) on attachment of Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates to dominant ECM proteins: collagen I, fibronectin, collagen IV and laminin were assessed. Also, the effects of three chemical rinses commonly used in abattoirs (2% acetic acid, 2% lactic acid and 10% trisodium phosphate (TSP)) were tested. Within a pH range of 5-9, there was no significant effect on attachment to ECM proteins, whereas the effect of salt type and concentration varied depending on combination of strain and ECM protein. A concentration-dependant effect was observed with NaCl and KCl (0.1-0.85%) on attachment of E. coli M23Sr, but only to collagen I. One-tenth percent CaCl2 produced the highest level of attachment to ECM proteins for E. coli M23Sr and EC614. In contrast, higher concentrations of CaCl2 increased attachment of E. coli EC473 to collagen IV. Rinses containing TSP produced >95% reduction in attachment to all ECM proteins. These observations will assist in the design of targeted interventions to prevent or disrupt contamination of meat surfaces, thus improving meat safety and quality.

  5. Epicardial measurement of alterations in extracellular pH and electrolytes during ischemia and reperfusion in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Sebastian; Troitzsch, Dirk; Moosdorf, Rainer

    2009-12-01

    Simultaneous measurements of extracellular pH, potassium (K(+)), and calcium (Ca(2+)) activity might be indicative of myocardium vitality or ischemia. Ten consecutive patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting were studied. Epicardial extracellular pH, potassium, and calcium were measured by a miniaturized disposable multi-sensor probe. Blood gases and electrolytes were derived with measurements of arterial and mixed venous blood samples at intervals during surgery. The mean epicardial baseline levels for pH in all patients were 8.04+/-0.22 arbitrary units (AU) for the right ventricle (RV) and 8.03+/-0.21 AU for the left ventricle (LV); for Ca(2+) 0.23+/-0.07 mmol/l (RV) and 0.20+/-0.10 mmol/l (LV); and for K(+) 4.54+/-1.51 mmol/l (RV) and 4.38+/-0.57 mmol/l (LV). Before ischemia, epicardial pH was moderately (ppH, venous K(+) and Ca(2+), but moderately correlated with arterial K(+) and Ca(2+) (pischemia and reperfusion with reproducible trends of extracellular pH, K(+), and Ca(2+), which results in electrolyte patterns applicable for detecting inadequate myocardial protection during cardiac surgery in patients.

  6. Extracellular alkaline pH leads to increased metastatic potential of estrogen receptor silenced endocrine resistant breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitham A Khajah

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Endocrine resistance in breast cancer is associated with enhanced metastatic potential and poor clinical outcome, presenting a significant therapeutic challenge. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER by transfection of MCF-7 cells which all exhibit enhanced expression profile of mesenchymal markers with reduction of epithelial markers, indicating an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this study we describe their behaviour in response to change in extracellular pH, an important factor controlling cell motility and metastasis. METHODS: Morphological changes associated with cell exposure to extracellular alkaline pH were assessed by live cell microscopy and the effect of various ion pumps on this behavior was investigated by pretreatment with chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules was assessed by western blotting. Cell motility and invasion were examined by scratch and under-agarose assays respectively. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity and specifically of MMP2/9 was assessed in conditioned medium in response to brief alkaline pH exposure. RESULTS: Exposure of ER -ve but not ER +ve breast cancer cells to extracellular alkaline pH resulted in cell shrinkage and spherical appearance (termed contractolation; this was reversed by returning the pH back to 7.4. Contractolation was blocked by targeting the Na(+/K(+ and Na(+/H(+ pumps with specific chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules critical for cell adhesion were modulated by the exposure to alkaline pH. Brief exposure to alkaline pH enhanced MMP2/9 activity and the invasive potential of ER -ve cells in response to serum components and epithelial growth factor stimulation without affecting unhindered motility. CONCLUSIONS: Endocrine resistant breast cancer cells behave very differently to estrogen

  7. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points.

  8. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in situ in the presence and absence of sucrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Bælum, Vibeke; Schlafer, Sebastian;

    biofilms. Fluorescence emissions of C-SNARF-4 in deep layers of each biofilm were recorded ex-vivo with confocal microscopy for 15 min (3 sites) or for 1 h (6 sites) after exposure to a 100 µl salivary solution with 0.4% glucose in custom-made wells. The ratiometric pH data were analyzed using a mixed......pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply. 48-h dental biofilms from 10......-effects linear regression procedure. Extracellular pH dropped rapidly in most examined sites after addition of glucose. Distinct pH microenvironments were observed within single biofilms. Variance components analyses showed similar variation between sites within the same biofilm (var=0.02-0.04 (se=0...

  9. The gene ICS3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in copper homeostasis dependent on extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesso, C A; Discola, K F; Monteiro, G

    2015-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes are involved in the uptake, transport, storage and detoxification of copper. Large scale studies have noted that deletion of the gene ICS3 increases sensitivity to copper, Sortin 2 and acid exposure. Here, we report a study on the Δics3 strain, in which ICS3 is related to copper homeostasis, affecting the intracellular accumulation of this metal. This strain is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and copper exposure, but not to other tested transition metals. At pH 6.0, the Δics3 strain accumulates a larger amount of intracellular copper than the wild-type strain, explaining the sensitivity to oxidants in this condition. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to copper exposure only occurs in acidic conditions. This can be explained by the fact that the exposure of Δics3 cells to high copper concentrations at pH 4.0 results in over-accumulation of copper and iron. Moreover, the expression of ICS3 increases in acidic pH, and this is correlated with CCC2 gene expression, since both genes are regulated by Rim101 from the pH regulon. CCC2 is also upregulated in Δics3 in acidic pH. Together, these data indicate that ICS3 is involved in copper homeostasis and is dependent on extracellular pH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. α1-Adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the impact of reducing extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Stephen J; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Noyes, R Dirk; Morgan, R Garrett; Gifford, Jayson R; Park, Song-Young; Symons, J David; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Graded exercise results not only in the modulation of adrenergic mediated smooth muscle tone and a preferential increase in blood flow to the active skeletal muscle termed 'functional sympatholysis', but is also paralleled by metabolically induced reductions in pH. We therefore sought to determine whether pH attenuates α(1)-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in human feed arteries. Feed arteries (560 ± 31 μm i.d.) were harvested from 24 humans (55 ± 4 years old) and studied using the isometric tension technique. Vessel function was assessed using KCl, phenylephrine (PE), ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration-response curves to characterize non-receptor-mediated and receptor-mediated vasocontraction, as well as endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation, respectively. All concentration-response curves were obtained from (originally contiguous) vessel rings in separate baths with a pH of 7.4, 7.1, 6.8 or 6.5. Reduction of the pH, via HCl, reduced maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (pH 7.4 = 85 ± 19, pH 7.1 = 57 ± 16, pH 6.8 = 34 ± 15 and pH 6.5 = 16 ± 5% KCl(max)), which was partly due to reduced smooth muscle function, as assessed by KCl (pH 7.4 = 88 ± 13, pH 7.1 = 67 ± 8, pH 6.8 = 67 ± 9 and pH 6.5 = 58 ± 8% KCl(max)). Graded acidosis had no effect on maximal vasorelaxation. In summary, these data reveal that reductions in extracellular pH attenuate α(1)-mediated vasocontraction, which is partly explained by reduced smooth muscle function, although vasorelaxation in response to ACh and SNP remained intact. These findings support the concept that local acidosis is likely to contribute to functional sympatholysis and exercise hyperaemia by opposing sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction while not impacting vasodilatation.

  11. Complete intracellular pH protection during extracellular pH depression is associated with hypercarbia tolerance in white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D W; Matey, V; Huynh, K T; Wilson, J M; Morgan, J D; Brauner, C J

    2009-06-01

    Sturgeons are among the most CO2 tolerant of fishes investigated to date. However, the basis of this exceptional CO2 tolerance is unknown. Here, white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, were exposed to elevated CO2 to investigate the mechanisms associated with short-term hypercarbia tolerance. During exposure to 1.5 kPa Pco2, transient blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)] depression was compensated within 24 h and associated with net plasma HCO3- accumulation and equimolar Cl- loss, and changes in gill morphology, such as a decrease in apical surface area of mitochondrial-rich cells. These findings indicate that pHe recovery at this level of hypercarbia is accomplished in a manner similar to most freshwater teleost species studied to date, although branchial mechanisms involved may differ. White sturgeon exposed to more severe hypercarbia (3 and 6 kPa Pco2) for 48 h exhibited incomplete pH compensation in blood and red blood cells. Despite pHe depression, intracellular pH (pHi) of white muscle, heart, brain, and liver did not decrease during a transient (6 h of 1.5 kPa Pco2) or prolonged (48 h at 3 and 6 kPa Pco2 blood acidosis. This pHi protection was not due to high intrinsic buffering in tissues. Such tight active cellular regulation of pHi in the absence of pHe compensation represents a unique pattern for non-air-breathing fishes, and we hypothesize that it is the basis for the exceptional CO2 tolerance of white sturgeon and, likely, other CO2 tolerant fishes. Further research to elucidate the specific mechanisms responsible for this tremendous pH regulatory capacity in tissues of white sturgeon is warranted.

  12. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  13. Tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, María; Martín, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2009-11-01

    The microbial decarboxylation of some amino acids leads to the undesirable presence of biogenic amines in foods. One of the most abundant and frequent biogenic amines found in fermented foods is tyramine, which is produced by the decarboxylation of tyrosine. In the present work, transcriptional analysis of tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans IPLA655, a strain isolated from cheese, was studied. The gene coding for the tyrosine decarboxylase (tdcA) and that coding for the tyrosine-tyramine antiporter (tyrP) form an operon transcribed from the promoter P(tdcA), the expression of which is regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration. Quantification of gene expression during the log phase of growth showed high concentrations of tyrosine and acidic pH conditions to induce tdcA-tyrP polycistronic messenger transcription.

  14. In vivo tumour extracellular pH monitoring using electron paramagnetic resonance: the effect of X-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Jonathan; Yachi, Katsuya; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Miyake, Yusuke; Inanami, Osamu; Bobko, Andrey A; Khramtsov, Valery V; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    The in vivo quantification of extracellular pH (pHe ) in tumours may provide a useful biomarker for tumour cell metabolism. In this study, we assessed the viability of continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) spectroscopy with a pH-sensitive nitroxide for the measurement of extracellular tumour pH in a mouse model. CW-EPR spectroscopy (750 MHz) of C3H HeJ mice hind leg squamous cell tumour was performed after intravenous tail vein injection of pH-sensitive nitroxide (R-SG, 2-(4-((2-(4-amino-4-carboxybutanamido)-3-(carboxymethylamino)-3-oxoproylthio)methyl)phenyl)-4-pyrrolidino-2,5,5-triethyl-2,5-dihydro-1Н-imidazol-1-oxyl) during stages of normal tumour growth and in response to a single 10-Gy dose of X-ray irradiation. An inverse relationship was observed between tumour volume and pHe value, whereby, during normal tumour growth, a constant reduction in pHe was observed. This relationship was disrupted by X-ray irradiation and, from 2-3 days post-exposure, a transitory increase in pHe was observed. In this study, we demonstrated the viability of CW-EPR spectroscopy using R-SG nitroxide to obtain high-sensitivity pH measurements in a mouse tumour model with an accuracy of <0.1 pH units. In addition, the measured changes in pHe in response to X-ray irradiation suggest that this may offer a useful method for the assessment of the physiological change in response to existing and novel cancer therapies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Diverse control of metabolism and other cellular processes in Streptomyces coelicolor by the PhoP transcription factor: genome-wide identification of in vivo targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Smith, Colin P

    2012-10-01

    Streptomycetes sense and respond to the stress of phosphate starvation via the two-component PhoR-PhoP signal transduction system. To identify the in vivo targets of PhoP we have undertaken a chromatin-immunoprecipitation-on-microarray analysis of wild-type and phoP mutant cultures and, in parallel, have quantified their transcriptomes. Most (ca. 80%) of the previously in vitro characterized PhoP targets were identified in this study among several hundred other putative novel PhoP targets. In addition to activating genes for phosphate scavenging systems PhoP was shown to target two gene clusters for cell wall/extracellular polymer biosynthesis. Furthermore PhoP was found to repress an unprecedented range of pathways upon entering phosphate limitation including nitrogen assimilation, oxidative phosphorylation, nucleotide biosynthesis and glycogen catabolism. Moreover, PhoP was shown to target many key genes involved in antibiotic production and morphological differentiation, including afsS, atrA, bldA, bldC, bldD, bldK, bldM, cdaR, cdgA, cdgB and scbR-scbA. Intriguingly, in the PhoP-dependent cpk polyketide gene cluster, PhoP accumulates substantially at three specific sites within the giant polyketide synthase-encoding genes. This study suggests that, following phosphate limitation, Streptomyces coelicolor PhoP functions as a 'master' regulator, suppressing central metabolism, secondary metabolism and developmental pathways until sufficient phosphate is salvaged to support further growth and, ultimately, morphological development.

  16. Conservation of PHO pathway in ascomycetes and the role of Pho84

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parul Tomar; Sinha Sinha

    2014-06-01

    In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the phosphate signalling and response pathway, known as PHO pathway, monitors phosphate cytoplasmic levels by controlling genes involved in scavenging, uptake and utilization of phosphate. Recent attempts to understand the phosphate starvation response in other ascomycetes have suggested the existence of both common and novel components of the budding yeast PHO pathway in these ascomycetes. In this review, we discuss the components of PHO pathway, their roles in maintaining phosphate homeostasis in yeast and their conservation across ascomycetes. The role of high-affinity transporter, Pho84, in sensing and signalling of phosphate has also been discussed.

  17. Intra- and extracellular pH of the brain in vivo studied by 31P-NMR during hyper- and hypocapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portman, M A; Lassen, N A; Cooper, T G

    1991-01-01

    .05 for extracellular pH (pHe) vs. arterial pH, 0.43 +/- 0.078 for intracellular pH (pHi) vs. pHe, and 0.23 +/- 0.056 for pHi vs. arterial pH. These data indicate that CO2 buffering capacity is different and decreases from the intracellular to extracellular to arterial blood compartments. Separation......Studies were performed to determine the pH relationships among the extracellular, intracellular, and arterial blood compartments in the brain in vivo. Resolution of the extracellular monophosphate resonance peak from the intracellular peak in 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sheep...... brain with the calvarium intact enabled pH measurement in these respective compartments. Sheep were then subjected to both hyper- and hypoventilation, which resulted in a wide range of arterial PCO2 and pH values. Linear regression analysis of pH in these compartments yielded slopes of 0.56 +/- 0...

  18. Role of metal oxide nanostructures in extracellular pH regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.

    2016-08-01

    A research area of great promise is the cancer treatment by regulating microenvironmental parameters of tumor cells using MgO and AlOOH. Magnesium hydroxide and aluminum oxyhydroxide (boehmite) are in the form of nanoplates and nanosheets. The morphology, structure, phases and electrokinetic properties of synthesized samples are analyzed using complex physical and chemical methods. We study how the pH of the culture medium—different when in contact with synthesized nanoplates—affects the viability of tumor cells. It is shown that MgO is more efficient in decreasing the tumor cell viability than AlOOH. In the case of magnesium hydroxide, the pH of the culture medium increases to 10.1; in the case of boehmite, to 7.7.

  19. Is central chemoreceptor sensitive to intracellular rather than extracellular pH?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1990-01-01

    of acetazolamide allows the dissociation of [pH]e from [pH]i. With acetazolamide a sharp acid shift of CSF pH [( pH]c) is measured and in two consonance with this shift a marked increase in CBF is seen. Comparing these two reactions to that obtained with CO2 breathing, it is apparent that 7% CO2 causes about...

  20. Urease-induced alkalinization of extracellular pH and its antitumor activity in human breast and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wah Yau; DeLuca, Carl I; Tian, Baomin; Wilson, Iain; Molund, Sharon; Warriar, Nalini; Govindan, Manjapra V; Segal, Donald; Chao, Heman

    2005-01-01

    Jack bean urease catalyzes the decomposition of urea into ammonia, which in turn increases the pH of the surrounding medium. Based on these two properties, we have investigated the antitumor effects of urease in vitro and in vivo on human lung and breast cancer cell lines either by the enzyme itself or in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs. First, through the generation of toxic ammonia, urease exerted direct cytotoxicity on A549 and MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with LC50 of 0.22 and 0.45 U/ml, respectively. The cytotoxic effects could effectively be blocked using the reversible urease inhibitor acetohydroxamic acid. Complete protection was observed at dose > or = 2 mM. In addition, nude mouse xenograft models demonstrated that intratumoral urease injections (1 - 10 U/dose) inhibited A549 and MCF-7 tumor growth in vivo. Second, when combined with weak-base anticancer drugs, urease provided indirect antitumor effects via pH augmentation. Alkalinization of extracellular pH by urease (2 U/ml) and urea (> or = 2 mM) was found to enhance the antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin (50 microM) and vinblastine (100 microM) significantly.

  1. Effect of Tris-Hydroxymethyl Aminomethane on intracellular pH depends on the extracellular non-bicarbonate buffering capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunti, Carine; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Allemand, Denis; Levraut, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    The effect of Tris-Hydroxymethyl Aminomethane (THAM) on intracellular pH (pHi) is unknown. We previously demonstrated that the effect of sodium bicarbonate on pHi depends on the non-bicarbonate buffering system. First, human hepatocytes from hepatocytes cell culture (HepG2) were perfused with an acidotic artificial medium containing 5-mmol/L (H5) or 30-mmol/L (H30) concentrations of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethane sulfonic acid (HEPES), a non-bicarbonate buffer. We studied the effect of THAM on the pHi in both conditions. We repeated the same protocol using an acidotic human blood with a 5% or 40% hematocrit. The pHi was measured with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye bis-carboxyethyl carboxy-fluorescein (BCECF). Gas analysis was performed before and during the alkaline infusion. The results showed that THAM caused an intracellular alkalization that was higher when the non-bicarbonate buffer concentration was low (0.45 +/- 0.21 and 0.22 +/- 0.14 pH units with H5 and H30, respectively). A significant relationship was found between changes in pHi and changes in PCO(2). Similar results were obtained with the human blood. In conclusion, the intracellular alkalizing effect of THAM is caused by the induced decrease of PCO(2) linked to the extracellular non-bicarbonate buffer capacity: The smaller the concentration of extracellular non-bicarbonate buffer, the higher the PCO(2) decrease caused by THAM.

  2. The cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate in breast cancer cells depends on extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Silva, João; Queirós, Odília; Ribeiro, Ana; Baltazar, Fátima; Young, Ko H; Pedersen, Peter L; Preto, Ana; Casal, Margarida

    2015-04-15

    Although the anti-cancer properties of 3BP (3-bromopyruvate) have been described previously, its selectivity for cancer cells still needs to be explained [Ko et al. (2001) Cancer Lett. 173, 83-91]. In the present study, we characterized the kinetic parameters of radiolabelled [14C] 3BP uptake in three breast cancer cell lines that display different levels of resistance to 3BP: ZR-75-1 < MCF-7 < SK-BR-3. At pH 6.0, the affinity of cancer cells for 3BP transport correlates with their sensitivity, a pattern that does not occur at pH 7.4. In the three cell lines, the uptake of 3BP is dependent on the protonmotive force and is decreased by MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) inhibitors. In the SK-BR-3 cell line, a sodium-dependent transport also occurs. Butyrate promotes the localization of MCT-1 at the plasma membrane and increases the level of MCT-4 expression, leading to a higher sensitivity for 3BP. In the present study, we demonstrate that this phenotype is accompanied by an increase in affinity for 3BP uptake. Our results confirm the role of MCTs, especially MCT-1, in 3BP uptake and the importance of cluster of differentiation (CD) 147 glycosylation in this process. We find that the affinity for 3BP transport is higher when the extracellular milieu is acidic. This is a typical phenotype of tumour microenvironment and explains the lack of secondary effects of 3BP already described in in vivo studies [Ko et al. (2004) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 324, 269-275].

  3. Effects of temperature and extracellular pH on metabolites: kinetics of anaerobic metabolism in resting muscle by 31P- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Alessandra; Gussoni, Maristella; Greco, Fulvia; Zetta, Lucia

    2003-09-01

    Environmental stress, such as low temperature, extracellular acidosis and anoxia, is known to play a key role in metabolic regulation. The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the combined temperature-pH regulation of metabolic rate in frog muscle, i.e. an anoxia-tolerant tissue. The rate of exergonic metabolic processes occurring in resting isolated muscles was determined at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C as well as at extracellular pH values higher (7.9), similar (7.3) and lower (7.0) than the physiological intracellular pH. (31)P and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy high-resolution measurements were carried out at 4.7 T in isolated frog (Rana esculenta) gastrocnemius muscle during anoxia to assess, by means of reference compounds, the concentration of all phosphate metabolites and lactate. Intra- and extracellular pH was also determined. In the range of examined temperatures (15-25 degrees C), the temperature dependence of anaerobic glycolysis was found to be higher than that of PCr depletion (Q(10)=2.3). High-energy phosphate metabolism was confirmed to be the initial and preferential energy source. The rate of phosphocreatine hydrolysis did not appear to be affected by extracellular pH changes. By contrast, independent of the intracellular pH value, at the higher temperature (25 degrees C) a lowering of the extracellular pH from 7.9 to 7.0 caused a depression in lactate accumulation. This mechanism was ascribed to the transmembrane proton concentration gradient. This parameter was demonstrated to regulate glycolysis, probably through a reduced lactate efflux, depending on the activity of the lactate-H(+) co-transporter. The calculated intracellular buffer capacity was related to intra- and extracellular pH and temperature. At the experimental extracellular pH of 7.9 and at a temperature of 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C, calculated intracellular buffering capacity was 29.50 micromol g(-1) pH unit(-1) and 69.98 micromol g(-1) pH unit(-1

  4. Construction of a novel secretion expression system guided by native signal peptide of PhoD in Zymomonas mobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; He, Ming-Xiong; Feng, Hong; Shui, Zong-Xia; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Hu, Qi-Chun; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, three native signal peptides (SPs) from PhoC, PhoD, and ZMO0331were investigated and compared to construct novel secretion expression systems in Zymomonas mobilis. The secretion expression of target protein, α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA), guided by PhoD's SP resulted in more hydrolysis of starch than that by the other two SPs. Extracellular and intracellular α-amylase activities of the strain containing PhoD's SP were also higher than the other two strains containing PhoC or ZMO0331's SP. In addition, the evidence by alcohol dehydrogenase activity assay further confirmed that the starch hydrolysis was resulted from the secretion expression of BAA rather than the breakage of cells. Our results indicated that the SP of PhoD is able to serve as a promising candidate to assist secretion expression of heterogeneous genes in Z. mobilis. This will contribute to development of engineered Z. mobilis strains converting starch into ethanol.

  5. Extracellular Brain pH and Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun K; Zygun, David A; Johnston, Andrew J; Steiner, Luzius A; Al-Rawi, Pippa G; Chatfield, Dot; Shepherd, Edna; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Hutchinson, Peter J; Menon, David K

    2004-06-01

    The ability to measure brain tissue chemistry has led to valuable information regarding pathophysiological changes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over the last few years, the focus has been on monitoring changes in brain tissue oxygen to determine thresholds of ischemia that affect outcome. However, the variability of this measurement suggests that it may not be a robust method. We have therefore investigated the relationship of brain tissue pH (pH(b)) and outcome in patients with TBI. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data of 38 patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit with TBI between 1998 and 2003, and who had a multiparameter tissue gas sensor inserted into the brain. All patients were managed using an evidence-based protocol targeting CPP > 70 mm Hg. Physiological variables were averaged over 4 min and analyzed using a generalized least squares random effects model to determine the temporal profile of pH(b) and its association with outcome. Median (IQR) minimum pH(b) was 7.00 (6.89, 7.08), median (IQR) maximum pH(b) was 7.25 (7.18, 7.33), and median (IQR) patient averaged pH(b) was 7.13 (7.07, 7.17). pH(b) was significantly lower in those who did not survive their hospital stay compared to those that survived. In addition, those with unfavorable neurological outcome had lower pH(b) values than those with favorable neurological outcome. pH(b) differentiated between survivors and non-survivors. Measurement of pH(b) may be a useful indicator of outcome in patients with TBI.

  6. Control of red cell volume and pH in trout: Effects of isoproterenol, transport inhibitors, and extracellular pH in bicarbonate/carbon dioxide-buffered media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NIKINMAA, M; STEFFENSEN, JF; TUFTS, BL

    1987-01-01

    , and that the Na+/H+ exchanger is not activated by changes in intracellular pH alone. The adrenergic drug, isoproterenol, promoted cell swelling and proton extrusion even in the presence of 10 mM HCO3-, showing that the adrenergic response plays a significant role in the control of cytoplasmic pH. These responses......The effects of extracellular pH and beta-adrenergic stimula-tion on the volume and pH of rainbow. trout red cells were studied in HCO3-/ CO2 butfered media. A decrease in extracellular pH caused an increase in red cell volume and a decrease in intracellular pH. The pH-induced changes in cell volume...... were enhanced by a decrease in extracellular pH, showing that the adrenergic response is of benefit to stressed animals. DIDS markedly enhanced the effect of isoproterenol on the pHi, but abolished the increase in red cell volume. The effects of furosemide were similar to those of DIDS, suggesting...

  7. The Erwinia amylovora PhoPQ system is involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptide and suppresses gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakka, Sridevi; Qi, Mingsheng; Zhao, Youfu

    2010-10-20

    The PhoPQ system is a pleiotropic two-component signal transduction system that controls many pathogenic properties in several mammalian and plant pathogens. Three different cues have been demonstrated to activate the PhoPQ system including a mild acidic pH, antimicrobial peptides, and low Mg(2+). In this study, our results showed that phoPQ mutants were more resistant to strong acidic conditions (pH 4.5 or 5) than that of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that this system in Erwinia amylovora may negatively regulate acid resistance gene expression. Furthermore, the PhoPQ system negatively regulated gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems in E. amylovora. These results are in contrast to those reported for the PhoPQ system in Salmonella and Xanthomonas, where it positively regulates type III secretion system and acid resistance. In addition, survival of phoPQ mutants was about 10-fold lower than that of WT when treated with cecropin A at pH 5.5, suggesting that the PhoPQ system renders the pathogen more resistant to cecropin A.

  8. pH sensitivity of ammonium transport by Rhbg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhoul, Nazih L; Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Schmidt, Eric; Doetjes, Rienk; Rabon, Edd; Hamm, L Lee

    2010-12-01

    Rhbg is a membrane glycoprotein that is involved in NH(3)/NH(4)(+) transport. Several models have been proposed to describe Rhbg, including an electroneutral NH(4)(+)/H(+) exchanger, a uniporter, an NH(4)(+) channel, or even a gas channel. In this study, we characterized the pH sensitivity of Rhbg expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We used two-electrode voltage clamp and ion-selective microelectrodes to measure NH(4)(+)-induced [and methyl ammonium (MA(+))] currents and changes in intracellular pH (pH(i)), respectively. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM NH(4)Cl (NH(3)/NH(4)(+)) at extracellular pH (pH(o)) of 7.5 induced an inward current, decreased pH(i), and depolarized the cell. Raising pH(o) to 8.2 significantly enhanced the NH(4)(+)-induced current and pH(i) changes, whereas decreasing bath pH to 6.5 inhibited these changes. Lowering pH(i) (decreased by butyrate) also inhibited the NH(4)(+)-induced current and pH(i) decrease. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM methyl amine hydrochloride (MA/MA(+)), often used as an NH(4)Cl substitute, induced an inward current, a pH(i) increase (not a decrease), and depolarization of the cell. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA(+) at alkaline bath pH (8.2) enhanced the MA(+)-induced current, whereas lowering bath pH to 6.5 inhibited the MA(+) current completely. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA(+) at low pH(i) abolished the MA(+)-induced current and depolarization; however, pH(i) still increased. These data indicate that 1) transport of NH(4)(+) and MA/MA(+) by Rhbg is pH sensitive; 2) electrogenic NH(4)(+) and MA(+) transport are stimulated by alkaline pH(o) but inhibited by acidic pH(i) or pH(o); and 3) electroneutral transport of MA by Rhbg is likely but is less sensitive to pH changes.

  9. Computational prediction of Pho regulons in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ying

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorus is an essential element for all life forms. However, it is limiting in most ecological environments where cyanobacteria inhabit. Elucidation of the phosphorus assimilation pathways in cyanobacteria will further our understanding of the physiology and ecology of this important group of microorganisms. However, a systematic study of the Pho regulon, the core of the phosphorus assimilation pathway in a cyanobacterium, is hitherto lacking. Results We have predicted and analyzed the Pho regulons in 19 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes using a highly effective scanning algorithm that we have previously developed. Our results show that different cyanobacterial species/ecotypes may encode diverse sets of genes responsible for the utilization of various sources of phosphorus, ranging from inorganic phosphate, phosphodiester, to phosphonates. Unlike in E. coli, some cyanobacterial genes that are directly involved in phosphorus assimilation seem to not be under the regulation of the regulator SphR (orthologue of PhoB in E coli. in some species/ecotypes. On the other hand, SphR binding sites are found for genes known to play important roles in other biological processes. These genes might serve as bridging points to coordinate the phosphorus assimilation and other biological processes. More interestingly, in three cyanobacterial genomes where no sphR gene is encoded, our results show that there is virtually no functional SphR binding site, suggesting that transcription regulators probably play an important role in retaining their binding sites. Conclusion The Pho regulons in cyanobacteria are highly diversified to accommodate to their respective living environments. The phosphorus assimilation pathways in cyanobacteria are probably tightly coupled to a number of other important biological processes. The loss of a regulator may lead to the rapid loss of its binding sites in a genome.

  10. Increased tumour extracellular pH induced by Bafilomycin A1 inhibits tumour growth and mitosis in vivo and alters 5-fluorouracil pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSheehy, P M J; Troy, H; Kelland, L R; Judson, I R; Leach, M O; Griffiths, J R

    2003-03-01

    The aim was to determine if a specific inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (V-ATPases), Bafilomycin A1 (BFM), could increase the low extracellular pH (pHe) typical of solid tumours and thus inhibit their growth in vivo. BFM inhibited the proliferation of various human cells and rat pituitary GH3 tumour cells in vitro (IC50: 2.5-19.2 nM), and flow cytometry on GH3 cells showed a marked increase in S and G2M phases after 16-48 h, but no evidence of increased apoptosis. BFM caused significant inhibition of GH3 xenograft growth, and histomorphometry showed a 30% decrease in mitosis but no change in apoptosis. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in vivo of GH3 xenografts showed that BFM increased pHe, but did not affect pHi, resulting in a decrease in the negative pH gradient (-delta pH). BFM decreased lactate formation suggesting a reduction in glycolysis. We suggest that BFM reduces extracellular H(+)-transport by inhibition of V-ATPases leading to an increase in pHe and decreased glycolysis, and thus reduced tumour cell proliferation. 19F-MRS in vivo showed that a smaller -delta pH was associated with decreased retention of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) which was consistent with our previous data in vivo implying the -delta pH controls tumour retention of 5 FU.

  11. Dual regulation of the native ClC-K2 chloride channel in the distal nephron by voltage and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Laurent; Nissant, Antoine; Edwards, Aurélie; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques; Paulais, Marc

    2016-09-01

    ClC-K2, a member of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels and transporters, forms the major basolateral Cl(-) conductance in distal nephron epithelial cells and therefore plays a central role in renal Cl(-) absorption. However, its regulation remains largely unknown because of the fact that recombinant ClC-K2 has not yet been studied at the single-channel level. In the present study, we investigate the effects of voltage, pH, Cl(-), and Ca(2+) on native ClC-K2 in the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells from the mouse connecting tubule. The ∼10-pS channel shows a steep voltage dependence such that channel activity increases with membrane depolarization. Intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) differentially modulate the voltage dependence curve: alkaline pHi flattens the curve by causing an increase in activity at negative voltages, whereas alkaline pHo shifts the curve toward negative voltages. In addition, pHi, pHo, and extracellular Ca(2+) strongly increase activity, mainly because of an increase in the number of active channels with a comparatively minor effect on channel open probability. Furthermore, voltage alters both the number of active channels and their open probability, whereas intracellular Cl(-) has little influence. We propose that changes in the number of active channels correspond to them entering or leaving an inactivated state, whereas modulation of open probability corresponds to common gating by these channels. We suggest that pH, through the combined effects of pHi and pHo on ClC-K2, might be a key regulator of NaCl absorption and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange in type B intercalated cells.

  12. Mechanism of activation of PhoQ/PhoP two-component signal transduction by SafA, an auxiliary protein of PhoQ histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Eiji; Eguchi, Yoko; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQ/PhoP two-component signal transduction system in Escherichia coli is activated by SafA, a small membrane protein that modifies the PhoQ histidine kinase. The SafA C-terminal domain (41-65 aa) interacts directly with the sensory domain of PhoQ at the periplasm. We used in vitro and in vivo strategies to elucidate the way SafA modifies the PhoQ/PhoP phosphorelay system. First, the enzymatic activities of membranes from cells overexpressing PhoQ and cells expressing both PhoQ and SafA were compared in vitro. Increased autophosphorylation of PhoQ was observed in the presence of SafA, but it did not increase the dephosphorylation of phospho-PhoP by PhoQ. In addition, SafA increased the phospho-PhoP level on the phosphotransfer assay. We confirmed that induction of SafA results in an accumulation of phospho-PhoP in vivo by the Phos-tag system. Our results suggest that the accumulation of phospho-PhoP is linked to activation of PhoQ autophosphorylation by SafA.

  13. Potential antitumor activity of novel DODAC/PHO-S liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Arthur Cássio de Lima; Saraiva, Greice Kelle Viegas; Filho, Otaviano Mendonça Ribeiro; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Neto, Salvador Claro; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies, we showed that synthetic phosphoethanolamine (PHO-S) has a great potential for inducing cell death in several tumor cell lines without damage to normal cells. However, its cytotoxic effect and selectivity against tumor cells could increase with encapsulation in cationic liposomes, such as dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC), due to electrostatic interactions between these liposomes and tumor cell membranes. Our aim was to use cationic liposomes to deliver PHO-S and to furthermore maximize the therapeutic effect of this compound. DODAC liposomes containing PHO-S (DODAC/PHO-S), at concentrations of 0.3–2.0 mM, prepared by ultrasonication, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxic effect of DODAC/PHO-S on B16F10 cells, Hepa1c1c7 cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was assessed by MTT assay. Cell cycle phases of B16F10 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and the morphological changes by SEM, after treatment. The liposomes were spherical and polydisperse in solution. The liposomes were stable, presenting an average of ∼50% of PHO-S encapsulation, with a small reduction after 40 days. DODAC demonstrated efficient PHO-S delivery, with the lowest values of IC50% (concentration that inhibits 50% of the growth of cells) for tumor cells, compared with PHO-S alone, with an IC50% value of 0.8 mM for B16F10 cells and 0.2 mM for Hepa1c1c7 cells, and without significant effects on endothelial cells. The Hepa1c1c7 cells showed greater sensitivity to the DODAC/PHO-S formulation when compared to B16F10 cells and HUVECs. The use of DODAC/PHO-S on B16F10 cells induced G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, with the proportion significantly greater than that treated with PHO-S alone. The morphological analysis of B16F10 cells by SEM showed changes such as “bleb” formation, cell detachment, cytoplasmic retraction, and apoptotic bodies after DODAC/PHO-S treatment. Cationic liposomal

  14. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  15. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  16. Combinatorial interactions are required for the efficient recruitment of pho repressive complex (PhoRC to polycomb response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana G Kahn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb Group (PcG proteins are epigenetic repressors that control metazoan development and cell differentiation. In Drosophila, PcG proteins form five distinct complexes targeted to genes by Polycomb Response Elements (PREs. Of all PcG complexes PhoRC is the only one that contains a sequence-specific DNA binding subunit (PHO or PHOL, which led to a model that places PhoRC at the base of the recruitment hierarchy. Here we demonstrate that in vivo PHO is preferred to PHOL as a subunit of PhoRC and that PHO and PHOL associate with PREs and a subset of transcriptionally active promoters. Although the binding to the promoter sites depends on the quality of recognition sequences, the binding to PREs does not. Instead, the efficient recruitment of PhoRC to PREs requires the SFMBT subunit and crosstalk with Polycomb Repressive Complex 1. We find that human YY1 protein, the ortholog of PHO, binds sites at active promoters in the human genome but does not bind most PcG target genes, presumably because the interactions involved in the targeting to Drosophila PREs are lost in the mammalian lineage. We conclude that the recruitment of PhoRC to PREs is based on combinatorial interactions and propose that such a recruitment strategy is important to attenuate the binding of PcG proteins when the target genes are transcriptionally active. Our findings allow the appropriate placement of PhoRC in the PcG recruitment hierarchy and provide a rationale to explain why YY1 is unlikely to serve as a general recruiter of mammalian Polycomb complexes despite its reported ability to participate in PcG repression in flies.

  17. HL-1 mouse cardiomyocyte injury and death after simulated ischemia and reperfusion: roles of pH, Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2, and Na+/H+ exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann-Dorit; Poulsen, Kristian Arild; Lambert, Ian H;

    2009-01-01

    The Ca(2+)-independent phospholipase A(2) VI (iPLA(2)-VI) and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) are highly pH-sensitive proteins that exert both protective and detrimental effects in cardiac ischemia-reperfusion. Here, we investigated the role of extracellular pH (pH(o)) in ischemia-reperfusion...... injury and death and in regulation and function of iPLA(2)-VI and NHE1 under these conditions. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were exposed to simulated ischemia (SI; 0.5% O(2), 8 mM K(+), and 20 mM lactate) at pH(o) 6.0 and 7.4, with or without 4 or 8 h of reperfusion (SI/R). Cytochrome c release and caspase-3...... previous studies of iPLA(2)-VIA and NHE1 during cardiac I/R....

  18. Contrasting Effects of Acidic pH on the Extracellular and Intracellular Activities of the Anti-Gram-Positive Fluoroquinolones Moxifloxacin and Delafloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to currently marketed fluoroquinolones, which are zwitterionic, delafloxacin is an investigational fluoroquinolone with an anionic character that is highly active against Gram-positive bacteria. We have examined the effect of acidic pH on its accumulation in Staphylococcus aureus and in human THP-1 cells, in parallel with its activity against extracellular and intracellular S. aureus. Moxifloxacin was used as a comparator. Delafloxacin showed MICs 3 to 5 log2 dilutions lower than those of moxifloxacin for a collection of 35 strains with relevant resistance mechanisms and also proved to be 10-fold more potent against intracellular S. aureus ATCC 25923. In medium at pH 5.5, this difference was further enhanced, with the MIC decreasing by 5 log2 dilutions. In infected cells incubated in acidic medium, the relative potency was 10-fold higher than that at neutral pH and the maximal relative efficacy reached a bactericidal effect at 24 h. These results can be explained by a 10-fold increase in delafloxacin accumulation in both bacteria and cells at acidic pH, making delafloxacin one of the most efficient drugs tested in this model. Opposite effects were seen for moxifloxacin with respect to both activity and accumulation. As reported for zwitterionic fluoroquinolones, delafloxacin was found associated with the soluble fraction in homogenates of eukaryotic cells. Taken together, these properties may confer to delafloxacin an advantage for the eradication of S. aureus in acidic environments, including intracellular infections. PMID:21135179

  19. Effect of pH and temperature on stability and kinetics of novel extracellular serine alkaline protease (70 kDa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Biswanath; Basak, Bikram; Mandal, Tamal; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Dey, Apurba

    2013-03-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease (70 kDa by SDS-PAGE) was purified and characterized. This enzyme retained more than 93% of its initial activity after preincubation for 30 min at 37 °C in the presence of 25% (v/v) tested organic solvents and showed feather degradation activity. The purified enzyme was deactivated at various combinations of pH and temperature to examine the interactive effect of them on enzyme activity. The deactivation process was modeled as first-order kinetics and the deactivation rate constant (k(d)) was found to be minimum at pH 9 and 37 °C. The kinetic analysis of enzyme over a range of pH values indicated two pK values at 6.21 and at 10.92. The lower pK value was likely due to the catalytic histidine in the free enzyme and higher pK value likely reflected deprotonation of the proline moiety of the substrate but ionization of the active site serine is another possibility. Inhibition kinetic showed that enzyme is serine protease because enzyme was competitively inhibited by antipain and aprotinin as these compounds are known to be competitive inhibitors of serine protease. The organic solvent, thermal and pH tolerances of enzyme suggested that it may have potential for use as a biocatalyst in industry.

  20. The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channel is sensitive to extracellular pH in mouse platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Albarran, Letizia; Dionisio, Natalia; Redondo, Pedro C; Alonso, Nieves; Gomez, Luis J; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    The canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) is a receptor-activated non-selective Ca(2+) channel regulated by a variety of modulators such as diacylglycerol, Ca(2+)/calmodulin or phosphorylation. The present study is aimed to investigate whether different situations, such as acidic pH, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) or hypoxic-like conditions modulate TRPC6 channel function. Here we show normal aggregation and Ca(2+) mobilization stimulated by thrombin in TRPC6 KO platelets; however, OAG (1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol)-evoked Ca(2+) entry was attenuated in the absence of TRPC6. Exposure of mouse platelets to acidic pH resulted in abolishment of thrombin-evoked aggregation and attenuated platelet aggregation induced by thapsigargin (TG) or OAG. Both OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry and platelet aggregation were greatly attenuated in cells expressing TRPC6 channels. Exposure of platelets to H2O2 or deferoxamine did not clearly alter thrombin, TG or OAG-induced platelet aggregation. Our results indicate that TRPC6 is sensitive to acidic pH but not to exposure to ROS or hypoxic-like conditions, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of the altered platelet responsiveness to DAG-generating agonists in disorders associated to acidic pH.

  1. Identification of DNA binding motifs of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Mena; Thomas, Christophe; Namouchi, Amine; Dubrac, Sarah; Gicquel, Brigitte; Gopaul, Deshmukh N

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system controls the expression of about 2% of the genome and plays a major role in pathogenicity. However, its regulon has not been well characterized. The binding site of PhoP transcription regulator was identified in the upstream regions of msl3, pks2, lipF and fadD21 genes, by using gene fusions, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments. A consensus sequence for PhoP binding was deduced. It consists of two direct repeats, DR1/DR2, associated with a third repeat, DR3, important in some cases for PhoP binding to DR1/DR2 but located at a variable distance from these direct repeats. DR1/DR2 and DR3 consensus sequences were used to screen the whole-genome sequence for other putative binding sites potentially corresponding to genes directly regulated by PhoP. The identified 87 genes, encoding transcription regulators, and proteins involved in secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism are proposed to belong to the PhoP regulon. A consensus sequence derived from the analysis of PhoP binding to four gene promoter regions is proposed. We show for the first time the involvement of a third direct repeat motif in this binding reaction. The consensus sequence was instrumented to study the global regulation mediated by PhoP in M. tuberculosis. This analysis leads to the identification of several genes that are potentially regulated by this key player.

  2. Ocean acidification affects parameters of immune response and extracellular pH in tropical sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus and Echinometra luccunter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite Figueiredo, Débora Alvares; Branco, Paola Cristina; Dos Santos, Douglas Amaral; Emerenciano, Andrews Krupinski; Iunes, Renata Stecca; Shimada Borges, João Carlos; Machado Cunha da Silva, José Roberto

    2016-11-01

    The rising concentration of atmospheric CO2 by anthropogenic activities is changing the chemistry of the oceans, resulting in a decreased pH. Several studies have shown that the decrease in pH can affect calcification rates and reproduction of marine invertebrates, but little attention has been drawn to their immune response. Thus this study evaluated in two adult tropical sea urchin species, Lytechinus variegatus and Echinometra lucunter, the effects of ocean acidification over a period of 24h and 5days, on parameters of the immune response, the extracellular acid base balance, and the ability to recover these parameters. For this reason, the phagocytic capacity (PC), the phagocytic index (PI), the capacity of cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell spreading area of phagocytic amebocytes in vitro, and the coelomic fluid pH were analyzed in animals exposed to a pH of 8.0 (control group), 7.6 and 7.3. Experimental pH's were predicted by IPCC for the future of the two species. Furthermore, a recovery test was conducted to verify whether animals have the ability to restore these physiological parameters after being re-exposed to control conditions. Both species presented a significant decrease in PC, in the pH of coelomic fluid and in the cell spreading area. Besides that, Echinometra lucunter showed a significant decrease in cell spreading and significant differences in coelomocyte proportions. The recovery test showed that the PC of both species increased, also being below the control values. Even so, they were still significantly higher than those exposed to acidified seawater, indicating that with the re-establishment of the pH value the phagocytic capacity of cells tends to restore control conditions. These results demonstrate that the immune system and the coelomic fluid pH of these animals can be affected by ocean acidification. However, the effects of a short-term exposure can be reversible if the natural values ​​are re-established. Thus, the effects of

  3. The effect of extracellular pH on matrix turnover by cells of the bovine nucleus pulposus

    OpenAIRE

    Razaq, Sajjad; Wilkins, Robert J.; Urban, Jill P. G.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that very acidic conditions can be found in degenerate discs. The effect of these acid conditions on matrix turnover are, however, unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of acidity on production of matrix components and on agents which break down the matrix in order to gain insight into the effect of pathological values of pH on matrix turnover. Cells were isolated from the nucleus of bovine discs and from bovine articular cartilage, embedded in alginate beads ...

  4. Structural features of PhoX, one of the phosphate-binding proteins from Pho regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Santos, Rodrigo M. L.; Medrano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter for phosphate is encoded by the pstSCAB operon. PstS is the periplasmic component responsible for affinity and specificity of the system and has also been related to a regulatory role and chemotaxis during depletion of phosphate. Xanthomonas citri has two phosphate-binding proteins: PstS and PhoX, which are differentially expressed under phosphate limitation. In this work, we focused on PhoX characterization and comparison with PstS. The PhoX three-dimensional structure was solved in a closed conformation with a phosphate engulfed in the binding site pocket between two domains. Comparison between PhoX and PstS revealed that they originated from gene duplication, but despite their similarities they show significant differences in the region that interacts with the permeases. PMID:28542513

  5. Acidic extracellular pH promotes prostate cancer bone metastasis by enhancing PC-3 stem cell characteristics, cell invasiveness and VEGF-induced vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng; Tang, Yubo; Peng, Xinsheng; Cai, Xingdong; Wa, Qingde; Ren, Dong; Li, Qiji; Luo, Jiaquan; Li, Liangping; Zou, Xuenong; Huang, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    Bone metastasis is a main cause of cancer-related mortality in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that the acidic extracellular microenvironment plays significant roles in the growth and metastasis of tumors. However, the effects of acidity on bone metastasis of PCa remain undefined. In the present study, PC-3 cells were cultured in acidic medium (AM; pH 6.5) or neutral medium (NM; pH 7.4), aiming to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of acidic extracellular microenvironment in bone metastasis of PCa. Our results showed that AM can promote spheroid and colony formations, cell viability and expression of stem cell characteristic-related markers in PC-3 cells. Moreover, AM stimulates MMP-9 secretion and promotes invasiveness of PC-3 cells, and these effects can be inhibited by blocking of MMP-9. Furthermore, AM stimulates VEGF secretion of PC-3 and AM conditioned medium (CMAM) promotes vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs by increasing cell viability, migration, tube formation, which involved activating the phosphorylation of VEGFR-2, Akt and P38, when pH of NM conditioned medium (CMNM) was modulated the same as AM conditioned medium (CMAM). Further studies have shown that CMNM induced vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs can be inhibited by the inhibition of VEGFR2 with DMH4. These findings suggest that acidic extracellular microenvironment may have the potential to modulate prostate cancer bone metastasis by enhancing PC-3 stem cell characteristics, cell invasiveness and VEGF-induced vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs. Improved anticancer strategies should be designed to selectively target acidic tumor microenvironment.

  6. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  7. HRG-1 enhances cancer cell invasive potential and couples glucose metabolism to cytosolic/extracellular pH gradient regulation by the vacuolar-H(+) ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, F M; O'Keeffe, J; Zhadanov, A; Papkovsky, D; Ayllon, V; O'Connor, R

    2014-09-18

    Haeme-responsive gene (HRG)-1 encodes a 16-kDa transmembrane protein that is induced by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and associates with the vacuolar-(H(+)) ATPase (V-ATPase). We previously reported that HRG-1 is essential for V-ATPase activity in endosomal acidification and receptor trafficking. Here, we show that in highly invasive and migratory cancer cell lines, HRG-1 and the V-ATPase are co-expressed at the plasma membrane, whereas in less invasive cell lines and non-transformed cells HRG-1 over-expression remains confined to intracellular compartments. Stable suppression of HRG-1 in invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells decreases extracellular pH, cell growth, migration and invasion. Ectopic expression of HRG-1 in non-invasive MCF-7 cells enhances V-ATPase activity, lowers the extracellular pH and increases the pH-dependent activity of MMP2 and MMP9 matrix metalloproteinases. HRG-1 enhances trafficking of the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) with a concomitant increase in glucose uptake and lactate production. HRG-1 also promotes trafficking of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-1R), β1-integrin and IGF-1 signalling. Taken together, our findings indicate that HRG-1 expression at the plasma membrane enhances V-ATPase activity, drives glycolytic flux and facilitates cancer cell growth, migration and invasion. Thus, HRG-1 may represent a novel target for selectively disrupting V-ATPase activity and the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

  8. Catalases and PhoB/PhoR system independently contribute to oxidative stress resistance in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Carolina L; Barbosa, Livia C; Bisch, Paulo M; von Krüger, Wanda M A

    2016-11-01

    All cells are subjected to oxidative stress, a condition under which reactive oxygen species (ROS) production exceeds elimination. Bacterial defences against ROS include synthesis of antioxidant enzymes like peroxidases and catalases. Vibrio cholerae can produce two distinct catalases, KatB and KatG, which contribute to ROS homeostasis. In this study, we analysed the mechanism behind katG and katB expression in two V. cholerae O1 pandemic strains, O395 and N16961, of classical and El Tor biotypes, respectively. Both strains express these genes, especially at stationary phase. However, El Tor N16961 produces higher KatB and KatG levels and is much more resistant to peroxide challenge than the classical strain, confirming a direct relationship between catalase activity and oxidative stress resistance. Moreover, we showed that katG and katB expression levels depend on inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability, in contrast to other bacterial species. In N16961, katB and katG expression is reduced under Pi limitation relative to Pi abundance. Total catalase activity in N16961 and its phoB mutant cells was similar, independently of growth conditions, indicating that the PhoB/PhoR system is not required for katB and katG expression. However, N16961 cells from Pi-limited cultures were 50-100-fold more resistant to H2O2 challenge and accumulated less ROS than phoB mutant cells. Together, these findings suggest that, besides KatB and KatG, the PhoB/PhoR system is an important protective factor against ROS in V. cholerae N16961. They also corroborate previous results from our and other groups, suggesting that the PhoB/PhoR system is fundamental for V. cholerae biology.

  9. Influence of extracellular pH on the accumulation and cytotoxicity of N-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-N'-(4-chlorophenyl)urea in human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosinski, J; Chapin, C; Thakar, J H; Houghton, P J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of extracellular pH (pH(e)) on the accumulation and cytotoxicity of the diarylsulfonylurea antitumor agent N-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-N'-(4-chlorophenyl)urea (MPCU) has been examined. In a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, GC3/C1, the initial rate of uptake of [3H]MPCU (2.4 microM) was increased by 4.5-fold as pH(e) was reduced from 7.4 to 6.5. Steady state levels of MPCU were inversely proportional to pH(e) and were 5-fold greater at pH 6.0 compared to 7.4. Similar results were obtained using Rh30 cells derived from an alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. MPCU rapidly re-equilibrated after achieving steady state when pH(e) was altered, indicating that MPCU was not tightly bound within cells. In both cell lines, the uncoupling agent, carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), significantly reduced (GC3/C1) or completely inhibited (Rh30) accumulation of MPCU at each pH(e) examined. Sodium azide had the same effect on the accumulation of MPCU as FCCP. The effects of FCCP and azide appeared to be due to collapse of the pH differential across the mitochondrial inner membrane rather than the gradient across the plasma membrane. As extracellular pH (pH(e)) decreased, intracellular pH(pH(i)) also decreased in GC3/C1 cells, such that the greatest pH differential (pH(i) - pH(e)) was 0.2 units at pH(e) 6.0. Neither FCCP nor azide significantly altered this pH gradient, indicating a minor role, if any, for the plasma membrane pH gradient in accumulation of MPCU in GC3/C1 cells. The effect of pH(e) (7.4 to 6.0) on cytotoxicity of MPCU was determined after exposure of cells for 4 hr to various concentrations of MPCU in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Decreasing the pH(e) from 7.4 to 6.0 increased the potency of MPCU by 4.7- and 4.5-fold in Rh30 and GC3/C1 cells, respectively. In cells exposed to drug/pH(e) combinations that resulted in 50% reduction in colony forming potential, the steady state levels of [3H]MPCU were similar (range 8.8 +/- 0.9 to 10

  10. The PhoP transcription factor negatively regulates avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renjun; Liu, Xingchao; Wen, Ying; Song, Yuan; Chen, Zhi; Li, Jilun

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to the stress of phosphate limitation, anticipating Pi deletion/starvation via the two-component PhoR-PhoP system. The role of the response regulator PhoP in primary metabolism and avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis was investigated. In response to phosphate starvation, S. avermitilis PhoP, like Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans PhoP, activates the expression of phoRP, phoU, and pstS by binding to the PHO boxes in their promoter regions. Avermectin biosynthesis was significantly increased in ΔphoP deletion mutants. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays showed that PhoP can bind to a PHO box formed by two direct repeat units of 11 nucleotides located downstream of the transcriptional start site of aveR. By negatively regulating the transcription of aveR, PhoP directly affects avermectin biosynthesis in S. avermitilis. PhoP indirectly affects melanogenesis on Casaminoacids Minimal Medium (MMC) lacking supplemental phosphate. Nitrogen metabolism and some key genes involved in morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in S. avermitilis are also under the control of PhoP.

  11. Desorption of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on extracellular polymeric substances: effects of pH, EDTA, Ca(II) and temperature shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoyong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) existed ubiquitously in biological systems affect the mobility and availability of heavy metals in the environments. The adsorption-desorption behaviors of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on EPS were investigated. The sorption rates follow Sb(V) > Hg(II), and the desorption rates follow reverse order. Applications of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), Ca(II) and pH shocks affect desorption rates and desorbed quantities of Hg(II) from EPS-Hg complex. Temperature shock minimally affects the desorption rate of Hg(II). Conversely, the EPS-Sb complex is stable subjected to EDTA, Ca(II), temperature or pH shocks. The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and fast-Fourier (FT-IR) analysis showed that Hg(II) and Sb(V) principally interacted with polysaccharides and protein-like compounds in the EPS, respectively. The EPS-Hg complex presents a time bomb that may release high levels of Hg(II) in short time period under environmental shocks.

  12. Binase-like guanyl-preferring ribonucleases are new members of Bacillus PhoP regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyanova, Vera; Vershinina, Valentina; Ilinskaya, Olga; Harwood, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular low-molecular weight guanyl-preferring ribonucleases (LMW RNases) of Bacillus sp. comprise a group of hydrolytic enzymes that share highly similar structural and catalytic characteristics with barnase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, and binase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus intermedius. Although the physical-chemical and catalytic properties of Bacillus guanyl-preferring ribonucleases are very similar, there is considerably more variation in the environmental conditions that lead to the induction of the genes encoding these RNases. Based on structural differences of their genes the guanyl-preferring ribonucleases have been sub-divided into binase-like and barnase-like groups. Here we show the ability of the key regulator of phosphate deficiency response, PhoP, to direct the transcription of the binase-like RNases but not barnase-like RNases. These results, together with our demonstration that binase-like RNases are induced in response to phosphate starvation, allow us to categorise this group of ribonucleases as new members of Bacillus PhoP regulon. In contrast, the barnase-like ribonucleases are relatively insensitive to the phosphate concentration and the environmental conditions that are responsible for their induction, and the regulatory elements involved, are currently unknown.

  13. Effect of extracellular acid–base disturbances on the intracellular pH of neurones cultured from rat medullary raphe or hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Patrice; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Zhao, Jinhua; Wang, Wengang; Richerson, George B; Boron, Walter F

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that an important characteristic of chemosensitive neurones is an unusually large change of steady-state intracellular pH in response to a change in extracellular pH (ΔpHi/ΔpHo). To determine whether such a correlation exists between neurones from the medullary raphe (a chemosensitive brain region) and hippocampus (a non-chemosensitive region), we used BCECF to monitor pHi in cultured neurones subjected to extracellular acid–base disturbances. In medullary raphe neurones, respiratory acidosis (5% → 9% CO2) caused a rapid fall in pHi (ΔpHi ∼0.2) with no recovery and a large ΔpHi/ΔpHo of 0.71. Hippocampal neurones had a similar response, but with a slightly lower ΔpHi/ΔpHo (0.59). We further investigated a possible link between pHi regulation and chemosensitivity by following the pHi measurements on medullary raphe neurones with an immunocytochemistry for tryptophan hydroxylase (a marker of serotonergic neurones). We found that the ΔpHi/ΔpHo of 0.69 for serotonergic neurones (which are stimulated by acidosis) was not different from either the ΔpHi/ΔpHo of 0.75 for non-serotonergic neurones (most of which are not chemosensitive), or from the ΔpHi/ΔpHo of hippocampal neurones. For both respiratory alkalosis (5% → 3% CO2) and metabolic alkalosis (22 mm → 35 mm HCO3−), ΔpHi/ΔpHo was 0.42–0.53 for all groups of neurones studied. The only notable difference between medullary raphe and hippocampal neurones was in response to metabolic acidosis (22 mm → 14 mm HCO3−), which caused a large pHi decrease in ∼80% of medullary raphe neurones (ΔpHi/ΔpHo = 0.71), but relatively little pHi decrease in 70% of the hippocampal neurones (ΔpHi/ΔpHo = 0.09). Our comparison of medullary raphe and hippocampal neurones indicates that, except in response to metabolic acidosis, the neurones from the chemosensitive region do not have a uniquely high ΔpHi/ΔpHo. Moreover, regardless of whether neurones were cultured from the

  14. Dependence of Relative Expression of NTR1 and EGFR on Cell Density and Extracellular pH in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski-Hamilton, Ulrike, E-mail: u.olszewski@gmx.net [Cluster of Translational Oncology, Ludwig Boltzmann Society, c/o Balderichgasse 26A / 7-8, A-1170 Vienna (Austria); Hamilton, Gerhard [Cluster of Translational Oncology, Ludwig Boltzmann Society, c/o Balderichgasse 26A / 7-8, A-1170 Vienna (Austria); Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-01-04

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a devastating disease characterized by early dissemination and poor prognosis. These solid tumors express receptors for neuropeptides like neurotensin (NT) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) and exhibit acidic regions when grown beyond a certain size. We previously demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels, intracellular pH and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells in response to a stable NT analog. The present study aimed at investigation of the dependence of the relative expression of NT receptor 1 (NTR1) and EGFR in BxPC-3 and MIA PaCa-2 cells on cell density and extracellular pH (pH{sub e}). MTT assays revealed the NTR1 inhibitor SR 142948-sensitive Lys{sup 8}-ψ-Lys{sup 9}NT (8–13)-induced proliferation in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. Confluent cultures of BxPC3 and HT-29 lines exhibited highest expression of NTR1 and lowest of EGFR and expression of NTR1 was maximal at slightly acidic pH{sub e}. IL-8 production was stimulated by Lys{sup 8}-ψ-Lys{sup 9}NT (8–13) and even enhanced at both acidic and alkaline pH{sub e} in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. In conclusion, our in vitro study suggests that one contributing factor to the minor responses obtained with EGFR-directed therapy may be downregulation of this receptor in tumor cell aggregates, possibly resulting in acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype via other growth factor receptors like NTR1.

  15. Dependence of Relative Expression of NTR1 and EGFR on Cell Density and Extracellular pH in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Hamilton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a devastating disease characterized by early dissemination and poor prognosis. These solid tumors express receptors for neuropeptides like neurotensin (NT or epidermal growth factor (EGF and exhibit acidic regions when grown beyond a certain size. We previously demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels, intracellular pH and interleukin-8 (IL-8 secretion in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells in response to a stable NT analog. The present study aimed at investigation of the dependence of the relative expression of NT receptor 1 (NTR1 and EGFR in BxPC-3 and MIA PaCa-2 cells on cell density and extracellular pH (pHe. MTT assays revealed the NTR1 inhibitor SR 142948-sensitive Lys8-ψ-Lys9NT (8–13-induced proliferation in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. Confluent cultures of BxPC3 and HT-29 lines exhibited highest expression of NTR1 and lowest of EGFR and expression of NTR1 was maximal at slightly acidic pHe. IL-8 production was stimulated by Lys8-ψ-Lys9NT (8–13 and even enhanced at both acidic and alkaline pHe in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. In conclusion, our in vitro study suggests that one contributing factor to the minor responses obtained with EGFR-directed therapy may be downregulation of this receptor in tumor cell aggregates, possibly resulting in acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype via other growth factor receptors like NTR1.

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.50.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho All cell types SRX681828,SRX681817,SR...X681831,SRX681822,SRX681825,SRX300934,SRX300935 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Emb.20.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho Embryo SRX681828,SRX681831,SRX681817,...SRX681822,SRX681825 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Emb.05.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho Embryo SRX681817,SRX681828,SRX681822,...SRX681831,SRX681825 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.ALL.20.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho All cell types SRX681828,SRX681831,SR...X681817,SRX300934,SRX681822,SRX681825,SRX300935 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Emb.10.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho Embryo SRX681817,SRX681828,SRX681831,...SRX681822,SRX681825 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Emb.50.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho Embryo SRX681828,SRX681817,SRX681831,...SRX681822,SRX681825 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.ALL.10.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho All cell types SRX681817,SRX681828,SR...X681831,SRX681822,SRX300934,SRX681825,SRX300935 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.ALL.05.pho.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.pho.AllCell dm3 TFs and others pho All cell types SRX681817,SRX681828,SR...X681822,SRX681831,SRX681825,SRX300934,SRX300935 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.pho.AllCell.bed ...

  4. Characterization and Transposon Mutagenesis of the Maize (Zea mays) Pho1 Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Vidal, M. Nancy; Acosta-Segovia, Edith; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Ahern, Kevin R.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Sawers, Ruairidh J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all plants, but also one of the least mobile, and consequently least available, in the soil. Plants have evolved a series of molecular, metabolic and developmental adaptations to increase the acquisition of phosphorus and to maximize the efficiency of use within the plant. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the AtPHO1 protein regulates and facilitates the distribution of phosphorus. To investigate the role of PHO1 proteins in maize (Zea mays), the B73 reference genome was searched for homologous sequences, and four genes identified that were designated ZmPho1;1, ZmPho1;2a, ZmPho1;2b and ZmPho1;3. ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b are the most similar to AtPHO1, and represent candidate co-orthologs that we hypothesize to have been retained following whole genome duplication. Evidence was obtained for the production of natural anti-sense transcripts associated with both ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b, suggesting the possibility of regulatory crosstalk between paralogs. To characterize functional divergence between ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b, a program of transposon mutagenesis was initiated using the Ac/Ds system, and, here, we report the generation of novel alleles of ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b. PMID:27648940

  5. Identification and characterization of PhoP regulon members in Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Zongmin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription regulator PhoP has been shown to be important for Y. pestis survival in macrophages and under various in vitro stresses. However, the mechanism by which PhoP promotes bacterial intracellular survival is not fully understood. Our previous microarray analysis suggested that PhoP governed a wide set of cellular pathways in Y. pestis. A series of biochemical experiments were done herein to study members of the PhoP regulon of Y. pestis biovar Microtus. Results By using gel mobility shift assay and quantitative RT-PCR, a total of 30 putative transcription units were characterized as direct PhoP targets. The primer extension assay was further used to determine the transcription start sites of 18 PhoP-dependent promoters and to localize the -10 and -35 elements. The DNase I footprinting was used to identify the PhoP-binding sites within 17 PhoP-dependent promoters, enabling the identification of PhoP box and matrix that both represented the conserved signals for PhoP recognition in Y. pestis. Data presented here providing a good basis for modeling PhoP-promoter DNA interactions that is crucial to the PhoP-mediated transcriptional regulation. Conclusion The proven direct PhoP targets include nine genes encoding regulators and 21 genes or operons with functions of detoxification, protection against DNA damages, resistance to antimicrobial peptides, and adaptation to magnesium limitation. We can presume that PhoP is a global regulator that controls a complex regulatory cascade by a mechanism of not only directly controlling the expression of specific genes, but also indirectly regulating various cellular pathways by acting on a set of dedicated regulators. These results help us gain insights into the PhoP-dependent mechanisms by which Y. pestis survives the antibacterial strategies employed by host macrophages.

  6. 31P NMR analysis of intracellular pH of Swiss Mouse 3T3 cells: effects of extracellular Na+ and K+ and mitogenic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Williams, S R; Gadian, D G; Rozengurt, E

    1986-01-01

    Swiss mouse 3T3 cells grown on microcarrier beads were superfused with electrolyte solution during continuous NMR analysis. Conventional 31P and 19F probes of intracellular pH (pHc) were found to be impracticable. Cells were therefore superfused with 1 to 4 mM 2-deoxyglucose, producing a large intracellular, pH-sensitive signal of 2-deoxyglucose phosphate (2DGP). The intracellular incorporation of 2DGP inhibited the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. However, intracellular ATP was at least in part retained and the cellular responsivity to changes in extracellular ionic composition and to the application of growth factors proved intact. Transient replacement of external Na+ with choline or K+ reversibly acidified the intracellular fluids. Quiescent cells and mitogenically stimulated cells displayed the same dependence of shifts in pHc on external Na+ concentration (CoNa). PHc also depended on intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa). Increasing ccNa by withdrawing external K+ (thereby inhibiting the Na,K-pump) caused reversible intracellular acidification; subsequently reducing CoNa produced a larger acid shift in pHc than with external K+ present. Comparison of separate preparations indicated that pHc was higher in stimulated than in quiescent cells. Transient administration of mitogens also reversibly alkalinized quiescent cells studied continuously. This study documents the feasibility of monitoring pHc of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells using 31P NMR analysis of 2DGP. The results support the concept of a Na/H antiport operative in these cells, both in quiescence and after mitogenic stimulation. The data document by an independent technique that cytoplasmic alkalinization is an early event in mitogenesis, and that full activity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is not required for the expression of this event.

  7. PhoR/PhoP two component regulatory system affects biocontrol capability of Bacillus subtilis NCD-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinggang Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bacillus subtilis strain NCD-2 is an important biocontrol agent against cotton verticillium wilt and cotton sore shin in the field, which are caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb and Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, respectively. A mutant of strain NCD-2, designated M216, with decreased antagonism to V. dahliae and R. solani, was selected by mini-Tn10 mutagenesis and in vitro virulence screening. The inserted gene in the mutant was cloned and identified as the phoR gene, which encodes a sensor kinase in the PhoP/PhoR two-component system. Compared to the wild-type strain, the APase activities of the mutant was decreased significantly when cultured in low phosphate medium, but no obvious difference was observed when cultured in high phosphate medium. The mutant also grew more slowly on organic phosphate agar and lost its phosphatidylcholine-solubilizing ability. The suppression of cotton seedling damping-off in vivo and colonization of the rhizosphere of cotton also decreased in the mutant strain when compared with the wild type strain. All of these characteristics could be partially restored by complementation of the phoR gene in the M216 mutant.

  8. PhoR/PhoP two component regulatory system affects biocontrol capability of Bacillus subtilis NCD-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinggang; Li, Shezeng; Lu, Xiuyun; Li, Baoqing; Ma, Ping

    2010-04-01

    The Bacillus subtilis strain NCD-2 is an important biocontrol agent against cotton verticillium wilt and cotton sore shin in the field, which are caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb and Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, respectively. A mutant of strain NCD-2, designated M216, with decreased antagonism to V. dahliae and R. solani, was selected by mini-Tn10 mutagenesis and in vitro virulence screening. The inserted gene in the mutant was cloned and identified as the phoR gene, which encodes a sensor kinase in the PhoP/PhoR two-component system. Compared to the wild-type strain, the APase activities of the mutant was decreased significantly when cultured in low phosphate medium, but no obvious difference was observed when cultured in high phosphate medium. The mutant also grew more slowly on organic phosphate agar and lost its phosphatidylcholine-solubilizing ability. The suppression of cotton seedling damping-off in vivo and colonization of the rhizosphere of cotton also decreased in the mutant strain when compared with the wild type strain. All of these characteristics could be partially restored by complementation of the phoR gene in the M216 mutant.

  9. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  10. The Photometric Software for Transits (PhoS-T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislis, D.; Heller, R.; Fernandez, J.; Seemann, U.; Ioannidis, P.; Avdellidou, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the Photometric Software for Transits (Phos-T), a user-friendly stand-alone astronomical software built to study in detail photometric data of transiting extra-solar planets. Through a simple and clean graphical environment, PhoS-T can perform data calibration, point-source differential photometry, and transit light curve modelling. Here we present a detailed description of the software, together with the analysis of a recent transit of the extra-solar planet HAT-P-19b, observed from Holomon astronomical station. The results obtained using PhoS-T are in good agreement with previous works, and provide a precise time-of-transit for HAT-P-19b.

  11. Do Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (PHO) Fellows Receive Communication Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Wilson; Bylund, Carma L.; Kesselheim, Jennifer; Leonard, David; Leavey, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has established communication as a core competency for physicians in training. However, data suggest that most pediatric residents perceive inadequate training in the delivery of bad news and the majority of former trainees in pediatric oncology received no formal training in the delivery of bad news during fellowship. The study examines communication training in ACGME accredited US pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) fellowship programs. Methods An online survey was distributed to 315 PHO fellows in training via the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) fellow email registry. Each fellow received an initial request to participate and 2 reminders, while participation was encouraged through a random incentive drawing. Results One hundred and ten fellows (35%) responded. Eighty percent of respondents perceived communication training to be important to fellow education, however only 32% reported receiving communication training (other than direct observation). The most common reported teaching method of fellowship communication training was formal lecture (42%). Twenty-three percent of respondents reported neither communication training nor frequent feedback on their communication skills from faculty observation. This same group was the least satisfied with their programs’ approach to teaching communication (P communication training in PHO fellowships despite ACGME requirements and fellows’ interest in this training. Didactic learning remains the most frequently described training method, yet educational theory identifies the limitation of didactic lectures alone. Communication training employing novel teaching methods and emphasizing communication challenges identified by fellows should be developed and evaluated. PMID:24039096

  12. Effects of Extracellular pH and Its Fluctuation on High - phosphate - induced Apoptosis of Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Its Mechanism%细胞外 pH 值及其波动对高磷诱导的大鼠血管平滑肌细胞凋亡的作用及机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔立文; 徐金升; 白亚玲; 张俊霞; 张胜雷

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of extracellular pH changes and its fluctuations on high - phosphate -induced apoptosis of rat vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs)and its mechanism. Methods A total of 6 healthy male SD rats aged 8 - 10 weeks were selected from November 2014 to March 2015. Using simple random sampling method,we selected 2 rats, and VSMCs from rat thoracic aorta were cultured in vitro. Using random number table method,VSMCs were divided into pH 7. 4 group and high - phosphate group. High - phosphate group was divided into pH 6. 8 + phosphate group,pH 7. 4 + phosphate group,pH 7. 7 + phosphate group and pH 6. 8 / 7. 7 + phosphate group. DMEM culture medium containing 10% FBS was employed in pH 7. 4 group. High - phosphate culture medium was employed in high - phosphate group,and according to the read- out values of acidity meter,1 mol/ L HCl or 7. 4% NaHCO3 were added to adjust pH;pH 6. 8 / 7. 7 + phosphate group was stimulated with pH 7. 7 on day 1 and was given pH 6. 8 on day 2. The VSMCs of the rest 4 rats were cultured with the above method for two times. Cells were determined using immunohistochemistry SP method,RT - PCR was employed to detect the mRNA relative expression level of Caspase - 3 and Bcl - 2 mRNA/ Bax mRNA. Flow cytometry was employed to detect apoptosis rate. Results Under inverted phase contrast microscope,the observation results were as follows:3 - 4 d later,VSMCs crawled out of the rim of tissue block in long fusiform shape and sarciniform distribution;5 - 6 d later,cell mass was formed in the shape of concentric circle with obvious growing follicle,crawling around the rim of tissue block in sarciniform and radiated shape;6 -7 d later,the cells were merged into films,and the cell body took on fusiform shape or irregular triangular shape with cytoplasm stretching out forming 2 to 3 protrusions of different lengths. The pH 6. 8 + phosphate group was lower than pH 7. 4 group in Caspase - 3 mRNA expression(P < 0. 05),and pH 7. 4

  13. THE RESPONSE OF MEMBRANE POTENTIAL (Vm) AND INTRACELLULAR pH (pHi) TO HYPERCAPNIA IN NEURONS AND ASTROCYTES FROM RAT RETROTRAPEZOID NUCLEUS (RTN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritucci, Nick A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Leiter, J.C.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    We compared the response to hypercapnia (10%) in both neurons and astrocytes between a distinct area of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), the medio-caudal RTN (mcRTN) and more intermediate and rostral RTN areas (irRTN) in medullary brain slices from neonatal rats. Exposure to hypercapnic acidosis (HA) caused pHo to decline from 7.45 to 7.15 and caused a maintained, intracellular acidification of 0.15±0.02 pH unit in 90% of neurons from both areas of the RTN (n=16). HA excited 44% of mcRTN (7 of 16) and 38% of irRTN neurons (6 of 16), increasing firing rate by 167±75% (chemosensitivity index, CI, of 256±72%) and 310±93% (CI of 292±50%) respectively. These responses did not vary throughout neonatal development. We investigated the role of pHo by comparing the responses between HA (decreased pHi and pHo) and isohydric hypercapnia (IH; decreased pHi with constant pHo) in mcRTN neurons. Neurons excited by HA (firing rate increased by 156±46%; n=5) were excited to the same extent by IH (firing rate increased by 167±38%; n=5). Neurons insensitive to HA were also insensitive to IH. In astrocytes from both areas of the RTN, exposure to HA caused a maintained, intracellular acidification of 0.17±0.02 pH unit (n=6) and a depolarization of 5±1mV (n=12). In summary, a high percentage of neurons (42%) from the entire RTN are highly responsive (CI 248%) to HA; this may reflect both synaptically driven and intrinsic mechanisms of CO2 sensitivity. Changes of pHi appear to be a more significant stimulus than changes of pHo in chemosensory RTN neurons. Finally, the lack of astrocytic pHi regulation in response to HA suggests that astrocytes do not enhance extracellular acidification during hypercapnia in the RTN in the neonatal period. PMID:15905224

  14. Learning Photogrammetry with Interactive Software Tool PhoX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, T.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetry is a complex topic in high-level university teaching, especially in the fields of geodesy, geoinformatics and metrology where high quality results are demanded. In addition, more and more black-box solutions for 3D image processing and point cloud generation are available that generate nice results easily, e.g. by structure-from-motion approaches. Within this context, the classical approach of teaching photogrammetry (e.g. focusing on aerial stereophotogrammetry) has to be reformed in order to educate students and professionals with new topics and provide them with more information behind the scene. Since around 20 years photogrammetry courses at the Jade University of Applied Sciences in Oldenburg, Germany, include the use of digital photogrammetry software that provide individual exercises, deep analysis of calculation results and a wide range of visualization tools for almost all standard tasks in photogrammetry. During the last years the software package PhoX has been developed that is part of a new didactic concept in photogrammetry and related subjects. It also serves as analysis tool in recent research projects. PhoX consists of a project-oriented data structure for images, image data, measured points and features and 3D objects. It allows for almost all basic photogrammetric measurement tools, image processing, calculation methods, graphical analysis functions, simulations and much more. Students use the program in order to conduct predefined exercises where they have the opportunity to analyse results in a high level of detail. This includes the analysis of statistical quality parameters but also the meaning of transformation parameters, rotation matrices, calibration and orientation data. As one specific advantage, PhoX allows for the interactive modification of single parameters and the direct view of the resulting effect in image or object space.

  15. Learning Photogrammetry with Interactive Software Tool PhoX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Luhmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Photogrammetry is a complex topic in high-level university teaching, especially in the fields of geodesy, geoinformatics and metrology where high quality results are demanded. In addition, more and more black-box solutions for 3D image processing and point cloud generation are available that generate nice results easily, e.g. by structure-from-motion approaches. Within this context, the classical approach of teaching photogrammetry (e.g. focusing on aerial stereophotogrammetry has to be reformed in order to educate students and professionals with new topics and provide them with more information behind the scene. Since around 20 years photogrammetry courses at the Jade University of Applied Sciences in Oldenburg, Germany, include the use of digital photogrammetry software that provide individual exercises, deep analysis of calculation results and a wide range of visualization tools for almost all standard tasks in photogrammetry. During the last years the software package PhoX has been developed that is part of a new didactic concept in photogrammetry and related subjects. It also serves as analysis tool in recent research projects. PhoX consists of a project-oriented data structure for images, image data, measured points and features and 3D objects. It allows for almost all basic photogrammetric measurement tools, image processing, calculation methods, graphical analysis functions, simulations and much more. Students use the program in order to conduct predefined exercises where they have the opportunity to analyse results in a high level of detail. This includes the analysis of statistical quality parameters but also the meaning of transformation parameters, rotation matrices, calibration and orientation data. As one specific advantage, PhoX allows for the interactive modification of single parameters and the direct view of the resulting effect in image or object space.

  16. Atypical Role for PhoU in Mutagenic Break Repair under Stress in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Gibson

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses drive pathogen/host adaptation, antibiotic and anti-fungal-drug resistance, and perhaps much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by homologous recombination is high fidelity in unstressed cells, but switches to a mutagenic mode using error-prone DNA polymerases when the both the SOS and general (σS stress responses are activated. Additionally, the σE response promotes spontaneous DNA breakage that leads to mutagenic break repair (MBR. We identified the regulatory protein PhoU in a genetic screen for functions required for MBR. PhoU negatively regulates the phosphate-transport and utilization (Pho regulon when phosphate is in excess, including the PstB and PstC subunits of the phosphate-specific ABC transporter PstSCAB. Here, we characterize the PhoU mutation-promoting role. First, some mutations that affect phosphate transport and Pho transcriptional regulation decrease mutagenesis. Second, the mutagenesis and regulon-expression phenotypes do not correspond, revealing an apparent new function(s for PhoU. Third, the PhoU mutagenic role is not via activation of the σS, SOS or σE responses, because mutations (or DSBs that restore mutagenesis to cells defective in these stress responses do not restore mutagenesis to phoU cells. Fourth, the mutagenesis defect in phoU-mutant cells is partially restored by deletion of arcA, a gene normally repressed by PhoU, implying that a gene(s repressed by ArcA promotes mutagenic break repair. The data show a new role for PhoU in regulation, and a new regulatory branch of the stress-response signaling web that activates mutagenic break repair in E. coli.

  17. Atypical Role for PhoU in Mutagenic Break Repair under Stress in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Janet L; Lombardo, Mary-Jane; Aponyi, Ildiko; Vera Cruz, Diana; Ray, Mellanie P; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses drive pathogen/host adaptation, antibiotic and anti-fungal-drug resistance, and perhaps much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination is high fidelity in unstressed cells, but switches to a mutagenic mode using error-prone DNA polymerases when the both the SOS and general (σS) stress responses are activated. Additionally, the σE response promotes spontaneous DNA breakage that leads to mutagenic break repair (MBR). We identified the regulatory protein PhoU in a genetic screen for functions required for MBR. PhoU negatively regulates the phosphate-transport and utilization (Pho) regulon when phosphate is in excess, including the PstB and PstC subunits of the phosphate-specific ABC transporter PstSCAB. Here, we characterize the PhoU mutation-promoting role. First, some mutations that affect phosphate transport and Pho transcriptional regulation decrease mutagenesis. Second, the mutagenesis and regulon-expression phenotypes do not correspond, revealing an apparent new function(s) for PhoU. Third, the PhoU mutagenic role is not via activation of the σS, SOS or σE responses, because mutations (or DSBs) that restore mutagenesis to cells defective in these stress responses do not restore mutagenesis to phoU cells. Fourth, the mutagenesis defect in phoU-mutant cells is partially restored by deletion of arcA, a gene normally repressed by PhoU, implying that a gene(s) repressed by ArcA promotes mutagenic break repair. The data show a new role for PhoU in regulation, and a new regulatory branch of the stress-response signaling web that activates mutagenic break repair in E. coli.

  18. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PhoP, a Two-Component Response Regulator, Involved in Antimicrobial Susceptibilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Liu

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a gram-negative bacterium, has increasingly emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. It is well-known for resistance to a variety of antimicrobial agents including cationic antimicrobial polypeptides (CAPs. Resistance to polymyxin B, a kind of CAPs, is known to be controlled by the two-component system PhoPQ. To unravel the role of PhoPQ in polymyxin B resistance of S. maltophilia, a phoP mutant was constructed. We found MICs of polymyxin B, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin and spectinomycin decreased 2-64 fold in the phoP mutant. Complementation of the phoP mutant by the wild-type phoP gene restored all of the MICs to the wild type levels. Expression of PhoP was shown to be autoregulated and responsive to Mg2+ levels. The polymyxin B and gentamicin killing tests indicated that pretreatment of low Mg2+ can protect the wild-type S. maltophilia from killing but not phoP mutant. Interestingly, we found phoP mutant had a decrease in expression of SmeZ, an efflux transporter protein for aminoglycosides in S. maltophilia. Moreover, phoP mutant showed increased permeability in the cell membrane relative to the wild-type. In summary, we demonstrated the two-component regulator PhoP of S. maltophilia is involved in antimicrobial susceptibilities and low Mg2+ serves as a signal for triggering the pathway. Both the alteration in membrane permeability and downregulation of SmeZ efflux transporter in the phoP mutant contributed to the increased drug susceptibilities of S. maltophilia, in particular for aminoglycosides. This is the first report to describe the role of the Mg2+-sensing PhoP signaling pathway of S. maltophilia in regulation of the SmeZ efflux transporter and in antimicrobial susceptibilities. This study suggests PhoPQ TCS may serve as a target for development of antimicrobial agents against multidrug-resistant S. maltophilia.

  19. phoU inactivation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances accumulation of ppGpp and polyphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Luiz Gustavo; Ortiz, Julia Helena; Schneider, René P; Spira, Beny

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear polymer composed of several molecules of orthophosphate (Pi) linked by energy-rich phosphoanhydride bonds. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pi is taken up by the ABC transporter Pst, encoded by an operon consisting of five genes. The first four genes encode proteins involved in the transport of Pi and the last gene of the operon, phoU, codes for a protein which exact function is unknown. We show here that the inactivation of phoU in P. aeruginosa enhanced Pi removal from the medium and polyP accumulation. The phoU mutant also accumulated high levels of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), which in turn increased the buildup of polyP. In addition, phoU inactivation had several pleiotropic effects, such as reduced growth rate and yield and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and stresses. However, biofilm formation was not affected by the phoU mutation.

  20. Mouse Slc4a11 expressed in Xenopus oocytes is an ideally selective H+/OH- conductance pathway that is stimulated by rises in intracellular and extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Evan J; Marshall, Aniko; Jennings, Michael L; Parker, Mark D

    2016-12-01

    The SLC4A11 gene encodes the bicarbonate-transporter-related protein BTR1, which is mutated in syndromes characterized by vision and hearing loss. Signs of these diseases [congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED) and Harboyan syndrome] are evident in mouse models of Slc4a11 disruption. However, the intrinsic activity of Slc4a11 remains controversial, complicating assignment of its (patho)physiological role. Most studies concur that Slc4a11 transports H(+) (or the thermodynamically equivalent species OH(-)) rather than HCO3(-), but disparities have arisen as to whether the transport is coupled to another species such as Na(+) or NH3/NH4(+) Here for the first time, we examine the action of mouse Slc4a11 in Xenopus oocytes. We simultaneously monitor changes in intracellular pH, membrane potential, and conductance as we alter extracellular pH, revealing the electrical and chemical driving forces that underlie the observed ion fluxes. We find that mSlc4a11 is an ideally selective H(+)/OH(-) conductive pathway, the action of which is uncoupled from the cotransport of any other ion. We also find that the activity of mSlc4a11 is independently enhanced by both extracellular and intracellular alkalinization, suggesting OH(-) as the most likely substrate and providing a novel explanation for the apparent NH3-dependence of Slc4a11-mediated currents reported by others. We suggest that the unique properties of Slc4a11 action underlie its value as a pH regulator in corneal endothelial cells. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Modulation of hexa-acyl pyrophosphate lipid A population under Escherichia coli phosphate (Pho) regulon activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Martin G; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Crépin, Sébastien; Mourez, Michael; Bertrand, Nicolas; Bishop, Russell E; Dubreuil, J Daniel; Harel, Josée

    2008-08-01

    Environmental phosphate is an important signal for microorganism gene regulation, and it has recently been shown to trigger some key bacterial virulence mechanisms. In many bacteria, the Pho regulon is the major circuit involved in adaptation to phosphate limitation. The Pho regulon is controlled jointly by the two-component regulatory system PhoR/PhoB and by the phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system, which both belong to the Pho regulon. We showed that a pst mutation results in virulence attenuation in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains. Our results indicate that the bacterial cell surface of the pst mutants is altered. In this study, we show that pst mutants of ExPEC strains display an increased sensitivity to different cationic antimicrobial peptides and vancomycin. Remarkably, the hexa-acylated 1-pyrophosphate form of lipid A is significantly less abundant in pst mutants. Among differentially expressed genes in the pst mutant, lpxT coding for an enzyme that transfers a phosphoryl group to lipid A, forming the 1-diphosphate species, was found to be downregulated. Our results strongly suggest that the Pho regulon is involved in lipid A modifications, which could contribute to bacterial surface perturbations. Since the Pho regulon and the Pst system are conserved in many bacteria, such a lipid A modification mechanism could be widely distributed among gram-negative bacterial species.

  2. The tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase like gene located in the tyramine biosynthesis cluster of Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by tyrosine concentration and extracellular pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linares Daniel M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tyramine producer Enterococcus durans IPLA655 contains all the necessary genes for tyramine biosynthesis, grouped in the TDC cluster. This cluster includes tyrS, an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase like gene. Results This work shows that tyrS was maximally transcribed in absence of tyrosine at acidic pH, showing a greater than 10-fold induction in mRNA levels over levels occurring in presence of tyrosine. Mapping of the tyrS transcriptional start site revealed an unusually long untranslated leader region of 322 bp, which displays the typical features of the T box transcriptional attenuation mechanism. The tyrosine concentration regulation of tyrS was found to be mediated by a transcription antitermination system, whereas the specific induction at acidic pH was regulated at transcription initiation level. Conclusions The expression of the tyrS gene present in the TDC cluster of E. durans is transcriptionally regulated by tyrosine concentration and extracelular pH. The regulation is mediated by both an antitermination system and the promoter itself.

  3. Two-component PhoB-PhoR regulatory system and ferric uptake regulator sense phosphate and iron to control virulence genes in type III and VI secretion systems of Edwardsiella tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Smarajit; Sivaraman, J; Leung, Ka Yin; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2011-11-11

    Inorganic phosphate (P(i)) and iron are essential nutrients that are depleted by vertebrates as a protective mechanism against bacterial infection. This depletion, however, is sensed by some pathogens as a signal to turn on the expression of virulence genes. Here, we show that the PhoB-PhoR two-component system senses changes in P(i) concentration, whereas the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) senses changes in iron concentration in Edwardsiella tarda PPD130/91 to regulate the expression of type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) through an E. tarda secretion regulator, EsrC. In sensing low P(i) concentration, PhoB-PhoR autoregulates and activates the phosphate-specific transport operon, pstSCAB-phoU, by binding directly to the Pho box in the promoters of phoB and pstS. PhoB also binds with EsrC simultaneously on the promoter of an E. tarda virulence protein, evpA, to regulate directly the transcription of genes from T6SS. In addition, PhoB requires and interacts with PhoU to activate esrC and suppress fur indirectly through unidentified regulators. Fur, on the other hand, senses high iron concentration and binds directly to the Fur box in the promoter of evpP to inhibit EsrC binding to the same region. In addition, Fur suppresses transcription of phoB, pstSCAB-phoU, and esrC indirectly via unidentified regulators, suggesting negative cross-talk with the Pho regulon. Physical interactions exist between Fur and PhoU and between Fur and EsrC. Our findings suggest that T3SS and T6SS may carry out distinct roles in the pathogenicity of E. tarda by responding to different environmental factors.

  4. Evolutionary history of tuberculosis shaped by conserved mutations in the PhoPR virulence regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús; Malaga, Wladimir; Pawlik, Alexandre; Astarie-Dequeker, Catherine; Passemar, Charlotte; Moreau, Flavie; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Martin, Carlos; Brosch, Roland; Guilhot, Christophe

    2014-08-05

    Although the bovine tuberculosis (TB) agent, Mycobacterium bovis, may infect humans and cause disease, long-term epidemiological data indicate that humans represent a spill-over host in which infection with M. bovis is not self-maintaining. Indeed, human-to-human transmission of M. bovis strains and other members of the animal lineage of the tubercle bacilli is very rare. Here, we report on three mutations affecting the two-component virulence regulation system PhoP/PhoR (PhoPR) in M. bovis and in the closely linked Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 (L6) that likely account for this discrepancy. Genetic transfer of these mutations into the human TB agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, resulted in down-regulation of the PhoP regulon, with loss of biologically active lipids, reduced secretion of the 6-kDa early antigenic target (ESAT-6), and lower virulence. Remarkably, the deleterious effects of the phoPR mutations were partly compensated by a deletion, specific to the animal-adapted and M. africanum L6 lineages, that restores ESAT-6 secretion by a PhoPR-independent mechanism. Similarly, we also observed that insertion of an IS6110 element upstream of the phoPR locus may completely revert the phoPR-bovis-associated fitness loss, which is the case for an exceptional M. bovis human outbreak strain from Spain. Our findings ultimately explain the long-term epidemiological data, suggesting that M. bovis and related phoPR-mutated strains pose a lower risk for progression to overt human TB, with major impact on the evolutionary history of TB.

  5. PhoP-PhoR two-component signal transduction systems in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis%PhoPR双组份系统在结核分枝杆菌致病机制中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬博; 张万江

    2014-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction system (TCS) exists extensively in prokaryotic cell ,which plays a key role of regulation in the growth ,differentiation ,metabolism ,virulence ,persistence ,and pathogenicity .PhoPR two-component signal transduction system ,as one of two-component systems ,is the most basic and the most importantly sensitive to the envi-ronmental changes and makes corresponding certain reaction system adapt to changes in the host microenvironment .Therefore , PhoPR TCS which is an important regulatory system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) to adapt to environmental change has been increasing concern ,even PhoPR TCS is becoming the new front-burner issue in the pathogenesis of M TB regulation of research .%双组份信号转导系统(Two-component signal transduction system ,TCS)广泛存在于原核生物细胞内,对细胞生长、分化、代谢、毒力、持留性、致病性等方面的调控发挥着重要作用。PhoPR TCS作为双组份系统中最基本、最重要的感应外界环境变化,并作出相应反应的调控系统,能够调控结核分枝杆菌(Mycobacterium Tuberculosis ,MTB)更好的适应宿主微环境变化。因此PhoPR TCS作为M TB适应环境变化的重要调控系统已愈来愈受关注,关于PhoPR TCS在M TB的致病机制调控方面的研究正在成为新的热点。

  6. The regulators of yeast PHO system participate in the transcriptional regulation of G1 cyclin under alkaline stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Masafumi

    2015-03-01

    The yeast Pho85 kinase oversees whether environmental conditions are favourable for cell growth and enables yeast cells to express only genes that are appropriate for the conditions. Alkaline stress perturbs transport of molecules across the plasma membrane that is vital for cell survival. Progression through the cell cycle is halted until the cells can adapt to the stress conditions. I found that Pho85 is required for CLN2 expression and that overproduction of the transcription factors Pho4, Rim101 and Crz1, all targets of Pho85, inhibited CLN2 expression. CLN2 expression in the absence of Pho85 could be recovered only when all the three transcription factors were deleted. Whi5, a functional homologue of the mammalian Rb protein, represses CLN2 expression and is inactivated when phosphorylated by either of the CDK-cyclin complexes, Cdc28-Cln3 or Pho85-Pcl9. Under alkaline conditions, the absence of Whi5 caused an increase in CLN2 expression but failed to do so when Pho85 was also absent, or when Pho4 was overproduced. The expression level of CLN2 in a Δpho85 Δpho4 Δrim101 Δcrz1 quadruple mutant was stimulated when the Whi5 activity was repressed by overproduction of Pho85-Pcl9. These results indicate that Whi5 is also under control of alkaline stress. The inhibitory function of Whi5 on CLN2 is dependent on Rpd3 HDAC, and the absence of Rpd3 could also suppress the inhibitory effect of Pho4 overproduction. Based on these findings, a model is presented in which Pho85 and Pho4 functions in CLN2 regulation under alkaline conditions.

  7. Phosphorus limitation enhances biofilm formation of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens through the PhoR-PhoB regulatory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danhorn, T.; Hentzer, Morten; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2004-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens forms architecturally complex biofilms on inert surfaces. Adherence of A. tumefaciens C58 was significantly enhanced under phosphate limitation compared to phosphate-replete conditions, despite slower overall growth under low-phosphate conditions...... biofilms revealed that phosphate limitation increased both the overall attached biomass and the surface coverage, whereas the maximum thickness of the biofilm was not affected. Functions encoded on the two large plasmids of A. tumefaciens C58, pTiC58 and pAtC58, were not required for the observed phosphate......-borne copies of the genes, suggesting that this regulatory system might be essential. Expression of the A. tumefaciens phoB gene from a tightly regulated inducible promoter, however, correlated with the amount of biofilm under both phosphate-limiting and nonlimiting conditions, demonstrating that components...

  8. Salmonellae PhoPQ regulation of the outer membrane to resist innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Miller, Samuel I

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellae sense host cues to regulate properties important for bacterial survival and replication within host tissues. The PhoPQ two-component regulatory system senses phagosome acidification and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) to regulate the protein and lipid contents of the bacterial envelope that comprises an inner and outer membrane. PhoPQ-regulated lipid components of the outer membrane include lipopolysaccharides and glycerophospholipids. Envelope proteins regulated by PhoPQ, include: components of virulence associated secretion systems, the flagellar apparatus, membrane transport systems, and proteins that are likely structural components of the outer membrane. PhoPQ alteration of the bacterial surface results in increased bacterial resistance to CAMP and decreased detection by the innate immune system. This review details the molecular complexity of the bacterial cell envelope and highlights the outer membrane lipid bilayer as an environmentally regulated bacterial organelle.

  9. Post-transcriptional control of the Escherichia coli PhoQ-PhoP two-component system by multiple sRNAs involves a novel pairing region of GcvB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Coornaert

    Full Text Available PhoQ/PhoP is a central two-component system involved in magnesium homeostasis, pathogenicity, cell envelope composition, and acid resistance in several bacterial species. The small RNA GcvB is identified here as a novel direct regulator of the synthesis of PhoQ/PhoP in Escherichia coli, and this control relies on a novel pairing region of GcvB. After MicA, this is the second Hfq-dependent small RNA that represses expression of the phoPQ operon. Both MicA and GcvB bind phoPQ mRNA in vivo and in vitro around the translation initiation region of phoP. Binding of either small RNA is sufficient to inhibit ribosome binding and induce mRNA degradation. Surprisingly, however, MicA and GcvB have different effects on the levels of the PhoP protein and therefore on the expression of the PhoP regulon. These results highlight the complex connections between small RNAs and transcriptional regulation networks in bacteria.

  10. PhoU Allows Rapid Adaptation to High Phosphate Concentrations by Modulating PstSCAB Transport Rate in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    diCenzo, George C; Sharthiya, Harsh; Nanda, Anish; Zamani, Maryam; Finan, Turlough M

    2017-09-15

    Maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is essential for cellular life. The PhoU protein has emerged as a key regulator of this process in bacteria, and it is suggested to modulate phosphate import by PstSCAB and control activation of the phosphate limitation response by the PhoR-PhoB two-component system. However, a proper understanding of PhoU has remained elusive due to numerous complications of mutating phoU, including loss of viability and the genetic instability of the mutants. Here, we developed two sets of strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti that overcame these limitations and allowed a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of the biological and molecular activities of PhoU. The data showed that phoU cannot be deleted in the presence of phosphate unless PstSCAB is inactivated also. However, phoU deletions were readily recovered in phosphate-free media, and characterization of these mutants revealed that addition of phosphate to the environment resulted in toxic levels of PstSCAB-mediated phosphate accumulation. Phosphate uptake experiments indicated that PhoU significantly decreased the PstSCAB transport rate specifically in phosphate-replete cells but not in phosphate-starved cells and that PhoU could rapidly respond to elevated environmental phosphate concentrations and decrease the PstSCAB transport rate. Site-directed mutagenesis results suggested that the ability of PhoU to respond to phosphate levels was independent of the conformation of the PstSCAB transporter. Additionally, PhoU-PhoU and PhoU-PhoR interactions were detected using a bacterial two-hybrid screen. We propose that PhoU modulates PstSCAB and PhoR-PhoB in response to local, internal fluctuations in phosphate concentrations resulting from PstSCAB-mediated phosphate import.IMPORTANCE Correct maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is critical in all kingdoms of life and in bacteria involves the PhoU protein. This work provides novel insights into the role of the Sinorhizobium

  11. Serratia marcescens arn, a PhoP-regulated locus necessary for polymyxin B resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Quei Yen; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Liu, Ming-Che; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-09-01

    Polymyxins, which are increasingly being used to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, perform poorly against Serratia marcescens. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, Tn5 mutagenesis was performed and two mutants exhibiting increased polymyxin B (PB) susceptibility were isolated. The mutants were found to have Tn5 inserted into the arnB and arnC genes. In other bacteria, arnB and arnC belong to the seven-gene arn operon, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification. LPSs of arn mutants had greater PB-binding abilities than that of wild-type LPS. Further, we identified PhoP, a bacterial two-component response regulator, as a regulator of PB susceptibility in S. marcescens. By the reporter assay, we found PB- and low-Mg2+-induced expression of phoP and arn in the wild-type strain but not in the phoP mutant. Complementation of the phoP mutant with the full-length phoP gene restored the PB MIC and induction by PB and low Mg2+ levels, as in the wild type. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) further demonstrated that PhoP bound directly to the arn promoter. The PB challenge test confirmed that pretreatment with PB and low Mg2+ levels protected S. marcescens from a PB challenge in the wild-type strain but not in the phoP mutant. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR also indicated that PB serves as a signal to regulate expression of ugd, a gene required for LPS modification, in S. marcescens through a PhoP-dependent pathway. Finally, we found that PB-resistant clinical isolates displayed greater expression of arnA upon exposure to PB than did susceptible isolates. This is the first report to describe the role of S. marcescens arn in PB resistance and its modulation by PB and Mg2+ through the PhoP protein.

  12. Genome-wide identification of polycomb target genes reveals a functional association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqing; Cheng, Daojun; Mon, Hiroaki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Zhu, Li; Xu, Jian; Lee, Jae Man; Xia, Qingyou; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC), to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent the distinct complexes. As a result, the expressions of 29 genes were up-regulated after knocking down 4 PcG genes. Particularly, there is a significant overlap between targets of BmPho (331 out of 524) and BmScm (331 out of 532), and among these, 190 genes function as regulator factors playing important roles in development. We also found that BmPho, as well as BmScm, can interact with other Polycomb components examined in this study. Further detailed analysis revealed that the C-terminus of BmPho containing zinc finger domain is involved in the interaction between BmPho and BmScm. Moreover, the zinc finger domain in BmPho contributes to its inhibitory function and ectopic overexpression of BmScm is able to promote transcriptional repression by Gal4-Pho fusions including BmScm-interacting domain. Loss of BmPho expression causes relocalization of BmScm into the cytoplasm. Collectively, we provide evidence of a functional link between BmPho and BmScm, and propose two Polycomb-related repression mechanisms requiring only BmPho associated with BmScm or a whole set of PcG complexes.

  13. DNA consensus sequence motif for binding response regulator PhoP, a virulence regulator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Shuishu

    2014-12-30

    Tuberculosis has reemerged as a serious threat to human health because of the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains and synergetic infection with HIV, prompting an urgent need for new and more efficient treatments. The PhoP-PhoR two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in the virulence of the pathogen and thus represents a potential drug target. To study the mechanism of gene transcription regulation by response regulator PhoP, we identified a high-affinity DNA sequence for PhoP binding using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The sequence contains a direct repeat of two 7 bp motifs separated by a 4 bp spacer, TCACAGC(N4)TCACAGC. The specificity of the direct-repeat sequence for PhoP binding was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PhoP binds to the direct repeat as a dimer in a highly cooperative manner. We found many genes previously identified to be regulated by PhoP that contain the direct-repeat motif in their promoter sequences. Synthetic DNA fragments at the putative promoter-binding sites bind PhoP with variable affinity, which is related to the number of mismatches in the 7 bp motifs, the positions of the mismatches, and the spacer and flanking sequences. Phosphorylation of PhoP increases the affinity but does not change the specificity of DNA binding. Overall, our results confirm the direct-repeat sequence as the consensus motif for PhoP binding and thus pave the way for identification of PhoP directly regulated genes in different mycobacterial genomes.

  14. In vitro colonization of the muscle extracellular matrix components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: the influence of growth medium, temperature and pH on initial adhesion and induction of biofilm formation by collagens I and III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chagnot

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-α2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed.

  15. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of the PhoP regulon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi versus Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelle C Charles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S. Typhi, a human-restricted Salmonella enterica serovar, causes a systemic intracellular infection in humans (typhoid fever. In comparison, S. Typhimurium causes gastroenteritis in humans, but causes a systemic typhoidal illness in mice. The PhoP regulon is a well studied two component (PhoP/Q coordinately regulated network of genes whose expression is required for intracellular survival of S. enterica. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS, we examined the protein expression profiles of three sequenced S. enterica strains: S. Typhimurium LT2, S. Typhi CT18, and S. Typhi Ty2 in PhoP-inducing and non-inducing conditions in vitro and compared these results to profiles of phoP(-/Q(- mutants derived from S. Typhimurium LT2 and S. Typhi Ty2. Our analysis identified 53 proteins in S. Typhimurium LT2 and 56 proteins in S. Typhi that were regulated in a PhoP-dependent manner. As expected, many proteins identified in S. Typhi demonstrated concordant differential expression with a homologous protein in S. Typhimurium. However, three proteins (HlyE, STY1499, and CdtB had no homolog in S. Typhimurium. HlyE is a pore-forming toxin. STY1499 encodes a stably expressed protein of unknown function transcribed in the same operon as HlyE. CdtB is a cytolethal distending toxin associated with DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and cellular distension. Gene expression studies confirmed up-regulation of mRNA of HlyE, STY1499, and CdtB in S. Typhi in PhoP-inducing conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first protein expression study of the PhoP virulence associated regulon using strains of Salmonella mutant in PhoP, has identified three Typhi-unique proteins (CdtB, HlyE and STY1499 that are not present in the genome of the wide host-range Typhimurium, and includes the first protein expression profiling of a live attenuated bacterial vaccine studied in humans (Ty800.

  17. Role of transcription factor-mediated nucleosome disassembly in PHO5 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharerin, Hungyo; Bhat, Paike J.; Marko, John F.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-01

    Studying nucleosome dynamics in promoter regions is crucial for understanding gene regulation. Nucleosomes regulate gene expression by sterically occluding transcription factors (TFs) and other non–histone proteins accessing genomic DNA. How the binding competition between nucleosomes and TFs leads to transcriptionally compatible promoter states is an open question. Here, we present a computational study of the nucleosome dynamics and organization in the promoter region of PHO5 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Introducing a model for nucleosome kinetics that takes into account ATP-dependent remodeling activity, DNA sequence effects, and kinetics of TFs (Pho4p), we compute the probability of obtaining different “promoter states” having different nucleosome configurations. Comparing our results with experimental data, we argue that the presence of local remodeling activity (LRA) as opposed to basal remodeling activity (BRA) is crucial in determining transcriptionally active promoter states. By modulating the LRA and Pho4p binding rate, we obtain different mRNA distributions—Poisson, bimodal, and long-tail. Through this work we explain many features of the PHO5 promoter such as sequence-dependent TF accessibility and the role of correlated dynamics between nucleosomes and TFs in opening/coverage of the TATA box. We also obtain possible ranges for TF binding rates and the magnitude of LRA.

  18. Repression of Salmonella enterica phoP expression by small molecules from physiological bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, L Caetano M; Wang, Melody; Andersen, Sarah K; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-05-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in humans causes the life-threatening disease typhoid fever. In the laboratory, typhoid fever can be modeled through the inoculation of susceptible mice with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Using this murine model, we previously characterized the interactions between Salmonella Typhimurium and host cells in the gallbladder and showed that this pathogen can successfully invade gallbladder epithelial cells and proliferate. Additionally, we showed that Salmonella Typhimurium can use bile phospholipids to grow at high rates. These abilities are likely important for quick colonization of the gallbladder during typhoid fever and further pathogen dissemination through fecal shedding. To further characterize the interactions between Salmonella and the gallbladder environment, we compared the transcriptomes of Salmonella cultures grown in LB broth or physiological murine bile. Our data showed that many genes involved in bacterial central metabolism are affected by bile, with the citric acid cycle being repressed and alternative respiratory systems being activated. Additionally, our study revealed a new aspect of Salmonella interactions with bile through the identification of the global regulator phoP as a bile-responsive gene. Repression of phoP expression could also be achieved using physiological, but not commercial, bovine bile. The biological activity does not involve PhoPQ sensing of a bile component and is not caused by bile acids, the most abundant organic components of bile. Bioactivity-guided purification allowed the identification of a subset of small molecules from bile that can elicit full activity; however, a single compound with phoP inhibitory activity could not be isolated, suggesting that multiple molecules may act in synergy to achieve this effect. Due to the critical role of phoP in Salmonella virulence, further studies in this area will likely reveal aspects of the interaction between Salmonella

  19. TcPho91 is a contractile vacuole phosphate sodium symporter that regulates phosphate and polyphosphate metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Veronica; Docampo, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    We have identified a phosphate transporter (TcPho91) localized to the bladder of the contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. TcPho91 has 12 transmembrane domains, an N-terminal regulatory SPX (named after SYG1, Pho81 and XPR1) domain and an anion permease domain. Functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by two-electrode voltage clamp showed that TcPho91 is a low-affinity transporter with a Km for Pi in the millimolar range, and sodium-dependency. Epimastigotes overexpressing TcPho91-green fluorescent protein have significantly higher levels of pyrophosphate (PPi ) and short-chain polyphosphate (polyP), suggesting accumulation of Pi in these cells. Moreover, when overexpressing parasites were maintained in a medium with low Pi , they grew at higher rates than control parasites. Only one allele of TcPho91 in the CL strain encodes for the complete open reading frame, while the other one is truncated encoding for only the N-terminal domain. Taking advantage of this characteristic, knockdown experiments were performed resulting in cells with reduced growth rate as well as a reduction in PPi and short-chain polyP levels. Our results indicate that TcPho91 is a phosphate sodium symporter involved in Pi homeostasis in T. cruzi.

  20. Contribution of the PhoP/Q regulon to survival and replication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jessica A; Liu, Mei; Helaine, Sophie; Holden, David W

    2011-07-01

    The ability of serovars of Salmonella enterica to cause systemic disease is dependent upon their survival and replication within macrophages. To do this, bacteria must withstand or surmount bacteriostatic and bactericidal responses by the host cell, including the delivery of hydrolytic enzymes from lysosomes to the phagosome. The bacterial two-component regulatory system PhoP/Q has been implicated in avoidance of phagolysosomal fusion by S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in murine macrophages. In this study, the involvement of PhoP/Q-activated genes in avoidance of phagolysosomal fusion was analysed: of all the S. Typhimurium mutant strains tested, only an mgtC mutant strain partially reproduced the phenotype of the phoP mutant strain. As this gene is required for bacterial growth in magnesium-depleted conditions in vitro, the contributions of PhoP/Q to intramacrophage replication and survival were reappraised. Although PhoP/Q was required for both replication and survival of S. Typhimurium within murine macrophages, subsequent analysis of the kinetics of phagolysosomal fusion, taking account of differences in the replication rates of wild-type and phoP mutant strains, provided no evidence for a PhoP/Q-dependent role in this process. PhoP/Q appeared to act subsequent to the process of phagolysosomal avoidance and to promote replication of those bacteria that had already escaped a phagolysosomal fate. Therefore, we conclude that the PhoP/Q regulon enables S. Typhimurium to adapt to intramacrophage stresses other than phagolysosomal fusion.

  1. Probing the roles of the two different dimers mediated by the receiver domain of the response regulator PhoB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Timothy R; Gao, Rong; Stock, Ann M

    2009-06-05

    Structural analysis of the Escherichia coli response regulator transcription factor PhoB indicates that the protein dimerizes in two different orientations that are both mediated by the receiver domain. The two dimers exhibit 2-fold rotational symmetry: one involves the alpha 4-beta 5-alpha 5 surface and the other involves the alpha1/alpha 5 surface. The alpha 4-beta 5-alpha 5 dimer is observed when the protein is crystallized in the presence of the phosphoryl analog BeF(3)(-), while the alpha1/alpha 5 dimer is observed in its absence. From these studies, a model of the inactive and active states of PhoB has been proposed that involves the formation of two distinct dimers. In order to gain further insight into the roles of these dimers, we have engineered a series of mutations in PhoB intended to perturb each of them selectively. Our results indicate that perturbation of the alpha 4-beta 5-alpha 5 surface disrupts phosphorylation-dependent dimerization and DNA binding as well as PhoB-mediated transcriptional activation of phoA, while perturbations to the alpha1/alpha 5 surface do not. Furthermore, experiments with a GCN4 leucine zipper/PhoB chimera protein indicate that PhoB is activated through an intermolecular mechanism. Together, these results support a model of activation of PhoB in which phosphorylation promotes dimerization via the alpha 4-beta 5-alpha 5 face, which enhances DNA binding and thus the ability of PhoB to regulate transcription.

  2. Overexpression of the starch phosphorylase-like gene (PHO3 in Lotus japonicus has a profound effect on the growth of plants and reduction of transitory starch accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Qin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Two isoforms of starch phosphorylase (PHO; EC 2.4.1.1, plastidic PHO1 and cytosolic PHO2, have been found in all plants studied to date. Another starch phosphorylase-like gene, PHO3, which is an ortholog of Chlamydomonas PHOB, has been detected in some plant lineages. In this study, we identified three PHO isoform (LjPHO genes in the Lotus japonicus genome. Expression of the LjPHO3 gene was observed in all tissues tested in L. japonicus, and the LjPHO3 protein was located in the chloroplast. Overexpression of LjPHO3 in L. japonicus resulted in a drastic decline in starch granule sizes and starch content in leaves. The LjPHO3 overexpression transgenic seedlings were smaller, and showed decreased pollen fertility and seed set rate. Our results suggest that LjPHO3 may participate in transitory starch metabolism in L. japonicus leaves, but its catalytic properties remain to be studied.

  3. Overexpression of the Starch Phosphorylase-Like Gene (PHO3) in Lotus japonicus has a Profound Effect on the Growth of Plants and Reduction of Transitory Starch Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shanshan; Tang, Yuehui; Chen, Yaping; Wu, Pingzhi; Li, Meiru; Wu, Guojiang; Jiang, Huawu

    2016-01-01

    Two isoforms of starch phosphorylase (PHO; EC 2.4.1.1), plastidic PHO1 and cytosolic PHO2, have been found in all plants studied to date. Another starch phosphorylase-like gene, PHO3, which is an ortholog of Chlamydomonas PHOB, has been detected in some plant lineages. In this study, we identified three PHO isoform (LjPHO) genes in the Lotus japonicus genome. Expression of the LjPHO3 gene was observed in all tissues tested in L. japonicus, and the LjPHO3 protein was located in the chloroplast. Overexpression of LjPHO3 in L. japonicus resulted in a drastic decline in starch granule sizes and starch content in leaves. The LjPHO3 overexpression transgenic seedlings were smaller, and showed decreased pollen fertility and seed set rate. Our results suggest that LjPHO3 may participate in transitory starch metabolism in L. japonicus leaves, but its catalytic properties remain to be studied. PMID:27630651

  4. Deep sequencing of the viral phoH gene reveals temporal variation, depth-specific composition, and persistent dominance of the same viral phoH genes in the Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn B. Goldsmith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing of the viral phoH gene, a host-derived auxiliary metabolic gene, was used to track viral diversity throughout the water column at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site in the summer (September and winter (March of three years. Viral phoH sequences reveal differences in the viral communities throughout a depth profile and between seasons in the same year. Variation was also detected between the same seasons in subsequent years, though these differences were not as great as the summer/winter distinctions. Over 3,600 phoH operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% sequence identity were identified. Despite high richness, most phoH sequences belong to a few large, common OTUs whereas the majority of the OTUs are small and rare. While many OTUs make sporadic appearances at just a few times or depths, a small number of OTUs dominate the community throughout the seasons, depths, and years.

  5. The phosphotransferase protein EIIA(Ntr) modulates the phosphate starvation response through interaction with histidine kinase PhoR in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüttmann, Denise; Göpel, Yvonne; Görke, Boris

    2012-10-01

    Many Proteobacteria possess the paralogous PTS(Ntr), in addition to the sugar transport phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the PTS(Ntr) phosphoryl-groups are transferred from phosphoenolpyruvate to protein EIIA(Ntr) via the phosphotransferases EI(Ntr) and NPr. The PTS(Ntr) has been implicated in regulation of diverse physiological processes. In Escherichia coli, the PTS(Ntr) plays a role in potassium homeostasis. In particular, EIIA(Ntr) binds to and stimulates activity of a two-component histidine kinase (KdpD) resulting in increased expression of the genes encoding the high-affinity K(+) transporter KdpFABC. Here, we show that the phosphate (pho) regulon is likewise modulated by PTS(Ntr). The pho regulon, which comprises more than 30 genes, is activated by the two-component system PhoR/PhoB under conditions of phosphate starvation. Mutants lacking EIIA(Ntr) are unable to fully activate the pho genes and exhibit a growth delay upon adaptation to phosphate limitation. In contrast, pho expression is increased above the wild-type level in mutants deficient for EIIA(Ntr) phosphorylation suggesting that non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) modulates pho. Protein interaction analyses reveal binding of EIIA(Ntr) to histidine kinase PhoR. This interaction increases the amount of phosphorylated response regulator PhoB. Thus, EIIA(Ntr) is an accessory protein that modulates the activities of two distinct sensor kinases, KdpD and PhoR, in E. coli.

  6. The RSC chromatin remodeling complex has a crucial role in the complete remodeler set for yeast PHO5 promoter opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musladin, Sanja; Krietenstein, Nils; Korber, Philipp; Barbaric, Slobodan

    2014-04-01

    Although yeast PHO5 promoter chromatin opening is a founding model for chromatin remodeling, the complete set of involved remodelers remained unknown for a long time. The SWI/SNF and INO80 remodelers cooperate here, but nonessentially, and none of the many tested single or combined remodeler gene mutations could prevent PHO5 promoter opening. RSC, the most abundant and only remodeler essential for viability, was a controversial candidate for the unrecognized remodeling activity but unassessed in vivo. Now we show that remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC) is crucially involved in PHO5 promoter opening. Further, the isw1 chd1 double deletion also delayed chromatin remodeling. Strikingly, combined absence of RSC and Isw1/Chd1 or Snf2 abolished for the first time promoter opening on otherwise sufficient induction in vivo. Together with previous findings, we recognize now a surprisingly complex network of five remodelers (RSC, SWI/SNF, INO80, Isw1 and Chd1) from four subfamilies (SWI/SNF, INO80, ISWI and CHD) as involved in PHO5 promoter chromatin remodeling. This is likely the first described complete remodeler set for a physiological chromatin transition. RSC was hardly involved at the coregulated PHO8 or PHO84 promoters despite cofactor recruitment by the same transactivator and RSC's presence at all three promoters. Therefore, promoter-specific chromatin rather than transactivators determine remodeler requirements.

  7. Polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ mutants is dependent on additional two-component regulatory systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutu, Alina D; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    systems, ColRS and CprRS. Deletion of the colRS genes, individually or in tandem, abrogated the polymyxin resistance of a ΔphoQ mutant, as did individual or tandem deletion of cprRS. Individual deletion of colR or colS in a ΔphoQ mutant also suppressed 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, consistent...... with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for Pho......PQ-mediated polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa. Episomal expression of colRS or cprRS in tandem or of cprR individually complemented the Pm resistance phenotype in the ΔphoQ mutant, while episomal expression of colR, colS, or cprS individually did not. Highly polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutants of P. aeruginosa...

  8. Control of M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 secretion and specific T cell recognition by PhoP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa Frigui

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of mycobacterial strains that have lost their ability to cause disease is a powerful approach to identify yet unknown virulence determinants and pathways involved in tuberculosis pathogenesis. Two of the most widely used attenuated strains in the history of tuberculosis research are Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (H37Ra, which both lost their virulence during in vitro serial passage. Whereas the attenuation of BCG is due mainly to loss of the ESAT-6 secretion system, ESX-1, the reason why H37Ra is attenuated remained unknown. However, here we show that a point mutation (S219L in the predicted DNA binding region of the regulator PhoP is involved in the attenuation of H37Ra via a mechanism that impacts on the secretion of the major T cell antigen ESAT-6. Only H37Ra "knock-ins" that carried an integrated cosmid with the wild-type phoP gene from M. tuberculosis H37Rv showed changes in colony morphology, increased virulence, ESAT-6 secretion, and induction of specific T cell responses, whereas other H37Ra constructs did not. This finding established a link between the PhoP regulator and ESAT-6 secretion that opens exciting new perspectives for elucidating virulence regulation in M. tuberculosis.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the Pho regulon in a pstCA mutant of Citrobacter rodentium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Cheng

    Full Text Available The phosphate-specific transport operon, pstSCAB-phoU, of Gram-negative bacteria is an essential part of the Pho regulon. Its key roles are to encode a high-affinity inorganic phosphate transport system and to prevent activation of PhoB in phosphate-rich environments. In general, mutations in pstSCAB-phoU lead to the constitutive expression of the Pho regulon. Previously, we constructed a pstCA deletion mutant of Citrobacter rodentium and found it to be attenuated for virulence in mice, its natural host. This attenuation was dependent on PhoB or PhoB-regulated gene(s because a phoB mutation restored virulence for mice to the pstCA mutant. To investigate how downstream genes may contribute to the virulence of C. rodentium, we used microarray analysis to investigate global gene expression of C. rodentium strain ICC169 and its isogenic pstCA mutant when grown in phosphate-rich medium. Overall 323 genes of the pstCA mutant were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold compared to the wild-type C. rodentium. Of these 145 were up-regulated and 178 were down-regulated. Differentially expressed genes included some involved in phosphate homoeostasis, cellular metabolism and protein metabolism. A large number of genes involved in stress responses and of unknown function were also differentially expressed, as were some virulence-associated genes. Up-regulated virulence-associated genes in the pstCA mutant included that for DegP, a serine protease, which appeared to be directly regulated by PhoB. Down-regulated genes included those for the production of the urease, flagella, NleG8 (a type III-secreted protein and the tad focus (which encodes type IVb pili in Yersinia enterocolitica. Infection studies using C57/BL6 mice showed that DegP and NleG8 play a role in bacterial virulence. Overall, our study provides evidence that Pho is a global regulator of gene expression in C. rodentium and indicates the presence of at least two previously unrecognized

  10. HL-1 mouse cardiomyocyte injury and death after simulated ischemia and reperfusion: roles of pH, Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2, and Na+/H+ exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ann-Dorit; Poulsen, Kristian Arild; Lambert, Ian H; Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2009-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-independent phospholipase A(2) VI (iPLA(2)-VI) and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) are highly pH-sensitive proteins that exert both protective and detrimental effects in cardiac ischemia-reperfusion. Here, we investigated the role of extracellular pH (pH(o)) in ischemia-reperfusion injury and death and in regulation and function of iPLA(2)-VI and NHE1 under these conditions. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were exposed to simulated ischemia (SI; 0.5% O(2), 8 mM K(+), and 20 mM lactate) at pH(o) 6.0 and 7.4, with or without 4 or 8 h of reperfusion (SI/R). Cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation were reduced after acidic compared with neutral SI, whereas necrotic death, estimated as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase release, was similar in the two conditions. Inhibition of iPLA(2)-VI activity by bromoenol lactone (BEL) elicited cardiomyocyte necrosis during normoxia and after acidic, yet not after neutral, SI. The isoform-selective enantiomers R- and S-BEL both mimicked the effect of racemic BEL after acidic SI. In contrast, inhibition of NHE activity by EIPA had no significant effect on necrosis after SI. Both neutral and acidic SI were associated with a reversible loss of F-actin and cortactin integrity. Inhibition of iPLA(2)-VI disrupted F-actin, cortactin, and mitochondrial integrity, whereas inhibition of NHE slightly reduced stress fiber content. iPLA(2)-VIA and NHE1 mRNA levels were reduced during SI and upregulated in a pH(o)-dependent manner during SI/R. This also affected the subcellular localization of iPLA(2)-VIA. Thus, the mode of cell death and the roles and regulation of iPLA(2)-VI and NHE1 are at least in part determined by the pH(o) during SI. In addition to having clinically relevant implications, these findings can in part explain the contradictory results obtained from previous studies of iPLA(2)-VIA and NHE1 during cardiac I/R.

  11. Acidic pH stimulates the production of the angiogenic CXC chemokine, CXCL8 (interleukin-8), in human adult mesenchymal stem cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-kappaB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2008-07-01

    Blood vessel injury results in limited oxygen tension and diffusion leading to hypoxia, increased anaerobic metabolism, and elevated production of acidic metabolites that cannot be easily removed due to the reduced blood flow. Therefore, an acidic extracellular pH occurs in the local microenvironment of disrupted bone. The potential role of acidic pH and glu-leu-arg (ELR(+)) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) treated with medium of decreasing pH (7.4, 7.0, 6.7, and 6.4). The cells showed a reciprocal increase in CXCL8 (interleukin-8, IL-8) mRNA levels as extracellular pH decreased. At pH 6.4, CXCL8 mRNA was induced >60x in comparison to levels at pH 7.4. hMSCs treated with osteogenic medium (OGM) also showed an increase in CXCL8 mRNA with decreasing pH; although, at a lower level than that seen in cells grown in non-OGM. CXCL8 protein was secreted into the medium at all pHs with maximal induction at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the G-protein-coupled receptor alpha, G(alphai), suppressed CXCL8 levels in response to acidic pH; whereas phospholipase C inhibition had no effect on CXCL8. The use of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction inhibitors indicated that the pH-dependent increase in CXCL8 mRNA is due to activation of ERK and p38 pathways. The JNK pathway was not involved. NF-kappaB inhibition resulted in a decrease in CXCL8 levels in hMSCs grown in non-OGM. However, OGM-differentiated hMSCs showed an increase in CXCL8 levels when treated with the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC, a pyrrolidine derivative of dithiocarbamate.

  12. Effect of pH and light on population growth and activity of extracellular carbonic anhydrase in two species of dinoflagellates%pH及光照对两种赤潮甲藻种群生长和胞外碳酸酐酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴芳芳; 周成旭; 严小军

    2011-01-01

    研究了pH和光照强度对两种赤潮甲藻(Prorocentrum donghaiense和Karlodinium micrum)的种群生长及其胞外碳酸酐酶(CA)活性的影响.结果表明,pH7.5、光照强度30 μmol/(m2.s)是两种微藻的最适种群生长条件,在种群生长的最适pH和光照强度下,胞外CA活性最大.最适培养条件下,两种甲藻胞外碳酸酐酶活性随着种群生长周期而变化,指数生长期至平台期CA酶活增加,平台期至衰退期CA酶活降低,平台期胞外CA活性最大.%The effects of pH and light intensity on population growth and extracellular carbonic anhydrase ( CA) activity in two species of dinoflagellates (Prorocenlnim donghaieme and Karlodinium micrum) were studied. The results show that pH 7. 5 and 30μmol/( m2 · s) irradiance which triggered the optimum population growth, were the conditions that favored the highest activity of extracellular CA in the two dinoflagellates. Under the optimum cultivation conditions,the extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity in the two dinoflagellates varies with the population growth phases. CA activities were increased from exponential phase to the stationary phase and decreased form stationary phase to the decline phase. The highest extracellular CA activity occurred at the stationary phase. The significance of the population growth related CA activity in population dynamics of the two dinoflagellates was also discussed.

  13. The synthesis of Phosphate-repressible alkaline phosphatase do not appear to be regulated by ambient pH in the filamentous mould Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozawa Sérgio R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate further the adaptive response of moulds to ambient pH, we have measured by ELISA the pho-2-encoded Pi-repressible alkaline phosphatase synthesised by Neurospora crassa. We showed that the 74A and pho-2A strains of this mould secrete similar amounts of the pho-2-encoded enzyme irrespective of ambient pH, when both the preg and pgov genes are not functional, i.e., in strains nuc-2+ growing under Pi-starvation. This suggests that pho-2, which is responsive to Pi starvation via the action of genes nuc-2, preg, pgov and nuc-1, is not a gene responsive to ambient pH and that the differential glycosylation observed for the Pi-repressible alkaline phosphatase retained by the mycelium at pH 5.6 or secreted into the growth medium at pH 8.0 is the genetic response to ambient pH sensing in N. crassa.

  14. Defining the DNA Binding Site Recognized by the Fission Yeast Zn2Cys6 Transcription Factor Pho7 and Its Role in Phosphate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M; Garg, Angad; Chatterjee, Debashree; Shuman, Stewart

    2017-08-15

    Fission yeast phosphate homeostasis entails transcriptional induction of genes encoding phosphate-mobilizing proteins under conditions of phosphate starvation. Transcription factor Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the starvation response. The DNA binding sites in the promoters of phosphate-responsive genes have not been defined, nor have any structure-function relationships been established for the Pho7 protein. Here we narrow this knowledge gap by (i) delineating an autonomous DNA-binding domain (DBD) within Pho7 that includes the Zn2Cys6 module, (ii) deploying recombinant Pho7 DBD in DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to map the Pho7 recognition sites in the promoters of the phosphate-regulated pho1 and tgp1 genes to a 12-nucleotide sequence motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA], (iii) independently identifying the same motif as a Pho7 recognition element via in silico analysis of available genome-wide ChIP-seq data, (iv) affirming that mutations in the two Pho7 recognition sites in the pho1 promoter efface pho1 expression in vivo, and (v) establishing that the zinc-binding cysteines and a pair of conserved arginines in the DBD are essential for Pho7 activity in vivoIMPORTANCE Fungi respond to phosphate starvation by inducing the transcription of a set of phosphate acquisition genes that comprise a phosphate regulon. Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the phosphate starvation response in fission yeast. The present study identifies a 12-nucleotide Pho7 DNA binding motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA] in the promoters of phosphate-regulated genes, pinpoints DNA and protein features important for Pho7 binding to DNA, and correlates them with Pho7-dependent gene expression in vivo The results highlight distinctive properties of Pho7 vis-a-vis other fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors as well as the

  15. Influence of PhoP and Intra-Species Variations on Virulence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis during the Natural Oral Infection Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheinrich, Maik; Schweer, Janina; Nuss, Aaron M.; Dersch, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ has been shown to (i) control expression of virulence-associated traits, (ii) confer survival and growth within macrophages and (iii) play a role in Yersinia infections. However, the influence of PhoP on virulence varied greatly between different murine models of infection and its role in natural oral infections with frequently used representative isolates of Y. pseudotuberculosis was unknown. To address this issue, we constructed an isogenic set of phoP+ and phoP− variants of strain IP32953 and YPIII and analyzed the impact of PhoP using in vitro functionality experiments and a murine oral infection model, whereby we tested for bacterial dissemination and influence on the host immune response. Our results revealed that PhoP has a low impact on virulence, lymphatic and systemic organ colonization, and on immune response modulation by IP32953 and YPIII, indicating that PhoP is not absolutely essential for oral infections but may be involved in fine-tuning the outcome. Our work further revealed certain strain-specific differences in virulence properties, which do not strongly rely on the function of PhoP, but affect tissue colonization, dissemination and/or persistence of the bacteria. Highlighted intra-species variations may provide a potential means to rapidly adjust to environmental changes inside and outside of the host. PMID:25075520

  16. Extracellular DNA-induced antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn eLewenza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is in the environment, bodily fluids, in the matrix of biofilms, and accumulates at infection sites. Extracellular DNA can function as a nutrient source, a universal biofilm matrix component and an innate immune effector in extracellular DNA traps. In biofilms, eDNA is required for attachment, aggregation and stabilization of microcolonies. We have recently shown that eDNA can sequester divalent metal cations, which has interesting implications on antibiotic resistance. Extracellular DNA binds metal cations and thus activates the Mg2+-responsive PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component systems. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and many other Gram-negative bacteria, the PhoPQ/PmrAB systems control various genes required for virulence and resisting killing by antimicrobial peptides, including the pmr genes (PA3552-PA3559 that are responsible for the addition of aminoarabinose to lipid A. The PA4773-PA4775 genes are a second DNA-induced cluster and are required for the production of spermidine on the outer surface, which protects the outer membrane from antimicrobial peptide treatment. Both modifications mask the negative surface charges and limit membrane damage by antimicrobial peptides. DNA-enriched biofilms or planktonic cultures have increased antibiotic resistance phenotypes to antimicrobial peptides and aminoglycosides. These dual antibiotic resistance and immune evasion strategies may be expressed in DNA-rich environments and contribute to long-term survival.

  17. A PhoPQ-Regulated ABC Transporter System Exports Tetracycline in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Duan, Kangmin

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen whose infections are difficult to treat due to its high intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Here, we show that the disruption of PA4456, encoding the ATP binding component of a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, increased the bacterium's susceptible to tetracycline and other antibiotics or toxic chemicals. Fluorescence spectroscopy and antibiotic accumulation tests showed that the interruption of the ABC transporter caused increased intracellular accumulation of tetracycline, demonstrating a role of the ABC transporter in tetracycline expulsion. Site-directed mutagenesis proved that the conserved residues of E170 in the Walker B motif and H203 in the H-loop, which are important for ATP hydrolysis, were essential for the function of PA4456. Through a genome-wide search, the PhoPQ two-component system was identified as a regulator of the computationally predicted PA4456-4452 operon that encodes the ABC transporter system. A >5-fold increase of the expression of this operon was observed in the phoQ mutant. The results obtained also show that the expression of the phzA1B1C1D1E1 operon and the production of pyocyanin were significantly higher in the ABC transporter mutant, signifying a connection between the ABC transporter and pyocyanin production. These results indicated that the PhoPQ-regulated ABC transporter is associated with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and other adverse compounds in P. aeruginosa, probably by extruding them out of the cell.

  18. Deletion of PHO13, encoding haloacid dehalogenase type IIA phosphatase, results in upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rin; Xu, Haiqing; Lesmana, Anastashia; Kuzmanovic, Uros; Au, Matthew; Florencia, Clarissa; Oh, Eun Joong; Zhang, Guochang; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-03-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily is one of the largest enzyme families, consisting mainly of phosphatases. Although intracellular phosphate plays important roles in many cellular activities, the biological functions of HAD enzymes are largely unknown. Pho13 is 1 of 16 putative HAD enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pho13 has not been studied extensively, but previous studies have identified PHO13 to be a deletion target for the generation of industrially attractive phenotypes, namely, efficient xylose fermentation and high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the improved xylose-fermenting phenotype produced by deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ), we investigated the response of S. cerevisiae to pho13Δ at the transcriptomic level when cells were grown on glucose or xylose. Transcriptome sequencing analysis revealed that pho13Δ resulted in upregulation of the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway and NADPH-producing enzymes when cells were grown on glucose or xylose. We also found that the transcriptional changes induced by pho13Δ required the transcription factor Stb5, which is activated specifically under NADPH-limiting conditions. Thus, pho13Δ resulted in the upregulation of the PP pathway and NADPH-producing enzymes as a part of an oxidative stress response mediated by activation of Stb5. Because the PP pathway is the primary pathway for xylose, its upregulation by pho13Δ might explain the improved xylose metabolism. These findings will be useful for understanding the biological function of S. cerevisiae Pho13 and the HAD superfamily enzymes and for developing S. cerevisiae strains with industrially attractive phenotypes.

  19. In vivo emergence of colistin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type carbapenemases mediated by insertional inactivation of the PhoQ/PhoP mgrB regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannatelli, Antonio; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Giani, Tommaso; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Arena, Fabio; Ambretti, Simone; Gaibani, Paolo; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2013-11-01

    Colistin is one of the few agents that retain activity against extensively drug-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type carbapenemases (KPC-KP). However, resistance to colistin is increasingly reported among KPC-KP. Comparative genomic analysis of a pair of sequential KPC-KP isolates from the same patient including a colistin-susceptible isolate (KKBO-1) and a colistin-resistant isolate (KKBO-4) selected after colistin exposure revealed that insertional inactivation of the mgrB gene, encoding a negative regulator of the PhoQ/PhoP signaling system, is a genetic mechanism for acquired colistin resistance. The role of mgrB inactivation in acquired colistin resistance was confirmed by complementation experiments with wild-type mgrB, which restored colistin susceptibility in KKBO-4, and by construction of an mgrB deletion mutant from KKBO-1, which exhibited a colistin-resistant phenotype. Insertional mgrB inactivation was also detected in 60% of colistin-resistant mutants selected from KKBO-1 in vitro, following plating on colistin-containing medium, confirming the role (although not unique) of this mechanism in the emergence of acquired colistin resistance. In colistin-resistant mutants carrying insertional inactivation or deletion of the mgrB gene, upregulated transcription of phoP, phoQ, and pmrK (which is part of the pmrHFIJKLM operon) was detected. These findings confirmed the MgrB regulatory role in K. pneumoniae and were in agreement with the known association between upregulation of the PhoQ/PhoP system and activation of the pmrHFIJKLM operon, which eventually leads to resistance to polymyxins by modification of the lipopolysaccharide target.

  20. Protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase functions in conjunction with the Pho85p-Pho80p and Cdc28p-cyclin B kinases to regulate lipid synthesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Casciano, Jessica; Carman, George M

    2012-09-28

    Pah1p, which functions as phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, plays a crucial role in lipid homeostasis by controlling the relative proportions of its substrate phosphatidate and its product diacylglycerol. The diacylglycerol produced by PAP is used for the synthesis of triacylglycerol as well as for the synthesis of phospholipids via the Kennedy pathway. Pah1p is a highly phosphorylated protein in vivo and has been previously shown to be phosphorylated by the protein kinases Pho85p-Pho80p and Cdc28p-cyclin B. In this work, we showed that Pah1p was a bona fide substrate for protein kinase A, and we identified by mass spectrometry and mutagenesis that Ser-10, Ser-677, Ser-773, Ser-774, and Ser-788 were the target sites of phosphorylation. Protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of Pah1p inhibited its PAP activity by decreasing catalytic efficiency, and the inhibitory effect was primarily conferred by phosphorylation at Ser-10. Analysis of the S10A and S10D mutations (mimicking dephosphorylation and phosphorylation, respectively), alone or in combination with the seven alanine (7A) mutations of the sites phosphorylated by Pho85p-Pho80p and Cdc28p-cyclin B, indicated that phosphorylation at Ser-10 stabilized Pah1p abundance and inhibited its association with membranes, PAP activity, and triacylglycerol synthesis. The S10A mutation enhanced the physiological effects imparted by the 7A mutations, whereas the S10D mutations attenuated the effects of the 7A mutations. These data indicated that the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of Ser-10 functions in conjunction with the phosphorylations mediated by Pho85p-Pho80p and Cdc28p-cyclin B and that phospho-Ser-10 should be dephosphorylated for proper PAP function.

  1. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmin, Thomas; Soto, Cinque S; Clinthorne, Graham; DeGrado, William F; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM) domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  2. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  3. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, M C [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiao, Y [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  4. Biomineralization of uranium by PhoY phosphatase activity aids cell survival in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Mimi C; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  5. 盐度和pH对底栖硅藻胞外多聚物的影响%Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by benthic diatom: effect of salinity and pH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈长平; 高亚辉; 林鹏

    2006-01-01

    研究了盐度和pH值对底栖硅藻新月简柱藻(Cylindrotheca closterium(Her.)Reimann et Lewin)增殖、蛋白质含量和胞外多聚物(Extracellular Polymeric Substances,EPS)的影响.结果表明新月筒柱藻最适生长的盐度和pH值分别是15和8,属半咸水性生活.高盐度(>15)和低pH值(<pH8)的胁迫促进了胞外多聚物(EPS)的积累,说明EPS的存在可能有利于缓解外界的不利条件.胶体EPS和附着EPS对盐度和pH值的响应不同,反应了两种EPS功能上的差异.盐度和pH值对新月筒柱藻胞内碳水化合物的影响不显著.

  6. A direct link between the global regulator PhoP and the Csr regulon in Y. pseudotuberculosis through the small regulatory RNA CsrC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Aaron M; Schuster, Franziska; Kathrin Heroven, Ann; Heine, Wiebke; Pisano, Fabio; Dersch, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of the global response regulator PhoP on the complex regulatory cascade controlling expression of early stage virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis via the virulence regulator RovA. Our analysis revealed the following novel features: (1) PhoP activates expression of the CsrC RNA in Y. pseudotuberculosis, leading to activation of RovA synthesis through the CsrABC-RovM cascade, (2) activation of csrC transcription is direct and PhoP is shown to bind to two separate PhoP box-like sites, (3) PhoP-mediated activation results in transcription from two different promoters closely downstream of the PhoP binding sites, leading to two distinct CsrC RNAs, and (4) the stability of the CsrC RNAs differs significantly between the Y. pseudotuberculosis strains YPIII and IP32953 due to a 20 nucleotides insertion in CsrC(IP32953), which renders the transcript more susceptible to degradation. In summary, our study showed that PhoP-mediated influence on the regulatory cascade controlling the Csr system and RovA in Y. pseudotuberculosis varies within the species, suggesting that the Csr system is a focal point to readjust and adapt the genus to different hosts and reservoirs.

  7. Four promoters subject to regulation by ExoR and PhoB direct transcription of the Sinorhizobium melilotiexoYFQ operon involved in the biosynthesis of succinoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quester, Ingmar; Becker, Anke

    2004-01-01

    Succinoglycan (EPS I), the main acidic exopolysaccharide of Sinorhizobium meliloti, is required for the initiation and elongation of infection threads during nodulation of the host plant alfalfa. The gene products of the exoYFQ operon are involved in the first step of succinoglycan biosynthesis as well as in the polymerisation of subunits to the high-molecular-mass form of this exopolysaccharide. One promoter region that directs transcription of exoX and two promoter regions that drive transcription of exoY were mapped in the exoX-exoY intergenic region. The distal exoY promoter region containing three putative -10 promoter elements was active under standard growth conditions and was subject to ExoR-dependent regulation. Although this promoter region was stimulated in a phoB mutant, no PHO box-like sequences were found, suggesting an indirect regulatory effect of PhoB. The proximal promoter contains a PHO box-like sequence in the putative -35 region and was affected by low and high phosphate concentrations dependent on PhoB. In the case of deleted upstream regions, this promoter was also controlled by ExoR. An additional promoter displaying activity in exoR, mucR and phoB mutants under standard conditions was identified upstream of exoF. The putative -35 promoter element of this promoter is covered by a second PHO box-like sequence.

  8. A structural model of the E. coli PhoB Dimer in the transcription initiation complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Chang-Shung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There exist > 78,000 proteins and/or nucleic acids structures that were determined experimentally. Only a small portion of these structures corresponds to those of protein complexes. While homology modeling is able to exploit knowledge-based potentials of side-chain rotomers and backbone motifs to infer structures for new proteins, no such general method exists to extend our understanding of protein interaction motifs to novel protein complexes. Results We use a Motif Binding Geometries (MBG approach, to infer the structure of a protein complex from the database of complexes of homologous proteins taken from other contexts (such as the helix-turn-helix motif binding double stranded DNA, and demonstrate its utility on one of the more important regulatory complexes in biology, that of the RNA polymerase initiating transcription under conditions of phosphate starvation. The modeled PhoB/RNAP/σ-factor/DNA complex is stereo-chemically reasonable, has sufficient interfacial Solvent Excluded Surface Areas (SESAs to provide adequate binding strength, is physically meaningful for transcription regulation, and is consistent with a variety of known experimental constraints. Conclusions Based on a straightforward and easy to comprehend concept, "proteins and protein domains that fold similarly could interact similarly", a structural model of the PhoB dimer in the transcription initiation complex has been developed. This approach could be extended to enable structural modeling and prediction of other bio-molecular complexes. Just as models of individual proteins provide insight into molecular recognition, catalytic mechanism, and substrate specificity, models of protein complexes will provide understanding into the combinatorial rules of cellular regulation and signaling.

  9. 3D Modeling from Multi-views Images for Cultural Heritage in Wat-Pho, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontranon, N.; Srestasathiern, P.; Lawawirojwong, S.

    2015-08-01

    In Thailand, there are several types of (tangible) cultural heritages. This work focuses on 3D modeling of the heritage objects from multi-views images. The images are acquired by using a DSLR camera which costs around 1,500 (camera and lens). Comparing with a 3D laser scanner, the camera is cheaper and lighter than the 3D scanner. Hence, the camera is available for public users and convenient for accessing narrow areas. The acquired images consist of various sculptures and architectures in Wat-Pho which is a Buddhist temple located behind the Grand Palace (Bangkok, Thailand). Wat-Pho is known as temple of the reclining Buddha and the birthplace of traditional Thai massage. To compute the 3D models, a diagram is separated into following steps; Data acquisition, Image matching, Image calibration and orientation, Dense matching and Point cloud processing. For the initial work, small heritages less than 3 meters height are considered for the experimental results. A set of multi-views images of an interested object is used as input data for 3D modeling. In our experiments, 3D models are obtained from MICMAC (open source) software developed by IGN, France. The output of 3D models will be represented by using standard formats of 3D point clouds and triangulated surfaces such as .ply, .off, .obj, etc. To compute for the efficient 3D models, post-processing techniques are required for the final results e.g. noise reduction, surface simplification and reconstruction. The reconstructed 3D models can be provided for public access such as website, DVD, printed materials. The high accurate 3D models can also be used as reference data of the heritage objects that must be restored due to deterioration of a lifetime, natural disasters, etc.

  10. A novel transposon construct expressing PhoA with potential for studying protein expression and translocation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker Indu S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a major poultry pathogen and causes severe economic loss to the poultry industry. In mycoplasmas lipoproteins are abundant on the membrane surface and play a critical role in interactions with the host, but tools for exploring their molecular biology are limited. Results In this study we examined whether the alkaline phosphatase gene (phoA from Escherichia coli could be used as a reporter in mycoplasmas. The promoter region from the gene for elongation factor Tu (ltuf and the signal and acylation sequences from the vlhA 1.1 gene, both from Mycoplasma gallisepticum , together with the coding region of phoA , were assembled in the transposon-containing plasmid pISM2062.2 (pTAP to enable expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP as a recombinant lipoprotein. The transposon was used to transform M. gallisepticum strain S6. As a control, a plasmid containing a similar construct, but lacking the signal and acylation sequences, was also produced (pTP and also introduced into M. gallisepticum . Using a colorimetric substrate for detection of alkaline phosphatase activity, it was possible to detect transformed M. gallisepticum . The level of transcription of phoA in organisms transformed with pTP was lower than in those transformed with pTAP, and alkaline phosphatase was not detected by immunoblotting or enzymatic assays in pTP transformants, eventhough alkaline phosphatase expression could be readily detected by both assays in pTAP transformants. Alkaline phosphatase was shown to be located in the hydrophobic fraction of transformed mycoplasmas following Triton X-114 partitioning and in the membrane fraction after differential fractionation. Trypsin proteolysis confirmed its surface exposure. The inclusion of the VlhA lipoprotein signal sequence in pTAP enabled translocation of PhoA and acylation of the amino terminal cysteine moiety, as confirmed by the effect of treatment with globomycin and radiolabelling

  11. Vibrio cholerae phosphatases required for the utilization of nucleotides and extracellular DNA as phosphate sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, EmilyKate; Kamp, Heather; Camilli, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate is essential for life, being used in many core processes such as signal transduction and synthesis of nucleic acids. The waterborne agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, encounters phosphate limitation in both the aquatic environment and human intestinal tract. This bacterium can utilize extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a phosphate source, a phenotype dependent on secreted endo- and exonucleases. However, no transporter of nucleotides has been identified in V. cholerae, suggesting that in order for the organism to utilize the DNA as a phosphate source, it must first separate the phosphate and nucleoside groups before transporting phosphate into the cell. In this study, we investigated the factors required for assimilation of phosphate from eDNA. We identified PhoX, and the previously unknown proteins UshA and CpdB as the major phosphatases that allow phosphate acquisition from eDNA and nucleotides. We demonstrated separable but partially overlapping roles for the three phosphatases and showed that the activity of PhoX and CpdB is induced by phosphate limitation. Thus, this study provides mechanistic insight into how V. cholerae can acquire phosphate from extracellular DNA, which is likely to be an important phosphate source in the environment and during infection.

  12. Evolutionary Landscape of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from the Viewpoint of PhoPR: Implications for Virulence Regulation and Application to Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broset, Esther

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Different members of the Mycobacterium genus have evolved to cause tuberculosis in diverse human populations and in a variety of animal species. Our cumulative knowledge of mycobacterial genomes indicates that mutations in the PhoPR two-component virulence system were acquired not only during the natural evolution of mycobacterial species but also during in vitro subculture, which has given rise to the attenuated reference strain H37Ra or to different daughter strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PhoPR is a well-known regulator of pathogenic phenotypes, including secretion of the virulence factor ESAT-6, biosynthesis of acyltrehalose-based lipids, and modulation of antigen export, in members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Evolutionarily conserved polymorphisms in PhoPR from Mycobacterium africanum, M. bovis, or M. tuberculosis H37Ra result in loss of functional phenotypes. Interestingly, some members of the MTBC have acquired compensatory mutations to counteract these polymorphisms and, probably, to maintain their pathogenic potential. Some of these compensatory mutations include the insertion of the IS6110 element upstream from phoPR in a particular M. bovis strain that is able to transmit between humans or polymorphisms in M. africanum and M. bovis that affect the regulatory region of the espACD operon, allowing PhoPR-independent ESAT-6 secretion. This review highlights the increasing knowledge of the significance of PhoPR in the evolution of the MTBC and its potential application in the construction of new attenuated vaccines based on phoPR inactivation. In this context, the live attenuated vaccine MTBVAC, based on a phoP fadD26 deletion mutant of M. tuberculosis, is the first vaccine of this kind to successfully enter into clinical development, representing a historic milestone in the field of human vaccinology. PMID:26489860

  13. Modulating the bacterial surface with small RNAs: a new twist on PhoP/Q-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as important regulatory components in bacterial stress responses and in bacterial virulence. Many of these are conserved in related species and act on target mRNAs by sequence complementarity. They are tightly controlled...... of bacterial surface properties by regulating lipopolysaccharide modification. The small RNA is expressed as part of the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system that plays a major role in virulence of pathogenic species. This work expands the list of global regulators known to control small RNA expression...... at the transcription level, and are frequently elements of global regulatory systems. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, almost one-third of the functional characterized small RNAs participate in control of outer membrane protein production. A subset of these genes is under the control of the sigma...

  14. PhoQ mutations promote lipid A modification and polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa found in colistin-treated cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Amanda K; Brannon, Mark K; Stevens, Laurel

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin and other cationic antimicrobial peptides. Previous work has shown that mutations in the PmrAB and PhoPQ regulatory systems can confer low to moderate levels of polymyxin resistance (MICs of 8 - 64 mg/L) in laboratory and clinical strains...... of chromosomal phoQ in the presence of an intact phoP allele stimulated 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A and induced transcription from the promoter of the pmrH (arnB) operon, consistent with the known role of this lipid A modification in polymyxin resistance. These results indicate that phoQ loss...... of this organism. To explore the role of PhoPQ in high-level clinical polymyxin resistance, P. aeruginosa strains with colistin MICs > 512 mg/L that had been isolated from cystic fibrosis patients treated with inhaled colistin (polymyxin E) were analyzed. Probable loss-of-function phoQ alleles found...

  15. Cooperative binding of PhoB(DBD) to its cognate DNA sequence-a combined application of single-molecule and ensemble methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Walhorn, Volker; Kleineberg, Christin; Bieker, Adeline; Kock, Klaus; Herrmann, Christian; Anselmetti, Dario; Sewald, Norbert

    2013-11-19

    A combined approach based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was applied to elucidate the mechanism of protein-DNA complex formation and the impact of protein dimerization of the DNA-binding domain of PhoB (PhoB(DBD)). These insights can be translated to related members of the family of winged helix-turn-helix proteins. One central question was the assembly of the trimeric complex formed by two molecules of PhoB(DBD) and two cognate binding sites of a single oligonucleotide. In addition to the native protein WT-PhoB(DBD), semisynthetic covalently linked dimers with different linker lengths were studied. The ITC, SPR, FRET, and CD results indicate a positive cooperative binding mechanism and a decisive contribution of dimerization on the complex stability. Furthermore, an alanine scan was performed and binding of the corresponding point mutants was analyzed by both techniques to discriminate between different binding types involved in the protein-DNA interaction and to compare the information content of the two methods DFS and SPR. In light of the published crystal structure, four types of contribution to the recognition process of the pho box by the protein PhoB(DBD) could be differentiated and quantified. Consequently, it could be shown that investigating the interactions between DNA and proteins with complementary techniques is necessary to fully understand the corresponding recognition process.

  16. Tunable PhoXonic Band Gap Materials from Self-Assembly of Block Copoliymers and Colloidal Nanocrystals (NBIT Phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Final Report for AOARD Grant 1014069 “Tunable PhoXonic Band Gap Materials from Self-Assembly of Block Copoliymers and Colloidal Nanocrystals...NBIT Phase II)” 5 July 2011 Name of Principal Investigators: Edwin L Thomas, Dept of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT e-mail address... elt @mit.edu Institution : Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mailing Address : 77 Mass. Avenue, 6-113, Cambridge, MA 02139 Phone : 617-253-6901

  17. Phosphate Homeostasis in Conditions of Phosphate Proficiency and Limitation in the Wild Type and the phoP Mutant of Streptomyces lividans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Smirnov

    Full Text Available Phosphate, as a constituent of the high energy molecules, ATP/GTP and polyphosphate, plays a crucial role in most of the metabolic processes of living organisms. Therefore, the adaptation to low Pi availability is a major challenge for bacteria. In Streptomyces, this adaptation is tightly controlled by the two component PhoR/PhoP system. In this study, the free intracellular Pi, ATP, ADP and polyP content of the wild type and the phoP mutant strain of S. lividans TK24 were analyzed at discrete time points throughout growth in Pi replete and limited media. PolyP length and content was shown to be directly related to the Pi content of the growth medium. In Pi repletion, ATP and high molecular weight (HMW polyP contents were higher in the phoP mutant than in the WT strain. This supports the recently proposed repressive effect of PhoP on oxidative phosphorylation. High oxidative phosphorylation activity might also have a direct or indirect positive impact on HMW polyP synthesis. In Pi sufficiency as in Pi limitation, the degradation of these polymers was shown to be clearly delayed in the phoP mutant, indicating PhoP dependent expression of the enzymes involved in this degradation. The efficient storage of Pi as polyphosphate and/or its inefficient degradation in Pi in the phoP mutant resulted in low levels of free Pi and ATP that are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the very poor growth of this mutant in Pi limitation. Furthermore, short polyP was shown to be present outside the cell, tightly bound to the mycelium via electrostatic interactions involving divalent cations. Less short polyP was found to be associated with the mycelium of the phoP mutant than with that of the WT strain, indicating that generation and externalization of these short polyP molecules was directly or indirectly dependent on PhoP.

  18. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PhoPQ two-component system is required for AvrXA21 activity, hrpG expression, and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Jeong, Kyu-Sik; Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Seung-Eun; Phee, Bong-Kwan; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Ronald, Pamela

    2008-03-01

    The rice pathogen recognition receptor, XA21, confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strains producing the type one system-secreted molecule, AvrXA21. X. oryzae pv. oryzae requires a regulatory two-component system (TCS) called RaxRH to regulate expression of eight rax (required for AvrXA21 activity) genes and to sense population cell density. To identify other key components in this critical regulatory circuit, we assayed proteins expressed in a raxR gene knockout strain. This survey led to the identification of the phoP gene encoding a response regulator that is up-regulated in the raxR knockout strain. Next we generated a phoP knockout strain and found it to be impaired in X. oryzae pv. oryzae virulence and no longer able to activate the response regulator HrpG (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity G) in response to low levels of Ca2+. The impaired virulence of the phoP knockout strain can be partially complemented by constitutive expression of hrpG, indicating that PhoP controls a key aspect of X. oryzae pv. oryzae virulence through regulation of hrpG. A gene encoding the cognate putative histidine protein kinase, phoQ, was also isolated. Growth curve analysis revealed that AvrXA21 activity is impaired in a phoQ knockout strain as reflected by enhanced growth of this strain in rice lines carrying XA21. These results suggest that the X. oryzae pv. oryzae PhoPQ TCS functions in virulence and in the production of AvrXA21 in partnership with RaxRH.

  19. 异丙酚在不同pH值环境下对苯甲酰苯甲酸ATP诱发的巨噬细胞嘌呤2X7受体电流的影响%Effect of propofol on BzATP induced P2X7-gated currents in RAW264.7 macrophages under different extracellular pH values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红亮; 戴体俊

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of P2X7 receptor to its specific agonist BZATP and the effect of propofol on P2X7-gated currents in RAW264. 7 macrophages under different extracellular pH values. METHODS-RAW264. 7 cells were cultured, and whole-cell patch clamp technique was used. BZATP (10 - 10000 pimol/L) was applied for 5 seconds, the currents were recorded, and the EC50 value of BZATP was achieved under the extracellular pH value of 7. 4 or 6. 0. Propofol (1 -100 jumol/L) was applied to the cells for 1 min, then BZATP with two times EC50 value was applied, the IC50 or EC50 value of propofol was achieved under different extracellular pH values. To investigate the effect of propofol on the dose-response curve of B2ATP under different extracellular pH values, propofol with IC50 value was applied, and BZATP (10-10000 fimol/L) was applied for 5 seconds, the EC50 value of BZATP was achieved. RESULTS :BZATP could induce the inward cur-rents in a dose-dependent manner, and the EC50 value of BZATP was (112 ±26) μmol/L and (643 ±87) μmol/L at extracellular pH value of 7. 4 or 6. 0. Propofol could inhibit P2X7-gated currents at pH 7. 4, and the IC50 value was (31 ±6) μmol/L; but propofol increased P2X7-ga-ted currents at pH 6. 0, and the EC50 value was (38 ±6) fxmol/L. The IC50 value of propofol made the dose-response curve of BZATP shifted rightward at pH 7.4, or leftward at pH 6.0. CONCLUSION: The sensitivity of P2X7 receptor to BZATP decreases when extracellular pH value changes from 7. 4 to 6. 0. Propofol with clinically related concentrations could inhibit P2X7-ga-ted currents at pH 7. 4, and increase P2X7-gated currents at pH 6. 0 extracellularly.%目的:观察在不同pH值条件下巨噬细胞膜嘌呤2X7(P2X7)受体电流对其特异性激动剂苯甲酰苯甲酸ATP (BZATP)的敏感性及异丙酚对P2X7受体电流的影响.方法:应用培养的RAW264.7巨噬细胞,采用全细胞膜片钳技术,向细胞施加BZ ATP(10~10000 μmol/L)5 s,记录电流,

  20. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...... and the phosphocreatine resonance frequencies was used for indirect assessment of the intracellular pH. The mean baseline intracellular pH was 7.05 +/- 0.04 (SD). The mean pH changes obtained at 15-min intervals within the first hour of acetazolamide administration were -0.03 +/- 0.04 (SD), -0.02 +/- 0.03 (SD), and 0.......00 +/- 0.04 (SD), i.e., no statistically significant pH decrease was observed during the period where extracellular pH is known to drop markedly. Although several factors contribute to the lack of change of the intraneuronal pH, we will discuss that this observation in addition might suggest a direct...

  1. Extracellular DNA chelates cations and induces antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, bacterial polysaccharides and proteins, which are up to 1000-fold more antibiotic resistant than planktonic cultures. To date, extracellular DNA has been shown to function as a structural support to maintain Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm architecture. Here we show that DNA is a multifaceted component of P. aeruginosa biofilms. At physiologically relevant concentrations, extracellular DNA has antimicrobial activity, causing cell lysis by chelating cations that stabilize lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the outer membrane (OM. DNA-mediated killing occurred within minutes, as a result of perturbation of both the outer and inner membrane (IM and the release of cytoplasmic contents, including genomic DNA. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of DNA created a cation-limited environment that resulted in induction of the PhoPQ- and PmrAB-regulated cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance operon PA3552-PA3559 in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, DNA-induced expression of this operon resulted in up to 2560-fold increased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and 640-fold increased resistance to aminoglycosides, but had no effect on beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone resistance. Thus, the presence of extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix contributes to cation gradients, genomic DNA release and inducible antibiotic resistance. DNA-rich environments, including biofilms and other infection sites like the CF lung, are likely the in vivo environments where extracellular pathogens such as P. aeruginosa encounter cation limitation.

  2. Identification of mycoplasma membrane proteins by systematic Tn phoA mutagenesis of a recombinant library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleavinger, C M; Kim, M F; Im, J H; Wise, K S

    1995-10-01

    Wall-less prokaryotes in the genus Mycoplasma include over 90 species of infectious agents whose pathogenicity for humans and other animals is currently being assessed. Molecular characterization of surface proteins is critical in this regard but is hampered by the lack of genetic systems in these organisms. We used TnphoA transposition to systematically mutagenize, in Escherichia coli, a genomic plasmid library constructed from Mycoplasma fermentans, a potential human pathogen. The strategy circumvented problems of expressing mycoplasma genes containing UGA (Trp) codons and relied on the construction of the vector pG7ZCW, designed to reduce TnphoA transposition into vector sequences. Functional phoA gene fusions directly identified genes encoding 19 putative membrane-associated proteins of M. fermentans. Sequences of fusion constructs defined three types of export sequence: (1) non-cleavable, membrane-spanning sequences, (2) signal peptides with signal peptidase (SPase) I-like cleavage sites, and (3) signal peptides with SPase II-like lipoprotein-cleavage sites which, like most other mycoplasmal lipoprotein signals analysed to date, differed from those in several Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria in their lack of a Leu residue at the -3 position. Antibodies to synthetic peptides that were deduced from two fusions to predicted lipoproteins, identified corresponding amphiphilic membrane proteins of 57 kDa and 78 kDa expressed in the mycoplasma. The P57 sequence contained a proline-rich N-terminal region analogous to an adhesin of Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The P78 protein was identical to a serologically defined phase-variant surface lipoprotein. TnphoA mutagenesis provides an efficient means of systematically characterizing functionally diverse lipoproteins and other exported proteins in mycoplasmas.

  3. Assessments of Tumor Extracellular pH with PARACEST MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    BA , Zhou J, van Zijl PCM. Water satura- tion shift referencing (WASSR) for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiments. Magn Reson Med...provides insights into the optimum design of PARACEST agents for MRI. Magn Reson Med 2005;53:790–799. 29. Zhou J, Wilson DA, Sun PZ, Klaus JA, van

  4. Salmonella Enteritidis with double deletion in phoPfliC--a potential live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, Ulrich; Barrow, Paul A; Berndt, Angela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-04-12

    Salmonella Enteritidis mutants with deletions in phoP, fliC or phoPfliC were tested for their virulence and their ability to induce parameters of the innate and adaptive immunity in addition to their potential for serological differentiation between vaccinated, non-vaccinated and infected chickens. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant was sufficiently attenuated but not diminished in its capability to inhibit the caecal colonisation and systemic invasion of homologous Salmonella Enteritidis shortly after administration of the vaccine strain to very young chicks. Immunisation with the attenuated ΔphoPfliC mutant resulted in protective effects which were only slightly and insignificantly lower than after "immunisation" with a Salmonella wild-type strain, indicating the capability to induce an intense adaptive immune response and protection against Salmonella exposure in older chickens. The deletion in fliC enabled the effective the differentiation between immunised and infected chickens using a commercially available ELISA kit. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis might be a potential and promising live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in poultry.

  5. Role of extracellular and intracellular acidosis for hypercapnia-induced inhibition of tension of isolated rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, R; Vogel, P; Lassen, N A

    1995-01-01

    The importance of smooth muscle cell pHi and pHo for the hypercapnic vasodilation of rat cerebral arteries was evaluated in vitro. Vessel segments were mounted in a myograph for isometric tension recording; pHi was measured by loading the smooth muscle cells with the fluorescent dye BCECF, and p......Ho was measured with a glass electrode. In all studies, Ca(2+)-dependent basal tension (in the absence of any agonist) and tension in the presence of arginine vasopressin were investigated. Control solution was physiological saline bubbled with 5% CO2 and containing 25 mmol/L HCO3- (pH 7.45 to 7.50). Induction...... of hypercapnic acidosis (10% CO2) or normocapnic acidosis (15 mmol/L HCO3-) caused significant inhibition of smooth muscle tension, and both conditions reduced pHi as well as pHo. N-Nitro-L-arginine significantly inhibited the relaxation to hypercapnic acidosis but had no significant effect on relaxation...

  6. LPS structure and PhoQ activity are important for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K Bender

    Full Text Available The larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella, have been used experimentally to host a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study we evaluated the suitability of G. mellonella as an alternative animal model of Salmonella infection. Using a range of inoculum doses we established that the LD₅₀ of SalmonellaTyphimurium strain NCTC 12023 was 3.6 × 10³ bacteria per larva. Further, a set of isogenic mutant strains depleted of known virulence factors was tested to identify determinants essential for S. Typhimurium pathogenesis. Mutants depleted of one or both of the type III secretion systems encoded by Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 showed no virulence defect. In contrast, we observed reduced pathogenic potential of a phoQ mutant indicating an important role for the PhoPQ two-component signal transduction system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure was also shown to influence Salmonella virulence in G. mellonella. A waaL(rfaL mutant, which lacks the entire O-antigen (OAg, was virtually avirulent, while a wzz(ST/wzz(fepE double mutant expressing only a very short OAg was highly attenuated for virulence. Furthermore, shortly after infection both LPS mutant strains showed decreased replication when compared to the wild type in a flow cytometry-based competitive index assay. In this study we successfully established a G. mellonella model of S. Typhimurium infection. By identifying PhoQ and LPS OAg length as key determinants of virulence in the wax moth larvae we proved that there is an overlap between this and other animal model systems, thus confirming that the G. mellonella infection model is suitable for assessing aspects of Salmonella virulence function.

  7. Phenotypic and Transcriptional Characterization of the Meningococcal PhoPQ System, a Magnesium-Sensing Two-Component Regulatory System That Controls Genes Involved in Remodeling the Meningococcal Cell Surface†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, J.; Jeynes, J. C.; Mendoza, E.; Hinds, J.; Marsden, G. L.; Stabler, R. A.; Marti, M.; McFadden, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized a two-component regulatory system in the meningococcus with homology to the phoP-phoQ system in salmonella and showed that allele replacement of the NMB0595 regulator gene led to loss of virulence, sensitivity to antimicrobial peptides, perturbed protein expression, and magnesium-sensitive growth. On the basis of these findings we proposed that the system should be designated the meningococcal PhoPQ system. Here we further characterized the NMB0595 mutant and demonstrated that it had increased membrane permeability and was unable to form colonies on solid media with low magnesium concentrations, features that are consistent with disruption of PhoPQ-mediated modifications to the lipooligosaccharide structure. We examined the transcriptional profiles of wild-type and NMB0595 mutant strains and found that magnesium-regulated changes in gene expression are completely abrogated in the mutant, indicating that, similar to the salmonella PhoPQ system, the meningococcal PhoPQ system is regulated by magnesium. Transcriptional profiling of the mutant indicated that, also similar to the salmonella PhoPQ system, the meningococcal system is involved in control of virulence and remodeling of the bacterial cell surface in response to the host environment. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PhoP homologue plays a role in the meningococcus similar to the role played by PhoP in salmonella. Elucidating the role that the PhoPQ system and PhoPQ-regulated genes play in the response of the meningococcus to the host environment may provide new insights into the pathogenic process. PMID:15995212

  8. The role of the phoPQ operon in the pathogenesis of the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis and the IP32953 strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna L; Cote, Christopher K; Trevino, Sylvia; Fritz, David; Worsham, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    At the genomic level, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are nearly identical but cause very different diseases. Y. pestis is the etiologic agent of plague; whereas Y. pseudotuberculosis causes a gastrointestinal infection primarily after the consumption of contaminated food. In many gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, PhoP is part of a two-component global regulatory system in which PhoQ serves as the sensor kinase, and PhoP is the response regulator. PhoP is known to activate a number of genes in many bacteria related to virulence. To determine the role of the PhoPQ proteins in Yersinia infections, primarily using aerosol challenge models, the phoP gene was deleted from the chromosome of the CO92 strain of Y. pestis and the IP32953 strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis, leading to a polar mutation of the phoPQ operon. We demonstrated that loss of phoPQ from both strains leads to a defect in intracellular growth and/or survival within macrophages. These in vitro data would suggest that the phoPQ mutants would be attenuated in vivo. However, the LD(50) for the Y. pestis mutant did not differ from the calculated LD(50) for the wild-type CO92 strain for either the bubonic or pneumonic murine models of infection. In contrast, mice challenged by aerosol with the Y. pseudotuberculosis mutant had a LD(50) value 40× higher than the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate that phoPQ are necessary for full virulence by aerosol infection with the IP32953 strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis. However, the PhoPQ proteins do not play a significant role in infection with a fully virulent strain of Y. pestis. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  9. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  10. 不同pH值下胞外聚合物对污泥脱水性能及束缚水含量的影响%Influence of extracellular polymeric substances on sludge dewaterability and bound water content at various pH values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢奕; 王志强; 洪晨; 司艳晓; 张坤; 刘敏; 田星强; 李洋

    2015-01-01

    The changes of sludge dewaterability and bound water content at various pH values were investigated in this study. The protein and polysaccharide contents in each layer of extracellular polymeric substances ( S-EPS、LB-EPS and TB-EPS) and the organic acid and organic functional group contents in S-EPS were determined in an attempt to explain the influence of EPS on the sludge dewa-terability and bound water content. The results indicate that the sludge dewaterability under acidic conditions is obviously better than that under neutral conditions, and the water content of dewatered sludge ( WC) and the capillary suction time ( CST) can be decreased to 60. 8% and 25. 4 s at pH 3. 03, respectively. Under alkaline conditions, the bound water content in dewatered sludge, the WC and CST significantly increase, and the sludge dewaterability deteriorates. The addition of acid or alkali reduces TB-EPS, on the contrary, increases LB-EPS and S-EPS. Each layer of extracellular polymeric substances has significant correlation with the WC, CST and the bound water content, and S-EPS has most significant correlation with the sludge dewaterability and bound water content. In the process of acid-alkali conditioning, the amount and type of organic-functional groups improve obviously and hydrolysis of partly EPS generates organic acids and other small molecules.%研究了不同pH值下污泥脱水性能和束缚水含量的变化,通过测定污泥调理过程中各层胞外聚合物( S-EPS、LB-EPS和TB-EPS)中蛋白质和多糖的含量、S-EPS中有机官能团以及有机酸的含量,探讨了胞外聚合物对污泥脱水性能及束缚水含量的影响.酸性条件下,污泥的脱水性能明显好于中性条件,并且pH值为3.03时,污泥滤饼含水率( WC)和毛细吸水时间( CST)均降至最低,分别为60.8%和25.4 s;碱性条件下,污泥中束缚水的含量明显增加,WC和CST均大幅升高,污泥脱水性能恶化.酸碱的加入导致污泥中TB-EPS含量降

  11. Mice Are Protected from Helicobacter pylori Infection by Nasal Immunization with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium phoPc Expressing Urease A and B Subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Corthésy-Theulaz, Irène E.; Hopkins, Sally; Bachmann, Daniel; Saldinger, Pierre F; Porta, Nadine; Haas, Rainer; Zheng-Xin, Yan; Meyer, Thomas; Bouzourène, Hanifa; Blum, André L.; Kraehenbuhl, Jean-Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Live Salmonella typhimurium phoPc bacteria were tested as mucosal vaccine vectors to deliver Helicobacter pylori antigens. The genes encoding the A and B subunits of H. pylori urease were introduced into S. typhimurium phoPc and expressed under the control of a constitutive tac promoter (tac-ureAB) or a two-phase T7 expression system (cT7-ureAB). Both recombinant Salmonella strains expressed the two urease subunits in vitro and were used to nasally immunize BALB/c mice. The plasmid carrying c...

  12. Deleting the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase (pNPPase), PHO13, in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves growth and ethanol production on D-xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vleet, Jennifer; Jeffries, T.W.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    this inhibition under aerobic growth conditions in well-controlled bioreactors using engineered S. cerevisiae CEN.PK. Growth on glucose was not significantly affected in pho13 Delta mutants, but acetate production increased by 75%. Cell growth, ethanol production, and xylose consumption all increased markedly...... in pho13 Delta mutants. The specific growth rate and rate of specific xylose uptake were approximately 1.5 times higher in the deletion strain than in the parental strain when growing on glucose-xylose mixtures and up to 10-fold higher when growing on xylose alone. In addition to showing higher acetate...

  13. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-de...

  14. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  15. Specific PCR detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum California Race 4 based on a unique Tfo1 insertion event in the PHO gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    A highly virulent race 4 (Cal race 4) of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) was identified in California cotton fields in 2001, and has since been found in increasing numbers of fields. Cal race 4 isolates contain a unique Tfo1 transposon insertion in the PHO gene that was not found in othe...

  16. Host cell type-dependent translocation and PhoP-mediated positive regulation of the effector SseK1 of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando eBaisón-Olmo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica expresses two virulence-related type III secretion systems (T3SSs encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1 and SPI2, respectively. SseK1 is a poorly characterized substrate of the SPI2-encoded T3SS. Here, we show that this effector is essential to get full virulence both in oral and intraperitoneal mice infections, in spite of not having a role in invasion or intracellular proliferation in cultured mammalian cells. In vitro, expression of sseK1 was higher in media mimicking intracellular conditions, when SPI2 was induced, but it was also significant under SPI1 inducing conditions. A detailed analysis of translocation of SseK1 into host cells unveiled that it was a substrate of both, T3SS1 and T3SS2, although with different patterns and kinetics depending on the specific host cell type (epithelial, macrophages or fibroblasts. The regulation of the expression of sseK1 was examined using lacZ and bioluminescent lux fusions. The two-component system PhoQ/PhoP is a positive regulator of this gene. A combination of sequence analysis, directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that phosphorylated PhoP binds directly to the promoter region of sseK1 and revealed a PhoP binding site located upstream of the predicted -35 hexamer of this promoter.

  17. Functional characterization of a novel outer membrane porin KpnO, regulated by PhoBR two-component system in Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diffusion of antibiotics through the outer membrane is primarily affected by the porin super family, changes contribute to antibiotic resistance. Recently we demonstrated that the CpxAR two-component signaling system alters the expression of an uncharacterized porin OmpC(KP, to mediate antimicrobial resistance in K. pneumoniae. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, functional characterization of the putative porin OmpC(KP (denoted kpnO with respect to antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence was evaluated by generating an isogenic mutant, ΔkpnO in a clinical isolate of K. pneumoniae. Estimation of uronic acid content confirmed that ΔkpnO produced ∼2.0 fold lesser capsular polysaccharide than the wild-type. The ΔkpnO displayed higher sensitivity to hyper osmotic and bile conditions. Disruption of kpnO increased the susceptibility of K. pneumoniae to oxidative and nitrostative stress by ∼1.6 fold and >7 fold respectively. The loss of the Klebsiella porin led to an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration of tetracycline (3-fold, nalidixic acid (4-fold, tobramycin (4-fold, streptomycin (10-fold, and spectinomycin (10-fold, which could be restored following complementation. The single deletion of kpnO reduced the survival of the pathogen by 50% when exposed to disinfectants. In Caenorhabditis elegans model, the kpnO mutant exhibited significantly (P<0.01 lower virulence. To dissect the role of PhoBR signaling system in regulating the expression of the kpnO, a phoB(KP isogenic mutant was constructed. The phoB(KP mutant exhibited impaired gastrointestinal stress response and decreased antimicrobial susceptibility. The mRNA levels of kpnO were found to be 4-fold less in phoB(KP mutant compared to wild type. A regulatory role of PhoB(KP for the expression of kpnO was further supported by the specific binding of PhoB(KP to the putative promoter of kpnO. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Loss of PhoBR regulated porin Kpn

  18. Systematic mutation analysis of two-component signal transduction systems reveals EsrA-EsrB and PhoP-PhoQ as the major virulence regulators in Edwardsiella tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuanzhi; Xiao, Jingfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Haizhen; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao

    2012-05-25

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative broad-host-range pathogen that causes hemorrhagic septicemia in many commercially important fish species. Its ability to adapt to and thrive in diverse environments outside and inside of its hosts prompts us to investigate the roles of the previously identified 33 putative two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) in E. tarda. In this work, we successfully constructed deletion mutations in each of the response regulator genes, suggesting that none of the TCSs are essential for cell viability in E. tarda. The mutants were further examined for roles in biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, stress response, expression and secretion of proteins involved in either the type III secretion system (T3SS) or type VI secretion system (T6SS), as well as virulence. Through these assays, we identified four regulators of biofilm development, two regulators of antibiotic resistance, and four regulators involved in stress responses. We found that two regulators, EsrB and PhoP, are essential for the pathogenicity of E. tarda and further demonstrated that these two regulators have codependent and independent contributions to E. tarda virulence. Mutation of EsrB resulted in the complete loss of both the T3SS and T6SS proteins, while PhoP partially regulated the expression of T3SS and T6SS genes through EsrB, and was essential for resistance to antimicrobial peptides. This work suggested that these two response regulators are involved in the regulation of the complex virulence network of this bacterium and merit as candidate genes for live attenuated vaccine construction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. (PCP) degradation subjected to pH shock

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-02-08

    Feb 8, 2012 ... for pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation subjected to. pH shock. S.H. Lan* and ... The content of extracellular polymers ... (2007), the degradation rate was up to 39.6 ..... The shock of pH on microbial morphology of granular.

  20. InPhoCUS (Inflated Photovoltaic Ultra-light Mirror Concentrators): First Results Of The Project And Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravettoni, Mauro; Barbato, Maurizio; Cooper, Thomas; Pedretti, Andrea; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    InPhoCUS (Inflated PhotovoltaiC Ultra-light mirror concentratorS) is a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) project funded by the Swiss Confederation's Innovation Promotion Agency (CTI) and developed by Airlight Energy Holding SA, the University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The proposed novel concentrating system has already been patented for concentrated solar power applications: it is made by unconventional pneumatic multilayer polymeric mirrors, has an innovative fibre-reinforced concrete structure and an original tilting mechanism to track the sun. The innovative CPV solar collector is profitable for electric power plants both for the sun-belt region and in the Mediterranean. In this paper the authors present the novel CPV system and preliminary results on cost analysis, optical design and thermal modelling.

  1. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA.

  2. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  3. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  4. Regulation of pH During Amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Nanci, Antonio; Kurtz, Ira; Wright, J Timothy; Paine, Michael L

    2010-02-01

    During amelogenesis, extracellular matrix proteins interact with growing hydroxyapatite crystals to create one of the most architecturally complex biological tissues. The process of enamel formation is a unique biomineralizing system characterized first by an increase in crystallite length during the secretory phase of amelogenesis, followed by a vast increase in crystallite width and thickness in the later maturation phase when organic complexes are enzymatically removed. Crystal growth is modulated by changes in the pH of the enamel microenvironment that is critical for proper enamel biomineralization. Whereas the genetic bases for most abnormal enamel phenotypes (amelogenesis imperfecta) are generally associated with mutations to enamel matrix specific genes, mutations to genes involved in pH regulation may result in severely affected enamel structure, highlighting the importance of pH regulation for normal enamel development. This review summarizes the intra- and extracellular mechanisms employed by the enamel-forming cells, ameloblasts, to maintain pH homeostasis and, also, discusses the enamel phenotypes associated with disruptions to genes involved in pH regulation.

  5. Commercial cow milk contains physically stable extracellular vesicles expressing immunoregulatory TGF-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartijn C H Pieters

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, have been identified in all biological fluids and rediscovered as an important part of the intercellular communication. Breast milk also contains extracellular vesicles and the proposed biological function is to enhance the antimicrobial defense in newborns. It is, however, unknown whether extracellular vesicles are still present in commercial milk and, more importantly, whether they retained their bioactivity. Here, we characterize the extracellular vesicles present in semi-skimmed cow milk available for consumers and study their effect on T cells.Extracellular vesicles from commercial milk were isolated and characterized. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles contained several immunomodulating miRNAs and membrane protein CD63, characteristics of exosomes. In contrast to RAW 267.4 derived extracellular vesicles the milk-derived extracellular vesicles were extremely stable under degrading conditions, including low pH, boiling and freezing. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles were easily taken up by murine macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, we found that they can facilitate T cell differentiation towards the pathogenic Th17 lineage. Using a (CAGA12-luc reporter assay we showed that these extracellular vesicles carried bioactive TGF-β, and that anti-TGF-β antibodies blocked Th17 differentiation.Our findings show that commercial milk contains stable extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, and carry immunoregulatory cargo. These data suggest that the extracellular vesicles present in commercial cow milk remains intact in the gastrointestinal tract and exert an immunoregulatory effect.

  6. Isolation of phoC from Enterobacter aerogenes and its characteristics on enzymatic phosphorylation of inosine by fusing PhoC with MBP%产气肠杆菌磷酸酶基因克隆表达及其特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洪新; 来奇恒; 杨程; 张子能; 邢新会

    2008-01-01

    产气肠杆菌(E.aerogenes IAM1183)的酸性磷酸酶,具有特异转移磷酸基团到核苷5'-位的功能,是极具应用价值的酶.本研究以产气肠杆菌(E.aerogenes IAM1183)的酸性磷酸酶(PhoC)为研究对象,采用基因工程手段,克隆了phoC基因,构建成酸性磷酸酶(PhoC)与麦芽糖结合蛋白(MBP)的融合表达载体pMKL-c2x-phoC,把其转化到不同的宿主,进行催化研究.结果发现构建成的基因工程菌具有高于原始菌催化5'-IMP生成的能力、水解5'-IMP的活性降低、酶促反应的最适pH值近中性等特点.

  7. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  8. Assessing Dispositions Toward Ridicule and Laughter in the Workplace: Adapting and Validating the PhoPhiKat-9 Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hofmann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current paper addresses the measurement of three dispositions toward ridicule and laughter; i.e., gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at, gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at, and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others. These traits explain inter-individual differences in responses to humor, laughter, and social situations related to humorous encounters. First, an ultra-short form of the PhoPhiKat-45 (Ruch and Proyer, 2009 was adapted in two independent samples (Construction Sample N = 157; Replication Sample N = 1,774. Second, we tested the validity of the PhoPhiKat-9 in two further independent samples. Results showed that the psychometric properties of the ultra-short form were acceptable and the proposed factor structure could be replicated. In Validation Sample 1 (N = 246, we investigated the relation of the three traits to responses in a ridicule and teasing scenario questionnaire. The results replicated findings from earlier studies by showing that gelotophobes assigned the same emotions to friendly teasing and malicious ridicule (predominantly low joy, high fear, and shame. Gelotophilia was mainly predicted by relating joy to both, teasing and ridicule scenarios, while katagelasticism was predicted by assigning joy and contempt to ridicule scenarios. In Validation Sample 2 (N = 1,248, we investigated whether the fear of being laughed at is a vulnerability at the workplace: If friendly teasing and laughter of co-workers, superiors, or customers are misperceived as being malicious, individuals may feel less satisfied and more stressed. The results from a representative sample of Swiss employees showed that individuals with a fear of being laughed at are generally less satisfied with life and work and experience more work stress. Moreover, gelotophilia went along with positive evaluations of one's life and work, while katagelasticism was negatively related to work satisfaction and positively related to work stress. In

  9. Defining the plasticity of transcription factor binding sites by Deconstructing DNA consensus sequences: the PhoP-binding sites among gamma/enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Harari

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg(2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs using a machine learning method inspired by the "Divide & Conquer" strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target

  10. The involvement of OsPHO1;1 in the regulation of iron transport through integration of phosphate and zinc deficiency signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorpet esaenchai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants survival depends on their ability to cope with multiple nutrient stresses that often occur simultaneously, such as the limited availability of essential elements inorganic phosphate (Pi, zinc (Zn and iron (Fe. Previous research has provided information on the genes involved in efforts by plants to maintain homeostasis when a single nutrient (Pi, Zn or Fe is depleted. Recent findings on nutritional stress suggest that plant growth capacity is influenced by a complex tripartite interaction between Pi, Zn and Fe homeostasis. However, despite its importance, how plants integrate multiple nutritional stimuli into complex developmental programs, and which genes are involved in this tripartite (Pi ZnFe interaction is still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the physiological and molecular responses of rice (Oriza sativa L. to a combination of Pi, Zn and/or Fe deficiency stress conditions. Results showed that Fe deficiency had the most drastic single-nutrient effect on biomass, while the Zn deficiency-effect depended on the presence of Pi in the medium. Interestingly, the observed negative effect of Fe starvation was alleviated by concomitant Pi or PiZn depletion. Members of the OsPHO1 family showed a differential transcriptional regulation in response PiZnFe combinatory stress conditions. Particularly, the transcripts of the OsPHO1;1 sense and its natural antisense cis-NatPHO1;1 showed the highest accumulation under PiZn deficiency. In this condition, the Ospho1;1 mutants showed over-accumulation of Fe in roots compared to wild type plants. These data reveal coordination between pathways involved in Fe transport and PiZn signalling in rice which involves the OsPHO1; 1, and support the hypothesis of a genetic basis for Pi, Zn and Fe signalling interactions in plants.

  11. The Atypical Response Regulator Protein ChxR Has Structural Characteristics and Dimer Interface Interactions That Are Unique within the OmpR/PhoB Subfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Lei; Middaugh, C. Russell; Hefty, P. Scott (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2013-05-29

    Typically as a result of phosphorylation, OmpR/PhoB response regulators form homodimers through a receiver domain as an integral step in transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation stabilizes the ionic and hydrophobic interactions between monomers. Recent studies have shown that some response regulators retain functional activity in the absence of phosphorylation and are termed atypical response regulators. The two currently available receiver domain structures of atypical response regulators are very similar to their phospho-accepting homologs, and their propensity to form homodimers is generally retained. An atypical response regulator, ChxR, from Chlamydia trachomatis, was previously reported to form homodimers; however, the residues critical to this interaction have not been elucidated. We hypothesize that the intra- and intermolecular interactions involved in forming a transcriptionally competent ChxR are distinct from the canonical phosphorylation (activation) paradigm in the OmpR/PhoB response regulator subfamily. To test this hypothesis, structural and functional studies were performed on the receiver domain of ChxR. Two crystal structures of the receiver domain were solved with the recently developed method using triiodo compound I3C. These structures revealed many characteristics unique to OmpR/PhoB subfamily members: typical or atypical. Included was the absence of two {alpha}-helices present in all other OmpR/PhoB response regulators. Functional studies on various dimer interface residues demonstrated that ChxR forms relatively stable homodimers through hydrophobic interactions, and disruption of these can be accomplished with the introduction of a charged residue within the dimer interface. A gel shift study with monomeric ChxR supports that dimerization through the receiver domain is critical for interaction with DNA.

  12. Survival of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in the presence of Acanthamoeba castellanii and its dependence on Pho regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekabab, Samuel Mohammed; Daigle, France; Charette, Steve J; Dozois, Charles M; Harel, Josée

    2012-12-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are involved in outbreaks of food-borne illness and transmitted to humans through bovine products or water contaminated by cattle feces. Microbial interaction is one of the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to survive in the environment. Among protozoa, the free-living amoebae are known to host and protect several water-borne pathogens. In this study, the interaction between EHEC and the predacious protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated. Using monoculture and cocultures, growth of both organisms was estimated for 3 weeks by total and viable cell counts. The numbers of EHEC were significantly higher when cultured with amoebae than without, and less EHEC shifted into a viable but nonculturable state in the presence of amoebae. Using several mutants, we observed that the Pho regulon is required for EHEC growth when cocultured with amoebae. In contrast, the Shiga toxins (Stx) were not involved in this association phenotype. Cocultures monitored by electron microscopy revealed a loss of the regular rod shape of EHEC and the secretion of multilamellar vesicles by the amoebae, which did not contain bacteria. As the interaction between A. castellanii and EHEC appears beneficial for bacterial growth, this supports a potential role for protozoa in promoting the persistence of EHEC in the environment.

  13. pH induced contrast in viscoelasticity imaging of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, R D; Insana, M F

    2009-01-01

    Understanding contrast mechanisms and identifying discriminating features is at the heart of diagnostic imaging development. This report focuses on how pH influences the viscoelastic properties of biopolymers to better understand the effects of extracellular pH on breast tumour elasticity imaging. Extracellular pH is known to decrease as much as 1 pH unit in breast tumours, thus creating a dangerous environment that increases cellular mutatation rates and therapeutic resistance. We used a gelatin hydrogel phantom to isolate the effects of pH on a polymer network with similarities to the extracellular matrix in breast stroma. Using compressive unconfined creep and stress relaxation measurements, we systematically measured the viscoelastic features sensitive to pH by way of time domain models and complex modulus analysis. These results are used to determine the sensitivity of quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging to pH. We found a strong elastic response of the polymer network to pH, such that the matrix stiffness decreases as pH was reduced, however the viscous response of the medium to pH was negligible. While physiological features of breast stroma such as proteoglycans and vascular networks are not included in our hydrogel model, observations in this study provide insight into viscoelastic features specific to pH changes in the collagenous stromal network. These observations suggest that the large contrast common in breast tumours with desmoplasia may be reduced under acidic conditions, and that viscoelastic features are unlikely to improve discriminability. PMID:19174599

  14. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cheng. W. Y., Cyclic 3', 5'-nucleotide phosphodiestrase: demonstration of an activator, Biochm. Biophys. Res. Commun.,1970, 38: 533-538.[2]Boynton, A. L., Whitfield, J. F., MacManus, J. P., Calmodulin stimulates DNA synthesis by rat liver cells, BBRC.1980,95(2): 745-749.[3]Gorbacherskaya, L. V., Borovkova, T. V., Rybin, U. O. et al., Effect of exogenous calmodulin on lymphocyte proliferation in normal subjects, Bull Exp. Med. Biol., 1983, 95: 361-363.[4]Wong, P. Y.-K., Lee, W. H., Chao, PH.-W., The role of calmodulin in prostaglandin metabolism, Ann. NY Acad. Sci.,1980, 356: 179-189.[5]Mac Neil, S., Dawson, R. A., Crocker, G. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin and calmodulin antagonists on B16 melanoma cell growth, J. Invest. Dermatol., 1984, 83: 15-19.[6]Crocker, D. G., Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil, S. et al., An extracellular role for calmodulin-like activity in cell proliferation,Biochem. J., 1988, 253: 877-884.[7]Polito. V. S., Calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors: effect on pollen germination and tube growth, in Pollen: Biology and Implications for Plant Breeding (eds. Mulvshy, D. L., Ottaviaro, E.), New York: Elsevier, 1983.53-60.[8]Biro, R. L., Sun, D. Y., Roux, S. J.et al., Characterization of oat calmodulin and radioimmunoassay of its subcellular distribution, Plant Physiol., 1984,75: 382-386.[9]Terry, M. E., Bonner, B. A., An examination of centrifugation as a method of extracting an extracellular solution from peas, and its use for the study of IAA-induced growth, Plant Physiol., 1980, 66: 321-325.[10]Josefina, H. N., Aldasars, J. J., Rodriguez, D., Localization of calmodulin on embryonic Cice aricium L, in Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Calcium in Plant Development (ed. Trewavas, A. J.), New York, London: Plenum Press, 1985, 313.[11]Dauwalder, M., Roux, S. J., Hardison, L., Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedling: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices, Planta, 1986, 168: 461

  15. Nitric oxide and pH modulation in gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Barros, Eric; Subiabre, Mario; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Chiarello, Delia I; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide plays several roles in cellular physiology, including control of the vascular tone and defence against pathogen infection. Neuronal, inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms synthesize nitric oxide. Cells generate acid and base equivalents, whose physiological intracellular concentrations are kept due to membrane transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and Na(+) /HCO3(-) transporters, thus maintaining a physiological pH at the intracellular (~7.0) and extracellular (~7.4) medium. In several pathologies, including cancer, cells are exposed to an extracellular acidic microenvironment, and the role for these membrane transport mechanisms in this phenomenon is likely. As altered NOS expression and activity is seen in cancer cells and because this gas promotes a glycolytic phenotype leading to extracellular acidosis in gynaecological cancer cells, a pro-inflammatory microenvironment increasing inducible NOS expression in this cell type is feasible. However, whether abnormal control of intracellular and extracellular pH by cancer cells regards with their ability to synthesize or respond to nitric oxide is unknown. We, here, discuss a potential link between pH alterations, pH controlling membrane transport systems and NOS function. We propose a potential association between inducible NOS induction and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger expression and activity in human ovary cancer. A potentiation between nitric oxide generation and the maintenance of a low extracellular pH (i.e. acidic) is proposed to establish a sequence of events in ovarian cancer cells, thus preserving a pro-proliferative acidic tumour extracellular microenvironment. We suggest that pharmacological therapeutic targeting of Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and inducible NOS may have benefits in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

  16. TRPV1 senses both acidic and basic pH

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaka, Ajay; Uzzell, Valerie; Dubin, Adrienne; Mathur, Jayanti; Petrus, Matt; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining physiological pH is required for survival, and exposure to alkaline chemicals such as ammonia (smelling salts) elicits severe pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, is an integrator of noxious stimuli including heat and extracellular acidic pH. Here we report that ammonia activates TRPV1, TRPA1 (another polymodal nocisensor), and other unknown receptor(s) expressed in sensory neurons. Ammonia and intracellular alkalization activate TRPV1 t...

  17. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  18. Extracellular superoxide dismutase of boar seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalowka, M; Wysocki, P; Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2008-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzymatic component of the antioxidant defense system that protects spermatozoa by catalysing the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Age and season effects on SOD activity in the seminal plasma were measured in boars at the onset of 8 months through a 35-month period. It was found that age-related changes in SOD activity in the seminal plasma were markedly higher in boars less than 2 years of age. However, it appeared that SOD activity was established at the early sexual maturity age (8-12 months). There were variations in SOD activity throughout the season, being significantly higher in spring and autumn than in summer. A secretory extracellular form of SOD (EC-SOD) was purified to homogeneity (350-fold) from boar seminal plasma, using a three-step purification protocol (affinity chromatography followed by ion exchange and ceramic hydroxyapatite chromatography). The molecular properties and specificity of SOD (molecular mass, isoelectric point, optimum pH, thermostability and susceptibility to inhibitors) confirmed that the purified enzyme is an extracellular form of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase occurring in boar seminal plasma. The results of this study indicate that EC-SOD is an important antioxidant enzyme of boar seminal plasma, which plays an important physiological role in counteracting oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

  19. Expresión heteróloga del gen phoC de Morganella morganii en Escherichia coli CC118 hpir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo H. Fraga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Las fosfatasas ácidas juegan un rol importante en la mineralización del fósforo de origen orgánico que está presente en el suelo. La transferencia de genes que codifican para estas enzimas, mediante ingeniería genética, es una vía para la obtención de cepas mejoradas en cuanto a la solubilización de fósforo. Se tuvo como objetivo el subclonaje del gen phoC de Morganella morganii en un vector para su integración estable en el cromosoma de bacterias promotoras del crecimiento de las plantas y su expresión en Escherichia coli CC118 pir. Se empleó un vector de acoplamiento, el pUC18NotI y posteriormente el vector de liberación suicida pJMT6 (derivado de pUT/mini Tn5, para construir el vector de integración que porta el gen que codifica para la fosfatasa ácida PhoC de Morganella morganii. La construcción recombinante fue transferida a Escherichia coli CC118 pir. Se analizó la expresión del gen phoC en la cepa transformada por medio de la cuantificación de la actividad fosfatasa ácida en el extracto celular y en el sobrenadante del cultivo, y se detectó un aumento significativo respecto a E.coli CC118 pir sin el plásmido recombinante, lo cual demostró la expresión del gen subclonado.

  20. Computational Analysis and In silico Predictive Modeling for Inhibitors of PhoP Regulon in S. typhi on High-Throughput Screening Bioassay Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harleen; Ahmad, Mohd; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    There is emergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhi in pandemic proportions throughout the world, and therefore, there is a necessity to speed up the discovery of novel molecules having different modes of action and also less influenced by the resistance formation that would be used as drug for the treatment of salmonellosis particularly typhoid fever. The PhoP regulon is well studied and has now been shown to be a critical regulator of number of gene expressions which are required for intracellular survival of S. enterica and pathophysiology of disease like typhoid. The evident roles of two-component PhoP-/PhoQ-regulated products in salmonella virulence have motivated attempts to target them therapeutically. Although the discovery process of biologically active compounds for the treatment of typhoid relies on hit-finding procedure, using high-throughput screening technology alone is very expensive, as well as time consuming when performed on large scales. With the recent advancement in combinatorial chemistry and contemporary technique for compounds synthesis, there are more and more compounds available which give ample growth of diverse compound library, but the time and endeavor required to screen these unfocused massive and diverse library have been slightly reduced in the past years. Hence, there is demand to improve the high-quality hits and success rate for high-throughput screening that required focused and biased compound library toward the particular target. Therefore, we still need an advantageous and expedient method to prioritize the molecules that will be utilized for biological screens, which saves time and is also inexpensive. In this concept, in silico methods like machine learning are widely applicable technique used to build computational model for high-throughput virtual screens to prioritize molecules for advance study. Furthermore, in computational analysis, we extended our study to identify the common enriched

  1. pH Sensing and Regulation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi eDamaghi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi within a narrow range (7.1-7.2 by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the intracellular pH, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including colfilin and talin regulated actin (de-polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H+-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extra-cellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors.

  2. Effects of sand burial on biomass, chlorophyll fluores-cence and extracellular polysaccharides of man-made cyanobacterial crusts under experimental conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Soil cyanobacterial crusts occur throughout the world, especially in the semiarid and arid regions. It always encounters sand burial, which is an important feature of mobile sand dunes. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sand burial on biomass, chlorophyll fluorescence and extracellular polysaccharides of man-made cyanobacterial crusts in six periods of time (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 d after burying) and at five depths (0, 0.2, 0.5, 1 and 2cm). The results indicated that with the increase of the burial time and burial depth extracellular polysaccharides content and Fv/Fm decreased correspondingly and there were no significant differences between 20 and 30 burial days under dif-ferent burial depths. The degradation of chlorophyll a content appeared only at 20 and 30 burial days and there was also no significant difference between them under different burial depths. It was also observed a simultaneous decrease of the values of the Fv/Fm and the content of extracellular poly-saccharides happened in the crusted cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus Gom. It may suggest that there exists a relationship between extracellular polysaccharides and recovery of the activity of pho-tosystem II (PS II) after rehydration.

  3. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5 into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  4. Extracellular Acidification Acts as a Key Modulator of Neutrophil Apoptosis and Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannan Cao

    Full Text Available In human pathological conditions, the acidification of local environment is a frequent feature, such as tumor and inflammation. As the pH of microenvironment alters, the functions of immune cells are about to change. It makes the extracellular acidification a key modulator of innate immunity. Here we detected the impact of extracellular acidification on neutrophil apoptosis and functions, including cell death, respiratory burst, migration and phagocytosis. As a result, we found that under the acid environment, neutrophil apoptosis delayed, respiratory burst inhibited, polarization augmented, chemotaxis differed, endocytosis enhanced and bacteria killing suppressed. These findings suggested that extracellular acidification acts as a key regulator of neutrophil apoptosis and functions.

  5. Intracellular pH is a tightly controlled signal in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orij, R.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nearly all processes in living cells are pH dependent, which is why intracellular pH (pHi) is a tightly regulated physiological parameter in all cellular systems. However, in microbes such as yeast, pHi responds to extracellular conditions such as the availability of nutrients. This rais

  6. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  7. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  8. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes. PMID:28174578

  9. Extracellular Polyhydroxyalkanoate Depolymerase by Acidovorax sp. DP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vigneswari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria capable of degrading polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA by secreting extracellular depolymerase enzymes were isolated from water and soil samples collected from various environments in Malaysia. A total of 8 potential degraders exhibited clear zones on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate [P(3HB] based agar, indicating the presence of extracellular PHA depolymerase. Among the isolates, DP5 exhibited the largest clearing zone with a degradation index of 6.0. The highest degradation activity of P(3HB was also observed with depolymerase enzyme of DP5 in mineral salt medium containing P(3HB. Based on biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA cloning and sequencing, isolate DP5 was found to belong to the genus Acidovorax and subsequently named as Acidovorax sp. DP5. The highest extracellular depolymerase enzyme activity was achieved when 0.25% (w/v of P(3HB and 1 g/L of urea were used as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively, in the culture media. The most suitable assay condition of the depolymerase enzyme in response to pH and temperature was tested. The depolymerase produced by strain Acidovorax sp. DP5 showed high percentage of degradation with P(3HB films in an alkaline condition with pH 9 and at a temperature of 40°C.

  10. The effects of extracellular acidosis on neurons and glia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S A; Pulsinelli, W A; Clarke, W Y; Kraig, R P; Plum, F

    1989-08-01

    Cerebral lactic acid, a product of ischemic anaerobic glycolysis, may directly contribute to ischemic brain damage in vivo. In this study we evaluated the effects of extracellular acid exposure on 7-day-old cultures of embryonic rat forebrain. Mixed neuronal and glial cultures were exposed to either lactic or hydrochloric acid to compare the toxicities of relatively permeable and impermeable acids. Neurons were relatively resistant to extra-cellular HCl acidosis, often surviving 10-min exposures to pH 3.8. In the same cultures, immunochemically defined astrocytes survived 10-min HCl exposures to a maximum acidity of pH 4.2. Similarly, axonal bundles defasciculated in HCl-titrated media below pH 4.4, although their constituent fibers often survived pH 3.8. Cell death occurred at higher pH in cultures subjected to lactic acidosis than in those exposed to HCl. Over half of forebrain neurons and glia subjected for 10 min to lactic acidification failed to survive exposure to pH 4.9. Longer 1-h lactic acid incubations resulted in cell death below pH 5.2. The potent cytotoxicity of lactic acid may be a direct result of the relatively rapid transfer of its neutral protonated form across cell membranes. This process would rapidly deplete intracellular buffer stores, resulting in unchecked cytosolic acidification. Neuronal and glial death from extracellular acidosis may therefore be a function of both the degree and the rapidity of intracellular acidification.

  11. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed.

  12. Binding and Transformation of Extracellular DNA in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Peng; HUANG Qiao-Yun; ZHANG Xue-Wen; CHEN Hao

    2005-01-01

    DNA is the genetic material of various organisms. Extracellular DNA adsorbed or bound on surface-active particles in soils has been shown to persist for long periods against nucleases degradation and still retain the ability to transform competent cells. This paper reviews some recent advances on the binding and transformation of extracellular DNA in soils,which is fundamental to understanding the nature of the soil, regulating biodiversity, and assessing the risk of releasing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) as well as being helpful for development of the genetic evolutional theory of bacteria. Several influencing factors, such as soil pH, ionic strength, soil surface properties, and characteristics of the DNA polymer, are discussed. To date, the understanding of the type of molecular binding sites and the conformation of adsorbed and bound DNA to soil particles is still in its infancy.

  13. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  14. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  16. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  18. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  20. Two Common Bean Genotypes with Contrasting Response to Phosphorus Deficiency Show Variations in the microRNA 399-Mediated PvPHO2 Regulation within the PvPHR1 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Hernández

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Crop production of the important legume, the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, is often limited by low phosphorus (P in the soil. The genotypes, BAT477 and DOR364, of the common bean have contrasting responses to P starvation. Plants from the BAT477 P deficiency tolerant genotype showed higher phosphate content and root biomass as compared to the DOR364 plants under P starvation. The PvPHR1 transcription factor-signaling pathway plays an essential role in the response to P starvation. PvPHO2, a negative regulator of this pathway, encodes an ubiquitin E2 conjugase that promotes degradation of P-responsive proteins and is the target gene of PvmiR399. PvPHO2 is downregulated in BAT477 plants under P deficiency, while such a response is not observed in P-starved DOR364 plants. Five putative PvmiR399 binding sites were identified in the 5' UTR region in both genotypes. While four sites showed an identical DNA sequence, the fifth (binding site of PvPHO2 one showed three base changes and higher complementarity scores in DOR364 as compared to BAT477. Modified 5'RACE experiments indicated that PvmiR399 binding and/or processing was affected in DOR364 P-starved plants. We propose that a less efficient cleavage of the PvPHO2 mRNA directed by PvmiR399 would result in a higher PvPHO2-mediated degradation of P-responsive proteins in the DOR364 genotype with decreased P deficiency tolerance.

  1. Design and synthesis of phosphoryl-substituted diphenylpyrimidines (Pho-DPPYs) as potent Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors: Targeted treatment of B lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Yang, Haijun; Wang, Changyuan; Meng, Qiang; Li, Lei; Sun, Huijun; Zhen, Yuhong; Liu, Kexin; Li, Yanxia; Ma, Xiaodong

    2017-01-15

    A family of phosphoryl-substituted diphenylpyrimidine derivatives (Pho-DPPYs) were synthesized and biologically evaluated as potent BTK inhibitors in this study. Compound 7b was found to markedly inhibit BTK activity at concentrations of 0.82nmol/L, as well as to suppress the proliferations of B-cell leukemia cell lines (Ramos and Raji) expressing high levels of BTK at concentrations of 3.17μM and 6.69μM. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis results further indicated that 7b promoted cell apoptosis to a substantial degree. In a word, compound 7b is a promising BTK inhibitor for the treatment of B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension, formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows: pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  3. pH Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  4. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  5. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tao-Sheng; Soyama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yan, Chen; Sakai, Yusuke; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Natsuda, Koji; Fujii, Mio; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Gu, Weili; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the PH and sham groups 14 days after operation. However, compared with those in the sham group, the livers in mice in the PH+BDL group had a smaller size, a lower cell proliferative activity, and more fibrotic tissue 14 days after the operation, suggesting the insufficient regeneration of the cholestatic liver. Pathway-focused array analysis showed that many genes were up- or down-regulated over 1.5-fold in both PH+BDL and PH groups at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment. Interestingly, more genes that were functionally related to the extracellular matrix and inflammatory chemokines were found in the PH+BDL group than in the PH group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Our data suggest that up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

  6. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium-Linens ATCC-9174

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8,5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and...

  7. Impact of nitrogen pollution/deposition on extracellular enzyme activity, microbial abundance and carbon storage in coastal mangrove sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ling; Meng, Han; Wu, Ruo-Nan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2017-06-01

    This study applied different concentration of NaNO3 solution to simulate the effect of inorganic nitrogen (N) deposition/pollution on carbon (C) storage in coastal mangrove sediment through observing the changes of enzyme activity and microbial abundance. Sediment collected from mangrove forest (MG) and intertidal zone (IZ) were incubated with different N rates (0 (control), 5 (low-N) and 20 (high-N) μg N g(-1) dry sediment, respectively). After incubation, the activities of phenol oxidase (PHO) and acid phosphatase (ACP) were enhanced, but β-glucosidase (GLU) and N-β-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities were reduced by N addition. The altered enzymatic stoichiometries by N input implied that microbial phosphorus (P) limitation was increased, whereas C and N limitation were alleviated. Besides, N input decreased the bacterial abundance but increased fungal abundance in both types of sediment. The increased pH and soluble phenolics along with the exacerbated P limitation by N addition might explain these changes. Furthermore, sediment with N addition (except high-N treated MG sediment) showed a trend of C sequestration, which might be largely caused by the decrease of bacterial abundance and GLU activity. However, MG sediment with high-N suggested a trend of C loss, and the possible reason for this discrepancy might be the relatively higher increase of PHO and ACP activity. To better understand the influence of N deposition/pollution on C cycling, the long-term N effect on microorganisms, enzymes, and thus C storage should be paid more attention in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  9. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  10. pH matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inaba, Masanori; Quinson, Jonathan; Arenz, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the ink properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity determined in thin film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) measurements. It was found that the adaption of a previously reported ink recipe...... to home-made catalysts does not lead to satisfying results, although reported work could be reproduced using commercial catalyst samples. It is demonstrated that the pH of the catalyst ink, which has not been addressed in previous TF-RDE studies, is an important parameter that needs to be carefully...

  11. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  12. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  13. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  14. Application of Optical Imaging Techniques for Quantification of pH and O2 Dynamicsin Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Seliman, A. F.; Pales, A. R.; Liang, W.; Sams, A.; Darnault, C. J. G.; DeVol, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal distribution of physical and chemical parameters (e.g. pH, O2) is imperative to characterize the behavior of contaminants in a natural environment. The objectives of this research are to calibrate pH and O2 sensor foils, to develop a dual pH/O2 sensor foil, and to apply them into flow and transport experiments, in order to understand the physical and chemical parameters that control contaminant fate and transport in an unsaturated sandy porous medium. In addition, demonstration of a sensor foil that quantifies aqueous uranium concentration will be presented. Optical imaging techniques will be conducted with 2D tanks to investigate the influence of microbial exudates and plant roots on pH and O2 parameters and radionuclides transport. As a non-invasive method, the optical imaging technique utilizes optical chemical sensor films and either a digital camera or a spectrometer to capture the changes with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Sensor foils are made for different parameters by applying dyes to generate favorable fluorescence that is proportional to the parameter of interest. Preliminary results suggested that this method could detect pH ranging from 4.5 to 7.5. The result from uranium foil test with different concentrations in the range of 2 to 8 ppm indicated that a higher concentration of uranium resulted in a greater color intensity.

  15. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Slim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature.... Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C. The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry, was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment

  16. Laryngopharyngeal pH measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Spurrier, E; Clancy, M; Deakin, C

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Cohorts of unconscious adult ED and elective surgical patients were recruited. The posterior pharyngeal wall pH was measured immediately before and after intubation. Pharyngeal pH was used to indicate risk of aspiration, and pH change to assess the efficacy of cricoid pressure.

  17. MICROBIAL LIPASES: PRODUCTION OF EXTRACELLULAR LIPASE ENZYME BY ALCALIGENES VISCOSUS (DOGE-1 STRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Sekhar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Industrially important extracellular lipase enzyme production was explored by utilizingmicrobial strain isolated from dairy effluents. Alcaligenes viscosus DOGE-1 strain isolated from dairywaste waters proved to produce extracellular lipase. Various growth factors were attempted to maximizethe lipase production by this strain. Growth factors like NH4PO4, Peptone, Urea coupled with peptone,KH2PO4, Olive oil and pH were found to be favored the maximum lipase production. This microbialstrain was found to have a high lipolytic activity.

  18. Effect of medium pH and cultivation period on mycelial biomass, polysaccharide, and ligninolytic enzyme production by Ganoderma lucidum from Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukojević Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of initial medium pH on biomass, extracellular and intracellular polysaccharide, and ligninolytic enzyme production by Ganoderma lucidum was investigated at different pH values after 7 and 14 days of cultivation. Maximal production of biomass was recorded at pH 4.5 and 5.0; maximal production of extracellular polysaccharides at pH 7.0 and 3.0; and maximal production of intracellular polysaccharides at pH 7.0 and 5.5. Ligninolytic enzymes were not produced at any pH of the medium. Maximal biomass production was obtained on the 11th day of cultivation; maximal extracellular polysaccharide production on the 7th day; and maximal intracellular polysaccharide production on the 6th and 10th day of cultivation. .

  19. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Megan R; Crosby, Heidi A; Hernandez, Frank J; Malone, Cheryl L; McNamara, James O; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc) enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2) that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R Kiedrowski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2 that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  2. Carbon dioxide suppresses macrophage superoxide anion production independent of extracellular pH and mitochondrial activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuebler, Joachim F.; Kos, Marcin; Jesch, NataLie K.; Metzelder, Martin L.; van der Zee, David C.; Bax, Klaas M.; Vieten, Gertrud; Ure, Benno M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Superoxide anions released by activated inacrophages during surgery are considered to be responsible for local cellular damage. Application of CO2 prieumoperitoneum during laparoscopy affects superoxide anion release, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear and the data reported are

  3. The effect of extracellular alkalinization on lactate metabolism of breast cancer stem cells: Overview of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1 and MCT4 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neolaka, G. M. G.; Yustisia, I.; Sadikin, M.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Changes in the metabolic status of cancer cells are presumed to be correlated with the adjustment of these cells to extracellular changes. Cell glycolysis increases the production of intracellular lactate catalyzed by the lactate dehydrogenases, both LDH-A and LDH-B. An increase in intracellular lactate can affect extracellular pH balance through monocarboxylate transporters, particularly MCT1 and MCT4. This study aimed to analyze the effects of extracellular alkalinization on the lactate metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In this study, human primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were treated with 100 mM sodium bicarbonate for 0.5, 24, and 48 h in DMEM F12/HEPES. After incubation, extracellular pH was measured and cells were harvested to extract the total RNA and protein. The expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 mRNA genes were analyzed using qRT-PCR method. Our study shows that administration of sodium bicarbonate in the BCSC culture medium could increase extracellular pH. To balance the increase of extracellular pH, BCSCs regulated the expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 genes. As the extracellular pH increases, the expression of LDH-A that converts pyruvate to lactate increased along with the increase of MCT 4 and MCT 1 expression, which act as lactate transporters. As the incubation time increases, the pH decreases, leading to the suppression of LDH-A and increase of LDH-B expression that converts lactate into pyruvate. Therefore, we suggest that the extracellular alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate in BCSCs affected the genes that regulate lactate metabolism.

  4. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Guido Antonioli Conservator pacis et iustitie. La signoria di Taddeo Pepoli a Bologna (1337-1347, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Filologia romanza e cultura medievale (XIII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001   Elisabetta Filippini «In vassallatico episcopi permanere debent». Rapporti vassallatici e concessioni beneficiali dei vescovi di Cremona fra X e XIII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di Ricerca in Storia Medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2003   Marco Meschini, Innocenzo III e il "negotium pacis et fidei" in Linguadoca tra il 1198 e il 1215, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 2003   Fabrizio Ricciardelli The Politics of Exclusion in Florence (1215-1434, thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History, University of Warwick, Department of History, April 2003 Renata Salvarani Baptizare pueros et decimas dare. Cura delle anime, strutturazione ecclesiastica e organizzazione delle campagne in area gardesana fra VIII e XIII secolo (diocesi di Brescia, Verona, Mantova e Trento, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2002-2003   Vito Sibilio Le parole della prima crociata, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel medioevo euromediterraneo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  5. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations.   Miguel Calleja Puerta El conde Suero Vermúdez, su parentela y su entorno social. La aristocracia leonesa en los siglos XI y XII, Tesis de doctorado en Historia, Universidad de Oviedo (España, 2000   Adele Cilento Potere e monachesimo nella Calabria bizantina: relazioni e interferenze (secc. IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (X ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2000   Amedeo De Vincentiis Firenze e i signori. Sperimentazioni istituzionali e modelli di regime nelle signorie fiorentine degli Angioini (fine XIII - metà XIV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale (XI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Milano, 1999   Marco Folin Il sistema politico di un antico Stato italiano: i ducati estensi nella prima Età moderna (1452-1598, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Scuola Normale superiore di Pisa, 2000   Barbara Frale Guardiani del Santuario. Le radici orientali del processo contro l’ordine del Tempio (1128 - 1314, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale d’Europa (XI ciclo, Università "Ca’ Foscari" di Venezia, 2000

  6. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Reporto of PhD Dissertations.   Mario Dalle Carbonare Società, potere e clientele nell’Irlanda altomedievale (secoli V-IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale europea, Università "Ca' Foscari" di Venezia, 2003 Vieri Mazzoni La legislazione antighibellina e la politica oligarchica della Parte Guelfa di Firenze nel secondo Trecento (1347-1378, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale (ciclo XII, Università degli Studi di Firenze   Alma Poloni Pisa dalle origini del movimento popolare alla discesa di Ludovico il Bavaro. I gruppi dirigenti cittadini tra continuità e trasformazione, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dell'Europa nel medioevo, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2003   Andrea Puglia Potere marchionale, amministrazione del territorio, società locali dalla morte di Ugo di Tuscia a Guelfo VI di Baviera (1001-1160, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Milano, 2003

  7. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  8. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  9. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  10. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Federica Cengarle Le investiture feudali di Filippo Maria Visconti (1412-1447, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Silvia Coazzin Liberi domini totius castri. L'aristocrazia rurale "minore" nel Senese e nella Toscana meridionale. Forme di egemonia, assetto sociale e patrimoniale di lignaggi, famiglie e gruppi consortili di castello (secc. XI-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Maria Elena Cortese Signori e castelli. Famiglie aristocratiche, dominati signorili e trasformazioni insediative nel comitatus fiorentino (fine X-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Patrizia Meli Gabriele Malaspina marchese di Fosdinovo: il condottiero ed il politico, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Federica Pessotto La Morea franca. Economia e istituzioni tra Oriente e Occidente nei secoli XIII e XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società e Religioni dal Tardoantico alla fine del Medioevo, Università degli studi di Torino, 2003 Lorenzo Pubblici Dal Caucaso al Mar d’Azov. L’impatto dell’invasione mongola nella Caucasia fra nomadismo e civiltà sedentaria (1204-1395, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [01/05] Riccardo Rao "Comunia". Risorse collettive e patrimoniali dei maggiori comuni subalpini (secoli XII - inizio XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Alessandro Soddu Feudalesimo e potere signorile in Sardegna nei secoli XI-XIV.  La signoria territoriale dei Malaspina, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Università "Pompeu Fabra" di Barcellona, 2004

  11. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertation. Laura Baietto Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Giuseppe Banfo Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Francesca Dell'Acqua La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001   Primo Giovanni Embriaco I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001   Antonella Ghignoli Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Vito Loré Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Rosaria Stracuzzi Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001   Stefania Tamburini Le "portate" ecclesiastiche nel piviere di San Giovanni in Firenze nel 1427. Spunti per una riflessione sul patrimonio ecclesiastico della diocesi fiorentina,Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e informatica, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001

  12. Transmembrane pH gradients in vivo: measurements using fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R P

    1999-06-01

    It is well recognized that pH plays a significant regulatory role in most cellular processes. Increasingly, there is interest in transmembrane pH gradients, particularly with respect to tumor growth and response to therapy. NMR offers a non-invasive approach to monitoring cellular pH and detecting changes in response to interventions. This review will consider the strengths of various approaches to measuring pH with particular focus on the reporter molecules designed to interrogate the cellular milieu. In particular, fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives (6-fluoropyridoxol and 6-fluoropyridoxamine) will be described, which for the first time provide a practical non-destructive method to measure simultaneously intra- and extracellular pH, i.e., the transmembrane pH gradient in animals in vivo based on a single reporter molecule.

  13. The cell transmembrane pH gradient in tumors enhances cytotoxicity of specific weak acid chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozin, S V; Shkarin, P; Gerweck, L E

    2001-06-15

    The extracellular pH is lower in tumor than in normal tissue, whereas their intracellular pH is similar. In this study, we show that the tumor-specific pH gradient may be exploited for the treatment of cancer by weak acid chemotherapeutics. i.v.-injected glucose substantially decreased the electrode estimated extracellular pH in a xenografted human tumor while its intracellular pH, evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, remained virtually unchanged. The resulting increase in the average cell pH gradient caused a parallel increase in tumor growth delay by the weak acid chlorambucil (CHL). Regardless of glucose administration, the effect of CHL was significantly greater in tumors preirradiated with a large dose of ionizing radiation. This suggests that CHL was especially pronounced in radioresistant hypoxic cells possessing a larger transmembrane pH gradient. These results indicate that the naturally occurring cell pH gradient difference between tumor and normal tissue is a major and exploitable determinant of the uptake of weak acids in the complex tumor microenvironment. The use of such drugs may be especially effective in combination with radiation.

  14. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Massimo Della Misericordia Divenire comunità. Comuni rurali, poteri signorili, identità sociali in Valtellina e nella montagna lombarda nel tardo medioevo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2003   Mariano Dell’Omo Il monastero di S. Liberatore alla Maiella centro dell’irradiazione di Montecassino nell’Abruzzo medievale e moderno. Contributo alla storia dell’organizzazione patrimoniale e della civiltà monastica cassinese nell’Italia centrale attraverso i documenti di S. Liberatore conservati nell’Archivio di Montecassino. Introduzione storica, paleografica e archivistica. Edizione dei documenti più antichi (†798-1000 e regesti di quelli posteriori (1005-1735, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Ecclesiastica, Facoltà di Storia Ecclesiastica, Pontificia Università Gregoriana di Roma,  2004   Giulia Lorenzoni Conquistare e governare la città. Forme di potere e istituzioni nel primo anno della signoria viscontea a Bologna (ottobre 1350-novembre 1351, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Federica Monteleone Il viaggio di Carlo Magno in Terra Santa. Un’esperienza di pellegrinaggio nella tradizione europea occidentale, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo   Francesca Pucci Donati Fra teorie mediche e pratica quotidiana: i calendari dietetici dell’Occidente latino altomedievale (secoli IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2004 Alberto Ricciardi L’Epistolario di Lupo di Ferrières come fonte per la storia degli intellettuali nell’età di Carlo il Calvo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Francesco Paolo Terlizzi I trattati dell'Anonimo Normanno: ricerche di ecclesiologia, Tesi

  15. and extracellular laccase isoenzymes from Pleurotus ostreatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZMG

    Colonia Vicentina, Delegación Iztapalapa, 09340 México D.F., México. ... In this study, extracellular laccase enzymes produced by Pleurotus ostreatus was identified in .... the intracellular forms), through the modified zymography method of.

  16. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  17. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  18. Low pH increases the yield of exosome isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Jae-Jun; Lee, Mijung; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2015-05-22

    Exosomes are the extracellular vesicles secreted by various cells. Exosomes mediate intercellular communication by delivering a variety of molecules between cells. Cancer cell derived exosomes seem to be related with tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor microenvironment is thought to be acidic and this low pH controls exosome physiology, leading to tumor progression. Despite the importance of microenvironmental pH on exosome, most of exosome studies have been performed without regard to pH. Therefore, the difference of exosome stability and yield of isolation by different pH need to be studied. In this research, we investigated the yield of total exosomal protein and RNA after incubation in acidic, neutral and alkaline conditioned medium. Representative exosome markers were investigated by western blot after incubation of exosomes in different pH. As a result, the concentrations of exosomal protein and nucleic acid were significantly increased after incubation in the acidic medium compared with neutral medium. The higher levels of exosome markers including CD9, CD63 and HSP70 were observed after incubation in an acidic environment. On the other hand, no exosomal protein, exosomal RNA and exosome markers have been detected after incubation in an alkaline condition. In summary, our results indicate that the acidic condition is the favorable environment for existence and isolation of exosomes.

  19. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  20. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  1. Preferential intracellular pH regulation represents a general pattern of pH homeostasis during acid-base disturbances in the armoured catfish, Pterygoplichthys pardalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T S; Shartau, R B; Baker, D W; Jackson, D C; Val, A L; Brauner, C J

    2014-08-01

    Preferential intracellular pH (pHi) regulation, where pHi is tightly regulated in the face of a blood acidosis, has been observed in a few species of fish, but only during elevated blood PCO2. To determine whether preferential pHi regulation may represent a general pattern for acid-base regulation during other pH disturbances we challenged the armoured catfish, Pterygoplichthys pardalis, with anoxia and exhaustive exercise, to induce a metabolic acidosis, and bicarbonate injections to induce a metabolic alkalosis. Fish were terminally sampled 2-3 h following the respective treatments and extracellular blood pH, pHi of red blood cells (RBC), brain, heart, liver and white muscle, and plasma lactate and total CO2 were measured. All treatments resulted in significant changes in extracellular pH and RBC pHi that likely cover a large portion of the pH tolerance limits of this species (pH 7.15-7.86). In all tissues other than RBC, pHi remained tightly regulated and did not differ significantly from control values, with the exception of a decrease in white muscle pHi after anoxia and an increase in liver pHi following a metabolic alkalosis. Thus preferential pHi regulation appears to be a general pattern for acid-base homeostasis in the armoured catfish and may be a common response in Amazonian fishes.

  2. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto; Apon Zaenal Mustopa; Kustiariyah Tarman

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii) KT30. Methods:In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results:Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions:Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  3. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii KT30. Methods: In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results: Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions: Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  4. Genetically manipulated phages with improved pH resistance for oral administration in veterinary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Costa, Ana Rita; Santos, José F.; Siliakus, Melvin F.; van Lent, Jan W. M.; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Azeredo, Joana; Kluskens, Leon D.

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered phages to control zoonotic pathogens face important challenges, mainly related to the hostile conditions found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). These include temperature, salinity and primarily pH, which is exceptionally low in certain compartments. Phage survival under these conditions can be jeopardized and undermine treatment. Strategies like encapsulation have been attempted with relative success, but are typically complex and require several optimization steps. Here we report a simple and efficient alternative, consisting in the genetic engineering of phages to display lipids on their surfaces. Escherichia coli phage T7 was used as a model and the E. coli PhoE signal peptide was genetically fused to its major capsid protein (10 A), enabling phospholipid attachment to the phage capsid. The presence of phospholipids on the mutant phages was confirmed by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography, Dynamic Light Scattering and phospholipase assays. The stability of phages was analysed in simulated GIT conditions, demonstrating improved stability of the mutant phages with survival rates 102–107 pfu.mL−1 higher than wild-type phages. Our work demonstrates that phage engineering can be a good strategy to improve phage tolerance to GIT conditions, having promising application for oral administration in veterinary medicine. PMID:27976713

  5. Global mapping of protein phosphorylation events identifies Ste20, Sch9 and the cell-cycle regulatory kinases Cdc28/Pho85 as mediators of fatty acid starvation responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pultz, Dennis; Bennetzen, Martin V; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis, degradation, and metabolism of fatty acids are strictly coordinated to meet the nutritional and energetic needs of cells and organisms. In the absence of exogenous fatty acids, proliferation and growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on endogenous synthesis of fatty acids...... identified as being regulated in a temporal manner in response to inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by cerulenin. By bioinformatic analysis of these phosphorylation events, we have identified the cell cycle kinases Cdc28 and Pho85, the PAK kinase Ste20 as well as the protein kinase Sch9 as central mediators...

  6. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; HUANG Xiao-wei; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2004-01-01

    @@ An extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum) was purified to SDSPAGE homogeneity with 14-fold purification by ultrafiltration、 ammonium sulfate precipetation、hydrophobic interaction chromatography and anion exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of the protease was 32 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The N-terminal sequence of first 10 amino acids was A-T-Q-S-N-A-P-W-G-L. This enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima of 9-10 and 60℃, respectively, and was stable over a wide range of pH 4-10 and temperature 4-50 ℃. It did not require Ca2+ for activity and thermal stability. Pre-incubation of enzyme with Zn2+ , Cu2+ , Hg2+,Fe3+ inhibited most of the enzyme activity, but Mn2+ increased enzyme activity up to 38%. It remained stable in the presence of Tween20, H2O2, EDTA. The inhibition profile of the enzymes by PMSF, suggested that this purified protease belongs to the serine protease family. The protease could immobilize nematodes (Panagrellus redivirus) in bioassays and hydrolyzed proteins of the purified cuticle.

  7. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  8. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  9. PhEDEx Data Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  10. Programmable pH buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  11. PhEDEx Data Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Ricky [University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Wildish, Tony [Princeton University (United States); Huang, Chih-Hao [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  12. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  13. Inhibition of intracellular pH control and relationship to cytotoxicity of chlorambucil and vinblastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, C. S.; Chadwick, J. A.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The uptake and cytotoxicity of weakly acidic or basic chemotherapeutic agents is determined in part by passive diffusion along the pH gradient between the intracellular and extracellular compartments. In vivo it is known that tumour extracellular pH is more acidic than intracellular pH. Using CaNT murine tumour cells in vitro, we found the cytotoxicity of chlorambucil (a weak acid) increased as the extracellular pH of the culture medium (pHmed) was acidified. The cytotoxicity of vinblastine shows a reverse pH relationship with reduced cytotoxicity as pHmed was acidified. Chlorambucil cytotoxicity increased at acidic pHmed because the weak acidic function is ionised to a lesser extent at acidic pH and, therefore, favours drug uptake into the relatively neutral intracellular compartment. Vinblastine cytotoxicity decreased at acidic pHmed because the weak basic function is ionised to a greater extent at acidic pH and therefore does not favour drug uptake into the relatively neutral intracellular compartment. Using a combination of an inhibitor of the cell membrane proton pump, amiloride, and the ionophore, nigericin, the intracellular compartment can be acidified. This results in a time-dependent increase in sensitivity of the cells to low pHmed with significant cytotoxicity after 6 h exposure to pHmed = 6.2 and suggests that there is potential for direct tumour cytotoxicity in vivo if the tumour extracellular pH were equally acidic. An indirect effect of intracellular acidification is to alter the distribution of drugs between the extra- and intracellular compartment by reducing the pH gradient across the cell membrane. In response to intracellular acidification, the cytotoxicity of chlorambucil was reduced and that for vinblastine was increased. Inhibition of cellular pH control may result in direct cytotoxicity by acidification due to inhibition of proton efflux or indirectly by resulting in differential uptake of chemotherapeutic agents with weak acidic or basic

  14. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation at low pH through urea hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S A; Prosser, J I

    2001-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation in laboratory liquid batch cultures of autotrophic ammonia oxidizers rarely occurs at pH values less than 7, due to ionization of ammonia and the requirement for ammonium transport rather than diffusion of ammonia. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence for autotrophic nitrification in acid soils, which may be carried out by ammonia oxidizers capable of using urea as a source of ammonia. To determine the mechanism of urea-linked ammonia oxidation, a ureolytic autotrophic ammonia oxidizer, Nitrosospira sp. strain NPAV, was grown in liquid batch culture at a range of pH values with either ammonium or urea as the sole nitrogen source. Growth and nitrite production from ammonium did not occur at pH values below 7. Growth on urea occurred at pH values in the range 4 to 7.5 but ceased when urea hydrolysis was complete, even though ammonia, released during urea hydrolysis, remained in the medium. The results support a mechanism whereby urea enters the cells by diffusion and intracellular urea hydrolysis and ammonia oxidation occur independently of extracellular pH in the range 4 to 7.5. A proportion of the ammonia produced during this process diffuses from the cell and is not subsequently available for growth if the extracellular pH is less than 7. Ureolysis therefore provides a mechanism for nitrification in acid soils, but a proportion of the ammonium produced is likely to be released from the cell and may be used by other soil organisms.

  15. The extracellular redox state modulates mitochondrial function, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis in murine hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nocito

    Full Text Available Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB/acetoacetate (Acoc, reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG, and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular βOHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular βOHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(PH and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater βOHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased β-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of βOHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases.

  16. Sorption of cadmium to bacterial extracellular polymeric sediment coatings under estuarine conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlekat, C.E.; Decho, A.W.; Chandler, G.T. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences

    1998-09-01

    Microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are ubiquitous features in aquatic environments. Produced by surface-adherent bacteria and microalgae, EPS are often present as coatings on surfaces of sediment particles and exhibit high affinities for divalent cationic metals. Thus, EPS sediment coatings may participate in the fate of potentially toxic metals. The authors coated particulate silica with EPS produced by NISC1, a bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments, in order to measure the metal binding characteristics of these coatings. They used the radioisotope {sup 109}Cd to measure effects of salinity, Cd concentration, and pH on Cd sorption to EPS-coated (EPS-silica) silica and to noncoated silica (NC-silica). Also, Cd sorption by NISC1 EPS coatings was compared to coatings of polymers formed by the bacterium, Alteromonas atlantica and the alga, Macrocystis porifera. Under all circumstances, EPS coatings increased the affinity of silica for Cd. Extracellular polymeric substance-particulate aggregates rapidly sorbed up to 90% of Cd from aqueous solution. Extracellular polymeric substance sediment coatings exhibited a maximum log distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of 6.5 at 2.5%. Sorption of Cd to NC-silica was affected by salinity and metal concentration, whereas sorption of Cd to EPS-silica was only affected by salinity under high metal concentrations. Changes in pH had a dramatic effect on Cd sorption, with the proportion of free Cd to sorbed Cd changing from approximately 90% at pH 5 to 5% at pH 9. Desorption of Cd from EPS-silica was enhanced with increasing salinity. These experiments suggest that EPS coatings actively participate in binding dissolved overlying and pore-water metals in estuarine sediments.

  17. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  18. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  19. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  20. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  1. General Biochemical Characterization of Thermostable Extracellular beta-Amylase from Clostridium thermosulfurogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, H H; Zeikus, J G

    1985-05-01

    Clostridium thermosulfurogenes, an anaerobic bacterium which ferments starch into ethanol at 62 degrees C, produced an active extracellular amylase and contained intracellular glucoamylase but not pullulanase activity. The extracellular amylase was purified 2.4-fold, and its general physicochemical and catalytic properties were examined. The extracellular amylase was characterized as a beta-amylase (1,4-alpha-d-glucan maltohydrolase) based on demonstration of exocleavage activity and the production of maltose with a beta-anomeric configuration from starch. The beta-amylase activity was stable and optimally active at 80 and 75 degrees C, respectively. The pH optimum for activity and the pH stability range was 5.5 to 6 and 3.5 to 6.5, respectively. The apparent [S](0.5V) and V(max) for beta-amylase activity on starch was 1 mg/ml and 60 U/mg of protein. Similar to described beta-amylase, the enzyme was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, Cu, and Hg; however, alpha- and beta-cyclodextrins were not competitive inhibitors. The beta-amylase was active and stable in the presence of air or 10% (vol/vol) ethanol. The beta-amylase and glucoamylase activities enabled the organism to actively ferment raw starch in the absence of significant pullulanase or alpha-amylase activity.

  2. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  3. The impact of pH inhomogeneities on CHO cell physiology and fed-batch process performance - two-compartment scale-down modelling and intracellular pH excursion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Matthias; Braun, Philipp; Doppler, Philipp; Posch, Christoph; Behrens, Dirk; Herwig, Christoph; Fricke, Jens

    2017-01-12

    Due to high mixing times and base addition from top of the vessel, pH inhomogeneities are most likely to occur during large-scale mammalian processes. The goal of this study was to set-up a scale-down model of a 10-12 m(3) stirred tank bioreactor and to investigate the effect of pH perturbations on CHO cell physiology and process performance. Short-term changes in extracellular pH are hypothesized to affect intracellular pH and thus cell physiology. Therefore, batch fermentations, including pH shifts to 9.0 and 7.8, in regular one-compartment systems are conducted. The short-term adaption of the cells intracellular pH are showed an immediate increase due to elevated extracellular pH. With this basis of fundamental knowledge, a two-compartment system is established which is capable of simulating defined pH inhomogeneities. In contrast to state-of-the-art literature, the scale-down model is included parameters (e.g. volume of the inhomogeneous zone) as they might occur during large-scale processes. pH inhomogeneity studies in the two-compartment system are performed with simulation of temporary pH zones of pH 9.0. The specific growth rate especially during the exponential growth phase is strongly affected resulting in a decreased maximum viable cell density and final product titer. The gathered results indicate that even short-term exposure of cells to elevated pH values during large-scale processes can affect cell physiology and overall process performance. In particular, it could be shown for the first time that pH perturbations, which might occur during the early process phase, have to be considered in scale-down models of mammalian processes.

  4. Analysis of the inter- and extracellular formation of platinum nanoparticles by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddin, T L [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown (South Africa); Gericke, M [MINTEK, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Whiteley, C G [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown (South Africa)

    2006-07-28

    Fusarium oxysporum fungal strain was screened and found to be successful for the inter- and extracellular production of platinum nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation was visually observed, over time, by the colour of the extracellular solution and/or the fungal biomass turning from yellow to dark brown, and their concentration was determined from the amount of residual hexachloroplatinic acid measured from a standard curve at 456 nm. The extracellular nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoparticles of varying size (10-100 nm) and shape (hexagons, pentagons, circles, squares, rectangles) were produced at both extracellular and intercellular levels by the Fusarium oxysporum. The particles precipitate out of solution and bioaccumulate by nucleation either intercellularly, on the cell wall/membrane, or extracellularly in the surrounding medium. The importance of pH, temperature and hexachloroplatinic acid (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) concentration in nanoparticle formation was examined through the use of a statistical response surface methodology. Only the extracellular production of nanoparticles proved to be statistically significant, with a concentration yield of 4.85 mg l{sup -1} estimated by a first-order regression model. From a second-order polynomial regression, the predicted yield of nanoparticles increased to 5.66 mg l{sup -1} and, after a backward step, regression gave a final model with a yield of 6.59 mg l{sup -1}.

  5. Analysis of the inter- and extracellular formation of platinum nanoparticles by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddin, T. L.; Gericke, M.; Whiteley, C. G.

    2006-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum fungal strain was screened and found to be successful for the inter- and extracellular production of platinum nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation was visually observed, over time, by the colour of the extracellular solution and/or the fungal biomass turning from yellow to dark brown, and their concentration was determined from the amount of residual hexachloroplatinic acid measured from a standard curve at 456 nm. The extracellular nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoparticles of varying size (10-100 nm) and shape (hexagons, pentagons, circles, squares, rectangles) were produced at both extracellular and intercellular levels by the Fusarium oxysporum. The particles precipitate out of solution and bioaccumulate by nucleation either intercellularly, on the cell wall/membrane, or extracellularly in the surrounding medium. The importance of pH, temperature and hexachloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) concentration in nanoparticle formation was examined through the use of a statistical response surface methodology. Only the extracellular production of nanoparticles proved to be statistically significant, with a concentration yield of 4.85 mg l-1 estimated by a first-order regression model. From a second-order polynomial regression, the predicted yield of nanoparticles increased to 5.66 mg l-1 and, after a backward step, regression gave a final model with a yield of 6.59 mg l-1.

  6. Seizure-induced damage to substantia nigra and globus pallidus is accompanied by pronounced intra- and extracellular acidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, K.; Smith, M.L.; Hansen, A.J.; Siesjoe, B.K. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden))

    1989-12-01

    Status epilepticus of greater than 30-min duration in rats gives rise to a conspicuous lesion in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNPR) and globus pallidus (GP). The objective of the present study was to explore whether the lesion, which encompasses necrosis of both neurons and glial cells, is related to intra- and extracellular acidosis. Using the flurothyl model previously described to produce seizures, we assessed regional pH values with the autoradiographic 5,5-dimethyl(2-14C)oxazolidine-2,4-dione technique. Regional pH values were assessed in animals with continuous seizures for 20 and 60 min, as well as in those allowed to recover for 30 and 120 min after seizure periods of 20 or 60 min. In additional animals, changes in extracellular fluid pH (pHe) were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes, and extracellular fluid (ECF) volume was calculated from the diffusion profile for electrophoretically administered tetramethylammonium. In structures such as the neocortex and the hippocampus, which show intense metabolic activation during seizures, status epilepticus of 20- and 60-min duration was accompanied by a reduction of the composite tissue pH (pHt) of 0.2-0.3 unit. Recovery of pHt was observed upon termination of seizures. In SNPR and in GP, the acidosis was marked to excessive after 20 and 60 min of seizures (delta pHt approximately 0.6 after 60 min).

  7. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  8. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  9. Particle-size fractions-dependent extracellular enzyme activity in sediments and implications for resource allocation in a subtropical mangrove ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of extracellular enzyme activities in particle-size fractions of sediments was investigated in a subtropical mangrove ecosystem. Five enzymes involved in carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P cycling were analyzed in the sand, silt, and clay of sediments. Among these fractions, the highest activities of phenol oxidase (PHO, β-D glucosidase (GLU, and N-acetyl-glucosiminidase (NAG were found in sand, and greater than bulk sediments of both intertidal zone (IZ and mangrove forest (MG. This result implied that sand fractions might protect selective enzymes through the adsorption without affecting their activities. Additionally, the enzyme-based resource allocation in various particle-size fractions demonstrated that nutirents availability varied with different particle-size fractions and only sand fraction of MG with highest total C showed high N and P availability among fractions. Besides, the analysis between elemental contents and enzymes activities in particle-size fractions suggested that enzymes could monitor the changes of nutrients availability and be good indicators of ecosystem responses to environmental changes. Thus, these results provided a means to assess the availability of different nutrients (C, N, and P during decomposition of sediment organic matter (SOM, and thus helping to better manage the subtropical mangrove ecosystems to sequester C into SOM.

  10. PhEDEx Data Service

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Ricky; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2009-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the SiteDB service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore,...

  11. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts, ac

  12. Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soil enzymes originate from a variety of organisms, notably fungi and bacteria...... and especially hydrolytic extracellular enzymes are of pivotal importance for decomposition of organic substrates and biogeochemical cycling. Their activity reflects the functional diversity and activity of the microorganisms involved in decomposition processes which are essential processes for soil functioning......, experimental conditions of extraction of enzymes from soils, buffer and pH, substrate concentration, temperature and the necessary controls were optimized and standardized. This has resulted in an optimized standard operating procedure of EEA, which are being tested as an indicator of soil functional diversity...

  13. Extracellular K+ activates a K(+)- and H(+)-permeable conductance in frog taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, S S; Margolskee, R F

    1998-03-01

    1. The effect of extracellular K+ on membrane currents of bull frog (Rana catesbeiana) taste receptor cells (TRCs) was investigated by the patch clamp and fast perfusion techniques. Extracellular K+ (2.5-90 mM) increased a TRC resting conductance and enhanced both inward and outward whole-cell currents. 2. To isolate the inward current activated by external potassium (PA current), TRCs were dialysed with 110 mM NMGCl while extracellular NaCl was replaced with NMGCl. Under these conditions, the PA current displayed an S-shaped current-voltage (I-V) curve in the -100 to 100 mV range. Extracellular Rb+ and NH4+, but not Li+, Na+ or Cs+, evoked similar currents. 3. The PA current reversal potential (Vr) did not follow the equilibrium K+ potential under experimental conditions. Therefore, K+ ions were not the only current carriers. The influence of other ions on the PA current Vr indicated that the channels involved are permeable to K+ and H+ and much less so to Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. Relative permeabilities were estimated on the basis of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation as follows: PH:PK:PNa = 4000:1:0.04. 4. All I-V curves of the PA current were nearly linear at low negative potentials. The slope conductance at these voltages was used to characterize the dependence of the PA current on external K+ and H+. The slope conductance versus K+ concentration was fitted by the Hill equation. The data yielded a half-maximal concentration, K1/2 = 19 +/- 3 mM and a Hill coefficient, nH = 1.53 +/- 0.36 (means +/- S.E.M.). 5. The dependence of the mean PA current and the current variance on the K+ concentration indicated a rise in the open probability of the corresponding channels as extracellular K+ was increased. With 110 mM KCl in the bath, the single channel conductance was estimated at about 6 pS. Taken together, the data suggest that extracellular K+ may serve as a ligand to activate specific small-conductance cation channels (PA channels). The mean number of the PA channels

  14. Controlling composition and color characteristics of Monascus pigments by pH and nitrogen sources in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kan; Song, Da; Chen, Gong; Pistolozzi, Marco; Wu, Zhenqiang; Quan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Submerged fermentations of Monascus anka were performed with different nitrogen sources at different pH in 3 L bioreactors. The results revealed that the Monascus pigments dominated by different color components (yellow pigments, orange pigments or red pigments) could be selectively produced through pH control and nitrogen source selection. A large amount of intracellular pigments dominated by orange pigments and a small amount of water-soluble extracellular yellow pigments were produced at low pH (pH 2.5 and 4.0), independently of the nitrogen source employed. At higher pH (pH 6.5), the role of the nitrogen source became more significant. In particular, when ammonium sulfate was used as nitrogen source, the intracellular pigments were dominated by red pigments with a small amount of yellow pigments. Conversely, when peptone was used, intracellular pigments were dominated by yellow pigments with a few red pigments derivatives. Neither the presence of peptone nor ammonium sulfate promoted the production of intracellular orange pigments while extracellular pigments with an orangish red color were observed in both cases, with a higher yield when peptone was used. Two-stage pH control fermentation was then performed to improve desirable pigments yield and further investigate the effect of pH and nitrogen sources on pigments composition. These results provide a useful strategy to produce Monascus pigments with different composition and different color characteristics.

  15. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  16. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  17. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  18. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  19. Extracellular acid block and acid-enhanced inactivation of the Ca2+-activated cation channel TRPM5 involve residues in the S3-S4 and S5-S6 extracellular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Zheng; Liman, Emily R

    2005-05-27

    TRPM5, a member of the superfamily of transient receptor potential ion channels, is essential for the detection of bitter, sweet, and amino acid tastes. In heterologous cell types it forms a nonselective cation channel that is activated by intracellular Ca(2+). TRPM5 is likely to be part of the taste transduction cascade, and regulators of TRPM5 are likely to affect taste sensation. In this report we show that TRPM5, but not the related channel TRPM4b, is potently blocked by extracellular acidification. External acidification has two effects, a fast reversible block of the current (IC(50) pH = 6.2) and a slower irreversible enhancement of current inactivation. Mutation of a single Glu residue in the S3-S4 linker and a His residue in the pore region each reduced sensitivity of TRPM5 currents to fast acid block (IC(50) pH = 5.8 for both), and the double mutant was nearly insensitive to acidic pH (IC(50) pH = 5.0). Prolonged exposure to acidic pH enhanced inactivation of TRPM5 currents, and mutant channels that were less sensitive to acid block were also less sensitive to acid-enhanced inactivation, suggesting an intimate association between the two processes. These processes are, however, distinct because the pore mutant H896N, which has normal sensitivity to acid block, shows significant recovery from acid-enhanced inactivation. These data show that extracellular acidification acts through specific residues on TRPM5 to block conduction through two distinct but related mechanisms and suggest a possible interaction between extracellular pH and activation and adaptation of bitter, sweet, and amino acid taste transduction.

  20. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle Formation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different phy...

  1. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zoraida Andreu Martínez; María eYáñez-Mó

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physi...

  2. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  3. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  4. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  5. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  6. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  7. Extracellular conversion of adiponectin hexamers into trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-a; Nuñez, Martha; Briggs, David B.; Laskowski, Bethany L.; Chhun, Jimmy J.; Eleid, Joseph K.; Quon, Michael J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that exists as trimers, hexamers and larger species collectively referred to as HMW (high-molecular-weight) adiponectin. Whether hexamers or HMW adiponectin serve as precursors for trimers outside the circulation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that adiponectin trimers can be generated from larger oligomers secreted from primary rat adipose cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Purified hexameric, but not HMW, adiponectin converted into trimers in conditioned media separated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes or, more efficiently, when enclosed in the dialysis membrane in the presence of adipocytes. Several lines of evidence indicate that the conversion is mediated by an extracellular redox system. First, N-terminal epitope-tagged hexamers converted into trimers without proteolytic removal of the tag. Secondly, appearance of trimers was associated with conversion of disulfide-bonded dimers into monomers. Thirdly, thiol-reactive agents inhibited conversion into trimers. Consistent with a redox-based mechanism, purified hexamers reductively converted into trimers in defined glutathione redox buffer with reduction potential typically found in the extracellular environment while the HMW adiponectin remained stable. In addition, conversion of hexamers into trimers was enhanced by NADPH, but not by NADP+. Collectively, these data strongly suggest the presence of an extracellular redox system capable of converting adiponectin oligomers. PMID:22973892

  8. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  9. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  10. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  11. The mevalonate pathway as a therapeutic target in the Ph-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Riley, Caroline H

    2007-01-01

    The Ph-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPDs) polycythaemia vera, essential thrombocytosis and idiopathic myelofibrosis are acquired stem cell disorders, which pathophysiologically are featured by clonal myeloproliferation and accumulation of myeloid cells, the latter being...... being partly explained by a proteolytic bone marrow mileu owing to excessive release of various proteases with ensuing extracellular matrix degradation and constitutive mobilisation of CD34+ cells into the peripheral blood. Thrombohaemorrhagic complications are major clinical problems contributing...

  12. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  13. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  14. Cell-associated and extracellular proteolytic activity of an oral flagellate, Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bózner, P; Demes, P

    1991-01-01

    Proteolytic activities in crude extracts and culture filtrates from Trichomonas tenax were determined using hide powder azure as substrate and the proteinase profiles in both samples were analysed in SDS-polyacrylamide gels containing copolymerized gelatin. The enzyme activity in the crude extract was detected over a broad pH range and was strongly activated by dithiothreitol, mainly in the pH range 5-8, and inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Extracellular enzyme activity in culture filtrates was SH-dependent and increased continuously during incubation of the cell suspension, suggesting proteinase release. A total of seven distinct proteolytic bands could be detected in crude preparations. Three of these, with apparent Mr values 35,000, 45,000 and 56,000 and a pH optimum of 4-7, were SH-dependent and their inhibitory sensitivities were characteristic for cysteine proteinases. The 45,000 and 56,000 proteinases probably corresponded to those found in the culture filtrates. Proteolytic bands with apparent Mr 76,000, 87,000, 102,000 and 270,000 and pH optima in the alkaline region, pH 8-9, were independent of SH groups and were inhibited by a chelating agent EDTA, suggesting that they belong to the metalloproteinase family.

  15. Purification and characterization of major extracellular proteinases from Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, M; Lindquist, R; Fukuyama, K; Apodaca, G; Epstein, W L; McKerrow, J H

    1985-11-15

    Two extracellular proteinases that probably play a central role in the metabolism and pathogenesis of the most common dermatophyte of man, Trichophyton rubrum, were purified to homogeneity. Size-exclusion chromatography and Chromatofocusing were used to purify the major proteinases 42-fold from crude fungal culture filtrate. The major enzyme has pI 7.8 and subunit Mr 44 000, but forms a dimer of Mr approx. 90 000 in the absence of reducing agents. A second enzyme with pI 6.5 and subunit Mr 36 000, was also purified. It is very similar in substrate specificity to the major enzyme but has lower specific activity, and may be an autoproteolysis product. The major proteinase has pH optimum 8, a Ca2+-dependence maximum of 1 mM, and was inhibited by serine-proteinase inhibitors, especially tetrapeptidyl chloromethane derivatives with hydrophobic residues at the P-1 site. Kinetic studies also showed that tetrapeptides containing aromatic or hydrophobic residues at P-1 were the best substrates. A kcat./Km of 27 000 M-1 X S-1 was calculated for the peptide 3-carboxypropionyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide. The enzyme has significant activity against keratin, elastin and denatured type I collagen (Azocoll).

  16. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  17. Production and characterization of an extracellular lipase from Candida guilliermondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Caroline Defranceschi Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular lipases from the endophytic yeast Candida guilliermondii isolated from castor leaves (Ricinus communis L. were produced using low-cost raw materials such as agro-industrial residues and applying them in the esterification of oleic acid for evaluating their potential use in biodiesel production. After partial purification using ammonium sulfate, the enzyme was characterized and presented higher activity (26.8 ± 1.5 U mL-1 in the presence of 5 mmol L-1 NaCl at 30 ºC and pH 6.5. The production through submerged fermentation was formerly performed in 150 mL erlenmeyer flasks and, once the enzyme production was verified, assays in a 14 L bioreactor were conducted, obtaining 18 ± 1.4 U mL-1. The produced enzyme was applied in the oleic acid esterification under different solvents: hexane, cyclohexane or cyclohexanone and different acid:alcohol molar ratios. Higher ester conversion rate (81% was obtained using hexane and the molar ratio of 1:9 was the best conditions using methanol. The results suggest the potential for development of endophytic yeast in the production of biocatalyst through submerged fermentation using agroindustrial residues as culture medium.

  18. Dark production of extracellular superoxide by the coral Porites astreoides and representative symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The reactive oxygen species (ROS superoxide has been implicated in both beneficial and detrimental processes in coral biology, ranging from pathogenic disease resistance to coral bleaching. Despite the critical role of ROS in coral health, there is a distinct lack of ROS measurements and thus an incomplete understanding of underpinning ROS sources and production mechanisms within coral systems. Here, we quantified in situ extracellular superoxide concentrations at the surfaces of aquaria-hosted Porites astreoides during a diel cycle. High concentrations of superoxide (~10’s of nM were present at coral surfaces, and these levels did not change significantly as a function of time of day. These results indicate that the coral holobiont produces extracellular superoxide in the dark, independent of photosynthesis. As a short-lived anion at physiological pH, superoxide has a limited ability to cross intact biological membranes. Further, removing surface mucus layers from the P. astreoides colonies did not impact external superoxide concentrations. We therefore attribute external superoxide derived from the coral holobiont under these conditions to the activity of the coral host epithelium, rather than mucus-derived epibionts or internal sources such as endosymbionts (e.g., Symbiodinium. However, endosymbionts likely contribute to internal ROS levels via extracellular superoxide production. Indeed, common coral symbionts, including multiple strains of Symbiodinium (clades A to D and the bacterium Endozoicomonas montiporae LMG 24815, produced extracellular superoxide in the dark and at low light levels. Further, representative P. astreoides symbionts, Symbiodinium CCMP2456 (clade A and E. montiporae, produced similar concentrations of superoxide alone and in combination with each other, in the dark and low light, and regardless of time of day. Overall, these results indicate that healthy, non-stressed P. astreoides and representative symbionts produce

  19. PRODUCTION OPTIMIZATION OF EXTRACELLULAR L-ASPARAGINASE THROUGH SOLID- STATE FERMENTATION BY ISOLATED BACILLUS SUBTILIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Shukla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available L-asparaginase has been used as anti-tumor agent for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and food processing aid to reduce the formation of cancer causing acrylamide. Extracellular Lasparaginase production was optimized through solid state fermentation using ground nut cake by isolated Bacillus subtilis. which was not reported in literature.Optimum production of L-asparaginase enzyme (18.4U/ml was obtained after 48h of incubation at 370C moisture content of 70% and at pH 7.

  20. Extracellular acidification synergizes with PDGF to stimulate migration of mouse embryo fibroblasts through activation of p38MAPK with a PTX-sensitive manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Caiyan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Clinical Medicine Research Center of the Affiliated Hospital, Inner Mongolia Medical University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Wu, Taoya; Bao, Muqiri; Bao, Liang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Tobo, Masayuki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Damirin, Alatangaole, E-mail: bigaole@imu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China)

    2015-05-01

    The elucidation of the functional mechanisms of extracellular acidification stimulating intracellular signaling pathway is of great importance for developing new targets of treatment for solid tumors, and inflammatory disorders characterized by extracellular acidification. In the present study, we focus on the regulation of extracellular acidification on intracellular signaling pathways in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). We found extracellular acidification was at least partly involved in stimulating p38MAPK pathway through PTX-sensitive behavior to enhance cell migration in the presence or absence of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Statistical analysis showed that the actions of extracellular acidic pH and PDGF on inducing enhancement of cell migration were not an additive effect. However, we also found extracellular acidic pH did inhibit the viability and proliferation of MEFs, suggesting that extracellular acidification stimulates cell migration probably through proton-sensing mechanisms within MEFs. Using OGR1-, GPR4-, and TDAG8-gene knock out technology, and real-time qPCR, we found known proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) were unlikely to be involved in the regulation of acidification on cell migration. In conclusion, our present study validates that extracellular acidification stimulates chemotactic migration of MEFs through activation of p38MAPK with a PTX-sensitive mechanism either by itself, or synergistically with PDGF, which was not regulated by the known proton-sensing GPCRs, TRPV1, or ASICs. Our results suggested that others proton-sensing GPCRs or ion channels might exist in MEFs, which mediates cell migration induced by extracellular acidification in the presence or absence of PDGF. - Highlights: • Acidic pH and PDGF synergize to stimulate MEFs migration via Gi/p38MAPK pathway. • Extracellular acidification inhibits the

  1. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  2. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  3. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Seper

    Full Text Available The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  4. Optimization of the production of extracellular α-amylase by Kluyveromyces marxianus IF0 0288 by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota-Yiolanda Stergiou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the production of extracellular α-amylase by Kluyveromyces marxianus IF0 0288 using optimized nutritional and cultural conditions in a complex yeast medium under aerobic batch fermentation. By applying the conventional "one-variable-at-a-time" approach and the response surface methodology, the effect of four fermentation parameters (type of carbon source, initial culture pH, temperature, and incubation time on the growth and α-amylase production was evaluated. The production of α-amylase during 60 h of fermentation increased 13-fold under optimized conditions (1% starch, pH 6.0, 30ºC in comparison to the conventional optimization method. The initial pH value of 6.13 and temperature of 30.3ºC were optimal conditions by the response surface methodology, leading to further improvement (up to 13-fold in the production of extracellular α-amylase. These results constituted first evidence that K. marxianus could be potentially used as an effective source of extracellular α-amylase.

  5. Experimental investigation and optimization of process variables affecting the production of extracellular lipase by Kluyveromyces marxianus IFO 0288.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Panagiota-Yiolanda; Foukis, Athanasios; Sklivaniti, Helen; Zacharaki, Paraskevi; Papagianni, Maria; Papamichael, Emmanuel M

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the production and optimization of extracellular lipase from Kluyveromyces marxianus IFO 0288 was investigated by using optimized nutritional and cultural conditions in a yeast medium containing glucose as the carbon source in fully aerobic batch fermentation (150 rpm). The influence of four fermentation parameters (type of lipidic source, initial culture pH, temperature, and length of fermentation) on growth and lipase production was investigated and evaluated using the conventional "one variable at a time" approach and response surface methodology. An 18-fold increase in lipase production during 65 h of fermentation was obtained with optimized nutritional (0.5 % olive oil) and cultivation (pH 6.5, 35 °C) conditions by employing the conventional optimization method. By applying the response surface methodology technique the initial pH value of 6.4 and temperature of 32.5 °C were identified as optimal and led to further improvements (up to 18-fold) of extracellular lipase production. The results provide, for the first time, evidence that K. marxianus has the potential to be used as an efficient producer of extracellular lipase with prospective application in a variety of industrial and biotechnological areas.

  6. Extracellular enzymatic activities of Bipolaris sorokiniana isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geimba, Mercedes P; Brandelli, Adriano

    2002-01-01

    Several enzymatic activities were investigated in six isolates of the fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana, originating from different areas of Brazil. Among the glycosidases studied, beta-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, beta-xylosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and chitobiohydrolase were the major activities. In some isolates, beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, and alpha-mannosidase activities were also present. Polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes, such as pectin lyase and carboxymethyl cellulase were detected in significant amounts, and their activities were variable among the different isolates. Other enzymes, namely phosphatases, proteinases and phenol oxidase, were also examined, showing variable amounts depending on the isolate. The pH dependence of all enzymes tested was investigated. Endoproteinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, and phenoloxidase had maximum activity in the pH range of 6-8, whilst all other enzymes showed maximum activity at pH 4-6.

  7. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Junying, E-mail: jyli04@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  8. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...... the extraction (Figure 1.a and 1.b). Comparing to cells in control group, MR-1 treated at 38 °C for EPS extraction showed different electrochemical characterizations as revealed by differential pulse voltammetry (Figure 1.c). EPS extracted from MR-1 also was proved to be electrochemically active. The present...

  9. Resorbable extracellular matrix grafts in urologic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Santucci

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is an increasingly large body of literature concerning tissue-engineering products that may be used in urology. Some of these are quite complex (such as multilayer patient-specific cell-seeded implants yet the most simple and successful products to date are also the most uncomplicated: resorbable acellular extra-cellular matrices (ECMs harvested from animals. ECMs have been used in a variety of difficult urologic reconstruction problems, and this review is intended to summarize this complex literature for the practicing urologist. METHODS: Medline search of related terms such as "SIS, small intestinal submucosa, ECM, extracellular matrix, acellular matrix and urologic reconstruction". Manuscripts missed in the initial search were taken from the bibliographies of the primary references. RESULTS: Full review of potential clinical uses of resorbable extra-cellular matrices in urologic reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, the "state of the art" in tissue engineering solutions for urologic reconstruction means resorbable acellular xenograft matrices. They show promise when used as a pubovaginal sling or extra bolstering layers in ureteral or urethral repairs, although recent problems with inflammation following 8-ply pubovaginal sling use and failures after 1- and 4-ply SIS repair of Peyronie's disease underscore the need for research before wide adoption. Preliminary data is mixed concerning the potential for ECM urethral patch graft, and more data is needed before extended uses such as bladder augmentation and ureteral replacement are contemplated. The distant future of ECMs in urology likely will include cell-seeded grafts with the eventual hope of producing "off the shelf" replacement materials. Until that day arrives, ECMs only fulfill some of the requirements for the reconstructive urologist.

  10. Live tissue imaging shows reef corals elevate pH under their calcifying tissue relative to seawater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Venn

    Full Text Available The threat posed to coral reefs by changes in seawater pH and carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification raises the need for a better mechanistic understanding of physiological processes linked to coral calcification. Current models of coral calcification argue that corals elevate extracellular pH under their calcifying tissue relative to seawater to promote skeleton formation, but pH measurements taken from the calcifying tissue of living, intact corals have not been achieved to date. We performed live tissue imaging of the reef coral Stylophora pistillata to determine extracellular pH under the calcifying tissue and intracellular pH in calicoblastic cells. We worked with actively calcifying corals under flowing seawater and show that extracellular pH (pHe under the calicoblastic epithelium is elevated by ∼0.5 and ∼0.2 pH units relative to the surrounding seawater in light and dark conditions respectively. By contrast, the intracellular pH (pHi of the calicoblastic epithelium remains stable in the light and dark. Estimates of aragonite saturation states derived from our data indicate the elevation in subcalicoblastic pHe favour calcification and may thus be a critical step in the calcification process. However, the observed close association of the calicoblastic epithelium with the underlying crystals suggests that the calicoblastic cells influence the growth of the coral skeleton by other processes in addition to pHe modification. The procedure used in the current study provides a novel, tangible approach for future investigations into these processes and the impact of environmental change on the cellular mechanisms underpinning coral calcification.

  11. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia...... parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K(+) in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better...

  12. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  13. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  14. Bidirectional extracellular matrix signaling during tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Normal tissue development and function are regulated by the interplay between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM provides biochemical and mechanical contextual information that is conveyed from the cell membrane through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus to direct cell phenotype. Cells, in turn, remodel the ECM and thereby sculpt their local microenvironment. Here we review the mechanisms by which cells interact with, respond to, and influence the ECM, with particular emphasis placed on the role of this bidirectional communication during tissue morphogenesis. We also discuss the implications for successful engineering of functional tissues ex vivo. PMID:19896886

  15. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-05-21

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.

  16. VirS, an OmpR/PhoB subfamily response regulator, is required for activation of vapA gene expression in Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Tsutomu; Hirota, Takuya; Takeuchi, Tatsuya; Hagiuda, Hirofumi; Miyazaki, Shiko; Takai, Shinji

    2014-10-03

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pulmonary pathogen in foals and in immunocompromised individuals. Virulent R. equi strains carry an 80-90 kb virulence plasmid that expresses the virulence-associated protein A (VapA). VapA expression is regulated by temperature and pH. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator, VirR, is involved in the regulation of the vapA gene. To examine the mechanism underlying transcriptional regulation of vapA, we characterized an R. equi mutant in which another putative transcriptional regulator encoded on the virulence plasmid, VirS, was deleted. Deletion of virS reduced vapA promoter activity to non-inducible levels. Complementary expression of VirS in the virS deletion mutant restored transcription at the PvapA promoter, even under non-inducing conditions (30°C and pH 8.0). In addition, VirS expression increased PvapA promoter activity in the absence of functional VirR. Further, transcription of the icgA operon containing virS was regulated by pH and temperature in the same manner as vapA. This study suggests that VirS is required for VapA expression and that regulation of PvapA-promoter activity may be achieved by controlling VirS expression levels.

  17. Perturbation of red blood cell membrane rigidity by extracellular ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulitschke, M; Nash, G B; Anstee, D J; Tanner, M J; Gratzer, W B

    1995-07-01

    It is known that binding of extracellular antibodies against the major sialoglycoprotein, glycophorin A, reduced the deformability of the red blood cell membrane. This has been taken to result from new or altered interactions between the glycophorin A and the membrane skeleton. We have shown by means of the micropipette aspiration technique that antibodies against the preponderant transmembrane protein, band 3, induce similar effects. A definite but much smaller reduction in elasticity of the membrane is engendered by univalent Fab fragments of the anti-band 3 antibodies. By examining cells genetically devoid of glycophorin A or containing a variant of this constituent, truncated at the inner membrane surface, we have shown that the anti-band 3 antibodies do not act through the band 3-associated glycophorin A. We examined the effect of anti-glycophorin A antibodies on homozygous Wr(a+b-) cells, in which an amino acid replacement in band 3 annihilates the Wright b (Wrb) epitope (comprising sequence elements of glycophorin A and band 3) and thus, by implication disrupts or perturbs the band 3-glycophorin A interaction; these cells show a much smaller response to an anti-glycophorin A antibody than do normal controls. We infer that in this case anti-glycophorin A antibodies exert their rigidifying effect through the associated band 3. Another anti-glycophorin A antibody, directed against an epitope remote from the membrane surface, however, increases the rigidity of both Wr(a+b-) and normal cells. This implies that not all antibodies act in the same manner in modifying the membrane mechanical properties. The effect exerted by anti-band 3 antibodies appears not to be transmitted through the band 3-ankyrin-spectrin pathway because the rigidifying effect of the intact antibody persists at alkaline pH, at which there is evidence that the ankyrin-band 3 link is largely dissociated. The large difference between the effects of saturating concentrations of the divalent and

  18. Raynaud-Phänomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturm W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Das Raynaud-Phänomen ist charakterisiert durch eine anfallsweise auftretende Minderdurchblutung und Verfärbung der Finger bedingt durch eine überschießende Vasokonstriktion der arteriellen Blutgefäße. Diese Veränderungen werden durch Kälte oder Stress ausgelöst und können ohne (primäre Form oder mit zugrundeliegenden Erkrankungen (sekundäre Form, häufig bei Sklerodermie, anderen Autoimmunerkrankungen oder Gefäßerkrankungen vorkommen. In der Diagnostik spielen Anamnese, physikalische Untersuchung, Laboruntersuchungen, Kapillarmikroskopie und Gefäßuntersuchungen mit Sonographie bzw. CT die wichtigste Rolle. In der Behandlung des Raynaud- Phänomens ist eine medikamentöse Therapie gerechtfertigt, wenn allgemeine Maßnahmen keine Besserung der Symptomatik bringen. Für Kalziumkanalblocker ist eine Wirksamkeit belegt, insbesondere für Nifedipin, das in seiner Retardform besonders geeignet erscheint. Bei schweren, insbesondere sekundären Formen von Raynaud mit ischämischen digitalen Ulzera, ist die Wirkung für Prostaglandine (besonders Iloprost und Endothelinantagonisten (Bosentan ausreichend belegt.

  19. Solvent production from starch: Effect of pH on. alpha. -amylase and glucoamylase localization and synthesis in synthetic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, B.K.; Kapp, C.; Goma, G.; Soucaille, P. (Institut National des Sciences Appliquees, 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie Biochimique et Alimentaire)

    1992-08-01

    The fermentation of starch by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has been reviewed in an optimised synthetic medium. A progressive increase of pH from 4.4 to 5.2 led to a higher production of extracellular {alpha}-amylase whereas glucoamylase was poorly affected. A portion of these enzymes was cell-associated and on increasing the pH from 4.4 to 5.8 a decrease was noted in cell-bound enzymes. The association was higher for the glucoamylase than for the {alpha}-amylase. The highest rate of starch consumption was at pH 5.2 whereas due to the earlier shift to solvent production at low pH, the highest solvent production was at pH 4.4. This study suggested that the level of {alpha}-amylase and then the rate of starch hydrolysis was the limiting step of sugar catabolism in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. (orig.).

  20. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  1. Thermoreversible copolymer gels for extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, B; Kim, S W; Bae, Y H

    2000-07-01

    To improve the properties of a reversible synthetic extracellular matrix based on a thermally reversible polymer, copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid were prepared in benzene with varying contents of acrylic acid (0 to 3%) and the thermal properties were evaluated. The poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and copolymers made with acrylic acid had molecular weights from 0.8 to 1.7 x10(6) D. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed the high-molecular-weight acrylic acid copolymers had similar onset temperatures to the homopolymers, but the peak width was considerably increased with increasing acrylic acid content. DSC and cloud point measurements showed that polymers with 0 to 3% acrylic acid exhibit a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition between 30 degrees and 37 degrees C. In swelling studies, the homopolymer showed significant syneresis at temperatures above 31 degrees C. Copolymers with 1 and 1.5% showed syneresis beginning at 32 degrees and 37 degrees C, respectively. At 37 degrees C the copolymers with 1.5-3% acrylic acid showed little or no syneresis. Due to the high water content and a transition near physiologic conditions (below 37 degrees C), the polymers with 1.5-2.0% acrylic acid exhibited properties that would be useful in the development of a refillable synthetic extracellular matrix. Such a matrix could be applied to several cell types, including islets of Langerhans, for a biohybrid artificial pancreas.

  2. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  3. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  4. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lässer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs. This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge.

  5. Extracellular matrix in canine mammary tumors with special focus on versican, a versatile extracellular proteoglycan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdélyi, Ildikó

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) research has become fundamental to understand cancer. This thesis focuses on the exploration of ECM composition and organization in canine mammary tumors, with a special interest in the large chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycan (PG), versican. Chapter 1 gives an overvie

  6. A Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Flammeovirga sp.MY04 and Its Extracellular Agarase System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Wenjun; GU Jingyan; YAN Qiujie; LI Jungang; WU Zhihong; GU Qianqun; LI Yuezhong

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Flammeovirga can digest complex polysaccharides(CPs),but no details have been reported regarding the CP depolymerases of these bacteria.MY04,an agarolytic marine bacterium isolated from coastal sediments,has been identified as a new member of the genus Flammeovirga.The MY04 strain is able to utilize multiple CPs as a sole carbon source and grows well on agarose,mannan,or xylan.This strain produces high concentrations of extracellular proteins (490mgL-1± 18.2 mgL-1liquid culture)that exhibit efficient and extensive degradation activities on various polysaccharides,especially agarose.These proteins have an activity of 310 U mg-1± 9.6 Umg-1 proteins.The extracellular agarase system(EAS)in the crude extracellular enzymes contains at least four agarose depolymerases,which are with molecular masses of approximately 30-70 kDa.The EAS is stable at a wide range of pH values(6.0-11.0),temperatures(0-50℃),and sodium chloride(NaCl)concentrations(0-0.9mol L-1).Two major degradation products generated from agarose by the EAS are identified to be neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose,suggesting that β-agarases are the major constituents of the MY04 EAS.These results suggest that the Flammeovirga strain MY04 and its polysaccharide-degradation system hold great promise in industrial applications.

  7. Acid loading test (pH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  8. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  9. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors modify intracellular pH transients and contractions of rat middle cerebral arteries during CO2/HCO3(-) fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jacob K; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2017-01-01

    The CO2/HCO3(-) buffer minimizes pH changes in response to acid-base loads, HCO3(-) provides substrate for Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO3(-)-exchangers, and H(+) and HCO3(-) modify vasomotor responses during acid-base disturbances. We show here that rat middle cerebral arteries express cytosolic, mitochondrial, extracellular, and secreted carbonic anhydrase isoforms that catalyze equilibration of the CO2/HCO3(-) buffer. Switching from CO2/HCO3(-)-free to CO2/HCO3(-)-containing extracellular solution results in initial intracellular acidification due to hydration of CO2 followed by gradual alkalinization due to cellular HCO3(-) uptake. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition decelerates the initial acidification and attenuates the associated transient vasoconstriction without affecting intracellular pH or artery tone at steady-state. Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransport and Na(+)/H(+)-exchange activity after NH4(+)-prepulse-induced intracellular acidification are unaffected by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. Extracellular surface pH transients induced by transmembrane NH3 flux are evident under CO2/HCO3(-)-free conditions but absent when the buffer capacity and apparent H(+) mobility increase in the presence of CO2/HCO3(-) even after the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. We conclude that (a) intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity accentuates pH transients and vasoconstriction in response to acute elevations of pCO2, (b) CO2/HCO3(-) minimizes extracellular surface pH transients without requiring carbonic anhydrase activity, and

  10. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  11. Biochemical study of the extracellular aspartyl protease Eap1 from the phytopathogen fungus Sporisorium reilianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Arana-Cuenca, Ainhoa; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Ángel; Téllez-Jurado, Alejandro; González-Becerra, Aldo E; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the extracellular protease Eap1 from Sporisorium reilianum was characterized in solid and liquid cultures using different culture media. The results showed that Eap1 was produced in all media and under all culture conditions, with the most activity in solid culture at an acidic pH of 3-5. Following purification, the 41 kDa protease demonstrated aspartyl protease activity. The enzyme was stable at a wide range of temperatures and pH values, but 45°C and pH 3 were optimal. The K(m) and V(max( values obtained were 0.69 mg/mL and 0.66 μmol/min, respectively, with albumin as the substrate. Eap1 degraded hemoglobin as well as proteins obtained from corn germ, roots, stems and slides at pH 3 and also had milk-clotting activity. Sequencing analysis showed that this protein has 100% similarity to the peptide sequence theoretically obtained from the sr11394 gene, which encodes an aspartyl protease secreted by S. reilianum.

  12. Extracellular α-Galactosidase from Trichoderma sp. (WF-3: Optimization of Enzyme Production and Biochemical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Singh Chauhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma spp. have been reported earlier for their excellent capacity of secreting extracellular α-galactosidase. This communication focuses on the optimization of culture conditions for optimal production of enzyme and its characterization. The evaluation of the effects of different enzyme assay parameters such as stability, pH, temperature, substrate concentrations, and incubation time on enzyme activity has been made. The most suitable buffer for enzyme assay was found to be citrate phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 6.0 for optimal enzyme activity. This enzyme was fairly stable at higher temperature as it exhibited 72% activity at 60°C. The enzyme when incubated at room temperature up to two hours did not show any significant loss in activity. It followed Michaelis-Menten curve and showed direct relationship with varying substrate concentrations. Higher substrate concentration was not inhibitory to enzyme activity. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km, maximum rate of reaction (Vmax, Kcat, and catalytic efficiency values for this enzyme were calculated from the Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plot and were found to be 0.5 mM, 10 mM/s, 1.30 U mg−1, and 2.33 U mg−1 mM−1, respectively. This information would be helpful in understanding the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of extracellular α-galactosidase from other microbial sources.

  13. High capacity for extracellular acid-base regulation in the air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong; Tuong, Dang Diem; Thinh, Phan Vinh; Huong Thanh, Do Thi; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of accessory air-breathing structures is typically associated with reduction of the gills, although branchial ion transport remains pivotal for acid-base and ion regulation. Therefore, air-breathing fishes are believed to have a low capacity for extracellular pH regulation during a respiratory acidosis. In the present study, we investigated acid-base regulation during hypercapnia in the air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus in normoxic and hypoxic water at 28-30°C. Contrary to previous studies, we show that this air-breathing fish has a pronounced ability to regulate extracellular pH (pHe) during hypercapnia, with complete metabolic compensation of pHe within 72 h of exposure to hypoxic hypercapnia with CO2 levels above 34 mmHg. The high capacity for pHe regulation relies on a pronounced ability to increase levels of HCO3(-) in the plasma. Our study illustrates the diversity in the physiology of air-breathing fishes, such that generalizations across phylogenies may be difficult.

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of a halotolerant Staphylococcus sp. extracellular lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Lobna; Kamoun, Jannet; Ali, Madiha Bou; Jallouli, Raida; Bradai, Rim; Mechichi, Tahar; Gargouri, Youssef; Ali, Yassine Ben; Aloulou, Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    We have isolated a lipolytic halotolerant bacterium, designated as CJ3, that was identified as a Staphylococcus sp. Culture conditions were optimized and the highest extracellular lipase production amounting to 5 U/ml was achieved after 24 h of cultivation. The extracellular lipase was purified 24-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation and a Sephacryl S-200 chromatography, and its molecular mass was found to be around 38 kDa, as revealed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The lipase substrate specificity was investigated using short (tributyrin) and long (olive oil) chain triglyceride substrates. The lipase was inhibited by submicellar concentrations of Triton X-100, and maximum specific activities were found to be 802 U/mg on tributyrin and 260 U/mg on olive oil at pH 8.0 and 45 °C. The lipase was fairly stable in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0, and about 69% of its activity was retained after incubation at 45 °C for 60 min. The enzyme showed a high tolerance to a wide range of salt concentration and a good stability in organic solvents, especially in long-chain alcohols.

  15. Do decapod crustaceans have nociceptors for extreme pH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Puri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nociception is the physiological detection of noxious stimuli. Because of its obvious importance, nociception is expected to be widespread across animal taxa and to trigger robust behaviours reliably. Nociception in invertebrates, such as crustaceans, is poorly studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THREE DECAPOD CRUSTACEAN SPECIES WERE TESTED FOR NOCICEPTIVE BEHAVIOUR: Louisiana red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii, white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus, and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes sp.. Applying sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, or benzocaine to the antennae caused no change in behaviour in the three species compared to controls. Animals did not groom the stimulated antenna, and there was no difference in movement of treated individuals and controls. Extracellular recordings of antennal nerves in P. clarkii revealed continual spontaneous activity, but no neurons that were reliably excited by the application of concentrated sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Previously reported responses to extreme pH are either not consistently evoked across species or were mischaracterized as nociception. There was no behavioural or physiological evidence that the antennae contained specialized nociceptors that responded to pH.

  16. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to the effect of extracellular acidosis on proliferation and migration of A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Gao, Bo; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Wang, Yu-Chan; Huang, Da-Ke; Wu, Wen-Ning

    2017-06-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels, a proton-gated cation channel, can be activated by low extracellular pH and involved in pathogenesis of some tumors such as glioma and breast cancer. However, the role of acid-sensing ion channels in the growth of lung cancer cell is unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression of acid-sensing ion channels in human lung cancer cell line A549 and their possible role in proliferation and migration of A549 cells. The results show that acid-sensing ion channel 1, acid-sensing ion channel 2, and acid-sensing ion channel 3 are expressed in A549 cells at the messenger RNA and protein levels, and acid-sensing ion channel-like currents were elicited by extracellular acid stimuli. Moreover, we found that acidic extracellular medium or overexpressing acid-sensing ion channel 1a promotes proliferation and migration of A549 cells. In addition psalmotoxin 1, a specific acid-sensing ion channel 1a inhibitor, or acid-sensing ion channel 1a knockdown can abolish the effect of acid stimuli on A549 cells. In addition, acid-sensing ion channels mediate increase of [Ca(2+)]i induced by low extracellular pH in A549 cells. All these results indicate that acid-sensing ion channel-calcium signal mediate lung cancer cell proliferation and migration induced by extracellular acidosis, and acid-sensing ion channels may serve as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  17. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  18. Neutrophils cast extracellular traps in response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Denkers, Eric Y

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular traps by neutrophils is a now well-established phenomenon that contributes to the innate response to extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. The importance of NETs during protozoan infection has been less explored, but recent findings suggest an emerging role for release of neutrophil-derived extracellular DNA in response to this class of microbial pathogens. The present review summarizes findings to date regarding elicitation of NETs by Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Eimeria bovis, and Leishmania spp.

  19. Extracellular polymeric substances of bacteria and their potential environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, T T; Yadav, J S S; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-11-01

    Biopolymers are considered a potential alternative to conventional chemical polymers because of their ease of biodegradability, high efficiency, non-toxicity and non-secondary pollution. Recently, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, biopolymers produced by the microorganisms) have been recognised by many researchers as a potential flocculent for their applications in various water, wastewater and sludge treatment processes. In this context, literature information on EPS is widely dispersed and is very scarce. Thus, this review marginalizes various studies conducted so far about EPS nature-production-recovery, properties, environmental applications and moreover, critically examines future research needs and advanced application prospective of the EPS. One of the most important aspect of chemical composition and structural details of different moieties of EPS in terms of carbohydrates, proteins, extracellular DNA, lipid and surfactants and humic substances are described. These chemical characteristics of EPS in relation to formation and properties of microbial aggregates as well as degradation of EPS in the matrix (biomass, flocs etc) are analyzed. The important engineering properties (based on structural characteristics) such as adsorption, biodegradability, hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of EPS matrix are also discussed in details. Different aspects of EPS production process such as bacterial strain maintenance; inoculum and factors affecting EPS production were presented. The important factors affecting EPS production include growth phase, carbon and nitrogen sources and their ratio, role of other nutrients (phosphorus, micronutrients/trace elements, and vitamins), impact of pH, temperature, metals, aerobic versus anaerobic conditions and pure and mixed culture. The production of EPS in high concentration with high productivity is essential due to economic reasons. Therefore, the knowledge about all the aspects of EPS production (listed above) is highly

  20. Complement-coagulation cross-talk: a potential mediator of the physiological activation of complement by low pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Ibrahim Kenawy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a major constituent of the innate immune system. It not only bridges innate and adaptive arms of the immune system but also links the immune system with the coagulation system. Current understanding of the role of complement has extended far beyond fighting of infections, and now encompasses maintenance of homeostasis, tissue regeneration and pathophysiology of multiple diseases. It has been known for many years that complement activation is strongly pH sensitive, but only relatively recently has the physiological significance of this been appreciated. Most complement assays are carried out at the physiological pH 7.4. However, pH in some extracellular compartments, for example renal tubular fluid in parts of the tubule, and extracellular fluid at inflammation loci, is sufficiently acidic to activate complement. The exact molecular mechanism of this activation is still unclear, but possible cross talk between the contact system and complement may exist at low pH with subsequent complement activation. The current article reviews the published data on the effect of pH on the contact system and complement activity, the nature of the pH sensor molecules, and the clinical implications of these effects. Of particular interest is chronic kidney disease (CKD accompanied by metabolic acidosis, in which therapeutic alkalinisation of urine has been shown significantly to reduce tubular complement activation products, an effect which may have important implications for slowing progression of CKD.

  1. Complement-Coagulation Cross-Talk: A Potential Mediator of the Physiological Activation of Complement by Low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenawy, Hany Ibrahim; Boral, Ismet; Bevington, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a major constituent of the innate immune system. It not only bridges innate and adaptive arms of the immune system but also links the immune system with the coagulation system. Current understanding of the role of complement has extended far beyond fighting of infections, and now encompasses maintenance of homeostasis, tissue regeneration, and pathophysiology of multiple diseases. It has been known for many years that complement activation is strongly pH sensitive, but only relatively recently has the physiological significance of this been appreciated. Most complement assays are carried out at the physiological pH 7.4. However, pH in some extracellular compartments, for example, renal tubular fluid in parts of the tubule, and extracellular fluid at inflammation loci, is sufficiently acidic to activate complement. The exact molecular mechanism of this activation is still unclear, but possible cross-talk between the contact system (intrinsic pathway) and complement may exist at low pH with subsequent complement activation. The current article reviews the published data on the effect of pH on the contact system and complement activity, the nature of the pH sensor molecules, and the clinical implications of these effects. Of particular interest is chronic kidney disease (CKD) accompanied by metabolic acidosis, in which therapeutic alkalinization of urine has been shown significantly to reduce tubular complement activation products, an effect, which may have important implications for slowing progression of CKD.

  2. The time course of the transcriptomic response of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 following a shift to acidic pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pühler Alfred

    2009-02-01

    L, exoO, exoN, exoP were up-regulated, the expression level of the flagellar and chemotaxis genes (visR, motA, flgF, flgB, flgC, fliE, flgG, flgE, flgL, flbT, mcpU simultaneously decreased in response to acidic pH. Other responding functional groups of genes mainly belonged to nitrogen uptake and metabolism (amtB, nrtB, nirB, nirD, methionine metabolism (metA, metF, metH, metK, bmt and ahcY as well as ion transport systems (sitABCD, phoCD. It is noteworthy, that several genes coding for hypothetical proteins of unknown function could be identified as up-regulated in response to the pH shift. Conclusion It was shown that the short term response to acidic pH stress does not result in a simple induction or repression of genes, but in a sequence of responses varying in their intensity over time. Obviously, the response to acidic pH is not based on a few specific genes, but involves whole sets of genes associated with various cellular functions.

  3. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  4. Physiology and pathology of extracellular vesicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first publication about blood plasma microparticles. Initially considered as cell fragments or “platelet dust”, extracellular vesicles currently attracted the attention of biochemists, biophysicists, physicians, pharmacists around the world. They are heterogeneous in structure and derived from many cell types, express different antigen and contain variety of biomolecules that determines wide range of biological activity, including procoagulant, regenerative, immunomodulating, and others. They play an important role in the pathophysiology of different diseases and conditions – from infarction, injuries and pregnancies to the “graft versus host” disease. The vesicles as medicaments and their carriers, as well as the drugs that affect them, are a rapidly developing field of research.

  5. Extracellular Matrices (ECM) for Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Thais O; Xylas, Joanna; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    Persistence of skin wounds due to underlying disease, bacterial contamination, and/or repeated trauma, causes a chronic condition where a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) cannot be established and the normal wound-healing cascade is unable to progress. These open chronic wounds leave the body susceptible to infection and present a major healthcare problem. To this end, a broad range of biologic ECM scaffolds have been developed that can provide other therapeutic options aside from traditional wound care approaches. These tissue engineered ECM scaffolds aim to facilitate the restoration of functional skin-like tissue by altering the chronic wound environment and facilitating cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. This discussion will center on reviewing current ECM scaffolds and highlighting their properties and mechanism of action with respect to the clinical application in chronic, non-healing wounds.

  6. Neutrophil extracellular traps in tissue pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Kumar, Santosh; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are innate immune systems against invading pathogens. NETs are characterized as released DNA mixed with cytoplasmic antimicrobial proteins such as myeloperoxidase, proteinase3 and neutrophil elastase. While NETs are thought to have an important role in host defense, recent work has suggested that NETs contribute to tissue injury in non-infectious disease states. Uncontrolled NET formation in autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, cancers and thrombotic diseases can exacerbate a disease or even be a major initiator of tissue injury. But spotting NETs in tissues is not easy. Here we review the available histopathological evidence on the presence of NETs in a variety of diseases. We discuss technical difficulties and potential sources of misinterpretation while trying to detect NETs in tissue samples.

  7. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre‐B cell colony‐enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro‐environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro‐environment. PMID:27128025

  8. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Kadota

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  10. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids.

  11. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...... of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...

  12. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  13. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Dorin; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results.

  14. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results. PMID:28358895

  15. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  16. Role of extracellular superoxide dismutase in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Qin, Zhenyu; Laude, Karine; Kim, Ha Won; McCann, Louise; Folz, J Rodney; Dikalov, Sergey; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2006-09-01

    We previously found that angiotensin II-induced hypertension increases vascular extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD), and proposed that this is a compensatory mechanism that blunts the hypertensive response and preserves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. To test this hypothesis, we studied ecSOD-deficient mice. ecSOD(-/-) and C57Blk/6 mice had similar blood pressure at baseline; however, the hypertension caused by angiotensin II was greater in ecSOD(-/-) compared with wild-type mice (168 versus 147 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.01). In keeping with this, angiotensin II increased superoxide and reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in small mesenteric arterioles to a greater extent in ecSOD(-/-) than in wild-type mice. In contrast to these findings in resistance vessels, angiotensin II paradoxically improved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, reduced intracellular and extracellular superoxide, and increased NO production in aortas of ecSOD(-/-) mice. Whereas aortic expression of endothelial NO synthase, Cu/ZnSOD, and MnSOD were not altered in ecSOD(-/-) mice, the activity of Cu/ZnSOD was increased by 80% after angiotensin II infusion. This was associated with a concomitant increase in expression of the copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD in the aorta but not in the mesenteric arteries. Moreover, the angiotensin II-induced increase in aortic reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity was diminished in ecSOD(-/-) mice as compared with controls. Thus, during angiotensin II infusion, ecSOD reduces hypertension, minimizes vascular superoxide production, and preserves endothelial function in resistance arterioles. We also identified novel compensatory mechanisms involving upregulation of copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD, increased Cu/ZnSOD activity, and decreased reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity in larger vessels. These compensatory mechanisms preserve large vessel function when ecSOD is absent in

  17. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  18. Identification of a receptor for extracellular renalase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI in wild type (WT mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase.RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase.PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling.

  19. Effect of oligogalacturonides on root length, extracellular alkalinization and O₂⁻-accumulation in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camejo, Daymi; Martí, María C; Jiménez, Ana; Cabrera, Juan C; Olmos, Enrique; Sevilla, Francisca

    2011-04-15

    The effects of an oligogalacturonic acid (OGA) pool on root length of intact alfalfa seedlings (Medicago sativa L.), on extracellular pH and on both extracellular and intracellular O₂⁻ dynamics were examined in this study. Lower OGA concentrations (25, 50 and 75 μg mL⁻¹)promoted root length, but 50 μg mL⁻¹ had a stronger effect in promoting growth, while the higher OGA concentration (100 μg mL⁻¹)had no significant effect. Extracellular alkalinization was tested only at concentrations higher than 50 μg mL⁻¹ OGA, showing that the response is determined not only by the specific size of OGA, but also by the concentration of OGA. The promoting effect of OGA on root growth at 25, 50 and 75 μg mL⁻¹ OGA concentrations in alfalfa root appeared to be unrelated to extracellular alkalinization. A possible explanation could be the induction of an O₂⁻ burst at non-toxic levels, which could drive directly or indirectly several processes associated with root elongation in 25, 50 and 75 μg mL⁻¹ OGA-treated seedlings. Analyses using confocal microscopy showed that the increase in the O₂⁻ generation, mainly in the epidermal cells, induced by 50 μg mL⁻¹ OGA could be related to the promoting effect on root growth. The combination of OGA with DPI allowed us to demonstrate that there are different O₂⁻-generating sources in the epidermal cells of the meristematic zone, likely NADPH oxidase and oxidases or oxido-reductase enzymes, insensitive to DPI, that maintain detectable O₂⁻ accumulation at 60 and 120 min of treatment. These results suggest that OGA induce an oxidative burst by several O₂⁻-generating sources in the active growth zones.

  20. Urinary pH and renal lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, F; Costa-Bauzá, A; Gomila, I; Ramis, M; García-Raja, A; Prieto, R M

    2012-02-01

    Formation of calcium oxalate crystals, either as monohydrate or dihydrate, is apparently unrelated to urinary pH because the solubilities of these salts are practically unaltered at physiologic urinary pH values. However, a urinary pH 6.0 may induce uric acid or calcium phosphate crystals formation, respectively, which under appropriate conditions may induce the development of the calcium oxalate calculi. We assessed the relationship between the urinary pH and the formation of different types of calculi. A retrospective study in 1,478 patients was done. We determined the composition, macrostructure, and microstructure of the calculi and the urinary pH, 50.9% of calcium oxalate monohydrate unattached calculi were present in patients with urinary pH 6.0, respectively. Infectious calculi were found primarily in patients with urinary pH >6.0 (50.7%). Only calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary calculi were associated with urinary pH between 5.5 and 6.0 (43.1%). Urine of pH 6.0 has an increased capacity to develop calcium phosphate crystals, which can act as a heterogeneous nuclei of calcium oxalate crystals. Oxalate monohydrate papillary calculi were associated to pH between 5.5 and 6.0 because the injured papilla acts as a heterogeneous nucleant. Consequently, measurement of urinary pH may be used to evaluate the lithogen risk of given urine.

  1. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS......It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...

  2. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  3. pH landscapes in a novel five-species model of early dental biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite continued preventive efforts, dental caries remains the most common disease of man. Organic acids produced by microorganisms in dental plaque play a crucial role for the development of carious lesions. During early stages of the pathogenetic process, repeated pH drops induce changes in microbial composition and favour the establishment of an increasingly acidogenic and aciduric microflora. The complex structure of dental biofilms, allowing for a multitude of different ecological environments in close proximity, remains largely unexplored. In this study, we designed a laboratory biofilm model that mimics the bacterial community present during early acidogenic stages of the caries process. We then performed a time-resolved microscopic analysis of the extracellular pH landscape at the interface between bacterial biofilm and underlying substrate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Strains of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Actinomyces naeslundii were employed in the model. Biofilms were grown in flow channels that allowed for direct microscopic analysis of the biofilms in situ. The architecture and composition of the biofilms were analysed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both biofilm structure and composition were highly reproducible and showed similarity to in-vivo-grown dental plaque. We employed the pH-sensitive ratiometric probe C-SNARF-4 to perform real-time microscopic analyses of the biofilm pH in response to salivary solutions containing glucose. Anaerobic glycolysis in the model biofilms created a mildly acidic environment. Decrease in pH in different areas of the biofilms varied, and distinct extracellular pH-microenvironments were conserved over several hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The designed biofilm model represents a promising tool to determine the effect of potential therapeutic agents on biofilm growth

  4. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  5. Tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Linares, Daniel M.; Fernández, María; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The microbial decarboxylation of some amino acids leads to the undesirable presence of biogenic amines in foods. One of the most abundant and frequent biogenic amines found in fermented foods is tyramine, which is produced by the decarboxylation of tyrosine. In the present work, transcriptional analysis of tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans IPLA655, a strain isolated from cheese, was studied. The gene coding for the tyrosine decarboxylase (tdcA) and that coding for the tyros...

  6. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...... confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...... exchanging organisms have major biogeochemical importance as they allow widely separated electron donors and acceptors to react with one another....

  7. Characterization of Extracellular Penicilin G Acylase Produced by A New Local Strain of Bacillus subtilis BAC4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUPARTONO

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Penicillin G acylase (PGA which catalyses penicillin G hydrolysis reaction is a key enzyme for the industrial production of penicilin G derivatives used in therapeutics. A new local strain of Bacillus subtilis BAC4 was found capable of producing extracellular PGA. However, characteristics of this extracellular PGA are not known. The goal of this research was to characterize the extracellular PGA produced by B. subtilis BAC4. Enzyme production was carried out by batch fermentation, followed by enzyme purification and characterization of the PGA. The PGA activity was determined by the Kornfeld method, with optimal activity for hydrolysing penicillin G observed at 43 oC and pH 8.5. The activation energy of penicillin G hydrolysis by the PGA of B. subtilis BAC4 was determined as 4.9 kcal.mol-1 and Vmax and Km values were found to be 0.7 µmole.min-1.mg-1 and 3.5 mM respectively. PGA catalytic activity was competitively inhibited by phenylacetic acid with an inhibition constant, Ki(PAA, of 347.2 mM. It was concluded that the extracellular PGA of B. subtilis BAC4 can hydrolyse penicillin G efficiently.

  8. Short communication: Teat skin pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L K; Oura, L Y; Ames, C R

    2003-12-01

    Changes in teat skin surface pH were studied over 12 wk in 99 lactating Holstein cows. Half the udder of each cow routinely received postmilking disinfection, and the other half served as control. Measures of pH were made on all teats at weekly intervals. Teat skin pH was affected by treatment but not week. Mean teat skin pH measures were: 7.18 (+/- 0.64) and 7.53 (+/- 0.46) for treatment and control teats. In study II, pH teat skin measures were made hourly on 16 cows, starting 2 h before milking, immediately before a milking, immediately after a milking, and for 2 h postmilking. Teat skin pH was significantly lower for treatment teats and was lower for all teats postmilking.

  9. Characterization of novel extracellular protease produced by marine bacterial isolate from the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Fulzele

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Out of the vast pool of enzymes, proteolytic enzymes from microorganisms are the most widely used in different industries such as detergent, food, peptide production etc. Several marine microorganisms are known to produce proteases with commercially desirable characteristics. We have isolated nine different cultures from marine samples of the Indian Ocean. All of them were i motile ii rod shaped iii non spore forming iv catalase and amylase positive v able to grow in presence of 10 % NaCl. They produced acid from glucose, fructose and maltose and grew optimally at 30 0C temperature and pH 7.0-8.0. None of them could grow above 45 0C and below 15 0C. Only one of them (MBRI 7 exhibited extracellular protease activity on skim milk agar plates. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing, it belonged to the genus Marinobacter (98% sequence similarity, 1201 bp. The cell free extract was used to study effects of temperature and pH on protease activity. The optimum temperature and pH for activity were found to be 40 0C and 7.0 respectively. The crude enzyme was stable at temperature range of 30-80 0C and pH 5.0-9.0. It retained 60 % activity at 80 0C after 4 h and more than 70 % activity at 70 0C after 1 h. D value was found to be 342 minutes and 78 minutes for 40 0C and 80 0C respectively. Interestingly the enzyme remained 50 % active at pH 9.0 after 1 h. Comparison with other proteases from different microbial sources indicated that the neutral protease from the halotolerant marine isolate MBRI 7 is a novel enzyme with high thermostability.

  10. Extracellular polysaccharide production by a strain of Pleurotus djamor isolated in the south of Brazil and antitumor activity on Sarcoma 180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gisele Martini; De Barba, Fabiana Figueredo Molin; Schiebelbein, Ana Paula; Pereira, Bruna Parmezzani; Chaves, Mariane Bonatti; Silveira, Marcia Luciane Lange; Pinho, Mauro Souza Leite; Furlan, Sandra Aparecida; Wisbeck, Elisabeth

    2013-12-01

    Polysaccharides with medicinal properties can be obtained from fruiting bodies, mycelium and culture broth of several fungus species. This work was carried out in batch culture using a stirred tank reactor with two different initial glucose concentrations (40-50 g/L) and pH values (3.0-4.0) to enhance extracellular polysaccharides production by Pleurotus djamor UNIVILLE 001 and evaluate antitumor effect of intraperitonial administration of Pleurotus djamor extract on sarcoma 180 animal model. According to factorial design, the low pH value (pH 3.0) led to a gain of 1.6 g/L on the extracellular polysaccharide concentration, while glucose concentration in the tested range had no significant effect on the concentration of polysaccharide. With 40 g/L initial glucose concentration and pH 3.0, it was observed that yield factor of extracellular polysaccharide on substrate (YP/S = 0.072) and maximum extracellular polysaccharide productivity (Q(Pmax) = 11.26 mg/L.h) were about 188% and 321% respectively higher than those obtained in the experiment performed at pH 4.0. Under these conditions, the highest values of the yield factor of biomass on substrate (YX/S = 0.24) and maximal biomass productivity (Q(Xmax) = 32.2 mg/L.h) were also reached. In tumor response study, mean tumor volume on the 21th day was 35.3 cm(3) in untreated group and 1.6 cm(3) in treated group (p = 0.05) with a tumor inhibition rate of 94%. These impressive results suggests an inhibitory effect of P.djamor extract on cancer cells.

  11. Extracellular polysaccharide production by a strain of Pleurotus djamor isolated in the south of Brazil and antitumor activity on Sarcoma 180

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Martini Borges

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides with medicinal properties can be obtained from fruiting bodies, mycelium and culture broth of several fungus species. This work was carried out in batch culture using a stirred tank reactor with two different initial glucose concentrations (40-50 g/L and pH values (3.0-4.0 to enhance extracellular polysaccharides production by Pleurotus djamor UNIVILLE 001 and evaluate antitumor effect of intraperitonial administration of Pleurotus djamor extract on sarcoma 180 animal model. According to factorial design, the low pH value (pH 3.0 led to a gain of 1.6 g/L on the extracellular polysaccharide concentration, while glucose concentration in the tested range had no significant effect on the concentration of polysaccharide. With 40 g/L initial glucose concentration and pH 3.0, it was observed that yield factor of extracellular polysaccharide on substrate (Y P/S = 0.072 and maximum extracellular polysaccharide productivity (Q Pmax = 11.26 mg/L.h were about 188% and 321% respectively higher than those obtained in the experiment performed at pH 4.0. Under these conditions, the highest values of the yield factor of biomass on substrate (Y X/S = 0.24 and maximal biomass productivity (Q Xmax = 32.2 mg/L.h were also reached. In tumor response study, mean tumor volume on the 21th day was 35.3 cm³ in untreated group and 1.6 cm³ in treated group (p = 0.05 with a tumor inhibition rate of 94%. These impressive results suggests an inhibitory effect of P.djamor extract on cancer cells.

  12. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Stavang, Jon Anders; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2015-05-01

    Water homeostasis and the structural integrity of the vertebrate lens is partially mediated by AQP0 channels. Emerging evidence indicates that external pH may be involved in channel gating. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, retains 4 aqp0 genes (aqp0a1, -0a2, -0b1, and -0b2), which are highly, but not exclusively, expressed in the lens. Functional characterization reveals that, although each paralog permeates water efficiently, the permeability is respectively shifted to the neutral, alkaline, or acidic pH in Aqp0a1, -0a2, and -0b1, whereas that of Aqp0b2 is not regulated by external pH. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that Ser(38), His(39), and His(40) residues in the extracellular transmembrane domain of α-helix 2 facing the water pore are critical for the pH modulation of water transport. To validate these findings, we show that both zebrafish Aqp0a and -0b are functional water channels with respective pH sensitivities toward alkaline or acid pH ranges and that an N-terminal allelic variant (Ser(19)) of Aqp0b exists that abolishes water transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The data suggest that the alkaline pH sensitivity is a conserved trait in teleost Aqp0 a-type channels, whereas mammalian AQP0 and some teleost Aqp0 b-type channels display an acidic pH permeation preference.

  13. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua-Rodríguez, Jacob; Oskarsson, Thordur

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is increasingly recognized as an important regulator in breast cancer. ECM in breast cancer development features numerous changes in composition and organization when compared to the mammary gland under homeostasis. Matrix proteins that are induced in breast cancer include fibrillar collagens, fibronectin, specific laminins and proteoglycans as well as matricellular proteins. Growing evidence suggests that many of these induced ECM proteins play a major functional role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. A number of the induced ECM proteins have moreover been shown to be essential components of metastatic niches, promoting stem/progenitor signaling pathways and metastatic growth. ECM remodeling enzymes are also markedly increased, leading to major changes in the matrix structure and biomechanical properties. Importantly, several ECM components and ECM remodeling enzymes are specifically induced in breast cancer or during tissue regeneration while healthy tissues under homeostasis express exceedingly low levels. This may indicate that ECM and ECM-associated functions may represent promising drug targets against breast cancer, providing important specificity that could be utilized when developing therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  15. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; LIU Binbin; XIONG Jinshui; YAN Jingchun

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension,formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100 ℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows:pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  16. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles: potential roles in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier G de Jong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV consist of exosomes, which are released upon fusion of the multivesicular body with the cell membrane, and microvesicles, which are released directly from the cell membrane. EV can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes, including immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. The vast amount of processes that EV are involved in and the versatility of manner in which they can influence the behavior of recipient cells make EV an interesting source for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Successes in the fields of tumor biology and immunology sparked the exploration of the potential of EV in the field of regenerative medicine. Indeed, EV are involved in restoring tissue and organ damage, and may partially explain the paracrine effects observed in stem cell based therapeutic approaches. The function and content of EV may also harbor information that can be used in tissue engineering, in which paracrine signaling is employed to modulate cell recruitment, differentiation, and proliferation. In this review, we discuss the function and role of EV in regenerative medicine and elaborate on potential applications in tissue engineering.

  18. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  19. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  20. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  1. Towards traceable size determination of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Varga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs have clinical importance due to their roles in a wide range of biological processes. The detection and characterization of EVs are challenging because of their small size, low refractive index, and heterogeneity. Methods: In this manuscript, the size distribution of an erythrocyte-derived EV sample is determined using state-of-the-art techniques such as nanoparticle tracking analysis, resistive pulse sensing, and electron microscopy, and novel techniques in the field, such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and size exclusion chromatography coupled with dynamic light scattering detection. Results: The mode values of the size distributions of the studied erythrocyte EVs reported by the different methods show only small deviations around 130 nm, but there are differences in the widths of the size distributions. Conclusion: SAXS is a promising technique with respect to traceability, as this technique was already applied for traceable size determination of solid nanoparticles in suspension. To reach the traceable measurement of EVs, monodisperse and highly concentrated samples are required.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  3. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  4. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell-cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable. Recent studies have shown the potential of hydrogels to mimic native ECM. Such an engineered native-like ECM is more likely to provide cells with rational cues for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. The research for novel biomaterials has led to an extension of the scope and techniques used to fabricate biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this article, we detail the progress of the current state-of-the-art engineering methods to create cell-encapsulating hydrogel tissue constructs as well as their applications in in vitro models in biomedicine.

  5. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  6. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  7. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in “cell wall organization and biogenesis”, “response to stimulus” and “protein metabolism”. It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions. PMID:28248232

  8. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish.

  9. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  10. Characterization and biological role of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wójtowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV form a heterogeneous population of mostly spherical membrane structures released by almost all cells, including tumour cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Their size varies from 30 nm to 1 μm, and size is one of the main criteria of the selection of two categories of EV: small (30-100 nm, more homogeneous exosomes and larger fragments (0.1-1 μm called membrane microvesicles or ectosomes. The presence of EV has already been detected in many human body fluids: blood, urine, saliva, semen and amniotic fluid. Formation of EV is tightly controlled, and their function and biochemical composition depend on the cell type they originate from. EV are the “vehicles” of bioactive molecules, such as proteins, mRNA and microRNA, and may play an important role in intercellular communication and modulation of e.g. immune system cell activity. In addition, on the surface of tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV, called oncosomes, several markers specific for cancer cells were identified, which indicates a role of TMV in tumour growth and cancer development. On the other hand, TMV may be an important source of tumour-associated antigens (TAA which can be potentially useful as biomarkers with prognostic value, as well as in development of new forms of targeted immunotherapy of cancer.

  11. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  12. Mechanics of composite cytoskeletal and extracellular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Living cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their surroundings. This mechanical response is mainly due to the cell cytoskeleton, and its interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cell cytoskeleton is a composite polymeric scaffold made of many different types of protein filaments and crosslinking proteins. Two major filament systems in the cytoskeleton are actin filaments (F-actin) and microtubules (MTs). Actin filaments are semiflexible, while the much stiffer MTs behave as rigid rods. I shall discuss theories that help understand how the direct coupling to the surrounding F-actin matrix allows intracellular MTs to bear large compressive forces and controls the range of force transmission along the MTs, and how the MTs not only enhance the stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton, but can also dramatically endow an initially nearly incompressible F-actin matrix with enhanced compressibility relative to its shear compliance. A second source of compositeness in the cytoskeleton is the presences of different types of crosslinkers that can interact cooperatively leading to enhanced mechanical rigidity and tunable response. Like the cytoskeleton, the ECM is also a polymeric composite. It is primarily composed of a mesh of fibrous proteins, mainly stiff collagen filaments, and a comparatively flexible gel of proteoglycans and hyaluronan. I shall discuss a model that shows how the interplay between the collagen network and the background elastic gel leads to a mechanically robust ECM.

  13. Extracellular matrix components in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Injured axons of the peripheral nerve are able to regenerate and, eventually, reinnervate target organs. However, functional recovery is usually poor after severe nerve injuries. The switch of Schwann cells to a proliferative state, secretion of trophic factors, and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (such as collagen, laminin, or fibronectin) in the distal stump are key elements to create a permissive environment for axons to grow. In this review, we focus attention on the ECM components and their tropic role in axonal regeneration. These components can also be used as molecular cues to guide the axons through artificial nerve guides in attempts to better mimic the natural environment found in a degenerating nerve. Most used scaffolds tested are based on natural molecules that form the ECM, but use of synthetic polymers and functionalization of hydrogels are bringing new options. Progress in tissue engineering will eventually lead to the design of composite artificial nerve grafts that may replace the use of autologous nerve grafts to sustain regeneration over long gaps.

  14. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  15. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  16. Trpac1, a pH response transcription regulator, is involved in cellulase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ronglin; Ma, Lijuan; Li, Chen; Jia, Wendi; Li, Demao; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2014-12-01

    Fungi grow over a relatively wide pH range and adapt to extracellular pH through a genetic regulatory system mediated by a key component PacC, which is a pH transcription regulator. The cellulase production of the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei is sensitive to ambient pH. To investigate the connection between cellulase expression regulation and ambient pH, an ortholog of Aspergillus nidulans pacC, Trpac1, was identified and functionally characterized using a target gene deletion strategy. Deleting Trpac1 dramatically increased the cellulase production and the transcription levels of the major cellulase genes at neutral pH, which suggested Trpac1 is involved in the regulation of cellulase production. It was further observed that the expression levels of transcription factors xyr1 and ace2 also increased in the ΔTrpac1 mutant at neutral pH. In addition, the ΔTrpac1 mutant exhibited conidiation defects under neutral and alkaline pH. These results implied that Trpac1 in involved in growth and development process and cellulase gene expression in T. reesei.

  17. Characterization of Local pH Changes in Brain Using Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry with Carbon Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takmakov, Pavel; Zachek, Matthew K.; Keithley, Richard B.; Bucher, Elizabeth; McCarty, Gregory S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Transient local pH changes in the brain are important markers of neural activity that can be used to follow metabolic processes that underlie the biological basis of behavior, learning and memory. There are few methods that can measure pH fluctuations with sufficient time resolution in freely moving animals. Previously, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used for the measurement of such pH transients. However, the origin of the potential dependent current in the cyclic voltammograms for pH changes recorded in vivo was unclear. The current work explored the nature of these peaks and established the origin for some of them. A peak relating to the capacitive nature of the pH CV was identified. Adsorption of electrochemically inert species, such as aromatic amines and calcium could suppress this peak, and is the origin for inconsistencies regarding in vivo and in vitro data. Also, we identified an extra peak in the in vivo pH CV relating to the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyacetic acid (DOPAC) in the brain extracellular fluid. To evaluate the in vivo performance of the carbon-fiber sensor, carbon dioxide inhalation by an anesthetized rat was used to induce brain acidosis induced by hypercapnia. Hypercapnia is demonstrated to be a useful tool to induce robust in vivo pH changes, allowing confirmation of the pH signal observed with FSCV. PMID:21047096

  18. Mycorrhizal fungal communities respond to experimental elevation of soil pH and P availability in temperate hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R; Kluber, Laurel A; Petersen, Sheryl M; Coyle, Kaitlin P; Hewins, Charlotte R; DeForest, Jared L; Smemo, Kurt A; Burke, David J

    2016-03-01

    Many forests are affected by chronic acid deposition, which can lower soil pH and limit the availability of nutrients such as phosphorus (P), but the response of mycorrhizal fungi to changes in soil pH and P availability and how this affects tree acquisition of nutrients is not well understood. Here, we describe an ecosystem-level manipulation in 72 plots, which increased pH and/or P availability across six forests in Ohio, USA. Two years after treatment initiation, mycorrhizal fungi on roots were examined with molecular techniques, including 454-pyrosequencing. Elevating pH significantly increased arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization and total fungal biomass, and affected community structure of AM and ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi, suggesting that raising soil pH altered both mycorrhizal fungal communities and fungal growth. AM fungal taxa were generally negatively correlated with recalcitrant P pools and soil enzyme activity, whereas EcM fungal taxa displayed variable responses, suggesting that these groups respond differently to P availability. Additionally, the production of extracellular phosphatase enzymes in soil decreased under elevated pH, suggesting a shift in functional activity of soil microbes with pH alteration. Thus, our findings suggest that elevating pH increased soil P availability, which may partly underlie the mycorrhizal fungal responses we observed.

  19. pH6 antigen (PsaA protein) of Yersinia pestis, a novel bacterial Fc-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Abramov, V M; Cherepanov, P G; Spirina, G V; Chernovskaya, T V; Vasiliev, A M; Zav'yalova, G A

    1996-05-01

    It was found that recombinant pH6 antigen (rPsaA protein) forming virulence-associated fimbriae on the surface of Yersinia pestis at pH 6.7 in host macrophage phagolysosomes or extracellularly in abscesses such as buboes, is a novel bacterial Fc-receptor. rPsaA protein displays reactivity with human IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses but does not react with rabbit, mouse and sheep IgG.

  20. Purification and Properties of an Extracellular Polyhydroxybutyrate Depolymerase from Pseudomonas mendocina DSWY0601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; LI Fan; WANG Zhan-yong; LIU Dong-bo; XIA Hong-mei; LIU Ling-fei; CHEN Shan

    2012-01-01

    An extracellular polyhydroxybutyrate(PHB) depolymerase was purified to homogeneity from the culture supematant of a PHB-degrading bacterium,Pseudomonas mendocina DSWY0601,which was isolated from brewery sewage for the ability to form clear zones on the PHB mineral agar plates.The molecular weight of the purified PHB depolymerase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) was approximately 59800 at the optimal temperature and pH value being 50℃ and 8.5,respectively.PHB depolymerase was stable in a temperature rangc of 20--50℃ and sensitive to pH value within a pH range of 8.0--9.5.PHB depolymerase degraded poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate(P3/4HB) and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate(PHBV) but did not degrade poly(lactic acid)(PLA),poly(butylene succinate)(PBS) or poly(caprolactone)(PCL).PHB depolymerase was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride(PMSF),H2O2 and SDS.The main product after enzymatic degradation of PHB was indentified as 3-hydroxbutyrate monomer(3HB) by mass spectrometric analysis,suggesting that PHB depolymerase acted as an exo-type hydrolase.Analysis ofphaZpm gene reveals that PHB depolymerase is a typical denatured short-chain-length PHA(dPHAscL,PHA=polyhydroxyalkanoate)depolymerase containing catalytic domain,linker and substrate-binding domain.

  1. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EXTRACELLULAR ALKALINE PROTEASE PRODUCED FROM AN ISOLATED BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bundela

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the studies on the purification and partial characterization of serine alkaline protease produced through submerged fermentation process from a locally isolated Bacillus subtilis. This strain, grown in a highly alkaline medium (pH 10, produces an extracellular proteolytic enzyme. The alkaline protease was purified in a simple two-step procedure involving ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified alkaline protease indicated an estimated molecular mass of 30KDa. It was more active in the range of 20-60ºC and had an optimum activity at 55ºC with optimum pH of 10.5. Characterization of the protease showed that it required certain cations such as Mg++, Mn++ and Ca++ for maximal activity. The serine nature of the alkaline protease was confirmed by PMSF inhibition. The temperature and pH stability of this Alkaline Protease from Bacillus Subtilismakes it potentially useful forindustrial applications.

  2. Cultivation conditions and properties of extracellular crude lipase from the psychrotrophic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum 9'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerz, R; Ginalska, G; Fiedurek, J; Gromada, A

    2005-06-01

    Among 97 fungal strains isolated from soil collected in the arctic tundra (Spitsbergen), Penicillium chrysogenum 9' was found to be the best lipase producer. The maximum lipase activity was 68 units mL(-1) culture medium on the fifth day of incubation at pH 6.0 and 20 degrees C. Therefore, P. chrysogenum 9' was classified as a psychrotrophic microorganism. The non-specific extracellular lipase showed a maximum activity at 30 degrees C and pH 5.0 for natural oils or at pH 7.0 for synthetic substrates. Tributyrin was found to be the best substrate for lipase, among those tested. The Km and Vmax were calculated to be 2.33 mM and 22.1 units mL(-1), respectively, with tributyrin as substrate. The enzyme was inhibited more by EDTA than by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and was reactivated by Ca2+. The P. chrysogenum 9' lipase was very stable in the presence of hexane and 1,4-dioxane at a concentration of 50%, whereas it was unstable in presence of xylene.

  3. Effect of Extracellular Polymeric Substances on CuO Nanoparticle Dissolution and Colloidal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleye, A. S.; Keller, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are high molecular weight polymers produced by microorganisms growing in natural as well as artificial environments. EPS may interact with engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in aquatic systems via electrostatic and/or hydrophobic associations, therefore, influencing the fate and transport of ENMs. In this study the effect of soluble EPS isolated from Isochrysis galbana, a marine phytoplankton, on the dissolution kinetics and colloidal stability of CuO nanoparticles was investigated. EPS was characterized by measuring hydrodynamic diameter, total organic carbon, carbohydrate, and protein concentrations. CuO nanoparticles were more stable in the presence of EPS in aqueous media as indicated by hydrodynamic size and average count rate measurements. The effect of pH and ionic strength on dissolution was also studied. [Cu2+] and [Cu]total detected after a week were 5.70 mg L-1 and 7.08 mg L-1 respectively when 10 mg L-1 CuO nanoparticles was kept in 10 mM NaCl at pH 4. In the presence of 5 mg-C EPS L-1, [Cu2+] and [Cu]total were slightly lower at 5.0 mg L-1 and 5.53 mg L-1 respectively. Although observed [Cu2+] and [Cu]total were significantly lower at neutral and alkaline pH conditions, a similar pattern was observed.

  4. Biosorption of Cu(Ⅱ) on extracellular polymers from Bacillus sp. F19

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan; FANG Xuliang; YE Zhilong; LI Yahong; CAI weimin

    2008-01-01

    Biosorption can be an effective process for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The adsorption of Cu(Ⅱ) from aqueous solution on the extracellular polymers (EPS) from Bacillus sp. (named MBFF19) with respect to pH, incubation time,concentration of initial Cu(Ⅱ), and biosorbent dose was studied. Biosorption of Cu(Ⅱ) is highly pH dependent. The maximum uptake of Cu(Ⅱ) (89.62 mg/g) was obtained at pH 4.8. Biosorption equilibrium was established in approximately 10 min. The correlation coefficient of more than 0.90 turned out that the adsorption process of Cu(Ⅱ) on MBFF19 was in accordance with both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The pseudo-first and second order models were applied to examine the kinetics of the adsorption, whereas the latter was found to be in harmony with the kinetic data better. Because of the outstanding uptake capacity of Cu(Ⅱ), MBFF19 produced by Bacillus sp. was proved to be an excellent biosorbent for removing Cu(Ⅱ) from aqueous solutions.

  5. Inverse pH regulation of plant and fungal sucrose transporters: a mechanism to regulate competition for sucrose at the host/pathogen interface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Wippel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant sucrose transporter activities were shown to respond to changes in the extracellular pH and redox status, and oxidizing compounds like glutathione (GSSG or H(2O(2 were reported to effect the subcellular targeting of these proteins. We hypothesized that changes in both parameters might be used to modulate the activities of competing sucrose transporters at a plant/pathogen interface. We, therefore, compared the effects of redox-active compounds and of extracellular pH on the sucrose transporters UmSRT1 and ZmSUT1 known to compete for extracellular sucrose in the Ustilago maydis (corn smut/Zea mays (maize pathosystem. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present functional analyses of the U. maydis sucrose transporter UmSRT1 and of the plant sucrose transporters ZmSUT1 and StSUT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in Xenopus laevis oocytes in the presence of different extracellular pH-values and redox systems, and study the possible effects of these treatments on the subcellular targeting. We observed an inverse regulation of host and pathogen sucrose transporters by changes in the apoplastic pH. Under none of the conditions analyzed, we could confirm the reported effects of redox-active compounds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that changes in the extracellular pH but not of the extracellular redox status might be used to oppositely adjust the transport activities of plant and fungal sucrose transporters at the host/pathogen interface.

  6. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference.

  7. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  8. Stretchable, multiplexed pH sensors with demonstrations on rabbit and human hearts undergoing ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Joong; Sulkin, Matthew S; Kim, Jong-Seon; Goudeseune, Camille; Chao, Hsin-Yun; Song, Joseph W; Yang, Sang Yoon; Hsu, Yung-Yu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Efimov, Igor R; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Stable pH is an established biomarker of health, relevant to all tissues of the body, including the heart. Clinical monitoring of pH in a practical manner, with high spatiotemporal resolution, is particularly difficult in organs such as the heart due to its soft mechanics, curvilinear geometry, heterogeneous surfaces, and continuous, complex rhythmic motion. The results presented here illustrate that advanced strategies in materials assembly and electrochemical growth can yield interconnected arrays of miniaturized IrOx pH sensors encapsulated in thin, low-modulus elastomers to yield conformal monitoring systems capable of noninvasive measurements on the surface of the beating heart. A thirty channel custom data acquisition system enables spatiotemporal pH mapping with a single potentiostat. In vitro testing reveals super-Nernstian sensitivity with excellent uniformity (69.9 ± 2.2 mV/pH), linear response to temperature (-1.6 mV °C(-1) ), and minimal influence of extracellular ions (sensor arrays on balloon catheters and on skin-like stretchable membranes. Real-time measurement of pH on the surfaces of explanted rabbit hearts and a donated human heart during protocols of ischemia-reperfusion illustrate some of the capabilities. Envisioned applications range from devices for biological research, to surgical tools and long-term implants.

  9. An aposymbiotic primary coral polyp counteracts acidification by active pH regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshikazu; Iguchi, Akira; Shinzato, Chuya; Inoue, Mayuri; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Corals build their skeletons using extracellular calcifying fluid located in the tissue–skeleton interface. However, the mechanism by which corals control the transport of calcium and other ions from seawater and the mechanism of constant alkalization of calcifying fluid are largely unknown. To address these questions, we performed direct pH imaging at calcification sites (subcalicoblastic medium, SCM) to visualize active pH upregulation in live aposymbiotic primary coral polyps treated with HCl-acidified seawater. Active alkalization was observed in all individuals using vital staining method while the movement of HPTS and Alexa Fluor to SCM suggests that certain ions such as H+ could diffuse via a paracellular pathway to SCM. Among them, we discovered acid-induced oscillations in the pH of SCM (pHSCM), observed in 24% of polyps examined. In addition, we discovered acid-induced pH up-regulation waves in 21% of polyps examined, which propagated among SCMs after exposure to acidified seawater. Our results showed that corals can regulate pHSCM more dynamically than was previously believed. These observations will have important implications for determining how corals regulate pHSCM during calcification. We propose that corals can sense ambient seawater pH via their innate pH-sensitive systems and regulate pHSCM using several unknown pH-regulating ion transporters that coordinate with multicellular signaling occurring in coral tissue.

  10. Purification and characterization of an extracellular, thermo-alkali-stable, metal tolerant laccase from Bacillus tequilensis SN4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhi, Sonica; Sharma, Prince; Saini, Shilpa; Puri, Neena; Gupta, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    A novel extracellular thermo-alkali-stable laccase from Bacillus tequilensis SN4 (SN4LAC) was purified to homogeneity. The laccase was a monomeric protein of molecular weight 32 KDa. UV-visible spectrum and peptide mass fingerprinting results showed that SN4LAC is a multicopper oxidase. Laccase was active in broad range of phenolic and non-phenolic substrates. Catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) showed that 2, 6-dimethoxyphenol was most efficiently oxidized by the enzyme. The enzyme was inhibited by conventional inhibitors of laccase like sodium azide, cysteine, dithiothreitol and β-mercaptoethanol. SN4LAC was found to be highly thermostable, having temperature optimum at 85°C and could retain more than 80% activity at 70°C for 24 h. The optimum pH of activity for 2, 6-dimethoxyphenol, 2, 2'-azino bis[3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate], syringaldazine and guaiacol was 8.0, 5.5, 6.5 and 8.0 respectively. Enzyme was alkali-stable as it retained more than 75% activity at pH 9.0 for 24 h. Activity of the enzyme was significantly enhanced by Cu2+, Co2+, SDS and CTAB, while it was stable in the presence of halides, most of the other metal ions and surfactants. The extracellular nature and stability of SN4LAC in extreme conditions such as high temperature, pH, heavy metals, halides and detergents makes it a highly suitable candidate for biotechnological and industrial applications.

  11. Anchorless surface associated glycolytic enzymes from Lactobacillus plantarum 299v bind to epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenting, Jacob; Beck, Hans Christian; Vrang, Astrid; Riemann, Holger; Ravn, Peter; Hansen, Anne Maria; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv; Israelsen, Hans; Madsen, Søren

    2013-06-12

    An important criterion for the selection of a probiotic bacterial strain is its ability to adhere to the mucosal surface. Adhesion is usually mediated by proteins or other components located on the outer cell surface of the bacterium. In the present study we characterized the adhesive properties of two classical intracellular enzymes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and enolase (ENO) isolated from the outer cell surface of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. None of the genes encoded signal peptides or cell surface anchoring motifs that could explain their extracellular location on the bacterial surface. The presence of the glycolytic enzymes on the outer surface was verified by western blotting using polyclonal antibodies raised against the specific enzymes. GAPDH and ENO showed a highly specific binding to plasminogen and fibronectin whereas GAPDH but not ENO showed weak binding to mucin. Furthermore, a pH dependent and specific binding of GAPDH and ENO to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells at pH 5 but not at pH 7 was demonstrated. The results showed that these glycolytic enzymes could play a role in the adhesion of the probiotic bacterium L. plantarum 299v to the gastrointestinal tract of the host. Finally, a number of probiotic as well non-probiotic Lactobacillus strains were analyzed for the presence of GAPDH and ENO on the outer surface, but no correlation between the extracellular location of these enzymes and the probiotic status of the applied strains was demonstrated.

  12. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  13. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shin-Ichiro; Drummen, Gregor P C; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-02-06

    Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs), like a "message in a bottle" to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  14. Insertion of tetracysteine motifs into dopamine transporter extracellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Navaroli

    Full Text Available The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT is a major determinant of extracellular dopamine (DA levels and is the primary target for a variety of addictive and therapeutic psychoactive drugs. DAT is acutely regulated by protein kinase C (PKC activation and amphetamine exposure, both of which modulate DAT surface expression by endocytic trafficking. In order to use live imaging approaches to study DAT endocytosis, methods are needed to exclusively label the DAT surface pool. The use of membrane impermeant, sulfonated biarsenic dyes holds potential as one such approach, and requires introduction of an extracellular tetracysteine motif (tetraCys; CCPGCC to facilitate dye binding. In the current study, we took advantage of intrinsic proline-glycine (Pro-Gly dipeptides encoded in predicted DAT extracellular domains to introduce tetraCys motifs into DAT extracellular loops 2, 3, and 4. [(3H]DA uptake studies, surface biotinylation and fluorescence microscopy in PC12 cells indicate that tetraCys insertion into the DAT second extracellular loop results in a functional transporter that maintains PKC-mediated downregulation. Introduction of tetraCys into extracellular loops 3 and 4 yielded DATs with severely compromised function that failed to mature and traffic to the cell surface. This is the first demonstration of successful introduction of a tetracysteine motif into a DAT extracellular domain, and may hold promise for use of biarsenic dyes in live DAT imaging studies.

  15. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  16. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  17. Metabolic requirements for neutrophil extracellular traps formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, Oscar; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina Bertha; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    As part of the innate immune response, neutrophils are at the forefront of defence against infection, resolution of inflammation and wound healing. They are the most abundant leucocytes in the peripheral blood, have a short lifespan and an estimated turnover of 1010 to 1011 cells per day. Neutrophils efficiently clear microbial infections by phagocytosis and by oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. In 2004, a new neutrophil anti-microbial mechanism was described, the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA, histones and anti-microbial peptides. Several microorganisms, bacterial products, as well as pharmacological stimuli such as PMA, were shown to induce NETs. Neutrophils contain relatively few mitochondria, and derive most of their energy from glycolysis. In this scenario we aimed to analyse some of the metabolic requirements for NET formation. Here it is shown that NETs formation is strictly dependent on glucose and to a lesser extent on glutamine, that Glut-1, glucose uptake, and glycolysis rate increase upon PMA stimulation, and that NET formation is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-glucose, and to a lesser extent by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Moreover, when neutrophils were exposed to PMA in glucose-free medium for 3 hr, they lost their characteristic polymorphic nuclei but did not release NETs. However, if glucose (but not pyruvate) was added at this time, NET release took place within minutes, suggesting that NET formation could be metabolically divided into two phases; the first, independent from exogenous glucose (chromatin decondensation) and, the second (NET release), strictly dependent on exogenous glucose and glycolysis. PMID:25545227

  18. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  19. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  20. Urbanism PhD Research 2008 - 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hoeven, F.D.; Brand, N.; Van der Burg, L.; Çalışkan, O.; Tan, E.R.; Wang, C.-Y.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the Ph.D. research the Department introduced a special procedure for periodic evaluation: after a period of nine months the potential Ph.D. candidates are asked to present their research design, theoretical framework and methodological approach to the members of the Departme

  1. On Calibration of pH Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ming Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of pH meters including the pH glass electrode, ISE electrodes,buffers, and the general background for calibration are reviewed. Understanding of basicconcepts of pH, pOH, and electrode mechanism is emphasized. New concepts of pH, pOH,as well as critical examination of activity, and activity coefficients are given. Theemergence of new solid state pH electrodes and replacement of the salt bridge with aconducting wire have opened up a new horizon for pH measurements. A pH buffer solutionwith a conducting wire may be used as a stable reference electrode. The misleadingunlimited linear Nernstian slope should be discarded. Calibration curves with 3 nonlinearportions for the entire 0—14 pH range due to the isoelectric point change effect areexplained. The potential measurement with stirring or unstirring and effects by double layer(DL and triple layer (TL will be discussed.

  2. Coaching af ph.d.-studerende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    Rapporten danner grundlag for at etablere et koncept for ph.d.-coaching. Erfaringerne fra et 2-årigt projekt om ph.d.-coaching i SCKK regi beskrives. De centrale temaer er tilrettelæggelse af den individuelle coaching, typiske temaer i coachingen og arbejdsdeling mellem coach og vejleder. Der er...

  3. Salivary pH: A diagnostic biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Baliga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Saliva contains a variety of host defense factors. It influences calculus formation and periodontal disease. Different studies have been done to find exact correlation of salivary biomarkers with periodontal disease. With a multitude of biomarkers and complexities in their determination, the salivary pH may be tried to be used as a quick chairside test. The aim of this study was to analyze the pH of saliva and determine its relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Study Design: The study population consisted of 300 patients. They were divided into three groups of 100 patients each: Group A had clinically healthy gingiva, Group B who had generalized chronic gingivitis and Group C who had generalized chronic periodontitis. The randomized unstimulated saliva from each patient was collected and pH was tested. Data was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance technique. Results: The salivary pH was more alkaline for patients with generalized chronic gingivitis as compared with the control group (P = 0.001 whereas patients with generalized chronic periodontitis had more acidic pH as compared with the control group (P = 0.001. Conclusion: These results indicate a significant change in the pH depending on the severity of the periodontal condition. The salivary pH shows significant changes and thus relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Salivary pH may thus be used as a quick chairside diagnostic biomarker.

  4. Ph og børnenes rum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Coninck-Smith, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Arkiteten og kulturkritikeren PH tegnede to bygninger til børn, nemlig fabriksbørnehaven ved Dehns Vaskeri fra 1948 og det ombyggede børnehjem Mindet fra 1954. Bidraget diskuterer PH's særlige greb om arkitektur til børn og placerer det ind i samtidens diskussion om børn, deres udvikling og behov....

  5. The effect of pH and ion channel modulators on human placental arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyba Y Ali

    Full Text Available Chorionic plate arteries (CPA are located at the maternofetal interface where they are able to respond to local metabolic changes. Unlike many other types of vasculature, the placenta lacks nervous control and requires autoregulation for controlling blood flow. The placental circulation, which is of low-resistance, may become hypoxic easily leading to fetal acidosis and fetal distress however the role of the ion channels in these circumstances is not well-understood. Active potassium channel conductances that are subject to local physicochemical modulation may serve as pathways through which such signals are transduced. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulation of CPA by pH and the channels implicated in these responses using wire myography. CPA were isolated from healthy placentae and pre-contracted with U46619 before testing the effects of extracellular pH using 1 M lactic acid over the pH range 7.4-6.4 in the presence of a variety of ion channel modulators. A change from pH 7.4 to 7.2 produced a 29±3% (n = 9 relaxation of CPA which increased to 61±4% at the lowest pH of 6.4. In vessels isolated from placentae of women with pre-eclampsia (n = 6, pH responses were attenuated. L-methionine increased the relaxation to 67±7% (n = 6; p<0.001 at pH 6.4. Similarly the TASK 1/3 blocker zinc chloride (1 mM gave a maximum relaxation of 72±5% (n = 8; p<0.01 which compared with the relaxation produced by the TREK-1 opener riluzole (75±5%; n = 6. Several other modulators induced no significant changes in vascular responses. Our study confirmed expression of several ion channel subtypes in CPA with our results indicating that extracellular pH within the physiological range has an important role in controlling vasodilatation in the human term placenta.

  6. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  7. Impact of seawater acidification on pH at the tissue-skeleton interface and calcification in reef corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venn, Alexander A; Tambutté, Eric; Holcomb, Michael; Laurent, Julien; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2013-01-29

    Insight into the response of reef corals and other major marine calcifiers to ocean acidification is limited by a lack of knowledge about how seawater pH and carbonate chemistry impact the physiological processes that drive biomineralization. Ocean acidification is proposed to reduce calcification rates in corals by causing declines in internal pH at the calcifying tissue-skeleton interface where biomineralization takes place. Here, we performed an in vivo study on how partial-pressure CO(2)-driven seawater acidification impacts intracellular pH in coral calcifying cells and extracellular pH in the fluid at the tissue-skeleton interface [subcalicoblastic medium (SCM)] in the coral Stylophora pistillata. We also measured calcification in corals grown under the same conditions of seawater acidification by measuring lateral growth of colonies and growth of aragonite crystals under the calcifying tissue. Our findings confirm that seawater acidification decreases pH of the SCM, but this decrease is gradual relative to the surrounding seawater, leading to an increasing pH gradient between the SCM and seawater. Reductions in calcification rate, both at the level of crystals and whole colonies, were only observed in our lowest pH treatment when pH was significantly depressed in the calcifying cells in addition to the SCM. Overall, our findings suggest that reef corals may mitigate the effects of seawater acidification by regulating pH in the SCM, but they also highlight the role of calcifying cell pH homeostasis in determining the response of reef corals to changes in external seawater pH and carbonate chemistry.

  8. Incorporation of tenascin-C into the extracellular matrix by periostin underlies an extracellular meshwork architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment.

  9. Production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using D-glucose as carbon source / substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Vânia Sousa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some Mucorales species have been reported as protease producers. The production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using glucose as substrate was studied. Experiments were carried out with different D-glucose concentrations (40, 60 and 80 g/L. Biomass, pH and protease activity were determined. Although biomass production had reached best yields for the medium containing D-glucose in a concentration of 80 g/L, the enzymatic production was higher when the substrate concentration was reduced to 40 g/L. The yield factor for product on cell growth and the yield factor for product on carbon substrate were higher when the microorganism grew in medium containing 40 g/L glucose. The kinetics parameters suggest that this strain seems to be promising as an alternative microorganism for protease production.

  10. Simulating microbiologically influenced corrosion by depositing extracellular biopolymers on mild steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, F.L.; Lewandowski, Z.; Funk, T. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Center for Biofilm Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Electrochemical properties of corroding mild steel (MS) surfaces were measured in real time using three closely spaced microelectrodes. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and ion currents were mapped simultaneously and noninvasively above a MS coupon partially coated with biopolymer gels. Calcium alginate (Ca-Alg [an extracellular biopolymer containing carboxylate functional groups]) and agarose (one without carboxylate functional groups) were tested. Corrosion occurred at approximately the same rate under the two biopolymer spots on the same coupon. Corrosion rates under these biopolymers were {approx} 4 mpy in a weak saline solution. Results suggested corrosion was not influenced by chemical properties of the biopolymer but possibly was controlled by oxygen reduction in noncoated regions of the coupon (i.e., a differential aeration cell).

  11. Development of biomimetic nanocomposites as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Arundhati; Mitra, Tapas; Gnanamani, Arumugam; Das, Manas; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2016-05-05

    Here, we have developed biomimetic nanocomposites containing chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed interconnected macroporous structures. Moreover, in this study, the problem related to fabricating a porous composite with good mechanical strength has been resolved by incorporating 5wt% of nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide into chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix; the present composite showed high tensile strength (20.25MPa) while maintaining appreciable porosity (65.25%). These values are similar to human cancellous bone. These nanocomposites also showed superior water uptake, antimicrobial and biodegradable properties than the previously reported results. Compatibility with human blood and pH was observed, indicating nontoxicity of these materials to the human body. Moreover, proliferation of osteoblastic MG-63 cells onto the nanocomposites was also observed without having any negative effect.

  12. Extracellular methionine amino peptidase (MAP production by Streptomyces gedanensis in solid-state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raji Rahulan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A bioprocess was developed for extracellular MAP production from Streptomyces gedanensis by solid-state fermentation. Response surface methodology of Box Behken Design was performed to evaluate the interaction effects of most significant variables {inoculum size, (NH42SO4 concentration, MgSO4.7H2O and tryptone on MAP production after the single parameter optimization and it resulted a maximum MAP production of 55.26 IU/g PUF after 120 h of fermentation. The concentrated crude MAP displayed a pH and temperature optimum of 8.5 and 50°C. By analyzing the thermal stability, the MAP was found to be stable in a temperature range of 50 to 55°C but lost about 50% of its activity at 65°C after 30 min. This is a first report of this kind of study for MAP.

  13. Studies on culture condition and extracellular hydrolase of psychrophilic bacteria from Arctic sea ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaohui; Yu Yong; Li Huirong; Zhang Lin; Jiang Xinyin; Ren Daming

    2008-01-01

    Arctic sea ice in the polar region provides a cold habitat for microbial community.Arctic sea ice microorganisms are revealed to be of considerable importance in basic research and potential in biotechnological application.This paper investigated the culture condition and extracellular hydrolase of 14 strains of different Arctic sea ice bacteria.The results showed that optimal growth temperature of strains is 15 ℃ or 20 ℃.The optimal pH is about 8.0.They hardly grow at acid condition.3% NaCl is necessary for better growth.These strains have different abilities in producing amylase,protease,cellulase and lipase.Pseudoalteronomas sp.Bsi429 and Pseudoalteronomas sp.Bsi539 produced both cellulose,protease and lipase.These results provide a basis for further developing and exploiting the cold adapted marine enzyme resources.

  14. Extracellular matrix assembly in extreme acidic eukaryotic biofilms and their possible implications in heavy metal adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, Angeles [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: aguileraba@inta.es; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); San Martin-Uriz, Patxi [Centro de Biologia Molecular (UAM-CSIC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Amils, Ricardo [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir Km 4, Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Biologia Molecular (UAM-CSIC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-30

    To evaluate the importance of the extracellular matrix in relation to heavy metal binding capacity in extreme acidic environments, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composition of 12 biofilms isolated from Rio Tinto (SW, Spain) was analyzed. Each biofilm was composed mainly by one or two species of eukaryotes, although other microorganisms were present. EPS ranged from 130 to 439 mg g{sup -1} biofilm dry weight, representing between 15% and the 40% of the total biofilm dry weight (DW). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the amount of total EPS extracted from biofilms dominated by the same organism at different sampling points. The amount of EPS varied among different biofilms collected from the same sampling location. Colloidal EPS ranged from 42 to 313 mg g{sup -1} dry weight; 10% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Capsular EPS ranged from 50 to 318 mg g{sup -1} dry weight; 5% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Seven of the 12 biofilms showed higher amounts of capsular than colloidal EPS (p < 0.05). Total amount of EPS decreased when total cell numbers and pH increased. There was a positive correlation between EPS concentration and heavy metal concentration in the water. Observations by low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) revealed the mineral adsorption in the matrix of EPS and onto the cell walls. EPS in all biofilms were primarily composed of carbohydrates, heavy metals and humic acid, plus small quantities of proteins and DNA. After carbohydrates, heavy metals were the second main constituents of the extracellular matrix. Their total concentrations ranged from 3 to 32 mg g{sup -1} biofilm dry weight, reaching up to 16% of the total composition. In general, the heavy metal composition of the EPS extracted from the biofilms closely resembled the metal composition of the water from which the biofilms were collected.

  15. DEGUMMING OF RAW SILK FABRIC WITH HELP OF MARINE EXTRACELLULAR PROTEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sumana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease secreting microbe was isolated and characterized on the basis of their morphological, biochemical, physiological and 16S rDNA based molecular properties. The extracellular protease was quantified and characterized. Protease was used for different time (4, 8, 12 and 24 h at different temperature (RT and 37°C for optimization of the degumming process for raw silk fabric with enzyme dosage (0.2-1 unit/cm2 of fabric. Post-enzymatic treatment, the fabric quality and texture was compared with conventionally treated as well as untreated fabric in terms of degumming loss, tensile strength and yarn count and colour fastness to light/water. The isolate SM1 (Bacillus thuringensis was able to grow in Carbon Minimal Salt Medium (CMSM with jaggery or tamarind as the carbon source (0.3% w/v. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescense (EDXRF data showed intracellular accumulation of heavy metal by the isolate. Extracellular protease was able to degum silk fabric within 4 h at RT with enzyme concentration of 0.8unit/cm2 and the maximum degumming loss was 21.72%. Post enzymatic degumming, a shiny texture was observed under Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM and the yarn volume also increased. Utilization of CMSM made the process cost effective during large scale application. Intracellular metal accumulation and growth in a wide range of temperature and pH made the isolate a potential candidate for bioremediation. Extracellular protease with significant degumming property could be used as an eco friendly approach as compared to the conventional chemical treatment.

  16. Lactate and glucose concomitant consumption as a self-regulated pH detoxification mechanism in HEK293 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Lopez-Repullo, Jonatan; Albiol, Joan; Solà, Carles; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2015-12-01

    One of the most important limitations of mammalian cell-based processes is the secretion and accumulation of lactate as a by-product of their metabolism. Among the cell lines commonly used in industrial bioprocesses, HEK293 has been gaining importance over the last years. Up recently, HEK293 cells were known to consume lactate in late stages of cell culture usually when glucose and/or glutamine were depleted from media. Remarkably, in both scenarios, no significant cell growth was reported. However, we have observed a different metabolic behavior regarding lactate production and consumption in HEK293 cultures. HEK293 cells were able to co-metabolize glucose and lactate simultaneously, even in exponentially growing cell cultures. Our deep study of the effects of environmental conditions on lactate metabolism revealed that pH was the key to trigger the metabolic shift from lactate production to lactate and glucose concomitant consumption. Remarkably, this shift could be triggered at will when pH was set at 6.8. Even more interesting was the fact that lowering pH to 6.6 and supplementing media with exogenous lactate resulted in co-consumption of glucose and lactate from the beginning of cell culture, without affecting cell growth or protein productivity. On the contrary, cell growth was clearly hampered at this low pH if extracellular lactate was lacking. From our results, we hypothesize that HEK293 cells metabolize extracellular lactate as a strategy for pH detoxification, by means of co-transporting extracellular protons together with lactate into the cytosol. This novel hypothesis for unraveling lactate metabolism in HEK293 cells could open a door to re-direct genetic engineering strategies in order to obtain more efficient cell lines and also to further develop animal cell technology applications.

  17. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  19. Ascorbic acid: a nonradioactive extracellular space marker in canine heart

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reil, G H; Frombach, R; Kownatzki, R; Quante, W; Lichtlen, P R

    1987-01-01

    The distribution pattern of ascorbic acid and L-[14C]ascorbic acid in myocardial tissue was compared with those of the classical radioactive extracellular space markers [3H]-inulin, [3H]sucrose, and Na82Br...

  20. Production of extracellular amylase from agricultural residues by a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... The production of extracellular amylases by solid state fermentation (SSF) was ... production of amylase have been studied and accordingly, optimum conditions have .... lactose and sucrose were tested along with control to.

  1. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  2. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism.

  3. Placental extracellular vesicles and feto-maternal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M; Chamley, L W

    2015-01-29

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. A secreted tyrosine kinase acts in the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoli, Mattia R; Yum, Jina; Breitkopf, Susanne B; Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E; Xiao, Junyu; Worby, Carolyn; Wong, Swee-Kee; Lin, Grace; Edenius, Maja; Keller, Tracy L; Asara, John M; Dixon, Jack E; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Whitman, Malcolm

    2014-08-28

    Although tyrosine phosphorylation of extracellular proteins has been reported to occur extensively in vivo, no secreted protein tyrosine kinase has been identified. As a result, investigation of the potential role of extracellular tyrosine phosphorylation in physiological and pathological tissue regulation has not been possible. Here, we show that VLK, a putative protein kinase previously shown to be essential in embryonic development, is a secreted protein kinase, with preference for tyrosine, that phosphorylates a broad range of secreted and ER-resident substrate proteins. We find that VLK is rapidly and quantitatively secreted from platelets in response to stimuli and can tyrosine phosphorylate coreleased proteins utilizing endogenous as well as exogenous ATP sources. We propose that discovery of VLK activity provides an explanation for the extensive and conserved pattern of extracellular tyrosine phosphophorylation seen in vivo, and extends the importance of regulated tyrosine phosphorylation into the extracellular environment.

  5. EVpedia : a community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong-Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyong-Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Desiderio, Dominic M; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W; Gross, Julia Christina; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F; Hill, Michelle M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young-Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming-Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, François; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Roh, Tae-Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stępień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yáñez-Mó, María; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song; Nolte - t Hoen, Esther

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. RESULTS: We prese

  6. EVpedia : A community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Kyong Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Christina Gross, Julia; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'T Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; Van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, Francois; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stepień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yánez-Mó, Maria; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. Results: We prese

  7. Production of Extracellular Anti-leukaemic Enzyme Lasparaginase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of Extracellular Anti-leukaemic Enzyme Lasparaginase from Marine Actinomycetes by ... actinomycetes, screen them for Lasparaginase activity and characterise the enzyme. ... The apparent Km value for the substrate was 25 μM.

  8. Extracellular siderophores of rapidly growing Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Charlang, G; Horowitz, R M; Lowy, P H; Ng, B.; Poling, S M; Horowitz, N. H.

    1982-01-01

    The highly active extracellular siderophores previously detected in young cultures of Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum have been identified as the cyclic ester fusigen (fusarinine C), and its open-chain form, fusigen B (fusarinine B).

  9. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R-M; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E; Buzas, Edit I; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Cordeiro-da Silva, Anabela; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Ghobrial, Irene M; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H H; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Nyman, Tuula A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Wauben, Marca H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological

  10. Extracellular Polymeric Substances Govern the Surface Charge of Biogenic Elemental Selenium Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Rohan

    2015-02-03

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The origin of the organic layer covering colloidal biogenic elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) is not known, particularly in the case when they are synthesized by complex microbial communities. This study investigated the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on BioSeNPs. The role of EPS in capping the extracellularly available BioSeNPs was also examined. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and colorimetric measurements confirmed the presence of functional groups characteristic of proteins and carbohydrates on the BioSeNPs, suggesting the presence of EPS. Chemical synthesis of elemental selenium nanoparticles in the presence of EPS, extracted from selenite fed anaerobic granular sludge, yielded stable colloidal spherical selenium nanoparticles. Furthermore, extracted EPS, BioSeNPs, and chemically synthesized EPS-capped selenium nanoparticles had similar surface properties, as shown by ζ-potential versus pH profiles and isoelectric point measurements. This study shows that the EPS of anaerobic granular sludge form the organic layer present on the BioSeNPs synthesized by these granules. The EPS also govern the surface charge of these BioSeNPs, thereby contributing to their colloidal properties, hence affecting their fate in the environment and the efficiency of bioremediation technologies.

  11. Sequestration of Reactive Blue 4 by free and immobilized Bacillus subtilis cells and its extracellular polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binupriya, Arthur Raj; Sathishkumar, Muthuswamy; Ku, Chang Sub; Yun, Soon-Il

    2010-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis a gram positive bacteria and its extracellular polysaccharide were used in free form as well as immobilized form as biosorbent for sequestration of an anionic dye, Reactive Blue 4 (RB) in aqueous phase. The dye uptake enhanced with decrease in pH. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and free cells were found to be better adsorbents when compared to alginate immobilized cells (IC) and EPS (IEPS). The presence of functional groups in free cells and EPS was confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Immobilization resulted in poor adsorption performance due to increase in mass transfer resistance by the polymeric matrix. High Q(max) and b values were noted in the case of free cells and free EPS in contrast to IC and IEPS. From the kinetic experiments, the adsorption system was found to be a pseudo-first-order reaction at low dye concentration. Desorption of RB was found to be 100% in 1N NaOH. However, the alginate beads were found to be unstable under high alkaline conditions of NaOH.

  12. Extracellular enzyme production and phylogenetic distribution of yeasts in wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingxiang; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xueling; Wang, Zhe; Xu, Ying; Ren, Siwei; Chen, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuanyuan; Hao, Hongxin; Wang, Hailei

    2013-02-01

    The abilities of yeasts to produce different extracellular enzymes and their distribution characteristics were studied in municipal, inosine fermentation, papermaking, antibiotic fermentation, and printing and dyeing wastewater treatment systems. The results indicated that of the 257 yeasts, 16, 14, 55, and 11 produced lipase, protease, manganese dependant peroxidase (MnP), and lignin peroxidase (LiP), respectively. They were distributed in 12 identified and four unidentified genera, in which Candida rugosa (AA-M17) and an unidentified Saccharomycetales (AA-Y5), Pseudozyma sp. (PH-M15), Candida sp. (MO-Y11), and Trichosporon montevideense (MO-M16) were shown to have the highest activity of lipase, protease, Mnp, and LiP, respectively. No yeast had amylase, cellulose, phytase, or laccase activity. Although only 60 isolates produced ligninolytic enzymes, 249 of the 257 yeasts could decolorize different dyes through the mechanism of biodegradation (222 isolates) or bio-sorption. The types of extracellular enzymes that the yeasts produced were significantly shaped by the types of wastewater treated.

  13. Extracellular lipase of an entomopathogenic fungus effecting larvae of a scale insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shaukat; Ren, Shunxiang; Huang, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    Lipases play an important role in the infection process of entomopathogenic fungi by hydrolyzing the ester bonds of lipoproteins, fats and waxes present on the insect surface and in the body. Here we report the purification and characterization of an extracellular lipase from Isaria fumosorosea. The enzyme was purified (138.46-fold) in three steps using (NH4 )2 SO4 precipitation followed by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The molecular weight of purified enzyme was determined to be 31 KDa by SDS-PAGE. The optimum temperature and pH for enzyme activity were 35 °C and 7.0, respectively, using p-nitrophenylpalmitate as the substrate. Lipolytic activity was enhanced in the presence of Ca(+2) , Mg(+2) , Na(+) , and NH4 (+) salts, while Zn(+2) , Fe(+2) , and Cu(+2) inhibited enzyme activity. The enzyme displayed broad substrate specificity with the highest activity observed for coconut oil and p-nitrophenyl carprate. Topical co-application of purified lipase with fungal conidial suspensions decreased the median survival time (ST50 ) of Dysmicoccus neobrevipes nymphs as compared to the fungus alone. Our results indicate that an extracellular lipase produced by I. fumosorosea can be exploited for development of enzyme-based insect management.

  14. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  15. Different patterns of extracellular proteolytic activity in W303a and BY4742 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredyński, Rafał; Wolna, Dorota; Kędzior, Mateusz; Gutowicz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Protease secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures is a complex process, important for the application of this organism in the food industry and biotechnology. Previous studies provide rather quantitative data, yielding no information about the number of enzymes involved in proteolysis and their individual biochemical properties. Here we demonstrate that W303a and BY4742 S. cerevisiae strains reveal different patterns of spontaneous and gelatin-induced extracellular proteolytic activity. We applied the gelatin zymography assay to track changes of the proteolytic profile in time, finding the protease secretion dependent on the growth phase and the presence of the protein inducer. Detected enzymes were characterized regarding their substrate specificity, pH tolerance, and susceptibility to inhibitors. In case of the W303a strain, only one type of gelatin-degrading secretory protease (presumably metalloproteinase) was observed. However, the BY4742 strain secreted different proteases of the various catalytic types, depending on the substrate availability. Our study brings the evidence that S. cerevisiae strains secrete several kinds of proteases depending on the presence and type of the substrate. Protein induction may cause not only quantitative but also qualitative changes in the extracellular proteolytic patterns.

  16. Adsorption of toxic mercury(II) by an extracellular biopolymer poly(gamma-glutamic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbaraj, B Stephen; Wang, J S; Lu, J F; Siao, F Y; Chen, B H

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption of mercury(II) by an extracellular biopolymer, poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA), was studied as a function of pH, temperature, agitation time, ionic strength, light and heavy metal ions. An appreciable adsorption occurred at pH>3 and reached a maximum at pH 6. Isotherms were well predicted by Redlich-Peterson model with a dominating Freundlich behavior, implying the heterogeneous nature of mercury(II) adsorption. The adsorption followed an exothermic and spontaneous process with increased orderliness at solid/solution interface. The adsorption was rapid with 90% being attained within 5 min for a 80 mg/L mercury(II) solution, and the kinetic data were precisely described by pseudo second order model. Ionic strength due to added sodium salts reduced the mercury(II) binding with the coordinating ligands following the order: Cl(-) >SO(4)(2-) >NO(3)(-). Both light and heavy metal ions decreased mercury(II) binding by gamma-PGA, with calcium(II) ions showing a more pronounced effect than monovalent sodium and potassium ions, while the interfering heavy metal ions followed the order: Cu(2+) > Cd(2+) > Zn(2+). Distilled water adjusted to pH 2 using hydrochloric acid recovered 98.8% of mercury(II), and gamma-PGA reuse for five cycles of operation showed a loss of only 6.5%. IR spectra of gamma-PGA and Hg(II)-gamma-PGA revealed binding of mercury(II) with carboxylate and amide groups on gamma-PGA.

  17. Rapid Extracellular Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles by Cunninghamella phaeospora Culture Supernatant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareib, Mohamed; Tahon, Medhat Abu; Saif, Mona Mostafa; El-Sayed Abdallah, Wafaa

    2016-01-01

    The development of green approaches for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is of prime significance in the field of nanotechnology research. A fast and eco-friendly protocol for the biosynthesis of extracellular AgNPs using culture supernatant (CS) from the fungus Cunninghamella phaeospora was studied in this work. This CS was proved as a potential new source for the extracellular biosynthesis of AgNPs. The AgNPs were formed at 100 oC and pH 9 within four min of contact between CS and 1mM silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. Nitrate reductase (NR) was confirmed to play a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of AgNPs. The enzyme expressed its highest activity at 80 oC and pH 9. At 100 oC the enzyme retained 70% of its original activity for one hour. The half-life (T1/2) of the enzyme activity was calculated to be 1.55 h confirming its thermostability. The produced AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, high resolution-transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). These NPs showed an absorption peak at 415 nm in UV-Vis spectrum corresponding to the plasmon resonance of AgNPs. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the production of monodispersed spherical NPs with average particle size 14 nm. XRD spectrum of the NPs confirmed the formation of metallic crystalline silver. It was also suggested that the aromatic amino acids play a role in the biosynthesis process. The current research provided an insight on the green biosynthesis of AgNPs including some mechanistic aspects using a new mycogenic source.

  18. Novel extracellular PHB depolymerase from Streptomyces ascomycinicus: PHB copolymers degradation in acidic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier García-Hidalgo

    Full Text Available The ascomycin-producer strain Streptomyces ascomycinicus has been proven to be an extracellular poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB degrader. The fkbU gene, encoding a PHB depolymerase (PhaZ Sa , has been cloned in E. coli and Rhodococcus sp. T104 strains for gene expression. Gram-positive host Rhodococcus sp. T104 was able to produce and secrete to the extracellular medium an active protein form. PhaZ Sa was purified by two hydrophobic interaction chromatographic steps, and afterwards was biochemically as well as structurally characterized. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 48.4 kDa, and displayed highest activity at 45°C and pH 6, thus being the first PHB depolymerase from a gram-positive bacterium presenting an acidic pH optimum. The PHB depolymerase activity of PhaZ Sa was increased in the presence of divalent cations due to non-essential activation, and also in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and PEG 3350. Protein structure was analyzed, revealing a globular shape with an alpha-beta hydrolase fold. The amino acids comprising the catalytic triad, Ser(131-Asp(209-His(269, were identified by multiple sequence alignment, chemical modification of amino acids and site-directed mutagenesis. These structural results supported the proposal of a three-dimensional model for this depolymerase. PhaZ Sa was able to degrade PHB, but also demonstrated its ability to degrade films made of PHB, PHBV copolymers and a blend of PHB and starch (7∶3 proportion wt/wt. The features shown by PhaZ Sa make it an interesting candidate for industrial applications involving PHB degradation.

  19. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  20. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Featherstone, David E.; Scott A. Shippy

    2007-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μ...

  1. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness and Architecture Govern Intracellular Rheology in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Erin L.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the complex interplay between the extracellular mechanical environment and the mechanical properties that characterize the dynamic intracellular environment. To elucidate this relationship in cancer, we probe the intracellular environment using particle-tracking microrheology. In three-dimensional (3D) matrices, intracellular effective creep compliance of prostate cancer cells is shown to increase with increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, whereas modulating E...

  2. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of pH......(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV......3, B16V, NIH3T3, MDCK-F1, EA.hy926) along the axis of movement. Differences in pH(i) between the front and the rear end (¿pH(i) front-rear) were present in all cell lines, and inhibition of NHE1 either with HOE642 or by absence of extracellular Na(+) caused the pH(i) gradient to flatten or disappear...

  3. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  4. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  5. Exhaled breath condensate pH assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael D; Hunt, John

    2012-08-01

    Airway pH is central to the physiologic function and cellular biology of the airway. The causes of airway acidification include (1) hypopharyngeal gastric acid reflux with or without aspiration through the vocal cords, (2) inhalation of acid fog or gas (such as chlorine), and (3) intrinsic airway acidification caused by altered airway pH homeostasis in infectious and inflammatory disease processes. The recognition that relevant airway pH deviations occur in lung diseases is opening doors to new simple and inexpensive therapies. This recognition has resulted partly from the ability to use exhaled breath condensate as a window on airway acid-base balance.

  6. ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In this #CERNandSociety video, the 3 PhD students, awarded the ATLAS PhD Grant in 2015, talk about their research work within the ATLAS Collaboration and how this experience has shaped their future. Fi